UBC Undergraduate Research

A Song of Fantasy Traditions: How A Song of Ice and Fire Subverts Traditions of Women in Tolkienesque… Buchanan, Mark 2014-04-15

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Notice for Google Chrome users:
If you are having trouble viewing or searching the PDF with Google Chrome, please download it here instead.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
52966-Buchanan_A_Song_of_Fantasy_Traditions.pdf [ 245.97kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 52966-1.0074552.json
JSON-LD: 52966-1.0074552-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 52966-1.0074552-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 52966-1.0074552-rdf.json
Turtle: 52966-1.0074552-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 52966-1.0074552-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 52966-1.0074552-source.json
Full Text
52966-1.0074552-fulltext.txt
Citation
52966-1.0074552.ris

Full Text

	  	  	  A	  Song	  of	  Fantasy	  Traditions	  How	  A	  Song	  of	  Ice	  and	  Fire	  Subverts	  Traditions	  of	  Women	  in	  Tolkienesque	  Fantasy	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Mark	  Buchanan	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Dr.	  Margaret	  Reeves	  English	  499	  Honours	  Essay	  15	  April	  2014	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Colombia’s	  Okanagan	  Campus	   	  Buchanan	   1	  George	  R.	  R.	  Martin’s	  A	  Song	  of	  Ice	  and	  Fire	  consists	  of	  a	  planned	  seven	  books,	  of	  which	  five	  have	  been	  published,	  A	  Game	  of	  Thrones	  (AGoT),	  A	  Clash	  of	  Kings	  (ACoK),	  A	  Storm	  of	  Swords	  (ASoS),	  A	  Feast	  for	  Crows	  (AFfC),	  and	  A	  Dance	  with	  Dragons	  (ADwD).	  Women	  have	  often	  been	  pushed	  to	  the	  margins	  in	  the	  fantasy	  genre.	  J.	  R.	  R.	  Tolkien’s	  The	  Lord	  of	  the	  Rings	  trilogy	  stands	  as	  the	  foundation	  for	  a	  particular	  subgenre	  of	  fantasy,	  and	  a	  tradition	  of	  focussing	  almost	  exclusively	  on	  male	  characters	  begins	  with	  Tolkien	  as	  well.	  Martin’s	  A	  Song	  of	  Ice	  and	  Fire	  series	  continues	  the	  fantasy	  genre	  in	  the	  mode	  of	  Tolkien	  and	  retains	  many	  of	  the	  same	  qualities,	  but	  differs	  in	  its	  portrayal	  of	  women.	  Martin	  has	  not	  only	  included	  female	  characters	  in	  his	  novels,	  but	  has	  made	  them	  integral	  to	  the	  plot,	  major	  protagonists,	  and	  dynamic	  characters.	  By	  examining	  three	  pairs	  of	  characters	  through	  the	  lens	  of	  feminist	  philosopher	  Judith	  Butler’s	  theory	  of	  gender	  performativity,	  it	  is	  possible	  to	  evaluate	  Martin’s	  subversion	  of	  the	  Tolkienesque	  genre.	  The	  first	  pair	  is	  Jaime	  Lannister	  and	  Brienne	  of	  Tarth.	  These	  two	  characters	  form	  the	  primary	  examples	  of	  the	  traditional	  trope	  of	  the	  chivalric	  knight.	  Martin	  presents	  Jaime	  as	  the	  stereotypical	  knight	  in	  appearance,	  but	  not	  behaviour,	  while	  Brienne	  juxtaposes	  with	  Jaime	  as	  a	  proper	  knight	  in	  behaviour	  but	  not	  title,	  appearance,	  or	  gender.	  The	  second	  pair	  consists	  of	  the	  two	  queens,	  Cersei	  Lannister	  and	  Daenerys	  Targaryen.	  Both	  of	  these	  queens	  gain	  power	  through	  a	  patriarchal	  society,	  but	  subvert	  the	  system	  to	  their	  benefit	  despite	  obstruction	  from	  those	  around	  them.	  The	  final	  pair	  is	  Arya	  and	  Sansa	  Stark,	  two	  sisters	  who	  each	  undergo	  a	  traumatic	  event	  but	  react	  very	  differently.	  They	  both	  respond	  with	  an	  outward	  performance	  of	  gender,	  but	  while	  Arya	  outwardly	  performs	  as	  a	  male,	  Sansa	  takes	  her	  performance	  of	  her	  own	  Buchanan	   2	  gender	  to	  a	  level	  that	  borders	  on	  parody.	  Through	  analysis	  of	  these	  three	  pairs	  of	  characters	  I	  will	  show	  how	  Martin	  is	  working	  against	  the	  tradition	  of	  marginalized	  female	  characters	  in	  the	  fantasy	  genre.	  Current	  scholarship	  on	  the	  fantasy	  genre	  is	  more	  focussed	  on	  defining	  the	  genre	  than	  on	  discussion	  of	  female	  characters1.	  Therefore,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  analyse	  the	  way	  that	  the	  traditions	  of	  the	  genre	  are	  changing.	  Although	  traditionally	  in	  the	  fantasy	  genre	  women	  are	  frequently	  marginalized,	  Martin’s	  A	  Song	  of	  Ice	  and	  Fire	  series	  subverts	  the	  traditions	  of	  the	  genre	  by	  giving	  his	  female	  characters	  integral	  roles	  in	  the	  plot,	  and	  coupling	  this	  with	  an	  awareness	  of	  the	  complex	  rules	  that	  govern	  gender.	  A	  Song	  of	  Ice	  and	  Fire	  mainly	  takes	  place	  on	  a	  continent	  called	  Westeros	  almost	  fourteen	  years	  after	  a	  rebellion	  by	  Robert	  Baratheon	  against	  the	  Targaryen	  dynasty.	  Westeros	  is	  made	  up	  of	  Seven	  Kingdoms,	  united	  under	  a	  single	  throne.	  Martin	  chronicles	  a	  civil	  war	  that	  occurs	  after	  the	  death	  of	  King	  Robert.	  The	  King’s	  son	  Joffery	  inherits	  power	  and	  enjoys	  the	  support	  of	  his	  mother’s	  family,	  the	  financially	  influential	  Lannisters.	  Other	  claims	  to	  the	  throne	  are	  made,	  including	  from	  the	  Starks	  in	  the	  North	  and	  King	  Robert’s	  brothers,	  Renly	  and	  Stannis.	  A	  second	  overarching	  plot	  details	  the	  far	  North	  of	  Westeros,	  where	  mythical	  creatures	  called	  the	  Others	  threaten	  to	  invade	  the	  Seven	  Kingdoms.	  Finally,	  there	  is	  a	  third	  plot	  occurring	  across	  the	  Narrow	  Sea	  from	  Westeros,	  on	  the	  continent	  of	  Essos.	  On	  Essos,	  the	  remnants	  of	  the	  Targaryen	  dynasty	  live	  in	  exile.	  Daenerys	  gains	  power	  and	  is	  determined	  to	  regain	  the	  throne	  her	  father	  lost,	  and	  this	  plotline	  depicts	  her	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  1	  For	  discussions	  of	  the	  fantasy	  genre	  see	  Lucie	  Armitt,	  Brian	  Attebery,	  and	  Edward	  James	  and	  Farah	  Mendlesohn.	  Buchanan	   3	  journey	  from	  exile	  to	  powerful	  ruler	  on	  Essos	  attempting	  to	  create	  an	  army	  powerful	  enough	  to	  invade	  Westeros.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Plots	  involving	  struggles	  for	  power	  are	  characteristic	  of	  the	  fantasy	  genre	  except	  that	  male	  characters	  often	  serve	  as	  the	  major	  protagonists	  in	  other	  fantasy	  works.	  This	  emphasis	  on	  males	  is	  especially	  apparent	  in	  famous	  works	  such	  as	  J.R.R.	  Tolkien’s	  The	  Hobbit	  and	  The	  Lord	  of	  the	  Rings.	  These	  works	  are	  often	  considered	  foundation	  texts	  of	  the	  fantasy	  genre.	  Brian	  Attebery	  proposes	  in	  Strategies	  of	  Fantasy	  that	  “Genres	  may	  be	  approached	  as	  ‘fuzzy	  sets,’	  meaning	  that	  they	  are	  defined	  not	  by	  boundaries,	  but	  a	  center”	  (12),	  and	  that	  in	  the	  fantasy	  genre	  “The	  Lord	  of	  the	  Rings	  stands	  in	  the	  bullseye”	  (14).	  As	  a	  result	  “Tolkien’s	  form	  of	  fantasy,	  for	  readers	  in	  English,	  is	  our	  mental	  template	  …	  One	  way	  to	  categorize	  the	  genre	  of	  fantasy	  is	  the	  set	  of	  texts	  that	  in	  some	  way	  or	  other	  resemble	  The	  Lord	  of	  the	  Rings”	  (14).	  The	  traditions	  of	  the	  fantasy	  genre	  are	  inextricably	  linked	  to	  Tolkien	  because	  as	  Attebery	  shows,	  Tolkien	  defines	  the	  form	  of	  fantasy,	  but	  when	  considering	  the	  traditions	  of	  a	  genre,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  establish	  a	  definition	  of	  that	  genre	  to	  ensure	  consistency	  of	  analysis.	  To	  properly	  understand	  the	  traditions	  Martin	  is	  working	  to	  subvert,	  it	  is	  integral	  to	  first	  understand	  the	  traditions	  as	  it	  applied	  to	  Tolkien.	  However,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  keep	  in	  mind	  Attebery’s	  notion	  of	  a	  “fuzzy	  set”	  because	  no	  definition	  can	  completely	  encapsulate	  the	  writings	  within	  an	  entire	  genre.	  Martin	  is	  still	  writing	  within	  a	  certain	  type	  of	  fantasy,	  in	  the	  mode	  of	  Tolkien.	  	  According	  to	  the	  Encyclopedia	  of	  Fantasy	  and	  the	  Encyclopedia	  of	  Science	  Fiction	  Martin’s	  work	  could	  fall	  into	  a	  few	  subgenres,	  including	  epic	  fantasy,	  heroic	  fantasy,	  sword	  and	  sorcery,	  history	  in	  fantasy,	  and	  high	  fantasy.	  	  John	  Clute	  defines	  Buchanan	   4	  Epic	  Fantasy	  as	  “[a]ny	  fantasy	  tale	  written	  to	  a	  large	  scale	  which	  deals	  with	  the	  founding	  or	  definitive	  and	  lasting	  defense	  of	  a	  Land	  may	  be	  fairly	  called	  an	  E[pic]	  F[antasy]”	  (n.pag.).	  This	  definition	  accurately	  describes	  an	  overarching	  plot	  of	  A	  Song	  of	  Ice	  and	  Fire,	  where	  the	  world	  is	  threatened	  by	  the	  Others	  from	  the	  North,	  but	  for	  large	  parts	  of	  the	  novels	  this	  plot	  is	  not	  the	  central	  focus.	  In	  the	  Encyclopedia	  of	  Fantasy	  Heroic	  Fantasy	  and	  Sword	  and	  Sorcery,	  are	  synonyms	  for	  a	  subgenre	  “featuring	  muscular	  Heroes	  in	  violent	  conflict	  with	  a	  variety	  of	  Villains…	  whose	  powers	  are…	  supernatural	  in	  origin”	  (Clute	  n.pag.).	  This	  definition	  is	  partly	  applicable	  to	  Martin’s	  novels,	  but	  not	  wholly	  as	  the	  plot	  is	  not	  concerned	  with	  the	  adventures	  of	  specific	  heroes	  against	  specific	  villains,	  and	  Martin’s	  novels	  do	  not	  follow	  a	  framework	  of	  a	  singular	  linear	  plot.	  Martin’s	  world	  does	  not	  feature	  obviously	  good	  or	  bad	  characters,	  but	  rather	  characters	  who	  exhibit	  attributes	  of	  both	  good	  and	  evil	  and	  who	  exhibit	  varying	  levels	  of	  morality.	  Similarly,	  many	  aspects	  of	  Martin’s	  novels	  can	  be	  classified	  as	  high	  fantasy,	  defines	  as	  “[f]antasies	  set	  in	  Otherworlds,	  specifically	  Secondary	  Worlds,	  and	  which	  deal	  with	  matters	  affecting	  the	  destiny	  of	  those	  worlds”	  (Clute	  n.pag.).	  Although	  this	  definition	  of	  High	  Fantasy	  is	  brief,	  it	  accurately	  describes	  the	  plot	  of	  A	  Song	  of	  Ice	  and	  Fire	  because	  Martin’s	  work	  is	  focussed	  on	  the	  fate	  of	  the	  entire	  world.	  Finally,	  within	  the	  definition	  for	  History	  in	  Fantasy	  there	  is	  a	  specific	  category	  within	  this	  subgenre	  for	  “[n]ovels	  which	  seek	  to	  create	  their	  own	  internal,	  coherent,	  invented	  history	  for	  an	  imaginary	  world	  or	  kingdom”	  (Maund	  n.pag.).	  Tolkien’s	  works	  on	  Middle-­‐earth	  are	  a	  good	  example	  of	  this	  subgenre.	  Martin’s	  works	  are	  also	  especially	  relevant	  to	  this	  subgenre,	  especially	  the	  section	  of	  definition	  that	  says,	  “[i]maginary	  histories	  have	  Buchanan	   5	  been	  created	  to	  make	  political	  points	  or	  to	  explore	  social	  and	  gender	  roles”	  (n.pag.).	  Politics	  and	  gender	  are	  central	  to	  A	  Song	  of	  Ice	  and	  Fire	  and	  the	  deep	  history	  that	  Martin	  has	  created	  lends	  credence	  to	  his	  imaginary	  world.	  This	  characterization	  of	  a	  complex	  imagined	  history	  is	  one	  of	  the	  defining	  features	  of	  the	  fantasy	  Tolkien	  wrote.	  Perhaps	  Martin	  himself	  says	  it	  best	  in	  his	  Introduction	  to	  Meditations	  on	  Middle-­‐earth:	  “[i]t	  is	  sometimes	  called	  epic	  fantasy,	  sometimes	  high	  fantasy,	  but	  it	  ought	  to	  be	  called	  Tolkienesque	  fantasy”	  (3).	  Martin	  goes	  on	  to	  describe	  Tolkienesque	  fantasy	  as	  “a	  fully	  realized	  secondary	  universe,	  an	  entire	  world	  with	  its	  own	  geography	  and	  histories	  and	  legends,	  wholly	  unconnected	  to	  our	  own,	  yet	  somehow	  just	  as	  real”	  (3).	  This	  definition	  of	  Tolkienesque	  fantasy	  is	  applicable	  to	  Martin’s	  own	  works	  as	  well.	  Martin	  creates	  the	  world	  of	  Westeros	  with	  a	  complex	  backstory,	  complex	  customs,	  and	  various	  nations	  and	  continents.	  In	  doing	  so	  his	  world	  gains	  aspects	  of	  verisimilitude	  while	  remaining	  within	  the	  fantasy	  genre.	  This	  verisimilitude	  results	  largely	  from	  Martin	  “draw[ing]	  extensively	  from	  both	  medieval	  and	  post-­‐medieval	  texts	  and	  tropes,	  as	  does	  Tolkien”	  (Mayer	  61).	  The	  elaborate	  creation	  of	  a	  secondary	  world	  is	  a	  definitive	  aspect	  that	  Martin	  and	  Tolkien’s	  fantasy	  worlds	  both	  share	  and	  a	  major	  part	  of	  why	  they	  are	  both	  texts	  that	  fall	  within	  the	  Tolkienesque	  fantasy	  subgenre.	  It	  is	  this	  definition	  of	  Tolkienesque	  fantasy	  that	  Martin	  is	  writing	  within,	  but	  also	  subverting	  by	  incorporating	  women	  in	  major	  roles,	  in	  a	  way	  Tolkien	  did	  not.	  	  Like	  Tolkien	  does	  with	  The	  Lord	  of	  the	  Rings,	  Martin	  creates	  a	  fully	  realized	  medieval-­‐type	  world	  where	  a	  patriarchal	  society	  exists.	  Martin’s	  A	  Song	  of	  Ice	  and	  Fire	  series	  takes	  this	  genre	  and	  subverts	  many	  of	  its	  conventions.	  Some	  medievalist	  Buchanan	   6	  critics	  such	  as	  Lauren	  S.	  Mayer	  have	  called	  Martin’s	  series	  a	  work	  of	  “fetish	  medivalism”	  (63).	  Martin	  uses	  aspects	  of	  medievalism,	  but	  then	  works	  against	  them	  when	  he	  “goes	  beyond	  this	  pattern	  and	  makes	  his	  way	  through	  the	  volumes	  gleefully	  smashing	  his	  own	  and	  other	  medievalist	  texts’	  attempts	  at	  world	  creation”	  (61).	  Tropes	  of	  medievalist	  Tolkienesque	  fantasy,	  are	  used	  and	  subverted	  by	  Martin	  as	  he	  works	  against	  the	  genre	  in	  his	  use	  and	  portrayal	  of	  women.	  Unlike	  Tolkien,	  Martin	  utilizes	  numerous	  female	  characters,	  and	  these	  characters	  play	  major	  roles	  in	  the	  development	  of	  the	  plot.	  Candice	  Fredrick	  and	  Sam	  McBride	  write	  that,	  “Many	  critics	  have	  noted	  that	  women	  do	  little	  of	  any	  importance	  in	  Middle-­‐earth”	  and	  “it	  is	  not	  true	  to	  say	  there	  are	  no	  women	  in	  The	  Lord	  of	  the	  Rings,	  but	  there	  certainly	  are	  few”	  (31-­‐32).	  The	  women	  in	  Tolkien	  are	  usually	  minor	  characters,	  even	  when	  they	  are	  intricately	  connected	  to	  the	  plot.	  This	  tradition	  in	  Tolkienesque	  fantasy	  leaves	  women	  underrepresented.	  Other	  critics,	  such	  as	  Charles	  Moseley,	  have	  argued	  that	  female	  characters	  are	  not	  present	  in	  The	  Lord	  of	  the	  Rings	  because	  “the	  Ring	  trilogy	  is	  a	  book	  about	  men	  united	  for	  a	  common	  purpose,	  to	  fight	  a	  common	  enemy.	  In	  other	  words,	  women	  are	  precluded	  from	  the	  story	  because	  it	  centers	  on	  war	  and	  the	  possibility	  of	  combat”	  (Fredrick	  and	  McBride	  32).	  Martin	  takes	  this	  tradition	  and	  destabilises	  it	  by	  making	  his	  female	  characters	  dynamic	  and	  involved.	  War	  and	  combat	  are	  not	  merely	  a	  possibility	  in	  A	  Song	  of	  Ice	  and	  Fire,	  but	  they	  are	  part	  of	  everyday	  life.	  Martin’s	  work	  takes	  on	  similar	  world-­‐changing	  events	  and	  not	  only	  includes	  women,	  but	  makes	  them	  integral	  parts	  of	  the	  story	  and	  vital	  players	  in	  the	  “game	  of	  thrones.”	  This	  difference	  is	  especially	  apparent	  in	  his	  depictions	  of	  Arya	  Buchanan	   7	  and	  Sansa	  Stark,	  Cersei	  Lannister,	  Daenerys	  Targaryen,	  and	  Brienne	  of	  Tarth,	  who	  are	  able	  to	  use	  the	  inherently	  patriarchal	  society	  of	  Westeros	  to	  their	  advantage.	  	  Martin	  also	  uses	  narrative	  style	  to	  highlight	  the	  importance	  of	  women	  in	  his	  work.	  The	  books	  are	  narrated	  from	  a	  third-­‐person	  limited	  point	  of	  view,	  which	  refers	  to	  the	  perspective	  from	  which	  a	  chapter	  is	  narrated,	  usually	  from	  one	  character	  per	  chapter.	  The	  narration	  is	  from	  a	  limited	  viewpoint,	  as	  only	  the	  thoughts	  of	  one	  character	  are	  presented	  in	  each	  chapter.	  The	  narrator	  does	  occasionally	  provide	  the	  thoughts	  of	  other	  characters	  as	  well,	  but	  this	  is	  not	  the	  norm	  throughout.	  When	  providing	  a	  character’s	  direct	  thoughts,	  Martin	  uses	  italics	  to	  separate	  the	  thoughts	  from	  both	  narration	  and	  dialogue.	  Throughout	  the	  books	  Martin	  employs	  a	  focalization	  technique	  where	  each	  chapter	  is	  written	  from	  the	  perspective	  of	  a	  different	  character.	  According	  to	  Dinah	  Birch,	  	  	  a	  focalized	  narrative	  constrains	  its	  perspective	  within	  the	  limited	  awareness	  available	  to	  a	  particular	  witness,	  to	  whom	  the	  thoughts	  of	  other	  characters	  remain	  opaque.	  As	  seeing	  differs	  from	  telling,	  such	  a	  focalizing	  observer	  is	  not	  necessarily	  the	  narrator	  of	  the	  story,	  but	  may	  be	  a	  character	  in	  an	  account	  given	  by	  a	  third-­‐person	  narrator.	  (n.pag.)	  	  Martin	  utilizes	  the	  technique	  of	  focalization	  with	  many	  different	  characters,	  allowing	  multiple	  viewpoints	  of	  the	  story	  and	  descriptions	  of	  events	  occurring	  far	  away	  from	  each	  other	  without	  the	  need	  for	  omniscient	  narration.	  There	  are	  many	  different	  point	  of	  view	  characters	  and	  throughout	  the	  five	  novels	  there	  are	  fourteen	  “major”	  point	  of	  view	  characters,	  of	  which	  eight	  are	  men	  and	  six	  are	  women.	  I	  have	  defined	  major	  point	  of	  view	  characters	  as	  those	  who	  are	  integral	  to	  the	  plot	  and	  Buchanan	   8	  serve	  as	  protagonists	  while	  they	  maintain	  point	  of	  view.	  These	  characters	  may	  also	  be	  antagonising	  forces	  from	  another	  character’s	  point	  of	  view.	  Chapters	  for	  major	  point	  of	  view	  characters	  almost	  exclusively	  headed	  with	  that	  character’s	  name.	  Chapters	  from	  minor	  point	  of	  view	  characters	  given	  a	  descriptive	  title	  rather	  than	  the	  character’s	  name	  and	  they	  do	  not	  function	  as	  protagonists.	  	  By	  having	  women	  serve	  as	  nearly	  half	  of	  the	  major	  protagonists	  in	  the	  novels,	  Martin	  emphasizes	  his	  female	  characters	  and	  allows	  them	  to	  present	  their	  thoughts	  to	  the	  reader,	  unlike	  other	  works	  in	  the	  tradition	  of	  the	  Tolkienesque	  fantasy	  genre.	  	  Some	  major	  characters	  in	  Martin’s	  work	  are	  women	  who	  gain	  power	  through	  the	  patriarchal	  system	  and	  then	  alter	  the	  system	  to	  work	  to	  their	  advantage.	  Martin’s	  characters	  also	  become	  self-­‐aware	  of	  the	  role	  of	  gender	  in	  their	  lives	  and	  how	  women	  are	  expected	  to	  behave	  in	  the	  patriarchal	  society.	  Proper	  behaviour	  for	  women	  is	  a	  social	  construct	  of	  the	  patriarchy,	  creating	  separate	  genders.	  Gender	  is	  not	  a	  biological	  component	  of	  identity,	  but	  rather	  a	  creation	  by	  a	  specific	  society.	  Butler	  contends	  that	  “gender	  is	  performatively	  produced	  and	  compelled	  by	  the	  regulatory	  practices	  of	  gender	  coherence”	  (34).	  The	  regulatory	  practices	  of	  Westeros	  create	  a	  distinct	  social	  difference	  in	  men	  and	  women.	  Gender	  results	  from	  the	  continued	  repetition	  of	  certain	  actions	  and	  behaviours	  that	  are	  ingrained	  and	  function	  as	  a	  performance.	  This	  performance	  can	  either	  be	  a	  conscious	  or	  an	  unconscious	  functioning	  of	  social	  roles.	  Some	  characters	  are	  consciously	  aware	  of	  the	  performance	  of	  gender	  in	  their	  society,	  and	  use	  this	  to	  their	  advantage.	  Major	  female	  characters	  also	  perform	  in	  Martin’s	  work	  as	  both	  males	  and	  females,	  and	  Buchanan	   9	  when	  this	  cross-­‐gender	  performance	  occurs	  there	  is	  a	  conscious	  awareness	  of	  the	  performance.	  	  	  The	  performance	  of	  gender	  can	  be	  seen	  when	  Martin	  creates	  the	  unlikely	  pairing	  of	  Jaime	  Lannister	  and	  Brienne	  of	  Tarth.	  Both	  of	  these	  characters	  represent	  the	  figure	  of	  the	  chivalrous	  knight	  or	  warrior.	  Jaime	  and	  Brienne	  reluctantly	  end	  up	  travelling	  together	  through	  Westeros	  and	  juxtapose	  the	  differing	  figures	  of	  the	  knight.	  Jaime	  is	  depicted	  as	  the	  stereotypical	  knight,	  handsome,	  and	  a	  fierce	  warrior.	  One	  of	  the	  first	  descriptions	  of	  Jaime	  comes	  from	  Jon	  Snow	  who	  upon	  seeing	  Jaime	  juxtaposed	  next	  to	  the	  slovenly	  King	  Robert	  thinks,	  “This	  is	  what	  a	  king	  should	  look	  like”	  (Martin	  AGoT	  51).	  Jaime	  is	  outwardly	  the	  finest	  knight	  in	  all	  of	  Westeros,	  and	  Sansa	  feels	  that	  he	  wins	  his	  victories	  in	  a	  tournament,	  “as	  easily	  as	  if	  he	  were	  riding	  at	  rings”	  (295).	  Though	  a	  great	  warrior	  and	  member	  of	  the	  Kingsguard,	  Jaime	  is	  not	  the	  chivalrous	  knight	  that	  Sansa,	  and	  others,	  imagine	  him	  to	  be.	  He	  is	  the	  best	  warrior,	  but	  he	  is	  an	  arrogant	  and	  pompous	  man.	  	  	   Jaime	  is	  meant	  to	  evoke	  the	  sense	  of	  the	  traditional	  heroic	  knight.	  This	  trope	  is	  popular	  in	  the	  fantasy	  genre	  and	  often	  exemplifies	  the	  chivalric	  code,	  broadly	  defined	  by	  Richard	  W.	  Kaeuper	  as	  a	  series	  of	  “core	  beliefs	  —	  martial	  prowess	  winning	  honour,	  piety	  embodied	  in	  ideal	  knightly	  practice	  and	  expiatory	  suffering,	  [and]	  the	  mutual	  inspiration	  of	  piety	  and	  love”	  and	  “a	  quality	  of	  the	  heart	  rather	  than	  the	  body”	  (63;	  65).	  Jaime’s	  initial	  scenes	  make	  it	  seem	  that	  Martin	  could	  be	  employing	  the	  traditional	  trope	  from	  other	  works	  of	  Tolkienesque	  fantasy.	  However,	  this	  image	  is	  soon	  shattered.	  Jaime	  and	  his	  sister	  Cersei	  are	  found	  in	  the	  middle	  of	  an	  incestuous	  liaison	  by	  Bran	  Stark	  who	  climbs	  a	  tower	  and	  sees	  them	  Buchanan	   10	  through	  a	  window,	  “[Jaime]	  looked	  over	  at	  [Cersei].	  ‘The	  things	  I	  do	  for	  love,’	  he	  said	  with	  loathing.	  He	  gave	  Bran	  a	  shove.	  Screaming,	  Bran	  went	  backward	  out	  the	  window	  into	  empty	  air”	  (Martin	  AGoT	  85).	  The	  image	  of	  the	  perfect	  knight,	  brave,	  beautiful,	  and	  kind,	  is	  not	  associated	  with	  throwing	  children	  out	  of	  windows	  or	  with	  incestuous	  affairs.	  Jaime’s	  contempt	  for	  others	  is	  shown	  in	  Martin’s	  use	  of	  the	  word	  loathing.	  Jaime	  is	  at	  once	  loathing	  the	  inconvenience	  Cersei	  is	  causing	  him,	  and	  the	  need	  to	  throw	  Bran	  out	  of	  a	  window.	  He	  knows	  he	  is	  acting	  above	  the	  law,	  and	  he	  does	  not	  care.	  Jaime	  regards	  his	  duties	  as	  a	  knight	  as	  nothing	  more	  than	  an	  inconvenience:	  	  So	  many	  vows	  …	  they	  make	  you	  swear	  and	  swear.	  Defend	  the	  king.	  Keep	  his	  secrets.	  Do	  his	  bidding.	  Your	  life	  for	  his.	  But	  obey	  your	  father.	  Love	  your	  sister.	  Protect	  the	  innocent.	  Defend	  the	  weak.	  Respect	  the	  gods.	  Obey	  the	  laws.	  It’s	  too	  much.	  No	  matter	  what	  you	  do,	  you’re	  forsaking	  one	  vow	  or	  the	  other.	  (Martin	  ACoK	  796).	  	  	  	  	  Jaime’s	  blatant	  disregard	  for	  his	  duties	  as	  a	  knight	  work	  to	  undermine	  the	  societal	  expectations	  placed	  on	  him.	  Those	  who	  do	  not	  know	  him	  view	  him	  as	  a	  heroic	  knight,	  but	  this	  idea	  is	  quickly	  dispelled	  when	  they	  come	  to	  know	  him.	  Jaime	  listens	  to	  no	  one	  and	  is	  only	  interested	  in	  himself	  and	  maintaining	  Cersei’s	  affections.	  The	  two	  have	  an	  incestuous	  relationship	  that	  causes	  Jaime	  to	  ignore	  many	  of	  his	  duties	  as	  a	  knight	  and	  Kingsguard	  to	  be	  with	  his	  sister.	  Though	  Kingsguard	  members	  are	  sworn	  to	  celibacy	  Jaime	  disregards	  his	  sacred	  vows	  to	  maintain	  his	  relationship	  with	  Cersei,	  not	  to	  mention	  simultaneously	  breaking	  the	  societal	  taboos	  against	  incest,	  Buchanan	   11	  breaking	  Cersei’s	  marriage	  vows	  to	  King	  Robert,	  and	  committing	  treason	  against	  the	  King.	  	  	   Though	  Jaime	  is	  not	  the	  stereotypical	  heroic	  knight,	  he	  is	  still	  a	  very	  masculine	  figure	  in	  Westeros	  as	  a	  beautiful	  man	  and	  accomplished	  knight	  of	  the	  kingsguard,	  but	  he	  eventually	  finds	  himself	  emasculated	  and	  dependent	  on	  Brienne.	  He	  is	  beautiful	  and	  desired	  by	  many	  women	  at	  court,	  and	  often	  uses	  this	  desire	  to	  his	  advantage.	  His	  masculinity	  is	  exemplified	  in	  his	  abilities	  as	  a	  knight.	  Tournaments	  barely	  pose	  a	  challenge	  to	  him,	  and	  he	  is	  a	  great	  fighter	  in	  real	  battles.	  Despite	  this,	  Jaime	  is	  unable	  to	  stop	  a	  group	  of	  mercenaries	  from	  capturing	  him	  and	  Brienne.	  These	  mercenaries	  then	  further	  emasculate	  and	  embarrass	  the	  great	  warrior	  Jaime	  by	  cutting	  off	  his	  sword	  hand.	  The	  loss	  of	  his	  sword	  hand	  rips	  from	  Jaime	  much	  of	  his	  identity.	  His	  new	  captors	  mock	  him	  and	  Brienne	  by	  tying	  them	  together,	  face-­‐to-­‐face,	  on	  a	  horse.	  The	  men	  laugh	  and	  shout,	  “’Twoud	  be	  cruel	  to	  separate	  the	  good	  knight	  and	  his	  lady…	  Ah,	  but	  which	  one	  is	  the	  knight	  and	  which	  one	  is	  the	  lady?”	  (Martin	  ASoS	  413-­‐414).	  In	  losing	  his	  ability	  to	  wield	  his	  phallic	  sword	  he	  has	  symbolically	  lost	  his	  masculinity.	  His	  loss	  of	  masculinity	  allows	  a	  role	  reversal	  where	  Jaime	  requires	  the	  protection	  of	  a	  stronger,	  more	  powerful	  figure,	  in	  this	  case	  Brienne,	  the	  female	  warrior.	  Having	  a	  woman	  as	  his	  protector	  increases	  his	  feelings	  of	  emasculation,	  as	  he	  is	  no	  longer	  able	  to	  be	  independent.	  This	  loss	  of	  masculinity	  causes	  him	  to	  re-­‐evaluate	  how	  he	  treats	  others	  and	  to	  consider	  how	  Brienne	  acts.	  Instead	  of	  being	  an	  object	  of	  his	  ridicule,	  Brienne	  becomes	  an	  example	  for	  Jaime,	  showing	  him	  how	  a	  knight	  should	  behave.	  Jaime’s	  honour	  system	  changes	  as	  he	  spends	  more	  time	  with	  Brienne	  and	  watches	  how	  she	  copes	  with	  the	  mocking	  Buchanan	   12	  she	  has	  always	  endured.	  Jaime	  has	  never	  known	  anyone	  to	  mock	  him	  for	  anything	  other	  than	  an	  oathbreaker	  and	  kingslayer;	  thus,	  it	  is	  emasculating	  for	  him	  to	  be	  mocked	  as	  a	  poor	  fighter,	  and	  a	  poor	  fighter	  with	  no	  sword.	  	  	  	  	  	  Westeros	  is	  an	  inherently	  patriarchal,	  sexualized,	  and	  violent	  society.	  The	  patriarchy	  relies	  on	  violence	  to	  maintain	  its	  power.	  Men	  in	  Westeros	  use	  violence	  to	  control	  others.	  This	  violence	  is	  seen	  in	  all	  aspects	  of	  life	  in	  Westeros	  and	  as	  Suzette	  Haden	  Elgin	  argues,	  “Violence	  is	  critical	  for	  the	  survival	  of	  patriarchy	  in	  the	  same	  way	  oxygen	  is	  critical	  for	  the	  survival	  of	  human	  beings.	  Without	  violence,	  patriarchy	  cannot	  exist”	  (117).	  Violence	  functions	  against	  everyone	  in	  Martin’s	  novels	  and	  it	  works	  against	  everyone,	  including	  both	  men	  and	  women,	  and	  it	  is	  not	  a	  society	  that	  is	  exclusively	  violent	  towards	  women,	  as	  might	  be	  expected	  from	  a	  particularly	  violent	  patriarchy.	  The	  violence	  of	  Westeros	  is	  also	  channelled	  through	  women.	  The	  patriarchy	  in	  Westeros	  is	  an	  exceptionally	  violent	  one,	  but	  not	  all	  of	  the	  violence	  is	  in	  support	  of	  the	  patriarchy.	  Violence	  carried	  out	  by	  women	  against	  others	  can	  work	  to	  subvert	  the	  patriarchal	  system.	  Brienne	  is	  juxtaposed	  with	  the	  outwardly	  perfect	  knight	  Jaime.	  Brienne	  is	  a	  fearsome	  warrior	  and	  is	  known	  throughout	  Westeros.	  Her	  liminal	  status	  as	  a	  female	  warrior	  creates	  a	  difficult	  time	  for	  her	  in	  many	  instances.	  She	  is	  often	  mocked	  because	  of	  her	  physical	  appearance,	  but	  unlike	  the	  beautiful	  Jaime,	  Brienne	  maintains	  a	  chivalrous	  attitude	  and	  exemplifies	  the	  qualities	  of	  the	  knight,	  including	  courteousness,	  compassion,	  generosity,	  loyalty,	  and	  passion.	  Her	  skills	  in	  battle	  and	  immense	  loyalty	  prompt	  King	  Renly	  to	  make	  her	  a	  member	  of	  his	  Rainbow	  Kingsguard,	  and	  “when	  Renly	  cut	  away	  her	  torn	  cloak	  and	  fastened	  a	  rainbow	  in	  its	  place,	  Brienne	  of	  Tarth	  did	  not	  look	  unfortunate.	  Her	  smile	  lit	  up	  her	  Buchanan	   13	  face,	  and	  her	  voice	  was	  strong	  and	  proud	  as	  she	  said,	  ‘My	  life	  for	  yours,	  Your	  Grace.	  From	  this	  day	  on,	  I	  am	  your	  shield,	  I	  swear	  it	  by	  the	  old	  gods	  and	  the	  new’”	  (Martin	  ACoK	  344).	  Brienne	  is	  not	  concerned	  with	  the	  attitudes	  and	  remarks	  of	  those	  around	  her,	  only	  with	  honour	  and	  loyalty	  and	  in	  keeping	  her	  beloved	  King	  safe.	  Unlike	  Jaime,	  who	  is	  known	  through	  the	  Kingdom	  as	  “Kingslayer,”	  Brienne	  cares	  deeply	  about	  her	  duty	  as	  a	  member	  of	  a	  Kingsguard.	  Brienne	  does	  not	  use	  violence	  to	  gain	  money,	  power,	  or	  political	  gain,	  but	  rather	  she	  uses	  it	  to	  gain	  respect	  and	  because	  she	  wishes	  to	  take	  her	  fate	  into	  her	  own	  hands	  saying,	  “You	  don’t	  feel	  so	  helpless	  when	  you	  fight.	  You	  have	  a	  sword	  and	  a	  horse,	  sometimes	  an	  axe.	  When	  you’re	  armored	  it’s	  hard	  for	  anyone	  to	  hurt	  you”	  (Martin	  ACoK	  652).	  This	  attitude	  works	  against	  the	  belief	  that	  a	  woman	  must	  rely	  on	  others	  for	  protection.	  Brienne	  is	  not	  willing	  to	  let	  anyone	  tell	  her	  what	  to	  do,	  even	  her	  father.	  Her	  father	  attempts	  to	  match	  her	  for	  marriage,	  but	  she	  resists	  his	  need	  for	  her	  to	  marry,	  and	  eventually	  sets	  out	  on	  her	  own.	  In	  Westeros	  it	  is	  difficult	  for	  women	  to	  remain	  independent,	  and	  indeed	  it	  is	  often	  frowned	  upon	  in	  the	  patriarchal	  society.	  Brienne’s	  independence	  is	  another	  way	  in	  which	  she	  subverts	  the	  patriarchy	  and	  manipulates	  it	  to	  suit	  her	  own	  needs.	  	  	  Jaime	  and	  Brienne	  serve	  as	  foils	  for	  each	  other.	  Jaime	  has	  everything	  Brienne	  wants	  including	  status,	  power,	  and	  the	  proper	  gender	  for	  a	  knight.	  She	  looks	  upon	  him	  both	  with	  jealousy	  and	  anger,	  because	  he	  acts	  in	  ways	  that	  she	  views	  as	  morally	  reprehensible	  for	  a	  knight.	  Brienne	  wants	  what	  she	  cannot	  have,	  while	  Jaime	  does	  not	  want	  any	  of	  it.	  Jaime	  is	  thrust	  into	  the	  role	  of	  knight	  by	  his	  noble	  birth	  and	  skills	  on	  the	  battlefield,	  while	  Brienne	  chooses	  the	  path	  of	  a	  warrior	  against	  the	  wishes	  of	  Buchanan	   14	  her	  father	  and	  against	  societal	  norms.	  In	  these	  two	  characters	  Martin	  takes	  the	  traditional	  trope	  of	  the	  historic	  knight	  and	  subverts	  it	  for	  his	  own	  needs,	  creating	  characters	  that	  are	  aware	  of	  the	  role	  of	  gender	  in	  their	  lives	  and	  how	  they	  must	  manipulate	  society	  to	  achieve	  their	  goals.	  	  Unlike	  Brienne,	  Cersei	  does	  not	  wield	  a	  sword	  herself,	  but	  nevertheless	  she	  still	  manages	  to	  undermine	  the	  patriarchal	  system	  and	  gain	  power.	  Though	  she	  is	  constantly	  working	  against	  the	  patriarchal	  system,	  Cersei	  functions	  as	  one	  of	  the	  major	  antagonists	  in	  Martin’s	  work.	  She	  becomes	  Queen	  Regent	  of	  the	  Seven	  Kingdoms	  of	  Westeros	  when	  her	  son	  Joffery	  becomes	  King.	  Much	  of	  her	  power	  originally	  stems	  from	  marriage	  to	  a	  powerful	  man.	  Cersei	  is	  married	  to	  Robert	  Baratheon	  to	  secure	  an	  alliance	  between	  their	  two	  houses.	  The	  men	  who	  arrange	  the	  marriage	  use	  Cersei	  only	  as	  a	  tool	  to	  further	  their	  own	  goals,	  leaving	  her	  with	  no	  choice	  in	  the	  matter.	  Her	  marriage	  is	  not	  about	  her	  own	  individuality,	  but	  about	  the	  combination	  of	  her	  father’s	  house	  with	  his	  ally.	  Therefore,	  Cersei’s	  only	  purpose	  is	  to	  give	  birth	  to	  a	  son	  and	  heir.	  Cersei	  functions	  as	  a	  token	  of	  exchange	  between	  men	  and	  Butler	  writes,	  “As	  wives,	  women	  not	  only	  secure	  the	  reproduction	  of	  the	  name	  (the	  functional	  purpose),	  but	  effect	  a	  symbolic	  intercourse	  between	  clans	  of	  men”	  (53).	  The	  transfer	  of	  name	  is	  part	  of	  Cersei’s	  marriage,	  but	  the	  true	  goal	  is	  for	  the	  two	  houses	  to	  become	  joined	  as	  one,	  and	  in	  order	  for	  the	  houses	  to	  be	  properly	  joined	  Cersei	  must	  produce	  a	  son.	  However,	  Cersei	  is	  unwilling	  to	  stand	  by	  and	  simply	  allow	  herself	  to	  be	  used	  as	  a	  pawn	  in	  the	  alliances	  of	  men,	  so	  she	  takes	  power	  back	  from	  the	  men	  by	  arranging	  her	  husband’s	  murder.	  Cersei	  is	  able	  to	  subvert	  the	  power	  structure	  and	  use	  it	  to	  her	  own	  advantage.	  Some	  critics	  claim	  Cersei’s	  power	  Buchanan	   15	  is	  purely	  the	  result	  of	  the	  patriarchal	  system.	  David	  Steinweg	  argues	  that,	  “her	  political	  position	  is	  due	  to	  her	  son’s	  status	  of	  inheriting	  the	  kingdom,	  not	  her	  own	  accomplishments	  or	  lineage.	  In	  other	  words,	  Cersei’s	  rule	  is	  completely	  dependant	  on	  her	  son,	  and	  the	  absence	  of	  her	  father”	  (11-­‐12;	  sic).	  However	  Steinweg	  fails	  to	  address	  the	  fact	  that	  her	  intentions	  and	  manipulations	  of	  the	  patriarchal	  system	  must	  be	  taken	  into	  account.	  The	  fact	  that	  her	  actions	  exist	  in	  a	  patriarchal	  context	  does	  not	  make	  them	  meaningless.	  By	  arranging	  for	  King	  Robert’s	  death,	  Cersei	  is	  able	  to	  elevate	  herself	  to	  the	  position	  of	  Queen	  Regent,	  acting	  in	  place	  of	  her	  son	  Joffery,	  and	  later	  her	  son	  Tommen.	  Her	  position	  allows	  her	  to	  rule	  over	  Westeros,	  albeit	  for	  a	  short	  amount	  of	  time.	  Her	  rule	  only	  lasts	  a	  short	  time	  as	  the	  patriarchal	  apparatus	  constantly	  works	  to	  remove	  Cersei	  from	  power.	  Although	  her	  rule	  is	  complicated	  because	  she	  is	  regent	  to	  the	  throne,	  she	  is	  able	  to	  use	  this	  system	  to	  her	  advantage.	  	  She	  takes	  control	  of	  the	  Small	  Council,	  and	  manipulates	  the	  other	  members	  into	  doing	  what	  she	  wants.	  Although	  she	  takes	  power	  within	  the	  confines	  of	  the	  patriarchal	  system,	  she	  is	  able	  to	  work	  the	  system	  to	  her	  advantage.	  	  	  	  Cersei	  is	  aware	  of	  her	  role	  in	  the	  patriarchal	  society,	  and	  the	  role	  her	  gender	  entails.	  She	  realizes	  the	  gender	  difference	  at	  a	  young	  age	  and	  begins	  to	  think	  of	  how	  to	  use	  it	  to	  her	  advantage.	  She	  knows	  that	  “Men	  had	  been	  looking	  at	  her	  that	  way	  since	  her	  breasts	  began	  to	  bud”	  and	  she	  thinks,	  “Because	  I	  was	  so	  beautiful,	  they	  said,	  but	  Jaime	  was	  beautiful	  as	  well,	  and	  they	  never	  looked	  at	  him	  that	  way”	  (Martin	  AFfC	  345).	  Though	  they	  are	  both	  attractive,	  Cersei	  is	  objectified	  because	  of	  her	  beauty.	  Cersei	  is	  able	  to	  take	  this	  objectification	  and	  subvert	  it,	  using	  it	  to	  her	  own	  advantage.	  After	  Jaime	  is	  sent	  away	  Cersei	  continues	  to	  use	  her	  body	  to	  achieve	  her	  Buchanan	   16	  goals.	  When	  Cersei	  suspects	  that	  her	  son’s	  wife	  Queen	  Margery	  is	  gaining	  too	  much	  power	  she	  begins	  plotting	  to	  have	  Margery	  discredited.	  She	  schemes	  with	  a	  knight	  of	  the	  Kingsguard,	  Osney	  Kettleblack,	  that	  he	  will	  seduce	  Queen	  Margery	  so	  she	  will	  be	  tried	  for	  adultery	  and	  treason	  against	  the	  King.	  Cersei	  promises	  Kettleblack	  that	  if	  he	  does	  so,	  she	  will	  sleep	  with	  him,	  saying,	  “’I	  am	  warm.’	  Cersei	  put	  her	  arms	  about	  his	  neck.	  ‘Bed	  a	  girl	  …	  I	  am	  yours’”	  (Martin	  AFfC	  359).	  He	  agrees	  and	  she	  relishes	  in	  the	  power	  she	  holds	  over	  him,	  thinking,	  “I	  was	  made	  for	  this…	  It	  was	  the	  sheer	  elegance	  of	  it	  that	  pleased	  her	  most”	  (360).	  Cersei	  does	  not	  take	  a	  physical	  pleasure	  from	  the	  sexual	  acts	  she	  engages	  in	  for	  power,	  but	  rather	  she	  relishes	  in	  the	  feelings	  of	  control	  over	  others.	  The	  men	  become	  helpless	  in	  front	  of	  her,	  unable	  to	  clearly	  think	  about	  what	  they	  are	  doing,	  seduced	  by	  her	  beauty	  and	  the	  promise	  of	  more	  pleasure	  to	  come.	  	  	  Despite	  having	  a	  large	  amount	  of	  power,	  she	  wishes	  often	  that	  she	  had	  been	  born	  a	  man,	  thinking,	  “If	  I	  were	  a	  man	  I	  would	  be	  Jaime…	  If	  I	  were	  a	  man	  I	  could	  rule	  this	  realm	  in	  my	  own	  name	  in	  place	  of	  Tommen’s”	  (Martin	  AFfC	  763).	  Cersei	  understands	  the	  limitations	  of	  her	  power	  in	  a	  patriarchal	  system.	  She	  believes	  the	  patriarchal	  message	  that	  women	  are	  inferior	  to	  men	  and,	  “She	  hated	  feeling	  weak.	  If	  the	  gods	  had	  given	  her	  the	  strength	  they	  gave	  Jaime	  and	  that	  swaggering	  oaf	  Robert,	  she	  could	  have	  made	  her	  own	  escape…	  She	  had	  a	  warrior’s	  heart,	  but	  the	  gods	  in	  their	  blind	  malice	  had	  given	  her	  the	  feeble	  body	  of	  a	  woman”	  (Martin	  ADwD	  719).	  Cersei’s	  own	  resentment	  of	  her	  gender	  drives	  her	  to	  often	  embody	  masculine	  ideals	  and	  use	  her	  sexuality	  for	  power.	  She	  also	  has	  a	  strong	  sexual	  desire	  for	  her	  own	  twin,	  who	  is	  in	  her	  mind	  what	  she	  would	  be	  if	  she	  had	  been	  born	  a	  man.	  Much	  of	  this	  Buchanan	   17	  desire	  stems	  from	  when	  she	  was	  young	  and	  “would	  sometimes	  don	  her	  brothers	  clothing	  as	  a	  lark.	  She	  was	  always	  startled	  by	  how	  differently	  men	  treated	  her	  when	  they	  thought	  she	  was	  Jaime.	  Even	  Lord	  Tywin	  himself…”	  (Martin	  AFfC	  345).	  However,	  as	  Cersei	  grows	  older	  her	  inability	  to	  be	  like	  her	  twin	  drives	  her	  to	  perform	  as	  a	  sexually	  charged	  woman.	  Her	  sexuality,	  and	  use	  of	  her	  sexuality,	  is	  a	  result	  of	  her	  close	  sexual	  relationship	  with	  her	  brother.	  Cersei	  and	  Jaime	  are	  similar	  in	  their	  appearance,	  and	  for	  much	  of	  their	  early	  childhood	  were	  raised	  the	  same	  way.	  It	  is	  through	  their	  upbringing	  that	  Cersei	  is	  treated	  differently,	  raised	  to	  be	  a	  lady,	  while	  Jaime	  becomes	  a	  knight.	  This	  close,	  but	  separate,	  upbringing	  creates	  in	  Cersei	  and	  Jaime	  a	  sexual	  desire	  that	  is	  initiated	  by	  their	  difference.	  Their	  similar	  early	  childhoods	  provoked	  in	  Cersei	  a	  resentment	  of	  her	  own	  gender,	  and	  an	  attempt	  to	  move	  beyond	  her	  prescribed	  gender	  role	  through	  sexual	  exploits.	  She	  controls	  Jaime	  through	  their	  sexual	  relationship,	  and	  drives	  him	  to	  give	  up	  his	  birthright	  as	  heir	  to	  the	  Lannister	  riches	  to	  join	  King	  Robert’s	  Kingsguard,	  thus	  keeping	  him	  close	  to	  his	  sister	  the	  Queen.	  Cersei’s	  manipulations	  ensure	  she	  always	  has	  Jaime’s	  support	  and	  affection.	  	  The	  patriarchal	  society	  punishes	  her	  for	  her	  hyper-­‐sexualisation,	  and	  her	  use	  of	  her	  female	  body	  for	  her	  own	  personal	  gain.	  Cersei	  faces	  the	  additional	  challenge	  of	  being	  punished	  by	  the	  patriarchy,	  but	  continues	  to	  work	  against	  it.	  As	  a	  noblewoman	  in	  Westeros,	  her	  sexual	  nature	  is	  not	  natural,	  because	  in	  a	  patriarchal	  society,	  sexual	  desire	  is	  a	  masculine	  domain.	  Patriarchal	  societies	  believe	  “The	  libido-­‐as-­‐masculine	  is	  the	  source	  from	  which	  all	  possible	  sexuality	  is	  presumed	  to	  come”	  (Butler	  72).	  With	  this	  belief	  it	  is	  impossible	  for	  women	  to	  naturally	  have	  any	  Buchanan	   18	  sexual	  desire.	  In	  Westeros,	  men	  view	  sexuality	  as	  a	  male	  domain	  because	  the	  libido	  resides	  in	  the	  masculine	  form,	  and	  not	  in	  the	  feminine,	  and	  the	  patriarchal	  system	  is	  revealed	  to	  be	  hypocritical	  in	  its	  treatment	  of	  women.	  While	  King	  Robert’s	  penchant	  for	  adultery	  is	  viewed	  by	  the	  Westerosi	  court	  as	  a	  normal	  event,	  when	  Cersei	  is	  (rightfully)	  accused	  of	  “murders	  and	  fornications”	  she	  is	  imprisoned	  (Martin	  AFfC	  935).	  Her	  power	  is	  stripped	  from	  her	  in	  an	  instant	  because	  she	  is	  a	  woman	  who	  is	  acting	  outside	  the	  realm	  of	  her	  gender.	  However,	  she	  is	  still	  able	  to	  continue	  using	  the	  patriarchal	  system	  to	  her	  advantage	  because	  of	  the	  carefully	  manipulated	  network	  she	  has	  created.	  She	  understands	  the	  system,	  and	  her	  role	  within	  it.	  From	  within	  her	  prison	  she	  continues	  scheming,	  sending	  messages	  to	  her	  trusted	  men,	  and	  working	  to	  craft	  her	  return	  to	  power.	  She	  confesses	  to	  her	  crimes	  and	  her	  punishment	  is	  to	  be	  completely	  shaved,	  and	  marched	  through	  the	  city	  naked.	  She	  endures	  crude	  taunts	  from	  the	  crowd—	  “’Whore’	  and	  ‘sinner’	  were	  most	  common”—and	  it	  is	  not	  until	  the	  final	  moments	  of	  her	  march	  that	  she	  covers	  herself	  or	  tries	  to	  run	  from	  the	  crowd	  (Martin	  ADwD	  856).	  Still,	  at	  the	  end	  of	  her	  march	  she	  is	  reunited	  with	  her	  ally	  Qyburn	  who	  has	  followed	  through	  on	  her	  orders,	  laying	  the	  groundwork	  for	  her	  revenge.	  At	  the	  end	  of	  her	  final	  point-­‐of-­‐view	  chapter	  in	  A	  Dance	  With	  Dragons	  she	  is	  optimistic	  that	  her	  honour	  and	  power	  will	  be	  restored	  and	  thinks	  to	  herself,	  “Yes,	  …	  Oh,	  yes”	  (Martin	  859).	  Even	  when	  faced	  with	  a	  seemingly	  insurmountable	  climb	  back	  to	  power,	  she	  seems	  poised	  to	  do	  so	  in	  the	  planned	  final	  two	  novels	  in	  the	  series.	  Even	  when	  the	  patriarchy	  punishes	  Cersei	  for	  her	  subversion	  she	  continues	  to	  fight	  against	  it,	  not	  allowing	  the	  punishment	  to	  deter	  Buchanan	   19	  her	  and	  force	  her	  to	  act	  as	  women	  are	  expected	  to.	  Despite	  gaining	  her	  power	  in	  a	  patriarchal	  system,	  Cersei	  is	  in	  fact	  using	  her	  sexuality	  as	  a	  method	  of	  subversion.	  Daenerys	  is	  Westerosi	  by	  birth,	  but	  her	  family	  was	  exiled	  across	  the	  Narrow	  Sea	  to	  Essos.	  She	  is	  married	  into	  a	  people	  called	  the	  Dothraki,	  who	  travel	  in	  large	  groups	  called	  khalasars.	  Daenerys	  is	  Khalessi,	  or	  Queen,	  of	  a	  khalasar,	  and	  becomes	  Khalessi	  after	  her	  marriage	  to	  Khal	  Drogo.	  However,	  Daenerys	  defies	  tradition	  by	  remaining	  as	  Khalessi	  after	  Drogo’s	  death.	  In	  Dothraki	  tradition	  when	  a	  Khal	  dies	  his	  wife	  is	  taken	  to	  the	  city	  of	  Vaes	  Dothrak	  to	  live	  amongst	  the	  Dosh	  Khaleen,	  the	  group	  of	  former	  Khaleesis	  who	  serve	  as	  fortune-­‐tellers	  for	  the	  Dothraki.	  When	  Drogo	  dies,	  Ser	  Jorah	  tells	  Daenerys,	  “They	  will	  take	  you	  to	  Vaes	  Dothrak,	  to	  the	  crones”	  (Martin	  AGoT	  707).	  However,	  Daenerys	  does	  not	  agree	  to	  go,	  and	  this	  causes	  a	  rift	  in	  what	  had	  previously	  been	  a	  large	  khalasar.	  Many	  of	  Drogo’s	  warriors	  leave,	  unwilling	  to	  follow	  the	  young	  Khalessi,	  but	  many	  also	  stay,	  willing	  to	  break	  tradition	  to	  follow	  their	  new	  young	  Queen.	  Unlike	  Cersei	  who	  uses	  her	  body	  and	  sexuality	  to	  manipulate	  and	  gain	  power	  over	  others,	  Daenerys	  is	  able	  to	  gain	  the	  respect	  and	  loyalty	  of	  her	  followers	  because	  they	  witness	  the	  birth	  of	  three	  dragons.	  Daenerys	  walks	  into	  her	  husband’s	  burning	  funeral	  pyre	  with	  three	  fossilized	  dragon	  eggs	  and	  emerges	  unburned	  and	  with	  three	  live	  dragons.	  These	  dragons	  are	  symbolic	  because	  the	  sigil	  of	  House	  Targaryen	  is	  a	  three-­‐headed	  dragon.	  These	  are	  the	  first	  dragons	  born	  for	  hundreds	  of	  years,	  and	  they	  help	  Daenerys	  gain	  her	  power	  (Martin	  AGoT	  806-­‐807).	  Steinweg	  argues	  that	  Daenerys	  only	  gains	  her	  power	  from	  this	  “fantastical	  moment”	  (13).	  However,	  to	  say	  that	  Daenerys	  only	  gain	  power	  because	  of	  her	  Dragons,	  as	  Steinweg	  seems	  to	  imply,	  is	  an	  overstatement.	  Daenerys	  is	  not	  alone	  at	  Buchanan	   20	  the	  birth	  of	  the	  dragons;	  she	  is	  still	  surrounded	  by	  many	  of	  Drogo’s	  warriors.	  These	  warriors	  could	  have	  easily	  dispatched	  Daenerys	  and	  taken	  the	  dragons	  for	  their	  own.	  Instead,	  many	  chose	  to	  follow	  her,	  and	  look	  upon	  her	  as	  their	  leader,	  and	  do	  not	  care	  about	  her	  gender.	  Those	  who	  enter	  her	  service	  are	  unconcerned	  that	  she	  is	  a	  girl	  of	  thirteen	  (Martin	  AGoT	  28),	  and	  focus	  on	  her	  leadership	  qualities,	  though	  her	  commands	  often	  are	  met	  with	  confusion	  by	  those	  who	  are	  unused	  to	  them.	  When	  faced	  with	  her	  power	  for	  the	  first	  time	  men	  react	  accordingly:	  	  “The	  gap-­‐toothed	  smile	  faded	  from	  the	  giant’s	  broad	  brown	  face,	  replaced	  by	  a	  confused	  scowl.	  Men	  did	  not	  often	  threaten	  Belwas,	  it	  would	  seem,	  and	  less	  so	  girls	  a	  third	  his	  size.	  Dany	  gave	  him	  a	  smile,	  to	  take	  a	  bit	  of	  the	  sting	  from	  the	  rebuke”	  (Martin	  ACoK	  883).	  While	  most	  people	  in	  Westeros	  mistrust	  Cersei	  because	  of	  her	  power,	  Daenerys	  commands	  absolute	  respect	  in	  her	  followers.	  While	  Cersei	  is	  destabilizing	  the	  court	  from	  within,	  Daenerys	  instead	  creates	  a	  new	  type	  of	  society,	  moving	  away	  from	  traditions.	  While	  some	  of	  her	  followers	  dispute	  her	  right	  to	  rule,	  when	  she	  gives	  orders,	  “no	  word	  was	  raised	  against	  it.	  They	  had	  been	  Drogo’s	  people,	  but	  they	  were	  hers	  now.	  The	  Unburnt,	  they	  called	  her,	  and	  Mother	  of	  Dragons.	  Her	  word	  was	  their	  law”	  (Martin	  ACoK	  189).	  Daenerys	  has	  no	  right	  to	  lead,	  at	  least	  not	  under	  the	  Dothraki	  customs,	  but	  she	  does	  not	  care	  and	  works	  to	  change	  the	  system	  in	  her	  new	  Khalasar.	  The	  people	  are	  willing	  to	  follow	  her	  because	  she	  is	  a	  strong	  leader,	  and	  because	  she	  is	  the	  Mother	  of	  Dragons;	  they	  fear	  and	  respect	  her,	  and	  wherever	  they	  travel	  she	  is	  always	  met	  with	  curiosity,	  fear,	  and	  marriage	  requests.	  Her	  group	  of	  loyal	  Dothraki	  bloodriders,	  and	  her	  steadfast	  Queensguard,	  keep	  her	  out	  of	  danger	  Buchanan	   21	  even	  as	  her	  control	  over	  the	  khalasar	  places	  her	  at	  odds	  with	  the	  patriarchal	  societies	  she	  moves	  through.	  It	  is	  in	  these	  societies	  that	  she	  meets	  resistance	  to	  her	  rule.	  Despite	  this	  resistance	  Daenerys	  continues	  to	  gain	  power	  and	  eventually	  ends	  up	  in	  the	  slaving	  city	  of	  Astapor.	  While	  in	  the	  city	  she	  is	  able	  to	  exploit	  the	  attitudes	  surrounding	  her	  status	  as	  a	  leader.	  The	  leaders	  of	  the	  slavers	  often	  call	  her	  a	  whore	  and	  a	  slut,	  among	  other	  names,	  when	  they	  speak	  about	  her	  in	  High	  Valyrian	  (Martin	  ASoS	  310-­‐322).	  Unbeknownst	  to	  them,	  Daenerys	  can	  understand	  them,	  and	  knows	  of	  their	  schemes.	  In	  addition	  to	  insulting	  her	  behind	  her	  back,	  they	  do	  it	  to	  her	  face	  as	  well	  saying,	  “Woman,	  you	  bray	  like	  an	  ass,	  and	  make	  no	  more	  sense”	  to	  which	  she	  replies,	  “‘Woman?’	  She	  chuckled.	  ‘Is	  that	  meant	  to	  insult	  me?	  I	  would	  return	  the	  slap,	  if	  I	  took	  you	  for	  a	  man”	  (Martin	  ASoS	  576).	  Daenerys	  is	  unaffected	  by	  the	  attitudes	  towards	  her	  rule.	  She	  has	  power	  and	  has	  no	  need	  for	  their	  opinions.	  The	  loyalty	  that	  she	  inspires	  in	  her	  khalasar	  means	  that	  she	  is	  safe	  from	  those	  who	  would	  try	  and	  remove	  her	  from	  power.	  She	  uses	  this	  attitude	  to	  her	  advantage,	  and	  tricks	  the	  slavers.	  As	  they	  appear	  poised	  to	  take	  a	  dragon	  from	  her	  in	  exchange	  for	  an	  army	  of	  slaves,	  she	  counters	  their	  plan	  of	  deception,	  and	  quickly	  overthrows	  the	  city’s	  rulers	  using	  her	  dragons	  and	  new	  army	  (Martin	  ASoS	  379-­‐381).	  Soon	  afterwards	  she	  frees	  her	  slave	  army	  and	  gives	  them	  the	  opportunity	  to	  join	  her	  as	  free	  men,	  and	  they	  do,	  inspired	  by	  her	  leadership	  and	  power.	  While	  she	  is	  seen	  as	  a	  woman,	  and	  often	  looked	  upon	  with	  desire	  by	  outsiders,	  Daenerys	  uses	  her	  gender	  to	  her	  own	  advantage,	  and	  inspires	  extreme	  loyalty	  from	  those	  who	  follow	  her.	  Buchanan	   22	  Daenerys	  is	  made	  a	  widow	  late	  in	  A	  Game	  of	  Thrones	  (The	  first	  volume	  in	  A	  Song	  of	  Ice	  and	  Fire),	  and	  is	  still	  very	  young.	  At	  the	  beginning	  of	  the	  first	  novel	  she	  is	  thirteen,	  and	  probably	  fourteen	  when	  her	  husband	  dies,	  based	  on	  the	  fact	  that	  she	  becomes	  pregnant	  soon	  after	  her	  wedding	  and	  carries	  a	  child	  nearly	  to	  term	  (Martin	  AGoT	  715).	  It	  is	  not	  until	  A	  Dance	  with	  Dragons	  that	  she	  takes	  another	  male	  lover	  (Martin	  ADwD	  483);	  because	  she	  is	  haunted	  by	  a	  desire	  for	  Khal	  Drogo,	  she	  feels	  unable	  to	  seek	  pleasure	  from	  another.	  Her	  memory	  of	  the	  pleasure	  she	  experienced	  with	  Drogo	  disables	  her	  ability	  to	  attain	  pleasure	  elsewhere.	  Daenerys	  is	  never	  able	  to	  reach	  the	  same	  level	  of	  pleasure	  as	  her	  initial	  love	  with	  Drogo,	  and	  so	  she	  will	  always	  be	  left	  with	  desire.	  As	  Butler	  writes,	  “This	  full	  pleasure	  that	  haunts	  desire	  as	  that	  which	  it	  can	  never	  attain	  is	  the	  irrecoverable	  memory	  of	  pleasure”	  (106).	  The	  pleasure	  of	  her	  time	  with	  Drogo	  stays	  with	  her	  and	  informs	  her	  choices	  as	  she	  begins	  feeling	  a	  desire	  for	  a	  new	  lover.	  Unlike	  Cersei,	  Daenerys’	  sexual	  desires	  are	  not	  tied	  to	  her	  power.	  Her	  sexuality	  and	  desire	  are	  presented	  as	  an	  integral	  part	  of	  her	  personality,	  but	  not	  as	  a	  method	  for	  control	  or	  power	  over	  others.	  Daenerys	  defies	  the	  continuous	  calls	  for	  her	  to	  remarry	  and	  instead	  she	  remains	  an	  unmarried	  Queen,	  violating	  the	  ideals	  of	  the	  patriarchy	  where	  power	  must	  stem	  from	  men.	  Still,	  her	  desire	  for	  Drogo	  remains	  after	  his	  death,	  and	  finally	  her	  desire	  reaches	  a	  peak	  and	  she	  gives	  into	  it:	  	  Once,	  so	  tormented	  she	  could	  not	  sleep,	  Dany	  slid	  a	  hand	  down	  between	  her	  legs,	  and	  gasped…	  Still,	  the	  relief	  she	  wanted	  seemed	  to	  recede	  before	  her,	  until…	  Irri	  woke	  and	  saw	  what	  she	  was	  doing.	  Buchanan	   23	  Dany	  knew	  her	  face	  was	  flushed,	  but	  in	  the	  darkness	  Irri	  surely	  could	  not	  tell.	  Wordless,	  the	  handmaid	  put	  a	  hand	  on	  her	  breast,	  then	  bent	  to	  take	  a	  nipple	  in	  her	  mouth.	  Her	  other	  hand	  drifted	  down	  across	  the	  soft	  curve	  of	  the	  belly,	  through	  the	  mound	  of	  fine	  silvery-­‐gold	  hair,	  and	  went	  to	  work	  between	  Dany’s	  thighs.	  It	  was	  no	  more	  than	  a	  few	  moments	  until	  her	  legs	  twisted	  and	  her	  breasts	  heaved	  and	  her	  whole	  body	  shuddered.	  She	  screamed	  then.	  (Martin	  ASoS	  345)	  	  Daenerys	  finds	  the	  release	  she	  needs	  in	  Irri,	  and	  it	  is	  a	  release	  that	  continues	  to	  defy	  the	  patriarchal	  society.	  By	  turning	  to	  her	  handmaid	  for	  sexual	  pleasure	  Dany	  rejects	  the	  notion	  that	  she	  needs	  a	  new	  husband.	  She	  is	  able	  to	  rule	  on	  her	  own,	  and	  she	  does	  not	  need	  a	  husband	  for	  sexual	  pleasure	  either.	  However,	  she	  is	  still	  haunted	  by	  her	  original	  memory	  of	  pleasure,	  “It	  is	  Drogo	  I	  want,	  my	  sun-­‐and-­‐stars,	  Dany	  reminded	  herself.	  Not	  Irri…	  only	  Drogo”	  (Martin	  ASoS	  345).	  This	  desire	  for	  Drogo	  does	  not	  immediately	  drive	  her	  into	  the	  arms	  of	  a	  similar	  lover.	  She	  continues	  her	  dalliances	  with	  Irri,	  and	  seems	  to	  also	  enter	  into	  a	  sexual	  relationship	  with	  another	  handmaid,	  Missandei.	  The	  two	  comfort	  each	  other	  when	  they	  are	  unable	  to	  sleep,	  “Missandei	  hugged	  her	  tighter.	  ‘Your	  Grace	  should	  sleep.	  Dawn	  will	  be	  here	  soon,	  and	  court.’	  ‘We’ll	  both	  sleep,	  and	  dream	  of	  sweeter	  days.	  Close	  your	  eyes.’	  When	  she	  did,	  Dany	  kissed	  her	  eyelids	  and	  made	  her	  giggle.	  Kisses	  came	  easier	  than	  sleep,	  however”	  (Martin	  ADwD	  151).	  Daenerys	  continues	  to	  satisfy	  her	  sexual	  desires	  in	  a	  way	  that	  does	  not	  satisfy	  the	  patriarchy.	  As	  desire	  is	  meant	  to	  reside	  only	  in	  the	  masculine	  figure,	  Daenerys	  destabilizes	  this	  belief.	  Not	  only	  is	  she	  a	  woman,	  but	  she	  Buchanan	   24	  also	  explores	  her	  desire	  with	  other	  women,	  subverting	  the	  patriarchal	  belief	  system	  governing	  female	  sexuality.	  	  The	  patriarchal	  system	  of	  Westeros	  is	  also	  subverted	  by	  Arya	  and	  Sansa	  Stark,	  characters	  introduced	  early	  in	  Martin’s	  epic.	  The	  two	  characters	  grow	  and	  evolve	  throughout	  the	  narrative	  and	  function	  as	  foils	  for	  each	  other.	  Although	  they	  are	  raised	  together,	  the	  two	  Stark	  girls	  have	  very	  different	  views	  on	  their	  gender.	  Their	  mother,	  and	  a	  religious	  woman,	  the	  Septa	  Mordane,	  raise	  them	  to	  be	  proper	  ladies.	  The	  concept	  of	  society	  influencing	  gender	  is	  demonstrated	  in	  Simone	  de	  Beauvoir’s	  argument	  that,	  “one	  is	  not	  born	  a	  woman,	  but,	  rather,	  becomes	  one”	  (qtd.	  in	  Butler	  11).	  Therefore	  gender	  is	  not	  determined	  by	  biological	  sex,	  but	  by	  the	  social	  conditions	  of	  upbringing.	  The	  societal	  roles	  and	  treatments	  of	  the	  different	  sexes	  make	  up	  the	  basis	  of	  what	  becomes	  gender.	  Women	  are	  treated	  differently	  than	  men,	  and	  so	  they	  end	  up	  behaving	  differently.	  Individuals	  are	  shaped	  by	  their	  upbringing,	  and	  this	  upbringing	  changes	  based	  on	  biological	  sex,	  thereby	  creating	  the	  male/female	  gender	  binary.	  In	  Westeros	  the	  construction	  of	  woman,	  and	  of	  gender	  in	  general,	  is	  particularly	  evident	  when	  examining	  the	  two	  Stark	  girls.	  They	  must	  engage	  in	  needlework	  while	  their	  brothers	  learn	  swordplay	  in	  the	  yard.	  The	  gendered	  difference	  in	  the	  education	  of	  the	  Stark	  children	  creates	  an	  expectation	  for	  how	  they	  must	  act.	  It	  is	  Sansa,	  the	  older	  sister,	  who	  takes	  lessons	  to	  heart:	  she	  is	  entertained	  by	  tournaments,	  swoons	  at	  the	  romantic	  attention	  of	  the	  prince,	  and	  always	  “remembered	  her	  courtesies,	  and	  she	  was	  resolved	  to	  be	  a	  lady	  no	  matter	  what”	  (Martin	  AGoT	  544).	  Sansa	  is,	  for	  most	  of	  A	  Game	  of	  Thrones,	  shown	  as	  wanting	  to	  be	  the	  ideal	  lady,	  but	  this	  desire	  diminishes	  in	  later	  volumes	  as	  she	  becomes	  Buchanan	   25	  aware	  of	  her	  political	  surroundings.	  Arya	  is	  raised	  as	  a	  proper	  lady,	  but	  finds	  herself	  unhappy	  with	  the	  prescribed	  activities	  for	  women.	  While	  Septa	  Mordane	  describes	  Arya’s	  hands	  as	  being	  unfit	  for	  needlework	  and	  because	  she	  has	  “the	  hands	  of	  a	  blacksmith”	  (AGoT	  68),	  it	  is	  in	  swordplay	  that	  she	  truly	  shines.	  Arya	  is	  given	  a	  small	  sword	  by	  her	  bastard	  half-­‐brother	  Jon	  Snow,	  which	  they	  dub	  Needle,	  a	  jest	  at	  her	  poor	  needlework.	  This	  gift	  pleases	  Arya	  because	  it	  defies	  the	  traditional	  notions	  of	  the	  skills	  needed	  by	  a	  girl.	  Arya’s	  father	  recruits	  Syrio	  Forel,	  a	  Braavosi	  swordmaster,	  to	  train	  Arya	  in	  the	  intricate	  sword	  fighting	  style	  of	  Water	  Dancing	  (Martin	  AGoT	  224-­‐225).	  This	  style	  of	  swordfighting	  suits	  Arya	  because	  of	  her	  slender	  physical	  size,	  and	  because	  she	  is	  conveniently	  able	  to	  tell	  people	  she	  is	  taking	  dancing	  lessons.	  Her	  need	  to	  hide	  the	  true	  nature	  of	  her	  training	  from	  everyone,	  including	  her	  sister	  Sansa,	  indicates	  the	  entrenchment	  of	  gender	  norms	  in	  Westeros,	  and	  Arya’s	  wish	  to	  move	  beyond	  them.	  She	  is	  not	  content	  to	  play	  the	  part	  of	  the	  proper	  lady.	  Through	  her	  training	  with	  Syrio	  Forel,	  he	  is	  uninterested	  in	  her	  gender	  saying,	  “Boy,	  girl…	  You	  are	  a	  sword,	  that	  is	  all”	  	  (Martin	  AGoT	  224).	  This	  attitude	  influences	  Arya	  as	  she	  stops	  defining	  herself	  by	  gender	  and	  instead	  refers	  to	  herself	  as	  a	  sword,	  a	  cat,	  the	  wind,	  and	  a	  shadow.	  Her	  choice	  to	  move	  beyond	  her	  gender	  and	  act	  as	  she	  wishes	  leads	  to	  her	  identity	  constantly	  being	  mistaken,	  especially	  when	  she	  is	  seen	  outside	  her	  noble	  context	  of	  wearing	  fine	  dresses	  and	  jewellery.	  The	  young	  Prince	  and	  Princess,	  who	  know	  Arya	  as	  a	  noblewoman,	  do	  not	  recognize	  her	  when	  they	  see	  her	  roaming	  the	  castle	  and	  believe	  her	  to	  be	  a	  poor	  boy	  causing	  her	  to	  think	  to	  herself,	  “They	  don’t	  know	  me,	  Arya	  realized.	  They	  don’t	  even	  know	  I’m	  a	  girl”	  (AGoT	  340).	  It	  is	  in	  this	  moment	  that	  Arya	  truly	  realizes	  that	  to	  the	  Buchanan	   26	  outside	  world	  her	  gender	  is	  not	  always	  apparent.	  While	  Sansa	  had	  teased	  her	  about	  her	  inability	  to	  do	  proper	  needlework,	  she	  now	  begins	  to	  realize	  that	  her	  disconnect	  from	  her	  gender	  runs	  deeper.	  Her	  identity	  is	  not	  rooted	  in	  her	  gender	  and	  she	  is	  able	  to	  react	  fluidly	  and	  perform	  her	  gender	  to	  suit	  her	  needs.	  	  	  	   Arya	  is	  faced	  with	  a	  traumatic	  experience	  of	  witnessing	  her	  father’s	  execution	  at	  the	  orders	  of	  King	  Joffery.	  It	  is	  after	  this	  event	  that	  she	  is	  stopped	  by	  Yoren,	  a	  man	  of	  the	  Night’s	  Watch,	  who	  cuts	  her	  hair	  off	  and	  insists	  on	  calling	  her	  “boy”	  (AGoT	  727-­‐8).	  This	  moment	  is	  the	  first	  time	  that	  she	  purposefully	  begins	  to	  act	  as	  a	  male	  consciously.	  Through	  her	  ability	  to	  outwardly	  perform	  as	  a	  male,	  she	  is	  able	  to	  escape	  the	  city,	  as	  the	  watchmen	  are	  looking	  for	  a	  young	  noblewoman,	  not	  a	  boy	  being	  taken	  by	  the	  Night’s	  Watch.	  She	  is	  conscious	  of	  her	  performance	  and	  how	  her	  gender	  impacts	  the	  way	  others	  view	  her.	  Her	  ability	  to	  perform	  both	  genders	  gives	  her	  the	  ability	  to	  escape	  notice	  and	  saves	  herself	  from	  becoming	  an	  abused	  prisoner,	  which	  is	  Sansa’s	  fate	  after	  Eddard	  Stark’s	  execution.	  Instead	  of	  escaping	  the	  city	  like	  Arya,	  Sansa	  is	  quickly	  taken	  to	  a	  tower	  room	  and	  locked	  inside	  (Martin	  AGoT	  741).	  	  Sansa	  remains	  betrothed	  to	  Joffery,	  and	  knowing	  her	  life	  is	  in	  danger,	  she	  relies	  on	  staying	  in	  favour	  with	  Joffery	  and	  Queen	  Cersei.	  Sansa,	  who	  had	  always	  embraced	  her	  lessons,	  works	  to	  convince	  her	  captors	  of	  her	  loyalty	  to	  them,	  renouncing	  her	  family	  as	  traitors.	  Even	  when	  Joffery	  has	  her	  beaten	  she	  “always	  remembered	  her	  courtesies”	  (AGoT	  750).	  Sansa	  is	  always	  polite	  to	  the	  knights	  who	  are	  sent	  to	  beat	  her,	  even	  as	  her	  childhood	  ideals	  evaporate	  before	  her	  eyes.	  She	  consciously	  works	  to	  perform	  as	  a	  proper	  lady,	  and	  as	  a	  result	  overperforms	  her	  role.	  Her	  conscious	  choice	  to	  give	  her	  captors	  courtesy	  begins	  to	  border	  on	  a	  parody	  Buchanan	   27	  of	  her	  gender	  performance.	  While	  her	  former	  life	  had	  been	  full	  of	  romanticized	  notions	  of	  the	  chivalry	  of	  knights,	  she	  sees	  how	  horribly	  the	  knights	  treat	  her	  while	  caring	  little	  that	  she	  is	  a	  woman.	  Her	  life	  becomes	  a	  performance	  as	  she	  works	  to	  convince	  her	  captors	  that	  she	  remains	  a	  proper	  lady,	  and	  as	  a	  result	  she	  goes	  beyond	  what	  is	  normal	  for	  women	  in	  her	  society.	  She	  becomes	  aware	  of	  this	  performance,	  and	  uses	  it	  to	  her	  advantage,	  thinking,	  “What	  was	  it	  Septa	  Mordane	  used	  to	  tell	  her?	  A	  lady’s	  armor	  is	  courtesy,	  that	  was	  it.	  She	  donned	  her	  armor”	  (Martin	  ACoK	  50).	  She	  uses	  this	  armour	  to	  her	  advantage,	  for	  as	  long	  as	  she	  pretends	  to	  be	  a	  proper	  lady	  her	  life,	  is	  not	  in	  danger.	  Her	  ability	  to	  move	  beyond	  an	  unconscious	  ability	  to	  perform	  her	  gender,	  and	  move	  into	  a	  conscious	  performance	  illustrates	  Sansa’s	  knowledge	  of	  the	  patriarchal	  system	  and	  her	  subversion	  of	  the	  system	  for	  her	  own	  gain.	  	  This	  performance	  does	  not	  convince	  everyone,	  and	  the	  King’s	  uncle	  Tyrion	  Lannister,	  is	  able	  to	  spot	  her	  lies.	  However,	  he	  is	  kind	  to	  her	  and	  tells	  her,	  “Well,	  someone	  has	  taught	  you	  to	  lie	  well.	  You	  may	  be	  grateful	  for	  that	  one	  day,	  child”	  (ACoK	  492).	  Sansa’s	  conscious	  understanding	  of	  her	  performance	  causes	  her	  to	  become	  disillusioned	  with	  her	  life	  and	  with	  those	  who	  continue	  to	  unconsciously	  perform	  as	  proper	  ladies.	  Everything	  that	  she	  had	  ever	  believed,	  and	  ever	  been	  taught,	  is	  revealed	  to	  be	  false.	  She	  looks	  at	  the	  other	  ladies	  of	  the	  court	  and	  thinks,	  “They	  are	  children.	  They	  are	  silly	  little	  girls…	  They’ve	  never	  seen	  a	  battle,	  they’ve	  never	  seen	  a	  man	  die,	  they	  know	  nothing.	  Their	  dreams	  were	  full	  of	  songs	  and	  stories,	  the	  way	  hers	  had	  been	  before	  Joffrey	  cut	  her	  father’s	  head	  off.	  Sansa	  pitied	  them.	  Sansa	  envied	  them”	  (Martin	  ASoS	  222).	  Sansa	  is	  able	  to	  subvert	  the	  patriarchy	  Buchanan	   28	  for	  her	  own	  needs,	  but	  still	  look	  at	  the	  other	  women’s	  unconscious	  performance	  and	  realize	  how	  she	  has	  changed.	  Her	  worldview	  changes	  from	  an	  innocent	  young	  lady	  who	  believes	  in	  the	  glamour	  and	  chivalry	  of	  the	  system	  to	  the	  viewpoint	  of	  someone	  who	  understands	  the	  system.	  	  	   Arya	  and	  Sansa	  are	  both	  able	  to	  subvert	  the	  system	  and	  use	  it	  to	  further	  their	  own	  goals,	  namely	  their	  survival	  despite	  the	  constant	  threat	  of	  death.	  Arya’s	  gender-­‐switching	  performance	  allows	  her	  to	  elude	  the	  capture	  of	  the	  forces	  that	  killed	  her	  father.	  She	  is	  able	  to	  exploit	  stereotypes	  and	  fool	  guards,	  knights,	  and	  her	  fellow	  Night’s	  Watch	  recruits	  into	  believing	  she	  is	  a	  boy.	  Sansa	  also	  exploits	  stereotypes	  of	  gender,	  but	  instead	  of	  switching	  genders	  she	  performs	  her	  own	  gender	  to	  the	  extreme.	  By	  performing	  consciously	  as	  the	  proper	  lady	  she	  is	  able	  to	  hide	  in	  plain	  sight	  of	  a	  hostile	  court.	  	  Therefore,	  Martin	  subverts	  the	  traditions	  of	  the	  fantasy	  genre	  by	  creating	  female	  characters	  that	  are	  not	  only	  fundamental	  to	  plot,	  but	  also	  demonstrate	  high	  levels	  of	  awareness	  of	  the	  complexity	  of	  gender	  roles.	  Martin’s	  characters	  move	  beyond	  the	  female	  characters	  found	  in	  Tolkienesque	  fantasy	  tradition	  and	  act	  as	  independent	  characters	  that	  do	  not	  rely	  on	  masculine	  influence.	  The	  tradition	  of	  male-­‐dependant	  women	  begins	  with	  Tolkien,	  whose	  works	  contain	  very	  few	  female	  characters.	  Martin’s	  continuation	  of	  the	  Tolkienesque	  genre	  includes	  many	  characters	  that	  work	  against	  the	  traditions.	  The	  figure	  of	  the	  traditional	  knight	  is	  shown	  to	  be	  false	  by	  having	  Jaime	  appear	  to	  be	  the	  chivalric	  knight,	  when	  he	  is	  in	  actuality	  an	  oathbreaker	  that	  cares	  little	  for	  others,	  while	  in	  contrast,	  Brienne	  is	  not	  a	  true	  knight,	  but	  is	  able	  to	  exemplify	  the	  chivalric	  code	  and	  set	  an	  example	  for	  Jaime	  Buchanan	   29	  to	  follow	  after	  he	  is	  emasculated	  through	  the	  loss	  of	  his	  sword	  hand.	  Gender	  performance	  is	  used	  by	  both	  Arya	  and	  Sansa	  to	  survive	  after	  the	  death	  of	  their	  father.	  Arya	  disguises	  herself	  as	  a	  male	  and	  uses	  her	  ability	  to	  cross	  genders	  to	  evade	  capture	  and	  keep	  herself	  alive.	  Sansa	  uses	  gender	  performance	  to	  exaggerate	  her	  own	  gender	  and	  convince	  her	  captors	  that	  she	  is	  a	  proper	  lady.	  Their	  use	  of	  gender	  performance	  allows	  them	  to	  hide	  their	  true	  motives	  and	  stay	  alive.	  Martin’s	  depictions	  of	  strong	  female	  characters	  give	  his	  fantasy	  series	  an	  element	  that	  is	  severely	  lacking	  in	  the	  foundation	  texts	  of	  the	  Tolkienesque	  fantasy	  genre.	  The	  use	  of	  female	  characters	  in	  Martin’s	  series	  shows	  how	  the	  fantasy	  genre	  has	  changed	  and	  evolved	  since	  the	  publication	  of	  The	  Lord	  of	  the	  Rings	  in	  1954.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	   	  	  	   	  	  	   	  Buchanan	   30	  Works	  Cited	  Armitt,	  Lucie.	  Contemporary	  Women's	  Fiction	  and	  the	  Fantastic.	  London:	  Macmillan;	  New	  York:	  St.	  Martin's,	  2000.	  Print.	  Attebery,	  Brian.	  Strategies	  of	  Fantasy.	  Bloomington:	  Indiana	  UP,	  1992.	  Print.	  Birch,	  Dinah.	  "focalization."	  The	  Oxford	  Companion	  to	  English	  Literature.	  Oxford:	  Oxford	  UP,	  2009.	  Oxford	  Reference,	  2009.	  Web.	  23	  Feb.	  2014	  	  Butler,	  Judith.	  Gender	  Trouble.	  1990.	  New	  York:	  Routledge,	  2008.	  Print.	  	  Clute,	  John	  and	  John	  Grant,	  eds.	  The	  Encylopedia	  of	  Fantasy.	  Orbit,	  1997.	  Web.	  9	  Dec.	  2013.	  Clute,	  John.	  "Epic	  Fantasy."	  Clute	  and	  Grant.	  n.pag.	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  "Heroic	  Fantasy."	  Clute	  and	  Grant.	  n.pag.	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  "High	  Fantasy."	  Clute	  and	  Grant.	  n.pag.	  Elgin,	  Suzette	  Haden.	  “The	  Feminist	  Pragmatics	  of	  Applied	  Fantasy.”	  The	  Fantastic	  Other:	  An	  Interface	  of	  Perspectives.	  Ed.	  Brett	  Cooke,	  George	  E.	  Slusser,	  and	  Juame	  Marti-­‐Olivella.	  Amsterdam:	  Rodopi,	  1998.	  	  Fredrick,	  Candice,	  and	  Sam	  McBride.	  "Battling	  the	  Woman	  Warrior:	  Females	  and	  Combat	  in	  Tolkien	  and	  Lewis."	  Mythlore:	  A	  Journal	  Of	  J.	  R.	  R.	  Tolkien,	  C.	  S.	  Lewis,	  Charles	  Williams,	  And	  Mythopoeic	  Literature	  25.3-­‐4	  (2007):	  29-­‐42.	  MLA	  International	  Bibliography.	  Web.	  16	  Oct.	  2013.	  James,	  Edward	  and	  Farah	  Mendlesohn,	  ed.	  The	  Cambridge	  Companion	  to	  Fantasy	  Literature.	  Cambridge:	  Cambridge	  UP,	  2012.	  Print.	  Martin,	  George	  R.	  R.	  A	  Clash	  of	  Kings.	  1999.	  New	  York:	  Bantam,	  2011.	  Print.	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  A	  Dance	  with	  Dragons.	  New	  York:	  Bantam,	  2011.	  Print.	  Buchanan	   31	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  	  A	  Feast	  for	  Crows.	  2005.	  New	  York:	  Bantam,	  2011.	  Print.	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  A	  Game	  of	  Thrones.	  1996.	  New	  York:	  Bantam,	  2011.	  Print.	  	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  A	  Storm	  of	  Swords.	  2000.	  New	  York:	  Bantam,	  2011.	  Print.	  -­‐-­‐-­‐.	  Introduction.	  Meditations	  on	  Middle-­‐earth.	  Ed.	  Karen	  Haber.	  New	  York:	  Preiss-­‐St.	  Martin’s,	  2002.	  Print.	  	  Maund,	  K	  L.	  "History	  in	  Fantasy."	  Clute	  and	  Grant.	  n.pag.	  Mayer,	  Lauryn	  S.	  "Unsettled	  Accounts:	  Corporate	  Culture	  and	  George	  R.	  R.	  Martin's	  Fetish	  Medievalism."	  Corporate	  Medievalism.	  57-­‐64.	  Cambridge:	  Brewer,	  2012.	  MLA	  International	  Bibliography.	  Web.	  6	  May	  2013.	  	  Kaeuper,	  Richard	  W.	  “Chivalry:	  Fantasy	  and	  Fear.”	  Writing	  and	  Fantasy.	  Eds.	  Ceri	  Sullivan	  and	  Barbara	  White.	  London:	  Longman,	  1999.	  Print.	  Stableford,	  Brian	  M,	  and	  John	  Clute.	  "Martin,	  George	  R	  R."	  The	  Encyclopedia	  of	  Science	  Fiction.	  Eds.	  John	  Clute,	  David	  Langford,	  Peter	  Nicholls	  and	  Graham	  Sleight.	  Gollancz,	  6	  Mar.	  2014.	  Web.	  9	  Mar.	  2014.	  Steinweg,	  David.	  "Governance	  of	  the	  Feminine	  in	  Popular	  Fantasy	  Fiction."	  Conference	  Papers—	  National	  Communication	  Association	  (2009):	  1-­‐16.	  Communication	  &	  Mass	  Media	  Complete.	  Web.	  16	  Oct.	  2013.	  	  	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52966.1-0074552/manifest

Comment

Related Items