UBC Undergraduate Research

Water-based oil spill modeling software : benefits, requirements & recommendations 2012

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
Lee_Caitlyn_GEOG_419_2012.pdf
Lee_Caitlyn_GEOG_419_2012.pdf [ 3.47MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 1.0103539.json
JSON-LD: 1.0103539+ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 1.0103539.xml
RDF/JSON: 1.0103539+rdf.json
Turtle: 1.0103539+rdf-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 1.0103539+rdf-ntriples.txt
Citation
1.0103539.ris

Full Text

	
  	
  	
   	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   An	
   analysis	
   of	
   water-­‐based	
   oil	
   spill	
   modeling	
   and	
   the	
   available	
   software	
   that	
   predicts,	
   simulates	
   and	
   models	
  the	
  trajectory	
  oil	
  spills	
  incorporating	
  coastal,	
  hydrodynamic	
  and	
  meteorological	
  conditions.	
   Water-­‐Based	
  Oil	
  Spill	
  Modeling	
  Software:	
  	
   Benefits,	
  Requirements	
  &	
  Recommendations	
   	
  	
  Report	
  prepared	
  at	
  the	
  request	
  of	
  YVR’s	
  Environmental	
  Specialist	
  Patrick	
  McGuiness	
  in	
  partial	
  fulfillment	
  of	
  UBC	
  GEOG	
  419:	
  Research	
  in	
  Environmental	
  Geography,	
  	
   	
  for	
  Dr.	
  David	
  Brownstein	
   By:	
  Caitlyn	
  Lee	
   	
   UBC	
  GEOGRAPHY	
   ‘12	
   08	
  Fall	
   	
   1	
   	
   Table	
  of	
  Contents	
   	
   	
   	
   Paper	
  Terminology…………………………………….……………………………….2	
   Introduction……………………………………………………….…………………….…3	
   YVR	
  Background	
  &	
  Rationale………………………………..…….…………………….…3	
   Literature	
  Review	
  &	
  Methods……………………………………………….….…4	
   Modeling	
  Benefits…………………………………………………….…………………5	
   The	
  Three	
  Pillars:	
  Ecological,	
  Economic	
  &	
  Social…………………………….………….5	
   Model	
  Requirements……………………………..……….………………………....7	
   Model	
  Types……………………………………………………………………………....8	
   Available	
  Software	
  Comparison…………………………………………………10	
   OILMAP………………………………………………………….……………………………11	
   GNOME……………………………………………………………………….……………...13	
   Limitations	
  &	
  Future	
  Work………………………………………………………..14	
   Recommendations…………………………………………………………………….15	
   Bibliography………………………………………………………………………………16	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   2	
   Paper	
  Terminology	
  	
   	
   “WOMS”	
  =	
  Water-­‐Based	
  Oil	
  Spill	
  Modeling	
  Software:	
  Computer	
  programs	
  and	
  systems	
  to	
  increase	
  knowledge	
  on	
  the	
  trajectory	
  and	
  fate	
  of	
  oil	
  spills,	
  which	
  enhances	
  oil	
  spill	
  response	
  capabilities.	
  Can	
  be	
  used	
  as	
  a	
  decision	
  support	
  tool	
  to	
  predict	
  the	
  behavior	
  of	
  various	
  oils/fuels	
  in	
  the	
  water	
  column	
  based	
  on	
  hydrodynamic	
  (water	
  forces/motions)	
  and	
  meteorological	
  (weather)	
  data.	
   YVR:	
  Vancouver	
  International	
  Airport	
  (British	
  Columbia,	
  Canada)	
   Oil	
  Type	
  à 	
  Fuel,	
  Jet	
  A	
  Fuel,	
  Oil	
  Spill:	
  In	
  this	
  study,	
  we	
  are	
  not	
  distinguishing	
  between	
  types	
  of	
  fuel	
  or	
  oil.	
  All	
  disperse	
  in	
  slightly	
  different	
  fashions	
  but	
  within	
  OMS	
  (Water-­‐Based	
  Oil	
  Spill	
  Modeling	
  Software)	
  the	
  user	
  can	
  select	
  an	
  oil	
  type	
  input	
  from	
  the	
  oil	
  type	
  database.	
   Plume	
  of	
  Fuel:	
  An	
  area	
  in	
  water	
  containing	
  oil/fuel	
  released	
  from	
  an	
  aircraft	
  or	
  tank	
  farm	
  that	
  spreads	
  in	
  the	
  environment	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  action	
  of	
  hydrodynamic	
  forces	
  and	
  meteorological	
  conditions.	
   Oil	
  Slick:	
  An	
  area	
  on	
  the	
  surface	
  of	
  water	
  caused	
  by	
  the	
  presence	
  of	
  oil.	
   Catastrophic	
  Oil	
  Spill:	
  Large-­‐scale	
  oil	
  spills	
  greater	
  than	
  1,000	
  L.	
   Oil	
  Spill	
  Trajectory/Simulation:	
  Predicting	
  the	
  route	
  of	
  an	
  oil	
  slick	
  and	
  plume	
  over	
  time,	
  while	
  also	
  describing	
  the	
  path,	
  movement,	
  behavior	
  and	
  time	
  of	
  oil	
  in	
  water.	
   Data	
  Types:	
  The	
  variables	
  that	
  WOMS	
  must	
  consider	
  and	
  have	
  available	
  for	
  inputs	
  for	
  accuracy	
  -­‐	
  hydrodynamic,	
  meteorological,	
  base	
  maps,	
  oil	
  types,	
  source	
  etc.…	
   YVR	
  Reference	
  Map:	
  Canada’s	
  West	
  Coast	
  in	
  Richmond:	
  Vancouver	
  Lower	
  Mainland,	
  B.C.	
   	
   	
   3	
   Introduction	
   	
  In	
  1989	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  catastrophic	
  oil	
  spill	
  in	
  Alaska’s	
  Prince	
  William	
  Sound,	
  known	
  as	
  the	
  Exxon	
  Valdez	
  Spill,	
  where	
  an	
  oil	
  tanker	
  spilled	
  11	
  million	
  gallons	
  of	
  crude	
  oil	
  (You	
  &	
  Leyffer,	
  2011).	
  Without	
  the	
  development	
  or	
  use	
  of	
  an	
  oil	
  spill	
  model	
  to	
  support	
  effective	
  response	
  planning,	
  the	
  spill	
  spread	
  to	
  devastate	
  and	
  contaminate	
  the	
  region	
  -­‐	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  catastrophic	
  human-­‐caused	
  environmental	
  disasters	
  (Li	
  et	
  al,	
  1998).	
  Following	
  the	
  Exxon	
  Valdez	
  spill,	
  the	
  need	
  for	
  oil	
  spill	
  mapping	
  technology	
  was	
  recognized,	
  and	
  this	
  major	
  event	
  received	
  extensive	
  attention	
  which	
  helped	
  kick-­‐start	
  the	
  development	
  of	
  water-­‐based	
  oil	
  spill	
  modeling	
  software	
  (WOMS).	
  YVR’s	
  Environmental	
  Specialist	
  Patrick	
  McGuiness	
  sponsored	
  my	
  research	
  question	
  for	
  this	
  project	
  regarding	
  water-­‐based	
  oil	
  spill	
  modeling	
  software	
  (WOMS).	
  	
  The	
  central	
  focus	
  of	
  my	
  research	
  is	
  to	
  explore	
  the	
  uses,	
  benefits,	
  requirements	
  and	
  types	
  of	
  WOMS	
  for	
  YVR’s	
  specific	
  coastal	
  needs,	
  then	
  to	
  locate	
  and	
  recommend	
  available	
  WOMS	
  that	
  YVR’s	
  environmental	
  specialists	
  can	
  integrate	
  into	
  their	
  “Airport	
  Authority	
  Spill	
  Response	
  Plan”.	
  This	
  paper	
  is	
  meant	
  to	
  educate	
  and	
  deliver	
  general	
  awareness	
  to	
  the	
  reader	
  regarding	
  all	
  aspects	
  of	
  WOMS,	
  and	
  provide	
  real	
  examples	
  of	
  WOMS	
  that	
  are	
  available	
  for	
  use.	
  Catastrophic	
  oil	
  spills,	
  such	
  as	
  the	
  Exxon	
  Valdez	
  Spill	
  and	
  the	
  recent	
  BP	
  oil	
  spill	
  in	
  the	
  Gulf	
  of	
  Mexico,	
  have	
  illustrated	
  the	
  extreme	
  importance	
  of	
  developing	
  efficient	
  oil	
  spill	
  response	
  planning	
  strategies	
  (You	
  &	
  Leyffer,	
  2011).	
  The	
  recent	
  development	
  of	
  oil	
  spill	
  modeling	
  software	
  will	
  further	
  strengthen	
  and	
  improve	
  spill	
  response	
  strategies	
  and	
  actions,	
  while	
  reducing	
  environmental	
  and	
  social	
  impacts.	
  	
   YVR	
  Background	
  &	
  Rationale	
  Due	
  to	
  the	
  risks	
  and	
  dangers	
  associated	
  with	
  a	
  potential	
  catastrophic	
  fuel	
  spill	
  (>1,000	
  L),	
  YVR	
  airport	
  authority	
  wants	
  to	
  locate	
  the	
  appropriate	
  software	
  available	
  to	
  predict	
  the	
  movement	
  and	
  dispersion	
  of	
  fuel	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  deploy	
  their	
  protocol	
  containment	
  measures.	
  YVR	
  is	
  Canada’s	
  second	
  largest	
  international	
  airport,	
  and	
  its	
  coastal	
  geographic	
  location	
  is	
  uniquely	
  placed	
  with	
  major	
  waterways	
  immediately	
  beside	
  it.	
  Currently,	
  YVR	
  airport	
  authority	
  does	
  not	
  have	
  the	
  software	
  tools	
  in-­‐house	
  to	
  map,	
  simulate	
  or	
  predict	
  the	
  movement	
  of	
  fuel	
  over	
  time	
  in	
  the	
  case	
  of	
  catastrophic	
  spill.	
  Given	
  the	
  1.3	
  billion	
  liters	
  of	
  jet	
  fuel	
  used	
  at	
  YVR	
  annually	
  (SRP,	
  2010),	
  the	
  Airport	
  Authority	
  is	
  regularly	
  preparing	
  to	
  manage	
  and	
  prevent	
  fuel	
  spills.	
  	
  The	
  major	
  concern	
  regarding	
  hazardous	
  spills	
  is	
  the	
  possibility	
  of	
  fuel	
  entering	
  the	
  water	
  bodies	
  that	
  are	
  in	
  direct	
  contact	
  with	
  YVR’s	
  perimeter	
  -­‐	
  The	
  Fraser	
  River,	
  and	
  The	
  Georgia	
  Straight.	
  These	
  two	
  waterways	
  in	
  contact	
  with	
  YVR	
  are	
  very	
  complex,	
  and	
  oil	
  spill	
  models	
  must	
  be	
  coupled	
  with	
  accurate	
  numerical	
  hydrodynamic	
  and	
  meteorological	
  models	
  that	
   	
   4	
   consider	
  the	
  individual	
  coastal	
  characteristics	
  (Li	
  et	
  al,	
  1998).	
  Specifically	
  for	
  YVR,	
  The	
  Georgia	
  Straight	
  forms	
  a	
  deep	
  waterway	
  with	
  strongly	
  modulated	
  estuarine	
  currents,	
  resulting	
  in	
  a	
  complex	
  flow	
  regime	
  dominated	
  by	
  the	
  freshwater	
  plume	
  of	
  The	
  Fraser	
  River	
  (McClintock	
  et	
  al,	
  2010).	
  	
  Incidents	
  that	
  could	
  cause	
  a	
  catastrophic	
  spill	
  would	
  be	
  from	
  an	
  aircraft	
  emergency	
  landing	
  in	
  the	
  foreshore	
  or	
  an	
  overflowing	
  spill	
  from	
  a	
  tank	
  farm.	
  The	
  fuel	
  volume	
  of	
  an	
  aircraft	
  spill	
  would	
  range	
  in	
  the	
  thousands	
  of	
  liters,	
  and	
  that	
  of	
  a	
  tank	
  farm	
  would	
  be	
  in	
  the	
  millions	
  of	
  liters.	
  One	
  of	
  YVR’s	
  key	
  goals	
  within	
  their	
  annual	
  environmental	
  reports	
  is	
  to	
  reduce	
  spills	
  to	
  zero	
  per	
  year,	
  but	
  this	
  has	
  only	
  been	
  accomplished	
  once.	
  The	
  airport	
  has	
  had	
  several	
  spills	
  over	
  100	
  liters,	
  with	
  the	
  largest	
  spill	
  of	
  18,000	
  liters	
  in	
  1998	
  (SRP,	
  2010).	
  Currently,	
  YVR	
  has	
  successfully	
  established	
  an	
  emergency	
  response	
  plan	
  and	
  team,	
  environmental	
  management	
  programs	
  (contaminated	
  sites,	
  hazardous	
  material,	
  environmental	
  impact	
  assessment,	
  water	
  quality,	
  climate	
  change,	
  waste,	
  natural	
  habitat	
  and	
  air	
  quality),	
  coast	
  guard,	
  containment	
  methods	
  and	
  an	
  Airport	
  Authority	
  Spill	
  Response	
  Plan.	
  With	
  all	
  the	
  these	
  great	
  practices	
  already	
  in	
  place,	
  my	
  research	
  is	
  limited	
  to	
  WOMS	
  details	
  and	
  recommendations	
  in	
  which	
  YVR	
  could	
  integrate	
  into	
  their	
  existing	
  Airport	
  Authority	
  plans	
  and	
  teams.	
  	
  	
   Literature	
  Review	
  &	
  Research	
  Methods	
   	
  The	
  academic	
  literature	
  research	
  I	
  conducted	
  was	
  primarily	
  to	
  gain	
  insight	
  on	
  the	
  importance	
  and	
  requirements	
  for	
  a	
  WOMS.	
  Before	
  I	
  could	
  search	
  for	
  available	
  software	
  models,	
  I	
  needed	
  to	
  build	
  an	
  educated	
  framework	
  so	
  I	
  could	
  properly	
  judge	
  and	
  recommend	
  specific	
  software	
  models.	
  	
  An	
  academic	
  search	
  input	
  of	
  “oil	
  spills”,	
  “water-­‐based	
  fuel	
  spill	
  models”	
  or	
  “oil	
  spill	
  modeling	
  software”	
  returns	
  a	
  vast	
  literature	
  that	
  is	
  somewhat	
  related,	
  but	
  usually	
  slightly	
  different	
  than	
  the	
  specifics	
  for	
  my	
  research	
  location,	
  type	
  and	
  usage.	
  Much	
  of	
  the	
  academic	
  literature	
  is	
  concerning	
  deep-­‐water	
  (non-­‐coastal)	
  oil	
  spills	
  such	
  as	
  the	
  BP	
  oil	
  spill,	
  or	
  scientific	
  lab	
  experiments	
  unrelated	
  to	
  my	
  desired	
  findings.	
  Through	
  examining	
  many	
  articles,	
  I	
  soon	
  found	
  studies	
  that	
  evaluated	
  coastal	
  oil	
  spill	
  models	
  and	
  provided	
  great	
  insight	
  on	
  benefits,	
  uses	
  and	
  requirements	
  of	
  the	
  models.	
  I	
  then	
  synthesized	
  my	
  information	
  into	
  a	
  table	
  so	
  I	
  could	
  conduct	
  a	
  proper	
  critique	
  of	
  each	
  WOMS	
  I	
  found	
  in	
  the	
  next	
  step	
  of	
  my	
  project,	
  primarily	
  through	
  grey	
  literature	
  searches.	
  Before	
  a	
  review	
  of	
  the	
  models	
  I	
  found	
  applicable,	
  and	
  my	
  recommendations	
  to	
  YVR,	
  it	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  understand	
  the	
  benefits	
  and	
  requirements	
  of	
  these	
  WOMS.	
   	
   5	
   Model	
  Benefits	
   	
  Water-­‐based	
  oil	
  spill	
  modeling	
  software	
  (WOMS)	
  has	
  emerged	
  within	
  the	
  21st	
  century	
  with	
  the	
  increased	
  acceptance	
  and	
  use	
  of	
  computers,	
  technology	
  and	
  electronic	
  communications	
  in	
  the	
  workplace	
  (Chao	
  et	
  al,	
  2000).	
  With	
  this	
  new	
  industrial	
  and	
  commercial	
  use	
  of	
  WOMS,	
  innovative	
  technologies	
  can	
  answer	
  many	
  questions	
  response	
  planners	
  have	
  in	
  regards	
  to	
  an	
  oil	
  spill.	
  Spill	
  models	
  provide	
  information	
  to	
  responders	
  and	
  some	
  example	
  questions	
  that	
  a	
  WOMS	
  can	
  answer	
  for	
  them	
  are:	
   ü Where	
  is	
  the	
  oil	
  slick	
  directed?	
  	
   ü What	
  is	
  the	
  speed	
  of	
  movement?	
  	
   ü What	
  are	
  the	
  weathering	
  and	
  spreading	
  characteristics	
  of	
  the	
  oil	
  under	
  the	
  influences	
  of	
  the	
  present	
  hydrodynamic	
  and	
  meteorological	
  conditions?	
  	
   ü What	
  coastal	
  environments	
  are	
  likely	
  to	
  be	
  impacted?	
  	
   ü Where	
  do	
  we	
  place	
  the	
  booms	
  and	
  containment	
  methods?	
  	
   ü How	
  much	
  time	
  do	
  we	
  have?	
  WOMS	
  will	
  help	
  answer	
  all	
  of	
  these	
  questions	
  more	
  effectively	
  and	
  accurately	
  than	
  any	
  other	
  method	
  during	
  a	
  spill	
  response.	
  A	
  primary	
  purpose	
  of	
  WOMS	
  is	
  to	
  reduce	
  the	
  environmental	
  impacts	
  of	
  spills	
  through	
  improved	
  selection	
  of	
  spill	
  response	
  planning	
  and	
  strategies	
  (Reed	
  et	
  al,	
  1999).	
  Conducting	
  various	
  spill	
  scenarios	
  and	
  simulations	
  allows	
  for	
  a	
  greater	
  understanding	
  of	
  oil	
  behavior	
  and	
  practices	
  for	
  spill	
  response	
  actions.	
  When	
  spill	
  models	
  are	
  used	
  properly,	
  they	
  mitigate	
  damages	
  to	
  community	
  values,	
  and	
  provide	
  multiple	
  ecological,	
  economic	
  and	
  social	
  benefits.	
   The	
  Three	
  Pillars:	
  Ecological,	
  Economic	
  &	
  Social	
  Taking	
  advantage	
  of	
  oil	
  spill	
  models	
  and	
  integrating	
  them	
  into	
  mitigation	
  planning	
  and	
  practice	
  will	
  positively	
  impact	
  the	
  three	
  pillars	
  of	
  sustainability:	
  ecological,	
  economic	
  and	
  social	
  (Chao,	
  2000).	
  The	
  irreplaceable	
  losses	
  and	
  damages	
  inflicted	
  upon	
  the	
  environment	
  and	
  people	
  within	
  an	
  oil-­‐destructed	
  community	
  are	
  preventable	
  (Delvigne	
  &	
  Sweeney,	
  1988).	
  With	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  WOMS,	
  we	
  can	
  prepare	
  for	
  such	
  an	
  occurrence,	
  properly	
  mitigate	
  the	
  destruction	
  and	
  sustain	
  a	
  community	
  in	
  danger	
  of	
  oil	
  spill	
  damages.	
  This	
  human-­‐caused	
  catastrophic	
  event	
  is	
  preventable	
  with	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  models	
  to	
  better	
  prepare	
  and	
  protect	
  the	
  three	
  pillars	
  of	
  sustainability.	
  An	
  oil	
  spill	
  accident	
  is	
  extremely	
  harmful	
  to	
  the	
  human	
  health	
  and	
  the	
  ocean	
  environment	
  (Chao,	
  2000).	
  Coastal	
  locations	
  such	
  as	
  YVR	
  have	
  an	
  increased	
  risk	
  because	
  an	
  oil	
  spill	
  can	
  cause	
  long-­‐term	
  irreversible	
  damage	
  to	
  the	
  marine	
  environment	
  for	
  fishery	
  and	
  wildlife,	
  contaminate	
  the	
  shoreline,	
  create	
  an	
  unsuitable	
  wildlife	
  habitat	
  and	
  kill	
  many	
  organisms	
  that	
  are	
  essential	
  links	
  in	
  the	
  global	
  food	
  chain	
  (Chao,	
  2000).	
  	
  YVR	
  values	
  its	
  relationship	
  with	
  their	
  neighboring	
  communities,	
  and	
  as	
  a	
  leader	
  in	
  exceeding	
  environmental	
  standards,	
  integrating	
  a	
  WOMS	
  into	
  their	
  Airport	
  Authority	
  Spill	
   	
   6	
   Response	
  Plan	
  would	
  strengthen	
  their	
  environmental	
  performance.	
  The	
  ecological,	
  economic	
  and	
  social	
  spheres	
  are	
  all	
  interconnected,	
  and	
  taking	
  action	
  to	
  protect	
  them	
  all	
  leads	
  to	
  a	
  more	
  sustainable	
  community	
  (Fig	
  1)	
  (You,	
  2011).	
  	
  There	
  are	
  benefits	
  to	
  all	
  three	
  pillars	
  of	
  sustainability	
  that	
  could	
  be	
  effectively	
  generated	
  if	
  YVR	
  introduced	
  a	
  WOMS	
  into	
  their	
  Spill	
  Response	
  Plan.	
  Some	
  of	
  which	
  include:	
  	
   Ecological:	
   ü YVR	
  showing	
  active	
  involvement	
  in	
  the	
  environment	
  with	
  a	
  proactive	
  approach	
   ü Minimizing	
  damage	
  and	
  taking	
  action	
  to	
  protect	
  important	
  environmental	
  values	
   ü Accurate	
  models	
  and	
  mitigation	
  efforts	
  could	
  protect	
  and	
  save	
  local	
  ecosystems,	
  sensitive	
  coastal	
  habitats	
  and	
  biodiversity.	
  	
   Economic:	
   ü Accurate	
  predictions	
  for	
  spill	
  trajectory	
  saves	
  time	
  and	
  money	
  during	
  real-­‐time	
  spill	
  response	
  actions	
   ü With	
  a	
  catastrophic	
  risk	
  event	
  there	
  would	
  be	
  less	
  total	
  impact	
  and	
  loss	
   ü Avoidance	
  of	
  response	
  costs,	
  fines	
  and	
  market	
  losses	
   ü Minimizing	
  cost	
  of	
  restoration	
  	
   Social:	
   ü Community	
  respect	
  and	
  appreciate	
  to	
  YVR	
  for	
  going	
  above	
  and	
  beyond	
  their	
  required	
  environmental	
  responsibilities	
   ü Positive	
  and	
  respectable	
  reputation	
  as	
  a	
  leader	
  in	
  environmental	
  protection	
   ü Minimizing	
  social	
  disruption	
  regarding	
  community	
  health,	
  exposure	
  and	
  concerns	
  In	
  the	
  case	
  of	
  a	
  catastrophic	
  spill,	
  the	
  cost,	
  losses,	
  time	
  of	
  restoration	
  and	
  clean	
  up	
  greatly	
  exceed	
  monetary	
  costs	
  of	
  integrating	
  a	
  WOMS	
  and	
  training	
  into	
  the	
  YVR	
  spill	
  response	
  plan.	
  	
   	
   Fig.	
  1:	
  Representing	
  the	
  interconnected	
  relationship	
  between	
  the	
  three	
  pillars	
  -­‐	
  suggesting	
  that	
  they	
  are	
  all	
  related	
  and	
  sustainability	
  is	
  achieved	
  with	
  the	
  consideration	
  and	
  needs	
  of	
  all	
  three	
  realms	
  (You,	
  2011).	
   	
   	
   7	
   Model	
  Requirements	
   	
  I	
  analyzed	
  and	
  took	
  note	
  on	
  the	
  data	
  and	
  calculations	
  in	
  the	
  scientific	
  research,	
  which	
  gave	
  me	
  insight	
  to	
  the	
  most	
  important	
  inputs	
  modeling	
  software	
  must	
  include,	
  being	
  as	
  accurate	
  as	
  possible.	
  Most	
  software	
  models	
  obtain	
  their	
  own	
  basemaps	
  and	
  information	
  via	
  remote	
  sensing	
  and	
  lab	
  investigation	
  (McClintock,	
  2010).	
  The	
  lab	
  tests	
  I	
  reviewed	
  that	
  predicted	
  water-­‐based	
  oil	
  behavioral	
  characteristics	
  included	
  oil	
  droplet	
  samples,	
  box	
  models	
  and	
  scientific	
  calculations	
  (Li,	
  1998).	
  Oil	
  behavior	
  is	
  affected	
  by	
  the	
  physical,	
  chemical	
  and	
  biological	
  processes	
  defining	
  the	
  water	
  body	
  (Delvigne,	
  1988).	
  These	
  processes	
  include	
  spreading,	
  advection,	
  evaporation,	
  dissolution,	
  emulsification,	
  photo-­‐oxidation,	
  sedimentation	
  and	
  biodegradation	
  (Chao,	
  2000).	
  Oils’	
  natural	
  dispersion	
  computation	
  relies	
  on	
  the	
  sea-­‐state	
  conditions	
  and	
  it	
  is	
  required	
  for	
  assessment	
  of	
  the	
  lifetime	
  of	
  an	
  oil	
  spill	
  (Reed	
  et	
  al,	
  1999).	
  	
  Modeling	
  software	
  must	
  consider	
  the	
  natural	
  dispersion	
  of	
  oil	
  in	
  its	
  different	
  weathering	
  states	
  and	
  types	
  as	
  a	
  function	
  of	
  time	
  in	
  different	
  hydrodynamic	
  and	
  meteorological	
  conditions	
  (Delvigne,	
  1988).	
  It	
  is	
  important	
  the	
  software	
  models	
  can	
  generate	
  the	
  necessary	
  calculations	
  but	
  are	
  user	
  friendly	
  and	
  allow	
  for	
  the	
  proper	
  input	
  data	
  fields.	
  	
  While	
  some	
  models	
  have	
  3D	
  features,	
  the	
  standard	
  2D	
  surface	
  simulation	
  is	
  just	
  as	
  effective	
  because	
  more	
  than	
  90%	
  of	
  oil	
  particles	
  stay	
  in	
  the	
  upper	
  layers	
  (0-­‐16m	
  under	
  the	
  surface),	
  which	
  means	
  the	
  upper	
  waters	
  are	
  the	
  most	
  polluted	
  after	
  a	
  spill	
  (Delvigne,	
  1988).	
  I	
  have	
  created	
  a	
  list	
  of	
  key	
  data	
  requirements	
  a	
  WOMS	
  must	
  include	
  for	
  an	
  accurate	
  output	
  and	
  model	
  representation:	
   ü Hydrodynamic	
  Variables	
  –	
  Tidal	
  &	
  currents.	
  	
  Hydrodynamic	
  data	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  important	
  determinant	
  for	
  oil	
  migration	
  because	
  oil	
  movement	
  is	
  influenced	
  primarily	
  by	
  current	
  patterns	
  (Chao,	
  2000).	
  Data	
  can	
  be	
  gathered	
  from	
  current	
  meters,	
  drift	
  buoys,	
  ship	
  surveys	
  and	
  remote	
  sensing.	
   ü Meteorological	
  –	
  Weather	
  –	
  wind,	
  SST,	
  air	
  temperature.	
  Available	
  from	
  weather	
  forecasting	
  services,	
  airports	
  (historic	
  dataset),	
  offshore	
  buoys	
  and	
  the	
  Internet	
  (Salt,	
  2011).	
  Important	
  to	
  communicate	
  data	
  from	
  the	
  field	
  for	
  “real	
  time”	
  models	
  in	
  an	
  actual	
  response.	
  	
   ü Oil	
  Type	
  –	
  Modeling	
  systems	
  contain	
  an	
  oil	
  database	
  with	
  oil	
  types	
  and	
  characteristics.	
  Oil	
  types	
  behave	
  differently	
  when	
  spilled	
  on	
  water	
  and	
  it	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  have	
  such	
  a	
  database	
  within	
  the	
  modeling	
  program	
  (Chao,	
  2000).	
  	
   ü Appropriate	
  Base	
  Maps–	
  Important	
  to	
  have	
  accurate	
  basemap	
  specific/tailored	
  to	
  their	
  (YVR)	
  environmental	
  setting.	
  Most	
  models	
  have	
  remotely	
  sensed	
  basemaps	
  included	
  in	
  their	
  database.	
   	
   8	
   ü Spill	
  Source/Volume	
  –	
  In	
  our	
  case,	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  known/estimated	
  depending	
  on	
  plane	
  size	
  or	
  tank	
  farm	
  volume,	
  and	
  location	
  of	
  emergency	
  landing/spill	
  would	
  be	
  determined	
  easily	
  in	
  the	
  case	
  of	
  an	
  actual	
  incident.	
  	
  For	
  YVR’s	
  specific	
  coastal	
  location,	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  need	
  for	
  the	
  modeling	
  software	
  to	
  include	
  a	
  level	
  of	
  dynamic	
  representation	
  of	
  oil	
  in	
  the	
  coastal	
  zone.	
  Coastal	
  consideration	
  includes	
  representation	
  of	
  oil-­‐sediment	
  interactions,	
  wave	
  propagation,	
  tides,	
  surf	
  and	
  variations	
  in	
  the	
  shoreline.	
  Modeling	
  oil	
  in	
  a	
  coastal	
  environment	
  is	
  more	
  complex	
  and	
  requires	
  explicit	
  descriptions	
  of	
  the	
  processes	
  active	
  at	
  the	
  coastline	
  (You,	
  2011)	
   Model	
  Types	
   	
  A	
  large	
  number	
  of	
  oil	
  spill	
  models	
  are	
  in	
  use	
  today,	
  ranging	
  in	
  capability	
  and	
  function.	
  	
  From	
  “simple	
  trajectory,	
  or	
  particle-­‐tracking	
  models,	
  to	
  three-­‐dimensional	
  trajectory	
  and	
  fate	
  models	
  that	
  include	
  simulation	
  of	
  response	
  actions	
  and	
  estimation	
  of	
  biological	
  effects”	
  (Reed	
  et	
  al,	
  1999).	
  All	
  of	
  the	
  ranging	
  functions	
  can	
  be	
  narrowed	
  down	
  into	
  five	
  model	
  types	
  (four	
  of	
  the	
  models	
  can	
  be	
  seen	
  below	
  –	
  3D	
  model	
  type	
  is	
  missing	
  because	
  it	
  is	
  an	
  extension	
  on	
  the	
  application	
  of	
  trajectory	
  models),	
  and	
  it	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  ensure	
  the	
  type	
  being	
  used	
  incorporates	
  the	
  appropriate	
  processes	
  required	
  for	
  each	
  individual	
  model	
  (Fig.	
  2).	
   Fig.	
  2:	
  Different	
  uses	
  of	
  modeling	
  functions	
  for	
  mitigation	
  spill	
  drills	
  and	
  spill	
  response	
  (Salt,	
  2011)	
  The	
  five	
  model	
  types	
  include	
  oil	
  weathering,	
  stochastic,	
  trajectory,	
  hind-­‐cast,	
  and	
  3D	
  models.	
  For	
  YVR’s	
  specific	
  use,	
  I	
  focused	
  my	
  research	
  on	
  four	
  of	
  the	
  five	
  models	
  (excluding	
  hind-­‐cast	
  models).	
  1. The	
  Oil	
  Weathering	
  model	
  predicts	
  the	
  changes	
  in	
  oil	
  characteristics	
  that	
  can	
  occur	
  to	
  the	
  oil	
  slick	
  over	
  a	
  function	
  of	
  time,	
  while	
  under	
  the	
  influence	
  of	
  specific	
  environmental	
  conditions	
  (Salt,	
  2011).	
  The	
  environmental	
  conditions	
  that	
  influence	
  the	
  properties	
  of	
  oil	
  include	
  water	
  temperature,	
  sea-­‐state	
  (waves,	
  salinity,	
  sediment)	
  and	
  wind	
  speed,	
  all	
  of	
  which	
  are	
  closely	
  interlinked	
  (Reed	
  et	
  al,	
  1999)	
  (Fig.	
  3).	
  	
   	
   9	
   Reed	
  et	
  al,	
  1999	
   Fig.	
  3:	
  General	
  layout	
  of	
  oil	
  weathering	
  models.	
  (Reed	
  et	
  al,	
  1999)	
  2. The	
  Stochastic	
  Model	
  acts	
  as	
  a	
  probability	
  model	
  that	
  includes	
  a	
  series	
  of	
  potential	
  trajectories,	
  which	
  is	
  very	
  useful	
  for	
  mitigation	
  planning	
  and	
  spill	
  drill	
  exercises	
  (Salt,	
  2011).	
  	
  Using	
  a	
  series	
  of	
  different	
  hydrodynamic	
  and	
  meteorological	
  conditions,	
  the	
  user	
  will	
  have	
  a	
  better	
  understanding	
  of	
  oil	
  behaviors	
  and	
  characteristics	
  during	
  seasonal	
  variations,	
  and	
  how	
  oil	
  properties	
  change	
  over	
  time.	
  Historical	
  records	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  as	
  example	
  inputs	
  to	
  produce	
  a	
  simulation	
  of	
  where	
  an	
  oil	
  slick	
  might	
  travel	
  over	
  a	
  defined	
  time	
  period.	
  	
  	
  3. The	
  Trajectory/Deterministic	
  Model	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  useful	
  in	
  the	
  occurrence	
  of	
  real-­‐time	
  oil	
  spill	
  response.	
  It	
  is	
  used	
  to	
  illustrate	
  the	
  predicted	
  route	
  of	
  an	
  oil	
  slick	
  over	
  time,	
  and	
  it	
  commonly	
  includes	
  an	
  estimate	
  weathering	
  profile	
  (the	
  first	
  model	
  described)	
  under	
  the	
  hydrodynamic	
  and	
  meteorological	
  conditions	
  (Salt,	
  2011).	
  The	
  information	
  this	
  model	
  tells	
  the	
  user	
  includes:	
   ü Predicted	
  slick	
  trajectory	
  and	
  volume	
   ü Dispersion,	
  emulsification	
  and	
  evaporation	
  over	
  time	
   ü Coastlines	
  impacted	
   ü Time	
  estimate	
  and	
  duration	
  All	
  of	
  the	
  above	
  allow	
  for	
  the	
  proper	
  placement	
  of	
  YVR’s	
  containment	
  procedures	
  to	
  be	
  put	
  in	
  action,	
  with	
  an	
  accurate	
  estimate	
  of	
  slick	
  destination	
  and	
  time	
  allowance.	
  4. Hind-­‐Cast	
  Models	
  are	
  produced	
  when	
  the	
  source	
  of	
  an	
  oil	
  spill	
  is	
  unknown.	
  This	
  model	
  can	
  backtrack	
  the	
  route	
  of	
  an	
  oil	
  slick	
  and	
  illustrate	
  a	
  reverse	
  trajectory	
  (Salt,	
  2011),	
  but	
  for	
  our	
  concerns	
  with	
  YVR	
  the	
  source	
  of	
  the	
  spill	
  is	
  known.	
  	
  5. 3D	
  Models	
  are	
  similar	
  to	
  the	
  trajectory	
  model	
  but	
  include	
  a	
  more	
  sophisticated	
  approach.	
  This	
  approach	
  includes	
  how	
  oil	
  components	
  are	
  behaving	
  in	
  the	
  vertical	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  water	
  column	
  subsurface,	
  with	
  illustrations	
  of	
  oil	
  characteristics	
  migrating	
  at	
  depth	
  (Salt,	
  2011).	
  	
   	
   10	
   Available	
  Software	
  Comparison	
   	
  	
  There	
  are	
  many	
  different	
  forms	
  of	
  oil	
  spill	
  models	
  ranging	
  in	
  complexity,	
  price	
  and	
  function.	
  Some	
  commonly	
  used	
  commercial	
  oil	
  spill	
  models	
  today	
  are	
  OILMAP	
  (Chao,	
  2000),	
  GNOME	
  (Beegle-­‐Krause,	
  2001),	
  WOSM,	
  NOAA	
  and	
  COZOIL.	
  All	
  these	
  models	
  have	
  the	
  same	
  purpose	
  of	
  determining	
  the	
  oil	
  movement	
  and	
  distribution	
  in	
  the	
  water	
  body.	
  	
  Within	
  my	
  research,	
  tailored	
  to	
  YVR’s	
  needs	
  and	
  location,	
  I	
  have	
  narrowed	
  my	
  recommended	
  oil	
  models	
  down	
  to	
  OILMAP	
  and	
  GNOME.	
  These	
  two	
  models	
  have	
  the	
  same	
  use	
  and	
  function,	
  but	
  range	
  highly	
  in	
  complexity,	
  cost	
  and	
  detail.	
  I	
  constructed	
  a	
  comparison	
  table	
  of	
  the	
  two	
  models	
  that	
  check	
  the	
  software	
  model	
  capabilities	
  and	
  data	
  input	
  options.	
  Below	
  the	
  model	
  comparison	
  table,	
  I	
  created	
  a	
  cost	
  table	
  including	
  quantitative	
  data	
  I	
  received	
  directed	
  from	
  contacting	
  both	
  OILMAP	
  and	
  GNOME	
  business	
  representatives.	
    Model:	
   Literature	
  Content,	
  Industry	
  Use,	
  Popularity	
  &	
  Date	
   Hydrodynamic	
  (wave	
  &	
  tidal)	
   Meteorological	
  (weather)	
  &	
  Oil	
  Type	
   2D	
  -­‐	
  Surface	
  Water	
  model	
  	
   3D	
  -­‐	
  Plume	
  -­‐	
  Depth	
  -­‐	
  Vertical	
  Model	
   Interactions	
  with	
  shoreline	
  and	
  coast	
   OILMAP	
   C C	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  More	
  Detailed	
   C	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  More	
  Detailed	
   C	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  More	
  Detailed	
   C	
   C	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  More	
  Detailed	
   GNOME	
   C	
   C	
   C	
   C	
   D 	
   D 	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Coast	
  only	
  acts	
  as	
  concrete	
  barriers	
  	
  	
   Model:	
   Initial	
  Computer	
   Model	
  Cost	
  USD$	
   Training	
  Cost	
  USD$	
   Data	
  Collection	
  for	
  Input	
   OILMAP	
   ~	
  $20,000	
   ~	
  $4,000	
  -­‐	
  2	
  days	
   Provided	
  &	
  Minimal	
  $	
   GNOME	
   FREE	
   -­‐	
  Free	
  online	
  -­‐	
  2	
  or	
  4	
  day	
  course	
  offered	
  by	
  NOAA	
   Provided	
  &	
  Minimal	
  $	
   	
   	
   	
   11	
   OILMAP	
  ASA	
  (applied	
  science	
  associates)	
  is	
  a	
  global	
  science	
  and	
  technology	
  solutions	
  company	
  who	
  develops,	
  consult,	
  train,	
  and	
  upgrade	
  the	
  OILMAP	
  software.	
  OILMAP	
  provides	
  rapid	
  predictions	
  of	
  the	
  movement	
  of	
  spilled	
  oil	
  via	
  simple	
  graphical	
  procedures	
  for	
  entering	
  all	
  required	
  data	
  -­‐	
  hydrodynamic,	
  meteorological,	
  oil	
  type,	
  volume	
  etc.…	
  OILMAP	
  can	
  predict	
  all	
  five	
  models	
  mentioned	
  above	
  and	
  it	
  contains	
  an	
  oil	
  database	
  of	
  nearly	
  1,000	
  oils.	
  This	
  modeling	
  application	
  is	
  in	
  use	
  by	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  largest	
  oil	
  and	
  gas	
  companies	
  worldwide	
  and	
  goes	
  above	
  and	
  beyond	
  meeting	
  all	
  the	
  requirements	
  for	
  an	
  accurate	
  model.	
  	
  OILMAP	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  with	
  an	
  online	
  subscription	
  to	
  access	
  data	
  and	
  weather	
  station	
  information	
  required	
  to	
  run	
  the	
  oil	
  spill	
  trajectories.	
  This	
  application	
  is	
  known	
  as	
  OilmapWeb,	
  which	
  is	
  used	
  on	
  a	
  monthly/yearly	
  subscription	
  online	
  fee	
  instead	
  of	
  the	
  one-­‐time	
  fee	
  for	
  the	
  standalone	
  OILMAP	
  version.	
  The	
  standard	
  OILMAP	
  version	
  can	
  only	
  run	
  under	
  Windows	
  (Vista,	
  XP,	
  7	
  etc.)	
  and	
  it	
  is	
  not	
  available	
  for	
  mobile	
  applications.	
  	
  The	
  ASA	
  professionals	
  are	
  easy	
  to	
  contact	
  and	
  offer	
  an	
  incredible	
  amount	
  of	
  helpful	
  information	
  tailored	
  to	
  the	
  needs	
  of	
  the	
  user.	
  OILMAP	
  licensing,	
  cost,	
  version,	
  and	
  use	
  will	
  vary	
  among	
  users	
  because	
  it	
  depends	
  on	
  the	
  functionalities	
  of	
  the	
  modules.	
  Web	
  conference	
  calls	
  can	
  easily	
  be	
  arranged	
  and	
  YVR	
  can	
  take	
  the	
  initiative	
  if	
  they	
  are	
  seeking	
  this	
  model.	
  Below	
  are	
  output	
  examples	
  of	
  OILMAP:	
   	
   Fig.	
  4:	
  Screen	
  shot	
  of	
  OILMAP	
  in	
  use,	
  showing	
  the	
  time	
  line	
  and	
  time	
  controls	
  on	
  the	
  bottom,	
  wind	
  direction	
  arrows	
  throughout	
  the	
  image,	
  weathering	
  over	
  time	
  graph	
  on	
  the	
  left,	
  and	
  the	
  input	
  values	
  for	
  hydrodynamic	
  and	
  meteorological	
  conditions	
  in	
  the	
  upper	
  left	
  box.	
  The	
  spill	
  source	
  is	
  the	
  dark	
  purple	
  area	
  in	
  the	
  center,	
  and	
  as	
  the	
  simulation	
  model	
  runs	
  over	
  time,	
  we	
  can	
  observe	
  the	
  movement,	
  spread	
  and	
  weathering	
  of	
  the	
  slick.	
  	
  	
   	
   12	
   	
   Time	
  x	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   Time	
  x	
  +	
  y	
   	
  	
  	
   	
   Fig.	
  5:	
  Screen	
  shot	
  of	
  OILMAP	
  in	
  use,	
  showing	
  the	
  same	
  features	
  as	
  above	
  with	
  a	
  progression	
  on	
  the	
  time	
  scale.	
  We	
  see	
  the	
  spread	
  and	
  depth	
  (represented	
  by	
  the	
  color	
  and	
  legend)	
  of	
  the	
  oil	
  with	
  the	
  chosen	
  input	
  conditions.	
  	
   	
   Fig.	
  6:	
  Screen	
  shot	
  of	
  the	
  new	
  OILMAP	
  version	
  6,	
  in	
  partnership	
  with	
  Google	
  Earth,	
  to	
  provide	
  a	
  more	
  sophisticated	
  model	
  of	
  a	
  surface	
  oil	
  slick	
  over	
  time.	
  Software	
  update	
  additions	
  such	
  as	
  this	
  are	
  available.	
   	
   	
   	
   13	
   GNOME	
  	
  GNOME	
  (General	
  NOAA	
  Oil	
  Modeling	
  Environment)	
  is	
  a	
  tool	
  developed	
  by	
  the	
  National	
  Oceanic	
  and	
  Atmospheric	
  Administration	
  (NOAA)	
  for	
  oil-­‐spill	
  response	
  (Beegle-­‐Krause,	
  2001).	
  GNOME	
  is	
  a	
  multi-­‐purpose	
  trajectory	
  model	
  with	
  three	
  different	
  modes:	
  Standard,	
  GIS	
  Output,	
  and	
  Diagnostic	
  (Beegle-­‐Krause,	
  2001).	
  The	
  GNOME	
  models	
  are	
  more	
  simplistic	
  than	
  the	
  OILMAP	
  model,	
  but	
  this	
  free	
  program	
  can	
  output	
  fairly	
  accurate	
  trajectories	
  for	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  users	
  ranging	
  in	
  oil	
  mapping	
  skills.	
  From	
  my	
  own	
  research,	
  I	
  found	
  GNOME	
  more	
  applicable	
  for	
  non-­‐complex	
  coastal	
  regions	
  at	
  a	
  smaller	
  scale.	
  The	
  model	
  does	
  not	
  take	
  into	
  consideration	
  the	
  coastal	
  characteristics	
  on	
  a	
  large	
  scale	
  for	
  a	
  localized	
  region	
  such	
  as	
  YVR,	
  and	
  its	
  surrounding	
  unique	
  coastline	
  properties.	
  	
  The	
  GNOME	
  model,	
  regional	
  location	
  files	
  and	
  documentation	
  are	
  available	
  online,	
  and	
  training	
  is	
  offered	
  in	
  a	
  few	
  different	
  formats	
  by	
  the	
  NOAA	
  professionals	
  who	
  developed	
  this	
  model	
  (Beegle-­‐Krause,	
  2001).	
  The	
  images	
  below	
  are	
  screen	
  shots	
  of	
  the	
  “oil	
  spill	
  movie”	
  output	
  provided	
  from	
  GNOME,	
  simulating	
  a	
  49,000	
  Gallon	
  oil	
  spill	
  in	
  the	
  San	
  Juan	
  Islands	
  over	
  a	
  72	
  hour	
  time	
  period.	
   	
   Fig.	
  7:	
  Time	
  x	
  -­‐	
  Screen	
  shot	
  series	
  of	
  time	
  x,	
  y	
  z	
  of	
  the	
  GNOME	
  model	
  output.	
  We	
  can	
  see	
  the	
  wind	
  speed	
  and	
  direction	
  in	
  the	
  top	
  right	
  corner,	
  but	
  it	
  shows	
  one	
  direction	
  representative	
  throughout	
  the	
  entire	
  simulation,	
  which	
  does	
  not	
  take	
  into	
  consideration	
  of	
  coastal	
  features.	
  A	
  very	
  simple	
  version	
  compared	
  to	
  OILMAP.	
   	
   14	
   	
   Fig.	
  8:	
  GNOME	
  output	
  at	
  Time	
  y	
   	
   Fig.	
  9:	
  GNOME	
  output	
  at	
  Time	
  z	
   Limitations	
  &	
  Future	
  Work	
   	
  Through	
  my	
  findings,	
  I	
  found	
  there	
  were	
  areas	
  that	
  were	
  limited	
  and	
  require	
  future	
  work.	
  It	
  appears	
  most	
  WOMS	
  are	
  only	
  run	
  under	
  windows	
  computer	
  software	
  and	
  have	
  no	
  sophisticated	
  mobile	
  functions	
  yet.	
  Mobile	
  options	
  for	
  WOMS	
  on	
  phones	
  and	
  emergency	
  response	
  DEVS	
  (Drivers	
  Enhanced	
  Vision	
  System)	
  are	
  very	
  limited,	
  and	
  the	
  best	
  option	
  for	
  mobile	
  applications	
  is	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  OilmapWeb	
  using	
  the	
  safari	
  iPhone	
  application	
  until	
  new	
  apps	
  are	
  released.	
  Technology	
  systems	
  and	
  software	
  are	
  constantly	
  improving	
  and	
  when	
  the	
  fundamental	
  data	
  additions	
  become	
  available	
  they	
  can	
  be	
  added.	
  	
  Future	
  directions	
  with	
  oil	
  spill	
  models	
  include	
  increasing	
  computational	
  power	
  to	
  strengthen	
  oil	
  spill	
  models,	
  allowing	
  more	
  chemical	
  and	
  physical	
  detail,	
  and	
  more	
  direct	
  coupling	
  to	
  hydrodynamic	
  and	
  meteorological	
  models	
  (Reed	
  et	
  al,	
  1999).	
  	
  	
   	
   15	
   Recommendations	
   	
  After	
  conducting	
  research	
  on	
  oil	
  spill	
  models	
  and	
  searching	
  for	
  an	
  appropriate	
  model	
  for	
  YVR,	
  I	
  have	
  several	
  recommendations	
  for	
  my	
  community	
  partner,	
  Patrick	
  McGuiness.	
  	
  With	
  my	
  first	
  recommendation,	
  I	
  suggest	
  with	
  great	
  confidence	
  that	
  YVR	
  implements	
  a	
  WOMS	
  into	
  the	
  already	
  present	
  Airport	
  Authority	
  Spill	
  Response	
  Plan.	
  As	
  a	
  leader	
  in	
  our	
  community	
  and	
  the	
  largest	
  airport	
  in	
  Western	
  Canada,	
  YVR	
  has	
  taken	
  the	
  extra	
  steps	
  to	
  invest	
  in	
  the	
  environment,	
  and	
  this	
  preparation	
  technology	
  allows	
  YVR	
  to	
  be	
  active	
  in	
  protecting	
  their	
  valuably	
  shared	
  environment.	
  Also,	
  I	
  believe	
  the	
  time	
  and	
  money	
  already	
  invested	
  in	
  the	
  YVR	
  spill	
  response	
  plan	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  secured	
  and	
  strengthened	
  with	
  the	
  additional	
  investment	
  in	
  an	
  oil	
  spill	
  modeling	
  system.	
  With	
  the	
  hydrological	
  and	
  meteorological	
  complexities	
  influencing	
  the	
  fate	
  of	
  an	
  oil	
  spill,	
  we	
  have	
  learned	
  that	
  every	
  spill	
  behaves	
  differently,	
  which	
  makes	
  predicting	
  locations	
  of	
  containment	
  and	
  response	
  actions	
  very	
  difficult.	
  There	
  is	
  no	
  better	
  way	
  to	
  predict	
  the	
  trajectory	
  and	
  fate	
  of	
  an	
  oil	
  slick	
  than	
  to	
  have	
  a	
  modeling	
  system	
  in	
  practice	
  such	
  as	
  OILMAP.	
  	
  My	
  next	
  recommendations	
  for	
  implementing	
  a	
  Water-­‐Based	
  Oil	
  Spill	
  Modeling	
  Software:	
   ü Purchase	
  the	
  desired	
  software	
  (there	
  are	
  many	
  different	
  commercially	
  available	
  oil	
  spill	
  modeling	
  programs	
  ranging	
  in	
  price)	
   ü Attend	
  professional	
  training	
  (~2-­‐4	
  days)	
   ü Integrate	
  the	
  new	
  software	
  model	
  in	
  the	
  already	
  established	
  Spill	
  Response	
  Plan	
   ü Attain	
  the	
  necessary	
  data	
  (included	
  in	
  training	
  course)	
   ü Conduct	
  “spill	
  drill”	
  exercises	
  within	
  the	
  Stochastic	
  Model	
  option	
  of	
  the	
  program	
   ü Practice	
  running	
  “real-­‐time”	
  trajectories	
  from	
  field	
  data	
  input	
  sources	
   ü Check	
  the	
  appropriate	
  containment	
  methods	
  and	
  spill	
  response	
  actions	
  are	
  working	
  in	
  unison	
  with	
  the	
  software	
  -­‐	
  proper	
  communication	
  is	
  key	
   ü Check	
  regularly	
  for	
  technological	
  version	
  updates	
  (mobile	
  applications	
  coming	
  soon)	
   ü Do	
  not	
  solely	
  rely	
  upon	
  the	
  program.	
  It	
  should	
  be	
  used	
  in	
  conjunction	
  to	
  strengthen	
  the	
  information	
  and	
  plan	
  in	
  place	
  to	
  benefit	
  YVR’s	
  response	
  team	
   ü Remember,	
  the	
  outputs	
  from	
  any	
  model	
  is	
  dependent	
  on	
  the	
  quality	
  of	
  inputted	
  data	
  My	
  last	
  recommendations	
  are	
  to	
  communicate	
  and	
  partner	
  with	
  provincial	
  support	
  and	
  ministry	
  roles	
  because	
  the	
  province	
  also	
  has	
  their	
  own	
  emergency	
  spill	
  response	
  plan	
  called	
  “The	
  BC	
  Marine	
  Oil	
  Spill	
  Response	
  Plan”.	
  This	
  plan	
  uses	
  software	
  that	
  includes	
  extremely	
  useful	
  functions	
  and	
  uses	
  to	
  many	
  levels	
  of	
  government	
  and	
  industries,	
  who	
  share	
  similar	
  goals,	
  values	
  and	
  concerns	
  with	
  protecting	
  B.C’s	
  coastal	
  communities	
  and	
  environment.	
  The	
  more	
  sectors	
  involved	
  in	
  implementing	
  a	
  new	
  water-­‐based	
  oil	
  spill	
  modeling	
  software,	
  the	
  greater	
  protection	
  of	
  our	
  coastal	
  waters	
  from	
  oil	
  spill	
  contamination.	
  	
   	
   16	
   	
   Bibliography	
   	
   	
  Chao,	
  X,	
  Shankar,	
  N.J.,	
  Cheong,	
  H.F.	
  (2000).	
  “Two-­‐	
  and	
  three-­‐dimensional	
  oil	
  spill	
  model	
  for	
  	
   coastal	
  waters”,	
  Ocean	
  Engineering,	
  28(1)	
  1557-­‐1573.	
  Beegle-­‐Krause,	
  C.J.	
  (2001).	
  “General	
  NOAA	
  Oil	
  Modeling	
  Environment	
  (GNOME):	
  A	
  New	
  Spill	
  	
   Trajectory	
  Model”,	
  Hazardous	
  Materials	
  Assessment	
  Division,	
  865-­‐871.	
  Delvigne,	
  G.A.L.,	
  Sweeney,	
  C.E.	
  (1988).	
  “Natural	
  Dispersion	
  of	
  Oil”,	
  Oil	
  &	
  Chemical	
  Pollution,	
   	
   4(1)	
  281-­‐310.	
  Hodgins,	
  D.O.	
  (1998).	
  “Assimilation	
  of	
  AVHRR,	
  Ground	
  Wave	
  Radar	
  and	
  RADARSAT	
  SAR	
  	
   	
  Data	
  Into	
  a	
  Coastal	
  Circulation	
  and	
  Oil	
  Spill	
  Modeling	
  System”,	
  Commission	
  VII	
   	
   Working	
  Group	
  5	
  Vancouver,	
  1-­‐8.	
  Li,	
  M.,	
  Gargett,	
  A.,	
  Denman,	
  K.	
  (1998).	
  “Seasonal	
  and	
  Interannual	
  Variability	
  of	
  Estuarine	
  	
   Circulation	
  in	
  a	
  Box	
  Model	
  of	
  the	
  Strait	
  of	
  Georgia	
  and	
  Juan	
  de	
  Fuca	
  Strait”,	
  	
   Atmosphere	
  Ocean,	
  37(1)	
  1-­‐19.	
  McClintock,	
  J.,	
  Donnet,	
  S.,	
  Batstone,	
  B.	
  (2010).	
  “Spill	
  Trajectory	
  Modeling	
  for	
  the	
  Hebron	
  	
   	
  Project”,	
  AMEC	
  Earth	
  &	
  Environmental,	
  1-­‐104.	
  Reed,	
  M.,	
  Johansen,	
  O.,	
  Brandi,	
  R.J.,	
  Daling,	
  P.,	
  Lewis,	
  A.,	
  Fiocco,	
  R.,	
  Mackay,	
  D.,	
  Prentki,	
  R.	
  	
   (1999).	
  “Oil	
  Spill	
  Modeling	
  towards	
  the	
  Close	
  of	
  the	
  20th	
  Century:	
  Overview	
  of	
  the	
  	
   State	
  of	
  Art”,	
  Spill	
  Science	
  &	
  Technology	
  Bulletin,	
  5(1)	
  3-­‐16.	
  Salt,	
  D.	
  (2011).	
  “Use	
  of	
  Models	
  in	
  Oil	
  Spill	
  Response”,	
  ITAC,	
  1-­‐6.	
  SRP	
  (YVR	
  Spill	
  Response	
  Plan),	
  (2010).	
  “Vancouver	
  International	
  Airport	
  Spill	
  Response	
  	
   Plan”,	
  OPI:	
  Environmental	
  DepartmentI,	
  1-­‐114.	
  You,	
  F.,	
  Leyffer,	
  S.	
  (2011).	
  “Oil	
  Spill	
  Response	
  Planning	
  with	
  MINLP”,	
  Argonne	
  National	
   	
   Laboratory,	
  20(1)	
  1-­‐8.	
  	
  	
  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

    

Usage Statistics

Country Views Downloads
China 9 2
United States 6 0
Canada 3 0
United Arab Emirates 2 0
Japan 2 0
Russia 1 0
France 1 0
Malaysia 1 0
Indonesia 1 0
City Views Downloads
Beijing 9 0
Unknown 4 2
Richmond 3 0
San Bruno 2 0
Tokyo 2 0
Mountain View 2 0
Putrajaya 1 0
Jakarta 1 0
Santa Clara 1 0
Ashburn 1 0

{[{ mDataHeader[type] }]} {[{ month[type] }]} {[{ tData[type] }]}

Share

Share to:

Comment

Related Items