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Building Food Skills and Knowledge through Campus Workshops Lee, Sherman; Zeng, Ingrid; Tung, Lynn; Hobbis, Odette 2019-04-11

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report        Building Food Skills and Knowledge through Campus Workshops Sherman Lee, Ingrid Zeng, Lynn Tung, Odette Hobbis University of British Columbia LFS 450 Themes: Food, Community, Wellbeing April 11, 2019         Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.                                                                  (Sprouts, 2019)                By Sherman Lee, Ingrid Zeng, Lynn Tung and Odette Hobbis    Workshop Stakeholders:                                                                        1   CONTENTS    Executive Summary 3 1. Introduction 6 1.1 Research Topic 6 1.2 Relevance to Sustainability ` 8 1.3 Project Context 9 1.4 Project Goals and Objectives 10 2. Research Approach/Methodology 11 2.1 Research Methodology 11 2.2 Research Methods 11 3. Results/Findings 14  3.1 Community Survey 14 3.2 Stakeholder Survey 21 4. Discussion 22 5. Conclusion 25 6. Recommendations 26 6.1 Actionand Implementation 26 6.2 Future Research 28 References 29 Appendices 30                                      Students prepare vegetables for Bibambap at a UBC Cooking Club workshop (UBC Cooking Club, 2018)                        2  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY                           Sprouts (Sprouts, 2019)  Food literacy can be defined as an individual's ability to source, prepare, and consume healthy, safe, and nutritious food (Cullerton et al. 2015; Vidgen et al. 2014).  Food literacy is an aggregated definition that encompasses components of food security, food skills and nutritional knowledge and is altered and mediated by environmental, social and cultural factors (Cullerton et al. 2015; Vidgen at al. 2014). Food insecurity is common on post-secondary campuses (Silverthorn, 2016). The statistic of Meal Exchange shows that 39% of students surveyed at 5 Canadian universities    experience food insecurity while in school (Silverthorn, 2016). Common concerns are related to quality, nutrition content, and budgeting for food and are said to be affecting the mental and physical health of the participants. The USDA defines food insecurity as inadequate food access due to income or other social conditions (Public Health Report, 2016). Under current trends of neoliberalization in higher education institutes, as well as the increase in student debt in the past decade (Goodnight et al., 2014), university students are likely to fall under this category due to both economic stress and food skill limitations. Our project purpose was focused on understanding how to build students’ food skills and knowledge through campus workshops and to address the issues surrounding food literacy on UBC campus. Our objectives included building an inventory of workshops available to students on campus (via this report, or an online calendar), conducting a community survey         3  to baseline food literacy at UBC, conducting a stakeholder survey to baseline workshop operational limitations/assets, identifying and addressing any overlaps and gaps between stakeholder workshops, and providing our stakeholders with recommendations to enhance campus food literacy.  We conducted two surveys to gain better understanding of the workshops available at UBC. The first survey was a stakeholder survey where we compiled a list of stakeholders that are currently running workshops and surveyed them through email. Returning surveys suggested that the major challenge faced by stakeholders are difficulties in maintaining attendance and participation, followed by troubles in acquiring funding and equipment.  The second survey was a community survey, where we surveyed 89 students in the UBC community on their self-perceived levels of food literacies, as well as their workshop experiences, preferences and their opinions and expectations on these   workshops. While only one student out of the surveyed 89 reported to have participated in workshops, many students reported interest and high willingness to participate. Surveyed students however, reported limited knowledge on the available workshops on campus.                    UBC Wellness Centre in the Life Building (UBC Wellness Centre, n.d.)  Among the surveyed students, a weak positive correlation between food literacy levels and willingness to attend workshops has been identified; suggesting students who are more food literate are more likely to attend campus workshops. This posed a major question: what limits non food literate individuals from attending workshops to gain better skills? We found a weak positive correlation between food         4  literacy and willingness to pay for workshops; suggesting cost may be one of many factors limiting self-reported food illiterate people from attending workshops. Some trends regarding specific student demographics (e.g. international vs. local status) and willingness to participate in and pay for workshops are also identified; suggesting workshops stakeholders should focus on advertisements to the international student body as they are both more likely to be food insecure while also more interested in attending workshops. More statistical data is required to prove these relationships.  Focusing on the stakeholder reported difficulties in maintaining attendance and   participation as well as the community reported lack of knowledge on workshops, we suggest that advertising and promotional efforts on these workshops should be improved to increase students’ knowledge of these events. Stakeholders are also encouraged to collaborate with each other, where the sharing of equipment and facilities may be able to relieve some difficulties faced by stakeholders. Further research on the factors limiting food literacy levels and the willingness to participate in workshops are also encouraged as the results can help our stakeholders identify their target audiences.                                     5  1. INTRODUCTION   1.1 RESEARCH TOPIC                           Uramaki from a UBC Cooking Club workshop (UBC Cooking Club, 2019)  Food literacy can be defined as an individual's ability to source, prepare, and consume healthy, safe, and nutritious food (Cullerton et al. 2015; Vidgen et al. 2014).  Food literacy is an aggregated definition that encompasses components of food security, food skills and nutritional knowledge and is altered and mediated by environmental, social and cultural factors -Fig 1. (Cullerton et al. 2015; Vidgen at al. 2014).              Fig 1. Food Literacy as defined by Cullerton et al. 2015; Vidgen et al. 2014.  Poor dietary practices are often observed among students on campuses (Navarro-Prado et al., 2017). There are a number of hypothesis for why this occurs, some of which are related to socio-economic status and lack of food skills and knowledge (Martinez-Lacoba et al., 2018). AMS Food Bank on UBC campus already addresses food insecurity issues through providing up to 6 visits to their food bank per student per term (AMS Food bank, n.d.). Various grants and financial support programs at UBC are available through Student Financial Services for students struggling economically. Food skills and knowledge on the other hand, is something that requires time to learn. The SEEDS       6  (Social Ecological Economic Development Studies) Sustainability Program at UBC initiated the UBC Food Systems Project; one of their eight top priorities is food knowledge and food skills (UBC Sustainability, n.d.). A Food Asset Map is provided on their website to showcase available food-related resources and several groups at UBC are potentially enhancing student food literacy skills by providing food literacy workshops: UBC Wellness Center, Roots on the Roof, Sprouts/Seedlings, Cooking Club, Food Science club, LFS Undergraduate Society, Agronomy Garden, UBC Farm, International student groups. Amidst all these initiatives, it remains unclear to what extent these workshops impact student’s food literacy skills. There are redundancies among these workshops due to a lack of communication between stakeholders. Additionally, it is unclear if they are effectively meeting the needs of the   undergraduate student body. The goal of this study is to therefore improve UBC workshop effectiveness in meeting food literacy shortages on campus. Because lack of food skills and knowledge is common among many universities, the recommendations of this report are scalable to other institutions.                                  Chinese Lionhead Meatballs and vermicelli (UBC Cooking Club, 2019)                     7  1.2 RELEVANCE TO SUSTAINABILITY ON CAMPUS AND BEYOND    Equipping university students with proper food knowledge and skills and teaching them about food literacy is an opportunity to advance the broader United Nations Sustainability Goals of: Zero-Hunger, Good Health and Well-being, Quality Education, Reduced Inequalities, Responsible Production and Consumption, Climate Action, and create Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions. Such changes in the food choices of the student population has the potential to alter socio-economic aspects of the future global food system, resulting in paradigm shifts where sustainable choices and practices are more accepted or sought after (Kingsolver, 2007).  This project’s efforts aligns with several sustainability goals set by UBC including the Food Systems Project (UBCFSP) and the UBC Wellbeing Strategy -Food and Nutrition target of Zero-Hunger. Goals of the UBCFSP include: coordination and facilitated understanding between    official and community food-related services and activities and addressing opportunities in the UBC food system.                   Poutine (UBC Cooking Club, 2018)  The deliverables of this project can also act as a model of reference for other communities at potentially larger scales beyond the campus environment. For example, the Vancouver Food Asset Map (VFAM), can perhaps draw upon our efforts and look into providing further information on the events hosted by vendors and communities that agree to be listed on the map. Currently, the VFAM only provides a list of locations that provide food-related services and activities but carries no information on event details. In this case,         8  introducing an initiative similar to this project can help coordinate the numerous groups and communities in Vancouver that provide food-related services and activities, hopefully through which service efficiency would be enhanced.  This project involves and concerns multiple groups and communities affiliated with UBC, including but not limited to students, campus services, community gardens, clubs, the UBC Farm, and student-led interest groups. If our recommendations are taken into consideration, it is very likely that this project will make direct impacts on different components of the campus food system and potentially advance campus-wide and global sustainability goals.     1.3 PROJECT CONTEXT    This project was conducted within the context of UBC. According to the UBC 2016/2017 annual report on enrolment, 46,000 people were enrolled as undergraduate students, about 23% of which were international students. Within the international student body, the majority of students come from China (36%), United States (11%), India (6%), Korea and Japan (6%). Although this project was conducted locally, clearly based on the diversity of students attending UBC; this project has far reaching consequences both locally and internationally.                                9  1.4 PROJECT GOALS AND OBJECTIVES  The overarching goal of our research is to encourage the development of greater food literacy skills and knowledge for UBC students and to encourage the practice of culturally relevant, environmentally and economically sustainable food consumption. Contributors to this overarching goal include workshop stakeholders, our research team (LFS 450 undergraduate students), and the Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) team.   A breakdown of our objectives are as follows:  1. Enhancing communication pathways between stakeholders who provide food skills and knowledge workshops: ● Enhance coordination of content offerings by workshop stakeholders  ● Enhance workshop content and format quality by providing a means for stakeholders to share information on what is/isn’t working and    ● Identify opportunities for future collaborations to foster a more coordinated approach between stakeholders  2. Enhancing communications pathways between stakeholders who provide food skills and knowledge workshops and their participants:  • Allow stakeholders to better understand their participant demographics • Allow stakeholders to better meet the needs and interests of their participants • Increase participant turnout and food skills and knowledge on campus • Reduce food waste associated with poor participant turnout               (Agronomy Garden, 2019)        10    2. RESEARCH APPROACH/ METHODOLOGY                        (UBC Farm, 2016)   2.1 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY  This project took a Community Based Participatory Action Research (CBPAR) approach (Burns, Cooke, & Schweidler, 2011). The primary stakeholders worked collaboratively along with the team throughout the process, from situational assessment, to developing community surveys, to analysis and dissemination of findings. This approach ensured that the project framework can address the practical concerns of the organizations that hold food literacy workshops and aim to fundamentally                                change the way students study and live on UBC campus in the future.  2.2 RESEARCH METHOD  Both qualitative and quantitative research were used to gather information on current food literacy workshops held at UBC. The research was completed in two parts, using primary and secondary research. First, we conducted a literature review. Then we administered two surveys, one community survey for students and another to our stakeholders.             11  SECONDARY DATA COLLECTION  The secondary data collection mainly consisted of a literature review of the topic, attempts were also made to compare and contrast our findings against studies of similar background, scope, and topic. The UBC Library website was used to find relevant reports and articles. Important keywords utilized when searching the literature included: food literacy, food security, university students, food skill, and nutrition knowledge.    PRIMARY DATA COLLECTION   For primary data collection, two surveys were created using UBC survey tool (qualtrics). The community survey was created to gather data on UBC students. The survey had two goals, one was to assess the average level of food skills, nutritional knowledge, and food security self-reported by UBC students. The second was to collect information on the engagement level of UBC student with food literacy workshops. . The first part of the online survey consisted of demographic questions such as year level and gender. Further questions covered topics such as self-reported nutrition knowledge, cooking skills, and food security. In addition, students were asked about food literacy workshops currently available on campus. A twenty-five-dollar gift card giveaway was used as an incentive to obtain results. Students were given the option to enter an email address for the draw. Data was collected over the course of two days, both on Friday at around noon.       12  (See Appendices 1.1).  The second survey was also in electronic format. It was administered to our clients via email due to difficulties arranging a focus group with all the stakeholders. Data was collected from February 17, 2019 to February 24, 2019. With a hundred percent response rate, the sample size was  5. The selected participants were either one of the stakeholders from the initial project description list or one that’s recommended by our stakeholder and is currently providing food literacy workshop. Questions from this survey were more open-ended and asked about the state of current food literacy workshops. (See Appendices 1.2).  UBC Farm workshop schedule (UBC Farm, 2015)                               13                           Fig 2. UBC students classified by domestic or international  and by faculty.   3. RESULTS/FINDINGS    3.1 COMMUNITY SURVEY  Overall, 89 students participated in the survey. The sample included 75% of domestic students and 25% of international students. The greatest proportion of students are from the Faculty of Science and the Faculty of Arts, remaining students are from the other faculties and graduate programs.  Each student was asked to self-report their level of food skills, nutritional knowledge, and  food security on a scale of 1-10, where 10 was “very good”. The responses were analyzed and  graphed to an aggregated line-graph. The result showed a left-skewed distribution and similar  trend was found in all three parameters. From the graph, we can conclude self-rated food  literacy level on UBC campus is high as the three parameters are considered to collectively  define food literacy in the literature (Cullerton et al. 2015; Vidgen et al. 2014). The food literacy  level is high in comparison to other university students in Iran, Spain and South Africa  (Azadbakht and Esmaillzadeh, 2012, Senekal et al., 2016, Navarro-Prado et al., 2017)1.  Despite high self-reported levels of food literacy, there is still an estimation of 40% of individuals who self-reported to have low levels of food literacy (literacy below 6). These results align with a 2016 report conducted by the national non-profit Meal Exchange who surveyed 5 universities across Canada and found that 40% of Canadian university students reported to be food insecure (Silverthorn, 2016).    1 Note: these studies were quantitative health studies, our results were self-reported and could indicate a disproportionately positive indication of student health.       14                      Fig 3. Self-reported food literacy levels (10 being high) among undergraduate UBC students. Food literacy was measured by  three categories: food skills, nutrition knowledge, and food security.  The questions regarding the engagement level of UBC students with food literacy workshops revealed that students generally had never attended food literacy workshop (88 of the 89). The reason for not attending varied. 80% of students within the high food literacy category and 76% of students within the lower food literacy category reported that they did not know about the workshops. 14% of students from the food literate and food illiterate groups said they had no time, only 6% of students were not interested. Of the people (from food literate and illiterate groups) who didn’t know about the   workshops, 87% showed willingness to attend a food literacy workshop. the most attractive workshop types are cooking, nutrition knowledge, follow by growing food. To conclude, there is a general interest for food literacy workshops, but the limiting factor for attending among the food literate and illiterate is a lack of proper advertisement or promotion for this type of activity on campus (Fig 4 and 5 below).  In addition, we asked students how much they are willing to pay for a food literacy workshop, many reported they would attend at the low cost of $0-5, but       15  interestingly, majority said they would pay up to  $10. And lastly, 89% students responded  that they are interested to see an aggregate  food literacy workshop calendar.                       Fig 4. Proportion of UBC students who are food literate, their reasons for not attending food literacy workshops, and their willingness to attend in the future.                    Fig 5. Proportion of UBC students who are food illiterate, their reasons for not attending food literacy workshops, and their willingness to attend in the future.                    16               Fig 6. Maximum cost students are willing to pay for a food literacy workshop.   We then wanted to understand more about the differences between the food literate and food illiterate populations at UBC. We asked the question: is willingness to gain more food skills dependent upon peoples self-reported level of food literacy? We found that yes, willingness to gain more skills was weakly positively dependent upon     Fig 7. Most popular food literacy workshop type                level of food literacy; Fig 8. (R^2=0.15). In fact, this relationship was stronger among the food illiterate (below 6 literacy) This has important implications for food literacy as a whole at UBC and for stakeholder revenue which will be explored further in the discussion section.                                     17                           Fig 8. Self-perceived levels of food literacy compared to willingness to gain more food skills.    We then asked the second question: does the price people are willing to pay for workshops depend on their level of food literacy? Interestingly, we found no relationship between the amount people were willing to pay for workshops and their self-reported level of food literacy when we analyzed all 89 participants (Fig 9.). However, when we just looked at the food illiterate proportion of the population (below 6), we found a weak positive relationship between willingness to pay and level of food literacy; Fig 10. (R^2=0.1).                            18                         Fig 9. Self-reported food literacy levels compared to the maximum amount of money students are willing to pay for a food literacy workshop.                         Fig 10. Self-reported levels of food literacy compared to the maximum amount of money students are willing to pay for a food literacy workshop among food illiterate students (self-reported score of less than 6).   When we looked deeper into the data and compared demographic differences, we found international students were slightly more willing to participate in food literacy    workshops than domestic students (the sample size for international students was small: n=22, and we did not do statistics for small sample means, so these are just        19  trends). Additionally, when looking at level   domestic students. This has important    of food security by student demographic, we   implications for stakeholders that will be   found that there were a slightly greater   elaborated on in the discussion section   proportion of international students within   below.   the medium-low range of food security than                               Fig 9. Proportion of students’ willingness to participate in food literacy workshops (10 being high) categorized by domestic or international status.                                   20  Fig 10. Proportion of students’ self-reported food security (10 is high) categorized by domestic or international status        3.2 STAKEHOLDER SURVEY   For the stakeholder survey, 5 responses were received from fellow stakeholders. Common challenges faced by fellow stakeholders include finding and maintaining equipment, funding for workshops, and maintaining participation numbers. Meanwhile, the success for workshops are mainly attributed to good program planning, and relevance with the participants’ needs and interests.  The challenges and opportunities reported by our fellow stakeholders aligned with the findings from a relevant study by Markow et.al (2012) which was sourced as a secondary research piece. Markow’s study looked at how school based cooking programs affected food literacy. The study reported on some challenges faced by program organizers, including the lack of effective program evaluation, limited funding and resources, lack of coordination between       interested parties, and limited participation. The study also identified some elements that supported program success, which included integration with curriculum, access to adequate funding and staff, and activities directed at enjoyment and interest. The challenges and opportunities reported in the study are very similar to those reported by our stakeholders in our stakeholder survey.  Regarding opportunities for collaboration and cooperation between stakeholders, we found that stakeholders are somewhat aware of each other as most reported knowledge on numerous food literacy assets and organizations in campus. 4 out of 5 stakeholders utilize social media as a form of promotion for their workshops and activities. All stakeholders reported interest in further collaboration and coordination of workshop information with each other through a public platform.       21  4. DISCUSSION                             Summer 2018 Expansion Project (Agronomy Garden,  2018)  The discussion section will be used to elaborate on our findings so the results can be generalized to the whole UBC student body to help stakeholders with workshop planning. Focus is on learning more about how food literacy levels can be enhanced on campus.  First, people’s self-perceived levels of food literacy (measured in our study as an aggregate of three different parameters: self-reported level of nutrition     knowledge, food skills, and food security) are been examined. Food literacy versus food illiteracy was proportioned at about 60:40. The most frequent reported limit to workshop attendance among both groups was not knowing the workshops existed, followed by not having enough time to attend.  For the 40% of undergraduate UBC population that are food illiterate, we studied the cost to see if it is also a limiting factor that creates barrier for them to attend food literacy workshops. There is a very weak positive relationship between food illiterate people’s willingness to pay for workshops and their self-reported level of food security (Fig 10.). Suggesting that cost limits people with low food literacy from attending workshops in some degree. This relationship was not apparent among the food literate as expected.          22  When comparing food literacy versus willingness to attend, there was a positive relationship between people’s level of self-perceived food literacy and their willingness to gain more food skills (with statistical significance occurring at R=0.3). This suggests that people who have a higher level of food literacy are more likely to attend food literacy workshops on campus; either because they have more money, time or are simply more motivated. This has fairly profound implications for stakeholders and SEEDS. Assuming that stakeholders are tailoring their workshops to meet the needs of their participants, it suggests that overtime, workshops may become more and more specialized to favour the food literate demographics needs at the cost of attracting people with lower levels of food literacy. Interestingly, we can already see this trend manifesting at UBC and beyond. We postulate that this may ironically reinforce a gap between the food literate and food illiterate demographics at UBC. To mitigate this, we propose   stakeholders collaborate and diversify the types/cost of workshops offered at UBC (see recommendations price chart).                   Bibambap (UBC Cooking Club, 2018)   When we looked deeper into our data, we found some differences between domestic and international student groups. Although we cannot say definitively that these results are statistically significant because the number of international students we sampled was 22, we can report on trends. International students reported slightly higher willingness to attend food literacy workshops than domestic students and they also self-reported slightly lower levels of food literacy than domestic students. This poses an opportunity for both stakeholders and SEEDS: suggesting that stakeholders could benefit from international         23  students’ willingness to attend workshops and SEEDS benefiting through enhancing campus food literacy levels and meeting their quota for student well-being.  When comparing the cost students were willing to pay for workshops, we found that the most popular price was $10. When conducting a price elasticity analysis (Recommendations Section), we found that for every $5 increase in workshop cost, there was a 20% decrease in participant   willingness to attend the workshops. Assuming a 20-person workshop capacity, stakeholders can expect to make the most revenue at the $10-15 price bracket.  When we asked all 89 students which types of food literacy workshops they would prefer, the majority said cooking workshops were their most preferred, followed by nutrition workshops, then gardening workshops.                                                   24  5. CONCLUSION                            Confit byaldi recreated from the film Ratatouille (UBC Cooking Club, 2019)  Based on our results, we conclude that the main barriers to attending workshops among the food literate and food illiterate is not knowing that the food literacy workshops exist. The next barrier to attendance among the food literate and food illiterate was not having enough time to attend workshops. Workshop cost was slightly limiting attendance among the food illiterate, but not food literate. Additionally, psychological barriers may be inhibiting people with low levels of food literacy from attending workshops due to the    concentrated nature of specialist workshops tailored towards people who have higher food literacy. We recommend that in order to close the gap between the food illiterate and food literate at UBC, cost and psychological barriers to attendance will need to be addressed. Additional psychological barriers not explored fully in our research are cultural barriers to attendance. It may be that certain cultures aggregate in certain clubs; reinforcing stereotypes and psychologically limiting some people from attending workshops. Lowering the barriers to attendance could be achieved if stakeholders collaborate and plan to diversify the price and workshop niches that they inhibit so that people at all levels of food literacy and cultural background will be willing and able to attend workshops (See pricing chart under Recommendations).   Top priority for all stakeholders should be to advertise their workshops, and        25  coordinate among one another to have   through a publicly accessible online food    workshops at different and more frequent   literacy calendar.   times throughout the year in order address  the issue of students not having enough  time to attend. This objective could be met                                                                   26    6. RECOMMENDATIONS                     (UBC Farm, 2019)   6.1 ACTION AND IMPLEMENTATION    STAKEHOLDER PRICING RECOMMENDATIONS    Because we reported finding a positive relationship between students willingness to attend workshops and levels of food literacy this led to the problem that stakeholders may be pressured to tailor their workshops to a specialist audience in order to generate greater revenue and as a result, may not be adequately addressing food illiteracy issues on campus. We recognize that workshop turnout was a concern for some stakeholders and workshop cost and revenue are important                       factors that stakeholders must consider if they want to maintain their long-term economic feasibility. To find a solution to these opposing concerns we have assembled a price elasticity table. This table was formed based on the assumption that all people who want to attend food literacy workshops (among the literate and illiterate) know that the workshops are happening. This table also was created assuming 20-person maximum workshop capacity. At a workshop cost of $0, we can see that there should be a 100% turnout assuming all who want to go know about it. Workshops that are free for the community       27  have the greatest potential to address food illiteracy issues on campus, however we recognize that not all stakeholders can afford to provide free workshops. UBC Wellness Centre is probably the best prepared stakeholder to offer free food literacy workshops as they get funding from UBC. A $5 workshop cost seems reasonable for Agronomy Garden, since gardening costs are generally low and these workshops focus more on community building rather than returning profits. A $10 price range is optimal for a stakeholder such as Sprouts because they focus on both enhancing community food literacy while also needing to generate revenue to maintain their operational costs. $15 workshop cost is the optimal price if stakeholders want to make the most profit (revenue is the same as $10, but costs will be cheaper due to lower turnout, resulting in greater profit). $15 may be a suitable range for a club such as the cooking club, as the cost of running their workshops is generally greater due to the fact that they rent out a   kitchen for $80/hr. The UBC Farm is pricing its workshops within the range of $20 or over. Based on our undergraduate price elasticity chart, this is not a price level that is adequately addressing food literacy issues for students on UBC campus. UBC Farm workshop participants are likely coming from a different, highly specialized, working demographic. If the UBC Farm wants to be more inclusive to the undergraduate UBC community, we recommend they price some of their workshops at $10 and have workshops that are less specialized and focus more on building general healthy lifestyle and eating habits.  Sprouts and the Cooking club have the greatest undergraduate workshop turnout among all of our stakeholders, and are therefore better positioned to meet food literacy issues on campus. We recommend that other groups with smaller turnout (such as the Wellness Centre and Agronomy Garden) collaborate with them to access their student capital in exchange for a greater diversity of food literacy pedagogical        28  options. Based on a general assessment, we identify that Sprouts has a greater focus on locally sourced and sustainable foods than the Cooking club does, whereas the cooking club has a greater focus on culturally relevant foods and forming collaborations with the international student body. Both are important aspects of food literacy; and we believe that each club has something they can learn from the other. We therefore recommend that Sprouts  Pricing Recommendation Chart:   reach out to the the international student body, as this is something that the Cooking Club has done and they have found that it enhanced their turnout (and likely food literacy on campus). Conversely, we recommend that the cooking club integrate pedagogical information in their workshops focused on sustainability and local food consumption as this something that Sprouts does with success.                        Fig 13. Recommended cost of admission for food literacy workshop compared to amount of people willing to attend, revenue, workshop types, and stakeholders.     ACTION   Immediate Action Recommendations:  1. Advertise workshops  2. Approach International Students   3. Increase collaboration among stakeholders and share equipment to reduce operating costs  Intermediate Actions Recommendations:  1. More funding from UBC has been requested from some stakeholders       29  2. Recruitment of people to help facilitate workshops 3. Maintain an online public calendar to showcase all available food literacy workshops     6.2 FUTURE RESEARCH  Future Research Recommendation:  1. Stakeholders should conduct participant surveys to gauge how they can improve their workshops and share these surveys among other stakeholders to help one another  2. SEEDS should try to conduct research to better understand the proportion of the UBC student body that are reporting low levels of food literacy. What is inhibiting them from gaining better food literacy?   REFERENCES   Bisogni, C., Bostic, S., & Sobal, J. (2016). Chapter 6: Food literacy and food choice: A constructionist  perspective. In H. Vidgen (Ed.), Food literacy (pp. 101-117). London: Routledge.  doi:https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315708492  Burns, J. C., Cooke, D. Y., & Schweidler, C. (2011). A Short Guide to Community Based Participatory  Action Research. Retrieved from  https://hc-v6-static.s3.amazonaws.com/media/resources/tmp/cbpar.pdf  Cullerton K, Vidgen HA, Gallegos D. A review of food literacy interventions targeting disadvantaged young people. Brisbane: Queensland University of Technology, School of Public Health; 2012.  Ferrara CM. The college experience: Physical activity, nutrition, and implications for intervention and future research. J Exerc Physiol Online. (2009); 12:23-35.  Laska MN., Pasch KE., Lust K., Story M., Ehlinger E. Latent class analysis of lifestyle characteristics and health risk behaviors among college youth. Prev Sci. 2009; 10:376-86.  Markow, K., Coveney, J., PhD, & Booth, S., PhD. (2012). Enhancing food literacy through school-based cooking programs—What’s working and what’s not? Journal of the HEIA, 19(2), 2-11. Retrieved March 23, 2019, Retrieved from:      30  <https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=081989203951811;res=IELIND>, ISSN: 1322-9974.  Navarro-Prado, S., González-Jiménez, E., Perona, J. S., Montero-Alonso, M. A., López-Bueno, M., & Schmidt-Riovalle, J. (2017). Need of improvement of diet and life habits among  university student regardless of religion professed. Appetite, 114, 6-14.  doi:10.1016/j.appet.2017.03.017  Silverthorn, D. (2016). Hungry for knowledge: Assessing the prevalence of student food insecurity on  five Canadian campuses. Toronto: Meal Exchange. Retrieved from: http://mealexchange.com  Sprouts. (2019). Retrieved April 6, 2019, from https://www.facebook.com/ubcsprouts/?ref=br_rs  The Agronomy Garden. (2019). Retrieved April 9, 2019, from https://www.facebook.com/theagronomygarden/?epa=SEARCH_BOX  The University of British Columbia. (2018b). Shaping UBC’s next century: Strategic plan 2018-2028.  Retreived from  https://strategicplan.ubc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/2018_UBC_Strategic_Plan_Full-201804  25.pdf  UBC Cooking Club. (2019). Retrieved April 7, 2019, from https://www.facebook.com/ubccookingclub/?ref=br_rs  UBC Farm - Centre for Sustainable Food Systems. (2019). Retrieved April 5, 2019, from https://www.facebook.com/UBCFarm/?ref=br_rs  UBC Wellness Centre. (2019). Retrieved April 8, 2019, from https://www.facebook.com/UBCWellnessCentre/  Vidgen, H. A., & Gallegos, D. (2014). Defining food literacy and its components. Appetite, 76, 50-59. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2014.01.010   APPENDICES    1.1 Community Survey  1. Which faculty are you from?  2. What year are you in?  3. Are you a domestic or international student?  a. Domestic  b. International  4. What is your gender?  a. Female  b. Male  c. Non-binary  5. On a scale of 1-10: - How would you rate your cooking skills?  6. On a scale of 1-10: - How would you rate your nutritional knowledge?  7. On a scale of 1-10: - How would you rate your food security (ability to supply adequate amounts of nutritious food to yourself)?       31  8. On a scale of 1-10: - What is your willingness to gain better food literacy skills?  9. Have you ever attended a food literacy workshop at UBC?  a. Yes  b. No  10. How did you hear about them?  a. Word of mouth  b. Social Media  c. Email  d. Other (type response)  11. Who hosted it?  12. What was your barrier to attending?  a. Didn’t know about it  b. No time/schedule conflicts  c. Not interested  13. Would you attend any of these in the future?  a. Workshop to learn more about nutrition  b. Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills  c. Workshops on growing your own food  d. None  e. Other (type response)  14. What would be the maximum price you are willing to pay for a food literacy workshop?  a. $0  b. $5  c. $10  d. $15  e. $20  15. If UBC had an online calendar showcasing all available food literacy workshops, would that make it more likely you would attend?  a. Yes  b. No  16. Please enter your email if you would like to enter a draw to win a $25 gift card  a. (Enter email address)  1.2 Stakeholder Survey  1. Please tell us below which club/centre you represent  2. What types of workshops do you provide for students that address "Building food Skills or Food Knowledge" ? (Select all that apply)  a. Cooking  b. Nutrition  c. Gardening  d. Other  3. If you offer more than one workshop, which ones were the most popular?  a. Cooking  b. Nutrition  c. Gardening  d. Other  4. Why do you think this workshop was popular?  5. How frequently do you offer these workshops each year?       32  a. Once a week  b. Once every two weeks  c. Once a month  d. Once a term  e. Other  6. How many people on average attend these workshops?  a. 0-10  b. 11-20  c. Other  7. How much do you charge per workshop?  a. No fee  b. Between $1-5  c. Between $6-10  d. Between $11-15  e. More than $15  8. Where do you conduct workshops?  9. What equipment/facilities do you use?  10. Are there equipment/facilities you would like to have to be able to conduct your workshops smoothly?  11. What has worked well in your workshops?  12. What are some challenges when conducting your workshops?  13. What other workshops are you interested in hosting?  14. Are there barriers preventing you from hosting them?  15. Do you have sponsors to help provide for your workshops?  a. Yes  b. No  16. How do you promote your Workshops? (Select all that apply)  a. Facebook  b. Twitter  c. Instagram  d. Email  e. Word of Mouth  f. Posters  g. Other  17. What time in the day do you have your workshops? (Select all that apply)  a. Morning  b. Afternoon  c. Night  18. Which days do you have workshops? (Select all that apply)  a. Weekdays  b. Weekends  19. Which other hosts of food skills/knowledge workshops on campus are you aware of? (Select all that apply)  a. Sprouts  b. Roots on the Roof  c. UBC Wellness  d. UBC Cooking Club  e. UBC Food Science Club        33  f. Other  20. Would you be interested in collaborating with other groups on campus to provide similar food skills/knowledge workshops?  a. Yes  b. No  21. Do you currently have a workshop evaluation form that you use?  a. Yes  b. No  22. Would you be willing to send out a survey to your workshop participants to collect data on food skills/knowledge workshop effectiveness at UBC?  a. Yes  b. No  23. If a collective public Food Skills/Knowledge calendar were available for you to post your workshop times and days in, would you be willing to contribute to this public calendar everytime you host a workshop?  a. Yes  b. No  24. Any other comments or questions?                 Community Survey Data:   Which faculty are you from? What year are you in? Are you a domestic or international student? What is your gender? On a scale of 1-10: - How would you rate your cooking skills? On a scale of 1-10: - How would you rate your nutritional knowledge? On a scale of 1-10: - How would you rate your food security (ability to supply adequate amounts of nutritious food to yourself)? On a scale of 1-10: - What is your willingness to gain better food literacy skills? Have you ever attended a food literacy workshop at UBC? Arts 3 Domestic Female 1 1 2 6 No Science 1 Domestic Female 2 2 4 1 No Arts 2 International 3 2 4 2 No Arts 3 International 2 4 4 0 No Arts 3 Domestic Male 2 4 4 9 No Computer Science 2 International Female 1 5 5 6 No Arts 1 International 5 2 5 6 No LFS 1 International Male 3 4 5 7 No Science 1 Domestic Female 6 5 2 10 No Arts 1 Domestic Female 5 4 4 7 No Science 2 Domestic Male 2 3 8 4 No Arts 1 Domestic Female 7 4 3 8 No Science 2 International Male 4 7 3 8 No LFS 1 Domestic Female 7 2 5 5 No Science 3 Domestic Female 1 8 5 9 No Science 1 Domestic Female 5 3 6 8 No Science 1 Domestic Female 4 4 6 5 No Commerce 1 Domestic Male 3 5 6 6 No Arts 1 Domestic Female 4 3 7 7 No Arts 4 International Female 6 6 3 6 No Unclassified 6 Domestic Male 5 5 5 6 No Science 2 Domestic  4 4 7 4 No Science 1 Domestic  3 5 7 8 Yes Science 2 International 3 5 7 6 No Science 2 Domestic Female 3 5 7 9 No Science 1 Domestic Female 4 3 8 9 No Science 4 Domestic Male 2 4 9 4 No Arts 2 Domestic Male 3 7 6 8 No Arts Post-grad International Male 6 3 7 10 No Science 1 Domestic Female 4 5 7 9 No Science 1 Domestic Female 4 5 7 5 No LFS 3 Domestic  6 2 8 10 No Arts 2 Domestic  2 4 10 8 No Commerce 4 Domestic Female 9 6 2 8 No Science 1 Domestic Male 6 7 4 7 No Science 2 Domestic Male 5 7 5 5 No Science 4 Domestic Male 6 5 6 7 No Science 5 Domestic  7 3 7 5 No Science 2 International Female 5 5 7 8 No Education 2 Domestic Female 4 6 7 7 No Science 1 International 3 7 7 7 No Arts 3 Domestic Female 2 8 7 8 No Science 3 Domestic Male 5 4 8 8 No Science 2 International 8 6 4 3 No Arts 2 Domestic Male 7 7 4 5 No Engineering 1 Domestic Male 6 7 5 4 No Forestry 1 International 7 5 6 8 No Commerce 4 International 6 5 7 10 No Science 1 Domestic Male 4 7 7 8 No Arts 2 Domestic Female 7 8 4 7 No Science 5 Domestic  7 6 6 8 No Arts 5 International 7 6 6 8 No Arts 3 International 7 5 7 6 No Computer Science 4 Domestic Female 6 6 7 7 No Science 2 Domestic Female 4 8 7 4 No Arts 3 International Female 8 8 4 7 No Science 3 Domestic Female 6 7 7 8 No Commerce 2 Domestic Male 7 5 8 8 No Arts 3 International 6 6 8 8 No Science 1 Domestic Female 6 6 8 10 No Science Post-grad Domestic  6 8 7 8 No Arts 3 International Female 7 6 8 10 No Kinesiology 3 Domestic Female 6 7 8 10 No Science 4 Domestic  5 8 8 6 No Engineering 1 Domestic Male 10 7 5 10 No Arts 2 International 8 7 7 7 No Science 3 Domestic Female 5 8 9 9 No Engineering 3 Domestic  6 6 10 6 No Engineering 1 Domestic Male 5 7 10 10 No Science 2 Domestic Male 8 9 6 6 No Science 3 Domestic  8 7 8 5 No Commerce 1 Domestic Female 5 10 8 10 No Arts 5 Domestic  7 7 9 10 No Science 3 Domestic  8 5 10 8 No Science 4 Domestic Female 7 6 10 6 No Arts 2 Domestic Female 7 6 10 4 No Science 1 Domestic Female 5 8 10 7 No Arts 2 Domestic  9 7 8 8 No Dentistry 1 Domestic  8 8 8 9 No Science 3 Domestic Male 8 7 9 10 No Forestry 2 Domestic  7 8 9 10 No Science 2 Domestic Female 7 7 10 3 No Science 1 Domestic Male 8 8 9 9 No Nursing Exchange International 7 9 9 9 No Science 1 Domestic Female 8 8 10 8 No Arts 3 Domestic Non binary 9 9 9 10 No Kinesiology 4 Domestic  8 9 10 6 No LFS 1 Domestic Female 10 10 9 10 No Arts 3 International  10 10 10 No Which faculty are you from? What year are you in? Are you a domestic or international student? What is your gender? On a scale of 1-10: - How would you rate your cooking skills? On a scale of 1-10: - How would you rate your nutritional knowledge? On a scale of 1-10: - How would you rate your food security (ability to supply adequate amounts of nutritious food to yourself)? Arts 3 Domestic Female 1 1 2 Science 1 Domestic Female 2 2 4 Arts 2 International 3 2 4 Arts 3 International 2 4 4 Arts 3 Domestic Male 2 4 4 Computer Science 2 International Female 1 5 5 Arts 1 International 5 2 5 LFS 1 International Male 3 4 5 Science 1 Domestic Female 6 5 2 Arts 1 Domestic Female 5 4 4 Science 2 Domestic Male 2 3 8 Arts 1 Domestic Female 7 4 3 Science 2 International Male 4 7 3 LFS 1 Domestic Female 7 2 5 Science 3 Domestic Female 1 8 5 Science 1 Domestic Female 5 3 6 Science 1 Domestic Female 4 4 6 Commerce 1 Domestic Male 3 5 6 Arts 1 Domestic Female 4 3 7 Arts 4 International Female 6 6 3 Unclassified 6 Domestic Male 5 5 5 Science 2 Domestic  4 4 7 Science 1 Domestic  3 5 7 Science 2 International 3 5 7 Science 2 Domestic Female 3 5 7 Science 1 Domestic Female 4 3 8 Science 4 Domestic Male 2 4 9 Arts 2 Domestic Male 3 7 6 Arts Post-grad International Male 6 3 7 Science 1 Domestic Female 4 5 7 Science 1 Domestic Female 4 5 7 LFS 3 Domestic  6 2 8 Arts 2 Domestic  2 4 10 Commerce 4 Domestic Female 9 6 2 Science 1 Domestic Male 6 7 4 Science 2 Domestic Male 5 7 5 Science 4 Domestic Male 6 5 6 Science 5 Domestic  7 3 7 Science 2 International Female 5 5 7 Education 2 Domestic Female 4 6 7 Science 1 International 3 7 7 Arts 3 Domestic Female 2 8 7 Science 3 Domestic Male 5 4 8 Science 2 International 8 6 4 Arts 2 Domestic Male 7 7 4 Engineering 1 Domestic Male 6 7 5 Forestry 1 International 7 5 6 Commerce 4 International 6 5 7 Science 1 Domestic Male 4 7 7 Arts 2 Domestic Female 7 8 4 Science 5 Domestic  7 6 6 Arts 5 International 7 6 6 Arts 3 International 7 5 7 Computer Science 4 Domestic Female 6 6 7 Science 2 Domestic Female 4 8 7 Arts 3 International Female 8 8 4 Science 3 Domestic Female 6 7 7 Commerce 2 Domestic Male 7 5 8 Arts 3 International 6 6 8 Science 1 Domestic Female 6 6 8 Science Post-grad Domestic  6 8 7 Arts 3 International Female 7 6 8 Kinesiology 3 Domestic Female 6 7 8 Science 4 Domestic  5 8 8 Engineering 1 Domestic Male 10 7 5 Arts 2 International 8 7 7 Science 3 Domestic Female 5 8 9 Engineering 3 Domestic  6 6 10 Engineering 1 Domestic Male 5 7 10 Science 2 Domestic Male 8 9 6 Science 3 Domestic  8 7 8 Commerce 1 Domestic Female 5 10 8 Arts 5 Domestic  7 7 9 Science 3 Domestic  8 5 10 Science 4 Domestic Female 7 6 10 Arts 2 Domestic Female 7 6 10 Science 1 Domestic Female 5 8 10 Arts 2 Domestic  9 7 8 Dentistry 1 Domestic  8 8 8 Science 3 Domestic Male 8 7 9 Forestry 2 Domestic  7 8 9 Science 2 Domestic Female 7 7 10 Science 1 Domestic Male 8 8 9 Nursing Exchange International 7 9 9 Science 1 Domestic Female 8 8 10 Arts 3 Domestic Non binary 9 9 9 Kinesiology 4 Domestic  8 9 10 LFS 1 Domestic Female 10 10 9 Arts 3 International  10 10   On a scale of 1-10: - What is your willingness to gain better food literacy skills? Have you ever attended a food literacy workshop at UBC? How did you hear about them? - Selected Choice How did you hear about them? - Other - Text Who hosted it? What was your barrier to attending? Would you attend any of these in the future? - Selected Choice 6 No    Didn't know about it None 1 No    Didn't know about it None 2 No    No time/schedule conflicts Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 0 No    Not interested Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 9 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition 6 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 6 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 7 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 10 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 7 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 4 No    Not interested None 8 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 8 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 5 No    Not interested Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 9 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 8 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition 5 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 6 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 7 No    No time/schedule conflicts Other 6 No    No time/schedule conflicts None 6 No    Not interested Other 4 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 8 Yes Word of mouth Not sure   6 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 9 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 9 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 4 No    Didn't know about it None 8 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 10 No    No time/schedule conflicts Workshop to learn more about nutrition 9 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 5 No    No time/schedule conflicts Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Workshops on growing your own food 10 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 8 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 8 No    No time/schedule conflicts Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 7 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 5 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 7 No    Didn't know about it None 5 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 8 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 7 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 7 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 8 No    Didn't know about it None 8 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 3 No    Didn't know about it Workshops on growing your own food 5 No    Didn't know about it None 4 No    Not interested None 8 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 10 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 8 No    No time/schedule conflicts Workshop to learn more about nutrition 7 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 8 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 8 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 6 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 7 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 4 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 7 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 8 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 8 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 8 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 10 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 8 No    No time/schedule conflicts Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Workshops on growing your own food 10 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 10 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 6 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 10 No    No time/schedule conflicts Workshop to learn more about nutrition 7 No    Didn't know about it None 9 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 6 No    Didn't know about it None 10 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 6 No    Didn't know about it Workshops on growing your own food 5 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 10 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 10 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 8 No    No time/schedule conflicts Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 6 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 4 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Workshops on growing your own food 7 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition 8 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 9 No    No time/schedule conflicts Workshop to learn more about nutrition 10 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 10 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 3 No    Didn't know about it None 9 No    Didn't know about it Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 9 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills 8 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 10 No    No time/schedule conflicts Class or community kitchen to help build your food skills,Workshops on growing your own food 6 No    No time/schedule conflicts Workshops on growing your own food 10 No    No time/schedule conflicts Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Workshops on growing your own food 10 No    Didn't know about it Workshop to learn more about nutrition,Other  Would you attend any of these in the future? - Other - Text What would be the maximum price you are willing to pay for a food literacy workshop? If UBC had an online calendar showcasing all available food literacy workshops, would that make it more likely you would attend?  $0 No  $0 No  $0 Yes  $5 Yes  $10 Yes  $15 Yes  $5 Yes  $0 Yes  $10 Yes  $15 Yes  $5 No  $15 Yes  $15 Yes  $10 Yes  $5 Yes  $5 Yes  $15 Yes  $5 Yes Presentation before class $0 No  $15 No Something less formal as a workshop, different wording maybe $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $0 Yes  $10 Yes  $15 Yes  $5 Yes  $0 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $0 Yes  $5 Yes  $15 Yes  $10 Yes  $15 Yes  $5 Yes  $10 Yes  $20 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $0 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $0 No  $0 Yes  $10 Yes  $15 Yes  $0 Yes  $15 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $15 No  $20 Yes  $10 Yes  $15 Yes  $5 Yes  $0 Yes  $10 Yes  $5 Yes  $0 No  $0 Yes  $0 No  $5 Yes  $5 Yes  $5 Yes  $0 Yes  $5 Yes  $5 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $20 No  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 No  $5 No  $15 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $10 Yes  $0 No  $5 Yes  $10 Yes    Stakeholder Survey  Please tell us below which club/centre you represent What types of workshops do you provide for students that address "Building food Skills or Food Knowledge" ? (Select all that apply) - Selected Choice What types of workshops do you provide for students that address "Building food Skills or Food Knowledge" ? (Select all that apply) - Other - Text If you offer more than one workshop, which ones were the most popular? - Selected Choice If you offer more than one workshop, which ones were the most popular? - Other - Text Why do you think this workshop was popular? How frequently do you offer these workshops each year? - Selected Choice How frequently do you offer these workshops each year? - Other - Text UBC Cooking Club Cooking,Nutriton Cooking  We kept our admission prices reasonable for students, while also providing all the ingredients and equipment. Participants would attend, and the executives would guide them through the recipe, showing them basic skills like how to cut, and where to buy ingredients. Once every two weeks UBC Wellness Centre Cooking,Nutriton Nutrition  The nutrition workshops have been more popular than the other wellness workshops (dealing with break-ups, mental health), perhaps because of the hands-on component, practical information, and possibly better promotion. The community kitchen is for a specific population (Indigenous students) Once a month UBC Farm Workshop Series Cooking,Gardening,Other Sustainable Living Skills Other Cheesemaking Great question! Maybe because there aren't too many other Once a week cheesemaking workshops in Vancouver? Agronomy Garden Gardening  Gardening  People like to understand where their food comes from and reconnect with the process in a very tactile way Once every two weeks Please tell us below which club/centre you represent What types of workshops do you provide for students that address "Building food Skills or Food Knowledge" ? (Select all that apply) - Selected Choice What types of workshops do you provide for students that address "Building food Skills or Food Knowledge" ? (Select all that apply) - Other - Text If you offer more than one workshop, which ones were the most popular? - Selected Choice If you offer more than one workshop, which ones were the most popular? - Other - Text Why do you think this workshop was popular? UBC Cooking Club Cooking,Nutriton Cooking  We kept our admission prices reasonable for students, while also providing all the ingredients and equipment. Participants would attend, and the executives would guide them through the recipe, showing them basic skills like how to cut, and where to buy ingredients. UBC Wellness Centre Cooking,Nutriton Nutrition  The nutrition workshops have been more popular than the other wellness workshops (dealing with break-ups, mental health), perhaps because of the hands-on component, practical information, and possibly better promotion. The community kitchen is for a specific population (Indigenous students) UBC Farm Workshop Series Cooking,Gardening,Other Sustainable Living Skills Other Cheesemaking Great question! Maybe because there aren't too many other cheesemaking workshops in Vancouver? Agronomy Garden Gardening  Gardening  People like to understand where their food comes from and reconnect with the process in a very tactile way Please tell us below which club/centre you represent What types of workshops do you provide for students that address "Building food Skills or Food Knowledge" ? (Select all that apply) - Selected Choice What types of workshops do you provide for students that address "Building food Skills or Food Knowledge" ? (Select all that apply) - Other - Text If you offer more than one workshop, which ones were the most popular? - Selected Choice If you offer more than one workshop, which ones were the most popular? - Other - Text UBC Cooking Club Cooking,Nutriton Cooking  UBC Wellness Centre Cooking,Nutriton Nutrition  UBC Farm Workshop Series Cooking,Gardening,Other Sustainable Living Skills Other Cheesemaking Agronomy Garden Gardening  Gardening    Why do you think this workshop was popular? How frequently do you offer these workshops each year? - Selected Choice How frequently do you offer these workshops each year? - Other - Text How many people on average attend these workshops? - Selected Choice How many people on average attend these workshops? - Other - Text We kept our admission prices reasonable for students, while also providing all the ingredients and equipment. Participants would attend, and the executives would guide them through the recipe, showing them basic skills like how to cut, and where to buy ingredients. Once every two weeks 20-Nov  The nutrition workshops have been more popular than the other wellness workshops (dealing with break-ups, mental health), perhaps because of the hands-on component, practical information, and possibly better promotion. The community kitchen is for a specific population (Indigenous students) Once a month 0-10  Great question! Maybe because there aren't too many other cheesemaking workshops in Vancouver? Once a week Other Depends on the workshop, as different workshops have different max capacities People like to understand where their food comes from and reconnect with Once every two weeks 0-10  the process in a very tactile way    How much do you charge per workshop? Where do you conduct workshops? What equipment/facilities do you use? Are there equipment/facilities you would like to have to be able to conduct your workshops smoothly? What has worked well in your workshops? Between $6-10 FNH 130 Vij's Kitchen We are fine with our facility, but we do need more funding since it is $80/hr. We are unable to sustain ourselves if we must continue using this venue. Our format (groups, how we cook, demos, etc) No fee Life Building No kitchen facilities for nutrition workshop, just tables and energy bites/overnight oats with basic kitchen utensils. We do collaborate with the Indigenous Wellness Committee to put on the community kitchen in Vij's kitchen in the FNH building. Funding provided by UBC Wellbeing/Health Promotion & Education. Multiple sets of mixing bowls, measuring cups/spoons, and for more advanced workshops, perhaps pots, pans, oven, stovetop hands-on demos where students get to take some items away, free cost, free snacks, interactiveness More than $15 Mostly at UBC Farm Facilities (Yurt, Kitchen, Marquee); Equipment (Projector/Laptop/Screen, Cooking supplies) Wish we had easier access to Vij's Kitchen in the FNH building... but it's been difficult for us to access that space. Most of our workshops sell out. We have an active promotional approach, with the UBC Farm newsletter, social media, etc. No fee At the Agronomy Garden Our gardening tools, like shovels and rakes Yes! Wheelbarrows The casual atmosphere  What are some challenges when conducting your workshops? What other workshops are you interested in hosting? Are there barriers preventing you from hosting them? Do you have sponsors to help provide for your workshops? How do you promote your Workshops? (Select all that apply) - Selected Choice How do you promote your Workshops? (Select all that apply) - Other - Text       Finding an adequate space (FNH 130), as no where else allows food and beverage, or has enough power to sustain out equipment.) Techniques workshops and more socials for club members. Yes, the cost of the FNH kitchen, and pricing for admission (which we use towards covering the cost of our venue) Yes Facebook,Instagram,Email,Word of Mouth getting enough people to attend, fitting in nutrition content and an interactive demo in 50 minutes nutrition on a budget capacity on our team to facilitate these workshops Yes Email,Posters,Word of Mouth Infrastructure challenges, as there are a HUGE number of diverse user groups at UBC Farm. So simple overload of users at times. Other infrastructure challenges: our kitchen isn't ideal of teaching larger groups, our stove is faulty, our yurt isn't adequately lit or heated for winter workshops, etc... So many! We do roughly 50 per year! We might be able to host them. However, generally speaking, our barriers are infrastructure/space-related as well as limited staff availablity to coordinate/promote. No Facebook,Twitter,Instagram,Email,Posters,Word of Mouth,Other Newsletter Getting volunteers to return consistently and passing down leadership a cooking one would be great Mostly schedules and harvest schedules No Facebook,Instagram,Email   What time in the day do you have your workshops? (Select all that apply) Which days do you have workshops? (Select all that apply) Which other hosts of food skills/knowledge workshops on campus are you aware of? (Select all that apply) - Selected Choice Which other hosts of food skills/knowledge workshops on campus are you aware of? (Select all that apply) - Other - Text Would you be interested in collaborating with other groups on campus to provide similar food skills/knowledge workshops? Night Weekdays Sprouts,Roots on the Roof,UBC wellness,UBC cooking club,UBC Food Science club,Other Food Society, UBC Brewery Yes Afternoon Weekdays Sprouts,Roots on the Roof,UBC wellness,UBC cooking club Yes Morning,Afternoon,Night Weekdays,Weekends Sprouts,Roots on the Roof,UBC wellness,UBC cooking club,UBC Food Science club Yes Afternoon Weekdays Sprouts,Roots on the Roof Yes   Do you currently have a workshop evaluation form that you use? Would you be willing to send out a survey to your workshop participants to collect data on food skills/knowledge workshop effectiveness at UBC? If a collective public Food Skills/Knowledge calendar were available for you to post your workshop times and days in, would you be willing to contribute to this public calendar everytime you host a workshop? Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes Yes  

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