UBC Undergraduate Research

LEGO prototype of the LineScout robot Ding, Sean; Been, Daniel; Dendandome, Sartsawat Jan 10, 2011

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
52966-Ding_Sean_et_al_APSC_479_2011.pdf [ 1.53MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 52966-1.0074455.json
JSON-LD: 52966-1.0074455-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 52966-1.0074455-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 52966-1.0074455-rdf.json
Turtle: 52966-1.0074455-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 52966-1.0074455-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 52966-1.0074455-source.json
Full Text
52966-1.0074455-fulltext.txt
Citation
52966-1.0074455.ris

Full Text

        LEGO PROTOTYPE OF THE LINESCOUT ROBOT    TEAM MEMBERS:  DANIEL BEEN  SARTSAWAT DENDANDOME  SEAN DING    PROJECT SPONSOR:  DR. JANOS TOTH    APPLIED SCIENCE 479  ENGINEERING PHYSICS  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA    JAN 10, 2011    PROJECT NUMBER: 1073      ii | P a g e     Preface   An assumption that the project group made was that the LEGO bricks are easy to obtain given a  design in LEGO Digital Designer file. As it turned out, LEGO.com only supplies less than 20% of  the bricks we needed for our design. We spent roughly another two weeks looking for vendors  who sell those other parts.    After placing the orders to LEGO, they made some mistakes and held our shipments in the  factory for three weeks. The shipments did not arrive for additional two weeks. Our project  could not officially start until early‐mid November 2010. This left us with about one month to  work on the project before the final exams. One of the main parts, the driving wheels, did not  arrive until late November. The status of the project at the completion of this report is not as  completed as we would have imagined.    Thanks to Shawn Crockett, previous BC Hydro co‐op, for his preliminary design on LEGO Digital  Designer. His work had saved us a lot of time trying to design a prototype LEGO that has the  same functionality of a LineScout.    Thanks for Bernhard for building the test environment for the LineScout to hang on and as well,  recommendations for alternations of our design. Thanks to Jon for providing various feedback  and comments whenever possible.    iii | P a g e     Executive	Summary   This report outlines the construction of a replica of the LineScout robot. The LineScout is  a remotely operated live‐line inspection and maintenance robot for high‐power electrical  transmission lines developed by the Institut de Recherche d'Hydro‐Québec in conjunction with  BC‐Hydro. The project sponsor, Dr. Janos Toth of BC‐Hydro, desires a scale model that emulates  the basic functions of the LineScout Robot for demonstration purposes.     We construct such a replica, primarily using commercially available LEGO construction parts,  based on the design done in LEGO Digital Designer by Shawn Crockett over the past summer as  part of his co‐op work at BC‐Hydro. The prototype is remotely controlled by an operator, be  able to move along a rope or cable, and cross obstacles in its path. The prototype consists of  two frames that can translate laterally relative to each other. One frame includes the drive  wheels that move the robot along the line, while the other has two grippers that can hold the  robot in place when the wheels are not in contact with the line. During an obstacle crossing, the  grippers will grip the line on either side of an obstacle, and the wheels will be rotated away  from the line, and moved to the other side of the obstacle. The grippers then release to allow  the robot to move on.     The result performance of the LEGO LineScout is not robust due to the fact that the LEGO  pieces deform when under load. An improvement can be seen the most when the wheel frame  can be tilted forward more.   Table	of	Contents   Preface .............................................................................................................................................ii  Executive Summary ......................................................................................................................... iii  Table of Contents ............................................................................................................................ 1  List of Figures .................................................................................................................................. 2  1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 3  1.1 Background and Motivation ................................................................................................. 3  1.2 Objective ............................................................................................................................... 4  1.3 Organization .......................................................................................................................... 5  2.  Discussion ................................................................................................................................... 6  2.1 Technical Background ........................................................................................................... 6  2.2 Final Design ........................................................................................................................... 7  2.2.1) Base Extension .................................................................................................................. 7  2.2.2) Gripper Arm Extension and Line Reinforcement .............................................................. 7  2.2.3) Height Extension ............................................................................................................... 7  2.2.4) Driving Mechanism Modification ..................................................................................... 7  2.2.5) Tilting Mechanism Modification ....................................................................................... 7  2.2.6) Base Gear Rail Modification ............................................................................................. 7  2.2.7) Gripplers Raising Mechanism Gear Ratio Change ............................................................ 8  2.2.8) Grippler Gear Modification and Hook Addition ............................................................... 8  2.2.9) NXT mounts Modification ................................................................................................. 8      2.3 Experimental Equipment / Obstacle Crossing Sequence/ Algorithms .................................. 8      2.4 Result and Discussion .......................................................................................................... 15  3.  Conclusion ................................................................................................................................ 16  4. Project Deliverables .................................................................................................................. 17  4.1 List of Deliverables .............................................................................................................. 17  4.2 Financial Summary .............................................................................................................. 17       4.3 Ongoing Commitments by Team Members ....................................................................... 17  5. Recommendation  5.1 Implement GUI Control ....................................................................................................... 18  5.2 Install Cameras to Aid Obstacle Crossing............................................................................ 18  5.3 Use Alternative Material or Design for Bending Issue ........................................................ 18  5.4 Redesign Wheel Frame for Rotation Issue ......................................................................... 18  5.5 Individual Motors to Raise/Lower the Gripplers ................................................................ 18  Appendices  A1. Procedures to setup Bluetooth on the PC .......................................................................... 19  A2. Configuration File ............................................................................................................... 20  A3. Code .................................................................................................................................... 20  A4. How to use the control program ........................................................................................ 21  References .................................................................................................................................... 22  2 | P a g e     List	of	Figures   Figure 1.  LineScout on an inclined transmission line (left). LineScout crossing an obstacle (right). ......................................................................................................................................................... 3  Figure 2. The testing platform. ....................................................................................................... 9  Figure 3. The robot approaches the object from the right and  stops just before the left wheel  touch it. ......................................................................................................................................... 10  Figure 4. The horizontal slider slides all the way across the obstacle. ......................................... 10  Figure 5. Both gripplers raise up to grab the cable. ..................................................................... 11  Figure 6. The gripplers close and then lift the wheels off the cable. ........................................... 11  Figure 7. The wheel frame is further tilted backward and the frame support disengaged. ........ 12  Figure 8: The wheel frame slides to the other side of the obstacle. ............................................ 12  Figure 9: The wheel frame and frame support are tilted back onto the cable. ........................... 13  Figure 10: The wheel frame is lowered back onto the cable and then gripplers open. ............... 14  Figure 11: The robot continues to travel down the other side of the cable after returning to  original position. ........................................................................................................................... 14  3 | P a g   1.	Intro 1.1 Bac Industria huge onu demands very care requires  power lin efficient  the safet problem  that tran low popu number o province These pr maintena   One of th develope collabora in British along a s up to 84c   Figure 1.  L   The LineS light cam manipula real‐time Because  to use it  e   duction kground a lized nation s on power . This mean fully. Maint highly traine es can be v long‐distanc y of mainten is further co smission lin lation dens f customer s, because o oblems have nce of tran e most adv d at the res ting with BC  Columbia. T ingle condu m in length ineScout on a cout’s prim eras and an tor arm tha  to the oper of the LineS for live dem nd Motiva s rely heavil  utilities to o s that electr aining an ele d technicia ery dangero e power tra ance crews mpounded  es must cov ity is that m s served. Br f the rugged  resulted in smission sys anced and s earch institu ‐Hydro on t he LineScou ctor at up to , and can op   n inclined tran ary function  infra‐red ca t can be fitt ator, who c cout’s size a onstrations. tion   y on univers perate cont ical distribu ctrical grid  ns to proper us for perso nsmission. O , which resu for Canadia er to provid ore miles of itish Columb  and inacce  a growing i tems.  ophisticated te at Hydro he LineScou t, seen in F  1 meter pe erate for up smission line   is conducto mera. It is a ed with a va an be up to  nd weight, a  BC‐Hydro w al access to inuously, w tion networ is an expens ly inspect a nnel due to ften, the tr lts in interr n power com e service to   transmissio ia is particu ssible terrai nterest in ro  live‐line ins ‐Québec. Re t project, a igure 1 belo r second (3.  to 8 hours  (left). LineSco r inspection lso equippe riety of sens 5km away f nd the dem ishes to ha  reliable ele hile serving  ks must be  ive and dan nd repair po  the very hig ansmission  upted servic panies bec all those wh n lines are r larly daunti n that some botic tools  pection rob cently, Hyd nd much of  w, weighs 1 6 km/h), ca a day.  ut crossing an , and so is e d with a hig ors and too rom the rob and for it to ve a portabl ctrical powe large, and g monitored a gerous end wer lines. W h voltages  line must b e for custom ause of the o need it. T equired rela ng, even com  power line for inspectio ots is the Li ro‐Québec  the testing h 00kg, is 1.37 n cross obst  obstacle (righ quipped w hly maneuv ls. The cam ot.   be in use,  e model of t r. This puts  rowing, pow nd maintain eavour. It  orking on t needed for  e shut down ers. The   vast distanc he result of  tive to the  pared to o s must trave n and  neScout  has been  as taken pl m long, tra acles on the t).  ith four visib erable  eras transm it is not prac he LineScou a  er  ed  he   for  es  this  ther  rse.  ace  vels   line    le‐ it in  tical  t  4 | P a g e     which is capable of demonstrating the basic capabilities of this remarkable new technology. To  this end we propose to build a model of the LineScout which can fulfill this role.    A preliminary design for a model has already been completed by Shawn Crockett, an Integrated  Engineering student, during his co‐op work term at BC‐Hydro. The design was done in the LEGO  Digital Designer software. This is a 3‐D CAD software that facilitates the design of structures to  be made with commercially available LEGO pieces, and generates step‐by‐step assembly  instructions for custom designs. The decision to use LEGO was made for a number of reasons:  ● Using LEGO pieces minimizes the need for machining custom parts.  ● Because the model is primarily made of standard LEGO pieces, it can be easily  replicated.  ● LEGO produces a number of high‐quality components for robotics applications; most  importantly microcomputers and servomotors.  ● If the model is featured at BC‐Hydro’s display at Science World (as hoped), the use of  LEGO would increase its appeal to children.  ● If the model will be displayed in public, it may be possible to persuade LEGO to sponsor  the project by providing discounted components, thus decreasing the cost to BC‐Hydro      1.2 Objective    ● Deliver to the project sponsor a working scaled‐model of the LineScout Robot that:  ○ Can move along a single suspended rope or cable  ○ Can cross obstacles on the wire that block its path  ○ Can be remotely operated by a single person  ○ Automated obstacle crossing sequence    ● Provide the project sponsor with full documentation regarding the construction,  programming, capabilities, and operation of the completed model.    At the completion of this project, it will provide BC‐Hydro with a valuable tool to help show  the applicability of robotics to modern power transmission networks. It will aid immensely  in explaining the capabilities of the LineScout robot. Instead of just using words and  pictures, a demonstrator will be able to show a manager, a client, or the public, something  that they can touch and see in real life. Even though the model will be quite different from  the LineScout in many respects, one can use the model as a starting point to properly  describe the LineScout, in conjunction with pictures and videos. If the user interface is  robust enough, it will allow people to get a taste of what is required to operate the  LineScout when inspecting lines or crossing obstacles.      5 | P a g e     1.3 Organization  This report is organized into the following sections:   Discussion – In this section, technical background, final design, obstacle crossing  sequence, and results are presented.   Conclusion – In this section, the important accomplishments are presented at the  completion of the project.   Project Deliverables – In this section, the materials to be handed over to project sponsor  and the summary of budget are outlined.   Recommendations – In this section, some features are outlined for improvements if  future projects are to carried out.  6 | P a g e     2.		Discussion 2.1 Technical Background    The LEGO Minstorm NXT Brick is the LEGO only micro‐controller based on 32‐bit ARM7  processor. It each provides 4 input and 3 output ports. The communication between each brick  is by wire via RS485 or wireless via Bluetooth. The computer controlling the robot  communicates to the master brick on the wireless Bluetooth protocol.    There are several options in programming the NXT brick. The LEGO provides the NXT‐G  Programming software when the LEGO Minstorm NXT kit is purchased. The software is based  on graphical flow control and suitable for basic programming and easy to use. However, to  bring NXT to the next levels, LabVIEW Toolkit, alternative programming software, could be used  to provide advanced featured textual/graphical‐based programming environment. For the  purpose of this project, we require the robot to be controlled wirelessly from a computer.  Many LEGO hobbyists have come up with different programming language to control the NXT  through Bluetooth. Because of the background of the project members, we chose to use the  Anders’ C++ Communication library to implement a program to remote control the NXTs1. In  addition, it offers some example programs that work well and complete library for almost  everything we can think of.    There are five major moving parts that we refer to often in this report and they are: the base  frame, the horizontal slider, the gripplers, the wheel frame and wheel frame support. The base  frame holds the two NXTs at its bottom, three servomotors that control the tilting of wheel  frame, and wheel frame support, and extending/retracting of the horizontal slider. The  horizontal slider slides on top of the base frame during obstacle crossing. It contains one  servomotor that raises/lowers two gripplers that are attached to it. Each grippler has a  servomotor to open or close the hook to the cable. The wheel frame has a Power Function  Motor that drives the robot along the cable. It can be tilted back to cross obstacles when the  gripplers are engaged.  7 | P a g e     2.2 Final Design In this section, we discuss about the major modifications to the original design due to technical  reasons explained in each part.    2.2.1)	Base	Extension The base that guides the horizontal slider is extended so that the gripplers never slide out of  the base. This modification was implemented to prevent the gripplers from catching the edge  of the base and hence stopping the horizontal sliders from coming back to the compact  position.    2.2.2)	Gripper	Arm	Extension	and	Line	Reinforcement LEGO beams are not rigid enough for a project of this scale. The evidence is when horizontal  slider slides out and the weight sits on one side, the base bends and twists towards outside. The  far grippler cannot reach the cable with original height. In addition, a line is used to pull the  base back up when the horizontal slider is extended to its fullest.    2.2.3)	Height	Extension The height of wheel frame is increased so the robot is able to cross larger obstacles. With  original design, the grippler arms are about the same height as the wheel.    2.2.4)	Driving	Mechanism	Modification The original design for the driving wheels was using O‐rings. During our tests we discovered  that one of the O‐rings cannot provide enough friction to turn the driving wheels. Therefore  gear sets are used to replace that O‐ring.    2.2.5)	Tilting	Mechanism	Modification The original design that connects the base frame to driving frame cannot provide rigid force to  keep the wheel frame and base frame in the desire angle. Although the modification has been  made to reduce the gear ratio dramatically, the mechanism still does not provide enough force  to prevent the base from tilting so the locking/support mechanism is introduced into the  system.    2.2.6)	Base	Gear	Rail	Modification The original design of the gear rail has all the gears on the rail to be able to drive the horizontal  slider out. Due to backlash of multiple gears, some torques is lost and may or may not be able  to extend/retract the slider frame. Because of the fact that the horizontal slider has continuous  racks and its one end never slides across the middle of the base, we made the end gears free  rotating.    8 | P a g e     2.2.7)	Gripplers	Raising	Mechanism	Gear	Ratio	Change The gripplers need to be able to lift the entire robot during the obstacle crossing sequence. The  original gear design was one to one ratio. A gear ratio reduction was made on the slider unit.    2.2.8)	Grippler	Gear	Modification	and	Hook	Addition The original worm gear design has slippage problem when the gripplers try to close on the  cable as the axle that holds the worm gear tilts. It is replaced by a row of gears and the gripplers  were added a little hook so that the motors do not need to exert any force once the gripplers  are hooked onto the cable.    2.2.9)	NXT	mounts	Modification The original design did not take into account the rechargeable battery, which has an extra  thickness than when using AA batteries. Locations of the mounts are still at the bottom of the  base.    2.3	Experimental	Equipment	/	Obstacle	Crossing	Sequence/	Algorithms   Bernhard has created a testing platform for us that consist of a frame, that is easy to uninstall  and become portable, and a tightened rope that stays reasonably straight when the LEGO  LineScout is on.     9 | P a g     Obstacle To cross  base fram of the ho the horiz drive the horizonta Unit off t disengag obstacle. support b slides ba   The serie e    Crossing Se the obstacle e which dr rizontal slid ontal slider   gears closin l slider lifts  o the side p ed. The mot  The rolling  ack in place ck to origina s of diagram quence  , the robot  ives the gea er passes th until the gri g the grippe up the robo reventing it  or on the ba servo would . The grippl l position th s below de Figure 2. T would slide  r rail which  rough the o pplers can c r to clamp t t; then, ano from hitting se frame w  roll the wh ers are relea en the robo monstrates  he testing plat out the hori push out the bstacle. Bot lose on the  he gripper  ther motor   the obstac ould drive t eel frame b sed and low t continues how the LEG form.  zontal slide  rack on th h grippers w cable. The s on the wire. on the base le after the  he rack mov ack on the c ered; finall  down the li O LineScou r by turning  e horizontal ill be raised ervo on eac  The same m  frame swin frame suppo ing the base able and th y, the horizo ne.  t across an    the servo o  slider until   by the serv h grippler w otor on the gs the Rollin rt unit is   over the  en the fram ntal slider  obstacle.  n the  half  o on  ould    g  e  10 | P a g   e   Fi Figure 3. The st gure 4. The ho  robot approa ops just befor rizontal slider ches the obje e the left whe    slides all the  ct from the ri el touch it.  way across th ght and   e obstacle.      11 | P a g   e   F Figure  igure 6. The g 5. Both grippl ripplers close  ers raise up to   and then lift t  grab the cabl he wheels off  e.  the cable.      12 | P a g   e   Figure 7. Th F e wheel frame igure 8: The w  is further tilt heel frame sl ed backward a   ides to the oth nd the frame er side of the  support disen  obstacle.    gaged.    13 | P a g     e   Figure 9: The wheel frame and frame support are tilted back onto the cable  .  14 | P a g   Figure 1   e   Figure 10 1: The robot c : The wheel fra ontinues to tr me is lowere avel down the d back onto th    other side of  e cable and th the cable afte en gripplers o r returning to   pen.    original position.  15 | P a g e     Algorithm  The control of the LEGO LineScout is done manually over Bluetooth wirelessly on a computer.  Direct commands are sent to the two NXTs to control all the motors. This enabled us to  program in our familiar and also algorithm‐efficient C/C++. The library we are using was  developed by Anders’ Mindstrom1. An exception to the direct motor command is the Power  Function Motor. In order to use the Power Function Motor, which was designed for previous  LEGO product, we used a RF remote control sensor called PFmate connecting to one of the  NXTs’ sensor port. Due to the fact there is no controlling library for PFmate from Anders, an  alternative implementation was developed. A NXT‐G program is downloaded to the NXT  connecting to the PFmate. This program reads the Bluetooth inbox message and if the received  messages is forward or reverse, the NXT sends the required signal through PFmate over RF to  control the Power Function motor accordingly. If there is no message in the inbox, by default,  the motor coasts to a stop. The code for the Bluetooth control interface and the NXT‐G  program are both archived and attached with this report.    2.4	Result	and	Discussion Upon testing, there are some uncertainties in disengaging the wheel frame lock. This mainly  was caused by the heavily loading of the entire robot. Due to the fact that the weight of the  robot is mostly in the base frame, the lock and joints in wheel frames undergoes bending.  Nonetheless, this issue may be resolved by tiling the wheel frame and the locking mechanism  insides a few times in order to get the lock to release. Due to this reason, automation has not  been implemented since the procedure to unlock the locking mechanism is uncertain. There are  no quantitative results for the required time to cross an obstacle for this reason. If the wheel  frame lock can be successfully disengaged, the replica can cross obstacles of size roughly the  size of a tennis ball.    During the testing stage, the LEGO LineScout often showed more inconsistent performance  among the days. Lots of efforts were made to discover that the structure strength of the LEGO  Technics is just not that strong for our design. Snaps that lock two beams together cannot hold  the two beams tightly in place when they are under load. This causes the horizontal slider failed  to slide smoothly. It also bends and twists when it is extended. The above two were some  examples of the problems we encountered. Strings were used to temporary fix the issues.  Before each run, it is a good practice to make sure all the snaps tightly connect the beams.         16 | P a g e     3.		Conclusion The replica of the LineScout has been built at the completion of this report. LEGO parts are used  for the construction of this replica and the preliminary design was completed in the LEGO  Digital Designer. Much effort had been put in to locate the necessary parts for the design as no  one vendor sells them all, including LEGO. This put the project on hold for roughly two months.    The result of the final LEGO LineScout can cross obstacles of a size of a tennis ball. However, its  robustness is still not very good. The major reason is because LEGO parts suffer from  deformation under load. However, further tests should be conducted to find out if there are  more reasons other than the structure strength of the LEGO pieces if time allows.    There are a few features that the real LineScout has that the Replica does not. The features that  are lacking are the variable cameras, the three‐frame design and a robotic arm. Every motion  performed on the LEGO LineScout is inspected by the eyes of the operator directly. This can  produce an issue when the cable is far away from the operator. The three‐frame design that the  real LineScout has allows it to cross larger obstacles and to be more balanced. However  implementing this on the replica will definitely signify the increasing in weight as more motors  are introduced. With current two‐frame design the LEGO parts are almost at their limit. It may  not be a good idea to implement the three‐frame design unless efforts are made to lighten the  structures. Finally, the robotic arm is used to repair or to inspect the obstacles crossed. Since  this is a rather familiar technology to the public, it may not be worthwhile implementing such  feature on the LEGO LineScout.   17 | P a g e     4.	Project	Deliverables 4.1 List of Deliverables   LEGO LineScout prototype robot   Complied controlling software   C/C++ Source Code and NXT‐G program   Excess LEGO parts   LEGO Digital Designer Design File  4.2 Financial Summary  The table below summarizes the major costs for the project, where, and who is it from.    Description  Quantity  Vendor  Cost  Purchased By:  Funded By:  LEGO Parts    LEGO  Approx  $1500  BC Hydro  BC Hydro  Testing Platform  1      Project Lab  Project Lab  Bluetooth Dongle  1  ASUS    Project Lab  Project Lab    4.3 Ongoing Commitments by Team Members  Currently, the LEGO design files need to be updated to match the actual design. Sartsawat is  taking responsibility for this task and will give it to the Sponsor by the January 31, 2011. If there  are chances of the project going into the Science World, both Sartsawat and Sean are willing to  participate in the demo runs provided time allows. 18 | P a g e     5.		Recommendations   There are several features that are not implemented in the current project design. In this  section, we have listed some goals that can be carried on for future projects based on the  results of this project. In addition, some issues are pointed out that affect the robustness of the  obstacle crossing sequence.    5.1 Implement GUI Control  The current project uses a text‐based program to reduce the development time. By  implementing the graphical user interface (GUI), it will provide ease of use for the operator to  control the LEGO LineScout. This will allow younger operators to use the replica.  5.2 Install Cameras to Aid Obstacle Crossing  The actual LineScout robot has several wireless cameras mounted on several place to assist the  operation of the robot since it can go out‐of‐sight easily; also they can take images (still or  motion) of the inspection process for records.  5.3 Use Alternative Material or Design for Bending Issue  The LEGO prototype twists and bends when the horizontal slider is extended. One may consider  alternative materials that are more rigid because LEGO parts suffer bending greatly when the  load is applied. Alternatively, the robot may also be lightened to reduce the bending issue.  5.4 Redesign Wheel Frame for Rotation Issue  The current wheel frame cannot rotate forward past 90 degrees with the body frame. This is  due to several reasons such as the axles bending. The major cause is due to a supporting rod  physically stops the frame from rotating forward. By allowing the wheel frame to rotate in  more, the frame support can disengage easily during the obstacle crossing sequence.    5.5 Individual Motors to Raise/Lower the Gripplers  When the horizontal sliders are extended, the centre of gravity of the robot is shifted and the  gripplers do not travel the same height to reach the cable. By allowing individual control of the  vertical positions of the gripplers will enhance the flexibility. However by introducing an extra  motor, the overall weight of the robot must be increased and needs to be considered. 19 | P a g e     Appendices A1. Procedures to setup Bluetooth on the PC  In order for Bluetooth communication with NXTs possible, the PC must have Bluetooth  connectivity. With Bluetooth enabled on the PC, pair the first NXT with default passcode  “1234”. Then you need to enable the service “Device B” for the NXT you just connected. This  will assign an outgoing COM port to the NXT. Note down this number and the NXT you just  connected. Then repeat the same steps to setup the second NXT and note down the outgoing  COM port for this NXT. The COM ports are required for the next section.The precise steps to  setup a Bluetooth‐serial COM port may vary on different systems. One step‐by‐step instruction  was found online from the University of Buffalo. Please refer to the link in the reference section  for this guide.  20 | P a g e     A2. Configuration File  Config.txt  This file contains parameters that the user can define to vary the control program without  recompiling. However this file must be modified before the program is executed or else the  changes will not take effect until you restart the program. The parameters are explained below.  1. COM1 and COM2. These two parameters are the COM port number you noted from the  section above. The NXT and COM port assignment is outlined in the table below.    Table 1. COM port assignments  COM1  Port A – Left Grippler Servo  Port B – Wheel Frame Servo  Port C – Horizontal Slider Servo  COM2  Port A – Right Grippler Servo  Port B – Grippler leverage servo  Port C – Wheel Frame Support servo    2. display_positions and control_display. These two parameters are to there to help new users  who are unfamiliar with the controls or for debugging purpose. Setting control_display to 1 will  allow the program to keep the information of key assignment on top. Setting display_positions  to 1 when control_display is 1 will print out the positions of all servos, along with the control  key mapping, whenever a key press is made.  Note turning display positions may cause the  program to be less responsive.    3. Speed configurations. Change any of these parameters will change the speed at which the  servos rotate for the entire program. The higher the values, the faster they rotate. If you put  down a negative value to a servo, it will reverse the direction of the motor, hence the controls  for that servo are swapped.    A3. Code  The package is archived and attached along with the submission of this report. The tool we  used to develop the program is Dev C++ with Anders’ C++ Communication Library. The code has  enough comments for the future programmers to understand.    The NXT‐G program, Bluetooth test, that drives the PFmate is also contained in the same  archive as the code.    21 | P a g e     A4. How to use the control program  The LEGO LineScount Bluetooth control program is very intuitive to use. At the initiation of the  program, you will be asked if you want to change the COM ports from the default values in the  config.txt file. If yes, press y and enter the first NXT’s COM port for the first prompt and follow  by the second NXT’s COM port for the next prompt. Then the program will try to connect to the  two NXTs. Once it is successful, it would print out the controls for once regardless of whether  you have set control_display parameter to 1 in the config file. If it fails to connect, please check  the two NXTs’ battery level and Bluetooth connection and restart the program again.    Once the program successfully connects to the NXTs, you should notice the red LED on Pfmate  at the back of the LEGO LineScout should be flashing. This means that the Power Function  Motor is ready to be driven. If the LED light is not flashing, manually start the NXT‐G program  you downloaded to the NXT connecting to the Pfmate. Then the follow controls are used to  control the motors of the robot.    Table 2. The control mapping for the Bluetooth Control Program  Key  Control  Key  Control  1  Drive Power Function Motor forward  A  Raise both gripplers  2  Drive Power Function Motor backward  Z  Lower both gripplers  O  Open left grippler  <  Move wheel frame to the left  L  Close left grippler  >  Move wheel frame to the right  P  Open right grippler  S  Tilt wheel frame forward  :  Close right grippler  D  Tilt wheel frame backward  Q  Engage wheel frame support  W  Disengage wheel frame support         22 | P a g e     References   1Andre's Minstorm Page. (n.d.). Retrieved January 10, 2010, from  http://www.norgesgade14.dk/bluetoothlibrary.php    Lea, C. (2008, October 2008). Setting Up the Lego Mindstorms NXT with Bluetooth. Retrieved  January 10, 2010, from http://www.eng.buffalo.edu/~colinlea/Bluetooth_With_NXT.pdf    mindsensors.com. (n.d.). PF Motor controller for NXT resource page. Retrieved January 10,  2010, from  http://www.mindsensors.com/index.php?module=pagemaster&PAGE_user_op=view_p age&PAGE_id=107   

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52966.1-0074455/manifest

Comment

Related Items