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Move UBC Post-Campaign Evaluation Wong, Eunice; Varady, Heather; Ackerman, Lindsey; Willms, Maya 2019-04-02

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report Move UBC Post-Campaign Evaluation Eunice Wong, Heather Varady, Lindsey Ackerman, Maya Willms University of British Columbia KIN 464 Themes: Health, Wellbeing April 2, 2019 Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.      Move UBC Post-Campaign Evaluation    Move UBC Post-Campaign Evaluation  Executive Summary  Purpose The purpose of this research project was to develop an evaluation tool that can be used in future years to measure participant’s experiences and involvement of Move UBC events. The University of British Columbia (UBC) students, faculty, and community members spend large periods of time sitting, which can have adverse health consequences. Move UBC aims to reduce sedentary time through opportunities to be physically active while on campus throughout the month of February.  Methods  To evaluate the Move UBC campaign, an online survey was developed using Qualtrics and was comprised of 20 likert-type questions based on Morgan et al.’s (2016) four factors of evaluation: participant responsiveness, quality, adaptation, and fidelity. The survey collected demographic information and perceptions of the Move UBC campaign from 10 students who had previously attended an event. The results were analyzed using a positivity scale and cross tabulation.   Results and Discussion This study found the Move UBC campaign was well received by students in terms of participant responsiveness, quality, and fidelity. Participants enjoyed the convenience in terms of location and time of the events, as well as the level of engagement the instructors provided. Move UBC participants felt they were more active because of the event they attended. Program adaptation scored the lowest on Morgan et al.’s (2016) factors. Some participants felt the events were not suitable for all levels of physical ability and the instructors did not accommodate for this variability through program adaptations. We also found that the Move UBC events targeted an already active population, instead of less active individuals.    Future Recommendations Based on our project findings, we developed 3 recommendations for future Move UBC campaigns to implement. Because Move UBC aims to increase physical activity of the entire campus population, future years should (1) target a less active population through leisure activities and educational advertising. In order to target a different audience, we recommend using advertising that briefly educates students on the benefits of physical activity. The types of events should focus more on fun, enjoyable activities. These changes will not only educate participants that physical activity does not need to be rigorous, but it also allows for a variety of physical abilities to engage in the campaign. We also recommend (2) the instructors should incorporate modifications into events to increase inclusivity of the program for all ability levels. This could involve changing materials, the environment, or types of activities performed so all levels of physical abilities are able to participate. Finally, Move UBC should (3) maintain a similar schedule (times and locations), as participants found the events to be convenient. Future Move UBC campaigns may also want to consider hosting events in additional months other than February.              Literature Review What is Move UBC? Move UBC is a health initiative program created by UBC to promote campus wide health and well-being (Faculty of Education, 2018). This campaign runs throughout the month of February and was developed in accordance with the UBC Wellbeing and Physical Activity Framework (Faculty of Education, 2018). Move UBC’s vision is to reduce sedentary behaviour and to provide opportunities to be physically active on campus (Faculty of Education, 2018).   How Can Move UBC Influence Health?  Sedentary time and physical activity are two important behaviours contributing to health. Sedentary behaviour encompasses a wide range of behaviours, such as sitting in class, watching TV or using a computer (Colley et al., 2011). Research has found that prolonged periods of sedentary behaviour can have adverse health consequences, regardless of physical activity levels (Owen, Healy, Matthews, & Dunstan, 2010). Breaking up sedentary time has been found to limit associated health implications (Owen et al., 2010). UBC has recognized the amount of time students, faculty, and community members spend sitting via classrooms, meetings, and commuting; therefore, Move UBC was created to alleviate sedentary time through physical activity (Faculty of Education, 2018). Increasing physical activity while on campus is also beneficial because it can increase physical, social and emotional health and wellbeing (Castro, Barrera, & Steiker, 2010). In particular to students, Move UBC promotes physical activity for benefits including regulating sleep patterns, reduce stress, anxiety, and depression, while increasing productivity, concentration, and learning (Faculty of Education, 2018).  Move UBC offers a variety of opportunities to increase physical activity while on campus. Some events include yoga, gymnastics, dance, and fitness classes. In addition to recreation activities, Move UBC offers educational workshops on health-related topics. Majority of events are little to no cost for participation and encourages participation from all UBC members and the surrounding community.       Barriers to Physical Activity Despite Move UBC’s promotion on physical activity, many intrapersonal factors influence a participant’s decision to engage in recreation programs (Beck, Hirth, Jenkins, Sleeman & Zhang, 2016). Beck and colleagues (2016) found that higher participation rates in wellness programs were associated with people who were more educated, younger, female, and possessed higher levels of self-efficacy. In addition, many individuals were unable to participate in recreation programs due to socioeconomic and health barriers, as well as, a lack of time, interest, or inconvenience (Beck et al., 2016). Understanding and identifying barriers individuals face towards participating in recreation events is important for future Move UBC campaigns to adapt its program delivery and better appeal to its target population.   Developing a Research Evaluation Tool Move UBC has been established since 2017, however, no research tool has been developed to measure the effectiveness of the campaign. The purpose of this project is to develop a universal research tool that can be used in future years to  measure participant experiences and involvement of Move UBC events. This research tool will evaluate intrapersonal factors that may influence a participant’s decision to attend events, as well as the overall outcome of the Move UBC campaign. The outcome of the campaign will primarily focus on the goals and vision of Move UBC: to decrease sedentary time and increase physical activity.  Previous evaluations of recreation programs emphasized the importance of not only measuring outcomes, but also evaluating how the program was implemented. Morgan et al. (2016) identified four important factors for program evaluation: Participant responsiveness (engagement and fit with the program), quality (staff delivery), adaptation (how a staff person might change a program to suit participant’s needs), and fidelity to the curriculum. Literature has shifted from measuring outcomes to evaluating the implementation of the program because the outcomes of the program are dependent on the interaction between program activity, staff, and participant characteristics (Morgan et al., 2016). It is important a program evaluation is included in this evaluation tool because it can link together planned activities with the intended results (Public Health Ontario, 2016). Information generated through evaluations can assist in decision-making and future programs, which are key tools necessary in order for health promotion to advance (Higgins, O’Connor-Flemming, Gould, & Parker, 2006). Therefore, this project will adapt similar methods to Morgan et al.’s program evaluation, with a particular emphasis on participant responsiveness (For definitions of program evaluation, see methods).  In sum, the research tool developed will examine both intrapersonal factors of participants and how the program was implemented to determine the overall outcome of the campaign.    Methods Sample Population Move UBC events encourage participation from the entire UBC community; however, for the purpose of this study, data were collected from UBC students of any background and educational year (n = 10). Data collected from participants who identified as faculty or community members were discarded and were not included in this study. All participants were required to sign a consent form    before engaging in the study (for consent form, see Appendix A). This research project chose to examine students due to availability of a large sample. UBC has over 50,000 students which contributes a large portion of the UBC population (The University of British Columbia, 2018); therefore, collecting data from this select group provided us with a sample that could be extrapolated to the larger UBC population. Also, students are more prone to financial strain and adverse factors such as long commute times that could affect their social integration (Adams et al., 2016; Coutts et al., 2018); therefore, their results provided us with detailed information about the suitability of the program. Data were collected at the end of various events to ensure the participants had attended a Move UBC event.   Data Collection An online survey using Qualtrics was used to collect data about the participants (for survey, see Appendix B). Using a survey to collect data allowed for objective and standardized measures of the program that were easy and inexpensive to administer. The online survey also facilitated the production of data which were suitable for tabulation, as well as sensitive to subgroup differences. The survey was comprised of 20 likert-type scale questions, each taking approximately 30 seconds to complete (10 minutes total). Some participant information, including gender, type of participant, and school year, were asked to help give context to the survey questions. The survey questions were developed based on Morgan et al.’s (2016) four factors of program evaluations. The questions were organized by each of the four factors: Participant responsiveness (Questions 1 - 9), quality (Questions 10 - 13), adaptation (Questions 14 - 16), and fidelity (Questions 17 - 20). The four factors of implementation will be applied to this study in the context of the definitions below.   Data Analysis Descriptive statistics were used to examine participant demographics of our sample population. Following, data were analyzed by examining each of the four factors of program implementation. To  gain an initial sense of the data, responses were categorized as being positive (agree and somewhat agree), neutral, or negative (disagree and somewhat disagree). Negatively worded questions’ scales were reversed to match positively worded questions, which allowed us to focus on the positivity value for each factor. Participants who responded with “not applicable” were removed from data analysis for that particular question. Pie charts were created from the positive, neutral, or negative responses from participants. To provide context for the pie chart results, survey questions were individually examined for each of the four factors of program implementation. After the four factors were examined individually, we considered how these factors interact to influence the overall effectiveness of the program. The pie charts allowed us to identify which of Morgan et al.’s (2016) four factors require refinement to improve future Move UBC campaigns, while examining survey questions allowed us to develop recommendations for improvement.    Participant Responsiveness This factor measures two components that are both dependent on the participant. The first component is an examination of the participants’ engagement during the program and their level of participation in Move UBC events (Morgan et al., 2016). Data collection will also focus on variables that may affect an individual’s decision to participate in Move UBC events including time, socioeconomic factors, and interest (Beck, Hirth, Jenkins, Sleeman & Zhang, 2016).   Program Quality The quality of a recreation program refers to the delivery of the program (Morgan et al., 2016). Program quality can encompass variables such as staff behaviours, staff-participant interactions and whether the participants’ expectations of program quality were met (Morgan et al., 2016).  Program Adaptation More than one perspective exists to measure program adaptation. However, this study will examine whether program adaptation occurred during the Move UBC events, if the suggested adaptations were helpful, and if the adaptations used deviated the program from its original goal (Morgan et al., 2016).   Program Fidelity This factor refers to the existence of a correlation between intended program outcomes and actual program outcomes (Morgan et al., 2016). Measurement of fidelity will examine if the Move UBC program was successful in reducing sedentary behaviour and providing an opportunity for participants to increase their daily physical activity. Additionally, we will examine if participants believe that programs like Move UBC help improve overall health and wellness of students (Faculty of Education, 2018).     Findings Participant Demographics Prior to data collection, we anticipated various intrapersonal factors may create barriers for attending Move UBC events such as gender, age, and education. From the data collected, intrapersonal factors did not appear to be a barrier to physical activity. When examining gender, Move UBC events targeted male and female populations equally. All Move UBC participants were under the age of 30 and were currently completing their undergraduate degree at UBC. Additionally, we anticipated Move UBC may target a specific year of a student's degree due to availability of time; however, participants in this study were of all years of their degree, ranging from first to fifth year.   Program Implementation Factors When examining Morgan et al.’s (2016) four factors of program implementation, program adaptation scored the lowest on positive responses. In comparison, participant responsiveness, program quality, and fidelity all had positive responses above 70%.                  Participant Responsiveness Participant responsiveness examined variables that influence an individual’s decision to participate in Move UBC events such as location, timing, cost, and event interests, as well as a participant’s physical capability. Overall, participant responsiveness was positive with 73% of attendees reporting a positive experience. Most students stated the events were scheduled at convenient times and the locations were easily accessible by all community members. We expected students to be more likely to participate in an event if they lived within twenty minutes of campus. However, our findings did not support our predictions as half of the participants in this study did not live within close proximity. Although distance did not seem to be an important factor to participation, 90% of participants agreed they would be less likely to attend a Move UBC event if they had to pay, even if the event interested them. Finally, capability did not appear to influence participant responsiveness, 80% of students agreed they felt physically competent to attend events.  Quality  Program quality primarily focused on participant’s expectations and delivery of the Move UBC events. 77% of participants reported a positive response to this factor, with zero negative responses. Further examination of this factor revealed that 90% of participants felt Move UBC met their expectations and majority of students somewhat agreed that they would attend another event based on their experience. Instructor engagement is an important factor contributing to program quality because instructors can link together the intended program activity and the overall outcome. On average, participants were excited to attend another event due to the level of engagement produced by the instructor. When participants were prompted to answer if they felt the Move UBC event felt safe and inclusive, the sample average agreed with this statement.  Adaptation   Adaptation primarily focused on whether the instructor modified the program to suit the participants’ needs. Adaptation scored 37% positivity, 33% negativity, and 30% neutral. For this reason, this factor will primarily be focused on for improvement for future Move UBC campaigns. Some of the events we collected data from incorporated a wide range of movements, which may have been physically demanding for participants who are less physically active. Based on our findings, only 40% of participants felt the events they attended were suitable for all ability levels. 60% of participants felt the instructors provided modifications for activities; although, responses were primarily “somewhat agree” or “neutral”. There responses were interpreted that only slight modifications were provided for  activities and the modifications were not suitable for all ability levels. Because participants did not feel the events were suitable for all ability levels, this may have deterred more sedentary individuals from participating.  Fidelity  Fidelity focused on the correlation between the purpose of the Move UBC campaign (goals and vision) and the actual outcome. 70% of participants reported a positive response to program fidelity. Move UBC was created to reduce sedentary behaviours and increase physical activity. 70% of participants believed the Move UBC events improved the health and wellness of students, staff, and community members. Additionally, 80% of students said they spent more time exercising that day because of the events. Therefore, Move UBC accomplished one of their goals: To decrease sedentary behaviours and increase physical activity. Only one participant admitted to not exercising regularly when they had a busy schedule, therefore our study concluded this sample population was regularly active. UBC students also indicated they would enjoy having events held throughout the entire year because it decreases sedentary time.    Discussion What did participants like about Move UBC events? Move UBC events promoted physical activity through a diverse range of events that participants enjoyed attending. Some reasons for the success of the campaign were due to the program’s participant responsiveness, program quality, and fidelity. Participants thought the events were held at convenient times and were easily accessible by most UBC students. Participants were excited to attend additional events due to the level of engagement and enthusiasm provided by the instructors, improving the overall quality of the program. Participants reported to have spent more time exercising as a result of Move UBC and even wished events could extend into additional months of the year. Overall, Move UBC was successful at decreasing sedentary time and increasing opportunities to be physically active.   Target Audience  Based on this study’s findings, participant increased their physical activity on days they attended a Move UBC event. However, most of the students who attended an event agreed to having an active lifestyle prior to participation. Although Move UBC provided opportunities to be physically active, the campaign targeted a population that was already active. Individuals who are more sedentary may benefit the most from the Move UBC campaign; however, these individuals did not attend events and therefore did not receive any benefits. Physical activity is one of the most difficult behaviours to adopt and individuals who are sedentary are less likely to participate in structured exercise (Pearson et al., 2014). For this reason, Move UBC needs to develop different approaches to encourage sedentary individuals to be involved in physical activity.    Participant inclusiveness On average, the sample population exercised regularly even when their schedules were busy and believed they were physically competent to attend events. However, regardless of individuals’ perceptions of physical abilities, not all participants agreed Move UBC events were adapted to all abilities. Participants who did not feel physically competent to attend events believed the instructors did not make suitable adaptations; however, some participants who felt physically competent also had similar opinions. Adaptations are important in recreation programs in order to reduce physical barriers participants may experience (Thomas et al., 2015). Tailoring programs to address potential barriers can create a more inclusive program (Thomas et al., 2015), which in turn can increase enjoyment, pride, and self-esteem (Roult et al., 2015). Inclusivity is important because it can create favourable attitudes, which make participants more likely to engage in physical activity (Kodish et al., 2006).        Limitations and Future Research Move UBC Event Type  Although this study can provide insight into the type of participants and individuals’ perceptions of Move UBC events, there are limitations to the research tool developed. One of the limitations is that we only collected sample data from events that were structured classes or drop-in exercise sessions. Structured events were preferred for data collection to ensure data could be collected about the instructor and program modifications. For this reason, data were not collected from other aspects of the Move UBC campaign, such as leisure activities or health promotion seminars. Because we only collected data from structured activities, the participants involved in these activities may be different from participants found at leisure events or health seminars. Future research should develop an evaluation tool to examine other aspects of the Move UBC campaign, aside from structured physical activity. By comparing the results from evaluation tools focused on physical activity, leisure activities, versus health promotion seminars, it could be determined if UBC students are more likely to attend a certain event based on personal factors.  Small Sample Size This study was limited due to its small sample size of ten participants. During data collection, this project encountered some unanticipated challenges. When attending events that were drop-in or provided free access to recreation spaces, some of the participants were not aware they were attending a Move UBC event. Data were not collected from students who were leisurely using these recreation spaces, which limited the amount of data that could be collected. Due to small sample size, the sample population may not accurately represent the UBC student population; therefore, future research should replicate this study with more participants.  Social Determinants of Health  This research tool excluded information pertaining to social determinants of health (SDH) to avoid requiring participants to provide sensitive information. SDH can result in health inequalities that may influence people’s ability to participant in physical activity (Mikkonen & Raphael, 2010). This limitation is beyond the purposes of this study but it is important to recognize because it can influence physical activity levels. Income is one of the SDH and this study found 90% of participants would be less likely to attend an event if they had to pay; therefore, it may be an important factor to examine. Future research should develop an evaluation tool that addresses SDH and barriers individuals may face in regards to being physically active at Move UBC events.      Future Recommendations  Based on this study’s findings, we have identified three recommendations for future Move UBC campaigns to implement in order to improve the effectiveness of the program.    1. Move UBC should target a less active population through leisure events and educational advertising The Move UBC campaign targeted active individuals. Data were not obtained from less active participants, suggesting this sub-population did not attend Move UBC events. Marcus and Forsyth (2018) suggest in order to get sedentary people to participate in physical activities, it is important to first educate the importance of being physically active. We suggest future Move UBC campaigns to target less active populations by producing advertisements that inform people on the benefits of physical activity. These advertisements should suggest that physical activity does not need to be rigorous in nature but rather fun, enjoyable activities that accommodate all ability levels. For example, future campaigns could include free rollerblade or kayak rentals, hopscotch, and limbo competitions.    2. Move UBC should increase inclusivity for all ability levels through program adaptations. This evaluation tool found that Move UBC events were not inclusive for all participants. To increase inclusivity, instructors should ensure adaptations are implemented in program activities. This could involve changing materials, the environment, or types of activities performed (Thomas et al., 2015). For example, dance classes should offer variations for movements and fitness classes should provide alterations in duration and intensity to accommodate all ability levels.      3. Move UBC should continue to develop a similar event schedule (times and locations) Positive aspects of Move UBC should be continued in future campaigns. Despite students’ busy schedules, participants found the events to be scheduled at convenient times and the locations were accessible. Future campaigns should continue to develop a similar event schedule (for schedule, see Appendix C). Participants also stated they wished similar events were held throughout various months in the year. Future Move UBC campaigns should consider staggering events throughout months rather than concentrating in February to see if participants may be more likely to attend multiple events.                              References  Beck, A. J., Hirth, R. A., Jenkins, K. R., Sleeman, K. K., & Zhang, W. (2016). Factors associated with participation in a university worksite wellness program. American Journal of Preventive Medicine,  51(1), e1-e11. https://doi-org.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/10.1016/j.amepre.2016.01.028 Castro, F., Barrera, M., & Steiker, L. (2010). Issues and challenges in the design of culturally adapted evidence-based interventions. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 6, 213– 239. doi: 10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-033109-132032.  Colley, R. C., Garriguet, D., Janssen, I., Craig, C. L., Clarke, J., & Tremblay, M. S. (2011). Physical activity of canadian children and youth: Accelerometer results from the 2007 to 2009 canadian health measures survey. Health Reports, 22(1), 15-23. Retrieved from https://search-proquest-com.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/docview/904400106?accountid=14656&pq-origsite=summon Faculty of Education (2018). Move UBC. Retrieved from http://educ.ubc.ca/move-ubc/ Higgins, H., O'Connor-Fleming, M., Gould, T., & Parker, E. (2006). A framework for evaluating health promotion programs. Health Promotion Journal of Australia: Official Journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals, 17(1), 61-6. doi:10.1071/HE06061 Kodish, S., Kulinna, P., Martin, J., Pangrazi, R., & Darst, P. (2006). Determinants of physical activity in an inclusive setting. Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 23(4), 390-409. doi:10.1123/apaq.23.4.390 Marcus, B. H., & Forsyth, L. H. (2018). Motivating people to be physically active. Human Kinetics. Mikkonen, J., & Raphael, D. (2010). Social Determinants of Health: The Canadian Facts. Toronto: York University School of Health Policy and Management  Morgan, C., Sibthorp, J., & Browne, L. P. (2016). Moving beyond outcomes: An applied example of implementation evaluation in a youth recreation program. Journal of Park and Recreation Administration, 34(4), 66-81. doi:10.18666/JPRA-2016-V34-I4-7290 Owen, N., Healy, G.N., Matthews, C.E., & Dunstan, D.W. (2010). Too much sitting: The population health science of sedentary behaviour. Exercise and sport sciences reviews, 38(3), 105-13. Pearson, N., Braithwaite, R. E., Biddle, S. J. H., van Sluijs, E. M. F, & Atkin, A. J. (2014). Associations between sedentary behaviour and physical activity in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis: Active and sedentary behaviours in youth. Obesity Reviews, 15(8), 666-675. doi:10.1111/obr.12188 Public Health Ontario (2016). Evaluating health promotion programs: introductory workbook. Toronto, ON: Queen's Printer for Ontario Roult, R., Brunet, I., Belley-Ranger, É., Carbonneau, H., & Fortier, J. (2015). Inclusive sporting events in schools for youth with disabilities in quebec: Social, educational, and experiential roles of these activities according to the interviewed practitioners. SAGE Open, 5(3), 215824401560469. doi:10.1177/2158244015604696 Thomas, R., Hack, T. F., Quinlan, E., Tatemichi, S., Towers, A., Kwan, W., ... & Morrison, T. (2015). Loss, adaptation and new directions: The impact of arm morbidity on leisure activities following breast cancer. Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal/Revue canadienne de soins infirmiers en oncologie, 25(1), 49-53. UBC Wellbeing (n.d.). UBC wellbeing challenge 2019. Retrieved from wellbeing.ubc.ca                    Appendices: Appendix A UBC Post-Campaign Evaluation Survey 2019  What age range best describes you:   20 and under  20-30 years  30-50 years  50 and over  What is your gender?   Male   Female  Other: ______________  What category do you best fit into:    UBC Student  Faculty Community Member  What year of your degree are you currently in: (leave blank if not applicable)    1 2 3 4 5 Other: ______________  Circle the following number associated to the answer that best fits you: 1 = Agree   3 = Neutral   5 = Disagree 2 = Somewhat agree  4 = Somewhat disagree 6 = Not applicable  1. I thoroughly enjoyed the Move UBC event(s) I have attended 1  2  3  4  5  6  2. The Move UBC events are scheduled at a convenient time for me 1  2  3  4  5  6  3. Move UBC events are easily accessible to all members of the community 1  2  3  4  5  6  4. I have attended _____ number of Move UBC events. Note: If more than 5 events, circle 6 1  2  3  4  5  6  5. I am less likely to attend a UBC event that interests me if I have to pay  1  2  3  4  5  6  6. I would attend a Move UBC event that costs under $10 1  2  3  4  5  6  7. I live within 20 minutes of the UBC campus  1  2  3  4  5  6  8. The types of events Move UBC offers interest me 1  2  3  4  5  6   9. I feel that I am physically competent to participate successfully in health and wellness programs 1  2  3  4  5  6  10. I felt as though my expectations for the Move UBC program were met 1  2  3  4  5  6  11. I would attend another Move UBC event based on my experience 1  2  3  4  5  6  12. I felt as though the instructor was engaging and got me excited to attend another event 1  2  3  4  5  6  13. The Move UBC event was safe and inclusive to all environments 1  2  3  4  5  6   14. I did not feel that the Move UBC event was adapted to suit all levels of physical ability  1  2  3  4  5  6  15. The instructor provided modifications for participants for all ability levels 1  2  3  4  5  6  16. I felt as though the adaptations the instructor made changed the overall outcome of the Move UBC event 1  2  3  4  5  6  17. I believe Move UBC improves the health and wellness of students, staff, and community members  1  2  3  4  5  6  18. I spent more time exercising today because of this Move UBC event 1  2  3  4  5  6  19. I commit to exercising regularly, even when my schedule gets busy  1  2  3  4  5  6  20. I wish events similar to Move UBC existed year round because it helped me reduce sedentary behaviours 1  2  3  4  5  6     Appendix B   KIN 464: Health Promotion and Physical Activity Participant Consent Form   Principal Investigator:  Negin Riazi (PhD Candidate, School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Education)   The purpose of the class project: To gather knowledge and expertise from community members on topics related to physical activity, recreation, and health promotion.   Study Procedures: With your permission, we are asking you to participate in a survey. With the information gathered, students will critically examine how different individuals understand or engage in health promoting activities or health promotion initiatives.  Project outcomes: The information gathered from survey questions will be part of a written report for the class project. The written report will be shared with the community partners involved with the project. Summaries of findings will also be posted on the following websites. No personal information/information that could identify participants will be included in these reports.  UBC SEEDS Program Library: https://sustain.ubc.ca/courses-degrees/alternative-credit-options/seeds-sustainability-program/seeds-sustainability-library  Potential benefits of class project: There are no explicit benefits to you by taking part in this class project. However, the survey will provide you with the opportunity to voice your opinion on your experiences with health promoting activities or initiatives in a broad sense and will provide the students with an opportunity to learn from your experiences.   Confidentiality: Maintaining the confidentiality of the participants involved in an interview is paramount, and no names will be asked for.   At the completion of the course, all data (i.e. notes) and signed consent forms will be kept in a locked filing cabinet in Negin Riazi’s office in the Population Physical Activity Lab (2259 Lower Mall) at the University of British Columbia. All data and consent forms will be destroyed 1 year after completion of the course. Risks: The risks associated with participating in this research are minimal. There are no known physical, economic, or social risks associated with participation in this study. Although there is a schedule of questions, the person you are surveying is free to share what they would like,  including refusing to answer specific questions. You should know that your participation is completely voluntary and you are free to withdraw from the survey and there will not be negative impacts related to your withdrawal. If you withdraw from the study, all of the information you have shared up until that point will be destroyed.   Contact for information about the study: If you have any questions about this class project, you can contact Negin Riazi by phone at 604-822-5288 or by email at negin.riazi@ubc.ca  Research ethics complaints:  If you have any concerns or complaints about your rights as a research participant and/or your experiences while participating in this study, contact the Research Participant Complaint Line in the UBC Office of Research Ethics at 604-822-8598 or e-mail RSIL@ors.ubc.ca . or call toll free 1-877-822-8598.    Consent: Your participation in this study is entirely voluntary and you may refuse to participate or withdraw from the study at any time.  Your signature below indicates that you have received a copy of this consent form for your own records. Your signature indicates that you consent to participate in this study.   Subject signature____________________________________________________    Date: ____________________________________________________   Appendix C      Appendix D                                            Appendix E          UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report Move UBC Post-Campaign Evaluation Eunice Wong, Heather Varady, Lindsey Ackerman, Maya Willms University of British Columbia KIN 464 Themes: Health, Wellbeing April 2, 2019 Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.      Move UBC Post-Campaign Evaluation    Move UBC Post-Campaign Evaluation  Executive Summary  Purpose The purpose of this research project was to develop an evaluation tool that can be used in future years to measure participant’s experiences and involvement of Move UBC events. The University of British Columbia (UBC) students, faculty, and community members spend large periods of time sitting, which can have adverse health consequences. Move UBC aims to reduce sedentary time through opportunities to be physically active while on campus throughout the month of February.  Methods  To evaluate the Move UBC campaign, an online survey was developed using Qualtrics and was comprised of 20 likert-type questions based on Morgan et al.’s (2016) four factors of evaluation: participant responsiveness, quality, adaptation, and fidelity. The survey collected demographic information and perceptions of the Move UBC campaign from 10 students who had previously attended an event. The results were analyzed using a positivity scale and cross tabulation.   Results and Discussion This study found the Move UBC campaign was well received by students in terms of participant responsiveness, quality, and fidelity. Participants enjoyed the convenience in terms of location and time of the events, as well as the level of engagement the instructors provided. Move UBC participants felt they were more active because of the event they attended. Program adaptation scored the lowest on Morgan et al.’s (2016) factors. Some participants felt the events were not suitable for all levels of physical ability and the instructors did not accommodate for this variability through program adaptations. We also found that the Move UBC events targeted an already active population, instead of less active individuals.    Future Recommendations Based on our project findings, we developed 3 recommendations for future Move UBC campaigns to implement. Because Move UBC aims to increase physical activity of the entire campus population, future years should (1) target a less active population through leisure activities and educational advertising. In order to target a different audience, we recommend using advertising that briefly educates students on the benefits of physical activity. The types of events should focus more on fun, enjoyable activities. These changes will not only educate participants that physical activity does not need to be rigorous, but it also allows for a variety of physical abilities to engage in the campaign. We also recommend (2) the instructors should incorporate modifications into events to increase inclusivity of the program for all ability levels. This could involve changing materials, the environment, or types of activities performed so all levels of physical abilities are able to participate. Finally, Move UBC should (3) maintain a similar schedule (times and locations), as participants found the events to be convenient. Future Move UBC campaigns may also want to consider hosting events in additional months other than February.              Literature Review What is Move UBC? Move UBC is a health initiative program created by UBC to promote campus wide health and well-being (Faculty of Education, 2018). This campaign runs throughout the month of February and was developed in accordance with the UBC Wellbeing and Physical Activity Framework (Faculty of Education, 2018). Move UBC’s vision is to reduce sedentary behaviour and to provide opportunities to be physically active on campus (Faculty of Education, 2018).   How Can Move UBC Influence Health?  Sedentary time and physical activity are two important behaviours contributing to health. Sedentary behaviour encompasses a wide range of behaviours, such as sitting in class, watching TV or using a computer (Colley et al., 2011). Research has found that prolonged periods of sedentary behaviour can have adverse health consequences, regardless of physical activity levels (Owen, Healy, Matthews, & Dunstan, 2010). Breaking up sedentary time has been found to limit associated health implications (Owen et al., 2010). UBC has recognized the amount of time students, faculty, and community members spend sitting via classrooms, meetings, and commuting; therefore, Move UBC was created to alleviate sedentary time through physical activity (Faculty of Education, 2018). Increasing physical activity while on campus is also beneficial because it can increase physical, social and emotional health and wellbeing (Castro, Barrera, & Steiker, 2010). In particular to students, Move UBC promotes physical activity for benefits including regulating sleep patterns, reduce stress, anxiety, and depression, while increasing productivity, concentration, and learning (Faculty of Education, 2018).  Move UBC offers a variety of opportunities to increase physical activity while on campus. Some events include yoga, gymnastics, dance, and fitness classes. In addition to recreation activities, Move UBC offers educational workshops on health-related topics. Majority of events are little to no cost for participation and encourages participation from all UBC members and the surrounding community.       Barriers to Physical Activity Despite Move UBC’s promotion on physical activity, many intrapersonal factors influence a participant’s decision to engage in recreation programs (Beck, Hirth, Jenkins, Sleeman & Zhang, 2016). Beck and colleagues (2016) found that higher participation rates in wellness programs were associated with people who were more educated, younger, female, and possessed higher levels of self-efficacy. In addition, many individuals were unable to participate in recreation programs due to socioeconomic and health barriers, as well as, a lack of time, interest, or inconvenience (Beck et al., 2016). Understanding and identifying barriers individuals face towards participating in recreation events is important for future Move UBC campaigns to adapt its program delivery and better appeal to its target population.   Developing a Research Evaluation Tool Move UBC has been established since 2017, however, no research tool has been developed to measure the effectiveness of the campaign. The purpose of this project is to develop a universal research tool that can be used in future years to  measure participant experiences and involvement of Move UBC events. This research tool will evaluate intrapersonal factors that may influence a participant’s decision to attend events, as well as the overall outcome of the Move UBC campaign. The outcome of the campaign will primarily focus on the goals and vision of Move UBC: to decrease sedentary time and increase physical activity.  Previous evaluations of recreation programs emphasized the importance of not only measuring outcomes, but also evaluating how the program was implemented. Morgan et al. (2016) identified four important factors for program evaluation: Participant responsiveness (engagement and fit with the program), quality (staff delivery), adaptation (how a staff person might change a program to suit participant’s needs), and fidelity to the curriculum. Literature has shifted from measuring outcomes to evaluating the implementation of the program because the outcomes of the program are dependent on the interaction between program activity, staff, and participant characteristics (Morgan et al., 2016). It is important a program evaluation is included in this evaluation tool because it can link together planned activities with the intended results (Public Health Ontario, 2016). Information generated through evaluations can assist in decision-making and future programs, which are key tools necessary in order for health promotion to advance (Higgins, O’Connor-Flemming, Gould, & Parker, 2006). Therefore, this project will adapt similar methods to Morgan et al.’s program evaluation, with a particular emphasis on participant responsiveness (For definitions of program evaluation, see methods).  In sum, the research tool developed will examine both intrapersonal factors of participants and how the program was implemented to determine the overall outcome of the campaign.    Methods Sample Population Move UBC events encourage participation from the entire UBC community; however, for the purpose of this study, data were collected from UBC students of any background and educational year (n = 10). Data collected from participants who identified as faculty or community members were discarded and were not included in this study. All participants were required to sign a consent form    before engaging in the study (for consent form, see Appendix A). This research project chose to examine students due to availability of a large sample. UBC has over 50,000 students which contributes a large portion of the UBC population (The University of British Columbia, 2018); therefore, collecting data from this select group provided us with a sample that could be extrapolated to the larger UBC population. Also, students are more prone to financial strain and adverse factors such as long commute times that could affect their social integration (Adams et al., 2016; Coutts et al., 2018); therefore, their results provided us with detailed information about the suitability of the program. Data were collected at the end of various events to ensure the participants had attended a Move UBC event.   Data Collection An online survey using Qualtrics was used to collect data about the participants (for survey, see Appendix B). Using a survey to collect data allowed for objective and standardized measures of the program that were easy and inexpensive to administer. The online survey also facilitated the production of data which were suitable for tabulation, as well as sensitive to subgroup differences. The survey was comprised of 20 likert-type scale questions, each taking approximately 30 seconds to complete (10 minutes total). Some participant information, including gender, type of participant, and school year, were asked to help give context to the survey questions. The survey questions were developed based on Morgan et al.’s (2016) four factors of program evaluations. The questions were organized by each of the four factors: Participant responsiveness (Questions 1 - 9), quality (Questions 10 - 13), adaptation (Questions 14 - 16), and fidelity (Questions 17 - 20). The four factors of implementation will be applied to this study in the context of the definitions below.   Data Analysis Descriptive statistics were used to examine participant demographics of our sample population. Following, data were analyzed by examining each of the four factors of program implementation. To  gain an initial sense of the data, responses were categorized as being positive (agree and somewhat agree), neutral, or negative (disagree and somewhat disagree). Negatively worded questions’ scales were reversed to match positively worded questions, which allowed us to focus on the positivity value for each factor. Participants who responded with “not applicable” were removed from data analysis for that particular question. Pie charts were created from the positive, neutral, or negative responses from participants. To provide context for the pie chart results, survey questions were individually examined for each of the four factors of program implementation. After the four factors were examined individually, we considered how these factors interact to influence the overall effectiveness of the program. The pie charts allowed us to identify which of Morgan et al.’s (2016) four factors require refinement to improve future Move UBC campaigns, while examining survey questions allowed us to develop recommendations for improvement.    Participant Responsiveness This factor measures two components that are both dependent on the participant. The first component is an examination of the participants’ engagement during the program and their level of participation in Move UBC events (Morgan et al., 2016). Data collection will also focus on variables that may affect an individual’s decision to participate in Move UBC events including time, socioeconomic factors, and interest (Beck, Hirth, Jenkins, Sleeman & Zhang, 2016).   Program Quality The quality of a recreation program refers to the delivery of the program (Morgan et al., 2016). Program quality can encompass variables such as staff behaviours, staff-participant interactions and whether the participants’ expectations of program quality were met (Morgan et al., 2016).  Program Adaptation More than one perspective exists to measure program adaptation. However, this study will examine whether program adaptation occurred during the Move UBC events, if the suggested adaptations were helpful, and if the adaptations used deviated the program from its original goal (Morgan et al., 2016).   Program Fidelity This factor refers to the existence of a correlation between intended program outcomes and actual program outcomes (Morgan et al., 2016). Measurement of fidelity will examine if the Move UBC program was successful in reducing sedentary behaviour and providing an opportunity for participants to increase their daily physical activity. Additionally, we will examine if participants believe that programs like Move UBC help improve overall health and wellness of students (Faculty of Education, 2018).     Findings Participant Demographics Prior to data collection, we anticipated various intrapersonal factors may create barriers for attending Move UBC events such as gender, age, and education. From the data collected, intrapersonal factors did not appear to be a barrier to physical activity. When examining gender, Move UBC events targeted male and female populations equally. All Move UBC participants were under the age of 30 and were currently completing their undergraduate degree at UBC. Additionally, we anticipated Move UBC may target a specific year of a student's degree due to availability of time; however, participants in this study were of all years of their degree, ranging from first to fifth year.   Program Implementation Factors When examining Morgan et al.’s (2016) four factors of program implementation, program adaptation scored the lowest on positive responses. In comparison, participant responsiveness, program quality, and fidelity all had positive responses above 70%.                  Participant Responsiveness Participant responsiveness examined variables that influence an individual’s decision to participate in Move UBC events such as location, timing, cost, and event interests, as well as a participant’s physical capability. Overall, participant responsiveness was positive with 73% of attendees reporting a positive experience. Most students stated the events were scheduled at convenient times and the locations were easily accessible by all community members. We expected students to be more likely to participate in an event if they lived within twenty minutes of campus. However, our findings did not support our predictions as half of the participants in this study did not live within close proximity. Although distance did not seem to be an important factor to participation, 90% of participants agreed they would be less likely to attend a Move UBC event if they had to pay, even if the event interested them. Finally, capability did not appear to influence participant responsiveness, 80% of students agreed they felt physically competent to attend events.  Quality  Program quality primarily focused on participant’s expectations and delivery of the Move UBC events. 77% of participants reported a positive response to this factor, with zero negative responses. Further examination of this factor revealed that 90% of participants felt Move UBC met their expectations and majority of students somewhat agreed that they would attend another event based on their experience. Instructor engagement is an important factor contributing to program quality because instructors can link together the intended program activity and the overall outcome. On average, participants were excited to attend another event due to the level of engagement produced by the instructor. When participants were prompted to answer if they felt the Move UBC event felt safe and inclusive, the sample average agreed with this statement.  Adaptation   Adaptation primarily focused on whether the instructor modified the program to suit the participants’ needs. Adaptation scored 37% positivity, 33% negativity, and 30% neutral. For this reason, this factor will primarily be focused on for improvement for future Move UBC campaigns. Some of the events we collected data from incorporated a wide range of movements, which may have been physically demanding for participants who are less physically active. Based on our findings, only 40% of participants felt the events they attended were suitable for all ability levels. 60% of participants felt the instructors provided modifications for activities; although, responses were primarily “somewhat agree” or “neutral”. There responses were interpreted that only slight modifications were provided for  activities and the modifications were not suitable for all ability levels. Because participants did not feel the events were suitable for all ability levels, this may have deterred more sedentary individuals from participating.  Fidelity  Fidelity focused on the correlation between the purpose of the Move UBC campaign (goals and vision) and the actual outcome. 70% of participants reported a positive response to program fidelity. Move UBC was created to reduce sedentary behaviours and increase physical activity. 70% of participants believed the Move UBC events improved the health and wellness of students, staff, and community members. Additionally, 80% of students said they spent more time exercising that day because of the events. Therefore, Move UBC accomplished one of their goals: To decrease sedentary behaviours and increase physical activity. Only one participant admitted to not exercising regularly when they had a busy schedule, therefore our study concluded this sample population was regularly active. UBC students also indicated they would enjoy having events held throughout the entire year because it decreases sedentary time.    Discussion What did participants like about Move UBC events? Move UBC events promoted physical activity through a diverse range of events that participants enjoyed attending. Some reasons for the success of the campaign were due to the program’s participant responsiveness, program quality, and fidelity. Participants thought the events were held at convenient times and were easily accessible by most UBC students. Participants were excited to attend additional events due to the level of engagement and enthusiasm provided by the instructors, improving the overall quality of the program. Participants reported to have spent more time exercising as a result of Move UBC and even wished events could extend into additional months of the year. Overall, Move UBC was successful at decreasing sedentary time and increasing opportunities to be physically active.   Target Audience  Based on this study’s findings, participant increased their physical activity on days they attended a Move UBC event. However, most of the students who attended an event agreed to having an active lifestyle prior to participation. Although Move UBC provided opportunities to be physically active, the campaign targeted a population that was already active. Individuals who are more sedentary may benefit the most from the Move UBC campaign; however, these individuals did not attend events and therefore did not receive any benefits. Physical activity is one of the most difficult behaviours to adopt and individuals who are sedentary are less likely to participate in structured exercise (Pearson et al., 2014). For this reason, Move UBC needs to develop different approaches to encourage sedentary individuals to be involved in physical activity.    Participant inclusiveness On average, the sample population exercised regularly even when their schedules were busy and believed they were physically competent to attend events. However, regardless of individuals’ perceptions of physical abilities, not all participants agreed Move UBC events were adapted to all abilities. Participants who did not feel physically competent to attend events believed the instructors did not make suitable adaptations; however, some participants who felt physically competent also had similar opinions. Adaptations are important in recreation programs in order to reduce physical barriers participants may experience (Thomas et al., 2015). Tailoring programs to address potential barriers can create a more inclusive program (Thomas et al., 2015), which in turn can increase enjoyment, pride, and self-esteem (Roult et al., 2015). Inclusivity is important because it can create favourable attitudes, which make participants more likely to engage in physical activity (Kodish et al., 2006).        Limitations and Future Research Move UBC Event Type  Although this study can provide insight into the type of participants and individuals’ perceptions of Move UBC events, there are limitations to the research tool developed. One of the limitations is that we only collected sample data from events that were structured classes or drop-in exercise sessions. Structured events were preferred for data collection to ensure data could be collected about the instructor and program modifications. For this reason, data were not collected from other aspects of the Move UBC campaign, such as leisure activities or health promotion seminars. Because we only collected data from structured activities, the participants involved in these activities may be different from participants found at leisure events or health seminars. Future research should develop an evaluation tool to examine other aspects of the Move UBC campaign, aside from structured physical activity. By comparing the results from evaluation tools focused on physical activity, leisure activities, versus health promotion seminars, it could be determined if UBC students are more likely to attend a certain event based on personal factors.  Small Sample Size This study was limited due to its small sample size of ten participants. During data collection, this project encountered some unanticipated challenges. When attending events that were drop-in or provided free access to recreation spaces, some of the participants were not aware they were attending a Move UBC event. Data were not collected from students who were leisurely using these recreation spaces, which limited the amount of data that could be collected. Due to small sample size, the sample population may not accurately represent the UBC student population; therefore, future research should replicate this study with more participants.  Social Determinants of Health  This research tool excluded information pertaining to social determinants of health (SDH) to avoid requiring participants to provide sensitive information. SDH can result in health inequalities that may influence people’s ability to participant in physical activity (Mikkonen & Raphael, 2010). This limitation is beyond the purposes of this study but it is important to recognize because it can influence physical activity levels. Income is one of the SDH and this study found 90% of participants would be less likely to attend an event if they had to pay; therefore, it may be an important factor to examine. Future research should develop an evaluation tool that addresses SDH and barriers individuals may face in regards to being physically active at Move UBC events.      Future Recommendations  Based on this study’s findings, we have identified three recommendations for future Move UBC campaigns to implement in order to improve the effectiveness of the program.    1. Move UBC should target a less active population through leisure events and educational advertising The Move UBC campaign targeted active individuals. Data were not obtained from less active participants, suggesting this sub-population did not attend Move UBC events. Marcus and Forsyth (2018) suggest in order to get sedentary people to participate in physical activities, it is important to first educate the importance of being physically active. We suggest future Move UBC campaigns to target less active populations by producing advertisements that inform people on the benefits of physical activity. These advertisements should suggest that physical activity does not need to be rigorous in nature but rather fun, enjoyable activities that accommodate all ability levels. For example, future campaigns could include free rollerblade or kayak rentals, hopscotch, and limbo competitions.    2. Move UBC should increase inclusivity for all ability levels through program adaptations. This evaluation tool found that Move UBC events were not inclusive for all participants. To increase inclusivity, instructors should ensure adaptations are implemented in program activities. This could involve changing materials, the environment, or types of activities performed (Thomas et al., 2015). For example, dance classes should offer variations for movements and fitness classes should provide alterations in duration and intensity to accommodate all ability levels.      3. Move UBC should continue to develop a similar event schedule (times and locations) Positive aspects of Move UBC should be continued in future campaigns. Despite students’ busy schedules, participants found the events to be scheduled at convenient times and the locations were accessible. Future campaigns should continue to develop a similar event schedule (for schedule, see Appendix C). Participants also stated they wished similar events were held throughout various months in the year. Future Move UBC campaigns should consider staggering events throughout months rather than concentrating in February to see if participants may be more likely to attend multiple events.                              References  Beck, A. J., Hirth, R. A., Jenkins, K. R., Sleeman, K. K., & Zhang, W. (2016). Factors associated with participation in a university worksite wellness program. American Journal of Preventive Medicine,  51(1), e1-e11. https://doi-org.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/10.1016/j.amepre.2016.01.028 Castro, F., Barrera, M., & Steiker, L. (2010). Issues and challenges in the design of culturally adapted evidence-based interventions. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 6, 213– 239. doi: 10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-033109-132032.  Colley, R. C., Garriguet, D., Janssen, I., Craig, C. L., Clarke, J., & Tremblay, M. S. (2011). Physical activity of canadian children and youth: Accelerometer results from the 2007 to 2009 canadian health measures survey. Health Reports, 22(1), 15-23. Retrieved from https://search-proquest-com.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/docview/904400106?accountid=14656&pq-origsite=summon Faculty of Education (2018). Move UBC. Retrieved from http://educ.ubc.ca/move-ubc/ Higgins, H., O'Connor-Fleming, M., Gould, T., & Parker, E. (2006). A framework for evaluating health promotion programs. Health Promotion Journal of Australia: Official Journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals, 17(1), 61-6. doi:10.1071/HE06061 Kodish, S., Kulinna, P., Martin, J., Pangrazi, R., & Darst, P. (2006). Determinants of physical activity in an inclusive setting. Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 23(4), 390-409. doi:10.1123/apaq.23.4.390 Marcus, B. H., & Forsyth, L. H. (2018). Motivating people to be physically active. Human Kinetics. Mikkonen, J., & Raphael, D. (2010). Social Determinants of Health: The Canadian Facts. Toronto: York University School of Health Policy and Management  Morgan, C., Sibthorp, J., & Browne, L. P. (2016). Moving beyond outcomes: An applied example of implementation evaluation in a youth recreation program. Journal of Park and Recreation Administration, 34(4), 66-81. doi:10.18666/JPRA-2016-V34-I4-7290 Owen, N., Healy, G.N., Matthews, C.E., & Dunstan, D.W. (2010). Too much sitting: The population health science of sedentary behaviour. Exercise and sport sciences reviews, 38(3), 105-13. Pearson, N., Braithwaite, R. E., Biddle, S. J. H., van Sluijs, E. M. F, & Atkin, A. J. (2014). Associations between sedentary behaviour and physical activity in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis: Active and sedentary behaviours in youth. Obesity Reviews, 15(8), 666-675. doi:10.1111/obr.12188 Public Health Ontario (2016). Evaluating health promotion programs: introductory workbook. Toronto, ON: Queen's Printer for Ontario Roult, R., Brunet, I., Belley-Ranger, É., Carbonneau, H., & Fortier, J. (2015). Inclusive sporting events in schools for youth with disabilities in quebec: Social, educational, and experiential roles of these activities according to the interviewed practitioners. SAGE Open, 5(3), 215824401560469. doi:10.1177/2158244015604696 Thomas, R., Hack, T. F., Quinlan, E., Tatemichi, S., Towers, A., Kwan, W., ... & Morrison, T. (2015). Loss, adaptation and new directions: The impact of arm morbidity on leisure activities following breast cancer. Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal/Revue canadienne de soins infirmiers en oncologie, 25(1), 49-53. UBC Wellbeing (n.d.). UBC wellbeing challenge 2019. Retrieved from wellbeing.ubc.ca                    Appendices: Appendix A UBC Post-Campaign Evaluation Survey 2019  What age range best describes you:   20 and under  20-30 years  30-50 years  50 and over  What is your gender?   Male   Female  Other: ______________  What category do you best fit into:    UBC Student  Faculty Community Member  What year of your degree are you currently in: (leave blank if not applicable)    1 2 3 4 5 Other: ______________  Circle the following number associated to the answer that best fits you: 1 = Agree   3 = Neutral   5 = Disagree 2 = Somewhat agree  4 = Somewhat disagree 6 = Not applicable  1. I thoroughly enjoyed the Move UBC event(s) I have attended 1  2  3  4  5  6  2. The Move UBC events are scheduled at a convenient time for me 1  2  3  4  5  6  3. Move UBC events are easily accessible to all members of the community 1  2  3  4  5  6  4. I have attended _____ number of Move UBC events. Note: If more than 5 events, circle 6 1  2  3  4  5  6  5. I am less likely to attend a UBC event that interests me if I have to pay  1  2  3  4  5  6  6. I would attend a Move UBC event that costs under $10 1  2  3  4  5  6  7. I live within 20 minutes of the UBC campus  1  2  3  4  5  6  8. The types of events Move UBC offers interest me 1  2  3  4  5  6   9. I feel that I am physically competent to participate successfully in health and wellness programs 1  2  3  4  5  6  10. I felt as though my expectations for the Move UBC program were met 1  2  3  4  5  6  11. I would attend another Move UBC event based on my experience 1  2  3  4  5  6  12. I felt as though the instructor was engaging and got me excited to attend another event 1  2  3  4  5  6  13. The Move UBC event was safe and inclusive to all environments 1  2  3  4  5  6   14. I did not feel that the Move UBC event was adapted to suit all levels of physical ability  1  2  3  4  5  6  15. The instructor provided modifications for participants for all ability levels 1  2  3  4  5  6  16. I felt as though the adaptations the instructor made changed the overall outcome of the Move UBC event 1  2  3  4  5  6  17. I believe Move UBC improves the health and wellness of students, staff, and community members  1  2  3  4  5  6  18. I spent more time exercising today because of this Move UBC event 1  2  3  4  5  6  19. I commit to exercising regularly, even when my schedule gets busy  1  2  3  4  5  6  20. I wish events similar to Move UBC existed year round because it helped me reduce sedentary behaviours 1  2  3  4  5  6     Appendix B   KIN 464: Health Promotion and Physical Activity Participant Consent Form   Principal Investigator:  Negin Riazi (PhD Candidate, School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Education)   The purpose of the class project: To gather knowledge and expertise from community members on topics related to physical activity, recreation, and health promotion.   Study Procedures: With your permission, we are asking you to participate in a survey. With the information gathered, students will critically examine how different individuals understand or engage in health promoting activities or health promotion initiatives.  Project outcomes: The information gathered from survey questions will be part of a written report for the class project. The written report will be shared with the community partners involved with the project. Summaries of findings will also be posted on the following websites. No personal information/information that could identify participants will be included in these reports.  UBC SEEDS Program Library: https://sustain.ubc.ca/courses-degrees/alternative-credit-options/seeds-sustainability-program/seeds-sustainability-library  Potential benefits of class project: There are no explicit benefits to you by taking part in this class project. However, the survey will provide you with the opportunity to voice your opinion on your experiences with health promoting activities or initiatives in a broad sense and will provide the students with an opportunity to learn from your experiences.   Confidentiality: Maintaining the confidentiality of the participants involved in an interview is paramount, and no names will be asked for.   At the completion of the course, all data (i.e. notes) and signed consent forms will be kept in a locked filing cabinet in Negin Riazi’s office in the Population Physical Activity Lab (2259 Lower Mall) at the University of British Columbia. All data and consent forms will be destroyed 1 year after completion of the course. Risks: The risks associated with participating in this research are minimal. There are no known physical, economic, or social risks associated with participation in this study. Although there is a schedule of questions, the person you are surveying is free to share what they would like,  including refusing to answer specific questions. You should know that your participation is completely voluntary and you are free to withdraw from the survey and there will not be negative impacts related to your withdrawal. If you withdraw from the study, all of the information you have shared up until that point will be destroyed.   Contact for information about the study: If you have any questions about this class project, you can contact Negin Riazi by phone at 604-822-5288 or by email at negin.riazi@ubc.ca  Research ethics complaints:  If you have any concerns or complaints about your rights as a research participant and/or your experiences while participating in this study, contact the Research Participant Complaint Line in the UBC Office of Research Ethics at 604-822-8598 or e-mail RSIL@ors.ubc.ca . or call toll free 1-877-822-8598.    Consent: Your participation in this study is entirely voluntary and you may refuse to participate or withdraw from the study at any time.  Your signature below indicates that you have received a copy of this consent form for your own records. Your signature indicates that you consent to participate in this study.   Subject signature____________________________________________________    Date: ____________________________________________________   Appendix C      Appendix D                                            Appendix E          Lindsey Ackerman1, Heather Varady1, Maya Willms2, Eunice Wong21 Department of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; ² Department of Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaNegin Riazi, Thalia Otamendi, Matthew Fagan, The Move UBC Program, the University of British ColumbiaA C K N O W L E D G E M E N T SR E S U LT SR E F E R E N C E SBeck, A. J., Hirth, R. A., Jenkins, K. R., Sleeman, K. K., & Zhang, W. (2016). Factors associated with participation in a university worksite wellness program. American Journal of Preventive Medicine,  51(1)Morgan, C., Sibthorp, J., & Browne, L. P. (2016). Moving beyond outcomes: An applied example of implementation evaluation in a youth recreation program. Journal of Park and Recreation Administration, 34(4), 66-81. Faculty of Education (2018). Move UBC. Retrieved from http://educ.ubc.ca/move-ubc/UBC Wellbeing (n.d.). UBC wellbeing challenge 2019. Retrieved from wellbeing.ubc.caD I S C U S S I O NConclusionsUBC students had an overall positive experience participating in the Move UBC campaign which was reflected in participant responsiveness, quality, and fidelity. Participants enjoyed the locations, times and level of engagement the instructors provided. Program adaptation scored the lowest of the four factors tested. Some participants felt the events were not suitable for all levels of physical ability and the instructors did not accommodate for this variability through program adaptations. Move UBC participants felt they were more active because of the event they attended, however we found that Move UBC events targeted an already active population. RecommendationsMOVE UBC POST-CAMPAIGN EVALUATION73%12%15%Participant ResponsivenessPositiveNegativeNeutralMove UBC should target a less active population through leisure events and educational advertising Move UBC should increase inclusivity for all ability levels through program adaptationsMove UBC should continue to develop a similar event schedule (times and locations)• The UBC post-campaign evaluation collected data from 10 UBC students who have partaken in at least one Move UBC event• The evaluation was an online survey with 20 questions directed at evaluating the following measures:M E T H O D S  &  M AT E R I A L SParticipant Responsiveness• Measuring participant dependent components• Examination of the participants’ engagement during the program• Level of participation in Move UBC events• Time, socioeconomic factors, and interestProgram Quality • The quality of a recreation program refers to the delivery of the program • Staff behaviours • Staff-participant interactions• Whether the participants’ expectation of program quality were metProgram Adaptation • Whether the instructor adapted the program to suit participant needs.• Did program adaptation occur during the session?• Were the suggested adaptations helpful?Program Fidelity• Correlation between intended program outcomes and actual program outcomes• Was the Move UBC program successful in reducing sedentary behaviour?• Did it provide an opportunity for participants to increase their daily physical activity? I N T R O D U C T I O NMove UBC was created to break up sedentary time through PA. The purpose of the UBC post-campaign evaluation is to develop a tool that can evaluate the effectiveness of the Move UBC program and assess involvement of UBC students. Our goal was to develop an evaluation tool that is universal for all program members to use in future Move UBC years. Move UBC is a health initiative program that promotes campus wide health with activities targeted at reducing sedentary behaviour and chances to participate in physical activity (PA). Participant Responsiveness: Most students agreed the events were scheduled at convenient times (Question 2) and they were easily accessible to all locations for community members. 90% of participants said they would be less likely to attend an event if they had to pay.77%23%Program QualityPositiveNeutral37%30%33%AdaptationPositiveNegativeNeutral70%7%23%Program FidelityPositiveNegativeNeutral80% of Participants already exercise regularly***Program Quality: 90% of participants had a positive response that Move UBC met their expectations (Question 10) and majority of students agreed that they would attend another event based on their experience. On average, participants were excited to attend another event due to the level of engagement produced by the instructor.Adaptation: Only 40% of participants had a positive response to the statement that the event(s) they had attended were well adapted to suit all levels of ability (Question 14). Participants did feel that instructors provided modifications for the activities; however, responses were primarily “somewhat agree” or “neutral”.Program Fidelity: 70% of participants believed the events improved the health and wellness of students, staff, and community members. 80% of students said they spent more time exercising due to the events

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