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Communication Analysis of UBC’s Recreation and Programs Website : Final Report Chung, Terrance; Ip, Nelson; Uppal, Aneil; Choi, Vincent; Nguyen, Daniel 2019-04-02

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report          Communications Content Analysis of UBC Recreation’s Programs and Classes Web Page Terrance Chung, Nelson Ip, Daniel Nguyen, Aneil Uppal, Vincent Choi University of British Columbia KIN 464 Themes: Health, Community, Wellbeing April 2, 2019        Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.   1     Final Report Communication Analysis of UBC’s Recreation and Programs Website Terrance Chung  Nelson Ip Aneil Uppal Vincent Choi Daniel Nguyen    2  Executive Summary ................................................... 3 Introduction .............................................................. 4 Methods .................................................................... 6 Results and Findings .................................................. 8 Discussion ............................................................... 10      Limitations  ......................................................... 10 Recommendations ................................................... 12 Appendices .............................................................. 14    CONTENTS Programs and Classes Web Page   3   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY         INTRODUCTION In this project we chose to do an audit of the University of British Columbia’s (UBC) Recreation’s Programs and Classes webpage. We wanted to see if there are any changes students would like to see that could potentially help them in registering for a class. We only targeted students of UBC because we wanted to help them in increasing their overall physical activity.  For data collection, we created a survey for the students of UBC that included closed-ended questions of the agreeableness on specific aspects of the website and two open-ended questions for participants own opinion. They will complete the survey via laptop or mobile phone. The responses we receive will be totaled and analyzed to determine recommendations.   RESULTS Based off our survey results, majority of the responses from our participants indicate that they are satisfied with most of the UBC recreation program and classes webpage. Specifically, there was a high to very high level of agreement regarding easy accessibility, appropriate font size/color scheme, clear and concise class descriptions, and the overall presentation of the webpage. Despite this, further improvement can be made in certain areas. For example, we found that many our participants were not satisfied with the clarity in level of difficulty for each program/class and, some users found the webpage difficult to navigate through a mobile device. Our participants also favored the use of more colors in which the inclusion of other colors can make the website even more appealing.  DISCUSSION Based on our results, we have found that many students are satisfied with the effectiveness of UBC’s recreation website. Across all the questions asked, the average response was between “Somewhat Agree” and “Agree”, suggesting that these students are content with the layout and design of the website. However, there are aspects that can certainly be improved to further increase the student’s satisfaction of the website. For example, the difficulty of classes could be made clearer because about one quarter of the students did not agree with the statement about the class difficulty being clear. By making the difficulty levels clearer, students can feel less intimidated by the program or class that they are interested in which can increase the likelihood of their participation. UBC recreation can do this by rewording the main objectives and goals of the programs, which can highlight the social opportunities that become available through participation.  Another aspect that be improved is the color scheme of the website, as the results show quite a bit of variation in the survey responses targeting this aspect of the website. Roughly a quarter of the students were either “Neutral” or did not agree with the statement about the color scheme being appealing, which is an incentive to perhaps change or add more color to the website layout. Overall, the results suggest that the UBC students that completed the survey are pleased with the recreation website, but there are some aspects of it that can be improved to enhance not only the level of appeal but hopefully the rates of participation amongst students in the UBC community.  RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Add videos of classes and more images for each class.  2. Putting the instructor profiles as the same page as the classes they teach. 3. Providing more information on the difficulty level of all programs and classes. 4. Make the website more navigation friendly for mobile device users.      4        INTRODUCTION With the advances in technology, building a website that is effective is crucial in promoting one’s products (Tucker & Hill, 2009). In our case, UBC Recreation’s Programs and Classes page. If a website is well built it can make communicating information much easier and give those who are interested the information they are looking for (Tucker & Hill). As more people rely on the internet to find information and resources (Nunally, 2004), websites should be created in a way that makes it easy and accessible for its target audience. A good website design has an appearance, accessibility, content and easy navigation that allows students to find the information they need (Nunally, 2004; Tan & Wei, 2006; Taylor, 2011).   The appearance of a site should be directed for its intended audience, in our case, students of the University of British Columbia (UBC) community (Taylor, 2011; Nunally, 2004). Including more pictures or videos of students in specific programs allows those who want to register for a program or class a better insight of whether that class is the right one for them. Websites that includes pictures showing people and their facial expressions are shown to have more trust in those certain websites (Cyr, Head, Larios, Pan, 2009). The colors, pictures, and style chosen for the website should be consistent and should also be able to say something about it without having much text (Taylor, 2011). They should be appealing to the students as they are the ones who will likely be considering registration for a program or class.  Accessibility of a website is important because it determines the usage of the website, especially when online resources have become more convenient for students (Nunally, 2004). A website should be easy to navigate and include relevant content for the users to be able to find information (Taylor, 2011). The programs and classes section should also take students with disabilities into consideration as the website should be created in a way that it can be accessed by anyone (Nunally, 2004). This is important because the goal is to achieve inclusion and offer every individual a sense of belonging, which helps the retention rates of students when accessing a website (Nunally, 2004). Everyone should feel like they have a program or class that they can be a part of. There is an increase of social presence when pictures of actual people are seen rather than just having images without or just equipment of the facilities (Cyr, Head, Larios & Pan, 2009).  Keeping the content up to date is another factor to creating a successful website (Taylor, 2011). The UBC’s recreation website had information regarding classes from the previous term which can cause some confusion for the students using it. Up to date information can show that those in charge of the website care about their viewers and the message that it sends to be up to date with the school schedule (Nunally, 2004). Keeping UBC Recreation’s website up to date shows that those responsible for the website are considerate to the students and want to encourage them to increase their physical activity levels. The content not only needs to be up to date, but there should also be enough information within the content to be able answer all the questions the viewer may have. Otherwise, the user will potentially deter from further use and create a lack of interest for the site (Tan & Wei, 2006; Nunally, 2004). If the content provides a sufficient amount of information, it gives the viewer more confidence that they are making the right choice for themselves (Tan & Wei, 2006).     5    INTRODUCTION UBC's ARC Gym - Inside Including the benefits and providing some knowledge about physical activity for each program can be beneficial in a fitness website (Tucker & Hill). This can possibly encourage students to increase their physical activity levels by finding the right program that fits them best.  Another important component to a website’s design is its consistency in compliance and navigation. Having the same logo, navigation bar, and drop-down window options in all areas of the website is a few of the characteristics that would make a website consistent (Tan & Wei, 2006). The consistency in these website conventions led to ease in students’ learning process in navigating the website (Tan & Wei, 2006). A term used by Tan & Wei (2006), “Cognitive Mapping”, which refers to the organization of information from a user’s past experiences. Creating a website that is similar to other fitness and recreation pages in certain features will help make it easier for users and viewers to find information because of the familiarity they will have coming from other sources and websites (Tan & Wei, 2006).  Our intention for this project is to find ways and areas to improve upon UBC’s Recreations Programs and Classes website and create more awareness of the programs and classes offered by UBC Recreation. Through an improved website design, we intend to encourage a larger portion of the students at UBC to get involved in these various programs in hopes of increasing the levels of physical activity that the students get on a daily basis.            Image via Twitter   6                                METHODS Student Union Building – The Nest PROCEDURE We conducted multiple surveys, online and in-person, to receive feedback on the current opinions on the perceived effectiveness of the UBC recreation website. We used UBC Qualtrics to create our survey and collect data. For the in-person surveys we went to various locations: the ARC, Bird Coop, Student Union Building and Irving K. Barber library and had participants complete them on our provided laptops. We decided to go to multiple locations so we can target a variety of students across campus and find different and unique perspectives on what is desired in a university’s recreation website For our online survey, which is identical to the in-person survey, they were sent a link and completed it with their mobile phones or their own computer/laptop. The link for the survey was shared amongst the group members social media, through platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and WhatsApp, strongly emphasizing that the survey was to be completed only by current UBC students. Prior to starting the survey, the participants were given a briefing about our project, and whether or not they consent to completing the survey. Once the participant gave their consent to take part in our survey, they were instructed on the website to go to UBC’s Recreation’s Programs and Classes webpage and find information for a class they are interested in (e.g. cost, schedule, instructor’s information), and answered the follow up questions regarding the effectiveness of their chosen page.   DATA COLLECTION The survey asked students to rate their levels of agreement with a wide variety of statements, that targeted multiple aspects of UBC’s recreation website. Some topics included: appropriateness of website imagery, and satisfaction with language used to attract inclusivity. The opinions of the font, colors, graphics, language of the webpage and information for each class was also asked to be rated with a scale from strongly disagree to strongly agree by each participant.   DESIGN We used a mixed method research design, to collect quantitative and qualitative data. For data collection, we created a survey for the students of UBC that included closed-ended questions of the agreeableness of specific aspects of the website and two open-ended questions, for participants own opinion. We only targeted students of UBC because we wanted to see if any changes to the Programs and Classes web site can be done to promote an increase in their overall activity.    Image via Google Images   7     METHODS It is important to collect data on the actual website for the programs because it can affect whether a student will continue to browse the site or not depending on its appeal and the ability to find information they need. There was also a section that allowed for comments on the pros and cons of the recreation website, which allowed for students to provide their thoughts on topics that weren’t asked previously in the survey. By doing this, we were able to gather more information from students that allowed us to make more recommendations for how the website can be improved to cater to all UBC students.    To analyze our data, we created frequency tables within Excel for our survey questions. For example, one of the survey questions that we will be asking students is whether they are happy with the coloring of the website on a scale of 1-5 (Not appealing - Very appealing). The frequency distribution tables will describe the central tendency of the responses. We determined what changes students wanted by using the mode, the most frequent response, from our survey questions.   By gathering our data at various locations throughout UBC, allowed us to target students from various programs as we want to receive feedback from everyone and not just already physically active Kinesiology students. Everyone’s perspective is important, and we wanted to find ways to achieve inclusion by gathering insight from different UBC students. Most importantly, this allowed us to get a better idea of how UBC recreation can improve their programs/classes section of their website by taking into consideration every type of individual regardless of whether they are experienced in physical activity. Irving K. Barber Library Photo by Laura Swimmer   8                               RESULTS 2% 2%17%22%46%11%CLASS DESCRIPTIONS ARE CLEAR AND CONCISEStrongly DisagreeDisagreeSomewhat DisagreeNeutralSomewhat AgreeAgreeStrongly Agree11%9%11%45%24%FONT SIZE AND COLOUR ARE EASY TO READStrongly DisagreeDisagreeSomewhat DisagreeNeutralSomewhat AgreeAgreeStrongly AgreeOur survey results indicate that the majority of the participants were satisfied with the overall presentation of the site. For our quantitative data, the measures of central tendency of mean, median and mode were used to calculate the most “typical” value for each survey question. Majority of our close-ended questions scored a mean of 5, a mode of 6 and a median of 6. Since the mean can be skewed by outliers, the median and mode were also used. As a result, there were a large number of responses that included a high to very high level of agreement regarding clear and concise class descriptions, easy web page accessibility, appropriate use of font size, and an appealing use of colour scheme.  The 2 open-ended questions at the end of our survey allowed for additional feedback as participants got to voice their opinions over the close-ended questions. The qualitative data that we gathered indicated that majority of the participants wanted to see videos for each program and class.  A large portion of the participants (69%) thought the choice of font and colour made it easy to read on the website.  Many responses from our survey (68%) thought the descriptions of the class was clear and provided the information they were looking for. “Videos of classes/programs can be added for more users to get a better idea of what the classes are like.”   9      RESULTS 4%9%11%17%24%20%15%CLASS DIFFICULTY IS CLEARLY STATEDStrongly DisagreeDisagreeSomewhat DisagreeNeutralSomewhat AgreeAgreeStrongly Agree6%4%13%24%33%20%COLOUR SCHEME WAS APPEALINGStrongly DisagreeDisagreeSomewhat DisagreeNeutralSomewhat AgreeAgreeStrongly AgreeSpecifically, participants think that it would help give UBC students a better idea of what each session will be like. Although many of our participants found the website to be appealing, our results suggest that there is a lack of clarity in terms of the difficulty level for each program and class.They stated that each program and class should have a difficulty level listed for everyone to see.       Furthermore, majority of the participants found the use of color scheme to be appealing but suggested that the inclusion of different colors can help the website stand out more. Lastly, our results indicate that some participants had difficulty navigating through the webpage on a mobile device. They stated that the webpage should be more mobile friendly as the load times were slow and that contents were clustered together.  “ … All classes should indicate the level of difficulty.” Most participants (53%) were satisfied with the color scheme but many (47%) would like to see some variety in colors on the website. A majority (56%)  of responses said they would like to see difficulties of classes stated in the descriptions.  “ … It felt cluttered when browsing on mobile. Make it easier to use and have quicker load time”   10                               DISCUSSION Based on our results, we have found that many students are satisfied with the effectiveness of UBC’s recreation website. Across all the questions asked, the average response was between “Somewhat Agree” and “Agree”, suggesting that these students are content with the layout and design of the website.  However, there are aspects that can certainly be improved to further increase the student’s satisfaction of the website. For example, the difficulty of classes could be made clearer because about one quarter of the students did not agree with the statement about the class difficulty being clear. By making the difficulty levels clearer, students can feel less intimidated by the program or class that they are interested in which can increase the likelihood of their participation. UBC recreation can do this by rewording the main objectives and goals of the programs, which can highlight the social opportunities that become available through participation.   Another aspect that be improved is the color scheme of the website, as the results show quite a bit of variation in the survey responses targeting this aspect of the website. Roughly a quarter of the students were either “Neutral” or did not agree with the statement about the color scheme being appealing, which is an incentive to perhaps change or add more color to the website layout.  Overall, the results suggest that the UBC students that completed the survey are pleased with the recreation website, but there are some aspects of it that can be improved to enhance not only the level of appeal but hopefully the rates of participation amongst students in the UBC community.  LIMITATIONS Throughout the data collection process, there were many anticipated challenges that needed to be addressed. There were two biases that we were concerned with in our survey, response bias and acquiescence bias. Response bias is where the participant answers questions in they way they think the researcher wants. Acquiescence bias is the tendency for subjects to answer “yes” to all questions they are asked. These biases can skew our data and provide inaccurate results (Vaughn, 2017). In order to mitigate this, survey questions should be short, concise, and clear (Aprameya, 2015). This is important because if our questions are too long, the participants may skip the question or rush through the survey by providing inaccurate answers. In this case, our survey questions will be short and easy to understand for all our participants so that we can encourage them to give the most accurate responses. Providing a simple selection of answers is another way to mitigate response and acquiescence bias (Aprameya, 2015). For our survey, we will be using a Likert scale format which will be short and concise to ensure that our participants aren’t bombarded with long answers. For example, asking our participants their level of agreeableness on the appeal of the website’s colour scheme on a scale from 1-7, with 1 meaning strongly disagree and 7 meaning strongly agree. However, by using a scale we will then be susceptible to extreme responding, which is when respondents only use the extreme ends of a scale (Vaughn, 2017). If the scale goes from 1 to 7, someone doing extreme responding will always choose 1 or 7, never selecting the options in the middle of the continuum. Scales also can lead to demand characteristics, which is when people provide skewed answers just because their participation in a survey slightly changes their disposition (Vaughn, 2017).    11    DISCUSSION To help mitigate these biases, we can make sure that most of our surveys will be done online anonymously, which will decrease the likelihood of extreme responses being provided. If our group members were watching the students as they took the survey, they may feel like they are being judged which can perhaps sway their true thoughts and lead them to providing these extreme or skewed responses. Time constraints is also an issue, especially if we’re doing the survey in-person during between classes and students have a next class to attend.  Using a survey with a multiple-choice format or closed-ended questions to collect data can affect how people respond. We may not have included the answers they want to select from in order to complete the survey or we may not have included all the questions relevant to keep the survey quick and concise. It can give us inaccurate data because participants are unsure how to answer each question and unable to give their thoughts on the issue. In order to mitigate this issue, we included 2 additional open-ended questions that give the participants the freedom to input their own ideas and opinions on the selected web site. However, with open-ended questions, they are easier to be misinterpreted by our group members compared to closed-ended questions.   Sample size may be another issue. This can affect the accuracy of our data, if there aren’t enough participants taking part in our survey. A way to mitigate this problem is to spend more time asking for participants, however it may be difficult due to the limited time frame. The same solution to solve the times constraint issue can be used for this problem as well, the easier and quicker the survey is for participants, the more people we can get to complete it within a constricted time period.  A challenge that can result from doing an online data collection is having inadequate or unavailable technology to complete the survey. Although it is very common in this day of age for almost all university students to have a mobile device or laptop, some students do not and there may even be some students that do not have their device on them during the time that we approach them on campus. Some students may have left their device at home, ran out of batteries on their device, or simply do not have an up to date device that has an internet browser. To help resolve this issue, the students in our group collecting data will have their own mobile phones and laptops available at the time of data collection for the participants to use if their device is unavailable. A related issue is the differences in completing the survey on a mobile device versus a laptop. Our solution to this is to ensure the survey is made accessible and useable regardless of what type of device is used to complete it.  An issue we had with our data was that we noticed people were “agreeing” with the many of the statements, which may have skewed the overall results. It made it difficult to use our data to determine if there were any changes the participants wanted to see. Also, we did not make the open-ended questions mandatory for participants, so many of them chose not to complete it. Although it does not affect the collected data, we may have gotten better input from more students. Another issue with our data collection was the completion of survey. A portion of responses (n=23) we received were not completed. These participants clicked consent but did not complete the survey within a week of the start date. We decided to exclude them from our data so it would not affect the results. For future reference, we can ask for participants email’s, for the purpose of sending out reminders to those who have yet to complete the survey.   12                                RECOMMENDATIONS  1. 2. 3. 4. Videos and Images  Including more images and videos of classes can be beneficial as UBC students will get a better sense of what to expect from the overall program.  Instructor Info and Bio Moving the instructor’s information and bio in the same page as the classes they teach will make it easier for the user because they don’t have to keep going back and forth from a separate page.   Difficulty Level  Participants wanted to have the difficulty of each class (e.g. Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced) stated with each class, so they know if they are able to complete the class or program comfortably.  Mobile Navigation There was a difference between navigating the website with a mobile and computer, participants found it harder to use it on mobile. We can create a mobile specific version of the website to make more mobile friendly with quicker load times and easier navigation. Based off our results, these are the recommendations that can be changed to encourage students to register for programs and classes with UBC recreation and help increase their physical activity.    13                                REFERENCES Aprameya, A. (2015, November 12). Are You Following These 6 Steps to Avoid Response Bias In Your Survey? Retrieved from https://blog.socialcops.com/academy/resources /following-6-steps-avoid-response-biassurvey/  Cyr, D., Head, M., Larios, H., & Pan, B. (2009). Exploring Human Images in Website Design: A Multi-Method Approach. MIS Quarterly, 33(3), 539-566. doi:10.2307/20650308  Nunally, M. L. (2004). Website Design and Development for College and University Recreation Programs Accredited by the NRPA/AALR Council on Accreditation [PDF] Retrieved January 28, 2019, from http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/209  Tan, G. W., & Wei, K. K. (2006). An empirical study of Web browsing behaviour: Towards an effective Website design. Electronic Commerce Research and Applications,5(4), 261- 271. doi:10.1016/j.elerap.2006.04.007  Taylor, A. (2011). Good website design–not just a pretty face. In Practice, 33(9), 486-489. doi:10.1136/inp.c4787  Vaughn, G. (2017, November 30). Response Bias: A Down To Earth Explanation. Retrieved from https://blog.zef.fi/en/response-bias-its-cramping-your-survey-style    14            APPENDICES Appendix A: Consent Form The purpose of this project is to increase the awareness of the University of British Columbia Recreation website and to promote physical activity. As undergraduate Kinesiology students from KIN 464, we will be conducting surveys to comprehend how students perceive UBC Recreation. The reason we are conducting surveys is to determine the effectiveness of the website at promoting physical activity and to see whether changes are needed to improve students’ awareness and participation. Principal Investigator:  Negin Riazi (PhD Candidate, School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Education) The purpose of the class project: To gather knowledge and expertise from community members on topics related to physical activity, recreation, and health promotion.  Study Procedures: With your permission, we are asking you to participate in a survey. With the information gathered, students will critically examine how different individuals understand or engage in health promoting activities or health promotion initiatives. Project outcomes: The information gathered from survey questions will be part of a written report for the class project. The written report will be shared with the community partners involved with the project. Summaries of findings will also be posted on the following websites. No personal information/information that could identify participants will be included in these reports. UBC SEEDS Program Library: https://sustain.ubc.ca/courses-degrees/alternative-credit-options/seeds-sustainability-program/seeds-sustainability-library Potential benefits of class project: There are no explicit benefits to you by taking part in this class project. However, the survey will provide you with the opportunity to voice your opinion on your experiences with health promoting activities or initiatives in a broad sense and will provide the students with an opportunity to learn from your experiences. Confidentiality: Maintaining the confidentiality of the participants involved in an interview is paramount, and no names will be asked for. At the completion of the course, all data (i.e. notes) and signed consent forms will be kept in a locked filing cabinet in Negin Riazi’s office in the Population Physical Activity Lab (2259 Lower Mall) at the University of British Columbia. All data and consent forms will be destroyed 1 year after completion of the course.    15    Risks: The risks associated with participating in this research are minimal. There are no known physical, economic, or social risks associated with participation in this study. Although there is a schedule of questions, the person you are interviewing is free to share what they would like, including refusing to answer specific questions. You should know that your participation is completely voluntary and you are free to withdraw from the survey and there will not be negative impacts related to your withdrawal. If you withdraw from the study, all of the information you have shared up until that point will be destroyed.  Contact for information about the study: If you have any questions about this class project, you can contact Negin Riazi by phone at 604-822-5288 or by email at negin.riazi@ubc.ca Research ethics complaints:  If you have any concerns or complaints about your rights as a research participant and/or your experiences while participating in this study, contact the Research Participant Complaint Line in the UBC Office of Research Ethics at 604-822-8598 or e-mail RSIL@ors.ubc.ca . or call toll free 1-877-822-8598.        o I consent, begin the survey.  o I do not consent, I do not wish to participate.    UBC Recreation offers a variety of programs and classes including Boot Camps, Cardio, Conditioning & Strength, Dance, Martial Arts, Spin & Group Fitness, and Yoga & Pilates. Imagine you were interested in taking a class with UBC Recreation. Please spend a few minutes to look up details on the class you have chosen (e.g. class description, instructor, class time and location). After obtaining all relevant information, return to the survey.  Please copy and paste the link into a new tab.https://recreation.ubc.ca/fitness-classes/programs-classes/ Appendix B: Survey Appendix A: Consent Form   16    APPENDIX B: SURVEY Q1. What type of device did you use to access the UBC Recreation website? o Mobile Device  o Computer   Q2. Please rate your level of agreement with the following statements.  Strongly Disagree (1) Disagree (2) Somewhat Disagree (3) Neutral (4) Somewhat Agree (5) Agree (6) Strongly Agree (7) The website was easily accessible from a computer.  o  o  o  o  o  o  o  The website was easily accessible from a mobile device. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  The website was easy to navigate on a computer.  o  o  o  o  o  o  o  The website was easy to navigate on a mobile device. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Website pages transitioned with ease. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  The colour scheme was appealing. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  The font sizes and colours are easy to read. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  UBC Recreation offers a wide variety of classes. o  o  o  o  o  o  o       17    APPENDIX B: SURVEY   Strongly Disagree (1) Disagree (2) Somewhat Disagree (3) Neutral (4) Somewhat Agree (5) Agree (6) Strongly Agree (7) Class descriptions are clear and concise.  o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Classes clearly state their level of difficulty.  o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Class schedules were easy to view and understandable. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Class times are clearly stated.  o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Class locations are clearly stated. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Class instructors are clearly indicated. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Class pages use appropriate imagery.  o  o  o  o  o  o  o  The price of the class was easy to find. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Q3. After looking through the UBC Recreation Programs & Classes page, what was appealing to you? ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________   Q4. What changes and improvements would you recommend?  ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________    18   Consent Principal Investigator: Negin Riazi (PhD Candidate, School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Education) The purpose of the class project:To gather knowledge and expertise from community members on topics related to physical activity, recreation, and health promotion.  Study Procedures:With your permission, we are asking you to participate in a survey. With the information gathered, students will critically examine how different individuals understand or engage in health promoting activities or health promotion initiatives. Project outcomes:The information gathered from survey questions will be part of a written report for the class project. The written report will be shared with the community partners involved with the project. Summaries of findings will also be posted on the following websites. No personal information/information that could identify participants will be included in these reports. UBC SEEDS Program Library:https://sustain.ubc.ca/courses-degrees/alternative-credit-options/seeds-sustainability-program/seeds-sustainability-library Potential benefits of class project:There are no explicit benefits to you by taking part in this class project. However, the survey will provide you with the opportunity to voice your opinion on your experiences with health promoting activities or initiatives in a broad sense and will provide the students with an opportunity to learn from your experiences.  Confidentiality:Maintaining the confidentiality of the participants involved in an interview is paramount, and no names will be asked for.  At the completion of the course, all data (i.e. notes) and signed consent forms will be kept in a locked filing cabinet in Negin Riazi’s office in the Population Physical Activity Lab (2259 Lower Mall) at the University of British Columbia. All data and consent forms will be destroyed 1 year after completion of the course. Risks:The risks associated with participating in this research are minimal. There are no known physical, economic, or social risks associated with participation in this study. Although there is a schedule of questions, the person you are interviewing is free to share what they would like, including refusing to answer specific questions. You should know that your participation is completely voluntary and you are free to withdraw from the survey and there will not be negative impacts related to your withdrawal. If you withdraw from the study, all of the information you have shared up until that point will be destroyed.  Contact for information about the study:If you have any questions about this class project, you can contact Negin Riazi by phone at 604-822-5288 or by email at negin.riazi@ubc.ca Q1. What type of device did you use to access the UBC Recreation website? Q2. The website was easily accessible from a computer. Q3. The website was easily accessible from a mobile device. APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   19  Research ethics complaints: If you have any concerns or complaints about your rights as a research participant and/or your experiences while participating in this study, contact the Research Participant Complaint Line in the UBC Office of Research Ethics at 604-822-8598 or e-mail RSIL@ors.ubc.ca . or call toll free 1-877-822-8598. 1. I do not consent, I do not wish to participate.    2. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 3. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree 4. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 5. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 6. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 7. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Agree 8. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Somewhat Agree Disagree 9. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Strongly Agree 10. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 11. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Agree 12. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 13. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 14. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 15. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 16. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Agree 17. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 18. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Agree 19. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Strongly Agree 20. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 21. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Agree 22. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Neutral 23. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree 24. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 25. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Disagree Strongly Disagree 26. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 27. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree 28. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 29. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Agree 30. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Somewhat Agree 31. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Neutral 32. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 33. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 34. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Somewhat Agree 35. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 36. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Agree 37. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Neutral 38. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 39. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Neutral 40. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree  APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   20  41. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Neutral 42. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Agree 43 I consent, begin the survey.    44. I consent, begin the survey.    45. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Agree 46. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Somewhat Agree Agree 47.     48. I consent, begin the survey.    49. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 50. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 51. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Neutral 52. I consent, begin the survey.    53. I consent, begin the survey.    54. I consent, begin the survey.    55. I consent, begin the survey.    56.     57. I consent, begin the survey.    58.     59. I consent, begin the survey.    60. I consent, begin the survey.    61. I consent, begin the survey.    62. I consent, begin the survey.    63.     64. I consent, begin the survey.    65. I consent, begin the survey.     66. I consent, begin the survey.    67. I consent, begin the survey.    68. I consent, begin the survey.    69. I consent, begin the survey.    70. I consent, begin the survey.      Q4. The website was easy to navigate on a computer. Q5. The website was easy to navigate on a mobile device. Q6. Website pages transitioned with ease. Q7. The colour scheme was appealing. Q8. The font sizes and colours are easy to read. Q9. UBC Recreation offers a wide variety of classes. Q10. Class descriptions are clear and concise. 1.        2. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Neutral Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree 3. Somewhat Agree Agree Neutral Agree Agree Agree Agree 4. Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree 5. Agree Neutral Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree  APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   21  6. Agree Agree Agree Neutral Agree Agree Somewhat Agree 7. Neutral Agree Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree 8. Strongly Agree Somewhat Disagree Disagree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree 9. Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Strongly Agree Neutral Neutral 10. Agree Neutral Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 11. Agree Agree Strongly Agree Neutral Agree Somewhat Agree Neutral 12. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 13. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 14. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree 15. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree 16. Agree Agree Somewhat Agree Neutral Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree 17. Agree Neutral Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree 18. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 19. Neutral Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree Somewhat Agree 20. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree 21. Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 22. Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral 23. Agree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Strongly Disagree 24. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 25. Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Disagree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Disagree Disagree 26. Agree Agree Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree 27. Neutral Somewhat Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree Neutral Neutral Neutral 28. Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree 29. Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree Agree Agree 30. Somewhat Agree Neutral Somewhat Disagree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral 31. Agree Neutral Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree  APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   22  32. Neutral Neutral Agree Agree Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree 33. Agree Neutral Neutral Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Disagree Agree 34. Neutral Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree 35. Agree Neutral Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree 36. Agree Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Neutral Neutral 37. Strongly Agree Neutral Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 38. Agree Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree 39. Strongly Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree Neutral 40. Agree Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Agree Agree 41. Strongly Agree Neutral Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 42. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 43        44.        45. Neutral Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Agree 46. Neutral Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Neutral Neutral Neutral 47.        48.        49. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Somewhat Agree 50. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree 51. Strongly Agree Neutral Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree 52.        53.        54.        55.        56.        57.        58.        59.        60.        61.        62.        63.         APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   23  64.        65.         66.        67.        68.        69.        70.          Q11. Class descriptions are clear and concise. Q2. Classes clearly state their level of difficulty. Q13. Class schedules were easy to view and understandable. Q14. Class times are clearly stated. Q15. Class locations are clearly stated. Q16. Class instructors are clearly indicated. Q17. Class pages use appropriate imagery. 1.        2. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree 3. Agree Somewhat Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Somewhat Agree 4. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Neutral 5. Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Disagree 6. Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 7. Strongly Agree Agree Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree Agree 8. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree 9. Neutral Disagree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Neutral Neutral Somewhat Agree 10. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 11. Neutral Neutral Neutral Somewhat Agree Neutral Neutral Neutral 12. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 13. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 14. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 15. Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 16. Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree 17. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 18. Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Somewhat Agree 19. Somewhat Agree Neutral Agree Agree Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree  APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   24  20. Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree 21. Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree 22. Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral 23. Strongly Disagree Disagree Disagree Neutral Disagree Somewhat Disagree Disagree 24. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 25. Disagree Strongly Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Neutral Disagree 26. Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 27. Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral 28. Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 29. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 30. Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree 31. Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree 32. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 33. Agree Strongly Disagree Agree Agree Agree Disagree Neutral 34. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Agree Somewhat Disagree 35. Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree Neutral Agree Neutral Agree 36. Neutral Neutral Neutral Agree Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree 37. Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree 38. Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 39. Neutral Somewhat Disagree Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Agree 40. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 41. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 42. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 43        44.        45. Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Disagree Disagree 46. Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral 47.        48.         APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   25  49. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Neutral Agree Agree Agree Agree 50. Somewhat Agree Disagree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree 51. Agree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 52.        53.        54.        55.        56.        57.        58.        59.        60.        61.        62.        63.        64.        65.         66.        67.        68.        69.        70.          Q18. The price of the class was easy to find. Q19. After looking through the UBC Recreation Programs & Classes page, what was appealing to you? Q20. What changes and improvements would you recommend? 1.    2. Somewhat Disagree   3. Agree   4. Neutral   5. Somewhat Agree  Videos or photos showing what the class is like. Not all classes indicate whether it's for beginners or for more advanced individuals. 6. Strongly Agree   7. Agree  None.  8. Somewhat Agree   9. Somewhat Agree    APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   26  10. Agree   11. Somewhat Agree   12. Agree Variety of classes  13. Agree Gym hours. I want to know when the weight room facility is open.  The hours and days when the gym facility is open. 14. Agree   15. Strongly Agree The content   16. Agree The types of class and programs offered  17. Strongly Agree It was easy to navigate and the important details were right in front of me.  I can't see any flaws with the website. It seems simple, easy, and straight to the point.  18. Agree   19. Agree Easy to find what i was looking for. Straightforward. The drop down menus for each subcategory should be at the top of each page 20. Strongly Agree The organization.  The colours could be more diverse! 21. Strongly Agree the variety of classes that are offered.   22. Neutral   23. Strongly Disagree   24. Strongly Agree there are so many options   25. Strongly Disagree   26. Somewhat Agree Navigation of the website itself was easy and transition from page to page was convienient  27. Neutral   28. Agree The navigation of the site was pretty simple and everything was organized properly. Videos of classes/programs can be added for more users to get a better idea of what the classes are like. 29. Agree The Variety of classes and good times for them! None at the moment 30. Neutral   31. Agree There was a wide selection of sports and activities to choose from.  maybe have emails for the instructors in their bio 32. Somewhat Agree   33. Disagree   34. Agree All the information i wanted was easy to find  Including videos from classes. It felt cluttered when browsing on  APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   27  mobile. Make it easier to use and have quicker load time 35. Agree  have the instructors on the same page as the classes 36. Agree   37. Strongly Agree Everything is easy to find and organize.  I was going through martial arts classes and besides the initial fees for the classes, I couldn't find any extra fees for the clothing or extra materials needed for the classes, i.e,. boxing gloves, wraps, etc. So does this mean that these fees are included in the initial fee?  38. Strongly Agree I like the design of the website, it was very transparent and easy to navigate. I recommend just making it run it a bit faster. It might just be might my internet thought. 39. Agree Its simplicity and all the important information is easy to spot.  40. Agree Lots of options   41. Strongly Agree EVERYTHING NOTHING 42. Agree Personal trainers and their bios, and classes like yoga and pilates. More information. 43    44.    45. Strongly Agree The variety of classes that are offered. Put instructor's name with the class. All classes should indicate the level of difficulty. 46. Neutral   47.    48.    49. Somewhat Agree   50. Somewhat Disagree The drop down menu on the left side of the screen was nice. Made it easy to open different windows. Change the colours of the website. White seems very boring. Instead of having everything on the website, maybe include pdfs of all information so users don't have to click around so much to find information. 51. Somewhat Agree Nothing.  More images or videos. Hard to find which instructor taught  APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   28  each class. Doesn't say if any equipment is needed. 52.    53.    54.    55.    56.    57.    58.    59.    60.    61.    62.    63.    64.    65.    66.    67.    68.    69.    70.              APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA  UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report          Communications Content Analysis of UBC Recreation’s Programs and Classes Web Page Terrance Chung, Nelson Ip, Daniel Nguyen, Aneil Uppal, Vincent Choi University of British Columbia KIN 464 Themes: Health, Community, Wellbeing April 2, 2019        Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.   1     Final Report Communication Analysis of UBC’s Recreation and Programs Website Terrance Chung  Nelson Ip Aneil Uppal Vincent Choi Daniel Nguyen    2  Executive Summary ................................................... 3 Introduction .............................................................. 4 Methods .................................................................... 6 Results and Findings .................................................. 8 Discussion ............................................................... 10      Limitations  ......................................................... 10 Recommendations ................................................... 12 Appendices .............................................................. 14    CONTENTS Programs and Classes Web Page   3   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY         INTRODUCTION In this project we chose to do an audit of the University of British Columbia’s (UBC) Recreation’s Programs and Classes webpage. We wanted to see if there are any changes students would like to see that could potentially help them in registering for a class. We only targeted students of UBC because we wanted to help them in increasing their overall physical activity.  For data collection, we created a survey for the students of UBC that included closed-ended questions of the agreeableness on specific aspects of the website and two open-ended questions for participants own opinion. They will complete the survey via laptop or mobile phone. The responses we receive will be totaled and analyzed to determine recommendations.   RESULTS Based off our survey results, majority of the responses from our participants indicate that they are satisfied with most of the UBC recreation program and classes webpage. Specifically, there was a high to very high level of agreement regarding easy accessibility, appropriate font size/color scheme, clear and concise class descriptions, and the overall presentation of the webpage. Despite this, further improvement can be made in certain areas. For example, we found that many our participants were not satisfied with the clarity in level of difficulty for each program/class and, some users found the webpage difficult to navigate through a mobile device. Our participants also favored the use of more colors in which the inclusion of other colors can make the website even more appealing.  DISCUSSION Based on our results, we have found that many students are satisfied with the effectiveness of UBC’s recreation website. Across all the questions asked, the average response was between “Somewhat Agree” and “Agree”, suggesting that these students are content with the layout and design of the website. However, there are aspects that can certainly be improved to further increase the student’s satisfaction of the website. For example, the difficulty of classes could be made clearer because about one quarter of the students did not agree with the statement about the class difficulty being clear. By making the difficulty levels clearer, students can feel less intimidated by the program or class that they are interested in which can increase the likelihood of their participation. UBC recreation can do this by rewording the main objectives and goals of the programs, which can highlight the social opportunities that become available through participation.  Another aspect that be improved is the color scheme of the website, as the results show quite a bit of variation in the survey responses targeting this aspect of the website. Roughly a quarter of the students were either “Neutral” or did not agree with the statement about the color scheme being appealing, which is an incentive to perhaps change or add more color to the website layout. Overall, the results suggest that the UBC students that completed the survey are pleased with the recreation website, but there are some aspects of it that can be improved to enhance not only the level of appeal but hopefully the rates of participation amongst students in the UBC community.  RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Add videos of classes and more images for each class.  2. Putting the instructor profiles as the same page as the classes they teach. 3. Providing more information on the difficulty level of all programs and classes. 4. Make the website more navigation friendly for mobile device users.      4        INTRODUCTION With the advances in technology, building a website that is effective is crucial in promoting one’s products (Tucker & Hill, 2009). In our case, UBC Recreation’s Programs and Classes page. If a website is well built it can make communicating information much easier and give those who are interested the information they are looking for (Tucker & Hill). As more people rely on the internet to find information and resources (Nunally, 2004), websites should be created in a way that makes it easy and accessible for its target audience. A good website design has an appearance, accessibility, content and easy navigation that allows students to find the information they need (Nunally, 2004; Tan & Wei, 2006; Taylor, 2011).   The appearance of a site should be directed for its intended audience, in our case, students of the University of British Columbia (UBC) community (Taylor, 2011; Nunally, 2004). Including more pictures or videos of students in specific programs allows those who want to register for a program or class a better insight of whether that class is the right one for them. Websites that includes pictures showing people and their facial expressions are shown to have more trust in those certain websites (Cyr, Head, Larios, Pan, 2009). The colors, pictures, and style chosen for the website should be consistent and should also be able to say something about it without having much text (Taylor, 2011). They should be appealing to the students as they are the ones who will likely be considering registration for a program or class.  Accessibility of a website is important because it determines the usage of the website, especially when online resources have become more convenient for students (Nunally, 2004). A website should be easy to navigate and include relevant content for the users to be able to find information (Taylor, 2011). The programs and classes section should also take students with disabilities into consideration as the website should be created in a way that it can be accessed by anyone (Nunally, 2004). This is important because the goal is to achieve inclusion and offer every individual a sense of belonging, which helps the retention rates of students when accessing a website (Nunally, 2004). Everyone should feel like they have a program or class that they can be a part of. There is an increase of social presence when pictures of actual people are seen rather than just having images without or just equipment of the facilities (Cyr, Head, Larios & Pan, 2009).  Keeping the content up to date is another factor to creating a successful website (Taylor, 2011). The UBC’s recreation website had information regarding classes from the previous term which can cause some confusion for the students using it. Up to date information can show that those in charge of the website care about their viewers and the message that it sends to be up to date with the school schedule (Nunally, 2004). Keeping UBC Recreation’s website up to date shows that those responsible for the website are considerate to the students and want to encourage them to increase their physical activity levels. The content not only needs to be up to date, but there should also be enough information within the content to be able answer all the questions the viewer may have. Otherwise, the user will potentially deter from further use and create a lack of interest for the site (Tan & Wei, 2006; Nunally, 2004). If the content provides a sufficient amount of information, it gives the viewer more confidence that they are making the right choice for themselves (Tan & Wei, 2006).     5    INTRODUCTION UBC's ARC Gym - Inside Including the benefits and providing some knowledge about physical activity for each program can be beneficial in a fitness website (Tucker & Hill). This can possibly encourage students to increase their physical activity levels by finding the right program that fits them best.  Another important component to a website’s design is its consistency in compliance and navigation. Having the same logo, navigation bar, and drop-down window options in all areas of the website is a few of the characteristics that would make a website consistent (Tan & Wei, 2006). The consistency in these website conventions led to ease in students’ learning process in navigating the website (Tan & Wei, 2006). A term used by Tan & Wei (2006), “Cognitive Mapping”, which refers to the organization of information from a user’s past experiences. Creating a website that is similar to other fitness and recreation pages in certain features will help make it easier for users and viewers to find information because of the familiarity they will have coming from other sources and websites (Tan & Wei, 2006).  Our intention for this project is to find ways and areas to improve upon UBC’s Recreations Programs and Classes website and create more awareness of the programs and classes offered by UBC Recreation. Through an improved website design, we intend to encourage a larger portion of the students at UBC to get involved in these various programs in hopes of increasing the levels of physical activity that the students get on a daily basis.            Image via Twitter   6                                METHODS Student Union Building – The Nest PROCEDURE We conducted multiple surveys, online and in-person, to receive feedback on the current opinions on the perceived effectiveness of the UBC recreation website. We used UBC Qualtrics to create our survey and collect data. For the in-person surveys we went to various locations: the ARC, Bird Coop, Student Union Building and Irving K. Barber library and had participants complete them on our provided laptops. We decided to go to multiple locations so we can target a variety of students across campus and find different and unique perspectives on what is desired in a university’s recreation website For our online survey, which is identical to the in-person survey, they were sent a link and completed it with their mobile phones or their own computer/laptop. The link for the survey was shared amongst the group members social media, through platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and WhatsApp, strongly emphasizing that the survey was to be completed only by current UBC students. Prior to starting the survey, the participants were given a briefing about our project, and whether or not they consent to completing the survey. Once the participant gave their consent to take part in our survey, they were instructed on the website to go to UBC’s Recreation’s Programs and Classes webpage and find information for a class they are interested in (e.g. cost, schedule, instructor’s information), and answered the follow up questions regarding the effectiveness of their chosen page.   DATA COLLECTION The survey asked students to rate their levels of agreement with a wide variety of statements, that targeted multiple aspects of UBC’s recreation website. Some topics included: appropriateness of website imagery, and satisfaction with language used to attract inclusivity. The opinions of the font, colors, graphics, language of the webpage and information for each class was also asked to be rated with a scale from strongly disagree to strongly agree by each participant.   DESIGN We used a mixed method research design, to collect quantitative and qualitative data. For data collection, we created a survey for the students of UBC that included closed-ended questions of the agreeableness of specific aspects of the website and two open-ended questions, for participants own opinion. We only targeted students of UBC because we wanted to see if any changes to the Programs and Classes web site can be done to promote an increase in their overall activity.    Image via Google Images   7     METHODS It is important to collect data on the actual website for the programs because it can affect whether a student will continue to browse the site or not depending on its appeal and the ability to find information they need. There was also a section that allowed for comments on the pros and cons of the recreation website, which allowed for students to provide their thoughts on topics that weren’t asked previously in the survey. By doing this, we were able to gather more information from students that allowed us to make more recommendations for how the website can be improved to cater to all UBC students.    To analyze our data, we created frequency tables within Excel for our survey questions. For example, one of the survey questions that we will be asking students is whether they are happy with the coloring of the website on a scale of 1-5 (Not appealing - Very appealing). The frequency distribution tables will describe the central tendency of the responses. We determined what changes students wanted by using the mode, the most frequent response, from our survey questions.   By gathering our data at various locations throughout UBC, allowed us to target students from various programs as we want to receive feedback from everyone and not just already physically active Kinesiology students. Everyone’s perspective is important, and we wanted to find ways to achieve inclusion by gathering insight from different UBC students. Most importantly, this allowed us to get a better idea of how UBC recreation can improve their programs/classes section of their website by taking into consideration every type of individual regardless of whether they are experienced in physical activity. Irving K. Barber Library Photo by Laura Swimmer   8                               RESULTS 2% 2%17%22%46%11%CLASS DESCRIPTIONS ARE CLEAR AND CONCISEStrongly DisagreeDisagreeSomewhat DisagreeNeutralSomewhat AgreeAgreeStrongly Agree11%9%11%45%24%FONT SIZE AND COLOUR ARE EASY TO READStrongly DisagreeDisagreeSomewhat DisagreeNeutralSomewhat AgreeAgreeStrongly AgreeOur survey results indicate that the majority of the participants were satisfied with the overall presentation of the site. For our quantitative data, the measures of central tendency of mean, median and mode were used to calculate the most “typical” value for each survey question. Majority of our close-ended questions scored a mean of 5, a mode of 6 and a median of 6. Since the mean can be skewed by outliers, the median and mode were also used. As a result, there were a large number of responses that included a high to very high level of agreement regarding clear and concise class descriptions, easy web page accessibility, appropriate use of font size, and an appealing use of colour scheme.  The 2 open-ended questions at the end of our survey allowed for additional feedback as participants got to voice their opinions over the close-ended questions. The qualitative data that we gathered indicated that majority of the participants wanted to see videos for each program and class.  A large portion of the participants (69%) thought the choice of font and colour made it easy to read on the website.  Many responses from our survey (68%) thought the descriptions of the class was clear and provided the information they were looking for. “Videos of classes/programs can be added for more users to get a better idea of what the classes are like.”   9      RESULTS 4%9%11%17%24%20%15%CLASS DIFFICULTY IS CLEARLY STATEDStrongly DisagreeDisagreeSomewhat DisagreeNeutralSomewhat AgreeAgreeStrongly Agree6%4%13%24%33%20%COLOUR SCHEME WAS APPEALINGStrongly DisagreeDisagreeSomewhat DisagreeNeutralSomewhat AgreeAgreeStrongly AgreeSpecifically, participants think that it would help give UBC students a better idea of what each session will be like. Although many of our participants found the website to be appealing, our results suggest that there is a lack of clarity in terms of the difficulty level for each program and class.They stated that each program and class should have a difficulty level listed for everyone to see.       Furthermore, majority of the participants found the use of color scheme to be appealing but suggested that the inclusion of different colors can help the website stand out more. Lastly, our results indicate that some participants had difficulty navigating through the webpage on a mobile device. They stated that the webpage should be more mobile friendly as the load times were slow and that contents were clustered together.  “ … All classes should indicate the level of difficulty.” Most participants (53%) were satisfied with the color scheme but many (47%) would like to see some variety in colors on the website. A majority (56%)  of responses said they would like to see difficulties of classes stated in the descriptions.  “ … It felt cluttered when browsing on mobile. Make it easier to use and have quicker load time”   10                               DISCUSSION Based on our results, we have found that many students are satisfied with the effectiveness of UBC’s recreation website. Across all the questions asked, the average response was between “Somewhat Agree” and “Agree”, suggesting that these students are content with the layout and design of the website.  However, there are aspects that can certainly be improved to further increase the student’s satisfaction of the website. For example, the difficulty of classes could be made clearer because about one quarter of the students did not agree with the statement about the class difficulty being clear. By making the difficulty levels clearer, students can feel less intimidated by the program or class that they are interested in which can increase the likelihood of their participation. UBC recreation can do this by rewording the main objectives and goals of the programs, which can highlight the social opportunities that become available through participation.   Another aspect that be improved is the color scheme of the website, as the results show quite a bit of variation in the survey responses targeting this aspect of the website. Roughly a quarter of the students were either “Neutral” or did not agree with the statement about the color scheme being appealing, which is an incentive to perhaps change or add more color to the website layout.  Overall, the results suggest that the UBC students that completed the survey are pleased with the recreation website, but there are some aspects of it that can be improved to enhance not only the level of appeal but hopefully the rates of participation amongst students in the UBC community.  LIMITATIONS Throughout the data collection process, there were many anticipated challenges that needed to be addressed. There were two biases that we were concerned with in our survey, response bias and acquiescence bias. Response bias is where the participant answers questions in they way they think the researcher wants. Acquiescence bias is the tendency for subjects to answer “yes” to all questions they are asked. These biases can skew our data and provide inaccurate results (Vaughn, 2017). In order to mitigate this, survey questions should be short, concise, and clear (Aprameya, 2015). This is important because if our questions are too long, the participants may skip the question or rush through the survey by providing inaccurate answers. In this case, our survey questions will be short and easy to understand for all our participants so that we can encourage them to give the most accurate responses. Providing a simple selection of answers is another way to mitigate response and acquiescence bias (Aprameya, 2015). For our survey, we will be using a Likert scale format which will be short and concise to ensure that our participants aren’t bombarded with long answers. For example, asking our participants their level of agreeableness on the appeal of the website’s colour scheme on a scale from 1-7, with 1 meaning strongly disagree and 7 meaning strongly agree. However, by using a scale we will then be susceptible to extreme responding, which is when respondents only use the extreme ends of a scale (Vaughn, 2017). If the scale goes from 1 to 7, someone doing extreme responding will always choose 1 or 7, never selecting the options in the middle of the continuum. Scales also can lead to demand characteristics, which is when people provide skewed answers just because their participation in a survey slightly changes their disposition (Vaughn, 2017).    11    DISCUSSION To help mitigate these biases, we can make sure that most of our surveys will be done online anonymously, which will decrease the likelihood of extreme responses being provided. If our group members were watching the students as they took the survey, they may feel like they are being judged which can perhaps sway their true thoughts and lead them to providing these extreme or skewed responses. Time constraints is also an issue, especially if we’re doing the survey in-person during between classes and students have a next class to attend.  Using a survey with a multiple-choice format or closed-ended questions to collect data can affect how people respond. We may not have included the answers they want to select from in order to complete the survey or we may not have included all the questions relevant to keep the survey quick and concise. It can give us inaccurate data because participants are unsure how to answer each question and unable to give their thoughts on the issue. In order to mitigate this issue, we included 2 additional open-ended questions that give the participants the freedom to input their own ideas and opinions on the selected web site. However, with open-ended questions, they are easier to be misinterpreted by our group members compared to closed-ended questions.   Sample size may be another issue. This can affect the accuracy of our data, if there aren’t enough participants taking part in our survey. A way to mitigate this problem is to spend more time asking for participants, however it may be difficult due to the limited time frame. The same solution to solve the times constraint issue can be used for this problem as well, the easier and quicker the survey is for participants, the more people we can get to complete it within a constricted time period.  A challenge that can result from doing an online data collection is having inadequate or unavailable technology to complete the survey. Although it is very common in this day of age for almost all university students to have a mobile device or laptop, some students do not and there may even be some students that do not have their device on them during the time that we approach them on campus. Some students may have left their device at home, ran out of batteries on their device, or simply do not have an up to date device that has an internet browser. To help resolve this issue, the students in our group collecting data will have their own mobile phones and laptops available at the time of data collection for the participants to use if their device is unavailable. A related issue is the differences in completing the survey on a mobile device versus a laptop. Our solution to this is to ensure the survey is made accessible and useable regardless of what type of device is used to complete it.  An issue we had with our data was that we noticed people were “agreeing” with the many of the statements, which may have skewed the overall results. It made it difficult to use our data to determine if there were any changes the participants wanted to see. Also, we did not make the open-ended questions mandatory for participants, so many of them chose not to complete it. Although it does not affect the collected data, we may have gotten better input from more students. Another issue with our data collection was the completion of survey. A portion of responses (n=23) we received were not completed. These participants clicked consent but did not complete the survey within a week of the start date. We decided to exclude them from our data so it would not affect the results. For future reference, we can ask for participants email’s, for the purpose of sending out reminders to those who have yet to complete the survey.   12                                RECOMMENDATIONS  1. 2. 3. 4. Videos and Images  Including more images and videos of classes can be beneficial as UBC students will get a better sense of what to expect from the overall program.  Instructor Info and Bio Moving the instructor’s information and bio in the same page as the classes they teach will make it easier for the user because they don’t have to keep going back and forth from a separate page.   Difficulty Level  Participants wanted to have the difficulty of each class (e.g. Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced) stated with each class, so they know if they are able to complete the class or program comfortably.  Mobile Navigation There was a difference between navigating the website with a mobile and computer, participants found it harder to use it on mobile. We can create a mobile specific version of the website to make more mobile friendly with quicker load times and easier navigation. Based off our results, these are the recommendations that can be changed to encourage students to register for programs and classes with UBC recreation and help increase their physical activity.    13                                REFERENCES Aprameya, A. (2015, November 12). Are You Following These 6 Steps to Avoid Response Bias In Your Survey? Retrieved from https://blog.socialcops.com/academy/resources /following-6-steps-avoid-response-biassurvey/  Cyr, D., Head, M., Larios, H., & Pan, B. (2009). Exploring Human Images in Website Design: A Multi-Method Approach. MIS Quarterly, 33(3), 539-566. doi:10.2307/20650308  Nunally, M. L. (2004). Website Design and Development for College and University Recreation Programs Accredited by the NRPA/AALR Council on Accreditation [PDF] Retrieved January 28, 2019, from http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/209  Tan, G. W., & Wei, K. K. (2006). An empirical study of Web browsing behaviour: Towards an effective Website design. Electronic Commerce Research and Applications,5(4), 261- 271. doi:10.1016/j.elerap.2006.04.007  Taylor, A. (2011). Good website design–not just a pretty face. In Practice, 33(9), 486-489. doi:10.1136/inp.c4787  Vaughn, G. (2017, November 30). Response Bias: A Down To Earth Explanation. Retrieved from https://blog.zef.fi/en/response-bias-its-cramping-your-survey-style    14            APPENDICES Appendix A: Consent Form The purpose of this project is to increase the awareness of the University of British Columbia Recreation website and to promote physical activity. As undergraduate Kinesiology students from KIN 464, we will be conducting surveys to comprehend how students perceive UBC Recreation. The reason we are conducting surveys is to determine the effectiveness of the website at promoting physical activity and to see whether changes are needed to improve students’ awareness and participation. Principal Investigator:  Negin Riazi (PhD Candidate, School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Education) The purpose of the class project: To gather knowledge and expertise from community members on topics related to physical activity, recreation, and health promotion.  Study Procedures: With your permission, we are asking you to participate in a survey. With the information gathered, students will critically examine how different individuals understand or engage in health promoting activities or health promotion initiatives. Project outcomes: The information gathered from survey questions will be part of a written report for the class project. The written report will be shared with the community partners involved with the project. Summaries of findings will also be posted on the following websites. No personal information/information that could identify participants will be included in these reports. UBC SEEDS Program Library: https://sustain.ubc.ca/courses-degrees/alternative-credit-options/seeds-sustainability-program/seeds-sustainability-library Potential benefits of class project: There are no explicit benefits to you by taking part in this class project. However, the survey will provide you with the opportunity to voice your opinion on your experiences with health promoting activities or initiatives in a broad sense and will provide the students with an opportunity to learn from your experiences. Confidentiality: Maintaining the confidentiality of the participants involved in an interview is paramount, and no names will be asked for. At the completion of the course, all data (i.e. notes) and signed consent forms will be kept in a locked filing cabinet in Negin Riazi’s office in the Population Physical Activity Lab (2259 Lower Mall) at the University of British Columbia. All data and consent forms will be destroyed 1 year after completion of the course.    15    Risks: The risks associated with participating in this research are minimal. There are no known physical, economic, or social risks associated with participation in this study. Although there is a schedule of questions, the person you are interviewing is free to share what they would like, including refusing to answer specific questions. You should know that your participation is completely voluntary and you are free to withdraw from the survey and there will not be negative impacts related to your withdrawal. If you withdraw from the study, all of the information you have shared up until that point will be destroyed.  Contact for information about the study: If you have any questions about this class project, you can contact Negin Riazi by phone at 604-822-5288 or by email at negin.riazi@ubc.ca Research ethics complaints:  If you have any concerns or complaints about your rights as a research participant and/or your experiences while participating in this study, contact the Research Participant Complaint Line in the UBC Office of Research Ethics at 604-822-8598 or e-mail RSIL@ors.ubc.ca . or call toll free 1-877-822-8598.        o I consent, begin the survey.  o I do not consent, I do not wish to participate.    UBC Recreation offers a variety of programs and classes including Boot Camps, Cardio, Conditioning & Strength, Dance, Martial Arts, Spin & Group Fitness, and Yoga & Pilates. Imagine you were interested in taking a class with UBC Recreation. Please spend a few minutes to look up details on the class you have chosen (e.g. class description, instructor, class time and location). After obtaining all relevant information, return to the survey.  Please copy and paste the link into a new tab.https://recreation.ubc.ca/fitness-classes/programs-classes/ Appendix B: Survey Appendix A: Consent Form   16    APPENDIX B: SURVEY Q1. What type of device did you use to access the UBC Recreation website? o Mobile Device  o Computer   Q2. Please rate your level of agreement with the following statements.  Strongly Disagree (1) Disagree (2) Somewhat Disagree (3) Neutral (4) Somewhat Agree (5) Agree (6) Strongly Agree (7) The website was easily accessible from a computer.  o  o  o  o  o  o  o  The website was easily accessible from a mobile device. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  The website was easy to navigate on a computer.  o  o  o  o  o  o  o  The website was easy to navigate on a mobile device. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Website pages transitioned with ease. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  The colour scheme was appealing. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  The font sizes and colours are easy to read. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  UBC Recreation offers a wide variety of classes. o  o  o  o  o  o  o       17    APPENDIX B: SURVEY   Strongly Disagree (1) Disagree (2) Somewhat Disagree (3) Neutral (4) Somewhat Agree (5) Agree (6) Strongly Agree (7) Class descriptions are clear and concise.  o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Classes clearly state their level of difficulty.  o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Class schedules were easy to view and understandable. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Class times are clearly stated.  o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Class locations are clearly stated. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Class instructors are clearly indicated. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Class pages use appropriate imagery.  o  o  o  o  o  o  o  The price of the class was easy to find. o  o  o  o  o  o  o  Q3. After looking through the UBC Recreation Programs & Classes page, what was appealing to you? ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________   Q4. What changes and improvements would you recommend?  ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________    18   Consent Principal Investigator: Negin Riazi (PhD Candidate, School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Education) The purpose of the class project:To gather knowledge and expertise from community members on topics related to physical activity, recreation, and health promotion.  Study Procedures:With your permission, we are asking you to participate in a survey. With the information gathered, students will critically examine how different individuals understand or engage in health promoting activities or health promotion initiatives. Project outcomes:The information gathered from survey questions will be part of a written report for the class project. The written report will be shared with the community partners involved with the project. Summaries of findings will also be posted on the following websites. No personal information/information that could identify participants will be included in these reports. UBC SEEDS Program Library:https://sustain.ubc.ca/courses-degrees/alternative-credit-options/seeds-sustainability-program/seeds-sustainability-library Potential benefits of class project:There are no explicit benefits to you by taking part in this class project. However, the survey will provide you with the opportunity to voice your opinion on your experiences with health promoting activities or initiatives in a broad sense and will provide the students with an opportunity to learn from your experiences.  Confidentiality:Maintaining the confidentiality of the participants involved in an interview is paramount, and no names will be asked for.  At the completion of the course, all data (i.e. notes) and signed consent forms will be kept in a locked filing cabinet in Negin Riazi’s office in the Population Physical Activity Lab (2259 Lower Mall) at the University of British Columbia. All data and consent forms will be destroyed 1 year after completion of the course. Risks:The risks associated with participating in this research are minimal. There are no known physical, economic, or social risks associated with participation in this study. Although there is a schedule of questions, the person you are interviewing is free to share what they would like, including refusing to answer specific questions. You should know that your participation is completely voluntary and you are free to withdraw from the survey and there will not be negative impacts related to your withdrawal. If you withdraw from the study, all of the information you have shared up until that point will be destroyed.  Contact for information about the study:If you have any questions about this class project, you can contact Negin Riazi by phone at 604-822-5288 or by email at negin.riazi@ubc.ca Q1. What type of device did you use to access the UBC Recreation website? Q2. The website was easily accessible from a computer. Q3. The website was easily accessible from a mobile device. APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   19  Research ethics complaints: If you have any concerns or complaints about your rights as a research participant and/or your experiences while participating in this study, contact the Research Participant Complaint Line in the UBC Office of Research Ethics at 604-822-8598 or e-mail RSIL@ors.ubc.ca . or call toll free 1-877-822-8598. 1. I do not consent, I do not wish to participate.    2. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 3. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree 4. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 5. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 6. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 7. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Agree 8. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Somewhat Agree Disagree 9. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Strongly Agree 10. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 11. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Agree 12. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 13. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 14. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 15. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 16. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Agree 17. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 18. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Agree 19. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Strongly Agree 20. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 21. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Agree 22. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Neutral 23. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree 24. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 25. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Disagree Strongly Disagree 26. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 27. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree 28. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 29. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Agree 30. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Somewhat Agree 31. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Neutral 32. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 33. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 34. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Somewhat Agree 35. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 36. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Agree 37. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Neutral 38. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 39. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Neutral 40. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree  APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   20  41. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Neutral 42. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Agree 43 I consent, begin the survey.    44. I consent, begin the survey.    45. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Neutral Agree 46. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Somewhat Agree Agree 47.     48. I consent, begin the survey.    49. I consent, begin the survey. Mobile Device Agree Agree 50. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Agree Neutral 51. I consent, begin the survey. Computer Strongly Agree Neutral 52. I consent, begin the survey.    53. I consent, begin the survey.    54. I consent, begin the survey.    55. I consent, begin the survey.    56.     57. I consent, begin the survey.    58.     59. I consent, begin the survey.    60. I consent, begin the survey.    61. I consent, begin the survey.    62. I consent, begin the survey.    63.     64. I consent, begin the survey.    65. I consent, begin the survey.     66. I consent, begin the survey.    67. I consent, begin the survey.    68. I consent, begin the survey.    69. I consent, begin the survey.    70. I consent, begin the survey.      Q4. The website was easy to navigate on a computer. Q5. The website was easy to navigate on a mobile device. Q6. Website pages transitioned with ease. Q7. The colour scheme was appealing. Q8. The font sizes and colours are easy to read. Q9. UBC Recreation offers a wide variety of classes. Q10. Class descriptions are clear and concise. 1.        2. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Neutral Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree 3. Somewhat Agree Agree Neutral Agree Agree Agree Agree 4. Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree 5. Agree Neutral Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree  APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   21  6. Agree Agree Agree Neutral Agree Agree Somewhat Agree 7. Neutral Agree Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree 8. Strongly Agree Somewhat Disagree Disagree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree 9. Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Strongly Agree Neutral Neutral 10. Agree Neutral Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 11. Agree Agree Strongly Agree Neutral Agree Somewhat Agree Neutral 12. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 13. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 14. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree 15. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree 16. Agree Agree Somewhat Agree Neutral Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree 17. Agree Neutral Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree 18. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 19. Neutral Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree Somewhat Agree 20. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree 21. Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 22. Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral 23. Agree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Strongly Disagree 24. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 25. Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Disagree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Disagree Disagree 26. Agree Agree Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree 27. Neutral Somewhat Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree Neutral Neutral Neutral 28. Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree 29. Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree Agree Agree 30. Somewhat Agree Neutral Somewhat Disagree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral 31. Agree Neutral Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree  APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   22  32. Neutral Neutral Agree Agree Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree 33. Agree Neutral Neutral Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Disagree Agree 34. Neutral Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree 35. Agree Neutral Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree 36. Agree Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Neutral Neutral 37. Strongly Agree Neutral Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 38. Agree Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree 39. Strongly Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree Neutral 40. Agree Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Agree Agree 41. Strongly Agree Neutral Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 42. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 43        44.        45. Neutral Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Agree 46. Neutral Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Neutral Neutral Neutral 47.        48.        49. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Somewhat Agree 50. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree 51. Strongly Agree Neutral Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree 52.        53.        54.        55.        56.        57.        58.        59.        60.        61.        62.        63.         APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   23  64.        65.         66.        67.        68.        69.        70.          Q11. Class descriptions are clear and concise. Q2. Classes clearly state their level of difficulty. Q13. Class schedules were easy to view and understandable. Q14. Class times are clearly stated. Q15. Class locations are clearly stated. Q16. Class instructors are clearly indicated. Q17. Class pages use appropriate imagery. 1.        2. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree 3. Agree Somewhat Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Somewhat Agree 4. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Neutral 5. Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Disagree 6. Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 7. Strongly Agree Agree Agree Agree Strongly Agree Agree Agree 8. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree 9. Neutral Disagree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Neutral Neutral Somewhat Agree 10. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 11. Neutral Neutral Neutral Somewhat Agree Neutral Neutral Neutral 12. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 13. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 14. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 15. Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 16. Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree 17. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 18. Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Somewhat Agree 19. Somewhat Agree Neutral Agree Agree Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree  APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   24  20. Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree 21. Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree Strongly Agree 22. Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral 23. Strongly Disagree Disagree Disagree Neutral Disagree Somewhat Disagree Disagree 24. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 25. Disagree Strongly Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Neutral Disagree 26. Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 27. Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral 28. Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 29. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 30. Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree 31. Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree 32. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 33. Agree Strongly Disagree Agree Agree Agree Disagree Neutral 34. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Agree Somewhat Disagree 35. Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree Neutral Agree Neutral Agree 36. Neutral Neutral Neutral Agree Agree Neutral Somewhat Agree 37. Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Agree 38. Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 39. Neutral Somewhat Disagree Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Agree 40. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 41. Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 42. Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree Agree 43        44.        45. Agree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Strongly Agree Somewhat Disagree Disagree 46. Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral Neutral 47.        48.         APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   25  49. Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree Neutral Agree Agree Agree Agree 50. Somewhat Agree Disagree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree 51. Agree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 52.        53.        54.        55.        56.        57.        58.        59.        60.        61.        62.        63.        64.        65.         66.        67.        68.        69.        70.          Q18. The price of the class was easy to find. Q19. After looking through the UBC Recreation Programs & Classes page, what was appealing to you? Q20. What changes and improvements would you recommend? 1.    2. Somewhat Disagree   3. Agree   4. Neutral   5. Somewhat Agree  Videos or photos showing what the class is like. Not all classes indicate whether it's for beginners or for more advanced individuals. 6. Strongly Agree   7. Agree  None.  8. Somewhat Agree   9. Somewhat Agree    APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   26  10. Agree   11. Somewhat Agree   12. Agree Variety of classes  13. Agree Gym hours. I want to know when the weight room facility is open.  The hours and days when the gym facility is open. 14. Agree   15. Strongly Agree The content   16. Agree The types of class and programs offered  17. Strongly Agree It was easy to navigate and the important details were right in front of me.  I can't see any flaws with the website. It seems simple, easy, and straight to the point.  18. Agree   19. Agree Easy to find what i was looking for. Straightforward. The drop down menus for each subcategory should be at the top of each page 20. Strongly Agree The organization.  The colours could be more diverse! 21. Strongly Agree the variety of classes that are offered.   22. Neutral   23. Strongly Disagree   24. Strongly Agree there are so many options   25. Strongly Disagree   26. Somewhat Agree Navigation of the website itself was easy and transition from page to page was convienient  27. Neutral   28. Agree The navigation of the site was pretty simple and everything was organized properly. Videos of classes/programs can be added for more users to get a better idea of what the classes are like. 29. Agree The Variety of classes and good times for them! None at the moment 30. Neutral   31. Agree There was a wide selection of sports and activities to choose from.  maybe have emails for the instructors in their bio 32. Somewhat Agree   33. Disagree   34. Agree All the information i wanted was easy to find  Including videos from classes. It felt cluttered when browsing on  APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   27  mobile. Make it easier to use and have quicker load time 35. Agree  have the instructors on the same page as the classes 36. Agree   37. Strongly Agree Everything is easy to find and organize.  I was going through martial arts classes and besides the initial fees for the classes, I couldn't find any extra fees for the clothing or extra materials needed for the classes, i.e,. boxing gloves, wraps, etc. So does this mean that these fees are included in the initial fee?  38. Strongly Agree I like the design of the website, it was very transparent and easy to navigate. I recommend just making it run it a bit faster. It might just be might my internet thought. 39. Agree Its simplicity and all the important information is easy to spot.  40. Agree Lots of options   41. Strongly Agree EVERYTHING NOTHING 42. Agree Personal trainers and their bios, and classes like yoga and pilates. More information. 43    44.    45. Strongly Agree The variety of classes that are offered. Put instructor's name with the class. All classes should indicate the level of difficulty. 46. Neutral   47.    48.    49. Somewhat Agree   50. Somewhat Disagree The drop down menu on the left side of the screen was nice. Made it easy to open different windows. Change the colours of the website. White seems very boring. Instead of having everything on the website, maybe include pdfs of all information so users don't have to click around so much to find information. 51. Somewhat Agree Nothing.  More images or videos. Hard to find which instructor taught  APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA   28  each class. Doesn't say if any equipment is needed. 52.    53.    54.    55.    56.    57.    58.    59.    60.    61.    62.    63.    64.    65.    66.    67.    68.    69.    70.              APPENDIX C:  RAW DATA  KIN 464 – Group 15Communication Analysis of UBC Recreation’s Programs and Classes Website Terrance Chung, Nelson Ip, Aneil Uppal, Vincent Choi, Daniel NguyenPURPOSETo find ways and areas to improve upon UBC’s Recreation Program and Classes website and create more awareness of the programs and classes offered by UBC Recreation. Through an improved website design, we intend to encourage a larger portion of the students at UBC to get involved in these various programs in hopes of increasing the levels of physical activity that the students get on a daily basis.RESULTSThe results indicate that the majority of the students are satisfied with the overall presentation of the site. That being said, there are some areas of improvement, such as clarity of what classes involve. Two main points students wanted was to add videos and more images of the classes, as well as, including the difficulty of each class in the description.The qualitative data that we gathered indicated that the majority of the participants wanted to see videos for each program and class. Participants thought that it would help give UBC students a better idea of what each session will be like. DISCUSSIONThe survey results show that many students are satisfied with the effectiveness of UBC’s recreation website. Across all the questions asked, the average response was between “Somewhat Agree” and “Agree”, suggesting that the students are content with the layout and design of the websiteOur open-ended questions gave us more insight into what changes the students wanted because it allowed them to voice their opinions. The closed-ended questions didn’t cover everything or something may have been missed that they would like see changed. UBC Recreation locationsThe ARC fitness centre (upper) and the Lower Level Studio (lower)REFERENCES1. Programs & Classes. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://recreation.ubc.ca/fitness-classes/programs-classes/2. Fitness Centres & Locations (n.d.). Retrieved from https://recreation.ubc.ca/fitness-classes?fitness-centre-locations/3. Ono, S. J. (2018, March 15). Great to see students already using the ARC in the UBC Life building. It opened on Feb 26th. I’ll have to work out there in the near future. pic.twitter.com/BwaS8DCen3. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/ubcprez/status/974396313713307648RECOMMENDATIONSThese are some of the recommendations that can be implemented to help students register for program and classes within UBC recreation, which can result in increases in their physical activity levels:1. Have images and videos of classes2. Include instructor info and bio on the same page3. Display the difficulty level of each class4. Make the website more mobile friendly"Videos of classes/programs can be added for more users to get a better idea of what the classes are like.”A majority (56%)  of responses said they would like to see difficulties of classes stated in the descriptions. CONCLUSIONBased on our results, we have found that many students are satisfied with the effectiveness of UBC’s recreation website. Across all the questions asked, the average response was between “Somewhat Agree” and “Agree”, suggesting that these students are content with the layout and design of the website.Overall, the results suggest that the UBC students that completed the survey are pleased with the recreation website, but there are some aspects of it that can be improved to enhance not only the level of appeal but hopefully the rates of participation amongst students in the UBC community. A screenshot of the current Programs and Classes front page.METHODSWe used a mixed methods research design, collecting both quantitative and qualitative data. For data collection, we created a UBC Qualtric’s survey that included closed-ended questions on the agreeableness of specific aspects of the website and two open-ended questions for participant’s own opinion.70 surveys were conducted online and in-person to receive feedback on the effectiveness of UBC’s recreation website. Various locations for the in-person survey include: the ARC, Bird Coop, Student Union Building and Irving K. Barber Library. Certain aspects of the website that we were interested in collecting feedback on include: appropriateness of website imagery, satisfaction with language used to attract inclusivity, and thoughts of the colours and font used.To analyze our data, we created frequency tables within Excel for our survey questions

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