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The UBC Recreation Website : Examination of the Personal Training Page for Staff and Faculty Compatibility Cheok, Jeffrey; Ip, Derek; Kainth, Ryan; Lin, Wenny; Zhang, Rachael 2019-04-02

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report The UBC Recreation Website: Examination of the Personal Training Page for Staff and Faculty Compatibility Jeffrey Cheok, Derek Ip, Ryan Kainth, Wenny Lin, Rachael Zhang University of British Columbia KIN 464 Themes: Health, Community, Wellbeing April 2, 2019 Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”. Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   1 Table of Contents  Executive Summary…………………………………………………....…………2  Introduction and Literature Review……………………………………..…..……2  Methods……………………………………………………………………..…….3  Results/Findings……………………………………………………………..……4  Discussions……………………………………………………………..…………6  Recommendations for the Client……………………………..……...……………8  References……………………………………………………………...…………10  Appendices……………………………………………….……………………… 11                        Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   2 Executive Summary  The following is a study examining UBC Staff and Faculty perspectives on barriers regarding the participation in UBC Recreation’s Personal Training Program and their opinions on the UBC Recreation Website. Our goal is to provide recommendations to improve the Personal Training page of the UBC Recreation website to ultimately increase interest and participation in the Personal Training program.  We believe the UBC Recreation website to be an integral part of informing the UBC population about the details of the programs. Enough information on the website should be provided to influence an individual’s decision on whether a program is a fit for them, which program to sign up for, and all the benefits to signing for said program. This directly relates to the suggestions we are planning to give to UBC Recreation about their website, which mostly relate to comprehensiveness, potential barriers, accessibility and clarity.   Data collection occurred in two parts. Firstly, a survey was given out to the participants to determine their views on the UBC Recreation personal training page. Then, an interview was conducted with each participant to further evaluate their attitudes towards personal training and the personal training page. We chose to interview staff and faculty members from different areas and roles on campus to reflect the many diverse opinions on personal training. A mixture of quantitative and qualitative data allows us to gain a deeper understanding of the topic at hand. The quantitative data allows us to describe the general impression that our participants have on the UBC Recreation personal training page. The qualitative data allows us to capture the more intricate details of our participants’ experiences with the UBC recreation personal training page. From our survey, we found that none of the participants in our study have participated in a UBC personal training class. A number of barriers were identified, including not seeing a need for a personal trainer, feeling uncomfortable working out in front of students, and the student-centred nature of UBC Recreation itself. The latter is the most important barrier related to our study. Many staff and faculty members felt left out, as most of the promotional materials were targeted towards students. Changes can be made to the UBC recreation personal training website to cater more towards the staff and faculty members and improve their user experience.  Three recommendations were formed through our study’s findings: making the information clearer and better organized, targeting different motivations for physical activity, and increasing material centered around staff and faculty. We believe that these recommendations will improve website user experience and motivate staff and faculty members to participate in personal training programs.  Introduction & Literature Review Physical activity has been known to contribute to better quality of life and improved health outcomes (Penedo & Dahn, 2005). Research has shown that regular exercise and physical activity may reduce risks of coronary heart disease and diabetes-related complications (Penedo & Dahn, 2005). It improves overall quality of life and also benefits both physical and mental well-being (Penedo & Dahn, 2005). In the case of university staff, administration, and faculty members, unique barriers to participation still exist despite the apparent benefits of physical activity and availability of exercise facilities and programs on campus (Leininger, Adams, & DeBeliso, 2015).  Personal Training is becoming more common as individuals realise the importance of exercise, as these individuals help people design exercise programs according to current guidelines and recommendations (“What is a”, n.d.).  While personal training programs are Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   3 tailored to individuals to help achieve their goals in the most efficient and effective way, individuals often face challenges when they attempt to enrol in personal training sessions such as availabilities, monetary cost, and compatibility with trainers. These are all possible reasons that might prevent people from joining these training sessions.  In a study by Das, Rinaldi-Miles, & Evans (2013), university faculty and staff identified the following barriers to physical activity in the university setting: 1) lack of access and choice in facilities, 2) time management and inflexible work schedules, and 3) lack of knowledge regarding physical activity choices in the campus. While the first two of these barriers may require vast changes to university policies and infrastructure, the latter can certainly be addressed by increasing knowledge of physical activity programs offered by UBC recreation through the UBC recreation website. Considering the internet’s substantial role in sharing information, organizations are forced to dedicate a great deal of effort towards the design and structure of their websites (Nilsson, 2017). Our goal is to provide recommendations for the UBC Recreation personal training website with the motive of increasing the interest and participation of staff and faculty in UBC Recreation personal training programs.   Methods Population Choice Rationale For this study, the population of focus is UBC’s staff and faculty. UBC Recreation has made it their goal to improve the health of the UBC community by providing welcoming, enjoyable, and accessible physical activity opportunities for all individuals on campus (Get Moving, n.d.). UBC has a population of approximately 55,887 students and 14,934 staff and faculty members in the Vancouver campus (UBC Overview & Facts, n.d.). Because students vastly outnumber staff and faculty, a large portion of UBC Recreation’s resources is invested into the student population. Staff and faculty may not benefit from the same resources because they experience different barriers to physical activity. Research has indicated that these barriers include limited options in physical activity facilities, demanding schedules, and lack of awareness around the programs being offered (Das, Rinaldi-Miles, & Evans, 2013). Additional resources must be allocated to address the needs of UBC’s staff and faculty population. This investigation will use a convenience sampling strategy in order to study information-rich cases that are easily accessible. An email was sent to UBC professors and staff working in UBC Residence Life to request their participation in our study. A total of 7 faculty and staff were sent a recruitment email with 5 agreeing to participate. A subsequent email was sent to arrange meeting times for a survey and interview.   Procedure          The participants that we will be focusing on for this study will be the UBC staff and faculty members. We are interested in their feedback and comments on the layout, ease of use (how user-friendly it is), and the quality of information on the website based on previous experiences or first engagements. Before the study begins, the participants are required to sign a consent form. The consent form will ask for permission from the participants to use the information that they have provided in the interview and survey. On the consent form (see Appendix A), we briefly explain the purpose and procedure of this study, and the benefits and possible risks. The information collected will be kept confidential and participants are welcome to withdraw at anytime without any penalties. Contacts will be provided on the consent form for more information regarding the study.   Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   4 After signing the consent form, participants will be asked to complete a 15-20 minute survey and interview. During this session, the participants will be provided a survey form (see Appendix B) for impressions and feedback on the UBC Recreation personal training website, and to answer in a five-point likert scale: Strongly Agree, Agree, Neutral, Disagree and Strongly Disagree. After completing the survey, a short interview will be conducted, asking several questions (see Appendix C) about their thoughts and opinions on UBC Recreation’s personal training website and the barriers to participating in personal training classes in UBC. Each interview will be recorded with an audio recorder for transcription and thematic analysis. Physical notes will also be taken by the interviewer during the session to provide additional information regarding the participant’s answer. The surveys and interviews were conducted from March 20th to March 28th in the offices of the staff and faculty who participated.   Data analysis          The data obtained through the survey and interview will be analyzed separately at first and will be integrated later to further knowledge on the research topic. The survey will provide quantitative data regarding faculty and staff opinions on the UBC Recreation personal training website. The interviews will provide qualitative data to understand why faculty and staff members have those views on the UBC Recreation personal training website. Through thematic analysis, we can uncover the common topics and themes in faculty and staff responses. This includes their participation in physical activity on campus, their opinions on the design of the website, as well as some of the common barriers that they may have experienced while navigating the UBC Recreation website.   Results/Findings  Five participants from UBC Staff and Faculty were provided a brief questionnaire regarding the UBC Recreation personal training webpage (see Appendix B), and interviewed to understand barriers to participation and recommendations for website improvement. Out of the 5 participants, 2 were UBC staff and 3 were faculty members, 2 were female and 3 were male. None of the participants had any experience with personal training classes offered by UBC Recreation (Figure 1). However, our survey results did suggest that the registration process for personal training was easy to find and navigate as well as being clear and informative (see Appendix D).  Figure 1 Participation in UBC personal training classes   Participant Opinions on the UBC Recreation Personal Training Website Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   5  Our surveys indicated that most participants found the information on the UBC Recreation Personal Training page to be clear and answered all their questions (Figure 2). However, there are still a number of ways the website could be improved according to the participants. During the interview, many participants brought into attention the programs taught by each personal trainer. Participants wanted a description of the programs as they believed the name itself was not sufficient. Another issue that was brought up was the discounts offered to staff and faculty members. Although most staff and faculty members were aware of the discounts offered to them (Figure 3), one participant was not aware. The same participant also brought it up during the interview, telling the interviewer that there was no clear indication that staff and faculty received a discount.   Most of the participants in the study agree that the UBC recreation website is aesthetically pleasing (Figure 4). However, some participants commented that the UBC Recreation personal training web pages “kind of feel like a different platform” (Appendix E). A way to improve the website would be to keep the design of the personal training page consistent with the rest of the UBC websites. Another concern that was brought up was the organization of the personal trainer profiles. Many participants found it tedious to scroll through and read the profile of every single personal trainer. Participants commented that “[they did not] find the finding a personal trainer user-friendly” and “it [took] a long time to scroll through all the trainer profiles” (Appendix E).  Figure 2: Quality of information on the UBC Recreation personal training page  Figure 3: Clarity of staff and faculty discounts     Figure 4: Attractiveness of the website design Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   6   Main Themes Identified in Interviews  Several common themes were raised in the interviews done with the participants. Firstly, an aspect of the UBC Recreation personal training webpage brought up by several participants was the lack of representation for staff and faculty and a large focus on students. The UBC Recreation facilities likely have a high participation rate for students, which is another factor that the participants identified to be a hindering factor to their participation at the facilities. Several participants emphasized the fact that they would be uncomfortable exercising near the students they work with. Other common themes seen between participants were a lack of knowledge regarding personal training and flawed organization of the website. A final theme seen amongst participants is the lack of a need for personal training. Many participants stated that they already lead an active lifestyle or that they rarely exercise as it is and so they feel that a personal trainer is not necessary.  Discussion Interpretation of Results  The data collected from the survey and interview revealed several barriers to participation that UBC staff and faculty experience.   I Don’t Need a Personal Trainer It is clear that UBC faculty and staff do not see any inherent value of working with a personal trainer. 3 out of the 5 participants suggest that they do not feel the need to pay for personal training classes when they are already active, or when they already know what to do at the gym. As one participant puts it: “If I needed to work out, I could do that without a personal trainer.” (Appendix E). Some participants have stated that at this point of their life, they are more interested in “getting into shape” rather than “athletic performance” (Appendix E). This might suggest that the participants view personal trainers as coaches who assist athletes in getting stronger and better.   I Don’t Want to Work Out in the Same Space as Students The second barrier to participation identified by faculty and staff members was the lack of a separate space for them. Many do not feel comfortable working out in the same area as their students. In response to the question about barriers preventing them from participating in UBC personal training classes, one participant said, “[I] don’t really want to run into students, I think it’ll make us both feel uncomfortable” (Appendix E). Several staff and faculty members have expressed that they did not want to be training or working out in front of students, as they wanted to avoid the feeling of being watched or giving students the feeling of being watched (Appendix Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   7 E). However, participants agreed that the logistics of arranging separate staff and faculty spaces may be complicated and unrealistic, thus, their lack of participation.  The Programs are More Geared Towards Students    The third reason—most connected to the way the UBC Recreation website is presented—is that many participants feel a lack of faculty- and staff-centred website pages and programs. One participant stated, “the immediate assumption is that most things are for students so I don’t pay much attention to them” (Appendix E). Another expressed that “from the pictures, it’s geared towards students… seems like faculty and staff are an afterthought” (Appendix E). The design of the website is important in providing an overall sense of inclusion for staff and faculty members, providing key information on the classes but also serving as ‘welcome’ signs for those who are interested in participating. A participant has suggested that with older staff and faculty members, motivations for joining personal training classes would be different: rather than working out to increase athletic performance, more people are interested in staying active and getting into shape. It is apparent that the most significant hindering factor is that staff and faculty are feeling underrepresented in the UBC Recreation website and on the personal training page. It is an opinion voiced by multiple participants, suggesting that it is an important factor to staff and faculty participation. More than just promotional materials, the interviews demonstrated that the participants are motivated to exercise (or to not exercise) for different reasons. One participant stated, “where I am now doesn’t really necesitate a personal trainer” while another said “if I needed to workout, I could do that without a personal trainer” (Appendix E), this shows that the personal training web page fails to recognize individual contexts and is therefore unable to target individual motivators.  Implications and Applications  With the findings of this study in mind, improvements can be made to the UBC Recreation Personal Training Website to motivate more staff and faculty members to participate in the personal training programs. To start, the personal training website seems to perpetuate a belief between staff and faculty members that personal training is only for athletes who wants to get bigger and stronger. However, most staff and faculty members are only looking to get fit. This might prevent staff and faculty members from seeing the inherent value of personal training and thus, choose not to pursue it. A website or web pages designed specifically for staff and faculty members that recognize their individual contexts might motivate more staff and faculty to participate in personal training programs.   A frequent concern that was brought up between participants is the lack of resources spent on UBC staff and faculty members. Promotional materials and exercise facilities seemed to be more catered towards students. If promotional materials are more catered towards students, staff and faculty members are less likely to pay attention to them. Staff and faculty members do not benefit from the same promotional materials because they face different barriers and have different motivations to exercise. Also, staff and faculty members do not feel comfortable working out in the same facilities as students. This may discourage staff and faculty members from participating in personal training programs.  The design of the personal training website has the potential to garner interest and motivate staff and faculty members to participate in personal training programs. Many participants found the organization of information cluttered. Scrolling through every personal Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   8 trainer to read their profiles became a very tedious and frustrating task. Also, many participants brought to attention the programs offered by each personal trainer. They felt that the names of the programs were insufficient and wanted a description for each program. Finding new ways to organize information can improve the user experience and persuade more staff and faculty to sign up for personal training programs.  Strengths and Limitations of Our Study This study allowed us to better understand the different perspectives of UBC faculty and staff members in regard to website design, personal training, barriers to participation, and physical activity behaviours and motivations. The questionnaires provided a general sense of what the faculty and staff members think of UBC Recreation, and the classes or events offered. The semi-structured interviews provided rich, detailed and in-depth qualitative data on their perspectives on physical activity and gave them the opportunity to provide feedback on improvements to be made to the programs and website design. The data obtained in this study provided us with a snapshot of current perspectives and can be used to identify strategies and indicators for future physical activity intervention programs (Riazi, 2019).  While we were able to obtain in-depth responses and feedback, this study could be more representative of the target population if more participants were surveyed and interviewed. Our study had a fairly small sample size. We were not able to find enough participants to participate in the study due to their lack of availability. In this study we only had a total of five participants where 2 were staff and 3 were faculty members. This sample size is not enough to represent the whole UBC staff and faculty population. Furthermore, the number of participants from staff and faculty were not consistent. We had more faculty members than staff, therefore we might not be able to represent their opinions effectively. Recruiting participants while walking around campus may be difficult since we cannot always differentiate between staff and faculty members and students. Since none of the participants actually participated in personal training classes prior to the study, we do not know what their experiences would be like in class. With more time and resources in the future, challenges with participant recruitment can be tackled by using different methods and platforms to reach a wider audience. Recruitment ads posted around campus, recreation centres and social media, and incentives could be helpful in gathering a larger sample population and a wider variety of experiences. Further research can delve more into experiences that may encourage people who are already participating to continue or deter them from returning. While the participants of this study navigated through the online registration process and agreed that it was quite clear and user-friendly, it would be interesting to know whether regular participants of classes would prefer the online registration process versus in-person, and their feedback on the strengths and limitations of the website. It would also be useful to understand their satisfaction with the training space, people, and classes, as well as their motivations for and barriers to participating in personal training classes. To provide more representative and generalizable data, further research should capture the experiences of faculty and staff members who participated in the past, those are currently participating, and those who have not participated in classes.  Recommendations for the Client The results from our study suggest three key changes to be made to the UBC Recreation personal training website and program design. Providing more information in a clear and well-organized fashion, targeting different motivations for physical activity, and increasing faculty- Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   9 and staff-centred promotional material may help to increase participation rates and thus improve the health of staff and faculty members. Most participants answered that the information provided on the website was useful, but not detailed or transparent enough (see Appendix E). Overall, participants stated that more information could be provided about the format and scheduling of classes, and staff and faculty member benefits could be more clearly presented (see Appendix E). Several participants noted that there were many schedules and too many personal trainer profiles on one page, and suggested organizing them by categories such as students or staff and faculty schedules, and personal trainer experience or specializations (see Appendix E). Improvements can be made to the personal training class landing page to emphasize staff and faculty member benefits and packages, and provide attentional cues that guide users through the registration process step-by-step. Programs and classes provided by UBC Recreation should also take into account the different motivations for physical activity in staff and faculty members. Rather than focusing on athletic performance, staff and faculty members are seeking to stay fit or get into shape (see Appendix E). Programs and classes can be more targeted for staff and faculty members by addressing their goals for physical activity, emphasizing the overall benefits to fitness and wellness, and the way regular physical activity can help prevent diseases that increase in risk with age and sedentary behaviour. Options offered by UBC Recreation should not appear restricted to programs and classes with more long-term commitment requirements, and can involve short-term, try-it, promotion days that encourage more staff and faculty members to look at the programs and facilities offered on campus. Another improvement to be made is gearing more promotional materials towards staff and faculty members. Most participants have agreed that most of the resources are directed towards students, and there is little targeted or faculty- and staff-centred materials on the web pages or circulating around campus—no images of staff and faculty members on the website, or emphasis on the benefits of training at recreation centres offered on campus. One participant was not even aware that personal training classes were offered (see Appendix E). Programs being promoted on campus should sell the advantages of training on campus such as convenience and savings. With more flexible schedules, convenient facility locations around their workplaces, and a variety of other events and programs offered by UBC Recreation, more people would be encouraged to participate.           Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   10 References Das, B. M., Rinaldi-Miles, A. I., & Evans, E. M. (2013). Exploring faculty and staff PA barriers at a large university. California Journal of Health Promotion, 11(2), 61-72. Get Moving. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://recreation.ubc.ca/get-moving/ Leininger, L. J., Adams, K. J., & DeBeliso, M. (2015). Differences in health promotion program participation, barriers and physical activity among faculty, staff and administration at a university worksite. International Journal of Workplace Health Management, 8(4), 246-255. DOI: https://doi-org.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/10.1108/IJWHM-10-2014-0045 Nilsson, M. A. (2017). The importance of website design and how it helps in making business profitable. Retrieved from https://codeburst.io/the-importance-of-website-design-and-how-it-helps-in-making-business-profitable-11bf5ee1817e?fbclid=IwAR2lP7Vy1OjV4nwCbTqhCaNYCrmyU2HUleywi3XwTTeMvzRTeb4m4YnoYs8 Penedo, F. J. & Dahn, J. R. (March 2005). Exercise and well-being: a review of mental and physical health benefits associated with physical activity. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 18(2), 189-193. Riazi, N. (2019). Week 8: The role of research and evaluation in health promotion [PowerPoint Slides]. Retrieved from https://canvas.ubc.ca/courses/20419/modules UBC Overview & Facts. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ubc.ca/about/facts.html What is a personal trainer?. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.personaltraineredu.org/what-is-a-personal-trainer/?fbclid=IwAR0pEl6-yfDsceL28B4_fRgoLv_2jH4fexW8c5w69XGrY8_GybKKuujg47E         Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   11 Appendices  Appendix A - Participant’s Consent Form   Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   12    Appendix B - Survey Form Survey Questions  1. The UBC Recreation website is aesthetically pleasing. 2. It is easy to find where the Personal Training page is located. Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   13 3. Information on the Personal Training page is clear and answers all my questions. 4. The website motivates me to participate. 5. I have participated in personal training classes offered by UBC Recreation. 6. I enjoyed personal training classes offered by UBC Recreation. 7. I have used the online registration process to sign up for personal training classes at UBC Recreation. 8. The online registration process is easy to navigate. 9. I am interested in getting to know the personal trainers. 10. Staff & faculty discounts are clearly presented on the website. 11. I am interested to see a brief introduction video on how personal training works.  Appendix C - Interview Questions 1. Have you participated in personal training classes with UBC Recreation? Why or why not? 2. What would you say are barriers to your participation in personal training classes offered by UBC Recreation? 3. Is the website informative and user-friendly? What can be improved? 4. What additions can be made to this website to encourage you and other staff & faculty members to participate in personal training? 5. What aesthetic changes would make this website more attractive to users? 6. Do you think the information provided on the website is detailed, useful, and persuasive?  Appendix D - Survey Results Forms response chart. Question title: 10. Staff & faculty discounts are clearly presented on the website.. Number of responses: 5 responses.  Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   14                  Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   15    Appendix E - Interview Transcripts  March 20, 2019, 3:00pm  Interviewer: Ryan Kainth (RK) Interviewee: Participant 1  RK: Firstly, have you participated with any personal training with UBC Rec? Participant 1: Never. RK: Is there a specific reason on why you haven’t, or…you just haven’t thought about it or anything? Participant 1: Well, two things immediately come to mind. One is the price point and related to that is that I’m already a pretty active person so I don’t feel the need to go to a personal trainer, and furthermore pay what I think is “a lot” for that support.  RK: Do you usually use Rec’s facilities or do you like working more on your own? Participant 1: I infrequently use the birdcoop gym pretty sporadically throughout the year, just because I usually like to run outside. I guess the Aquatic Centre I use pretty frequently if that counts..? RK: Other than price and just not seeming convenient for you, would you say that there are any other barriers that you, in your position, or you, as a person/manager, see as a barrier in participating in personal training or with Rec’s facilities? Participant 1: I’d say probably one of the largest barriers for me in using Rec facilities, is that I think the position that I’m in is pretty “outward facing”, because there’s so many students I interact with, I think there is a barrier of how it’s primarily student-based. I’m also in a position where I can have difficult Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   16 conversations with students, it’s not ideal to then run into them outside of work. What was the first part of the question again? RK: Just with personal training specifically. Participant 1: As a staff member, from my understanding the personal trainers are all students, or student adjacent. So if I were to be interested in personal training, and had to choose between doing it at UBC with a student vs going to a gym and doing it with a full time employee there, I’d say the latter is preferable to me.  RK: When it comes to being a more student-based facility, do you think having specific times for staff or a specific facility for staff would bring up numbers for participation? Participant 1: Absolutely. I think if there were just a staff and faculty gym, it would be amazing, but I doubt it would be possible. It does eliminate a lot of the barriers I see. I mean, a more realistic idea would be if there were staff and faculty hours, I can definitely see myself being more likely to go.  RK: How about during regular hours, how would you feel about having a staff and faculty portion of the gym, and like, no students can use that area? Participant 1: Potentially. In the spectrum of things, it’s kind of in the middle, with the ideal being just staff and faculty. If there was a portion sectioned off then maybe. RK: Moving onto the website, first of all what was your first impression towards the website? Participant 1: So I’m decently familiar with the website, I can’t say it’s the most aesthetically pleasing, but I can say it’s relatively easy to navigate, the tabs are pretty clearly labelled, and I think part of it kind of goes hand in hand with my work at UBC so I’m familiar with the interface for most their website. Can’t say it’s pretty but decently easy to use.  RK: Would you value aesthetics and interactivity or something more simple, but more well labeled? Participant 1: I think the latter, the aesthetics is a nice bonus, but ultimately, if I’m able to go in, find the information I want, that’s what’s most important. RK: Do you think for someone who’s never been on the website, that a more aesthetically pleasing website would be better for them? Participant 1: I think so, it would be helpful for people to spend longer on the website and consume more information, but I think beyond that I can’t really think of any other benefit.  RK: As someone who is pretty familiar with the website, do you find the website to be 1, informative and 2, user friendly, and how so would you say that? Participant 1: I think pretty informative, two things that stick out for me the most is that the pricing is clearly laid out, like staff price, student price, and in addition to that, the hours and calendar I find particularly useful of when classes are, so yeah, pretty easy to use and easy to navigate.  RK: From your perspective, what can be improved on the website? Participant 1: It seems that the UBC Rec’s website is aesthetically quite different from even students.ubc.ca, and so if there’s a way to make it aesthetically pleasing without complicating it, then it's probably to have similar branding to the rest of the university.  RK: And do you think that type of consistency can potentially improve numbers for staff and faculty in any way? Participant 1: Not that I can see. RK: What do you think can be done in terms of technology and promotion through the website that would specifically call towards staff and faculty, and specifically pull you into the Rec world? Participant 1: I think just having more things specifically targeted to staff and faculty, I think a lot of times, especially with Rec, my immediate assumption is that it’s just for students so I don’t pay much Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   17 attention to it. Like if Rec is interested in doing events or specific times for staff and faculty, I think just one landing page for staff and faculty. RK: Do you find the information on the website, detailed and useful, and also persuasive? Participant 1: I’d say yes to useful, I think it can use more detail, I think a lot of the classes have like fun names, but I don’t necessarily have the best understanding of what those classes are. Regarding persuasiveness, I think it’s neutral. RK: Okay, so that’s all we have for you, thanks so much.   March 21 2019, 4:00pm  Interviewer: Ryan Kainth (RK) Interviewee: Participant 2  RK: Have you taken any personal training classes with UBC Rec, or anything with Rec at all? Participant 2: I have not done personal training at UBC, and I have done some Rec participation, mostly free week. I also used to work at UBC camps. RK: As a member of UBC staff and specific to your role, what kind of barriers do you feel when looking to participate in personal training, and at Rec’s facilities? Participant 2: One of the bigger ones is that I have 2000+ students who know my name, know my face, and see me all the time. I also like to take my fitness outside of here because it’s a nice way to not be at UBC. I work here, do academic classes here as well, so it’s just nice to not do something that is UBC occasionally. I also try not to run into the students I’m supporting or supervising because it makes them uncomfortable, specifically if there is a sensitive student case.  RK: Do you think that if Rec were to have specific areas that were made just for staff, or another option are times that are just for staff and faculty, do you think that would be something that would attract you? Participant 2: Biasly, I like the idea of having a separate space, just because of that whole concept of running into people. But, I also agree and disagree with it because I think it’s challenging to just give staff space for an academic institution that’s supposed to be focused on students. We have a gym in totem park, and it’s usually pretty empty during the day, so [colleague] and I like to go across the hall and just workout there sometimes. RK: So moving on to the website, when look at the website do you find it informative and user friendly, and then afterwards what can be improved? Participant 2: Relatively informative, relatively user-friendly, specifically to the personal training section. I just don't think I would pursue personal training, so I look at it with disinterest. I think earlier in the term I was interesting in joining one of the classes, but I was like “these classes don’t make any sense, what’s the program? If I sign up for this pass, what program do I get”, I didn’t know if that was really worth my time figuring it out so I didn’t pursue it.  RK: What additions can be made to the website that can specifically encourage you and other people in your position to participate more in personal training or in Rec’s facilities? Participant 2: I can see a lot of appeal for me if it’s only other staff and faculty members. I really like how IT has an “IT only” yoga session, and it’d be great to just go with other staff members. There’s an organization at my workplace that organizes events off-campus for employees only and if they can collaborate with internal resources and make that happen here, I think there would be great turnout since a lot of people still show up off-campus. It’d be nice to take a break from students once in a while.  Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   18 RK: Going back to how you said having students around can be challenging sometimes, another idea was to potentially have a space within the facility dedicated to staff and faculty, what are your thoughts on that? Participant 2: Yeah, like I said, we’re an educational institution so we should be prioritizing students, but if there’s enough space to make it happen, I’d like it, I just want to make sure it’s not impactful for students.  RK: Back to the website, and more aesthetically, what changes can be made to make the website more attractive to users? Participant 2: General format is on par with the rest of UBC, but a general thing with all the classes is that there are so many different schedules, and the different schedules you couldn’t overlay. Like, if I click on a pass to buy, can it just show all the classes that are with that pass, and then clarity of “you can buy this with this”, and that’ where I got lost, and didn’t end up pursuing it. And for me, clarity and transparency is important, like if you’re asking for 12 month commitment, I might not know when I’m free so if there’s potential information on how that year round commitment would look like, there would a potential for me to embrace that.  RK: Finally, when it comes to the information on the website, do you find it to be detailed and useful, and also do you find it to be persuasive in the sense that after reading you want to participate in Rec things? Participant 2: I think I was looking to participate earlier this year, but it actually dissuaded me because it felt like too much effort. I also at one point was just gonna buy a pass, but the link was broken and I tried emailing them, and they were like “oh just drop by”, and for me that’s 20 minutes away so it wasn’t really worth it. Ultimately though, the information is informative, important, and relatively good, it just didn’t work out in my case RK: Cool, well thanks for you time.     March 26, 2019, 1:00 PM  Interviewers: Wenny Lin (WL), Rachael Zhang (RZ) Interviewee: Participant 3  WL: The first question is, have you ever participated in personal training classes with UBC Recreation? Participant 3: No. WL: Is there a reason you haven’t done so? Participant 3: No time! With two kids and a job it’s just too busy. WL: Yes. I guess that’s the barriers. Overall, do you find the website informative and user-friendly? Participant 3: I think it is… I don’t find the finding a personal trainer user-friendly. If I were to suggest a change, it would be to have… organize it by categories. What are you looking for? Are you looking for weight training, are you looking for CPR? The way it’s set up is, here’s all fifty trainers, scroll down through. So, I think it’d make more sense if… “I’m interested in speed and agility”, and you click on that button and then it pulls up the trainers that offer that training. Here it’s just that I don’t want to bother looking anymore after the first five. WL: So, make it more goals-oriented? Participant 3: Mhm. What was the question? Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   19 RZ: Do you think the website information… or do you think the website is informative and user-friendly? You pretty much covered it as well! What additions do you think can be made to encourage you and other staff and faculty members to participate? Participant 3: I don’t think there’s any kind of focus on faculty and staff. So… they mostly talk about students, most of the trainers look really young—not that there’s anything wrong with younger trainers but I think, I don’t know whether they’d done the research already to say, “our clientele is 90% students, so it’s not worth marketing to faculty and staff because they don’t commit anyways”. It seems like from the pictures, it seems like it’s geared towards students, much more than faculty and staff. Seems like faculty and staff are… an afterthought. One of the questions on the survey was, is it kind of clear that there were discounts for faculty and staff? WL: Yea. Participant 3: It doesn’t look like there’s a discount, because students are 60 dollars, the staff are 65, and the community are 67. So, if I compare myself to a student I’m paying more… so when I look at it, it doesn’t look like I’m getting a discount. I think they could… if you’re suggesting that those packages are discounts, then yes I saw them. The packages mean that you pay for more classes, you pay less. But, it doesn’t clearly say, if you’re faculty and staff, you get a discount. WL: Earlier you mentioned that the website was mostly aiming towards students, and do you have any suggestions on something we could put to encourage staff and faculty who wanted to participate? Participant 3: If you’re targeting faculty and staff, and you’re considering faculty and staff to be older people, not students—because there are student staff members as well—then things like flexible hours, because I can’t come in 9 to 5, I’m working. So, flexible hours would be one… for some people perhaps the motivations are different as well. Maybe more people my age are not so much worried about athletic performance, as just getting into shape, generally, and so the goals may be different for someone my age.  If you really wanted to target older faculty and staff perhaps you’d have separate space for faculty and staff, then they’re not sharing space with students, but I don’t know, I’ve never been there so I don’t know how exactly it works. WL: Okay, and what aesthetic changes would you make towards the website to make it more user-friendly? RZ: Or more attractive! Participant 3: I don’t think there’s anything wrong with it, per se.  RZ: Okay, it’s mostly just the pictures that aren’t geared towards faculty and staff, right? Participant 3: Yea. RZ: For other people who are there for the first time, they might be like, “okay, I guess there’s nothing for me”. Do you think that would be one of the more major barriers for you? Participant 3: No. RZ: It’s mostly just the hours right, because you have kids. Participant 3: Yea, it’s mostly just the lack of available time. I like to run. I have been involved in sports for a long time, so I kind of know what I would be doing anyways, so I don’t know if I had the time if I’d be bothered to go to a personal trainer. I might, but I just feel like I’m at ground zero. Maybe if I got to 60%, maybe I’ll be like, “okay, I need someone to help me on the last 40%”. But, where I am doesn’t really necessitate a personal trainer. WL: Do you think overall the website information provided is useful, detailed, and persuasive? Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   20 Participant 3: Depends how you define persuasive, I guess. If the goal is to attract faculty and staff, then no. If it’s just a general comment about if it’s useful, persuasive to students, then probably. It really depends on who the target audience is. WL: Okay, that’s all the questions we have!   March 26, 2019, 2:30 PM  Interviewers: Wenny Lin (WL), Rachael Zhang (RZ) Interviewee: Participant 4   WL: Have you participated in personal training classes with UBC Recreation? Participant 4: No, but I have done it elsewhere. WL: Do you mind me asking why not? Participant 4: I had no idea it was even offered! WL: So, what would you say are barriers to your participation in personal training classes offered by UBC Recreation? Participant 4: … Not knowing they exist! I have gone to the UBC Pool before, but I did not know the personal training program existed. If I knew I would have gone, as I’ve done personal training before. Also, being able to fit it reliably into schedule. WL: Okay. Do you think the website is informative and user-friendly? Participant 4: Yes, it was informative and quite user-friendly. WL: What can be improved, do you think? Participant 4: The personal trainer page was presented as scrolling vertically, and I assumed more information was provided on scrolling. I wasn’t sure whether the personal training was one-on-one or small classes—I think some instructors did classes, so maybe I can learn more about the instructors. I did not see the instructor tabs, so maybe link at the bottom of the web page that I can click on to direct me there. RZ: What format of classes do you prefer? Participant 4: I prefer one-on-one, if they’re knowledgeable about the things I am interested in. RZ: Is it clear what each personal trainer specializes in? Participant 4: Yes, knowing who does what on the personal trainer page, it’s quite straightforward. I have only used the pool, I wasn’t even aware personal training classes were offered. RZ: Would you be interested in any other events offered by UBC Recreation? I know there are some walks around campus for staff and faculty members… Participant 4: No. It’s just my personality… I just want to do my own thing without talking to others, you know? I don’t really care if my student sees me, I just want to do my own thing. WL: I see. What additions can be made to this website to encourage you and other staff and faculty members to participate in personal training? Participant 4: Like I said, I had no idea these classes were even offered. I don’t have anything to add, really. The formatting is okay, but some acronyms may need explanation. Like, what’s HIIT? RZ: Let me check… I think it’s high-intensity interval training. Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   21 Participant 4: Yea, that could just be me. A quick Google search would pull it up. So, things like this can be explained. I don’t know if they’ve posted anything around campus, but if things were publicized out of the confines of they gym, I would be interested in doing it. WL: Yes. What aesthetic changes would you make to this website to make it more attractive to users? Participant 4: Not much. A video would be nice—knowing what type of classes, looking at facilities and like, here are the possibilities. Also, personal trainers reiterated at the bottom of the page. WL: Awesome. Last question, do you think the information provided on the website is useful, detailed, and persuasive? Participant 4: I think there’s enough here—the costs, what everybody does, where the forms are, it’s all pretty clear and upfront. WL: That’s all we have for today, thank you for your time!   March 28, 2019 - 1:50 PM  Interviewer: Rachael Zhang (RZ) Interviewee: Participant 5   RZ: Have you participated in personal training classes with UBC Recreation before? Participant 5: No. RZ: No, and why not? Participant 5: … Never thought about it. Never entered my mind I would do personal training. RZ: Do you… often go to the gym, or? Participant 5: I have been to the gym fewer than 10 times in my whole life. RZ: Okay…! What would you say are the barriers to your participation in personal training classes? Participant 5: Well, laziness, complacency… I’m already married… I think mostly the third one isn’t really a reason, it’s more of laziness and complacency, and I’m overall satisfied with where I am. If I needed to work out, I could do that without a personal trainer. RZ: Okay, so you had a look through the website. Do you think it was informative and user-friendly? Participant 5: Yes. RZ: What can be improved, do you think? It could be layout, how things are ordered… Participant 5: Maybe… because it takes a long time to scroll through all the trainer profiles… instead of having that, something more like a grid-like format where you see a picture of all the trainers with their name underneath. Then you can click into it and maybe it’ll expand into their profile and their hours, something like that. RZ: If you were interested in personal training classes, would you be interested in seeing what things they specialize in? For example, performance, health in general… Participant 5: Yea. RZ: What additions do you think could be made to the website to encourage you or other staff to participate? Participant 5: I don’t know… incentives? I don’t know what incentives there could be. RZ: There are benefits? I guess, like the packages, and because they’re situated on campus, like if you’re just done a class. Do you think they would go there? Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   22 Participant 5: I guess. I think it would be a different issue getting through to people who are on the fence about going to personal trainers and people who haven’t even considered going to a personal trainer. Convincing people in that camp to do personal training—who might not think it’s necessary, who might not think that they themselves personally need it. I think those different groups of people—those who are on the fence and those people who don’t even think about it, they probably have different motivations. I imagine convenience and packages and all that would convince people who are on the fence, that might nudge them over the edge and off the fence, but I don’t know if those incentives would convince the other group. RZ: Okay, what aesthetic changes would you make to the website to make it more attractive to users? Participant 5: I think it was just the having to scroll. I think aesthetically as well it’s just more colourful if you had all the people’s pictures up on the grid, sort of like how psychology does their faculty profiles, it’s just all pictures and you can learn more about them when you click into them. It’s just more colour, more appealing. RZ: Some people mentioned videos, or some introductions. Participant 5: I guess that would help, it’s just because I know people who do personal training, so I kind of have a sense of what it’s like to work with a personal trainer. It wasn’t high on my list on things I would be looking for, but I imagine, I could imagine someone who has little experience with personal training, who doesn’t really know what it’s about, what it’s like, multimedia would be helpful. RZ: Okay, awesome. Last question! Do you think the information provided on the website is detailed, useful, and persuasive? Participant 5: Yea! I don’t know about persuasive… just because I’m too lazy to be persuaded, but I thought it was useful. It was detailed, it gives you hours, information about who they are, how you sign up, how much it costs, and dependent on how many classes or sessions you take, so… yea, I thought it was fine. RZ: Yea, we’re looking to improve the website so that more people who are ‘on the fence’ would start to go to classes, or the people who don’t really want to, feel like they have more incentive to do it. Participant 5: Maybe better quality photos too… because those photos were really low res, and some of them were… a bit of a blur. More high def, high res photos, more professionally taken photos. RZ: I think that’s pretty much it, thank you so much for your time!                Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   23 Appendix F - Individual Surveys     Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   24     Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   25   UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report The UBC Recreation Website: Examination of the Personal Training Page for Staff and Faculty Compatibility Jeffrey Cheok, Derek Ip, Ryan Kainth, Wenny Lin, Rachael Zhang University of British Columbia KIN 464 Themes: Health, Community, Wellbeing April 2, 2019 Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”. Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   1 Table of Contents  Executive Summary…………………………………………………....…………2  Introduction and Literature Review……………………………………..…..……2  Methods……………………………………………………………………..…….3  Results/Findings……………………………………………………………..……4  Discussions……………………………………………………………..…………6  Recommendations for the Client……………………………..……...……………8  References……………………………………………………………...…………10  Appendices……………………………………………….……………………… 11                        Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   2 Executive Summary  The following is a study examining UBC Staff and Faculty perspectives on barriers regarding the participation in UBC Recreation’s Personal Training Program and their opinions on the UBC Recreation Website. Our goal is to provide recommendations to improve the Personal Training page of the UBC Recreation website to ultimately increase interest and participation in the Personal Training program.  We believe the UBC Recreation website to be an integral part of informing the UBC population about the details of the programs. Enough information on the website should be provided to influence an individual’s decision on whether a program is a fit for them, which program to sign up for, and all the benefits to signing for said program. This directly relates to the suggestions we are planning to give to UBC Recreation about their website, which mostly relate to comprehensiveness, potential barriers, accessibility and clarity.   Data collection occurred in two parts. Firstly, a survey was given out to the participants to determine their views on the UBC Recreation personal training page. Then, an interview was conducted with each participant to further evaluate their attitudes towards personal training and the personal training page. We chose to interview staff and faculty members from different areas and roles on campus to reflect the many diverse opinions on personal training. A mixture of quantitative and qualitative data allows us to gain a deeper understanding of the topic at hand. The quantitative data allows us to describe the general impression that our participants have on the UBC Recreation personal training page. The qualitative data allows us to capture the more intricate details of our participants’ experiences with the UBC recreation personal training page. From our survey, we found that none of the participants in our study have participated in a UBC personal training class. A number of barriers were identified, including not seeing a need for a personal trainer, feeling uncomfortable working out in front of students, and the student-centred nature of UBC Recreation itself. The latter is the most important barrier related to our study. Many staff and faculty members felt left out, as most of the promotional materials were targeted towards students. Changes can be made to the UBC recreation personal training website to cater more towards the staff and faculty members and improve their user experience.  Three recommendations were formed through our study’s findings: making the information clearer and better organized, targeting different motivations for physical activity, and increasing material centered around staff and faculty. We believe that these recommendations will improve website user experience and motivate staff and faculty members to participate in personal training programs.  Introduction & Literature Review Physical activity has been known to contribute to better quality of life and improved health outcomes (Penedo & Dahn, 2005). Research has shown that regular exercise and physical activity may reduce risks of coronary heart disease and diabetes-related complications (Penedo & Dahn, 2005). It improves overall quality of life and also benefits both physical and mental well-being (Penedo & Dahn, 2005). In the case of university staff, administration, and faculty members, unique barriers to participation still exist despite the apparent benefits of physical activity and availability of exercise facilities and programs on campus (Leininger, Adams, & DeBeliso, 2015).  Personal Training is becoming more common as individuals realise the importance of exercise, as these individuals help people design exercise programs according to current guidelines and recommendations (“What is a”, n.d.).  While personal training programs are Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   3 tailored to individuals to help achieve their goals in the most efficient and effective way, individuals often face challenges when they attempt to enrol in personal training sessions such as availabilities, monetary cost, and compatibility with trainers. These are all possible reasons that might prevent people from joining these training sessions.  In a study by Das, Rinaldi-Miles, & Evans (2013), university faculty and staff identified the following barriers to physical activity in the university setting: 1) lack of access and choice in facilities, 2) time management and inflexible work schedules, and 3) lack of knowledge regarding physical activity choices in the campus. While the first two of these barriers may require vast changes to university policies and infrastructure, the latter can certainly be addressed by increasing knowledge of physical activity programs offered by UBC recreation through the UBC recreation website. Considering the internet’s substantial role in sharing information, organizations are forced to dedicate a great deal of effort towards the design and structure of their websites (Nilsson, 2017). Our goal is to provide recommendations for the UBC Recreation personal training website with the motive of increasing the interest and participation of staff and faculty in UBC Recreation personal training programs.   Methods Population Choice Rationale For this study, the population of focus is UBC’s staff and faculty. UBC Recreation has made it their goal to improve the health of the UBC community by providing welcoming, enjoyable, and accessible physical activity opportunities for all individuals on campus (Get Moving, n.d.). UBC has a population of approximately 55,887 students and 14,934 staff and faculty members in the Vancouver campus (UBC Overview & Facts, n.d.). Because students vastly outnumber staff and faculty, a large portion of UBC Recreation’s resources is invested into the student population. Staff and faculty may not benefit from the same resources because they experience different barriers to physical activity. Research has indicated that these barriers include limited options in physical activity facilities, demanding schedules, and lack of awareness around the programs being offered (Das, Rinaldi-Miles, & Evans, 2013). Additional resources must be allocated to address the needs of UBC’s staff and faculty population. This investigation will use a convenience sampling strategy in order to study information-rich cases that are easily accessible. An email was sent to UBC professors and staff working in UBC Residence Life to request their participation in our study. A total of 7 faculty and staff were sent a recruitment email with 5 agreeing to participate. A subsequent email was sent to arrange meeting times for a survey and interview.   Procedure          The participants that we will be focusing on for this study will be the UBC staff and faculty members. We are interested in their feedback and comments on the layout, ease of use (how user-friendly it is), and the quality of information on the website based on previous experiences or first engagements. Before the study begins, the participants are required to sign a consent form. The consent form will ask for permission from the participants to use the information that they have provided in the interview and survey. On the consent form (see Appendix A), we briefly explain the purpose and procedure of this study, and the benefits and possible risks. The information collected will be kept confidential and participants are welcome to withdraw at anytime without any penalties. Contacts will be provided on the consent form for more information regarding the study.   Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   4 After signing the consent form, participants will be asked to complete a 15-20 minute survey and interview. During this session, the participants will be provided a survey form (see Appendix B) for impressions and feedback on the UBC Recreation personal training website, and to answer in a five-point likert scale: Strongly Agree, Agree, Neutral, Disagree and Strongly Disagree. After completing the survey, a short interview will be conducted, asking several questions (see Appendix C) about their thoughts and opinions on UBC Recreation’s personal training website and the barriers to participating in personal training classes in UBC. Each interview will be recorded with an audio recorder for transcription and thematic analysis. Physical notes will also be taken by the interviewer during the session to provide additional information regarding the participant’s answer. The surveys and interviews were conducted from March 20th to March 28th in the offices of the staff and faculty who participated.   Data analysis          The data obtained through the survey and interview will be analyzed separately at first and will be integrated later to further knowledge on the research topic. The survey will provide quantitative data regarding faculty and staff opinions on the UBC Recreation personal training website. The interviews will provide qualitative data to understand why faculty and staff members have those views on the UBC Recreation personal training website. Through thematic analysis, we can uncover the common topics and themes in faculty and staff responses. This includes their participation in physical activity on campus, their opinions on the design of the website, as well as some of the common barriers that they may have experienced while navigating the UBC Recreation website.   Results/Findings  Five participants from UBC Staff and Faculty were provided a brief questionnaire regarding the UBC Recreation personal training webpage (see Appendix B), and interviewed to understand barriers to participation and recommendations for website improvement. Out of the 5 participants, 2 were UBC staff and 3 were faculty members, 2 were female and 3 were male. None of the participants had any experience with personal training classes offered by UBC Recreation (Figure 1). However, our survey results did suggest that the registration process for personal training was easy to find and navigate as well as being clear and informative (see Appendix D).  Figure 1 Participation in UBC personal training classes   Participant Opinions on the UBC Recreation Personal Training Website Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   5  Our surveys indicated that most participants found the information on the UBC Recreation Personal Training page to be clear and answered all their questions (Figure 2). However, there are still a number of ways the website could be improved according to the participants. During the interview, many participants brought into attention the programs taught by each personal trainer. Participants wanted a description of the programs as they believed the name itself was not sufficient. Another issue that was brought up was the discounts offered to staff and faculty members. Although most staff and faculty members were aware of the discounts offered to them (Figure 3), one participant was not aware. The same participant also brought it up during the interview, telling the interviewer that there was no clear indication that staff and faculty received a discount.   Most of the participants in the study agree that the UBC recreation website is aesthetically pleasing (Figure 4). However, some participants commented that the UBC Recreation personal training web pages “kind of feel like a different platform” (Appendix E). A way to improve the website would be to keep the design of the personal training page consistent with the rest of the UBC websites. Another concern that was brought up was the organization of the personal trainer profiles. Many participants found it tedious to scroll through and read the profile of every single personal trainer. Participants commented that “[they did not] find the finding a personal trainer user-friendly” and “it [took] a long time to scroll through all the trainer profiles” (Appendix E).  Figure 2: Quality of information on the UBC Recreation personal training page  Figure 3: Clarity of staff and faculty discounts     Figure 4: Attractiveness of the website design Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   6   Main Themes Identified in Interviews  Several common themes were raised in the interviews done with the participants. Firstly, an aspect of the UBC Recreation personal training webpage brought up by several participants was the lack of representation for staff and faculty and a large focus on students. The UBC Recreation facilities likely have a high participation rate for students, which is another factor that the participants identified to be a hindering factor to their participation at the facilities. Several participants emphasized the fact that they would be uncomfortable exercising near the students they work with. Other common themes seen between participants were a lack of knowledge regarding personal training and flawed organization of the website. A final theme seen amongst participants is the lack of a need for personal training. Many participants stated that they already lead an active lifestyle or that they rarely exercise as it is and so they feel that a personal trainer is not necessary.  Discussion Interpretation of Results  The data collected from the survey and interview revealed several barriers to participation that UBC staff and faculty experience.   I Don’t Need a Personal Trainer It is clear that UBC faculty and staff do not see any inherent value of working with a personal trainer. 3 out of the 5 participants suggest that they do not feel the need to pay for personal training classes when they are already active, or when they already know what to do at the gym. As one participant puts it: “If I needed to work out, I could do that without a personal trainer.” (Appendix E). Some participants have stated that at this point of their life, they are more interested in “getting into shape” rather than “athletic performance” (Appendix E). This might suggest that the participants view personal trainers as coaches who assist athletes in getting stronger and better.   I Don’t Want to Work Out in the Same Space as Students The second barrier to participation identified by faculty and staff members was the lack of a separate space for them. Many do not feel comfortable working out in the same area as their students. In response to the question about barriers preventing them from participating in UBC personal training classes, one participant said, “[I] don’t really want to run into students, I think it’ll make us both feel uncomfortable” (Appendix E). Several staff and faculty members have expressed that they did not want to be training or working out in front of students, as they wanted to avoid the feeling of being watched or giving students the feeling of being watched (Appendix Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   7 E). However, participants agreed that the logistics of arranging separate staff and faculty spaces may be complicated and unrealistic, thus, their lack of participation.  The Programs are More Geared Towards Students    The third reason—most connected to the way the UBC Recreation website is presented—is that many participants feel a lack of faculty- and staff-centred website pages and programs. One participant stated, “the immediate assumption is that most things are for students so I don’t pay much attention to them” (Appendix E). Another expressed that “from the pictures, it’s geared towards students… seems like faculty and staff are an afterthought” (Appendix E). The design of the website is important in providing an overall sense of inclusion for staff and faculty members, providing key information on the classes but also serving as ‘welcome’ signs for those who are interested in participating. A participant has suggested that with older staff and faculty members, motivations for joining personal training classes would be different: rather than working out to increase athletic performance, more people are interested in staying active and getting into shape. It is apparent that the most significant hindering factor is that staff and faculty are feeling underrepresented in the UBC Recreation website and on the personal training page. It is an opinion voiced by multiple participants, suggesting that it is an important factor to staff and faculty participation. More than just promotional materials, the interviews demonstrated that the participants are motivated to exercise (or to not exercise) for different reasons. One participant stated, “where I am now doesn’t really necesitate a personal trainer” while another said “if I needed to workout, I could do that without a personal trainer” (Appendix E), this shows that the personal training web page fails to recognize individual contexts and is therefore unable to target individual motivators.  Implications and Applications  With the findings of this study in mind, improvements can be made to the UBC Recreation Personal Training Website to motivate more staff and faculty members to participate in the personal training programs. To start, the personal training website seems to perpetuate a belief between staff and faculty members that personal training is only for athletes who wants to get bigger and stronger. However, most staff and faculty members are only looking to get fit. This might prevent staff and faculty members from seeing the inherent value of personal training and thus, choose not to pursue it. A website or web pages designed specifically for staff and faculty members that recognize their individual contexts might motivate more staff and faculty to participate in personal training programs.   A frequent concern that was brought up between participants is the lack of resources spent on UBC staff and faculty members. Promotional materials and exercise facilities seemed to be more catered towards students. If promotional materials are more catered towards students, staff and faculty members are less likely to pay attention to them. Staff and faculty members do not benefit from the same promotional materials because they face different barriers and have different motivations to exercise. Also, staff and faculty members do not feel comfortable working out in the same facilities as students. This may discourage staff and faculty members from participating in personal training programs.  The design of the personal training website has the potential to garner interest and motivate staff and faculty members to participate in personal training programs. Many participants found the organization of information cluttered. Scrolling through every personal Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   8 trainer to read their profiles became a very tedious and frustrating task. Also, many participants brought to attention the programs offered by each personal trainer. They felt that the names of the programs were insufficient and wanted a description for each program. Finding new ways to organize information can improve the user experience and persuade more staff and faculty to sign up for personal training programs.  Strengths and Limitations of Our Study This study allowed us to better understand the different perspectives of UBC faculty and staff members in regard to website design, personal training, barriers to participation, and physical activity behaviours and motivations. The questionnaires provided a general sense of what the faculty and staff members think of UBC Recreation, and the classes or events offered. The semi-structured interviews provided rich, detailed and in-depth qualitative data on their perspectives on physical activity and gave them the opportunity to provide feedback on improvements to be made to the programs and website design. The data obtained in this study provided us with a snapshot of current perspectives and can be used to identify strategies and indicators for future physical activity intervention programs (Riazi, 2019).  While we were able to obtain in-depth responses and feedback, this study could be more representative of the target population if more participants were surveyed and interviewed. Our study had a fairly small sample size. We were not able to find enough participants to participate in the study due to their lack of availability. In this study we only had a total of five participants where 2 were staff and 3 were faculty members. This sample size is not enough to represent the whole UBC staff and faculty population. Furthermore, the number of participants from staff and faculty were not consistent. We had more faculty members than staff, therefore we might not be able to represent their opinions effectively. Recruiting participants while walking around campus may be difficult since we cannot always differentiate between staff and faculty members and students. Since none of the participants actually participated in personal training classes prior to the study, we do not know what their experiences would be like in class. With more time and resources in the future, challenges with participant recruitment can be tackled by using different methods and platforms to reach a wider audience. Recruitment ads posted around campus, recreation centres and social media, and incentives could be helpful in gathering a larger sample population and a wider variety of experiences. Further research can delve more into experiences that may encourage people who are already participating to continue or deter them from returning. While the participants of this study navigated through the online registration process and agreed that it was quite clear and user-friendly, it would be interesting to know whether regular participants of classes would prefer the online registration process versus in-person, and their feedback on the strengths and limitations of the website. It would also be useful to understand their satisfaction with the training space, people, and classes, as well as their motivations for and barriers to participating in personal training classes. To provide more representative and generalizable data, further research should capture the experiences of faculty and staff members who participated in the past, those are currently participating, and those who have not participated in classes.  Recommendations for the Client The results from our study suggest three key changes to be made to the UBC Recreation personal training website and program design. Providing more information in a clear and well-organized fashion, targeting different motivations for physical activity, and increasing faculty- Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   9 and staff-centred promotional material may help to increase participation rates and thus improve the health of staff and faculty members. Most participants answered that the information provided on the website was useful, but not detailed or transparent enough (see Appendix E). Overall, participants stated that more information could be provided about the format and scheduling of classes, and staff and faculty member benefits could be more clearly presented (see Appendix E). Several participants noted that there were many schedules and too many personal trainer profiles on one page, and suggested organizing them by categories such as students or staff and faculty schedules, and personal trainer experience or specializations (see Appendix E). Improvements can be made to the personal training class landing page to emphasize staff and faculty member benefits and packages, and provide attentional cues that guide users through the registration process step-by-step. Programs and classes provided by UBC Recreation should also take into account the different motivations for physical activity in staff and faculty members. Rather than focusing on athletic performance, staff and faculty members are seeking to stay fit or get into shape (see Appendix E). Programs and classes can be more targeted for staff and faculty members by addressing their goals for physical activity, emphasizing the overall benefits to fitness and wellness, and the way regular physical activity can help prevent diseases that increase in risk with age and sedentary behaviour. Options offered by UBC Recreation should not appear restricted to programs and classes with more long-term commitment requirements, and can involve short-term, try-it, promotion days that encourage more staff and faculty members to look at the programs and facilities offered on campus. Another improvement to be made is gearing more promotional materials towards staff and faculty members. Most participants have agreed that most of the resources are directed towards students, and there is little targeted or faculty- and staff-centred materials on the web pages or circulating around campus—no images of staff and faculty members on the website, or emphasis on the benefits of training at recreation centres offered on campus. One participant was not even aware that personal training classes were offered (see Appendix E). Programs being promoted on campus should sell the advantages of training on campus such as convenience and savings. With more flexible schedules, convenient facility locations around their workplaces, and a variety of other events and programs offered by UBC Recreation, more people would be encouraged to participate.           Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   10 References Das, B. M., Rinaldi-Miles, A. I., & Evans, E. M. (2013). Exploring faculty and staff PA barriers at a large university. California Journal of Health Promotion, 11(2), 61-72. Get Moving. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://recreation.ubc.ca/get-moving/ Leininger, L. J., Adams, K. J., & DeBeliso, M. (2015). Differences in health promotion program participation, barriers and physical activity among faculty, staff and administration at a university worksite. International Journal of Workplace Health Management, 8(4), 246-255. DOI: https://doi-org.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/10.1108/IJWHM-10-2014-0045 Nilsson, M. A. (2017). The importance of website design and how it helps in making business profitable. Retrieved from https://codeburst.io/the-importance-of-website-design-and-how-it-helps-in-making-business-profitable-11bf5ee1817e?fbclid=IwAR2lP7Vy1OjV4nwCbTqhCaNYCrmyU2HUleywi3XwTTeMvzRTeb4m4YnoYs8 Penedo, F. J. & Dahn, J. R. (March 2005). Exercise and well-being: a review of mental and physical health benefits associated with physical activity. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 18(2), 189-193. Riazi, N. (2019). Week 8: The role of research and evaluation in health promotion [PowerPoint Slides]. Retrieved from https://canvas.ubc.ca/courses/20419/modules UBC Overview & Facts. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ubc.ca/about/facts.html What is a personal trainer?. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.personaltraineredu.org/what-is-a-personal-trainer/?fbclid=IwAR0pEl6-yfDsceL28B4_fRgoLv_2jH4fexW8c5w69XGrY8_GybKKuujg47E         Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   11 Appendices  Appendix A - Participant’s Consent Form   Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   12    Appendix B - Survey Form Survey Questions  1. The UBC Recreation website is aesthetically pleasing. 2. It is easy to find where the Personal Training page is located. Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   13 3. Information on the Personal Training page is clear and answers all my questions. 4. The website motivates me to participate. 5. I have participated in personal training classes offered by UBC Recreation. 6. I enjoyed personal training classes offered by UBC Recreation. 7. I have used the online registration process to sign up for personal training classes at UBC Recreation. 8. The online registration process is easy to navigate. 9. I am interested in getting to know the personal trainers. 10. Staff & faculty discounts are clearly presented on the website. 11. I am interested to see a brief introduction video on how personal training works.  Appendix C - Interview Questions 1. Have you participated in personal training classes with UBC Recreation? Why or why not? 2. What would you say are barriers to your participation in personal training classes offered by UBC Recreation? 3. Is the website informative and user-friendly? What can be improved? 4. What additions can be made to this website to encourage you and other staff & faculty members to participate in personal training? 5. What aesthetic changes would make this website more attractive to users? 6. Do you think the information provided on the website is detailed, useful, and persuasive?  Appendix D - Survey Results Forms response chart. Question title: 10. Staff & faculty discounts are clearly presented on the website.. Number of responses: 5 responses.  Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   14                  Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   15    Appendix E - Interview Transcripts  March 20, 2019, 3:00pm  Interviewer: Ryan Kainth (RK) Interviewee: Participant 1  RK: Firstly, have you participated with any personal training with UBC Rec? Participant 1: Never. RK: Is there a specific reason on why you haven’t, or…you just haven’t thought about it or anything? Participant 1: Well, two things immediately come to mind. One is the price point and related to that is that I’m already a pretty active person so I don’t feel the need to go to a personal trainer, and furthermore pay what I think is “a lot” for that support.  RK: Do you usually use Rec’s facilities or do you like working more on your own? Participant 1: I infrequently use the birdcoop gym pretty sporadically throughout the year, just because I usually like to run outside. I guess the Aquatic Centre I use pretty frequently if that counts..? RK: Other than price and just not seeming convenient for you, would you say that there are any other barriers that you, in your position, or you, as a person/manager, see as a barrier in participating in personal training or with Rec’s facilities? Participant 1: I’d say probably one of the largest barriers for me in using Rec facilities, is that I think the position that I’m in is pretty “outward facing”, because there’s so many students I interact with, I think there is a barrier of how it’s primarily student-based. I’m also in a position where I can have difficult Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   16 conversations with students, it’s not ideal to then run into them outside of work. What was the first part of the question again? RK: Just with personal training specifically. Participant 1: As a staff member, from my understanding the personal trainers are all students, or student adjacent. So if I were to be interested in personal training, and had to choose between doing it at UBC with a student vs going to a gym and doing it with a full time employee there, I’d say the latter is preferable to me.  RK: When it comes to being a more student-based facility, do you think having specific times for staff or a specific facility for staff would bring up numbers for participation? Participant 1: Absolutely. I think if there were just a staff and faculty gym, it would be amazing, but I doubt it would be possible. It does eliminate a lot of the barriers I see. I mean, a more realistic idea would be if there were staff and faculty hours, I can definitely see myself being more likely to go.  RK: How about during regular hours, how would you feel about having a staff and faculty portion of the gym, and like, no students can use that area? Participant 1: Potentially. In the spectrum of things, it’s kind of in the middle, with the ideal being just staff and faculty. If there was a portion sectioned off then maybe. RK: Moving onto the website, first of all what was your first impression towards the website? Participant 1: So I’m decently familiar with the website, I can’t say it’s the most aesthetically pleasing, but I can say it’s relatively easy to navigate, the tabs are pretty clearly labelled, and I think part of it kind of goes hand in hand with my work at UBC so I’m familiar with the interface for most their website. Can’t say it’s pretty but decently easy to use.  RK: Would you value aesthetics and interactivity or something more simple, but more well labeled? Participant 1: I think the latter, the aesthetics is a nice bonus, but ultimately, if I’m able to go in, find the information I want, that’s what’s most important. RK: Do you think for someone who’s never been on the website, that a more aesthetically pleasing website would be better for them? Participant 1: I think so, it would be helpful for people to spend longer on the website and consume more information, but I think beyond that I can’t really think of any other benefit.  RK: As someone who is pretty familiar with the website, do you find the website to be 1, informative and 2, user friendly, and how so would you say that? Participant 1: I think pretty informative, two things that stick out for me the most is that the pricing is clearly laid out, like staff price, student price, and in addition to that, the hours and calendar I find particularly useful of when classes are, so yeah, pretty easy to use and easy to navigate.  RK: From your perspective, what can be improved on the website? Participant 1: It seems that the UBC Rec’s website is aesthetically quite different from even students.ubc.ca, and so if there’s a way to make it aesthetically pleasing without complicating it, then it's probably to have similar branding to the rest of the university.  RK: And do you think that type of consistency can potentially improve numbers for staff and faculty in any way? Participant 1: Not that I can see. RK: What do you think can be done in terms of technology and promotion through the website that would specifically call towards staff and faculty, and specifically pull you into the Rec world? Participant 1: I think just having more things specifically targeted to staff and faculty, I think a lot of times, especially with Rec, my immediate assumption is that it’s just for students so I don’t pay much Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   17 attention to it. Like if Rec is interested in doing events or specific times for staff and faculty, I think just one landing page for staff and faculty. RK: Do you find the information on the website, detailed and useful, and also persuasive? Participant 1: I’d say yes to useful, I think it can use more detail, I think a lot of the classes have like fun names, but I don’t necessarily have the best understanding of what those classes are. Regarding persuasiveness, I think it’s neutral. RK: Okay, so that’s all we have for you, thanks so much.   March 21 2019, 4:00pm  Interviewer: Ryan Kainth (RK) Interviewee: Participant 2  RK: Have you taken any personal training classes with UBC Rec, or anything with Rec at all? Participant 2: I have not done personal training at UBC, and I have done some Rec participation, mostly free week. I also used to work at UBC camps. RK: As a member of UBC staff and specific to your role, what kind of barriers do you feel when looking to participate in personal training, and at Rec’s facilities? Participant 2: One of the bigger ones is that I have 2000+ students who know my name, know my face, and see me all the time. I also like to take my fitness outside of here because it’s a nice way to not be at UBC. I work here, do academic classes here as well, so it’s just nice to not do something that is UBC occasionally. I also try not to run into the students I’m supporting or supervising because it makes them uncomfortable, specifically if there is a sensitive student case.  RK: Do you think that if Rec were to have specific areas that were made just for staff, or another option are times that are just for staff and faculty, do you think that would be something that would attract you? Participant 2: Biasly, I like the idea of having a separate space, just because of that whole concept of running into people. But, I also agree and disagree with it because I think it’s challenging to just give staff space for an academic institution that’s supposed to be focused on students. We have a gym in totem park, and it’s usually pretty empty during the day, so [colleague] and I like to go across the hall and just workout there sometimes. RK: So moving on to the website, when look at the website do you find it informative and user friendly, and then afterwards what can be improved? Participant 2: Relatively informative, relatively user-friendly, specifically to the personal training section. I just don't think I would pursue personal training, so I look at it with disinterest. I think earlier in the term I was interesting in joining one of the classes, but I was like “these classes don’t make any sense, what’s the program? If I sign up for this pass, what program do I get”, I didn’t know if that was really worth my time figuring it out so I didn’t pursue it.  RK: What additions can be made to the website that can specifically encourage you and other people in your position to participate more in personal training or in Rec’s facilities? Participant 2: I can see a lot of appeal for me if it’s only other staff and faculty members. I really like how IT has an “IT only” yoga session, and it’d be great to just go with other staff members. There’s an organization at my workplace that organizes events off-campus for employees only and if they can collaborate with internal resources and make that happen here, I think there would be great turnout since a lot of people still show up off-campus. It’d be nice to take a break from students once in a while.  Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   18 RK: Going back to how you said having students around can be challenging sometimes, another idea was to potentially have a space within the facility dedicated to staff and faculty, what are your thoughts on that? Participant 2: Yeah, like I said, we’re an educational institution so we should be prioritizing students, but if there’s enough space to make it happen, I’d like it, I just want to make sure it’s not impactful for students.  RK: Back to the website, and more aesthetically, what changes can be made to make the website more attractive to users? Participant 2: General format is on par with the rest of UBC, but a general thing with all the classes is that there are so many different schedules, and the different schedules you couldn’t overlay. Like, if I click on a pass to buy, can it just show all the classes that are with that pass, and then clarity of “you can buy this with this”, and that’ where I got lost, and didn’t end up pursuing it. And for me, clarity and transparency is important, like if you’re asking for 12 month commitment, I might not know when I’m free so if there’s potential information on how that year round commitment would look like, there would a potential for me to embrace that.  RK: Finally, when it comes to the information on the website, do you find it to be detailed and useful, and also do you find it to be persuasive in the sense that after reading you want to participate in Rec things? Participant 2: I think I was looking to participate earlier this year, but it actually dissuaded me because it felt like too much effort. I also at one point was just gonna buy a pass, but the link was broken and I tried emailing them, and they were like “oh just drop by”, and for me that’s 20 minutes away so it wasn’t really worth it. Ultimately though, the information is informative, important, and relatively good, it just didn’t work out in my case RK: Cool, well thanks for you time.     March 26, 2019, 1:00 PM  Interviewers: Wenny Lin (WL), Rachael Zhang (RZ) Interviewee: Participant 3  WL: The first question is, have you ever participated in personal training classes with UBC Recreation? Participant 3: No. WL: Is there a reason you haven’t done so? Participant 3: No time! With two kids and a job it’s just too busy. WL: Yes. I guess that’s the barriers. Overall, do you find the website informative and user-friendly? Participant 3: I think it is… I don’t find the finding a personal trainer user-friendly. If I were to suggest a change, it would be to have… organize it by categories. What are you looking for? Are you looking for weight training, are you looking for CPR? The way it’s set up is, here’s all fifty trainers, scroll down through. So, I think it’d make more sense if… “I’m interested in speed and agility”, and you click on that button and then it pulls up the trainers that offer that training. Here it’s just that I don’t want to bother looking anymore after the first five. WL: So, make it more goals-oriented? Participant 3: Mhm. What was the question? Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   19 RZ: Do you think the website information… or do you think the website is informative and user-friendly? You pretty much covered it as well! What additions do you think can be made to encourage you and other staff and faculty members to participate? Participant 3: I don’t think there’s any kind of focus on faculty and staff. So… they mostly talk about students, most of the trainers look really young—not that there’s anything wrong with younger trainers but I think, I don’t know whether they’d done the research already to say, “our clientele is 90% students, so it’s not worth marketing to faculty and staff because they don’t commit anyways”. It seems like from the pictures, it seems like it’s geared towards students, much more than faculty and staff. Seems like faculty and staff are… an afterthought. One of the questions on the survey was, is it kind of clear that there were discounts for faculty and staff? WL: Yea. Participant 3: It doesn’t look like there’s a discount, because students are 60 dollars, the staff are 65, and the community are 67. So, if I compare myself to a student I’m paying more… so when I look at it, it doesn’t look like I’m getting a discount. I think they could… if you’re suggesting that those packages are discounts, then yes I saw them. The packages mean that you pay for more classes, you pay less. But, it doesn’t clearly say, if you’re faculty and staff, you get a discount. WL: Earlier you mentioned that the website was mostly aiming towards students, and do you have any suggestions on something we could put to encourage staff and faculty who wanted to participate? Participant 3: If you’re targeting faculty and staff, and you’re considering faculty and staff to be older people, not students—because there are student staff members as well—then things like flexible hours, because I can’t come in 9 to 5, I’m working. So, flexible hours would be one… for some people perhaps the motivations are different as well. Maybe more people my age are not so much worried about athletic performance, as just getting into shape, generally, and so the goals may be different for someone my age.  If you really wanted to target older faculty and staff perhaps you’d have separate space for faculty and staff, then they’re not sharing space with students, but I don’t know, I’ve never been there so I don’t know how exactly it works. WL: Okay, and what aesthetic changes would you make towards the website to make it more user-friendly? RZ: Or more attractive! Participant 3: I don’t think there’s anything wrong with it, per se.  RZ: Okay, it’s mostly just the pictures that aren’t geared towards faculty and staff, right? Participant 3: Yea. RZ: For other people who are there for the first time, they might be like, “okay, I guess there’s nothing for me”. Do you think that would be one of the more major barriers for you? Participant 3: No. RZ: It’s mostly just the hours right, because you have kids. Participant 3: Yea, it’s mostly just the lack of available time. I like to run. I have been involved in sports for a long time, so I kind of know what I would be doing anyways, so I don’t know if I had the time if I’d be bothered to go to a personal trainer. I might, but I just feel like I’m at ground zero. Maybe if I got to 60%, maybe I’ll be like, “okay, I need someone to help me on the last 40%”. But, where I am doesn’t really necessitate a personal trainer. WL: Do you think overall the website information provided is useful, detailed, and persuasive? Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   20 Participant 3: Depends how you define persuasive, I guess. If the goal is to attract faculty and staff, then no. If it’s just a general comment about if it’s useful, persuasive to students, then probably. It really depends on who the target audience is. WL: Okay, that’s all the questions we have!   March 26, 2019, 2:30 PM  Interviewers: Wenny Lin (WL), Rachael Zhang (RZ) Interviewee: Participant 4   WL: Have you participated in personal training classes with UBC Recreation? Participant 4: No, but I have done it elsewhere. WL: Do you mind me asking why not? Participant 4: I had no idea it was even offered! WL: So, what would you say are barriers to your participation in personal training classes offered by UBC Recreation? Participant 4: … Not knowing they exist! I have gone to the UBC Pool before, but I did not know the personal training program existed. If I knew I would have gone, as I’ve done personal training before. Also, being able to fit it reliably into schedule. WL: Okay. Do you think the website is informative and user-friendly? Participant 4: Yes, it was informative and quite user-friendly. WL: What can be improved, do you think? Participant 4: The personal trainer page was presented as scrolling vertically, and I assumed more information was provided on scrolling. I wasn’t sure whether the personal training was one-on-one or small classes—I think some instructors did classes, so maybe I can learn more about the instructors. I did not see the instructor tabs, so maybe link at the bottom of the web page that I can click on to direct me there. RZ: What format of classes do you prefer? Participant 4: I prefer one-on-one, if they’re knowledgeable about the things I am interested in. RZ: Is it clear what each personal trainer specializes in? Participant 4: Yes, knowing who does what on the personal trainer page, it’s quite straightforward. I have only used the pool, I wasn’t even aware personal training classes were offered. RZ: Would you be interested in any other events offered by UBC Recreation? I know there are some walks around campus for staff and faculty members… Participant 4: No. It’s just my personality… I just want to do my own thing without talking to others, you know? I don’t really care if my student sees me, I just want to do my own thing. WL: I see. What additions can be made to this website to encourage you and other staff and faculty members to participate in personal training? Participant 4: Like I said, I had no idea these classes were even offered. I don’t have anything to add, really. The formatting is okay, but some acronyms may need explanation. Like, what’s HIIT? RZ: Let me check… I think it’s high-intensity interval training. Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   21 Participant 4: Yea, that could just be me. A quick Google search would pull it up. So, things like this can be explained. I don’t know if they’ve posted anything around campus, but if things were publicized out of the confines of they gym, I would be interested in doing it. WL: Yes. What aesthetic changes would you make to this website to make it more attractive to users? Participant 4: Not much. A video would be nice—knowing what type of classes, looking at facilities and like, here are the possibilities. Also, personal trainers reiterated at the bottom of the page. WL: Awesome. Last question, do you think the information provided on the website is useful, detailed, and persuasive? Participant 4: I think there’s enough here—the costs, what everybody does, where the forms are, it’s all pretty clear and upfront. WL: That’s all we have for today, thank you for your time!   March 28, 2019 - 1:50 PM  Interviewer: Rachael Zhang (RZ) Interviewee: Participant 5   RZ: Have you participated in personal training classes with UBC Recreation before? Participant 5: No. RZ: No, and why not? Participant 5: … Never thought about it. Never entered my mind I would do personal training. RZ: Do you… often go to the gym, or? Participant 5: I have been to the gym fewer than 10 times in my whole life. RZ: Okay…! What would you say are the barriers to your participation in personal training classes? Participant 5: Well, laziness, complacency… I’m already married… I think mostly the third one isn’t really a reason, it’s more of laziness and complacency, and I’m overall satisfied with where I am. If I needed to work out, I could do that without a personal trainer. RZ: Okay, so you had a look through the website. Do you think it was informative and user-friendly? Participant 5: Yes. RZ: What can be improved, do you think? It could be layout, how things are ordered… Participant 5: Maybe… because it takes a long time to scroll through all the trainer profiles… instead of having that, something more like a grid-like format where you see a picture of all the trainers with their name underneath. Then you can click into it and maybe it’ll expand into their profile and their hours, something like that. RZ: If you were interested in personal training classes, would you be interested in seeing what things they specialize in? For example, performance, health in general… Participant 5: Yea. RZ: What additions do you think could be made to the website to encourage you or other staff to participate? Participant 5: I don’t know… incentives? I don’t know what incentives there could be. RZ: There are benefits? I guess, like the packages, and because they’re situated on campus, like if you’re just done a class. Do you think they would go there? Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   22 Participant 5: I guess. I think it would be a different issue getting through to people who are on the fence about going to personal trainers and people who haven’t even considered going to a personal trainer. Convincing people in that camp to do personal training—who might not think it’s necessary, who might not think that they themselves personally need it. I think those different groups of people—those who are on the fence and those people who don’t even think about it, they probably have different motivations. I imagine convenience and packages and all that would convince people who are on the fence, that might nudge them over the edge and off the fence, but I don’t know if those incentives would convince the other group. RZ: Okay, what aesthetic changes would you make to the website to make it more attractive to users? Participant 5: I think it was just the having to scroll. I think aesthetically as well it’s just more colourful if you had all the people’s pictures up on the grid, sort of like how psychology does their faculty profiles, it’s just all pictures and you can learn more about them when you click into them. It’s just more colour, more appealing. RZ: Some people mentioned videos, or some introductions. Participant 5: I guess that would help, it’s just because I know people who do personal training, so I kind of have a sense of what it’s like to work with a personal trainer. It wasn’t high on my list on things I would be looking for, but I imagine, I could imagine someone who has little experience with personal training, who doesn’t really know what it’s about, what it’s like, multimedia would be helpful. RZ: Okay, awesome. Last question! Do you think the information provided on the website is detailed, useful, and persuasive? Participant 5: Yea! I don’t know about persuasive… just because I’m too lazy to be persuaded, but I thought it was useful. It was detailed, it gives you hours, information about who they are, how you sign up, how much it costs, and dependent on how many classes or sessions you take, so… yea, I thought it was fine. RZ: Yea, we’re looking to improve the website so that more people who are ‘on the fence’ would start to go to classes, or the people who don’t really want to, feel like they have more incentive to do it. Participant 5: Maybe better quality photos too… because those photos were really low res, and some of them were… a bit of a blur. More high def, high res photos, more professionally taken photos. RZ: I think that’s pretty much it, thank you so much for your time!                Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   23 Appendix F - Individual Surveys     Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   24     Examination of the UBC Personal Training Page   25   The purpose of this study is to understand why UBC Staff and Faculty participation in personal training is low and how it can be increased. We hope to do so by recommending certain adjustments to the UBC Recreation website, specifically the personal training page.P H Y S I C A L  A C T I V I T Y  P A R T I C I P A T I O N  I N  U B C  S T A F F  A N D  F A C U L T YP U R P O S EOBSERVING UBC STAFF AND FACULTY PARTICIPATION IN PERSONAL TRAININGRYAN KAINTH, DEREK IP, JEFFREY CHEOK, RACHAEL ZHANG, WENNY LINB A C K G R O U N DPhysical activity has been shown to reduce risks of many diseases and increase quality of life. Knowing this, UBC Recreation's goal is to be the physically healthiest campus in Canada. Being such a large university, UBC has a large number of staff and faculty. Therefore, to reach their goal, UBC Recreation has to find ways to increase staff and faculty participation in physical activity. Personal training is a form of physical activity that encourages exercise while also providing education on techniques and healthy living.P A R T I C I P A N T S  A N D  R E C R U I T M E N TParticipants of this study were members of the UBC staff and faculty community. In this study, we were hoping to understand individual contexts with meaningful recommendations from participants. As such, we decided to use a convenience sampling strategy to recruit staff and faculty.  B A R R I E R S  T O  P A R T I C I P A T I O N  I N  P E R S O N A L  T R A I N I N G  P R O G R A M S1 )  N O  V A L U E  I N  P E R S O N A L  T R A I N I N G  P R O G R A M S   2 )  U N C O M F O R T A B L E  T O  S H A R E  W O R K O U T  S P A C E  W I T H  S T U D E N T S 3 )  P R O G R A M S  A R E  M O R E  G E A R E D  T O W A R D S  S T U D E N T SR E S U L T Sn = 5“ I  D O N ’ T  T H I N K  T H E R E ’ S  A N Y  K I N D  O F  F O C U S  O N  F A C U L T Y  A N D  S T A F F . ”“ F R O M  T H E  P I C T U R E S ,  I T ’ S  G E A R E D  T O W A R D S  S T U D E N T S…  S E E M S  L I K E  F A C U L T Y  A N D  S T A F F  A R E  A N  A F T E R T H O U G H T . ”R E C O M M E N D A T I O N SR E F E R E N C E SUBC Overview & Facts. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ubc.ca/about/facts.html Das, B. M., Rinaldi-Miles, A. I., & Evans, E. M. (2013). Exploring faculty and staff PA barriers at a large university. California Journal of Health Promotion, 11(2), 61-72.Fitness centre personal training. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://mcgillathletics.ca/sports/2018/7/17/fitness-centre-personal-training.aspx2 1 . 1 %7 8 . 9 %1 )  P R O V I D E  M O R E  I N F O R M A T I O N  I N  A  C L E A R  A N D  W E L L -O R G A N I Z E D  M A N N E R   2 )  T A R G E T  D I F F E R E N T  M O T I V A T I O N S  F O R  P H Y S I C A L  A C T I V I T Y 3 )  I N C R E A S E  S T A F F  A N D  F A C U L T Y  C E N T R E D  P R O M O T I O N A L  M A T E R I A L- 0 out of 5 participants have participated in personal training. - Personal training page is easy to locate, informative and aesthetically pleasing. - Registration process is easy to navigate. - Participants were not interested in knowing more about personal training or personal trainers. -  A significant percentage of participants were not aware of staff and faculty discounts and deals. - Staff and Faculty felt under-represented on the UBC Recreation website and the personal training webpage. - Participants believe that the personal training webpage can be more informative, clear and organized. 

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