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Geochemistry of the Baie Charrier Basaltic Section, Courbet Peninsula, Kerguelen Archipelago: Implications.. Hanano, Diane 2004-01-11

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 GEOCHEMISTRY OF THE BAIE CHARRIER BASALTIC SECTION, COURBET PENINSULA, KERGUELEN ARCHIPELAGO: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE COMPOSITION OF THE KERGUELEN MANTLE PLUME  By  DIANE W. HANANO  A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FUFILLMENT OF  THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF  BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONOURS)  In  THE FACULTY OF SCIENCE Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences   This thesis conforms to the required standard  ………………..………….  …………..…………………                                  Supervisor            Supervisor  THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA MARCH 2004  ii ABSTRACT  The Baie Charrier basaltic section is lo cated on the northern Courbet Peninsula on the Kerguelen Archipelago.  The archipelago repr esents the emergent part of the Northern Kerguelen Plateau, part of the Kerguelen larg e igneous province in the southern Indian Ocean.  The archipelago formed through volcanism (40 Ma to recent) related to the Kerguelen mantle plume.  This study presen ts a detailed petrographic and geochemical analysis of basalts from the Baie Charrier section.  The results of this study will compliment the 1000 m Mt. Crozier section located in the cente r of the Courbet Peninsula.  Mineral compos itions of olivine and clinopy roxene phenocrysts by electron microprobe analysis were obtained for phe nocryst zoning profiles and mineral-melt equilibria.  Major and trace element concen trations by XRF and hi gh-resolution ICP-MS, as well as Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compos itions by TIMS and multi-collector ICP-MS define the chemical and isotopic characteris tics of the Baie Charrier section.    Based on petrographic and geoche mical criteria, the Baie Cha rrier section is subdivided into four distinct units.  The Baie Charrier basalts are primarily olivine-phyric, and sometimes contain phenocrysts of plagiocl ase or clinopyroxene.  Mineral chemistry reveals normally zoned phenocrysts, with olivine core compositions ranging from Fo 86-70  and clinopyroxene core Mg# ranging from 0.88 to 0.79.  The Baie Charrier basalts are mildly alkalic and possess relatively high Mg O contents; Units A and C are comprised of high-MgO (8-10 wt.%) basalts, and sample 240 of unit D is a picrite (>16 wt.%).  CaO depletion at ~6 wt.% MgO, coupled  with a continuously increasing Al 2O3  content, reflect fractionation driven by significant clinopyroxene  crystallization.  Trace element depletion in Ni, Cr, and Sc with decreas ing MgO reflect the relative compatibility of these elements in olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts.  Incompatible element abundance relationships are used to define a relative incompatibility  index in order of in creasing compatibility: Th<Ce, Nb, Rb<Ba<Zr<Sr.  The Baie Cha rrier basalts are enriched in highly incompatible elements and light rare earth elements.  The units of the Baie Charrier section are also isotopica lly distinct; Unit C possesse s some of the highest 143 Nd/ 144 Nd, lowest 87 Sr/ 86 Sr, and lowest Pb isotopic ratios, while  Unit D has the highest Pb isotopic ratios of the section.    The small-scale petrographic and geochemical variation observed in the Baie Charrier section is interpreted to reflect tempor al changes in volcanism derived from a heterogeneous source region.  Mineral-melt equilibria constrain the maximum MgO content for magmas without accumulated phenoc rysts to be between 8-10 wt.% MgO.   The similarities between the trace element and isotopic compositions of the Baie Charrier section and the Mt. Crozier section suggests th at both are derived from the same source, which supports the inte rpretation of the Courbet Penins ula as a single volcanic unit.  However, the abundance of olivine-phyric basa lts at Baie Charrier, and their absence at Mt. Crozier, suggest that th e eruptive center of this volca no may not coincide with the present geographic center of the Courbet Peninsula.  Lastly, the Baie Charrier basalts, with their highly radiogenic Pb compositions, co ntain a strong signature of an enriched plume-derived component, and provide additi onal constraints on the source composition of the Kerguelen mantle plume.     iii TABLE OF CONTENTS  Abstract          ii Table of Contents         iii List of Figures          v List of Tables          vii Acknowledgements         viii Chapter 1: Introduction         1.1  Geochemistry of Basalts       1 1.2  Large Igneous Provinces and Mantle Plumes    2 1.3  Scope of the Study       3  Chapter 2: Geologic Setting of th e Kerguelen Archipelago      2.1 Geologic History of the Ke rguelen Mantle Plume   5  2.2 Geology of the Kerguelen Archipelago     7  2.3 Geology of the Courbet Peninsula     9  2.4 The Baie Charrier Stratigraphic Section     11  Chapter 3: Analytical Techniques         3.1 Mineral Chemistry       12  3.2 Previous Whole Rock Sample Preparation    12  3.3 Major Element Compositions      13  3.4 Trace Element Concentrations      13   3.4.1 Loading        13   3.4.2 Digestion       16   3.4.3 Dilution        16   3.4.4 Trace Element Analysis by High-Resolution Inductively 17           Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS)   3.5 Pb-Sr-Nd Isotopic Compositions      18   3.5.1 Sample Selection      18   3.5.2 Loading        18   3.5.3 Leaching       19   3.5.4 Digestion       19   3.5.5 Pb Column Chemistry      20   3.5.6 Sr Column Chemistry      21   3.5.7 Nd Column Chemistry      22   3.5.8 Pb Isotopic Analysis by Mu lti-Collector Inductively   23          Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS)    3.5.9 Sr and Nd Isotopic Analys is by Thermal Ionization   25          Mass Spectrometry (TIMS)   iv  Chapter 4: Results           4.1 Stratigraphic Relationships in the Baie Charrier Section   27  4.2 Petrography        29  4.3 Mineral Chemistry       31   4.3.1 Olivine        31    4.3.2 Clinpoyroxene       31  4.4 Major Elements        35  4.5 Trace Elements        38  4.6 Isotopes         46  Chapter 5: Discussion           5.1 Temporal Variation       51  5.2 Mineral-Melt Equilibria       52  5.3 Comparison with Mt. Crozier and the Southeast Province  55  5.4 Source Composition of the Kerguelen Mantle Plume   59  Chapter 6: Conclusions 6.1 Conclusions        64         References          66    Appendix A: Electron Microprobe Data for Olivine     71  Appendix B: Electron Microprobe Da ta for Clinopyroxene    81  Appendix C: Thin Section Index       83  v LIST OF FIGURES  Fig. 2.1 Indian Ocean bathymetric map     6  Fig. 2.2 Satellite photo of the Ke rguelen Archipelago   8   Fig. 2.3 Simplified geologic map of the Courbet Peninsula   10  Fig. 4.1 Stratigraphic subdivisions of  the Baie Charrier section  28  Fig. 4.2 Photomicrographs of phenocry sts from the Baie Charrier     basalts         30  Fig. 4.3 Olivine forsterite zoning profiles     32  Fig. 4.4 Clinopyroxene Mg# zoning profiles     34  Fig. 4.5 Clinopyroxene phenocryst compositions projected onto a   pyroxene quadrilateral      34  Fig. 4.6 Clinopyroxene Al 2O3  zoning profiles     35  Fig. 4.7 Na 2O + K 2O vs. SiO2 classification plot    36  Fig. 4.8 Alkalinity index and MgO abunda nce vs. stratigraphic height 37  Fig. 4.9 Selected major element oxides vs. MgO    39  Fig. 4.10 Selection of compatible elements vs. MgO    40  Fig. 4.11 Selection of incompatible elements vs. Nb    42  Fig. 4.12 Stratigraphic and temporal va riation in incompatible element    ratios         44  Fig. 4.13 Incompatible element abundances of the Baie Charrier samples 45  Fig. 4.14 Stratigraphic variation in Nd and Sr isotopic ratios   47  Fig. 4.15 Stratigraphic variation in  Pb isotopic ratios    48  Fig. 4.16 Pb-Pb isotopic diagrams      49  Fig. 4.17 Nd-Sr isotopic diagram      50  Fig. 4.18 Sr-Pb isotopic diagram      50  vi Fig. 5.1 Mineral-melt equilibrium diagrams for olivine   53  Fig. 5.2 Mineral-melt equilibrium diagrams for clinopyroxene  54  Fig. 5.3 MgO content comparison between  Baie Charrier, Mt. Crozier,   and the Southeast Province      56  Fig. 5.4 Zr/Nb comparison between Ba ie Charrier, Mt. Crozier, and   the Southeast Province      57   Fig. 5.5 Comparison of incompatible element abundances between   The Baie Charrier and Mt. Crozier sections    58  Fig. 5.6 Nd-Sr isotopic diagram s howing comparison between the    Baie Charrier and Mt. Crozier sections    60  Fig. 5.7 Sr-Pb isotopic diagram s howing comparison between the    Baie Charrier and Mt. Crozier sections    60  Fig. 5.8 Pb-Pb isotopic diagrams showing comparison between the   Baie Charrier and Mt. Crozier sections    61  Fig. 5.9 Sr-Nd isotopic variations      62   vii LIST OF TABLES  Table 3.1 Major and trace element abunda nces in basaltic lavas from  14   the Baie Charrier section  Table 3.2 Column chemistry procedure for Pb isotopes    21  Table 3.3 Column chemistry proc edure for Sr isotopes    22  Table 3.4 Column chemistry procedure for Nd isotopes   23  Table 3.5 Pb isotopic compositions in basaltic lavas from the Baie  25   Charrier section  Table 3.6 Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in basaltic lavas from the  26   Baie Charrier section  viii ACKNOWLEDGEME NTS   First and foremost, I must thank my thesis supervisors James Scoates and Dominique Weis for giving me the opportunity to work on this project.  Their advice, support and encouragement during the past year  have been greatly appreciated.  I am grateful for all of their time and effort spen t editing this paper, looking at my data and graphs, and answering my questions.     I would like to thank Bruno Kieffer fo r his assistance with sample leaching, digestion and column chemistry procedures, as well as Sr and Nd analysis by TIMS.  Many thanks to Wilma Pretorius for her assi stance with sample digestion and dilution procedures, as well as trace element analysis  by HR-ICP-MS.  I must also thank Jane Barling for her assistance with Pb analysis  by MC-ICP-MS.  I woul d also like to thank Heidi Annell and Mati Rausdepp for their he lp with electron microprobe analysis, and Christa Sluggett and Richard Friedm an for general lab assistance.  A portion of this research was funde d by an NSERC Undergraduate Student Research Award.  As well, I would like to thank Dimitri Damasceno at the Université Libre de Bruxelles for whole rock sample pr eparation and Mike Rhodes at the University of Massachusetts for major and trace element XRF data.  I must acknowledge my fellow P.O.T.’s Gwen Williams, Melissa Zack, Elizabeth Castle, and Julia Davison for their company, mo ral support, and reviews of this paper.  Lastly, thank-you to my family, friends, and es pecially Ryan for th eir unconditional love, support and patience.    Chapter 1: Introduction  1 1.1  G e o c h e m i s t r y of Basalts Geochemistry is an extremely useful tool for studying the Earth, as it can be used to describe and interpret the chemical inform ation recorded in rocks and minerals.  The chemical composition of a given rock varies  greatly depending on its source region and history, and is controlled by the behaviour of elements with di fferent chemical properties.  For example, highly incompatible elements su ch as the large ion lithophiles, which have large ionic radii and/or high charges, are not r eadily incorporated into crystal structures.  During partial melting of the mantle, these elements become concentrated in the residual melt, resulting in chemical fractionation.  Consequently, the source and the magma will have different chemical compositions.  Rocks formed by such processes will have distinctive geochemical characteristics that can  be used to reveal critical information regarding its source and histor y.  For example, rocks formed by mid-ocean ridge, oceanic island, or island arc volcanism possess distinct ive geochemical signatures that can be revealed through geochemical analyses.  By contrast, radiogenic is otopes (e.g. Pb, Sr, Nd, Hf) are not fractionated by processes such as  partial melting or crystallization.  As a result, the isotopic composition of the magma is equivalent to the isotopic composition of the source.  Therefore, isotope geochemistry of mantle-derived rocks such as basalts can provide insight into the chemis try of their source regions, as well as into the role of the various components involved in their genesis.  The study of compositional variability in the mantle must rely on rocks brought up from the interior of the earth, such as mantle xenoliths, or on rocks that have crystallized from melts originating deep in  the mantle.  Flood basalts and ocean island basalts (OIB) that comprise large igneous provi nces are thought to ha ve sources deep in Chapter 1: Introduction  2 the mantle (e.g. Griffiths & Campbell, 1990; Coffin & Edholm, 1994).  Thus, large igneous provinces are of great intere st from a geochemical perspective.  1.2  L a r g e Igneou s Provin c e s and Mantle Plum es Large igneous provinces (LIPs) are areas  of emplacement of massive volumes of mafic magma, which are considered to ha ve been brought to the surface by mantle plumes.  Mantle plumes are columns of hot  material that rise buoyantly through the mantle towards the surface of the earth (G riffiths & Campbell, 1990).  There has been considerable debate regardi ng the origin of these plumes .  The lower mantle, the upper mantle, and the core-mantle boundary are locat ions that have been proposed (e.g. Shen et al., 1998; Helmberger et al., 1998; Ritsema et al., 1999).  However, it is now generally accepted that mantle plumes originate from deep in the mantle.  Evidence includes the high 3 He/ 4He ratios in OIB, suggesting that thes e plumes are tapping parts of the mantle that have never been degassed (Kurz et al., 1982).  As well, OIB are enriched in incompatible elements relative to the primitive mantle, while mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) are depleted in these elements  (Hofmann, 1997).  MORB are derived from partial melting of the upper mantle, which b ecomes progressively depleted in these elements upon repeated melting to form the con tinental crust.  Therefore OIB, with their ‘enriched’ character, must come from below this ‘depleted’ upper mantle region.  Lastly, the estimated volumes of source material required to produce some LIPs, such as Kerguelen or Ontong-Java, extend well into th e lower mantle (Coffin & Edholm, 1994).  Thus, mantle plume-derived rocks have the ability to provide information about their source region, the lower mantle.  Study of these rocks may also provide additional insight into the origins and dynamics of mantle plumes (e.g. Albare de & van der Hilst, 1999).   Chapter 1: Introduction  3 1 . 3 Scope of the Study This study involves a detailed  investigation into the geochemistry of the Baie Charrier basaltic section located on the Ke rguelen Archipelago, which is part of the Kerguelen large igneous province located in the southern Indian Ocean. The geochemical analyses presented include the mineral chemistry of olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts, and the major and trace element c oncentrations and isotopic compositions of whole rocks from the section.  The vari ation observed in the petrographic and geochemical properties of the basaltic rocks fr om the Baie Charrier section are used to subdivide the section into four  distinct units, which are inte rpreted to reflect temporal changes in volcanism.  The scale over which th is variability is observed will be discussed in terms of the implications for magmatic  processes and source region heterogeneity. Importantly, this study presents new petr ographic and geochemical data from the northern flanks of the Courbet Peninsula of the Kerguelen Archipelago.  Mt. Crozier, a 1000 m basaltic section in the middle of the pe ninsula has been sampled extensively for petrographic and geochemical analysis (Scoates et al., in preparation).  The Mt. Crozier section has been interpreted as representative of the enriched component of the Kerguelen plume (e.g. Weis et al., 2002) on the basis of its isotopic characteristics; more specifically its very radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions.  The Baie Charrier section will complement the findings at Mt. Crozier, a nd provide further insight into  the geologic history of the Courbet Peninsula.  In partic ular, this study will address the proposed theory that the Courbet Peninsula is a single volcanic unit (Nougier, 1970).  Finally, the isotopic compositions of the Baie Charrier basalts pres ented in this study yield information about the isotopic composition of their plume source.   This study therefore provides additional Chapter 1: Introduction  4 constraints on the source composition of the Kerguelen mantle plume and the various components that generate its enriched features.      Chapter 2: Geologic Setting of  the Kerguelen Archipelago   5 2 . 1 Geologic History of th e Kerguele n Mantle Plume The formation of the Kerguelen Plateau, in  the southern Indian Ocean, has been attributed to hotspot volcanism from the Ke rguelen mantle plume.  Volcanic activity associated with this plume began approxi mately 130 million years ago, following the break-up of Gondwana, when seafloor spread ing was initiated between India, Australia and Antarctica (Frey et al., 2000; Coffin et al., 2002).  During this time, the plume produced ~2.5 x 10 7  km 3  of basaltic magma (Coffin et al. , 2002), creating the world’s second largest oceanic plateau and significantl y altering the physiographic character of the Indian Ocean (Fig. 2.1).   The Southern Kerguelen Plateau formed between ~120 and ~110 Ma, followed by the formation of the Central Kerguelen Plat eau between ~105 and ~100 Ma and Broken Ridge at ~95 Ma (Duncan, 2002; Coffin et al., 2002).   This initial pulse of voluminous magmatism is interpreted to represent the arri val of the plume head at the base of the Indian Ocean lithosphere (Frey et al., 2000).  Subsequently, the plume was associated with a mid-ocean ridge, resulting in the formation of the Ninetyeast Ridge (Weis et al., 1991).  At a length of over 5000 km, this ridge is the longest linear feature on Earth.  The ages of the basalts that comprise the ridge progressively increase in age from 38 Ma in the south to 82 Ma in the north (Duncan, 1991).  Thus, the ridge is inferred to represent the trace of the Kerguelen hotspot, created as  the Indian Plate moved northwards over the plume stem (Weis et al., 1992).  At ~40 Ma, the Southeas t Indian Ridge began to migrate towards the northwest, presumably cause d by relatively rapid motion between the Australian and Antarctic plates (Mutter & Cande, 1983).  This event was followed by the formation of the Northern Kerguelen Pl ateau and Kerguelen Archipelago and the separation of Broken Ridge from th e Central Kerguelen Plateau (Frey et al., 2000; Coffin Chapter 2: Geologic Setting of  the Kerguelen Archipelago   6 et al., 2002).  Thus, the Kerguele n Archipelago initially formed in a ridge-centered setting and later adopted an intr aplate setting on the relatively  stationary Antarctic Plate, where it has remained.     F ig . 2.1.   Indian Ocean bathymetric map (Smith & Sandwell, 1997).  Shown are features produced by volcanism from the Kerguelen mantle plume, including the Ninetyeast Ridge, Broken Ridge, Kerguelen Plateau, and Kerguelen Archipelago.  The recent volcanic history of the Kerguelen mantle plume has been varied and diffuse.  There have been historic erupti ons at Heard and McDonald Islands, located ~440 km southeast of the ar chipelago, and there is curr ent volcanism at McDonald Island.  However, Eocene and younger lavas have been found on both Heard Island and the Kerguelen Archipelago.  This record of vol canism has raised considerable uncertainty over the current location of the hotspot.   Plate reconstruction models have placed the hotspot to the west of the archipelago in or der to match the Ninetyeast Ridge (Duncan & N i n e t y e a s t Ridge Broken Ridge  Kerguelen  Pla tea u Kerguele n Archipe l a g o  Chapter 2: Geologic Setting of  the Kerguelen Archipelago   7 Storey, 1992; Steinberger, 2000).  However,  drilling at ODP Site 1139 revealed the basalts to be 68 Ma (Duncan, 2002), thus ruling out this area as the location of the current hotspot.  The record of recent volcanism, including 18-21 Ma seamounts between the Kerguelen Archipelago and Heard Island (Weis et al., 2002), suggests that  the hotspot is located beneath Heard Island.  A recent study involving paleomagnetics and numerical modelling has proposed that the Kerguelen hotsp ot has migrated southwards between 3º and 10º during the last  100 Myr (Antretter et al., 2002).    2.2 Geology of the Kerguelen Archipelago   The Kerguelen Archipelago is a 6500 km 2 assemblage of islands that represent the emergent part of the Northern Kerguelen Plateau (Fig. 2.2).  Seismic studies have determined that the crust beneath the archip elago is 15-20 km thick, anomalously thicker than normal oceanic crust (Recq et al., 1994; Charvis et al., 1995).  This crust does not possess any low-velocity zones, which result from the presence of continental material, suggesting that the crust underlying the ar chipelago is entirely oceanic (Recq et al., 1994; Charvis et al., 1995).         Over ~85% of the archipelago is covered by transitional-tholeiitic and mildly alkalic flood basalts (e.g. Nougier, 1970; Weis et al., 1993; Frey et al., 2000).  These basalt flows are generally 1-5 m thick and dip ge ntly to the southeast at  an angle of 2-3º.  The archipelago was heavily glaciated duri ng the Quaternary, erodi ng 1-2 km of basalt and incising deep glacial valleys that now expose basaltic sequences up to 1000 m thick. The archipelago also contains isolated silici c and gabbroic plutonic co mplexes, ranging in age from 25 Ma to <1 Ma (Weis & Giret, 1994).   Chapter 2: Geologic Setting of  the Kerguelen Archipelago   8 The basalts on the archipelago can be br oadly divided into three groups based on their age and composition.  The Loranchet Pe ninsula in the northwest and the Plateau Central are comprised of tholeiitic-transitional basalts with ages ranging from 26-29 Ma (Yang et al., 1998; Nicolaysen et al., 2000; Doucet et al., 2002; Frey et al., 2002).  The Southeast Province is younger, with 25 Ma ba salts of mildly alkalic composition (Weis et al., 1993; Frey et al., 2000).  The basalts of the Courbet Peninsula ar e also mildly alkalic, but are slightly younger, with ages of 24 Ma (Nicolaysen et al., 2000).  The transition to more alkaline volcanism is thought to refl ect a decrease in partial melting and magma supply, possibly due to the anomalously thick lithosphere that under lies the archipelago (Weis et al., 1998; Frey et al., 2000; Damasceno et al., 2002).     F ig . 2.2.   Satellite photo of the Kerguelen Arch ipelago.  Shown are the 26-29 Ma transitional-tholeiitic Loranchet Peninsula and Plateau Central to the west and the 24-25 Ma mildly alkalic Courbet Peninsula and the Southeast Province to the east.  Pla tea u Central  Courbet Penin s u l a Southeast Prov i n c e  Loranc h e t Penin s u l a Chapter 2: Geologic Setting of  the Kerguelen Archipelago   9 2 . 3 Geology of the Courbet Peninsul a  The Courbet Peninsula is located in the northeast part of the Kerguelen Archipelago (Fig. 2.2).  The peninsula comprise s approximately 1/5 of the overall area of the archipelago, with an area of ~1300 km 2 (Fig. 2.3).  The peninsula can be divided into three distinct regions (Nougier, 1970).  To the west is a 450 km 2 mountainous region that has experienced intense glacial erosion, resulting in the formation of deep glacial valleys.  This region is predominantly comprised of  volcanic rocks, and includes the 1000 m Mt. Crozier basaltic section.  To the east is a 780 km 2 low-lying swampy region composed of glacial moraine deposits, which overlie the basalt ic basement.  To the southeast is a small 40 km 2 peninsula composed of alkalic basa lts, basanites, and phonolites.     The volcanic region of the Courbet Penins ula is composed primarily of near- horizontal layers of basal tic lava flows and pyrocla stic deposits.  A 1000 m high stratigraphic section on the nor theast flank of Mt. Crozie r, from Val Studer to the summit, was sampled for detailed petrographi c and geochemical stud ies in 1993 (Scoates et al., in preparation).  The Crozier section consists of variably porphyritic flows dominated by plagioclase, with minor clinopyroxene, olivin e and Fe-Ti oxides (Damasceno et al., 2002).  Clinopyroxene-liquid th ermobarometry and clinopyroxene structural barometry indicate th at the Crozier magmas crystallized at pressures ranging from 1 to 12 kbar (Damasceno et al., 2002).  Mt. Crozier is on e of the most important sections on the archipelago, as  it is interpreted to be re presentative of the enriched component of the Kerguelen plume (Weis et al., 2002). Large plutons, as well as thin dikes and si lls, locally intrude the volcanic region of the Courbet Peninsula.  Montagnes Vertes a nd Monts des Mamelles ar e two of the largest intrusions.  They are located in the center of the volcanic region (Fig. 2.3), having been Chapter 2: Geologic Setting of  the Kerguelen Archipelago   10 exposed by glacial erosion.  Nougier (1970) s uggested that the Cour bet Peninsula is a single volcanic unit and that these intrusions  represent its sub-volcan ic conduit system.  A considerable region of volcanic breccia can  be found in the northwest part of the peninsula.  Seismic studies have revealed  the existence of high-density material underlying this breccia, which may be due to the presence of a larg e, shallow intrusive body in the subsurface (Charvis et al., 1995).      F ig . 2.3.  Simplified geologic map of the Courbet Peninsula.  Note the mountainous volcanic region to the west and the region covered by glacial deposits to the east.  Note also the intrusive complexes in the center, the high-density zone in the northwest, and the location of the Mt. Crozier and Baie Charrier stratigraphic sections.    Baie Charri er Mt. Crozi er Chapter 2: Geologic Setting of  the Kerguelen Archipelago   11 2 . 4 The Baie Charrier Stratigra p hi c Section Baie Charrier is located on the northern part of the Courbet Peninsula (Fig. 2.3).  Basalt flows in this area are typical of those found in other parts of the archipelago, as they are relatively thin and approximately hori zontal.  The distinctive phenocryst content of the Baie Charrier basalts is  of particular interest, and one  of the main motivations for studying this section.  Olivine and clinopyroxe ne-phyric basalts are abundant in this section, yet absent in th e 1000 m Mt. Crozier section. Samples were collected as part of th e CartoKer Mapping Program in 1994.  In total, 33 samples (MM94-228 to MM94-260) we re collected from a 325 m high section of basaltic flows.  The lowest sample was obt ained from an elevation of 85 metres above sea level and the highest was obtained from  410 m.  These flows ranged in thickness from 2-15 m, with an average of approxima tely 5.5 m.  The samples collected were identified in the field as either aphyric or c ontaining combinations of olivine, plagioclase or pyroxene phenocrysts.  The pr esence of local zeolite alteration was also noted in some samples.      Of the 33 samples from the Baie Charrier  section, 15 were selected for detailed geochemical analyses based on freshness, st ratigraphic position and phenocryst content.  These samples encompass a range of eleva tions, including the stra tigraphically highest and lowest samples.  Of these 15 samples, 10 polished thin sections were prepared, 8 were selected for mineral chemistry, and 11 were selected for isotopic analysis (see Chapter 3: Analytical Techniques).      Chapter 3: Analytical Techniques   12 3.1 Mineral Chemistry Eight samples were selected for electronprobe microanalysis of olivine and clinopyroxene phenocryst compositions.  The other two samples, MM94-230 and MM94- 244, were not analysed as they do not contain clinopyroxene phenocrysts and the olivines are completely replaced by iddingsite, a common low temperature alteration product.  Between 3 and 6 phenocrysts of olivine from each thin section were selected.  Clinopyroxene phenocrysts were also chosen when present.  Selection of a particular crystal was based mainly on degree of alteration; the crystals chosen showed minimal alteration and were isolated (i.e. not bordering other crystals).  Core, mid, and rim positions on the crystal were carefully chosen.  A clear spot, free of inclusions and fractures was required for analysis of mineral composition.  Probe traverses were mapped onto the thin sections, which were subsequently carbon-coated prior to analysis.   The phenocrysts were analyzed on a Cameca SX-50 electron microprobe at the University of British Columbia with an accelerating voltage of 15 kV, a beam current of 15 nA, a peak count time of 20 s, and a background count time of 10 s.  Calibration was made with natural olivine and clinopyroxene standards.  Data reduction was made with a PAP φ(ρz) correction procedure.  In total, 102 olivine analyses (34 phenocrysts) and 15 clinopyroxene analyses (5 phenocrysts) were completed.  Mineral compositions for olivine and clinopyroxene are reported in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively.    3 . 2 Previous Whole Rock Sample Preparat i o n   Initial sample preparation was carried out at the Université Libre de Bruxelles in Belgium.  The samples were cut using a diamond-embedded saw to remove surface alteration.  The cut surface was then abraded with sandpaper to eliminate any saw traces Chapter 3: Analytical Techniques   13 or residual alteration.  The samples were coarse-crushed in a hydraulic piston  crusher between WC-plates using the percussion method (no grinding).  The samples were subsequently reduced to powder in an agate planetary mill.  3.3  M a j o r Eleme n t Composi t i o n s    All 15 samples were analysed for major element compositions and some trace elements (Rb, Sr, Ba, V, Cr, Ni, Zn, Ga, Y, Zr, Nb, Ce and La) by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst (see Rhodes, 1996 for analytical procedure).  Major and trace element compositions by XRF are the mean of duplicate analyses and are reported in Table 3.1.   3 . 4 Trace Element Concentra t i o n s Samples were prepared and analysed at the Pacific Centre for Isotopic and Geochemical Research (PCIGR) of the University of British Columbia.  The procedure involved loading, digesting, and diluting the samples in preparation for analysis by High- Resolution Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS).  Trace element abundances by HR-ICP-MS are reported in Table 3.1.      3.4.1 Loading Approximately 0.1 g of each sample were weighed into clean 15 ml Savillex® vials using a Mettler Toledo balance.  Fifteen samples were loaded plus the U.S.G.S. reference materials BCR-1 (Basalt, Columbia River) and BHVO-1 (Basalt, Hawaiian Volcanic Observatory).  Replicates of both reference materials and two samples chosen at random were loaded to monitor the accuracy and reproducibility of the analytical Chapter 3: Analytical Techniques   14 techniques.  Two procedural blanks were also included to detect any contamination during the sample preparation.    3.4.2 Digestion  To dissolve the powders, 2 ml of concentrated sub-boiled HF and 500 µl of concentrated Seastar® HNO3 were added.  The samples were sealed and placed on a hotplate for 48 hours at a temperature of approximately 120 ºC.  Twice during this time interval, the samples were placed in an ultra-sonic bath for 15 minutes to ensure complete dissolution of the powder.  The samples were then uncapped and placed on a hotplate to dry down.  Once dry, 2 ml of Seastar® concentrated HNO3 were added.  After 24 hours on the hotplate, the samples were again allowed to dry down.  Approximately 4 g of 1% HNO3 with 1 ppb Indium (In) were added using the Mettler Toledo balance.  The samples were placed on a hotplate for 24 hours.  Twice during this time interval, the samples were placed in an ultra-sonic bath for 15 minutes to ensure complete redissolution.    3.4.3 Dilution The samples were then transferred to clean 125 ml HDPE sample bottles.  Two separate dilutions were carried out.  Samples were diluted to 1000x for the rare earth elements, and to 2000x for the high field strength elements.  They were first diluted to 1000 times their initial weight with 1% HNO3 with 1 ppb In using the Mettler Toledo balance.  A portion of this diluted mixture was transferred to clean 60 ml HDPE sample bottles and subsequently diluted to 2000x.  Various amounts of concentrated HCl were added to each of the 2000x dilutions so that the resulting solutions would have a concentration of 1% HCl. Chapter 3: Analytical Techniques   15 3.4.4 Trace Element Analysis by High-Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass  Spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS)  The samples were analysed on the Element2 (Finnigan MAT) HR-ICP-MS at the PCIGR at the University of British Columbia.  The rare earth elements were measured in high resolution, while Pb and U were measured in low resolution.  The majority of the high field strength elements were measured in medium resolution, with the exception of Cd, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ta, W, and Bi, which were also measured in low resolution.  Using higher resolution enables potential interferences to be resolved, while using lower resolution enables the measurement of less abundant elements through increased instrument sensitivity.  A series of 6 standards, obtained by series dilution from 1000 ppm High Purity® stock standard solutions using 1% HNO3 with 1 ppb In, were used for external calibration and concentration calculation.  Procedural blank values were in the parts-per-trillion (ppt) range, and are considered negligible in comparison to the sample concentrations, which are in the parts-per-million (ppm) range.   When performing analyses by HR-ICP-MS, memory effects, sensitivity drift, and mass drift must be monitored and, if present, corrected for.  A solution of 4% Aqua regia + 0.05% HF was used to rinse the instrument between each sample to minimize memory effects from the previously analysed sample.  Background values were checked periodically during the course of analysis, especially after high abundance samples or standards, to detect and correct for memory effects.  Indium, which is spiked at 1 ppb in all blank, standard, and sample solutions, was used as an internal standard to monitor and correct for sensitivity drift.  Low level (5 ppb) REE standard solutions were run after every fifth or sixth sample to detect and correct for instrumental mass drift.   Chapter 3: Analytical Techniques   16 3 . 5 Pb-Sr-Nd Isotopi c Compositio n s 3.5.1 Sample Selection The amount of weight loss on ignition (LOI), coupled with petrographic observation, were significant factors in determining which samples would be selected for isotopic analysis.  LOI was used as an indication of alteration, and a maximum value of 2.75 wt.% LOI was decided upon.  Samples with LOI above this value were dismissed as possible candidates for isotopic work due to their greater degree of alteration.  The choice of this value also took into consideration the need to encompass the observed variation in MgO and Zr/Nb (see Chapter 4: Results).  Samples from the stratigraphic top and bottom of the section were also selected.   3.5.2 Loading Samples for isotopic compositions were prepared and analysed at the PCIGR at the University of British Columbia.  The procedure involved loading, leaching and digesting the samples followed by column chemistry and analysis by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) and Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS).  In total, 11 samples were loaded, plus two replicates, and one procedural blank.  For samples with greater than 2 ppm Pb, approximately 400 mg of powder was added to a clean 15 ml Savillex® vial using a Mettler Toledo balance.  For samples with less than 2 ppm Pb, approximately 800 mg of powder was added to ensure enough Pb would remain for analysis after leaching and column chemistry.    3.5.3 Leaching The samples were acid-leached (Weis & Frey, 1991) to remove any secondary Chapter 3: Analytical Techniques   17 alteration products such as zeolites and carbonates, which are typically found in basalts from the Kerguelen Archipelago.  Approximately 10 ml of 6N quartz-distilled HCl were added to each vial.  The samples were placed in an ultra-sonic bath for 15 minutes.  The supernatant fluid was then discarded.  This procedure was repeated until the supernatant fluid was clear.  A few of the samples were finished after 9 repetitions, but most required 11 repetitions.  Approximately 10 ml of doubly-deionized water (DDW) were then added to each vial.  After 10 minutes in an ultra-sonic bath, the supernatant fluid was discarded and the samples were placed on a hotplate to dry down.  Once dry, the samples were weighed to determine how much powder remained after the leaching process.  To ensure the samples were completely dry, they were placed back on the hotplate for 30 minutes and then re-weighed.  The samples were considered dry when the weight of the sample remained constant.  On average, 215 mg of sample was lost during the leaching process, corresponding to between 25% and 50% of the initial weight.   3.5.4 Digestion Approximately 1-2 ml of sub-boiled concentrated HNO3 and 8-9 ml of sub-boiled concentrated HF were added to each of the leached samples.  The Savillex® vials were sealed and placed on a hotplate for 48 hours at a temperature of approximately 110 ºC.  Once during this time interval, the samples were placed in an ultra-sonic bath for 15 minutes.  After the samples had dried down on the hotplate, approximately 10 ml of quartz-distilled 6N HCl were added, and they were placed back on the hotplate for 48 hours.  Twice during this time interval, the samples were placed in an ultra-sonic bath for 15 minutes.  The vials were once again uncapped and allowed to dry down on the hotplate. Chapter 3: Analytical Techniques   18 3.5.5 Pb Column Chemistry Pb separation chemistry was carried out using six 1.5 cm Pb anion exchange columns containing Biorad® AG1-X8 100-200 mesh chloride-form resin and Frits filters.  This procedure involves adding either acid or doubly-deionized water (DDW) to the columns by pipette and allowing the liquids to drain through into waste trays or Savillex® vials.  It should be noted that each solution was allowed to drain though completely before the next solution was added.  As well, when adding the solutions, care was taken to minimize the disturbance of the resin.    To properly condition the columns, 1 ml each of the following were added: DDW, 0.5N HBr, 6N HCl, DDW, 0.5N HBr, 6N HCl, DDW, 0.5N HBr (Table 3.2).  These solutions were allowed to drain through and were collected in waste trays.  To prepare the samples, 2 ml of HBr were added to each.  The vials were placed on a hotplate for about 5 minutes, and then placed in an ultra-sonic bath for 5 minutes.  After ensuring complete re-dissolution, the acid mixture was carefully transferred to 5 ml centrifuge tubes and placed in a centrifuge for 6 minutes.  The samples, in 2 ml HBr, were then transferred to the columns by pipette, ensuring that any material that had settled was not incorporated.  To each column, 1 ml 0.5N HBr was added followed by 0.5 ml 0.5N HBr.  The liquid that drained through the columns following the addition of these last two acids was collected in 15 ml Savillex® vials.  This liquid contained the Sr and rare earth elements  (REE), and was thus retained for future Sr and Nd isotope chemistry.  The Pb was collected in 7 ml Savillex® vials after the addition of 1 ml of 6N HCl.  All vials were then placed on a hotplate to dry down.   Chapter 3: Analytical Techniques   19 3.5.6 Sr Column Chemistry Sr and REE separation chemistry was carried out using six 15 cm Sr cation exchange columns containing Biorad® AG-50W-X8 100-200 mesh hydrogen-form resin.    To each sample collected from the Pb columns containing the Sr and REE that were subsequently dried, 5 ml of 1.5N HCL were added.  The vials were placed on a hotplate for about 5 minutes, and then placed in an ultra-sonic bath for 5 minutes.  After ensuring complete re-dissolution, the acid mixture was carefully transferred to 5 ml centrifuge tubes and placed in a centrifuge for 6 minutes.  The samples, in 5 ml 1.5N HCl, were then transferred to the columns by pipette (Table 3.3).  Subsequently, 1 ml of 1.5N HCl was added, followed by 50 ml of 2.5N HCl.  The liquid that drained through was collected in waste trays.  The Sr was collected in plastic beakers following the addition of 35 ml 2.5N  HCl and 10 ml 4N HCl.  Next, 13 ml 4N HCl were added and collected in the waste trays.  The REE were collected in plastic beakers following the addition of 40 ml 4N HCl.  The columns were then cleaned with one full reservoir (100ml) of 6N HCl and another of 1.5N HCl.  The beakers containing the Sr and REE were placed on a hotplate to dry down.  3.5.7  Nd Column Chemistry Nd separation chemistry was carried out using six quartz columns containing Teflon (PTFE) beads coated with di-2 ethylhexylorthophosphoric acid (HDEHP).    These beads, when coated with this particular organic compound, can be used as an ion exchange medium (Cheatham, 1996).  To each sample collected from the Sr columns, containing the REE, 0.5 ml 0.16N HCl was added.  The samples were then placed in an ultra-sonic bath for 5 minutes, and then transferred to the columns by pipette (Table 3.4).  Chapter 3: Analytical Techniques   20 Subsequently, 0.5 ml 0.16N HCl was added to the columns.  This step was repeated three times, followed by 2 ml of 0.16N HCl, with the resulting liquids that drained through collected in waste trays.  The Nd was collected in Savillex® vials following the addition of 4 ml 0.16N HCl.  The columns were then cleaned three times with 10 ml 6N HCl and twice with 10 ml 0.16N HCl.  The vials containing the Nd were placed on a hotplate to dry down.      3.5.8 Pb Isotopic Analysis by Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass  Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS)  Each sample was dissolved in 1 ml of 0.05M HNO3.  A 100 µl aliquot was taken from this solution and diluted by adding 1.9 ml of 1% HNO3 with 1 ppb In.  These samples were analysed on the Element2 ICP-MS to determine the content of Pb in each sample.  Depending on the amount of Pb in each sample, aliquots of between 25% and 100 % were taken from the remaining 0.9 ml solutions and diluted to 2 ml with 0.05M HNO3.  This was to ensure that a minimum 2V 208Pb signal would be exceeded in all the samples during analysis.  The samples were spiked with a solution of 5 ppm Thallium (Tl) obtained by dilution from a concentrated Tl Specpure® atomic absorption spectroscopy standard solution.  For every ng of Pb present in the samples, 0.25 ng of Tl was added to achieve a Pb/Tl ratio of 4, which is critical for proper correction for mass fractionation.    The samples were analysed on the Nu Instruments Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS at the PCIGR at the University of British Columbia.  The Nu Plasma offers high precision and high sensitivity Pb isotopic analyses.  A desolvation nebulizer (DSN) was used with a nebulizer pressure of 37 psi, hot gas flow of 0.23 L/min, and membrane gas flow of 3.01 Chapter 3: Analytical Techniques   21 L/min.  Membrane and spray temperatures were 110 ºC.  The uptake rate of the Glass Expansion Micromist nebulizer was between 150-160 µl/min.   Before any samples were analysed, a batch of 5 NBS 981 (50 ppb) Pb standards were run.  This standard was subsequently analysed after every 2 samples and twice at the end.  This standard-sample bracketing was used to monitor and correct for instrumental drift during the course of analyses.  After each sample or standard, the uptake tube was rinsed in doubly-deionized water and placed in 3% HNO3.  After each standard, the tube was additionally placed in 10% HNO3.  During the washing, the background intensity of 208Pb was monitored for a period of ~5 minutes.  When an acceptable background intensity was reached (<2 mV) and no further decrease observed, the uptake tube was placed in 0.05M HNO3 to equilibrate the system prior to analysis. Pb isotopic compositions were measured in the static mode with an interference correction for 204Hg.  Pb compositions in each sample are derived from the mean of 60 analyses (3 blocks of 20 cycles) and are reported in Table 3.5.  Pb isotopic data was corrected for mass fractionation using 205Tl/203Tl = 2.3885.  Average triple spike values for NBS 981 were 206Pb/204Pb = 16.9423 + 0.0017 (2sd), 207Pb/204Pb = 15.4980 + 0.0015 (2sd), and 208Pb/204Pb = 36.7188 + .0.0041 (2sd).  These values fall within 2σ error of the accepted triple spike values (206Pb/204Pb = 16.9405, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.4963, and 208Pb/204Pb = 36.7219) (Galer & Abouchami, 1998).  The procedural blank contained 150 + 1 pg Pb, which is negligible in comparison to the Pb content of the samples.  3.5.9 Sr and Nd Isotopic Analysis by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) The Sr samples were dissolved in 1M H3PO4, and 2 µl of this solution was loaded onto single Ta filaments.  The Nd samples were dissolved in 0.1M H3PO4, and 2 µl were Chapter 3: Analytical Techniques   22 loaded onto double Re-Ta filaments.  To load ~400 ng Sr and ~150 ng Nd onto the filaments, every 200 ng of Sr required dilution by 1 µl of 1M H3PO4, while every 75 ng of Nd required 1 µl of 0.1M H3PO4.  Therefore, to determine how much 1M or 0.1M H3PO4 to add, the amount of Sr and Nd in the sample had to be calculated.  The initial amount of Sr and Nd prior to column chemistry was calculated by knowing the weight of the sample and the concentration of Sr and Nd in the sample, measured previously by HR-ICP-MS.  The amount of Sr and Nd lost through column chemistry was then subtracted from this initial value.  Sample loss is assumed to be 15% for each set of columns (Doucet et al., 2002).  Thus, 72.3% of the initial Sr remained after passing through Pb and Sr columns, and 61.4% Nd remained after Pb, Sr, and Nd columns.   The samples were analysed on the Thermo Finnigan Triton-TI TIMS at the PCIGR at the University of British Columbia.  Sr and Nd isotopic compositions were measured in the static mode with relay matrix rotation.  Sr and Nd compositions in each sample are the mean of 135 analyses (9 blocks of 15 cycles) and are reported in Table 3.6.  During the course of analyses, 10 analyses of the NBS 987 Sr standard and 10 analyses of the La Jolla Nd standard were made, with mean values of 87Sr/86Sr = 0.710252 + 0.000007 (2sd) and 143Nd/ 144Nd = 0.511853 + 0.000004 (2sd), respectively.  These are within the range of accepted values.  Sr isotopic data were corrected for mass fractionation using 86Sr/88Sr = 0.1194, while Nd isotopic data were corrected using 146Nd/144Nd = 0.7219.  Procedural blanks contained 427 pg Sr and 69 pg Nd, which are negligible in comparison to the Sr and Nd content of the samples.     Elevation (m): 85 95 100 135 165 175 190 250 Sample: MM94-238 MM94-237 MM94-236 MM94-233 MM94-231 MM94-230 MM94-229 † MM94-258 SiO 2 47.83 48.13 46.93 48.08 48.35 47.26 51.34 48.49 TiO 2 2.73 2.31 2.46 2.74 3.14 2.75 2.47 3.11 Al 2 O 3 14.57 14.86 14.79 14.70 16.48 17.65 15.97 16.62 Fe 2 O 3 12.42 12.61 13.01 12.46 13.58 12.99 12.98 12.48 MnO 0.17 0.17 0.18 0.18 0.17 0.17 0.20 0.17 MgO 8.41 8.70 9.26 8.26 3.95 5.41 3.12 4.58 CaO 8.97 8.43 8.61 9.08 7.63 9.17 6.60 8.79 Na 2 O 2.56 2.52 2.27 2.52 3.64 3.11 4.28 3.58 K 2 O 1.61 1.54 1.52 1.66 2.01 1.14 2.26 1.47 P 2 O 5 0.53 0.53 0.55 0.53 1.06 0.35 1.04 0.46 Total 99.80 99.80 99.58 100.21 100.01 100.00 100.26 99.75 LOI ‡ 2.65 3.26 3.10 2.25 2.95 -0.08 1.67 1.89 Sc ICP 24.7 18.5 18.8 24.7 16.9 21.5 16.8 20.2 V XRF 196 151 169 199 140 225 83 243 Cr XRF 235 306 321 238 2 99 1 33 Co ICP 50.9 50.0 54.5 50.4 36.9 51.4 26.7 38.1 Ni XRF 179 180 206 163 19 69 1 32 Zn XRF 117 105 115 116 124 101 148 111 Ga XRF 20 19 21 21 22 20 25 24 Rb ICP 34.5 29.5 27.9 35.4 43.8 20.4 48.4 29.4 Sr XRF 518 655 709 559 625 600 466 533 Ba ICP 343 369 405 351 459 271 499 337 Y XRF 25.4 20.9 19.8 25.5 32.2 19.6 42.9 23.5 Zr XRF 282 229 225 286 308 164 377 230 Hf ICP 5.52 4.44 4.48 5.73 5.87 3.60 7.64 4.90 Nb ICP 44.0 34.0 35.4 43.4 47.7 23.7 57.2 34.3 Ta ICP 2.41 1.78 1.88 2.44 2.56 1.31 3.21 2.00 La ICP 36.6 30.8 32.2 37.1 46.2 19.4 51.4 29.3 Ce ICP 77.8 65.6 72.0 79.8 99.4 42.3 112.7 66.7 Pr ICP 8.71 7.47 8.66 9.27 12.13 4.79 13.36 7.73 Nd ICP 34.6 31.3 34.6 36.0 49.8 21.2 54.1 31.7 Sm ICP 7.23 6.40 6.98 7.34 10.14 4.81 11.19 6.86 Eu ICP 2.46 2.23 2.35 2.43 3.40 1.67 3.61 2.40 Tb ICP 1.06 0.91 0.94 1.05 1.30 0.77 1.53 1.03 Gd ICP 7.10 6.15 6.50 6.95 9.26 5.01 10.50 6.88 Dy ICP 5.15 4.16 4.26 5.14 6.38 3.89 7.92 4.73 Ho ICP 0.96 0.82 0.79 0.98 1.23 0.71 1.51 0.93 Er ICP 2.47 1.94 1.83 2.43 3.03 1.78 3.94 2.35 Yb ICP 2.25 1.80 1.74 2.30 2.64 1.65 3.44 2.13 Lu ICP 0.27 0.21 0.19 0.27 0.32 0.25 0.46 0.26 Pb ICP 3.80 3.15 3.00 3.71 3.75 2.26 4.46 3.14 Th ICP 4.99 3.49 3.42 5.01 4.75 2.26 6.02 3.91 U ICP 2.54 2.26 2.21 2.54 2.22 2.20 2.61 2.20 Table 3.1: Major and trace element abundances in basaltic lavas from the Baie Charrier section (major element oxides in wt.%; trace elements in ppm)Table 3.1: continued Elevation (m): 275 283 290 310 355 375 410 Sample: MM94-256 MM94-255 MM94-253 MM94-250 MM94-244 † MM94-242 MM94-240 SiO 2 47.80 47.54 47.75 48.20 49.44 48.99 46.83 TiO 2 2.11 1.90 2.07 3.03 3.54 2.57 1.61 Al 2 O 3 14.41 14.40 14.41 17.43 16.27 15.62 9.83 Fe 2 O 3 12.78 12.69 12.65 11.78 11.94 12.32 12.29 MnO 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.18 MgO 9.34 10.02 9.73 4.38 4.32 6.33 16.69 CaO 9.91 9.93 9.64 7.92 8.72 9.61 10.22 Na 2 O 2.59 2.49 2.18 3.68 3.20 2.64 1.20 K 2 O 0.74 0.58 0.68 2.35 1.99 1.25 0.62 P 2 O 5 0.26 0.21 0.24 0.79 0.55 0.38 0.19 Total 100.12 99.94 99.53 99.73 100.14 99.88 99.66 LOI ‡ 1.48 0.07 2.74 0.83 3.74 2.28 0.82 Sc ICP 27.2 29.4 28.3 12.2 22.3 26.7 32.0 V XRF 229 219 220 154 238 231 190 Cr XRF 455 511 453 8 33 149 925 Co ICP 54.5 61.2 57.0 32.8 33.1 42.7 79.1 Ni XRF 186 214 191 11 36 77 482 Zn XRF 102 95 98 122 115 105 96 Ga XRF 20 19 20 24 24 22 13 Rb ICP 13.0 11.1 10.9 48.2 37.5 22.8 12.6 Sr XRF 355 321 323 870 513 468 441 Ba ICP 176 134 156 539 379 265 144 Y XRF 19.1 17.5 18.1 25.2 28.4 25.9 15.2 Zr XRF 129 112 122 362 279 210 105 Hf ICP 3.00 2.43 2.64 6.56 5.69 4.43 2.28 Nb ICP 15.7 13.6 15.2 62.0 43.9 29.3 17.1 Ta ICP 0.91 0.68 0.79 3.46 2.43 1.66 0.89 La ICP 13.7 10.8 11.5 52.9 38.6 26.0 13.7 Ce ICP 31.5 25.6 28.4 114.4 83.7 59.6 29.0 Pr ICP 3.85 3.12 3.38 12.54 9.83 7.12 3.35 Nd ICP 17.6 14.6 16.1 47.6 39.5 29.3 15.7 Sm ICP 4.12 3.41 3.66 8.98 8.16 6.24 3.41 Eu ICP 1.44 1.22 1.28 2.96 2.70 2.14 1.15 Tb ICP 0.70 0.62 0.64 1.10 1.16 1.01 0.62 Gd ICP 4.53 3.83 4.03 7.78 7.75 6.45 4.03 Dy ICP 3.66 3.28 3.27 5.34 5.80 5.05 2.89 Ho ICP 0.72 0.64 0.64 0.94 1.08 1.00 0.61 Er ICP 1.78 1.59 1.53 2.30 2.72 2.59 1.43 Yb ICP 1.59 1.46 1.44 2.09 2.52 2.41 1.38 Lu ICP 0.18 0.16 0.14 0.24 0.31 0.31 0.14 Pb ICP 1.65 1.31 1.50 5.26 3.75 2.69 1.38 Th ICP 1.44 1.07 1.23 6.63 4.59 3.08 1.55 U ICP 1.45 1.47 1.37 3.07 2.04 2.16 1.69 † Compositions are the mean of replicate analyses. ‡ LOI is the weight loss on ignition after 30 minutes at 1020 °C.Table 3.2: Pb isotopic compositions in basaltic lavas from the Baie Charrier section Elevation Sample 206 Pb/ 204 Pb 2sd 207 Pb/ 204 Pb 2sd 208 Pb/ 204 Pb 2sd 85 MM94-238 18.4888 0.0016 15.5554 0.0013 39.1310 0.0035 135 MM94-233 18.4905 0.0009 15.5553 0.0008 39.1363 0.0022 175 MM94-230 † 18.386502 0.0011 15.5551 0.0011 38.9512 0.0027 190 MM94-229 18.5168 0.0010 15.5637 0.0014 39.1392 0.0046 250 MM94-258 18.4508 0.0008 15.5559 0.0008 39.0529 0.0024 275 MM94-256 18.2011 0.0010 15.5340 0.0010 38.6643 0.0043 283 MM94-255 18.3499 0.0010 15.5379 0.0009 38.7624 0.0023 290 MM94-253 † 18.1923 0.0017 15.5370 0.0017 38.6762 0.0046 310 MM94-250 18.5861 0.0009 15.5797 0.0008 39.2252 0.0021 375 MM94-242 18.5942 0.0013 15.5704 0.0011 39.2464 0.0032 410 MM94-240 18.6419 0.0011 15.5769 0.0010 39.2493 0.0026 † Compositions are the mean of replicate analyses.Elevation Sample 87 Sr/ 86 Sr 2sd 143 Nd/ 144 Nd 2sd 85 MM94-238 0.705237 0.000008 0.512625 0.000005 135 MM94-233 0.705237 0.000007 0.512623 0.000007 175 MM94-230 † 0.7050815 0.000008 0.512632 0.000008 190 MM94-229 0.705239 0.000007 0.512624 0.000007 250 MM94-258 0.705114 0.000008 0.512649 0.000006 275 MM94-256 0.704860 0.000007 0.512664 0.000006 283 MM94-255 0.704965 0.000008 0.512685 0.000010 290 MM94-253 † 0.7051885 0.000008 0.5126665 0.000010 310 MM94-250 0.705178 0.000007 0.512590 0.000007 375 MM94-242 0.705163 0.000007 0.512635 0.000005 410 MM94-240 0.705150 0.000006 0.512621 0.000007 † Compositions are the mean of replicate analyses. Table 3.3: Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in basaltic lavas from the Baie Charrier sectionChapter 4: Results  27 4.1 Stratigraphic Relationships in the Baie Charrier Section The stratigraphy of the Baie Charrier s ection will be discussed to provide a  context for the remainder of the study.  This  will be followed by a detailed description of the geochemical and petrographi c characteristics of the section.  However, it should be noted that this study will focus primarily on th e geochemistry rather than the petrography of the samples. The Baie Charrier section can be subdivid ed into 4 stratigraph ic units (A, B, C, and D) based on their geochemical and petrogr aphic characteristics (Fig. 4.1).  Unit A, the lowermost unit, ranges from the base of  the section to an elevation of 150 m and consists primarily of olivine-phyric basalts.  It was immediately recognized as a separate unit based on the observed enrichment in inco mpatible elements.  The four samples in this unit possess twic e the abundance of P 2O5 , K2O, Zr, Rb, Ba, Ce, and La than other samples at a given MgO content.  This unit is  also relatively MgO-ri ch, with all samples having greater than 8 wt.% MgO.  Unit B ranges in elevation fr om 150 m to 265 m and consists of predominantly plagioclase-phyric ba salts.  The four samples in this unit have lower MgO contents than the previous unit, wi th less than 5.5 wt.% MgO.  These samples also have relatively high alkali nity indexes (A.I. = +1 to + 2.5).  Unit C is a narrow unit ranging in elevation from 265 m to 300 m a nd consists primarily of olivine-phyric basalts.  This is the most geochemically di stinct unit of the section.  The three samples that make up this unit have MgO contents s lightly higher than Unit A, at over 9 wt.% MgO.  They have low alkalinity indexes (~0), with two samples plotting in the tholeiitic field (negative values).  Unit C samples have anomalous incompatible element ratios such as Zr/Nb, (La/Sm) N, and Th/Ta.  This unit is also  isotopically distinct, having the highest 143 Nd/ 144 Nd, low 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios, and the lowest Pb isotopic ratios of the section. Chapter 4: Results  28 Unit D, the uppermost unit, consists of four samples and ranges in elevation from 300 m to the top of the section at 410 m.  Thr ee of the samples have relatively low MgO contents, with less than 6.5 wt.% MgO and are predominantly plagioclase-phyric.  The uppermost sample is a picrite with over 17 wt.% MgO and is oliv ine and clinopyroxene- phyric.  These four samples become progressi vely less alkaline with increasing elevation (A.I. = +2.5 to -1) and have the highes t Pb isotopic ratios of the section. U N I T D C E lev at io n (m ) B A Fig. 4.1. Stratigraphic subdivisions of the Baie Charrier section. The defining petrographic, geochemical and isotopic characteristics of each unit are listed. The thick horizontal black lines indicate the elevations of flows involved in this study.  Corresponding sample numbers are written adjacent to these flows.  High-MgO (>9 wt.%) olivine-phyric basalts                                                                   High Zr/Nb, high (La/Sm) N, low Th/Ta, low alkalinity index (~0)                                  Hig hest 143 Nd/ 144 Nd, Low 87 Sr/ 86 Sr, Lowest Pb isoto pic ratios High-MgO (>8 wt.%) mildy alkalic basalts                                                      Olivine-phyric                                                                                                   Enriched in incompatibles (P 2O5 , K2O, Zr, Rb, Ba, Ce, La)                             Low-MgO (<6.5 wt.%) mildy alkalic basalts                                                    Plagioclase-phyric                                                                                             (except sample 240, which is an olivine and clinopyroxene-phyric picrite)     Becomes less alkaline with increasing elevation (A.I . = +2.5 to -1)                 Highest Pb isotopic ratios                Low-MgO (<5.5 wt.%) mildly alkalic basalts                                                   Plagioclase-phyric                                                                                             High alkalinity index (>1)                                                          238 237 236 233 231 230 229 258 256 255 253 250 244 242 240 150 265 300 410 0Chapter 4: Results  29 4.2 Petrography The Baie Charrier basalts are vari ably porphyritic; all samples contain phenocrysts of olivine, including several sa mples that also contain phenocrysts of plagioclase and clinopyroxene (Fig. 4.2).  O livine is the dominant phenocryst in the high MgO basalts of Units A and C, with a moda l abundance of ~5%.  Crystal habit ranges from euhedral six-sided prisms to rounded, a nhedral crystals.  Crys tal size ranges from 0.25 mm to 5 mm.  Most of the olivine phenocry sts are partially to completely replaced by iddingsite, with alteration typically occurring around the e dges of the crystal and along fractures.   Rarely, the o livines are broken, exhibit undul atory extinction, or are glomerocrystic.  Plagioclase is the dominant  phenocryst in the low MgO basalts of Units B and D, with a modal abundance of ~10% to ~15%.  They are typically euhedral, lath- shaped prisms 1 mm to 6 mm in lengt h.  They commonly exhibit simple and polysynthetic twinning and oscillatory zoni ng.  Occasionally, they exhibit undulatory extinction or are glomerocrystic.  Phenocry sts of clinopyroxene ca n be found in the two stratigraphically highest samples (240 and 242) from Unit D, with a modal abundance of  ~5%.  They range in size from 1 mm to 6 mm.  Some of the clinopyroxene phenocrysts are euhedral 8-sided prisms, while others are anhedral and resorbed.  Most exhibit simple twinning and have very distinct  twin planes.  The groundmass in all samples is generally composed of plagioclase microlites, sma ll euhedral opaques, and occasionally small crystals of olivine and clinopyroxene.  The groundmass also commonly contains greenish-brown botryoidal or radiating zeolite minerals filling interstices and vesicles.     Chapter 4: Results  30                                                Fig. 4.2.  Photomicrographs of phenocrysts from the Baie Charrier basalts.  (a) Euhedral olivine from sample 256, a high-MgO basalt. (b) Large olivine phenocrysts from sample 240, the picrite.  (c) Euhedral clinopyroxene from sample 242.  Note the distinct twin plane.  (d) Large resorbed clinopyroxene from sample 240, the picrite.  (e) Large euhedral plagioclase lath from sample 230, a low-MgO mildly alkalic basalt.  (f) Plagioclase and olivine glomerocrysts from sa mple 242.  All photomicrographs in cross-polars.  Black dots are probe traverses.     D e 1 mm f 1 mm c 1 mm 1 mm  b 1 mm a 250 μm d 1 mmChapter 4: Results  31 4.3 Mineral Chemistry  4.3.1 Olivine The compositional data from the electron microprobe (Appendix A) was converted to forsterite content and plotted ve rsus relative spot position (i.e. core, middle, or rim) on the phenocryst (Fig. 4.3).  The olivine phenocrysts are normally zoned, with the rim having a lower forsterite content than either the middle or the core.  The middle and core of a crystal typically have very si milar forsterite contents.  Core compositions are relatively limited, ranging from Fo 86-70 , while rim compositions vary considerably, ranging from Fo 81-52 .   4.3.2 Clinopyroxene  The compositional data from the electron microprobe (Appendix B) was converted to Mg# cpx  and plotted versus spot position (Fig. 4.4).  The clinopyroxene phenocrysts are normally zoned, with  the rims having a lower Mg# cpx  than either the middles or the cores.  However, the Mg# cpx  continues to increase from rim to core.  Core values of Mg# cpx  range from 0.88 to 0.79, while rim values range from 0.86 to 0.72.  The clinopyroxene phenocrysts in the Baie Charri er section are augitic in composition and show relatively little variation when projec ted onto a pyroxene quadr ilateral (Fig. 4.5).  This is typical of clinopyroxene phenocrysts from mildly alkalic basalts on the Kerguelen Archipelago (Damasceno et al., 2002).  Greater variability  in the chemistry of the clinopyroxene phenocrysts is observed when considering non-quadrilateral components such as Al (Fig. 4.6).  The Al 2O3  content of the Baie Charrier samples is relatively high and ranges from ~2 wt.% to ~6.5 wt.%.    (a) (b) (c) (d) Fig. 4.3.   Olivine forsterite content zoning profiles.  Sample (a) MM94-233, (b) MM94-236, (c) MM94-238, and (d) MM94-240. MM94-233 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 Rim  Mid  Core Relative Position % F o Crystal 1 Crystal 2 Crystal 3 Crystal 4 MM94-236 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 Rim  Mid  Core Relative Position % F o Crystal 1 Crystal 2 Crystal 3 Crystal 4 MM94-238 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 Rim  Mid  Core Relative Position % F o Crystal 1 Crystal 2 Crystal 3 Crystal 4 MM94-240 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 Rim  Mid  Core Relative Position % F o Crystal 1 Crystal 3 Crystal 5 Crystal 6(e) (f) (g) (h) Fig. 4.3. Continued. Olivine forsterite content zoning profiles for samples (e) MM94-242, (f) MM94-253, (g) MM94-256, and (h) MM94-258.  Note the change of scale in (g) and (h). MM94-242 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 Rim  Mid  Core Relative Position % F o Crystal 2 Crystal 4 Crystal 5 MM94-256 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 Rim  Mid  Core Relative Position % F o Crystal 1 Crystal 2 Crystal 3 Crystal 4 MM94-258 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 Rim  Mid  Core Relative Position % F o Crystal 1 Crystal 2 Crystal 3 Crystal 4 Crystal 5 MM94-253 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 Rim  Mid  Core Relative Position % F o Crystal 1 Crystal 2 Crystal 3 Crystal 4 Crystal 5 Crystal 6Chapter 4: Results  34  MM94-240 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 Rim  Mid  Core Relative Position M g#  (c px ) Crystal 2 Crystal 4 MM94-242 0 .70 0 .75 0 .8 0 0 .8 5 0 .9 0 Rim  Mid  Core R e la t iv e  P o s it io n Crys tal 1 Crys tal 3 Crys tal 6 E n D i F s Hd Fig. 4.4.  Clinopyroxene Mg# zoning profiles.  Samples (a) MM94-240 and (b) MM94-242.  (a) (b) Fig. 4.5. Clinopyroxene phenocryst compositions projected onto a pyroxene quadrilateral. Middle and core compositions are plotted as open squares, rim compositions are plotted as crosses.Chapter 4: Results  35  4.4 Major Elements To define the basic geochemical characteristi cs of the Baie Charrier lavas, a total alkali (Na 2O + K 2O) versus SiO2 classification plot was used  (Fig. 4.7).  The Macdonald and Katsura (1964) tholeiitic-a lkalic division is shown for reference; samples plotting above this line are alkalic, while those that fa ll below are tholeiitic.  The majority of the Baie Charrier samples plot slightly above th is line, and thus may be characterized as mildly alkalic basalts.  This is consistent  with other lavas from the Courbet Peninsula MM94-240 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 R im Mid Co re R e la t iv e  P o s it io n Crys tal 2 Crys tal 4 MM94-242 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 R im Mid Co re R e la t iv e  P o s it io n Crys tal 1 Crys tal 3 Crys tal 6 Fig. 4.6.  Clinopyroxene Al 2O3  zoning profiles.  Samples (a) MM94-240 and (b) MM94-242. (a) (b) Chapter 4: Results  36 (Damasceno et al., 2002).  The three samples from Unit C and the uppermost sample from Unit D fall either on or below this line.  These samples have the highest MgO contents (>9.73 wt.%) and th e highest modal abundances of  olivine phenocrysts in the section.  The possibility that these samp les may have accumulated olivine phenocrysts will be addressed in the following chapter.             Elevation plots of alkalinity index and MgO illustrate the stratigraphic variation in the Baie Charrier section (Fig. 4.8) and clearly delineate  the major subdivisions of the section.  The alkalinity index [Na 2O + K 2O – 0.37(SiO 2 – 39)] is a measure of the  deviation in Na2O + K 2O from the Macdonald & Katsur a (1964) line; samples with positive values are alkalic, while those with ne gative values are tholei itic.  Samples in the lower two-thirds of the sect ion are consistently alkalic, followed by a significant 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 4 6 4 7 4 8 4 9 50 5 1 52 SiO 2 (wt%) N a 2 O  +  K 2O  (w t% ) Unit A Unit B Unit C Unit D Alkalic Tholeiitic 240 229 Fig. 4.7. Na2O + K2O vs. SiO2 cl assification pl ot. Alk ali c sampl es pl ot ab ove the Macdonald & Katsura (1964) line, while th oleiitic samples plot below. The Baie Charrier samples are mildly alkalic basalts with the highest MgO samples appearing more tholeiitic.Chapter 4: Results  37 excursion towards less alkalic lavas in Un it C.  Unit D then defines a trend of progressively decreasing alkalinity with in creasing elevation, ra nging from the highest values of the section (+2.6) to the lowest (-1) .  The elevation plots of  alkalinity index and MgO appear to mirror each other, with high MgO corresponding to low alkalinity, and vice versa.  The high MgO (~8-11 wt.%) Units  A and C are separated by Unit B lavas, which have the lowest MgO (~3-6 wt.%) of th e section.  Unit D has similarly low MgO, with the exception of the stratigraphically highest sample, which has the highest MgO (>16 wt.%) of the section.  Thus, Units A and C may be classified as high MgO basalts (8-12 wt.% MgO) and sample 240 of Un it D is a picrite (>12 wt.% MgO).  0 2 5 50 75 10 0 12 5 150 175 2 0 0 2 2 5 2 50 2 75 3 0 0 3 2 5 3 50 3 75 4 0 0 4 2 5 4 50 - 1.5 - 1.0 -0 .5 0 .0 0 .5 1.0 1.5 2 .0 2 .5 3 .0 Alkalinity Index E le va ti on  (m ) 0 2 5 50 75 10 0 12 5 150 175 2 0 0 2 2 5 2 50 2 75 3 0 0 3 2 5 3 50 3 75 4 0 0 4 2 5 4 50 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 MgO  (wt.%) E le va ti on  (m ) Unit A Unit B Unit C Unit D F i g . 4.8.   Alk alinity index and MgO abundanc e vs . str atigr aphic height.  Alk alinity index [Na2O + K2O - 0.37( SiO 2 - 39) ] is a m eas ur e of the deviation in Na2O + K2O f rom the Mac donald and Kats ur a (1964) line in Fig. 4.7.  Pos itive values indic ate alk alic sam ples , while negative values indic ate tholeiitic sam ples .  Chapter 4: Results  38  A selection of major element oxides is plotted vs. MgO in Fig. 4.9.  MgO can be used as a differentiation index, ranging from the least to the most differentiated with decreasing MgO.  Negative tr ends are observed in TiO 2 and K2O, which reflects the residual melt becoming enriched in these in compatible elements as crystallization progresses.  Note the distinctive K-rich char acter of Unit A.  The four samples belonging to Unit A can be seen plotting above the regu lar fractionation trend.  A positive trend is observed in CaO below ~6 wt.% MgO and clearly suggests significant clinopyroxene crystallization.  Unit A samples have relativel y low CaO at a given MgO compared to the other samples.  A negative trend in Al 2O3  is observed, with continuously increasing Al 2O3  with decreasing MgO, which supports frac tionation driven by the crystallization of clinopyroxene and not plagioclase.  This is  consistent with m ildly alkalic 24-25 Ma basalts from the Courbet Peninsula (Damasceno et al., 2002) and in contrast to transitional-tholeiitic 26-29 Ma basalts found elsewhere on the archipelago (Yang et al.,  1998; Doucet et al., 2002; Frey et al., 2002).  SiO2 exhibits a negative relationship with MgO, with all units appearing to  follow the general trend.  Fe 2O3  appears to decrease with decreasing MgO for Units A, C, and mo st of D, with the exception of the most MgO-rich sample (240) and Unit B.  4.5 Trace Elements Abundances of Ni, Cr, and Sc are plotted vs. MgO to illustrate the relative  compatibility of these elements in the phenoc rystic phases (Fig. 4.10).  Ni and Cr define positive linear trends; the abundance of these elements decreases with decreasing MgO, reflecting the incorporation of these elements into olivine phenocrysts.  Note that Unit C appears to be slightly enriched in Cr re lative to the other units.  A positive trend is Chapter 4: Results  39  1 1.5 2 2 .5 3 3 .5 4 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Unit  A Unit B Unit C Unit D 0 .0 0 .4 0 .8 1.2 1.6 2 .0 2 .4 2 .8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 8 10 12 14 16 18 2 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 4 6 4 7 4 8 4 9 50 51 52 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 MgO (wt.% ) 11.5 12 .0 12 .5 13 .0 13 .5 14 .0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 MgO (wt.% ) Fig. 4.9.  Selected major element oxides vs. MgO.  Abundances of TiO 2, K2O, CaO, Al 2O3 , SiO2, and Fe2O3 (all in wt.%).  TiO2 (wt.%) K2O (wt.%) CaO (wt.%) Al2O3 (wt.%) SiO2 (wt.%) Fe2O3 (wt.%) 229 240Chapter 4: Results  40  0 100 200 300 400 500 600 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Unit A Unit B Unit C Unit D 0 200 400 600 800 1000 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Mg O (wt. % ) F ig . 4 . 1 0 . Selection of compatible elements vs. MgO. Abundances of Ni, Cr, and Sc (in ppm) vs. MgO (in wt.%), illustrating the relative compatibility of these elements in olivine and cllinopyroxene phenocrysts. N i (ppm ) Cr (ppm) Sc (ppm) 250 237 236Chapter 4: Results  41 observed in Sc below ~6 wt.% MgO, reflecting clinopyroxene crystallization and the incorporation of Sc into these phenocrysts. Two samples (236 and 237) from Unit A as well as sample 250 from Unit D have relatively low Sc at a given MgO compared to the other samples.    Abundances of Rb, Ba, Sr, Ce, Zr and Th are plotted vs. Nb to illustrate the  relative incompatibility of these elements in the phenocrystic phases (Fig. 4.11).  Sr, however, is an exception as it is compatible once plagioclase starts to crystallize.  Sample 250 of Unit D likely contains accumulated plagioclase, as it has 870 ppm Sr.  Samples 236 and 237 of Unit A also appear to be enriched in Sr as well as Ba.  Note that Unit C has the lowest abundances of each of these elements.  Strong positive trends are observed between these elements, reflecting the enrichment of these incompatible elements in the residual melt as crystallization proceeds, and dilution through the addition of olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts.   As Nb is a significant incompatible element, these plots can be used to derive an incompatibility index for the Baie Charrier basalts.  A linear fit to the Rb and Ce data would pass through, or very near to, the origin, indicating that these elements have similar incompatibilities to Nb.  This also indicates that the samples were not affected by significant alteration.  Trendlines through the Zr and Ba data would intersect the Zr and Ba axes, repectively, indicating that Zr and Ba are more compatible than Nb.  Similarly, a trendline through the Th data would intersect the Nb axis, indicating that Nb is more compatible than Th.  This results in the following order of increasing compatibility:  Th < Ce, Nb, Rb < Ba < Zr < Sr.       Chapter 4: Results  42  0 10 20 30 40 50 60 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Unit A Unit B Unit C Unit D 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Nb (ppm) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Nb (ppm) F ig . 4 . 1 1 . Selection of incompatible elements vs. Nb. Abundances of Rb, Ba, Sr, Ce, Zr, and Th vs. Nb (all in ppm), illustrating the relative incompatibility of these elements in the phenocrystic phases (except Sr).    Rb (ppm) Ba (ppm) Sr (ppm) Ce (ppm) Zr (ppm) Th (ppm) 250 229 236 237 236 237Chapter 4: Results  43 Elevation plots of Zr/Nb, La/Nb, Th/Ta and (La/Sm)N vs. MgO illustrate the stratigraphic and temporal variation in incompatible element ratios in the Baie Charrier section (Fig. 4.12).  Unit C can be immediately distinguished from the other units, characterized by significantly higher Zr/Nb and La/Sm ratios and lower Th/Ta ratios.  Sample 250 of Unit D, identified previously as being plagioclase-rich, is also distinctive, having the lowest Zr/Nb and La/Sm ratios of the section.  Note that two of the samples (236 and 237) from Unit A continue to have slightly different chemistry from the other samples in the unit.    Incompatible element abundances were normalized to the primitive mantle estimates of McDonough & Sun (1995) and are plotted in Fig. 4.13a.  The rare earth elements (REE) were normalized to the C1 Chondrite values from McDonough & Sun (1995) and are plotted in Fig 4.13b.  All of the Baie Charrier samples are enriched in the light rare earth elements.  However, the extent to which they concentrate the different incompatible elements varies with each unit.  The samples with the highest MgO contents of the section, including the high-MgO basalts of Unit C and the picrite from Unit D, have the lowest abundances of incompatible elements, reflecting a dilution effect from accumulated olivine, which does not incorporate incompatible elements.  Units B and D encompass a wide range of incompatible element abundances, with the plagioclase-rich sample (250, Unit D) having the highest abundances of the section.  Unit A has moderate abundances; note that samples 236 and 237 are shifted to slightly lower abundances relative to the other two samples in this unit.    Chapter 4: Results  44   0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 5 6 7 8 9 Zr/Nb Elevation (m) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 1.1 La /Nb Elevation (m) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 2.2 2.4 Th /Ta Elevation (m) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 ( La /S m ) N Elevation (m) F ig . 4.1 2 .   Stratigraphic and temporal variation in incompatible element ratios.  Zr/Nb, La/Nb, Th/Ta, and (La/Sm)N vs. elevation (in metres), where (La/Sm)N is the chondrite-normalized ratio using the C1 chondrite normalizing values of McDonough & Sun (1995). 250 250 253 236 237Chapter 4: Results  45  0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Cs Rb B a Th U Nb Ta L a Ce P b P r Nd S r Zr Hf S m Eu Gd Tb Dy Ho Y Er Yb L u Ga C o mp a t ib ilit y U nit A (238) U nit A (237) U nit A (236) U nit A (233) U nit B (231) U nit B (230) U nit B (229) U nit B (258) U nit C (256) U nit C (255) U nit C (253) U nit D (250) U nit D (244) U nit D (242) U nit D (240) 0 50 100 150 200 250 La Ce Pr N d Sm Eu Gd T b D y H o Er Yb Lu C o mp a t ib ilit y U nit A (238) U nit A (237) U nit A (236) U nit A (233) U nit B (231) U nit B (230) U nit B (229) U nit B (258) U nit C (256) U nit C (255) U nit C (253) U nit D (250) U nit D (244) U nit D (242) U nit D (240) F ig . 4.1 3 .   Incompatible element abundances of the Baie Charrier samples.  Normalized to (a) the primitive mantle estimates of McDonough & Sun (1995) and (b) the C1 Chondrite values of McDonough & Sun (1995).  Note that the y-axis scale is linear, not logarithmic, to emphasize the differences between individual samples.   Chapter 4: Results  46 4.6  Sr-Nd-Pb Isotope s Elevation plots of measured 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr demonstrate the isotopic variability of the Baie Charrier section (Fig. 4.14).  Units A, B, and D have relatively similar 143Nd/144Nd.  Sample 250 of Unit D, however, has a significantly lower ratio than the rest of the unit.  The three Unit C samples are characterized by the highest 143Nd/144Nd values of the section.  The two Unit A samples have 87Sr/86Sr values that are within error of each other.  Unit B has lower values of 87Sr/86Sr than Unit A, with the exception of sample 229, which has a higher value.  The three Unit C samples have the lowest 87Sr/86Sr values of the section, with the exception of sample 253, which has a significantly higher 87Sr/86Sr value.  The Unit D samples have relatively similar 87Sr/86Sr.    Plots of measured Pb isotopic compositions vs. elevation show considerable variability within the Baie Charrier section (Fig. 4.15).  Unit C is characterized by significantly lower Pb isotopic compositions, except for sample 255, which has a higher 206Pb/204Pb ratio.  Unit D consistently has the highest Pb isotopic ratios of the section.  On Pb-Pb isotopic diagrams (Fig. 4.16) the Baie Charrier samples fall along positive linear trends.  Sample 255 from Unit C, however, does not fall along either of the trendlines.  On a Sr-Nd isotopic diagram (Fig. 4.17), the majority of the Baie Charrier samples define a relatively small field.  Note that the two samples from Unit A and sample 229 from Unit B all plot at the same point.  There are three samples that appear to be slightly unusual; two from Unit C (255 and 256) have higher 143Nd/144Nd and lower 87Sr/86Sr, while sample 250 from Unit D has lower 143Nd/144Nd.  On a Pb-Sr isotopic diagram (Fig. 4.18), the Baie Charrier samples define a linear array range of 206Pb/204Pb between ~18.35 and ~18.65.  However, samples 253 and 256 from Unit C are significantly less radiogenic, with 206Pb/204Pb = ~18.2.     Chapter 4: Results  47   0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 0.51256 0.51260 0.51264 0.51268 0.51272 1 4 3 N d/ 1 4 4 N d Elevation (m)  0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 0.7048 0.7049 0.7050 0.7051 0.7052 0.7053 0.7054 8 7 S r/ 8 6 S r Elevation (m) F ig . 4.1 4 .   Stratigraphic variation in Nd and Sr isotopic ratios.  (a) 143Nd/144Nd vs. elevation ( in metres) and (b) 87Sr/86Sr vs. elevation (in metres).  The error bars correspond to 2s m of the individual samples. 250 253 229Chapter 4: Results  48  0 50 100 150 2 00 250 3 00 350 4 00 450 15.52 15.54 15.56 15.58 15.60 2 0 7 P b/ 2 0 4 P b Elevation (m) 0 50 100 150 2 00 250 3 00 350 4 00 450 18 .1 18 .2 18 .3 18 .4 18 .5 18 .6 18 .7 2 0 6 P b/ 2 0 4 P b Elevation (m) Unit  A Unit  B Unit  C Unit  D 0 50 100 150 2 00 250 3 00 350 4 00 450 38 .6 3 8 .8 39 .0 39 .2 3 9 .4 2 0 8 P b/ 2 0 4 P b Elevation (m) Fig. 4.15.   Stratigraphic variation in Pb isotopic ratios.  (a) 206 Pb/ 204 Pb, (b) 207 Pb/ 204 Pb, and (c) 208 Pb/ 204 Pb vs. elevation (in metres).  Note the distinctive Pb isotopic compositions of Unit C, and the higher  206 Pb/ 204 Pb of sample 255.  The 2s m is smaller than the symbol size. 255Chapter 4: Results  49     F ig . 4.16 .  Pb-Pb isotopic diagrams.  (a) Measured 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb.  (b) Measured  208Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb.  Note sample 255, which does not fall along either of the trendlines.  The 2σm is smaller than the symbol size.   15.46 15.48 15.50 15.52 15.54 15.56 15.58 15.60 15.62 18.0 18.2 18.4 18.6 18.8 2 0 6 P b/ 2 0 4 P b 207 Pb/ 204 Pb Unit A Unit B Unit C Unit D 255 38.5 38.6 38.7 38.8 38.9 39.0 39.1 39.2 39.3 39.4 18.0 18.2 18.4 18.6 18.8 2 0 6 P b/ 2 0 4 P b 208 Pb/ 204 Pb 255Chapter 4: Results  50   F ig . 4.17 .  Nd-Sr isotopic diagram.  Measured 143Nd/144Nd vs. 87Sr/86Sr.  Note the distinctive  Unit C samples and sample 250.  The 2σm is smaller than the symbol size.    F ig . 4.18 .  Sr-Pb isotopic diagram.  Measured 87Sr/86Sr vs. 206Pb/204Pb.  Note the two samples  from Unit C, which are significantly less radiogenic.  The 2σm is smaller than the symbol size.  0.51250 0.51255 0.51260 0.51265 0.51270 0.51275 0.7046 0.7048 0.7050 0.7052 0.7054 0.7056 8 7 Sr/ 8 6 Sr 143 Nd/ 144 Nd Unit A Unit B Unit C Unit D 255 256 250 253 0.7035 0.7040 0.7045 0.7050 0.7055 0.7060 0.7065 18.1 18.2 18.3 18.4 18.5 18.6 18.7 2 0 6 P b/ 2 0 4 P b 87 Sr/ 86 Sr 256 253Chapter 5: Discussion  51 5.1 Temporal Variation in the Baie Charrier Section The Baie Charrier section preserves a 325 m series of basaltic flows, which represent a temporal record of volcanism from the Kerguelen mantle plume.  With increasing elevation, these flows may be used to define geochemical variations with time.  Ar-Ar dating of whole rocks from the tops and bottoms of 24-29 Ma basaltic sections across the Kerguelen Archipelago, with stratigraphic thicknesses from 400-1000 m, shows them to be the same within error (Nicolaysen et al., 2000).  Estimated lava accumulation rates are ~1.6 + 0.9 km/my (Nicolaysen et al., 2000) suggesting that a 300 m section of basalts such as at Baie Charrier would be formed in approximately 200,000 years.     The Baie Charrier section can be subdivided into four stratigraphic units that possess distinctive petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic characteristics (Fig. 4.1).  The units alternate between the high-MgO olivine-phyric basalts of Units A and C, and the low-MgO plagioclase-phyric mildly alkalic basalts of Units B and D.  The basal Unit A can also be defined by a significant enrichment in incompatible elements.  The intermediate Unit C is characterised by unusually high ratios of Zr/Nb, and (La/Sm)N (chondrite-normalized) and low ratios of Th/Ta.  As well, Unit C generally exhibits high 143Nd/144Nd, low 87Sr/86Sr, and less radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions.  The observed differences in ratios of incompatible elements and isotopic compositions are of particular significance.  In an intra-oceanic setting (i.e. no continental crust), the only way to alter these geochemical characteristics is to change a variable in the source region.  These differences therefore may reflect either a change in the extent of partial melting (trace element differences) or in the composition of the source region (isotopic differences).  What is of particular significance is the scale over which these differences are observed.  Chapter 5: Discussion  52 Unit C, for example, is only 35 m thick, suggesting very small-scale variability and heterogeneity in the source region of these lavas.  5 . 2 Minera l - M e l t Equili b r i a An important objective of this study, as well as for other studies of Kerguelen Archipelago basalts, was to determine if the phenocrysts are in equilibrium with their host rock.  In other words, do the bulk compositions of these basaltic rocks represent liquids?  To answer this ques tion, the whole rock Mg# was pl otted against the forsterite content for olivine (Fig. 5.1) and the Mg# for clinopyroxene (Fig. 5.2).  The Fe/Mg exchange partition coefficients between olivine and basaltic liquid and between clinopyroxene and basaltic liquid have been constrained experimentally.  Values of 0.30 + 0.03 (Roeder & Emslie, 1970) for olivine and 0.23 + 0.05 (Grove & Bryan, 1983; Toplis & Carroll, 1995) for clinopyroxene appear to be consistent.  The equilibrium fields for Fe/Mg exchange between these minerals and basaltic melt are shown on Figures 5.1 and 5.2.  Compositions that fall above this field are interpreted to have inherited ‘exotic’ crystals, or xenocrysts.  Compositions that are shifted to higher whole-rock Mg#’s, and therefore fall below the equilibrium field, are interpreted to have experienced olivine or clinopyroxene accumulation.  Rim compositions that are pulled towards lower forsterite content or Mg# cpx reflect diffusion of Mg and Fe as the crystal grew and interacted with the remaining melt in the groundmass. The majority of the olivine phenocrysts in the Baie Charrier basalts fall within the equilibrium field, and are thus interpreted to be in equilibrium with their host rock.  However, the forsterite-rich cores of samples 258 (Unit B) and 233 (Unit A) plot slightly above the equilibrium field, perhaps reflecting the addition of small amounts of  Chapter 5: Discussion  53  50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 Mg # Wh ol e  Rock Fo (olivine) Series1 Series2 Series3 Unit A (233) Unit A (236) Unit A (238) Unit B (258) Unit C (253) Unit C (256) Unit D (240) Unit D (242) ac c umulation gr oundmas s x enoc r y s ts 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 Mg# Wh ol e  Rock Fo (olivine) Series1 Series2 Series3 Unit A (233) Unit A (236) Unit A (238) Unit B (258) Unit C (253) Unit C (256) Unit D (240) Unit D (242) 8-10 wt.% MgO (a) (b) F ig . 5.1 .   Mineral-melt equilibrium diagrams for olivine. Whole rock Mg-number vs. forsterite content of olivine. (a) Rim and core compositions. (b) Core compositions only.  Curves represent the equilibrium fields for Fe/Mg exchange between olivine and basaltic melt (Roeder & Emslie, 1970).  (See text for details).Chapter 5: Discussion  54  0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 Mg# Me l t Mg# (cpx) Series1 Series2 Series3 Unit D (240) Unit D (242) 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 Mg# Me l t Mg# (cpx) Series1 Series2 Series3 Unit D (240) Unit D (242) (a) (b) F ig . 5.2 .   Mineral-melt equilibrium diagrams for clinopyroxene. Whole rock Mg-number vs. clinopyroxene Mg- number. (a) Rim and core compositions. (b) Core compositions only.  Curves represent the equilibrium fields for Fe/Mg exchange between clinopyroxene and basaltic melt (Grove & Bryan, 1983; Toplis & Carroll, 1995).  (See text for details).Chapter 5: Discussion  55 xenocrystic olivine.  Sample 240 (Unit D) plots well below the equilibrium field at high whole rock Mg#, suggesting that this sa mple has accumulated significant amounts of olivine.  If olivine were to be removed from this rock, the composition would track back to the cluster of samples that have Mg#’s ranging from 0.59 to 0.63, corresponding to MgO content between 8-10 wt.%.  Interestingly, Doucet et al. (2002) also determined that the most MgO-rich lava from the Ruches and Fontaine sections of the Kerguelen Archipelago were also between 8-10 wt.% MgO.  This suggests that 10 wt.% MgO may be the maximum MgO content for magmas without accumulated phenocrysts on the Kerguelen Archipelago. The two Baie Charrier samples analysed for clinopyroxene phenocryst compositions are both from Unit D.  Sample 242 plots just within the equilibrium field, indicating that the clinopyroxene phenocrysts are in equilibrium with the whole rock, along with the olivines.  Sample 240 plots below the equilibrium field, again at high whole rock Mg#, consistent with the accumu lation of both clinopyroxene and olivine.   5 . 3 Comparis o n Between the Baie Charrier and Mt. Crozier Sections on the Courbet Peninsu l a  The Baie Charrier section can be compared to the Mt. Crozier section, on the Courbet Peninsula, and sections from the Southeast Province, which are composed of mildly alkalic 24-25 Ma basalts (Fig. 2.2).  The motivation for comparing Baie Charrier with Mt. Crozier is to determine if the Courbet Peninsula is a single volcanic unit, as proposed by Nougier (1970).  The petrography of the lavas in the two sections is markedly different.  The Crozier lavas, in the center of the Courbet Peninsula, are characterized by the absence of olivine-phyric basalts (Damasceno et al. , 2002), while all Chapter 5: Discussion  56 of the Baie Charrier basalts are olivine-phyric to some degree.  Correspondingly, the MgO contents between the two sections are very different (Fig 5.3).  The average value for the Crozier section is ~4 wt.% MgO, whereas the average for the Baie Charrier section is significantly higher at ~7.5 wt.% MgO.  All of the Crozier lavas have <8 wt.% MgO, while many of the Baie Charrier basalts have MgO >8 wt.% and can reach over 16 wt.% (in the picrite, sample 240, Unit D).  This relationship is important, since a greater eruptive flux is typically required for lavas rich in olivine phenocrysts due to their greater density (Murata & Richter, 1966).  The lack of olivine-phyric basalts in the Mt. Crozier section relative to the Baie Charrier section suggests that the eruptive center of the higher magma flux lavas from the Courbet Peninsula may not correspond to the geographic center of the glacially eroded peninsula.  F ig . 5.3.  MgO content comparison between Baie Charrier, Mt. Crozier, and the Southeast Province.  MgO (wt.%) vs. elevation (m).  Note that the Baie Charrier basalts are significantly more MgO-rich.  0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 MgO  (wt. %) Elevation (m) Mt. Crozier SE Province Baie CharrierChapter 5: Discussion  57 Trace element and isotopic compositions are similar between the Baie Charrier and Mt. Crozier sections.  The Zr/Nb ratios are comparable between the two sections (Fig. 5.4).  The majority of the samples in both sections plot in a limited range between 6- 7.5, while the anomalous samples have higher values of between ~7.5 and ~9.  Values in each of the sections are consistent with the temporal variation in Zr/Nb observed in lavas associated with the Kerguelen mantle plume, where lavas <30 Ma typically have Zr/Nb <10 (Weis et al. , 2002).      F ig . 5.4.  Zr/Nb comparison between Baie Charrier, Mt. Crozier, and the Southeast Province.  The majority of the samples in all sections plot between 6-7.5.  When comparing the primitive mantle-normalized incompatible element abundances of the two sections, the general trend is similar, with relatively large abundances of the most incompatible elements, and a relative enrichment in the light rare earth elements (Fig. 5.5).   0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Zr/N b Elevation (m) Mt. Crozier SE Province Baie CharrierChapter 5: Discussion  58   0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Rb Ba Nb Ta La Ce Nd Sr Zr Hf Sm Eu Tb Y Yb Lu Ga Sample/Primitive Mantle Unit A (238) Unit  A (237) Unit  A (236) Unit  A (233) Unit  B (231) Unit  B (230) Unit  B (229) Unit  B (258) Unit  C (256) Unit  C (255) Unit  C (253) Unit  D (250) Unit  D (244) Unit  D (242) Unit  D (240) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Rb Ba Nb Ta La Ce Nd Sr Zr Hf Sm Eu Tb Y Yb Lu Ga Sample/Primitive Mantle 978 940 878 848 755 670 515 465 420 418 390 380 370 315 295 285 275 245 230 M t . Crozier Fig . 5.5 .  Comparison of incompatible element abundances between the Baie Charrier and Mt. Crozier sections.  Normalized to the primitive mantle estimates of McDonough & Sun (1995).  Note that data for some elements was not available for the Mt. Crozier section, and have been removed from the Baie Charrier plot to allow for easier comparison. Baie Charrier Chapter 5: Discussion  59 When comparing the isotopic systematics of Baie Charrier and Mt. Crozier, the two sections are also quite similar.  On a Nd-Sr isotope diagram (Fig. 5.6), there is considerable overlap between the samples of both sections.  Two of the high-MgO samples from Unit C in the Baie Charrier section are drawn up to higher 143Nd/144Nd and lower 87Sr/86Sr, as is one of the Mt. Crozier samples.  Sample 250 (Unit D) has a lower 143Nd/144Nd for a given 87Sr/86Sr compared to the other samples.  This same trend is observed in the Mt. Crozier samples.  On a Sr-Pb isotope diagram (Fig. 5.7), the Baie Charrier samples overlap with the Mt. Crozier samples, which have the most radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions of basalts on the Kerguelen Archipelago.  Two high-MgO samples from Baie Charrier (253 and 256) have relatively low 206Pb/204Pb, which is not observed at Mt. Crozier.  On Pb-Pb isotope diagrams (Fig 5.8), the Baie Charrier samples again overlap the Mt. Crozier samples.  Linear trendlines to both data sets are very similar.  The consistent trace element and isotopic data is compelling evidence that both Baie Charrier and Mt. Crozier are derived from the same source.  By inference, this also supports the theory proposed by Nougier (1970), that the Courbet Peninsula represents a single volcanic unit.    5.4  Constraint s on the Source Composit i o n of the Kergue l e n Mantle Plum e On a Sr-Nd isotope diagram, volcanism associated with the Kerguelen mantle plume plots on a negative linear trend (Fig. 5.9).  The Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) represents a depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) component, and originates from a source depleted in incompatible elements due to repeated melting of the mantle.  Site 1140 basalts on the Northern Kerguelen Plateau present an strong mixing relationship between depleted material from the SEIR and the Kerguelen plume, which is coherent  Chapter 5: Discussion  60  Fig. 5.6.  Nd-Sr isotopic diagram showing comparison between the Baie Charrier and Mt. Crozier sections.  Baie Charrier samples overlap with the Mt. Crozier samples, except for the three high-MgO samples (253, 255, 253) from Unit C. The 2σm is smaller than the symbol size.   Fig. 5.7.  Sr-Pb isotopic diagram showingcomparison between the Baie Charrier and Mt. Crozier sections.  Baie Charrier samples overlap with the Mt. Crozier samples, except for two of the high-MgO samples (253 and 256) from Unit C.  The 2σm is smaller than the symbol size.  0.51250 0.51255 0.51260 0.51265 0.51270 0.51275 0.7044 0.7048 0.7052 0.7056 87 S r/ 86 S r 143 Nd/ 144 Nd Crozier Baie Charrier 256 253 255 250 0.7040 0.7045 0.7050 0.7055 0.7060 0.7065 18.1 18.2 18.3 18.4 18.5 18.6 18.7 2 0 6 Pb/ 2 0 4 Pb 87 Sr/ 86 Sr Crozier Baie Charrier 253 256Chapter 5: Discussion  61  Fig. 5.8.  Pb-Pb isotopic diagrams showing comparison between the Baie Charrier and Mt. Crozier sections.  (a) 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb.  (b) 208Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb.  The 2σm is smaller than the symbol size.  15.46 15.48 15.50 15.52 15.54 15.56 15.58 15.60 15.62 17.90 18.10 18.30 18.50 18.70 2 0 6 Pb/ 2 0 4 Pb 207 Pb/ 204 Pb High MgO Nu Cro zier Nu Cro zier Aug03 Baie  Charrie r Linear (High MgO Nu) Linear (Cro zier Nu) 38.20 38.40 38.60 38.80 39.00 39.20 39.40 39.60 17.90 18.10 18.30 18.50 18.70 2 0 6 Pb/ 2 0 4 Pb 208 Pb/ 204 Pb High MgO Nu Cro zier Nu Cro zier Aug03 Baie  Charrie r Linear (High MgO Nu) Linear (Cro zier Nu) Linear (Baie  Charrie r)Chapter 5: Discussion  62 F ig . 5.9.  Sr-Nd isotopic variations.  This illustrates binary mixing between a depleted SEIR-type source and the Kerguelen plume.  Baie Charrier falls within the enriched plume endmember, except for the three Unit C samples. (Weis and Frey, 2002)   with their eruption at 34 Ma, only 50 km away from the ridge axis (Weis & Frey, 2002).  Mildly alkalic lavas from the Kerguelen Archipelago contain a strong signature of an enriched plume-derived component that originates from a deep mantle source (Weis et al., 2002).  Basaltic lavas from the Kerguelen Archipelago also show an enrichment in radiogenic Pb relative to the SEIR.  Since Baie Charrier has one of the most radiogenic Pb compositions of the Kerguelen Archipelago, the isotopic composition of the enriched Kerguelen mantle plume is well represented by the basaltic lava flows of the Baie Charrier section.  The geochemical characteristics of the Baie Charrier basalts are entirely oceanic and present no evidence for any role of continental material in their genesis.  This is consistent with what is observed in other basaltic sections on the archipelago (e.g. Chapter 5: Discussion  63 Doucet et al., 2002; Frey et al., 2002; Weis et al., 2002) and in the Northern Kerguelen Plateau (Weis & Frey, 2002) and contrasts sharply with the Cenozoic history of the Kerguelen plume, where basalts were emplaced in a young ocean not too far from away from the old Gondwana continent (e.g. Ingle et al., 2003).     Chapter 6: Conclusions  64 6 . 1 Conclusion s   This study has presented new petrographic and geochemical data from the Baie Charrier basaltic section on the Courbet Peninsula of the Kerguelen Archipelago.  Mineral chemistry, major and trace element concentrations, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions of basalts from the section were integrated to provide a detailed geochemical analysis of the section.  The major findings of this study are as follows: 1.  Based on petrographic and geoche mical characteristics, the Baie Charrier section can be subdivided into 4 distinct stratigra phic units.  The variation observed between these units reflects temporal changes in volcanism related to the Kerguelen mantle plume.  The small scale over which this variation occurs suggests considerable heterogeneity and relatively rapid temporal  fluctuations in the source region.   2. Mineral-melt equilibria between olivine and clinopyroxene phenoc rysts and basaltic melt reveal that a majority of the phenocrysts are in equilibrium with their host rocks.  However, two samples (233 and 258) were  interpreted to have inherited small amounts of xenocrystic olivines, and the highest MgO sample (240) was found to have accumulated both olivine and clinopyr oxene.  Therefore, the highest MgO lavas from the Baie Charrier section are constrained to between 8-10 wt.% MgO, consistent with findings from the Loranc het Peninsula basalts (Doucet et al., 2002).  This suggests that 10 wt.% may be the maximu m MgO content for Kerguelen Archipelago magmas without accumulated phenocrysts. 3.  A comparison of the Baie Charrier and Mt. Crozier sections  yields strikingly similar trace element and isotopic compositions, wh ich is compelling evidence that both sections are derived from the same source region.  Thus, this study provides evidence Chapter 6: Conclusions  65 to support the interpretation that the Courbet Peni nsula is a single volcanic unit (Nougier, 1970).  However, the petrography and MgO contents of the two sections are markedly different, with Baie Cha rrier possessing significantly higher MgO olivine-phyric basalts.  The absence of oliv ine-phyric basalts at  Mt. Crozier suggests that the eruptive center for these high fl ux magmas may not correspond to the present geographic center of th e Courbet Peninsula. 4. 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Appendix A: Microprobe analyses of olivine grains from the Baie Charrier section Elevation (m): 85 85 85 85 85 85 85 85 85 85 85 Sample: MM94-238 MM94-238 MM94-238 MM94-238 MM94-238 MM94-238 MM94-238 MM94-238 MM94-238 MM94-238 MM94-238 Crystal: 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 Zone: Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Oxides (wt.%) SiO 2 38.10 38.98 39.30 36.79 38.17 39.25 38.81 39.39 39.18 37.82 39.14 Cr 2 O 3 0.01 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.07 0.04 0.02 0.04 FeO 23.47 17.61 17.67 29.27 20.94 18.99 18.03 16.07 17.80 24.15 18.43 MnO 0.34 0.20 0.22 0.48 0.15 0.20 0.21 0.14 0.22 0.44 0.23 NiO 0.18 0.21 0.33 0.16 0.08 0.22 0.24 0.37 0.26 0.19 0.24 MgO 37.96 42.51 42.61 32.68 40.18 42.03 43.41 43.53 42.49 36.99 41.54 CaO 0.24 0.20 0.20 0.37 0.20 0.23 0.19 0.21 0.20 0.31 0.23 Total 100.28 99.73 100.36 99.80 99.73 100.93 100.91 99.78 100.18 99.92 99.85 Cations (p.f.u.) Si 0.995 0.995 0.997 0.995 0.990 0.996 0.982 0.998 0.996 0.996 1.002 Cr 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.001 Fe 2+ 0.513 0.376 0.375 0.662 0.454 0.403 0.382 0.340 0.379 0.532 0.394 Mn 0.008 0.004 0.005 0.011 0.003 0.004 0.004 0.003 0.005 0.010 0.005 Ni 0.004 0.004 0.007 0.003 0.002 0.004 0.005 0.008 0.005 0.004 0.005 Mg 1.478 1.618 1.612 1.318 1.554 1.589 1.638 1.644 1.611 1.452 1.585 Ca 0.007 0.006 0.005 0.011 0.005 0.006 0.005 0.006 0.005 0.009 0.006 Total 3.004 3.003 3.002 3.001 3.009 3.003 3.017 3.000 3.001 3.002 2.998 End members (%) Fo 74.2 81.1 81.1 66.6 77.4 79.8 81.1 82.8 81.0 73.2 80.1 Fa 25.8 18.9 18.9 33.4 22.6 20.2 18.9 17.2 19.0 26.8 19.9Appendix A: continued Elevation (m): 85 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Sample: MM94-238 MM94-236 MM94-236 MM94-236 MM94-236 MM94-236 MM94-236 MM94-236 MM94-236 MM94-236 MM94-236 Crystal: 4 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 Zone: Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Oxides (wt.%) SiO 2 39.25 38.85 39.22 39.57 38.96 39.64 39.34 38.62 39.60 39.11 39.14 Cr 2 O 3 0.06 0.03 0.05 0.03 0.05 0.07 0.10 0.00 0.07 0.04 0.04 FeO 17.49 19.38 16.56 17.16 17.79 15.38 16.02 20.58 14.75 16.18 17.75 MnO 0.23 0.27 0.18 0.12 0.21 0.19 0.26 0.28 0.16 0.18 0.22 NiO 0.28 0.24 0.26 0.26 0.27 0.27 0.35 0.23 0.36 0.32 0.28 MgO 42.82 41.46 43.84 43.09 42.51 44.35 43.55 40.03 44.70 43.81 42.31 CaO 0.20 0.23 0.20 0.21 0.22 0.21 0.19 0.29 0.21 0.23 0.25 Total 100.33 100.47 100.29 100.46 100.01 100.10 99.80 100.03 99.84 99.88 99.98 Cations (p.f.u.) Si 0.995 0.993 0.991 1.000 0.993 0.997 0.997 0.997 0.997 0.992 0.997 Cr 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.002 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.001 Fe 2+ 0.371 0.414 0.350 0.363 0.379 0.324 0.339 0.444 0.310 0.343 0.378 Mn 0.005 0.006 0.004 0.003 0.004 0.004 0.006 0.006 0.003 0.004 0.005 Ni 0.006 0.005 0.005 0.005 0.005 0.006 0.007 0.005 0.007 0.006 0.006 Mg 1.619 1.580 1.651 1.623 1.616 1.663 1.645 1.540 1.677 1.655 1.607 Ca 0.005 0.006 0.005 0.006 0.006 0.006 0.005 0.008 0.006 0.006 0.007 Total 3.002 3.006 3.008 3.000 3.005 3.001 3.000 3.001 3.002 3.008 3.001 End members (%) Fo 81.4 79.2 82.5 81.7 81.0 83.7 82.9 77.6 84.4 82.8 80.9 Fa 18.6 20.8 17.5 18.3 19.0 16.3 17.1 22.4 15.6 17.2 19.1Appendix A: continued Elevation (m): 100 100 135 135 135 135 135 135 135 135 135 Sample: MM94-236 MM94-236 MM94-233 MM94-233 MM94-233 MM94-233 MM94-233 MM94-233 MM94-233 MM94-233 MM94-233 Crystal: 4 4 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 Zone: Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Oxides (wt.%) SiO 2 39.32 38.77 37.12 39.47 39.53 38.27 39.30 39.02 38.19 39.46 39.68 Cr 2 O 3 0.07 0.05 0.03 0.06 0.04 0.02 0.07 0.04 0.04 0.08 0.06 FeO 17.28 17.56 26.33 13.18 13.25 22.29 18.53 18.54 23.13 15.10 15.10 MnO 0.16 0.15 0.42 0.14 0.14 0.29 0.17 0.24 0.28 0.16 0.19 NiO 0.25 0.34 0.10 0.38 0.45 0.12 0.27 0.26 0.26 0.32 0.30 MgO 42.74 42.38 34.95 45.51 45.60 38.34 41.48 40.65 37.69 44.03 44.29 CaO 0.21 0.19 0.22 0.20 0.18 0.27 0.21 0.24 0.19 0.21 0.20 Total 100.03 99.44 99.18 98.95 99.19 99.59 100.02 98.98 99.77 99.36 99.82 Cations (p.f.u.) Si 0.999 0.994 0.996 0.996 0.995 1.001 1.003 1.008 1.001 0.999 1.000 Cr 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.002 0.001 Fe 2+ 0.367 0.376 0.590 0.278 0.279 0.487 0.396 0.400 0.507 0.320 0.318 Mn 0.003 0.003 0.010 0.003 0.003 0.006 0.004 0.005 0.006 0.003 0.004 Ni 0.005 0.007 0.002 0.008 0.009 0.002 0.006 0.005 0.005 0.006 0.006 Mg 1.618 1.619 1.397 1.711 1.712 1.494 1.579 1.565 1.472 1.662 1.664 Ca 0.006 0.005 0.006 0.005 0.005 0.008 0.006 0.007 0.005 0.006 0.005 Total 3.000 3.005 3.002 3.002 3.003 2.999 2.994 2.991 2.997 2.998 2.999 End members (%) Fo 81.5 81.1 70.3 86.0 86.0 75.4 80.0 79.6 74.4 83.9 83.9 Fa 18.5 18.9 29.7 14.0 14.0 24.6 20.0 20.4 25.6 16.1 16.1Appendix A: continued Elevation (m): 135 135 135 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 Sample: MM94-233 MM94-233 MM94-233 MM94-258 MM94-258 MM94-258 MM94-258 MM94-258 MM94-258 MM94-258 MM94-258 Crystal: 4 4 4 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 Zone: Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Oxides (wt.%) SiO 2 38.05 39.61 39.08 35.90 37.36 37.14 32.58 38.03 37.92 37.00 37.04 Cr 2 O 3 0.02 0.03 0.06 0.01 0.00 0.03 0.02 0.00 0.01 0.01 0.00 FeO 25.26 17.05 17.05 31.19 24.24 23.83 34.50 21.98 22.56 27.15 24.66 MnO 0.34 0.18 0.16 0.53 0.32 0.24 0.47 0.27 0.26 0.38 0.33 NiO 0.15 0.33 0.31 0.02 0.07 0.09 0.04 0.13 0.17 0.15 0.06 MgO 36.15 42.92 42.63 30.80 37.26 37.06 20.66 38.86 38.32 34.79 36.90 CaO 0.26 0.18 0.21 0.33 0.27 0.28 1.43 0.25 0.22 0.26 0.24 Total 100.22 100.30 99.49 98.78 99.52 98.67 89.70 99.51 99.46 99.74 99.22 Cations (p.f.u.) Si 1.002 1.002 0.998 0.993 0.988 0.989 1.027 0.994 0.994 0.991 0.986 Cr 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Fe 2+ 0.557 0.361 0.364 0.721 0.536 0.531 0.909 0.481 0.495 0.608 0.549 Mn 0.008 0.004 0.003 0.013 0.007 0.005 0.013 0.006 0.006 0.009 0.007 Ni 0.003 0.007 0.006 0.000 0.002 0.002 0.001 0.003 0.003 0.003 0.001 Mg 1.420 1.619 1.622 1.270 1.470 1.472 0.971 1.515 1.498 1.389 1.464 Ca 0.007 0.005 0.006 0.010 0.008 0.008 0.048 0.007 0.006 0.008 0.007 Total 2.997 2.997 3.000 3.006 3.011 3.008 2.969 3.005 3.002 3.007 3.014 End members (%) Fo 71.8 81.8 81.7 63.8 73.3 73.5 51.6 75.9 75.2 69.6 72.7 Fa 28.2 18.2 18.3 36.2 26.7 26.5 48.4 24.1 24.8 30.4 27.3Appendix A: continued Elevation (m): 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 275 275 275 275 Sample: MM94-258 MM94-258 MM94-258 MM94-258 MM94-258 MM94-258 MM94-258 MM94-256 MM94-256 MM94-256 MM94-256 Crystal: 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 1 1 1 2 Zone: Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Oxides (wt.%) SiO 2 37.56 36.33 37.50 37.41 34.73 37.55 37.66 35.99 39.01 39.84 36.74 Cr 2 O 3 0.02 0.00 0.01 0.04 0.02 0.02 0.06 0.01 0.00 0.03 0.02 FeO 24.22 30.67 23.67 24.51 34.16 23.72 23.09 33.68 15.42 14.78 28.56 MnO 0.34 0.61 0.30 0.32 0.56 0.32 0.29 0.41 0.19 0.20 0.38 NiO 0.12 0.06 0.10 0.13 0.03 0.14 0.15 0.11 0.24 0.22 0.17 MgO 36.76 31.54 36.85 36.95 27.24 37.32 37.38 29.62 44.00 44.52 33.06 CaO 0.24 0.32 0.23 0.26 0.51 0.22 0.25 0.37 0.25 0.25 0.35 Total 99.26 99.51 98.66 99.63 97.25 99.31 98.88 100.19 99.11 99.83 99.28 Cations (p.f.u.) Si 0.996 0.993 0.997 0.990 0.994 0.993 0.997 0.992 0.993 1.002 0.996 Cr 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.001 Fe 2+ 0.537 0.701 0.526 0.542 0.818 0.525 0.511 0.776 0.328 0.311 0.647 Mn 0.008 0.014 0.007 0.007 0.014 0.007 0.006 0.010 0.004 0.004 0.009 Ni 0.003 0.001 0.002 0.003 0.001 0.003 0.003 0.003 0.005 0.004 0.004 Mg 1.452 1.285 1.461 1.457 1.162 1.471 1.475 1.216 1.670 1.668 1.336 Ca 0.007 0.009 0.007 0.007 0.016 0.006 0.007 0.011 0.007 0.007 0.010 Total 3.002 3.004 3.000 3.007 3.004 3.006 3.002 3.008 3.007 2.997 3.002 End members (%) Fo 73.0 64.7 73.5 72.9 58.7 73.7 74.3 61.1 83.6 84.3 67.4 Fa 27.0 35.3 26.5 27.1 41.3 26.3 25.7 38.9 16.4 15.7 32.6Appendix A: continued Elevation (m): 275 275 275 275 275 275 275 275 290 290 290 Sample: MM94-256 MM94-256 MM94-256 MM94-256 MM94-256 MM94-256 MM94-256 MM94-256 MM94-253 MM94-253 MM94-253 Crystal: 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 1 1 1 Zone: Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Oxides (wt.%) SiO 2 38.54 38.59 35.59 38.69 38.70 35.35 39.25 38.96 37.86 38.81 39.34 Cr 2 O 3 0.00 0.04 0.03 0.06 0.02 0.02 0.00 0.08 0.02 0.00 0.06 FeO 19.22 17.67 35.86 17.68 17.81 34.04 15.54 15.79 24.87 17.51 15.68 MnO 0.20 0.28 0.47 0.20 0.25 0.49 0.21 0.23 0.34 0.30 0.18 NiO 0.23 0.25 0.03 0.20 0.20 0.15 0.30 0.23 0.11 0.24 0.30 MgO 41.62 42.18 27.24 42.26 42.31 28.71 44.18 43.92 36.10 42.66 43.58 CaO 0.13 0.18 0.37 0.26 0.30 0.42 0.26 0.28 0.34 0.27 0.25 Total 99.94 99.18 99.60 99.34 99.58 99.18 99.74 99.50 99.63 99.79 99.40 Cations (p.f.u.) Si 0.990 0.992 0.998 0.993 0.991 0.988 0.993 0.990 1.002 0.991 0.999 Cr 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.002 0.000 0.000 0.001 Fe 2+ 0.413 0.380 0.841 0.379 0.381 0.796 0.329 0.335 0.551 0.374 0.333 Mn 0.004 0.006 0.011 0.004 0.005 0.012 0.004 0.005 0.008 0.006 0.004 Ni 0.005 0.005 0.001 0.004 0.004 0.003 0.006 0.005 0.002 0.005 0.006 Mg 1.593 1.617 1.139 1.616 1.615 1.197 1.667 1.663 1.424 1.624 1.650 Ca 0.004 0.005 0.011 0.007 0.008 0.013 0.007 0.008 0.010 0.007 0.007 Total 3.008 3.006 3.001 3.005 3.006 3.009 3.007 3.008 2.997 3.009 3.000 End members (%) Fo 79.4 81.0 57.5 81.0 80.9 60.1 83.5 83.2 72.1 81.3 83.2 Fa 20.6 19.0 42.5 19.0 19.1 39.9 16.5 16.8 27.9 18.7 16.8Appendix A: continued Elevation (m): 290 290 290 290 290 290 290 290 290 290 290 Sample: MM94-253 MM94-253 MM94-253 MM94-253 MM94-253 MM94-253 MM94-253 MM94-253 MM94-253 MM94-253 MM94-253 Crystal: 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 Zone: Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Oxides (wt.%) SiO 2 37.74 39.39 39.04 38.07 38.57 38.61 38.32 39.03 39.08 36.01 38.77 Cr 2 O 3 0.03 0.05 0.06 0.03 0.04 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.01 0.00 0.03 FeO 21.44 14.99 15.89 21.03 17.86 19.01 19.45 16.33 17.15 32.07 17.23 MnO 0.21 0.24 0.17 0.28 0.19 0.27 0.22 0.25 0.20 0.36 0.21 NiO 0.21 0.30 0.27 0.19 0.21 0.22 0.18 0.17 0.22 0.10 0.21 MgO 40.16 44.64 43.78 39.39 42.23 41.28 41.09 43.49 42.92 30.31 42.70 CaO 0.28 0.28 0.29 0.30 0.19 0.16 0.29 0.25 0.27 0.34 0.20 Total 100.06 99.89 99.50 99.29 99.29 99.57 99.59 99.58 99.85 99.19 99.36 Cations (p.f.u.) Si 0.980 0.993 0.992 0.994 0.991 0.994 0.990 0.992 0.994 0.995 0.993 Cr 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.001 Fe 2+ 0.466 0.316 0.338 0.459 0.384 0.409 0.420 0.347 0.365 0.741 0.369 Mn 0.005 0.005 0.004 0.006 0.004 0.006 0.005 0.005 0.004 0.008 0.004 Ni 0.004 0.006 0.006 0.004 0.004 0.005 0.004 0.004 0.004 0.002 0.004 Mg 1.555 1.677 1.658 1.533 1.618 1.584 1.582 1.649 1.628 1.248 1.630 Ca 0.008 0.008 0.008 0.008 0.005 0.004 0.008 0.007 0.007 0.010 0.006 Total 3.018 3.006 3.007 3.005 3.008 3.003 3.009 3.005 3.004 3.004 3.006 End members (%) Fo 76.9 84.1 83.1 77.0 80.8 79.5 79.0 82.6 81.7 62.7 81.5 Fa 23.1 15.9 16.9 23.0 19.2 20.5 21.0 17.4 18.3 37.3 18.5Appendix A: continued Elevation (m): 290 290 290 290 375 375 375 375 375 375 375 Sample: MM94-253 MM94-253 MM94-253 MM94-253 MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-242 Crystal: 5 6 6 6 2 2 2 4 4 4 5 Zone: Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Oxides (wt.%) SiO 2 38.89 37.13 38.51 38.45 37.04 38.09 38.28 36.39 38.42 38.32 36.77 Cr 2 O 3 0.00 0.00 0.02 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.02 0.00 0.05 0.03 0.02 FeO 17.84 23.79 18.09 19.37 25.64 20.97 20.56 28.90 18.82 18.71 29.15 MnO 0.28 0.31 0.25 0.23 0.35 0.28 0.26 0.42 0.23 0.24 0.38 NiO 0.19 0.12 0.22 0.18 0.08 0.14 0.15 0.14 0.22 0.17 0.03 MgO 42.17 37.22 42.20 41.10 35.75 39.82 40.04 33.08 41.66 41.32 32.53 CaO 0.20 0.36 0.19 0.19 0.29 0.28 0.24 0.30 0.25 0.25 0.32 Total 99.57 98.93 99.47 99.51 99.15 99.58 99.55 99.22 99.64 99.02 99.22 Cations (p.f.u.) Si 0.996 0.987 0.989 0.992 0.991 0.990 0.994 0.990 0.989 0.992 0.999 Cr 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.000 Fe 2+ 0.382 0.529 0.389 0.418 0.574 0.456 0.446 0.657 0.405 0.405 0.663 Mn 0.006 0.007 0.005 0.005 0.008 0.006 0.006 0.010 0.005 0.005 0.009 Ni 0.004 0.002 0.004 0.004 0.002 0.003 0.003 0.003 0.005 0.004 0.001 Mg 1.610 1.475 1.616 1.581 1.426 1.544 1.549 1.341 1.599 1.594 1.318 Ca 0.005 0.010 0.005 0.005 0.008 0.008 0.007 0.009 0.007 0.007 0.009 Total 3.003 3.011 3.010 3.006 3.008 3.007 3.005 3.009 3.010 3.007 2.999 End members (%) Fo 80.8 73.6 80.6 79.1 71.3 77.2 77.6 67.1 79.8 79.7 66.5 Fa 19.2 26.4 19.4 20.9 28.7 22.8 22.4 32.9 20.2 20.3 33.5Appendix A: continued Elevation (m): 375 375 410 410 410 410 410 410 410 410 410 Sample: MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-240 MM94-240 MM94-240 MM94-240 MM94-240 MM94-240 MM94-240 MM94-240 MM94-240 Crystal: 5 5 1 1 1 3 3 3 5 5 5 Zone: Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Oxides (wt.%) SiO 2 36.84 37.04 38.72 39.27 39.29 35.29 39.04 38.60 38.80 38.54 38.02 Cr 2 O 3 0.01 0.02 0.04 0.00 0.01 0.07 0.00 0.02 0.02 0.01 0.00 FeO 26.86 26.64 18.32 16.50 16.72 28.23 17.81 17.84 19.16 21.33 21.34 MnO 0.37 0.29 0.23 0.20 0.21 0.54 0.22 0.24 0.31 0.26 0.31 NiO 0.09 0.09 0.28 0.21 0.21 0.09 0.18 0.16 0.19 0.14 0.16 MgO 34.81 34.97 41.82 43.15 43.26 27.77 42.09 42.11 41.22 39.90 39.58 CaO 0.34 0.34 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.50 0.22 0.23 0.29 0.21 0.25 Total 99.32 99.40 99.67 99.60 99.97 92.49 99.56 99.19 100.00 100.40 99.65 Cations (p.f.u.) Si 0.990 0.993 0.994 0.999 0.996 1.032 0.999 0.993 0.996 0.994 0.990 Cr 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.002 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Fe 2+ 0.604 0.597 0.393 0.351 0.355 0.690 0.381 0.384 0.411 0.460 0.465 Mn 0.008 0.007 0.005 0.004 0.005 0.013 0.005 0.005 0.007 0.006 0.007 Ni 0.002 0.002 0.006 0.004 0.004 0.002 0.004 0.003 0.004 0.003 0.003 Mg 1.394 1.397 1.600 1.636 1.635 1.210 1.606 1.614 1.577 1.535 1.537 Ca 0.010 0.010 0.007 0.007 0.007 0.016 0.006 0.006 0.008 0.006 0.007 Total 3.008 3.006 3.005 3.001 3.002 2.964 3.001 3.006 3.003 3.004 3.009 End members (%) Fo 69.8 70.1 80.3 82.3 82.2 63.7 80.8 80.8 79.3 76.9 76.8 Fa 30.2 29.9 19.7 17.7 17.8 36.3 19.2 19.2 20.7 23.1 23.2Appendix A: continued Elevation (m): 410 410 410 Sample: MM94-240 MM94-240 MM94-240 Crystal: 6 6 6 Zone: Rim Mid Core Oxides (wt.%) SiO 2 37.67 39.77 39.79 Cr 2 O 3 0.05 0.01 0.04 FeO 24.53 14.39 14.48 MnO 0.34 0.23 0.23 NiO 0.16 0.21 0.26 MgO 35.99 45.05 45.06 CaO 0.38 0.29 0.27 Total 99.13 99.94 100.13 Cations (p.f.u.) Si 1.002 0.998 0.997 Cr 0.001 0.000 0.001 Fe 2+ 0.545 0.302 0.303 Mn 0.008 0.005 0.005 Ni 0.003 0.004 0.005 Mg 1.426 1.685 1.683 Ca 0.011 0.008 0.007 Total 2.997 3.001 3.002 End members (%) Fo 72.3 84.8 84.7 Fa 27.7 15.2 15.3Appendix B: Microprobe analyses of clinopyroxene grains from the Baie Charrier section Elevation (m): 375 375 375 375 375 375 375 375 375 410 410 Sample: MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-242 MM94-240 MM94-240 Crystal: 1 1 1 3 3 3 6 6 6 2 2 Zone: Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Core Rim Mid Oxides (wt.%) SiO 2 50.02 50.46 51.00 49.65 50.40 50.89 49.55 49.85 50.18 50.12 50.52 TiO 2 1.47 1.21 1.03 1.44 1.13 1.16 1.56 1.42 1.06 0.96 0.64 Al 2 O 3 3.32 2.66 2.27 2.11 2.54 2.69 3.10 3.33 2.77 3.68 4.43 Cr 2 O 3 0.31 0.32 0.28 0.04 0.25 0.27 0.19 0.40 0.41 0.37 0.64 FeO 8.44 8.70 8.62 10.97 8.53 8.06 9.36 8.02 7.80 6.29 5.81 MnO 0.19 0.16 0.18 0.24 0.21 0.15 0.15 0.21 0.21 0.17 0.17 MgO 14.55 15.53 15.83 14.13 15.40 15.30 14.40 15.14 15.63 15.97 16.98 CaO 20.38 19.50 19.43 19.67 19.88 20.39 20.45 20.45 20.16 21.02 19.07 Na 2 O 0.33 0.30 0.30 0.31 0.31 0.33 0.31 0.33 0.29 0.25 0.41 Total 99.00 98.84 98.94 98.55 98.65 99.25 99.08 99.16 98.50 98.83 98.67 Cations (p.f.u.) Si 1.881 1.897 1.913 1.897 1.900 1.903 1.872 1.870 1.891 1.872 1.874 Ti 0.042 0.034 0.029 0.041 0.032 0.033 0.044 0.040 0.030 0.027 0.018 Al 0.147 0.118 0.100 0.095 0.113 0.118 0.138 0.147 0.123 0.162 0.194 Cr 0.009 0.010 0.008 0.001 0.007 0.008 0.006 0.012 0.012 0.011 0.019 Fe 2+ 0.243 0.242 0.241 0.308 0.230 0.226 0.250 0.208 0.202 0.150 0.147 Fe 3+ 0.022 0.032 0.029 0.043 0.038 0.026 0.046 0.044 0.044 0.047 0.033 Mn 0.006 0.005 0.006 0.008 0.007 0.005 0.005 0.007 0.007 0.005 0.005 Mg 0.816 0.871 0.886 0.805 0.865 0.853 0.811 0.847 0.878 0.890 0.939 Ca 0.821 0.786 0.781 0.805 0.803 0.817 0.828 0.822 0.814 0.841 0.758 Na 0.024 0.022 0.022 0.023 0.023 0.024 0.023 0.024 0.021 0.018 0.029 Total 4.011 4.016 4.015 4.025 4.019 4.013 4.023 4.022 4.022 4.023 4.017 AlIV 0.119 0.103 0.087 0.103 0.100 0.097 0.128 0.130 0.109 0.128 0.126 AlVI 0.028 0.015 0.013 0.000 0.013 0.021 0.010 0.018 0.014 0.034 0.068 Mg# 0.77 0.78 0.79 0.72 0.79 0.79 0.76 0.80 0.81 0.86 0.86 Fe 2+ /(Fe 2+ +Fe 3+ ) 0.92 0.88 0.89 0.88 0.86 0.90 0.85 0.83 0.82 0.76 0.82 End members (%) Wo 43.7 41.4 40.9 42.0 42.3 43.1 43.8 43.8 43.0 44.7 41.1 En 43.4 45.9 46.4 42.0 45.6 45.0 42.9 45.1 46.4 47.3 50.9 Fs 12.9 12.7 12.6 16.1 12.1 11.9 13.2 11.1 10.7 8.0 8.0Appendix B: continued Elevation (m): 410 410 410 410 Sample: MM94-240 MM94-240 MM94-240 MM94-240 Crystal: 2 4 4 4 Zone: Core Rim Mid Core Oxides (wt.%) SiO 2 51.25 48.72 48.01 48.40 TiO 2 0.53 1.05 1.14 1.13 Al 2 O 3 3.65 6.42 6.42 6.30 Cr 2 O 3 0.63 0.53 0.58 0.55 FeO 5.28 6.83 6.96 6.92 MnO 0.09 0.10 0.17 0.17 MgO 17.47 14.87 14.85 14.99 CaO 19.37 19.62 19.83 19.85 Na 2 O 0.38 0.49 0.45 0.48 Total 98.66 98.63 98.41 98.78 Cations (p.f.u.) Si 1.896 1.822 1.805 1.812 Ti 0.015 0.030 0.032 0.032 Al 0.159 0.283 0.285 0.278 Cr 0.018 0.016 0.017 0.016 Fe 2+ 0.136 0.179 0.164 0.162 Fe 3+ 0.028 0.034 0.055 0.054 Mn 0.003 0.003 0.005 0.005 Mg 0.964 0.829 0.832 0.837 Ca 0.768 0.786 0.799 0.796 Na 0.027 0.035 0.033 0.035 Total 4.014 4.017 4.028 4.027 AlIV 0.104 0.178 0.195 0.188 AlVI 0.056 0.105 0.090 0.090 Mg# 0.88 0.82 0.84 0.84 Fe 2+ /(Fe 2+ +Fe 3+ ) 0.83 0.84 0.75 0.75 End members (%) En 41.1 43.8 44.5 44.3 Fs 51.6 46.2 46.4 46.6 Wo 7.3 10.0 9.1 9.1Appendix C: Thin Section Index  83 D H - 2 3 0            Appendix C: Thin Section Index  84 D H - 2 3 3         Appendix C: Thin Section Index  85 D H - 2 3 6       Appendix C: Thin Section Index  86 D H - 2 3 8         Appendix C: Thin Section Index  87 D H - 2 4 0      Appendix C: Thin Section Index  88 D H - 2 4 2      Appendix C: Thin Section Index  89 D H - 2 4 4           Appendix C: Thin Section Index  90 D H - 2 5 3            Appendix C: Thin Section Index  91 D H - 2 5 6           Appendix C: Thin Section Index  92 D H - 2 5 8   

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