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Evaluation of Staff and Departmental Partnerships of MoveUBC Victoria, Enzo; Liang, Henry; Chan, Jamie; Gaspar, Sabrina; Dean, Sumayya 2019-04-02

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report         Evaluation of Staff and Departmental Partnerships of MoveUBC Enzo Victoria, Henry Liang, Jamie Chan, Sabrina Gaspar, Sumayya Dean University of British Columbia KIN 464 Themes: Health, Wellbeing April 2, 2019        Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.   Executive Summary  The University of British Columbia (UBC) runs MoveUBC, an annual month-long campaign, through the month of February to promote physical activity and healthy lifestyles for students, faculty, and residents on and near campus. Numerous events are held on the UBC campus during the campaign, with majority of these events being created and run by organizational partners. MoveUBC relies greatly on these partners to host exciting and engaging events throughout the month, and the future growth of MoveUBC largely depends on partnership contributions and participation. Because of this, it is important to make sure all of MoveUBC’s partners have a positive experience, and this is why we have collected information on and assessed the experiences of past and present MoveUBC staff and departmental partners.  Interviews were conducted with representatives from three past and present MoveUBC partners, all of which are a part of a branch of UBC Recreation. These partners included; the UBC Aquatics Centre, UBC Recreations Operations, and UBC Tennis Centre. Our semi-structured interviews were conducted in-person and online via email, and questions were asked about the execution of each partner’s events, their support from MoveUBC organizers, and their goals regarding their participation in the campaign. Data collected from these interviews were used to guide MoveUBC in their partnership efforts by highlighting what MoveUBC is doing right, and which areas partners would like to see changes in. Suggestions will be taken into consideration in order to grow the MoveUBC campaign in the upcoming years, and create strong, positive, and successful relationships with all partners in the future.  Common themes reported from the interviews included the definition of health, physical activity, and actively engaging its participants in any form of movement.  Furthermore, the data collected across all interviews showed a common goal of increasing inclusivity in UBC; whether it be students, staff and faculty population, the goal was to increase engagement across all populations. Overall, MoveUBC and the UBC Recreation department had a clear agreement of what is to be expected and the resources provided in order to allow for an effective relationship. A recommendation for improvement of the campaign was that there should be a post-event detailed statistics report supplied to each partner as a way to gauge the success and to act as an indicator for whether or not to continue for future years. Efforts here can be redistributed to target a “lacking” component and make it stronger for next year. Another recommendation for this partnership is to have clear communication across all levels of staff involved in case any messages get miscommunicated or lost, particularly the student staff and volunteers. To fix this, an orientation event specifically for this staff demographic could be held, that way all levels of staff are on the right page by the time the campaign starts. The last recommendation for MoveUBC was expansion of the campaign. A director from UBC Aquatics Centre suggested a partnership with Wesbrook Village Community Centre due to its growing population. Regardless of whether or not the residents at Wesbrook Village are students or staff, the goals of MoveUBC and UBC Recreation partners are the same in being easily accessible to all participants in getting them physically engaged with their health.          Final Report: Staff and Departmental Partnerships with MoveUBC  Introduction and Literature Review  MoveUBC is a month-long, annual health and fitness campaign targeted at University of British Columbia (UBC) students, faculty, and residential community. The intent of this campaign is to decrease sedentary behaviour and increase daily physical activity, which can ultimately help decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, anxiety, and some cancers in the population (“Move UBC”, 2019). Overall participation and digital engagement of the campaign both increased greatly from 2017 to 2018 as more contributing partners and non-recreation events and activities were included (Move UBC [PDF File], 2019). MoveUBC encourages people of UBC to incorporate more movement into their day through fun events held each day throughout the month of February. Such events include guided walks around campus, drop-in brain and body fitness classes, drop-in badminton and volleyball, waltz and ballroom dance classes, and nutrition workshops (“Move UBC”, 2019). In addition to this wide variety of events, the Move U Crew, a group of UBC students committed to enhancing physical activity on campus, are enthusiastically engaging students, staff, and faculty in and out of class by leading movement breaks and guided walks throughout the month.  Our research was focused on obtaining feedback from MoveUBC’s past staff and departmental partners as a method to evaluate the interest of organizations to participate in the campaign in the following years. We conducted interviews with past MoveUBC partners to gain a better understanding of their experiences and to collect recommendations to improve the partnership experience and encourage additional potential organizers to get involved. MoveUBC relies greatly on their partners to run wide assortments of events in order to engage people of all ages and interests. Recommendations for MoveUBC will be a large part of our research as feedback from past partners about their experiences and observations is valuable information that can be used to assess and enhance the MoveUBC experience.  The reasoning for our research is to evaluate and explore gaps in the relationship between partners and MoveUBC organizers. Evaluating this relationship and the needs of each party in the relationship allows for more efficient collaboration and ultimately, more variation in perspectives contributing to the campaign. Including organizations with different but parallel values and definitions of health and wellness would add variety in the events and activities MoveUBC would offer, so there would be a higher chance of individuals finding a method of exercise they actually enjoy. A common problem for people who are looking to increase physical activity in their daily life is failing to adhere to a fitness routine they enjoy (Loprinzi & Beets, 2014). The obesity trends of North Americans are steadily increasing with a dire need for a lifestyle intervention. 64% of Americans who received healthcare were not encouraged to increase exercise levels, and 45% of these Americans lived sedentary lifestyles (Loprinzi & Beets, 2014), demonstrating the need to increase awareness of the benefits of exercise. Barriers to physical activity include lack of time, knowledge, and confidence, which is why MoveUBC is an important tool to help people become more active as a collective (Loprinzi & Beets, 2014). Intervention and promotion of physical activity is needed to hit this niche; Canadians can take this similar data and apply it to their programs. Furthermore, data collected from health enhancing activity programs has provided support that sports programming can help influence   people to get active (Ooms et al., 2018). The information gathered from MoveUBC can become precedent cases to set a foundation for a high functioning program.   The VERB campaign, run by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention of the United States, was active from 2002 and 2006 and was aimed at increasing physical activity levels and encouraging play in “tweens”, which are children aged nine to 13 (Wong et al., 2004). An article by Bretthauer-Mueller et al. (2008) thoroughly explains the VERB campaign’s partnering process and subsequent success with their target audience, so this article will be used to guide us in our efforts to create valuable interview themes and questions. Although the VERB campaign paid for national advertising, their partnerships with numerous national and community partners were integral to their success (Bretthauer-Mueller et al., 2008). The VERB campaign created a three-pronged strategy for their partners to promote physical activity, which involved linking their brand to physical activity, reframing the idea of physical activity, and driving the audience to places, programs, and opportunities for physical activity (Bretthauer-Mueller et al., 2008). Marketing training and promotion resources were provided by the VERB campaign leaders so that all the partners were on the same page in terms of goals, marketing style, and methodology (Bretthauer-Mueller et al., 2008). It is advised by Bretthauer-Mueller et al. (2008) to recruit partners from a spectrum of backgrounds in order to reach all corners of the community, which is why we will be interviewing MoveUBC partners of different physical activity backgrounds. Ideal partners possessed four main characteristics, which include an existing community network that enables access to physical activity opportunities, a reliable leader within each organization, an understanding of marketing, and each partner’s own funding to back up their efforts (Bretthauer-Mueller et al., 2008). Bretthauer-Mueller et al. (2008) notes that it can be difficult to find partners who possess all four characteristics, so MoveUBC’s offer to fund each partner up to $300 is very helpful. Using the aforementioned characteristics to find ideal partners, as well as utilizing some of the VERB campaign strategies with partners, creates the potential to develop long-lasting and effective partnerships for MoveUBC, ultimately enhancing the MoveUBC campaign altogether. Finding partners that have an existing community network, a reliable leader, and an understanding of marketing would be ideal for this campaign. Furthermore, debriefing the partners on the expectations of the campaign and providing these partners with advertising resources may help partners navigate their MoveUBC initiatives. For this reason, questions in our interview will be addressing the partners’ experiences with MoveUBC in terms of resources provided to them, marketing help, leadership support, and additional factors, so we may get an idea of what MoveUBC can do to further support its partners.  We have examined other physical activity campaigns such as MoveU, Active Ichabod, and Project Impact developed by the University of Toronto, Washburn University, and the University of Western Ontario, respectively. All campaigns stressed the need for physical activity among university students as a means of improving overall health and wellness. Opportunities to get active were implemented through events and physical activity classes at all universities, in addition to using marketing material to educate students on the benefits of staying physically active. The MoveU campaign at the University of Toronto used questionnaires to assess the impact and awareness of the campaign, and it was discovered that only 36% of students on campus were aware of the program’s existence (Iancovich, 2015). Social media was the most effective form of advertising, but the campaign seemed flat as there was not as much collaboration between groups on different levels as there could have been (Iancovich, 2015). In a   paper that reviewed the World Health Organization’s approaches for developing international public health, Chodzko-Zajko and Schwingel (2009) identified that multi-sectional collaboration was required for effective policy making, which is a key component in generating awareness and promoting a healthy active lifestyle. As we develop our own assessment tools, we will take into consideration that data we collect from the partners is not an individual factor in the perceived success of their programs, but a single piece in a collaborative effort to increasing physical literacy and overall wellness in students. Methods MoveUBC will absolutely need staff and departmental partners in following years, so exploring whether or not past partners have had a positive experience with MoveUBC is imperative. We conducted interviews with and collected data from three partners from the UBC Recreation department. These partners included a UBC Aquatics Centre director, a UBC Recreations Operations Coordinator, and a UBC Tennis Center Operations Coordinator. With representatives from UBC Recreation as our primary research participants, we hoped to gain a cohesive opinion on their collaborations with MoveUBC organizers, as they worked closely alongside them prior to and throughout the execution of the campaign. We first obtained a list of organization representatives and their contact information from the director of MoveUBC. We then reached out to organization representatives via email to ask for their participation in our study, and once representatives agreed to participate, we conducted the interviews. Our group conducted two in-person interviews and one emailed questionnaire to collect our detail-rich qualitative data. In-person interviews were conducted in quiet, secluded areas so voice recordings could be taken. From these recordings, each interview was fully transcribed.  Each interviewee signed a consent form, which informed them that their identity will be anonymous in our data. The emailed questionnaire was completed by sending our interview questions directly to the organization representative’s email, and detailed answers to our questions were sent back through email as well.  We wanted to collect data that would enlighten us on UBC Recreation’s coordination and execution of their events for MoveUBC, how much support they had from MoveUBC organizers, and their goals regarding their involvement in the campaign. To collect this data, we asked 12 interview questions regarding each partner’s awareness and opinions of MoveUBC, their definitions of health and physical activity, their values and expectations when it comes to forming partnerships with other organizations, and their relationship with MoveUBC organizers. In regards to their relationship with MoveUBC organizers, we would like to further understand if the partners required more help and resources in the form of software, time flexibility, and other methods of support from MoveUBC. We also asked them to compare and contrast their opinions and experiences regarding the execution of this year’s campaign and of previous years. The in-person interviews allowed for probing during the interviews, which provided additional context. Refer to the appendix D for a list of the interview questions. All interviews were transcribed, which allowed us to easily identify common themes in the data. Once the thematic analysis was completed, we assessed patterns and trends within each individual theme and across all themes.  Through Braun and Clarke’s literature of thematic analysis, it is described as a method of identifying, analysing, and reporting patterns within data (Braun and Clarke, 2006). We used the qualitative analytic methods because these method benefits could aid us with our research. One   of the mentioned benefits includes the flexibility of the analysis which can be divided into two positions, one of them being a qualitative analysis where there are those tied to, or stemming from, a particular theoretical or epistemological position (Braun and Clarke, 2006). Secondly, the other benefit and method includes methods that are independent of theory and can be applied across many different approaches. Additionally, because of the flexibility of using the thematic analysis, our group was able to identify qualitative data and through the three interviews discover a pattern (themes) between partners.   Results/Findings  From the three interviews we had with different facets of UBC Recreation, we gathered information pertaining to their perspectives on health, physical education, what factors contributed to MoveUBC’s campaign this year and past years, and aspects of the campaign that could be improved or added to increase its success. Each interview can be referred to below in appendices A-C. Because MoveUBC is a campaign that is structured around achieving optimal health through positive health behaviors, such as exercise and a clean diet, we thought it would be appropriate to ask each interviewee what their definitions of “physical activity” and “good health” were and what those terms meant to their organization. The UBC Aquatics Center Director and the UBC Recreations Operations Coordinator answered this question similarly by mentioning the importance of getting up and moving around as a method of physical activity, while the UBC Tennis Centre Director answered this question by acknowledging what physical activity means in relation to UBC Recreation as a structural component. The UBC Aquatics Center Director talked about methods of physical engagement pertaining to their facility, including stretching, therapeutic needs, or family fun focus. The UBC Recreation Operations Coordinator, in a similar fashion, included activities exclusive to their facilities including participation in intramural leagues and tournaments, and working out at the gym. The director at the UBC Tennis Centre spoke about the promotion aspect of physical activity, as they strive for “active engagement, education, and research” and “want to reduce barriers and highlight positive impacts of well-being, which includes physical activity”. Meanwhile, all three interviewees agreed the definition of “good health” goes beyond just physical health by acknowledging the important of mental wellbeing as well. To continue about the shared perspectives between the three interviewees, they also all agreed upon inclusivity and participant experience as being essential values to their organization. Both the UBC Recreation Operations Coordinator and the UBC Aquatic Centre Director talked about their respective facilities and how they wanted them to be as open to the UBC student population as possible by offering wide varieties of activities. The UBC Tennis Centre Director emphasized the significance of programming and building community as a way of upholding their value of inclusivity.       UBC Aquatics Centre Director UBC Recreation Operations Coordinator UBC Tennis Centre Director What does physical activity mean to your organization? Any kind of movement Simply moving A pillar of UBC Recreation What is your definition of good health? Someone who is happy with their current mental and physical wellbeing To be active and eat healthily Being physically, mentally, and spiritually healthy What values are important to your organization? Seeing the UBC population engage in any kind of recreation, whether it be leisure or competition Making sure everyone is able to participate in the physical activities they want  Participant experience, wellbeing, inclusivity, and sustainability. Figure 1: Summary of answers to interviews # 1, 2, and 5.  While conducting these interviews, we noted that 2 out of 3 interviewees’ organizations were involved in MoveUBC this year only. One of the interviewees’ answers for this question was unavailable at the time. This is an interesting note since this shows a new partnership that was formed with the UBC Aquatics Centre, UBC Recreation Operations and the UBC Tennis Centre. Despite this newly formed partnership, the UBC Recreation partners were content with the promotional material and level of organization MoveUBC put together months before the month-long campaign. In terms of partnerships, MoveUBC has met the partners’ expectations in ensuring there are passionate people involved that can drive this movement. We found out through the interviews that MoveUBC contacted their partners months in advance to provide details of how the events would work and if the partners were interested in collaboration. Both parties’ had expectations to ensure the events were executed well and prepared for key dates in the timeline. Overall, these partnerships with MoveUBC were successful in engaging student and faculty population in physical activity over the course of a month.    UBC Aquatics Centre Director UBC Recreation Operations Coordinator UBC Tennis Centre Director Has your organization been a partner of MoveUBC before? If yes, why did you choose to  First year in participating with MoveUBC  Goal was to engage First year in participating with MoveUBC  Values of MoveUBC N/A   become a partner again?/If no, why haven’t you chosen to become a partner? (depending on whether or not they have participated before, it would be just one or the other “if yes” or “if no”, not both). and support students with the community and staff faculty population in movement  matched with UBC Recreation and how they could reach their goals together When partnering with other organizations, what do you look for in that partnership/what are your expectations?  Supporting all the different levels that are interacted/contacted to execute the plan Being well prepared with a plan   Making sure both parties’ expectations are met for key dates Having passionate staff and volunteer to execute the events  Both parties’ expectations should be on the same page Do you think MoveUBC has improved in terms of preparation, organization, and communication from past years? If yes, how so? If no, how would you have hoped the campaign would have improved? E.g., was it a straightforward process? First year in participating but overall, this year was executed well  Student and staff communication was no problem First year in participating but commented on giving more time to student staff/volunteers to adjust - orientation event may help Yes, MoveUBC has provided an informative packet of details and instructions months prior to the events Figure 2: Summary of answers to interviews #4, 6, and 7.  Common themes across all interviews Differences across all interviews 1. Health is defined on multiple aspects and in order to reach optimal status of health, one should actively work to engage all aspects (physical, mental, spiritual) into their lifestyle. 2. Accessibility into the interviewee’s 1. Recommendations for MoveUBC had a couple of suggestions: to provide the option of post-event feedback to the general public to improve event execution for next year, more promotional activities/pamphlets to   departments was readily available for those who wanted to engage in physical activity. It ranges from students to staff to even strangers on campus who wanted to get physically active/try something new.  3. There is a common goal across the organizers to increase UBC rec events/physical activity engagement across campus in student, staff and faculty population.  4. Having a clear idea of what is to be expected from MoveUBC organizers and UBC rec representatives allows for an effective relationship to excel in event execution.  5. Event partners thoroughly enjoyed the execution of MoveUBC’s collaboration , upheld each partner’s expectations and agreed to continue for next year.  get the word out, and to partner with Wesbrook Village Community Centre to increase the scope of participants for next year.  2. Each department had other different side goals - UBC Recreation wanted to work more on campus groups and the wellness centre, UBC aquatics centre wanted to get people into the facility to check out the new equipment and amenities and the tennis centre wanted to promote the sport in the UBC community.  Figure 3: A table to compare and contrast the qualitative data collected.   Discussion  This project gave us insight about the partnerships and interactions that the different branches of UBC Recreation have with MoveUBC. The interviews demonstrated that these partners’ MoveUBC events were executed efficiently and smoothly with minimal issues. Since this was community based research, it illustrated the need and passion to get participants actively engaged in any form of exercise/movement. Getting direct feedback from one of the main organizations that contribute to MoveUBC has provided us with knowledge that can be used to further improve and increase engagement in a healthy lifestyle among UBC student, staff, and faculty.  One prevalent theme from our interviews was the importance of achieving inclusivity in physical activity. Participant experience is one of the most important components when it comes to running events through UBC Recreation, which is an organization that strives to “[keep activities] as open as possible” and to “[accommodate] towards students or public’s needs”, as told by the operations coordinator. It is important to acknowledge the barriers that people can be faced with when trying to live a healthy lifestyle, especially when planning for such a campaign like MoveUBC, because such a lifestyle should not be a privilege. Using an intersectional lense allows one to view and acknowledge the various factors that may influence an individual’s ability to live a healthy lifestyle. Being inclusive means to be aware of barriers people may have when wanting to be physically active, which may include lack of knowledge, lack of physical literacy, or limited physical and cognitive capacities. It is important for organizations like UBC   Recreation and MoveUBC to be able to work through those barriers in order for people of all kinds to be included. The UBC Aquatics Center does their part by offering a variety of fitness classes, including therapy classes, and performance classes for both younger and older adults, in addition to their swimming lessons for children (“Aqua Fitness Classes, 2019). Additionally, the Student Recreation Centre offers leisurely activities such as wheelchair basketball, which can be enjoyed by people with varying physical abilities and fitness literacy.  MoveUBC and UBC Recreation have been a collaborative unit since the campaign started. One of the main reasons why the two organizations work so well together is because of their shared values, which includes inclusivity and living a healthy lifestyle. This commonality was another prevalent theme among our interviews. MoveUBC’s purpose is to increase fitness levels in the UBC student, staff, and faculty population by introducing them to enjoyable ways to get active and educating them on how to maintain such a lifestyle. UBC Recreation facilitated this goal by not only offering material resources to the campaign, but also with their inherent belief that being physically active in any capacity is beneficial for physical and mental health. The events that took place during this year’s campaign ranged from drop-in skating to ballroom dance lessons to a nutrition workshop to Afro-Caribbean Zumba. UBC Recreation offered several of their facilities, including the Student Recreation Centre and the Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Arena, to house some of MoveUBC’s events. With such a wide variety of activities taking place over the whole month of February, it allowed for many options for the UBC population to engage in. This opportunity provided for us highlighted the learning environment and learning from our community partners in what they need to execute a month long event while keeping in line with their goals.  A third common theme among our interviews was having high expectations from MoveUBC regarding their organization and communication. According to all three UBC Recreation representatives, those expectations were met this year. The operations coordinator was particularly impressed with the MoveUBC director of 2019, providing examples of their efficient communication and organization skills:   “Usually [the MoveUBC director] was the main contact.. So say we wanted to do something with Wellbeing [committee], we’d be like ‘hey we want to offer like a discounted rate for yoga classes for people that go to the wellness center” so then we’d talk to [the MoveUBC director’ who would then in turn coordinate with them”. “Thankfully with [the MoveUBC director] and all the previous positions or people who have been in that position … [they] usually have their calendar pretty set beginning of the year so we are well-aware and have a lot of time to set up everything for them”.  According to Bretthauer-Mueller et al., 2008, one main characteristic possessed by an ideal partners is being reliable. Judging from the answers provided by the interviewees regarding their collaboration with the MoveUBC director, the director could be considered an ideal partner. The UBC Recreation Operations Coordinator said that they could “usually just phone [the MoveUBC director] to figure out what was going on” in situations where they found themselves stuck, such as when a piece of equipment has been misplaced. Additionally, the UBC Aquatics Centre Director said they had a “really good relationship with [the MoveUBC director]” and that the partner process was “so simple”.  This demonstrates the MoveUBC director’s reliability as a leader as they were there to support help when needed.    The primary limitation in our study was the lack of study participants, as it was difficult to find representatives who were interested in participating and had time to participate at this time of the year. Our initial goal was to have five-to-six interviewees, but majority of the organizations we reached out to either declined to participate, or had their hands full with events, spring break camps, and other priorities. There were also instances where the team leaders and project managers that were working directly with MoveUBC in the past, were no longer a part of the organizations, therefore the organizations had no one to comment on their experiences. Additionally, a handful of the representatives we reached out to were on vacation and would not be able to participate until a later date. We provided organizational partners with interview alternatives such as Skype interviews and phone interviews, but responses were still limited. We managed to conduct interviews with three organizations with the help of the director of MoveUBC, and although valuable data was collected, having a larger sample size would have enhanced our study even more.  A second limitation was having to switch our project scope part-way through our execution. We started the project with wanting to recruit current partners of MoveUBC to learn about their contributions to the campaign and their opinions on their collaborative partnership with MoveUBC organizers. We later switched to recruiting past partners of MoveUBC and partners who have never contributed to the campaign instead, as it was suggested to us that it would be more helpful for the campaign organizers to understand why organizations may have decided to stop contributing to MoveUBC or to not contribute at all. This limitation is closely associated with the first limitation, as we struggled to find partners who we could get into contact with and who actually had experience working with MoveUBC in the past due to constant employee turnover. Due to this occurrence, we were limited in both time and resources to gather sufficient data.  The final limitation had to do with human error. Due to the subjective nature of the interview process, human error may play a factor in the types of follow up questions asked or not asked and if the interviewer was able to ask all of the questions. In the instance of this project it was the later, where an interviewer was not able to ask the interviewee the complete list of questions as designated by the group. As with the other limitations this leads to a lack of sufficient data.    Recommendations for Client  Two out of three of the partners we interviewed explicitly agreed to continue being a partner with MoveUBC for next year. While the third partner did not explicitly agree, it seems they intended on joining again in future campaigns judging from the rest of their interview content. For recommendations, the representative of UBC Recreations Operations believed that the effective communication and organization with MoveUBC helped their contribution to the campaign run smoothly, indicating that those components must be prioritized in partnerships in future campaigns. One suggestion from UBC Recreation’s Operations Coordinator to make expectations of their contributions more clear is to provide them with detailed statistics of the event post-execution. Rather than simply notifying them of whether or not their event was successful, it would be more insightful for the operations staff to know specifically what components of their contribution worked well so they know where to focus their energy in future   campaigns.  While communication between partners in MoveUBC seemed to be efficient, communication between student volunteers and UBC Recreation staff for MoveUBC events could be improved, as mentioned by the UBC Recreations Operations Coordinator. To improve this, an orientation event just for student volunteers could be implemented to help them become more familiarized and comfortable with the facilities and staff before the events take place, rather than having them experience learning curves during the execution of the events. Moreover, since the partners we interviewed generally had positive experiences working with MoveUBC, the next step would be expansion of the campaign. The UBC Aquatics Centre director suggested teaming up with the Wesbrook Village Community Centre to reach the neighbouring population. Those residing in Wesbrook Village may not necessarily all be UBC students and staff but the goal of MoveUBC and the UBC recreation partners align in terms of getting participants physically active and engaged, which would make this expansion beneficial.                                    Appendix A Sabrina’s Interview  Sabrina (S): Okay, do you wanna just start off by talking about what you do here at UBC rec?  Interviewee (I): Yeah definitely. So, I am the operations coordinator. So (censor) and I are the two that oversee all the operations staff. So the desk staff, essentially. Um, and then outside of that, anything that has to do with bookings in the facilities goes through us.. the drop-in sports, and the fitness memberships also run through our department as well. So that’s sort of the three main things that we do. And outside of that we still coordinate with like varsity, TSC, things like that to coordinate the studio space or help them with getting equipment. But the main thing is bookings, fitness memberships, and the front desk staff.  S: Okay. Cool. And so kind of – I’m going to start with more general questions. So what does physical activity mean for UBC rec?  I: In like a broad term?   S: Yeah like how would you define physical activity?  I guess in our eyes it would be the act of moving, really. Depending on the program we’re applying it towards, it could be just getting people walking around campus. So.. through MoveUBC things like that, just, initiatives of getting standing desks. It could be as simple as that. Or having people come in to do tournaments, intramural leagues, going to the gym. So… pretty broad term. Essentially the base value– getting people active and moving.  S: Active and moving, cool. And kind of on a similar scope, how would you define health and good health?  I: Good health.. tough to say. ‘Cause it can be really individualized on that as well. So for good health, I think as a general rule it would be being active and eating healthy, at least within what your body dictates as being healthy. ‘Cause some people obviously can eat less on a diet and still be okay. Some people can- have to be more cautious with what they’re eating to remain in that sort of healthy sphere of being active and being able to be active and not have like a negative effect, if they’re say, walking around campus or just doing something that is required for their daily life.   S: Yeah that’s true.  I: Yeah, its really individualized on that end. So, it could be if someone is in a wheelchair or something like that. It can definitely be different compared to someone else. So, for them it’d just like be like offering them the schedule for when we do wheelchair basketball or seeing if there’s movements on campus that have people going through on walks or strolls around the area. So, was there like a certain group of people that you’re looking at? Or just everyone in general?    S: Umm, it was more of like everyone in general. Like general according to everyone. Um, okay, so next I want to ask what values are important to your organization, so UBC rec?  I: What values?  S: Yeah.  I: One of the top ones that we have is definitely inclusivity. So, the big thing that we try to do is to make sure that everyone is able to participate and anything that they would like to participate in. And keeping things as open as possible. And accommodating towards students or public’s needs towards it. So that would definitely be the top value for us.   S: Okay. Cool. Um, when you, when UBC rec works with other organizations, either on campus or off, what do you guys look for when you, like, form that partnership or collaboration? What are your expectations?  I: Are you thinking in terms of sponsorships?  S: Yeah, like..  I: For sponsorship, I’m not quite sure honestly. Typically, anything that has to do with like a large partnership or a sponsor goes through the staff that worked at the arena. So usually by the time they’re working with us, they’ve already gone through that end and it’s just sort of “here is one of our new partners”. This is what we have agreed upon so it’s like– say there’s a group on campus that we are now partnered with. So, it’s like “oh okay so they get a discount on maybe gym bookings or with the AMS”. We have set times where the different clubs can come in and those times will always be set aside for AMS to be available to book. So it’s usually the tail-end that comes to us so everything is already set in place. Just mostly in regards to any sort of like large scale sponsorships or deals with companies. Typically, what we have if it’s a public group that’s coming in, it's usually they’re wanting to rent a gym space or they’re wanting specific things from us, which we can offer. Less on the long-term deals side.   S: Okay. So, it sounds like they– because of what you guys do, they kind of just utilize the resources you guys, like, offer.  I: Yeah. Is there like a certain scenario you’re looking more towards?  S: Yeah, since this is more geared towards MoveUBC, like did you have any expectations working with that campaign?   I: Uh, not really any expectations. Typically, with MoveUBC, the physical activity coordinator that’s here, which was Liz, but she’s now moved to Switzerland.  S: Oh wow.    I: So there’s always been that position that’s worked in this office before. Um, it’s now going to be (censor) that’s taking over. Not quite sure when that’s happening. But typically they work alongside us but not like fully alongside us. It would be whenever those campaigns or movements coming out– in Liz’s case she would come to us a few months early and then coordinate if there’s something that desk staff have to do. Maybe have her come to the meeting or she would prepare slides for us. But typically if there’s anything MoveUBC related, we would accommodate fully since it’s something important or coincides with a lot of our beliefs. So, the most recent campaign, during that reading week, we offered free gym access to staff, the faculty, if they’re needing gym space or studio space that’s when we help coordinate all that with them. So it’s, in terms of that, usually all we’re doing is either offering support from staff in terms of being like an information post. Like the passports were delivered and given out from the desk at the SRC. The ARC was one of the locations for one of those words that people were trying to find for their passport. So, things like that. If they come and ask us, then sure. We’ve got plenty help here with that. And then depending on some of the movements that they’re doing throughout the year- so if it’s like a one-off event then that’s when we have to talk with (censor), who’s the fitness program coordinator. So that would be constructional programs, PT, boot camps, things like that.   S: Yeah.  I: So depending on the course, usually [the MoveUBC director] would’ve talked [the fitness coordinator] first to make sure it’s not interfering with any of his programming. Typically, not anything that has to do with like wellness on campus, we go through [the fitness coordinator] first and then they coordinate. ‘Cause a lot of times we offer instructors for them as well.  So its kind of like if they’re wanting to do like a yoga class, usually they’ll come to us, we’ll check the studio schedule and figure out when would work best for them and then we would also loop [the fitness coordinator] in as well. And then “do they need another instructor? Or are they looking for us to host a class for them?”, so sort of a few people all get roped into one situation and then we sort of split off to figure out the best route for them to host their session. Especially with all the wellbeing movements on campus. Usually [the MoveUBC director] was the main contact. So, say we wanted to do something with wellbeing, we’d be like “hey we wanna offer like a discounted rate for yoga classes for people that go into the wellness center” so then we’d talk to [the MoveUBC director] who would then in turn coordinate with them so, we sort out of all of that. Depends on who is needing what it would go either way.  S: Okay. So, it sounds like that there’s a lot of moving parts and moving people to get this really moving efficiently. So, I would– would you say that communication is like one of the number one things, like smooth communication?  I: Oh yeah definitely.  S: Yeah, okay. Yeah. Well that goes like without saying, about good communication  I: Thankfully with [the MoveUBC director] and all the previous positions or people who have   been in that position. It’s always- usually they have their calendar pretty set the beginning of the year. So, we are well-aware and have a lot of time to set up everything for them. For the MoveUBC month we were pretty much set on everything in November.  S: Oh wow  I: So we had a lot of leeway for those where it gives us adequate time to tell our staff everything that’s coming out. So there’s never been any issues on that end. But yeah, its usually well in advanced that everything’s planned out by then. Or at least they know the key dates and then closer to the dates we’re like “okay – this is, we at least know what’s happening” and then we’ll have the final details beforehand. But everything will already be booked in, it’s just we’re not sure what type of yoga class it is or who the instructor is but we know you need the studio from like 5-6 every Tuesday for the month. So, we’ll have it already set aside.   S: Okay. Yeah. That’s good. And have you guys, UBC rec, been a part of MoveU since the very beginning?  I: Umm. I believe so. I’ve only been here for one year. I was a desk staff previously. And (censor) who’s in the position before that, we were– I think that was sort of in the beginning days of them setting everything up. So, we’ve always been involved with it. But I’m not sure the full extent of our involvement. Like I know previously reading week, the free gym access has been done. Not sure how many years it was done, though.  S: Yeah, from what I know, it’s a new campaign. Quite new.   I: This year [the MoveUBC director] definitely added a lot more into the campaigns. So, I think this year is seeing a lot more involvement from us. Unfortunately, previous years, not too familiar with what’s been done. It definitely seems like it’s increased over the last year.   S: Yeah. Okay. Um, so considering that you do work quite closely with the MoveU organizers, do you think anything could be improved? In terms of like preparation, organization, communication? I know you’ve only been here for about a year but is there anything that comes to mind?  I: The only times we’ve ever had like small issues sometimes is student staff that were volunteering for it. There was a few times where there was like miscommunication between where like certain supplies were kept. It was never– there was never any large issues. It was like they would come in looking for– like I know for the.. yoga rave? Whichever one they were using the paint for, one of them they were looking for paint, essentially. And they were quite sure it was.. so there was times like that where we weren’t sure where they were storing the supplies. So, we couldn’t really help them. Could be in like one of the seven different places but only it only happened like a couple times. It was usually like really small things like that. And we would usually just phone [the MoveUBC director] to figure out what was going on. Cuz typically the students would come in a week or two prior event starting. And they would do a practice round of like where everything is, get everything together. So, I think it was just those first few times   when they were starting to do that, there was a few miscommunications on that with like the room numbers where things were kept.   S: Okay. Was that this year’s or like?  I: Yeah back in September or so. All my dates are kind of merging into one to be honest over this last year. We’ve had so many things happen with like the new facility and everything. Umm. But yeah typically it was just small things like that.   S: Small like miscommunications.  I: Or it was like the student staff coming in for the first time, coming to the recreation facilities and like shy to talk to us to find help like where zap straps are, stuff like that. On that end, the most that probably could’ve been done was just to having a really good orientation day for them. Coming in, introducing them to the full-times that they would most likely be talking to. Which they started to do later on. And those were the extent of any sort of issues that we had, communication-wise.  S: Okay. I guess that’s good. It’s not a super big thing.  I: Yeah. Not that significant actually.  S: Nothing drastic yeah. Umm. So, you guys like I said, you work very closely and you provide them with like a lot of resources for MoveU. So, what did you guys want to accomplish by working with this campaign?   I: Umm. I think the biggest thing that we’re wanting to accomplish was just one of our main initiatives over the last two years was increasing inclusivity and like working more with on campus groups and the wellness center. So by working with MoveUBC it coincided with a lot of the movements we’re looking towards. So, one of the more recent ones we were working on was including Asian females that were new to sport into. I forget what programs we were running for them. I think it was a variety that they were doing. There was a lot of things like that that we’re trying to do more so on campus. Getting the groups in that aren’t as accustomed to the fitness center, ‘cause it can be kind of intimidating coming in for your first time just seeing like a ton of lifting platforms and a bunch of huge guys that are just sort of standing there. Um. Especially with the ARC opening. We were branding that more towards people that are new to fitness.   S: Yeah. I could see that.  I: A lot of the movements that were targeting people that were unused to the environment, unused to sort of fitness in general. We definitely wanted to branch out and do more of that. Those were sort of the main, main things we’re trying to achieve this year with them. Thankfully [the MoveUBC director] was looking towards that as well so it helped with a lot of the cross-over we had.    S: That’s good. Yeah. You kind of already answered this. Your target audience sounds like its people who are not so …  I: Our department specifically, our target audience would be students first. Depending on who you talk to within recreation, it’s a little bit different. As a whole, we always prioritize students first. But then let’s say if you go out into the arena, you’re sort of looking at students but then also large outer groups. They do a lot of concerts and stuff out there, so they have a pretty far outreach compared to what we do here. So, we do obviously focus on staff and faculty stuff as well. Public, not so much of a focus currently. Our next year is more pushed towards the staff and faculty involvement. Pretty much across the board all of us, students are first for what we wanna do. Since it is student recreation centre, so we always wanna make sure that student staff are priority here too. We’re wanting to make peoples campus experience best as possible and not just have the gym rented out to public groups 90% of the time.  S: Yeah that’s fair. I don’t know if this question applies because its: what resources were needed for the execution of your events. But it sounds like you guys supply those resources, am I right?  I: Yeah, typically depending on the event– so say it’s a yoga event. Yoga mats and the instructors would typically be through the fitness programs. So that’d be through the fitness program coordinator. We normally, from us, we’re mainly supplying the space that’s being used. But as a whole we’ll supply instructors, we’ll supply equipment for it, spaces, we supply staff if we need it for like helping bring in supplies or coordinating people when they’re coming in. and then any of the smaller items or specialty items usually are brought in by MoveUBC. And then any promo goods would be done by them. But depending on the promo goods, they may order it through the marketing department. So, the marketing department, if they’re doing larger orders usually has the context. Actually, this is a good example. This was one of the bags that [the MoveUBC director] ordered. So we had all the pens like this but had the MoveUBC logo on it. There was the pins, notepads, things like that. So depending on the quantity that theyre ordering, a lot of the time it’ll be through marketing. And then it’s just like an internal transfer. It would need different accounts to pay for it. And then for the smaller goods, so like Fitbits or prizing like that, usually its just order from either supplier or through our sponsorships. So, I know for one of the events, one of our sponsors was lululemon. So they would go and talk with sponsorship teams at the arena and then the arena would then sort of find out who the supplier is and then get in contact that way. So it’s a lot of like, depending on what you’re wanting to order usually you’ll talk to sponsorship and marketing first and then “hey do we actually have..” so it’s sort of the sponsor that could hook us up with something or at least give us a discount on ordering these items.    S: So it sounds like you have all those people that you need just.. there. Yeah.  I: I’m not sure how familiar you are with how many facilities there are but I believe there’s 13 total? Let me see there’s .. one.. two.. three..  S: Like on campus?    I: Yeah, there’s nine main facilities and 13 total locations so depending on the resources that they are needing it could really be like someone from anywhere for that. But the main ones that MoveUBC will be working with will be us and the arena. The arena in terms of sponsorships. But for space-wise, there might be some use with fields. I’m not sure if they did anything on the south end of campus in the fields area. So, between the arena and the football stadium there’s like baseball fields, soccer fields, all of that is run through us as well so depending on the field space, you’re going to one of the different people that figures that out. And I can’t remember if there was anything done down there.  S: I don’t – like I know a lot of the stuff was like in the life building, for sure. And like I think like in Osborne, yeah.   I: That’s another– yeah. And also in the Life building too there’s a whole other like life building ambassador that they would go through for renting that space out. Potentially AMS if they’re wanting to do more than the five, four studios that we have potentially. Cuz the AMS has their own studios as well. There’s also building stress that they might go through as well. Say if they’re wanting to do like an outdoor event, more so than just doing a walk-around, if they like actually have– like let’s say they want to rent the area between the alumni center and the nest, like that outdoor pavilion. There’s like certain people they have to talk to for that. It’s sort of all over the place depending on the event that they wanna do.   S: Oh okay. So, what about like, in terms of resources like, having the support that you need. Like people that are there .. it sounds like you have..?   I: It depends on the event. So usually they will find their own volunteers and she has her own student staff as well when we’re working with her. And then there’s the larger team of MoveUBC as well that are at the other facilities who I – the one downside is that we only ever really worked with [the MoveUBC director]. But she has other partners that are at different facilities that she worked with as well. But the main point of contact that we just went through was just liz for everything. So some of the stuff she might have been asking on behalf of other people. Not quite sure, unfortunately, too much on that end, how much of that was done. but typically there was a few of them that worked with them on projects for MoveUBC, MoveU month. I know there was a few other people that were working on it but we never really met any of them since everything we just did was straight through [the MoveUBC director]. I can’t talk too much on that unfortunately since we’ve only really worked, or at least myself, have worked with [the MoveUBC director]. [The new MoveUBC director] would have a bigger scope of that probably. If you can get him to find time. But he would have the best idea, sort of the whole branch of that entire department. Since for us, at least we only ever worked with [the MoveUBC director]. And then like the student staff that she had coming to help her as well. And  then if she ever needed anything from us typically it would just be with helping set up or if she needed us to have an extra desk staff on to help like coordinate people coming in or come to our meetings to let the staff know of events that are coming out. So they did act as like an information post for the movements, or giving out prizing ‘cause they could store Fitbits and stuff that we could keep in the safe here and then we would just have a list at the desk and then we would be the ones to   help give out prizing so at least it doesn’t go missing.   S: That’s good then that you had enough hands there. Okay, um. Do you have any recommendations for MoveUBC to maybe improve how they work with the people who are involved? Like you and maybe other organizations that they work with?  I: Umm. Not really, honestly. It was really, really easy and straightforward to work with them. ‘Cause essentially all the campaigns that they’re running they knew exactly what they needed for it. And then if there was anything extra they would ask us like “hey is there anything you can donate towards prizing”. They would always come to us months in advance or two so. Honestly no. it was really well organized on [the MoveUBC director’s] behalf so no complaints there.  S: That’s really good. Okay. Kind of the same question but, do you have recommendations for MoveUBC to improve the overall experience for like the target audience? I guess the public? Like how can they better achieve their goals?  I: The downside is we never really saw the stats for their events.   S: Like just UBC Rec? Or everyone?  I: I would assume like, I’m sure [the new MoveUBC director] probably saw the stats from the events. Just to see how the coordination of everything went. We would sort of be told “yeah it was successful” or not but we wouldn’t be seeing like “successful and we were trying to target 500 people but we got 400 people to come in”. We never really saw any of that ‘cause unfortunately it doesn’t really affect us in any way, what those numbers are. It’s more so on their end like okay yeah this event was successful, we wanna do it again next year. And then they’d just tell us “yup this worked well, we would like that spacing next year” and we’d be like “sure”. ‘Cause on our end it’s– we obviously want to see them succeed. But the amount of time it would take for them to sort of explain all of that to us is not really worth it on their part either so for us we’re typically at least, in my position, we’re just sort of helping them get the space and run the event. And then like the marketing department and stuff will help them do all of their promotions and stuff like that. So, I’m sure either [the new MoveUBC Director] or the marketing team would be more in touch with the actual success on a data scale rather than us just being like “great. We know this year was really successful. We had more people than last year”. What the exact number is, I’m not quite sure. But typically yeah we’re just sort of told “yeah it was good” or “it was what we were expecting”.  S: Are you guys usually like– do you guys usually attend the events that are held here? Do you get to see the turnouts?  I: Yeah. So especially with all the events in the studio. I’m here Tuesday to Saturday so I always get to see the ones that are done on the weekends, so we see people there. And we see that there’s always people that are doing classes. I’m just not sure.. like let’s say we’re doing an instructional program. We know that we need at least 8 people or something in this class for it to run efficiently. I’m not sure what the numbers are like for them, for what they’re looking for. Say   if they’re trying to target this one demographic on campus that’s maybe like 5000 people over the entire campaign. Are they just trying to get half of those in or a quarter.. I’m not quite sure on that end what the percentages that they’re looking for. I’ve seen people at their events but if its how many they’re hoping for or more.. Unfortunately on that it’s not really reflected to us too much. It’s more just “here’s what’s coming up. Here’s what we’re wanting to do. It was successful we’re wanting to do it again” or “we’ve done this one campaign now were targeting a new group for next year” kind of thing.  S: Yeah. Like I guess you already said this. Like they wouldn’t really be worth it for them to explain it to you, right? In terms of improving how it would be executed in the future?  I: Yeah. Every so often we get total numbers. Especially if its towards movements that we’re trying to do. But, usually it’s sort of lumped in with everything that has to do with student activity. So we’ll look at like a percentage of student engagement across all programs that were offered. But typically we won’t see an entire breakdown of it ‘cause for us at least we’re just sort of looking at how many students total attended all the events this year, and what percentage of students were a part of UBC Recreation as a whole, and how’s that number looking as a percentage-wise and what can we shoot for next year to see that number go up. Yeah, usually we’re just looking at that main number and then depending on the department they’re looking at, the more specified numbers. But for us in general, for fitness and drop-in sports, we’re just looking at a total number.  S: Yeah. You’re just taking what you need. Umm, this questions a bit– concerning how you guys are involved. Are you guys considering to be a part of MoveUBC in the future?  I: Yeah definitely. It’s really nice working with them. It’s cool to see the different programming that they’re able to bring into the space that either we’re not able to offer or we just haven’t thought of offering. So, its cool to have that different perspective that they’re bringing in and allowing someone else to offer this program within our space is great. It allows us to offer more and have more running within our facility and can’t really say no to that.  S: Yeah. And I feel like without UBC Rec, there would be no MoveUBC.   I: I feel like there would be still something along those lines. It would just be a little more difficult to run since it would probably be more of an AMS initiative. So they would probably do a lot more on the staff/faculty side and try to do more of the movements like “yeah, do your step counters each week” or “do the weekly climb the stairs down to wreck beach”. But I think it would definitely be a lot harder to hit a larger audience of students since they’d be way more limited for space they could use. So, its definitely nice that they’re able to partner with us. We can offer them the gyms and the studios compared to having like a couple studios and a conference space the AMS has.   S: Yeah there’s tons of space you guys have. Umm, I think that is it. Do you have anything you wanna let me know in regards of how you think this campaign went or anything you’re excited about for future MoveU?    I: I think one of the things I’m most excited for is to see sort of what the next campaigns are looking at  are. Especially with the most recent one, where they’re targeting the Asian female demographic. Especially with the international students. I’m interested to see if they’re going to continue on that route with like an international focus or if they’re going to target another demographic or how they’re gonna go from that. ‘Cause from what I’ve heard they had a good turnout for a lot of their events they were doing. So, it’d be interesting to see if they continue on that trend or if they wanna do a different area. I just like seeing the different ideas that they’re doing cuz obviously they’ll always be doing like yoga rave, party Zumba, a lot of those big events will continue in each year. It’s those smaller events that I kinda look more forward to ‘cause it’s interesting to see how them in the wellness center are targeting different groups on camps and sort of seeing how we can also help them with that too.   S: Okay. That’s cool. Alright. I think I got everything I needed.   I: Awesome.                                  Appendix B  Jamie’s Interview Jamie (J):Thank you for coming, do you have an idea of what this whole research question is about?   I (Interviewee): Based off the consent form in terms of improving ubc, as far as I know.  J: Yep so yea that’s pretty much we’re getting the feedback and we’re trying to see what we can recommend for the ubc like the bigger people who organize it better. So let me ask you this question first. What does physical activity mean to you?  I: Physical activity means physical engagement, means any kind of movement whether it be for leisure or sport and in respect to my area aquatics it can mean stretching, exercise, therapeutic, swim, it could mean leisure in the hot tub or recreating with our basketball hoops, family fun focus, and here at the aquatic center, we’re a campus community competition amenity so we’re trying to serve all three groups at once.  J: Oh ok interesting….if you could define health what would it be and what components of it would define good health?  I: If I could define health, umm, health respect to physical and mental well being, I would say.  J: Yeah, the other one is what would define it to be good, how would you be in optimal health?  I would say if someone is happy with their current mental and physical wellbeing.  J: Alright, so this one’s a long question. But your organization has obviously been a partner with move ubc before. So what made did you decide to become a partner again?  I: For a number of reasons, philosophically this is something we want to be doing. We want to engage in students with the community and staff faculty population in movement and in getting them going and we support their active wellbeing, part of the reason would be in addition to getting people to the aquatic centre despite all of our undergraduate that pay their athletics direct fees having free access to the facility, not enough see it so MoveUBC, it was  a no brainer to us we want people in the facility and we strategically positioned our moveubc ward at the end of the facility so they would have to walk through and see everything before they get to the ward.  J: Was it like that before with the old aquatic centre?  I: I’m not familiar, i’ve only been here a couple of years, i know it was different, it was definitely not as accessible as it is now  J: Because it’s a little more outdated right?    I: Right, the old aquatic centre i believe was built in 67 or 76.  J: Oh my ok, yeah . So what other paths or events have you done before and have they always been continuous or did you have to change the curriculum a bit. Like every year?  I: What do you mean? With MoveUBC, this is our first time as soon as I know running with MoveUBC.  J: Oh, this year is the first time the aquatics centre is partnered with MoveUBC?  I: As far as I know, again I’m not sure, (anonymous) which is the operations coordinator, she may have some more insights as to what ran. But we’ve run a number of different events that we want to get the staff, faculty, and community here whether it be sports days for instance, you know run de-stressing days for the students during exam times where we’ll have a class that has treated them to get them in the steam sauna just to relax and destress. So we do a lot of physical activity that way.  J: Can you see these events that happen this year occuring again for next year?  I: Yeah, I hope so I mean that’s the plan, we would love to.  J: It’s like a funding issue is it or is it staff?  I: Not as far as I know, I know (anonymous), she left and she spearheaded this movement or at least this MoveUBC contest I guess. I’m not sure if it’s a funding issue. (anonymous), our director would know more about that as he would approve the funding or not but in terms of investment from the aquatic centre side, it was very low, so we’d be more than happy to support this event again.  J: So what values are important to your organizations, UBC REC?  I: Yeah, so again in general it’s seeing more of our community students faculty, spin it into any kind of recreation whether it be leisure or competition we want to support as many things as possible.  J: So for the next one when partnering with different organizations what do you look for in those partnerships and what are you expectations.  I: It depends, philosophically we want to ensure that we are aligned with respect to you know active living and healthy and again one of our directors, (anonymous), wants us to engage more partnerships, getting people active, getting them out and about, whether it be therapeutic or whether it be sport minded there’s a business component of it as well but at the same time philosophically we want to be doing these things based off our unit plan to support the university and that comes down from santa ono and the rest of the directors    J: What organizations are you partnered with this year, do you know?  I: Partnerships that’s a good one...I’m not sure which organizations we are partnered with, we work a lot through with the musqueam band which is fantastic getting different groups out here into the facility that may not be open to this, diversity and inclusion is all fundamentally important to us. Right now I am running a current initiative with hampton place so I’ve essentially taken an instructor to there, I’m running an aquafit class out of hampton place, it’s the first time we’ve done that here at UBC REC. Normally people would come to our facility but specifically with this group, they don’t have the same mobility or the same accessibility to get to the aquatic centre so we take an instructor to their pool, so that’s an interesting one. It’s the first time we ever done that so we want to increase that.  J: So right now, it’s like a little trial run?  I: Yep, definitely a trial run, I mean with a lot student groups whether it be synchronized swimming or a lot of our sport teams you know we want to partner to get their events in here as well.  J: Ok cool, do you think MoveUBC has improved in terms of preparation organization and communication from past years?  I: I’m not sure, I couldn’t tell you. This is my first year working with MoveUBC?  J: What did you think for marketing and everything this year?  I: Yeah I thought it was great, I thought the initiative and the event was fantastic, the contest was great because it got people all over campus. I thought the choices, because I did the contest myself as a staff, I thought the choices were great because it got you all over campus in addition it wasn’t just sport or recreation based it was healthy eating, it was what other great amenities do we have on campus, the botanical garden so i thought it was great, I’d love to see it expanded further in future years, just offer different offerings and some of the same ones as well.  J: Mmm for sure, what about any things you can improve on this year, do you think there’s any?  I: I’m not sure, I thought the little brochure was really well instructed.  J: Easy to understand?  I: Yeah, I thought it was easy to understand, well designed, I’d like to see more advertisement on moveubc, I’m not sure what promotion activities were done promoted outside of our newsletters and those kinds of things.  J: I know they go to like different classrooms and do a little spiel about it, but I think this year, I don’t know if they did too much of that, I only had it happen once.    I: Yeah, I’m not sure as a staff, I don’t see those things. Yeah, I don’t know if we have promotion events, for instance we have events throughout campus, like the strombola festival coming out, we have a number of different events through January and February and we’re looking to do MoveUBC around the same time so there’s a lot of events to capitalize on, they may have already used those events for promoting MoveUBC I’m not aware of, but that would be my suggestion as well, we’re going to use those events.  J: What does your department hope to achieve by becoming a partner of MoveUBC?  I: I think part of it is again, whether it’s getting people into the facility or not it was getting people active and engaged, showing the facility to new participants or new community staff members it would be great, you know it wasn’t about getting people for registrations or money, it was “let’s show them the pool, let’s show them what amazing space we have” and then go from there.  J: Ok, and who is your target audience and did you reach this audience this year?  I: On my end, I mean it was everyone who was able to participate, we definitely want to see more students in here because again, it is a free amenity for them and we want to help support programs for them. We didn't get a fair number of staff here as well so we do just want to see a lot of new faces as far as i know i did see a lot of new faces go through the aquatic centre. I think with respect to move ubc and what we did as well as the contest it was an easy location because it was fairly central.  J: What was this contest?  I: So this contest as far as i recall, there were two types. The first one was you go to a minimum of 4 different places and you find a special word. Ours, I believe was ‘splash’ and you write it down on a little booklet, and getting four or more would make you eligible to draw for prizes like a fitness class or fitbit. If you were able to get all fourteen words across campus as well as across westbrook village, you would enter for the grand prize which was a bike and a dinner for two.  J: That was awesome, I didn’t actually know about this contest.  I: As far as I know, that was the big push from MoveUBC. This contest that ran almost a month long i think. And i guess MoveUBC day which was Feb 28, we were also there as staff were supporting active wear day and wearing our own active wear.  J: What resource did you end from the university for the execution of the events?  I: So there was promotional posters, we had buttons, we had some stickers, we headed to the front desk, all our staff wore moveubc buttons, but yeah, in terms of graphics, it was all provided by MoveUBC and we’d like to see them again.    J: Did you get everything that you needed?  I: I think so, I can’t speak for the entire team but as far as I know, we got everything we needed. Could there be more? Yeah but at the same time, it comes down to funding and how much were you willing to invest in marketing materials.  J: So for the next one, what are your recommendations for MoveUBC to improve their partnering process and I was thinking expansion maybe along those lines? Do you have any ‘oh I want to partner with LFS for this’ or that kind of thing?  I: I’m not sure, with (anonymous) we had a really good relationship so she simply asked us if we would like to be part of this and we said ‘yes absolutely’ and that was it, that was as simple as our partner process was. Rooms for improvement for the actual process I’m not sure, I’m not sure how (anonymous) approached some of the other groups whether it be the healthy soup place or some other departments I’d imagine it was much of the same because participants wouldn’t get exposure to some of those places.  J: And so for this next one, similar to the last one, but what do you think MoveUBC can do to reach more of the general public?  I: I think it’s more promotional activities, promotional pamphlets, whatever it may be, we did partner with Wesbrook Village Community Centre, I think there’s more opportunities there, again we have a number of yoga studios, whatever else it may be, get some of those people out there. Yeah, I think it’s getting people aware of what amenities they have around here and some of them are free whether it’s the ropes course, the forest, or whatever it may be.  J: I know UBC is a little city in itself.  I: It certainly is, we have a huge population of people living here. Exactly, and it’s a wide range, we have students with their families, kids, seniors that live in and around campus along with faculty.  J: And the next one I think is pretty much given but are you willing to be a partner again?  I: Of course, we’d be more than happy to partner again.  J: That’s awesome.            Appendix C  Henry’s Interview  1.What does physical activity mean to your organization?   Physical activity is a strong pillar of UBC Recreation, as we are constantly promoting physical activity through awareness, active engagement, education, and research. Ultimately we want to reduce barriers and highlight the positive impacts of well-being, which includes physical health and activity.   2. If you could define health, what would it be and what components of it would define good health?   Total health embodies physical, mental, and spiritual health. To have good health, you must actively work towards being physically healthy, mentally healthy and spiritually healthy. This could mean a variety of things to different people, but you cannot achieve total health without working on each of these pillars.  3. What values are important to your organization?  UBC Recreation values participant experience, wellbeing, inclusivity, and sustainability. We strive to uphold these values by increasing physical activity throughout the UBC community, providing excellent programming, and building community.   4. When partnering with other organizations, what do you look for in that partnership/what are your expectations?  When partnering with other organizations, we look for someone who is passionate and agrees with our values and mission statement. Partnerships are all about a shared commonality and working together to achieve a goal. A partner will help to enhance engagement opportunities and help to promote within their community. We would also ensure that we do our part to reciprocate and promote within our community. Both organizations would need to uphold the expectations and requirements of the partnership in order to maintain a healthy partnership.   5. Do you think MoveUBC has improved in terms of preparation, organization, and communication from past years? If yes, how so? If no, how would you have hoped the campaign would have improved? E.g., was it a straightforward process?   Yes, we were contacted months before the MoveUBC campaign was launched and was provided a full packet that contained information that we could supply to our clients and customers. We   participated in the Wellbeing Challenge that encouraged participants to travel to various locations on campus and learn about how they can get involved and improve their overall wellbeing. The website contained a lot of information, not only for partner organizations but for participants and the community. It was straightforward and listed out all the deadlines for the required information that we needed to provide the MoveUBC team. We received a package of instructions, pens, pins, posters, and other promotional material to help advertise the MoveUBC initiative.   6. What did your department hope to achieve by becoming a partner of MoveUBC?  Our facility wanted to promote the sport of tennis and encourage people in the UBC community to get involved. We hope that people in the UBC community will see tennis as an opportunity to get physically active and improve their wellbeing. This could be in after-school programs, breaks in the middle of the day or during the lunch hour, or encouraging faculty and staff to bring their children to the facility. The UBC Recreation department hopes to promote physical activity and wellbeing to the entire UBC community and wants the MoveUBC initiative to be a year-long commitment to all participant groups. We want total wellbeing to be supported by the physical activity programming that we offer across campus. Our diverse programs and expertise will encourage others to incorporate physical activity in their everyday lives.   7. Who was your target audience? Did you reach this audience?  Our target audience for our event was beginner tennis players or people who had never received previous instruction but knew how to play. We wanted to provide the platform for people to learn more about how they can be involved in the sport of tennis. We had 37 people attend who had never taken any programming at our facility before. We encouraged those participants to return and register for programs and facility bookings in the future. 2 participants registered on that evening and we are unsure if more registered for programming after the session.   8. What resources were needed for the execution of your event(s)? Were you able to obtain all necessary resources?  Our facility staff were mainly responsible for creating the materials needed to execute the beginner workshops. Outside of our facility, we required the assistance to promote the event. This was done so through the MoveUBC team and our UBC Recreation marketing department. We had no problem advertising and selling our event as it sold out 3 weeks beforehand.   9. What are your recommendations for MoveUBC to improve the partner process and experience?  I felt that this year there we were able to effectively promote our event and our facility through this process. This year there was a considerable amount of communication and resources provided by the MoveUBC team, in comparison to previous years. I feel that these days social media is a great tool when promoting any organization or event. If we were provided tools specifically designed to use on different social media platforms (newsletters, facebook, etc) like   photos or other multimedia, this could help in the united promotion of MoveUBC across all partner organizations.                                              Appendix D Interview Questions:  1. What does physical activity mean to your organization?  2. If you could define health, what would it be and what components of it would define good health?  3. Are you aware of the MoveUBC campaign?  4. Has your organization been a partner of MoveUBC before? If yes, why did you choose to not become a partner again?/If no, why haven’t you chosen to become a partner? (depending on whether or not they have participated before, it would be just one or the other “if yes” or “if no”, not both).  5. What values are important to your organization?  6. When partnering with other organizations, what do you look for in that partnership/what are your expectations?  7.  Do you think MoveUBC has improved in terms of preparation, organization, and communication from past years? If yes, how so? If no, how would you have hoped the campaign would have improved? E.g., was it a straightforward process?  8. What did your department hope to achieve by becoming a partner of MoveUBC?  9. Who was your target audience? Did you reach this audience?  10. What resources were needed for the execution of your event(s)? Were you able to obtain all necessary resources?  11. What are your recommendations for MoveUBC to improve the partner process and experience?  12. What are your recommendations for MoveUBC to improve the overall experience for the general public?  13. Are you willing to be a partner of MoveUBC again in the future? Why?    References  Aqua Fitness Classes. (2019). Retrieved from: ​https://recreation.ubc.ca/aquatics/aqua-fitness/​.  Braun, V., & Clarke, V. (2006). Using thematic analysis in psychology. ​Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3​(2), 77-101.  Bretthauer-Mueller, R., Berkowitz, J. M., Thomas, M., McCarthy, S., Green, L. A., Melancon, H., ... & Dodge, K. (2008). Catalyzing community action within a national campaign: VERB™ community and national partnerships. ​American Journal of Preventive Medicine​, ​34​(6), 210-221.  Chodzko-Zajko, W., & Schwingel, A. (2009). Transnational strategies for the promotion of physical activity and active aging: The world health organization model of consensus building in international public health.​ Quest, 61​(1), 25-38. doi:10.1080/00336297.2009.10483598  Iancovich, V. (2015). ​Using social media to get students moving: MoveU​. Retrieved from: https://www.utoronto.ca/news/using-social-media-get-students-moving-moveu Loprinzi, P. D., & Beets, M. W. (2014). Need for increased promotion of physical activity by health care professionals.​ Preventive Medicine, 69​, 75-79. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.09.002  Move UBC A campus-wide campaign to encourage movement! (2019).​ ​[PDF file]. Retrieved from​ ​https://canvas.ubc.ca/conversations#filter=type=inbox  Move UBC. (2019). Retrieved from ​https://move.ubc.ca/​. Ooms, L., Leemrijse, C., Collard, D., Schipper-van Veldhoven, N., & Veenhof, C. (2018). Characteristics of insufficiently active participants that benefit from health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) promotion programs implemented in the sports club setting. Bmc Public Health, 18​(1), 685-13. doi:10.1186/s12889-018-5579-2 Wong, F., Huhman, M., Asbury, L., Bretthauer-Mueller, R., McCarthy, S., Londe, P., & Heitzler, C. (2004). VERB™—a social marketing campaign to increase physical activity among youth. ​Preventing Chronic Disease, 1​(3).   UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report         Evaluation of Staff and Departmental Partnerships of MoveUBC Enzo Victoria, Henry Liang, Jamie Chan, Sabrina Gaspar, Sumayya Dean University of British Columbia KIN 464 Themes: Health, Wellbeing April 2, 2019        Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.   Executive Summary  The University of British Columbia (UBC) runs MoveUBC, an annual month-long campaign, through the month of February to promote physical activity and healthy lifestyles for students, faculty, and residents on and near campus. Numerous events are held on the UBC campus during the campaign, with majority of these events being created and run by organizational partners. MoveUBC relies greatly on these partners to host exciting and engaging events throughout the month, and the future growth of MoveUBC largely depends on partnership contributions and participation. Because of this, it is important to make sure all of MoveUBC’s partners have a positive experience, and this is why we have collected information on and assessed the experiences of past and present MoveUBC staff and departmental partners.  Interviews were conducted with representatives from three past and present MoveUBC partners, all of which are a part of a branch of UBC Recreation. These partners included; the UBC Aquatics Centre, UBC Recreations Operations, and UBC Tennis Centre. Our semi-structured interviews were conducted in-person and online via email, and questions were asked about the execution of each partner’s events, their support from MoveUBC organizers, and their goals regarding their participation in the campaign. Data collected from these interviews were used to guide MoveUBC in their partnership efforts by highlighting what MoveUBC is doing right, and which areas partners would like to see changes in. Suggestions will be taken into consideration in order to grow the MoveUBC campaign in the upcoming years, and create strong, positive, and successful relationships with all partners in the future.  Common themes reported from the interviews included the definition of health, physical activity, and actively engaging its participants in any form of movement.  Furthermore, the data collected across all interviews showed a common goal of increasing inclusivity in UBC; whether it be students, staff and faculty population, the goal was to increase engagement across all populations. Overall, MoveUBC and the UBC Recreation department had a clear agreement of what is to be expected and the resources provided in order to allow for an effective relationship. A recommendation for improvement of the campaign was that there should be a post-event detailed statistics report supplied to each partner as a way to gauge the success and to act as an indicator for whether or not to continue for future years. Efforts here can be redistributed to target a “lacking” component and make it stronger for next year. Another recommendation for this partnership is to have clear communication across all levels of staff involved in case any messages get miscommunicated or lost, particularly the student staff and volunteers. To fix this, an orientation event specifically for this staff demographic could be held, that way all levels of staff are on the right page by the time the campaign starts. The last recommendation for MoveUBC was expansion of the campaign. A director from UBC Aquatics Centre suggested a partnership with Wesbrook Village Community Centre due to its growing population. Regardless of whether or not the residents at Wesbrook Village are students or staff, the goals of MoveUBC and UBC Recreation partners are the same in being easily accessible to all participants in getting them physically engaged with their health.          Final Report: Staff and Departmental Partnerships with MoveUBC  Introduction and Literature Review  MoveUBC is a month-long, annual health and fitness campaign targeted at University of British Columbia (UBC) students, faculty, and residential community. The intent of this campaign is to decrease sedentary behaviour and increase daily physical activity, which can ultimately help decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, anxiety, and some cancers in the population (“Move UBC”, 2019). Overall participation and digital engagement of the campaign both increased greatly from 2017 to 2018 as more contributing partners and non-recreation events and activities were included (Move UBC [PDF File], 2019). MoveUBC encourages people of UBC to incorporate more movement into their day through fun events held each day throughout the month of February. Such events include guided walks around campus, drop-in brain and body fitness classes, drop-in badminton and volleyball, waltz and ballroom dance classes, and nutrition workshops (“Move UBC”, 2019). In addition to this wide variety of events, the Move U Crew, a group of UBC students committed to enhancing physical activity on campus, are enthusiastically engaging students, staff, and faculty in and out of class by leading movement breaks and guided walks throughout the month.  Our research was focused on obtaining feedback from MoveUBC’s past staff and departmental partners as a method to evaluate the interest of organizations to participate in the campaign in the following years. We conducted interviews with past MoveUBC partners to gain a better understanding of their experiences and to collect recommendations to improve the partnership experience and encourage additional potential organizers to get involved. MoveUBC relies greatly on their partners to run wide assortments of events in order to engage people of all ages and interests. Recommendations for MoveUBC will be a large part of our research as feedback from past partners about their experiences and observations is valuable information that can be used to assess and enhance the MoveUBC experience.  The reasoning for our research is to evaluate and explore gaps in the relationship between partners and MoveUBC organizers. Evaluating this relationship and the needs of each party in the relationship allows for more efficient collaboration and ultimately, more variation in perspectives contributing to the campaign. Including organizations with different but parallel values and definitions of health and wellness would add variety in the events and activities MoveUBC would offer, so there would be a higher chance of individuals finding a method of exercise they actually enjoy. A common problem for people who are looking to increase physical activity in their daily life is failing to adhere to a fitness routine they enjoy (Loprinzi & Beets, 2014). The obesity trends of North Americans are steadily increasing with a dire need for a lifestyle intervention. 64% of Americans who received healthcare were not encouraged to increase exercise levels, and 45% of these Americans lived sedentary lifestyles (Loprinzi & Beets, 2014), demonstrating the need to increase awareness of the benefits of exercise. Barriers to physical activity include lack of time, knowledge, and confidence, which is why MoveUBC is an important tool to help people become more active as a collective (Loprinzi & Beets, 2014). Intervention and promotion of physical activity is needed to hit this niche; Canadians can take this similar data and apply it to their programs. Furthermore, data collected from health enhancing activity programs has provided support that sports programming can help influence   people to get active (Ooms et al., 2018). The information gathered from MoveUBC can become precedent cases to set a foundation for a high functioning program.   The VERB campaign, run by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention of the United States, was active from 2002 and 2006 and was aimed at increasing physical activity levels and encouraging play in “tweens”, which are children aged nine to 13 (Wong et al., 2004). An article by Bretthauer-Mueller et al. (2008) thoroughly explains the VERB campaign’s partnering process and subsequent success with their target audience, so this article will be used to guide us in our efforts to create valuable interview themes and questions. Although the VERB campaign paid for national advertising, their partnerships with numerous national and community partners were integral to their success (Bretthauer-Mueller et al., 2008). The VERB campaign created a three-pronged strategy for their partners to promote physical activity, which involved linking their brand to physical activity, reframing the idea of physical activity, and driving the audience to places, programs, and opportunities for physical activity (Bretthauer-Mueller et al., 2008). Marketing training and promotion resources were provided by the VERB campaign leaders so that all the partners were on the same page in terms of goals, marketing style, and methodology (Bretthauer-Mueller et al., 2008). It is advised by Bretthauer-Mueller et al. (2008) to recruit partners from a spectrum of backgrounds in order to reach all corners of the community, which is why we will be interviewing MoveUBC partners of different physical activity backgrounds. Ideal partners possessed four main characteristics, which include an existing community network that enables access to physical activity opportunities, a reliable leader within each organization, an understanding of marketing, and each partner’s own funding to back up their efforts (Bretthauer-Mueller et al., 2008). Bretthauer-Mueller et al. (2008) notes that it can be difficult to find partners who possess all four characteristics, so MoveUBC’s offer to fund each partner up to $300 is very helpful. Using the aforementioned characteristics to find ideal partners, as well as utilizing some of the VERB campaign strategies with partners, creates the potential to develop long-lasting and effective partnerships for MoveUBC, ultimately enhancing the MoveUBC campaign altogether. Finding partners that have an existing community network, a reliable leader, and an understanding of marketing would be ideal for this campaign. Furthermore, debriefing the partners on the expectations of the campaign and providing these partners with advertising resources may help partners navigate their MoveUBC initiatives. For this reason, questions in our interview will be addressing the partners’ experiences with MoveUBC in terms of resources provided to them, marketing help, leadership support, and additional factors, so we may get an idea of what MoveUBC can do to further support its partners.  We have examined other physical activity campaigns such as MoveU, Active Ichabod, and Project Impact developed by the University of Toronto, Washburn University, and the University of Western Ontario, respectively. All campaigns stressed the need for physical activity among university students as a means of improving overall health and wellness. Opportunities to get active were implemented through events and physical activity classes at all universities, in addition to using marketing material to educate students on the benefits of staying physically active. The MoveU campaign at the University of Toronto used questionnaires to assess the impact and awareness of the campaign, and it was discovered that only 36% of students on campus were aware of the program’s existence (Iancovich, 2015). Social media was the most effective form of advertising, but the campaign seemed flat as there was not as much collaboration between groups on different levels as there could have been (Iancovich, 2015). In a   paper that reviewed the World Health Organization’s approaches for developing international public health, Chodzko-Zajko and Schwingel (2009) identified that multi-sectional collaboration was required for effective policy making, which is a key component in generating awareness and promoting a healthy active lifestyle. As we develop our own assessment tools, we will take into consideration that data we collect from the partners is not an individual factor in the perceived success of their programs, but a single piece in a collaborative effort to increasing physical literacy and overall wellness in students. Methods MoveUBC will absolutely need staff and departmental partners in following years, so exploring whether or not past partners have had a positive experience with MoveUBC is imperative. We conducted interviews with and collected data from three partners from the UBC Recreation department. These partners included a UBC Aquatics Centre director, a UBC Recreations Operations Coordinator, and a UBC Tennis Center Operations Coordinator. With representatives from UBC Recreation as our primary research participants, we hoped to gain a cohesive opinion on their collaborations with MoveUBC organizers, as they worked closely alongside them prior to and throughout the execution of the campaign. We first obtained a list of organization representatives and their contact information from the director of MoveUBC. We then reached out to organization representatives via email to ask for their participation in our study, and once representatives agreed to participate, we conducted the interviews. Our group conducted two in-person interviews and one emailed questionnaire to collect our detail-rich qualitative data. In-person interviews were conducted in quiet, secluded areas so voice recordings could be taken. From these recordings, each interview was fully transcribed.  Each interviewee signed a consent form, which informed them that their identity will be anonymous in our data. The emailed questionnaire was completed by sending our interview questions directly to the organization representative’s email, and detailed answers to our questions were sent back through email as well.  We wanted to collect data that would enlighten us on UBC Recreation’s coordination and execution of their events for MoveUBC, how much support they had from MoveUBC organizers, and their goals regarding their involvement in the campaign. To collect this data, we asked 12 interview questions regarding each partner’s awareness and opinions of MoveUBC, their definitions of health and physical activity, their values and expectations when it comes to forming partnerships with other organizations, and their relationship with MoveUBC organizers. In regards to their relationship with MoveUBC organizers, we would like to further understand if the partners required more help and resources in the form of software, time flexibility, and other methods of support from MoveUBC. We also asked them to compare and contrast their opinions and experiences regarding the execution of this year’s campaign and of previous years. The in-person interviews allowed for probing during the interviews, which provided additional context. Refer to the appendix D for a list of the interview questions. All interviews were transcribed, which allowed us to easily identify common themes in the data. Once the thematic analysis was completed, we assessed patterns and trends within each individual theme and across all themes.  Through Braun and Clarke’s literature of thematic analysis, it is described as a method of identifying, analysing, and reporting patterns within data (Braun and Clarke, 2006). We used the qualitative analytic methods because these method benefits could aid us with our research. One   of the mentioned benefits includes the flexibility of the analysis which can be divided into two positions, one of them being a qualitative analysis where there are those tied to, or stemming from, a particular theoretical or epistemological position (Braun and Clarke, 2006). Secondly, the other benefit and method includes methods that are independent of theory and can be applied across many different approaches. Additionally, because of the flexibility of using the thematic analysis, our group was able to identify qualitative data and through the three interviews discover a pattern (themes) between partners.   Results/Findings  From the three interviews we had with different facets of UBC Recreation, we gathered information pertaining to their perspectives on health, physical education, what factors contributed to MoveUBC’s campaign this year and past years, and aspects of the campaign that could be improved or added to increase its success. Each interview can be referred to below in appendices A-C. Because MoveUBC is a campaign that is structured around achieving optimal health through positive health behaviors, such as exercise and a clean diet, we thought it would be appropriate to ask each interviewee what their definitions of “physical activity” and “good health” were and what those terms meant to their organization. The UBC Aquatics Center Director and the UBC Recreations Operations Coordinator answered this question similarly by mentioning the importance of getting up and moving around as a method of physical activity, while the UBC Tennis Centre Director answered this question by acknowledging what physical activity means in relation to UBC Recreation as a structural component. The UBC Aquatics Center Director talked about methods of physical engagement pertaining to their facility, including stretching, therapeutic needs, or family fun focus. The UBC Recreation Operations Coordinator, in a similar fashion, included activities exclusive to their facilities including participation in intramural leagues and tournaments, and working out at the gym. The director at the UBC Tennis Centre spoke about the promotion aspect of physical activity, as they strive for “active engagement, education, and research” and “want to reduce barriers and highlight positive impacts of well-being, which includes physical activity”. Meanwhile, all three interviewees agreed the definition of “good health” goes beyond just physical health by acknowledging the important of mental wellbeing as well. To continue about the shared perspectives between the three interviewees, they also all agreed upon inclusivity and participant experience as being essential values to their organization. Both the UBC Recreation Operations Coordinator and the UBC Aquatic Centre Director talked about their respective facilities and how they wanted them to be as open to the UBC student population as possible by offering wide varieties of activities. The UBC Tennis Centre Director emphasized the significance of programming and building community as a way of upholding their value of inclusivity.       UBC Aquatics Centre Director UBC Recreation Operations Coordinator UBC Tennis Centre Director What does physical activity mean to your organization? Any kind of movement Simply moving A pillar of UBC Recreation What is your definition of good health? Someone who is happy with their current mental and physical wellbeing To be active and eat healthily Being physically, mentally, and spiritually healthy What values are important to your organization? Seeing the UBC population engage in any kind of recreation, whether it be leisure or competition Making sure everyone is able to participate in the physical activities they want  Participant experience, wellbeing, inclusivity, and sustainability. Figure 1: Summary of answers to interviews # 1, 2, and 5.  While conducting these interviews, we noted that 2 out of 3 interviewees’ organizations were involved in MoveUBC this year only. One of the interviewees’ answers for this question was unavailable at the time. This is an interesting note since this shows a new partnership that was formed with the UBC Aquatics Centre, UBC Recreation Operations and the UBC Tennis Centre. Despite this newly formed partnership, the UBC Recreation partners were content with the promotional material and level of organization MoveUBC put together months before the month-long campaign. In terms of partnerships, MoveUBC has met the partners’ expectations in ensuring there are passionate people involved that can drive this movement. We found out through the interviews that MoveUBC contacted their partners months in advance to provide details of how the events would work and if the partners were interested in collaboration. Both parties’ had expectations to ensure the events were executed well and prepared for key dates in the timeline. Overall, these partnerships with MoveUBC were successful in engaging student and faculty population in physical activity over the course of a month.    UBC Aquatics Centre Director UBC Recreation Operations Coordinator UBC Tennis Centre Director Has your organization been a partner of MoveUBC before? If yes, why did you choose to  First year in participating with MoveUBC  Goal was to engage First year in participating with MoveUBC  Values of MoveUBC N/A   become a partner again?/If no, why haven’t you chosen to become a partner? (depending on whether or not they have participated before, it would be just one or the other “if yes” or “if no”, not both). and support students with the community and staff faculty population in movement  matched with UBC Recreation and how they could reach their goals together When partnering with other organizations, what do you look for in that partnership/what are your expectations?  Supporting all the different levels that are interacted/contacted to execute the plan Being well prepared with a plan   Making sure both parties’ expectations are met for key dates Having passionate staff and volunteer to execute the events  Both parties’ expectations should be on the same page Do you think MoveUBC has improved in terms of preparation, organization, and communication from past years? If yes, how so? If no, how would you have hoped the campaign would have improved? E.g., was it a straightforward process? First year in participating but overall, this year was executed well  Student and staff communication was no problem First year in participating but commented on giving more time to student staff/volunteers to adjust - orientation event may help Yes, MoveUBC has provided an informative packet of details and instructions months prior to the events Figure 2: Summary of answers to interviews #4, 6, and 7.  Common themes across all interviews Differences across all interviews 1. Health is defined on multiple aspects and in order to reach optimal status of health, one should actively work to engage all aspects (physical, mental, spiritual) into their lifestyle. 2. Accessibility into the interviewee’s 1. Recommendations for MoveUBC had a couple of suggestions: to provide the option of post-event feedback to the general public to improve event execution for next year, more promotional activities/pamphlets to   departments was readily available for those who wanted to engage in physical activity. It ranges from students to staff to even strangers on campus who wanted to get physically active/try something new.  3. There is a common goal across the organizers to increase UBC rec events/physical activity engagement across campus in student, staff and faculty population.  4. Having a clear idea of what is to be expected from MoveUBC organizers and UBC rec representatives allows for an effective relationship to excel in event execution.  5. Event partners thoroughly enjoyed the execution of MoveUBC’s collaboration , upheld each partner’s expectations and agreed to continue for next year.  get the word out, and to partner with Wesbrook Village Community Centre to increase the scope of participants for next year.  2. Each department had other different side goals - UBC Recreation wanted to work more on campus groups and the wellness centre, UBC aquatics centre wanted to get people into the facility to check out the new equipment and amenities and the tennis centre wanted to promote the sport in the UBC community.  Figure 3: A table to compare and contrast the qualitative data collected.   Discussion  This project gave us insight about the partnerships and interactions that the different branches of UBC Recreation have with MoveUBC. The interviews demonstrated that these partners’ MoveUBC events were executed efficiently and smoothly with minimal issues. Since this was community based research, it illustrated the need and passion to get participants actively engaged in any form of exercise/movement. Getting direct feedback from one of the main organizations that contribute to MoveUBC has provided us with knowledge that can be used to further improve and increase engagement in a healthy lifestyle among UBC student, staff, and faculty.  One prevalent theme from our interviews was the importance of achieving inclusivity in physical activity. Participant experience is one of the most important components when it comes to running events through UBC Recreation, which is an organization that strives to “[keep activities] as open as possible” and to “[accommodate] towards students or public’s needs”, as told by the operations coordinator. It is important to acknowledge the barriers that people can be faced with when trying to live a healthy lifestyle, especially when planning for such a campaign like MoveUBC, because such a lifestyle should not be a privilege. Using an intersectional lense allows one to view and acknowledge the various factors that may influence an individual’s ability to live a healthy lifestyle. Being inclusive means to be aware of barriers people may have when wanting to be physically active, which may include lack of knowledge, lack of physical literacy, or limited physical and cognitive capacities. It is important for organizations like UBC   Recreation and MoveUBC to be able to work through those barriers in order for people of all kinds to be included. The UBC Aquatics Center does their part by offering a variety of fitness classes, including therapy classes, and performance classes for both younger and older adults, in addition to their swimming lessons for children (“Aqua Fitness Classes, 2019). Additionally, the Student Recreation Centre offers leisurely activities such as wheelchair basketball, which can be enjoyed by people with varying physical abilities and fitness literacy.  MoveUBC and UBC Recreation have been a collaborative unit since the campaign started. One of the main reasons why the two organizations work so well together is because of their shared values, which includes inclusivity and living a healthy lifestyle. This commonality was another prevalent theme among our interviews. MoveUBC’s purpose is to increase fitness levels in the UBC student, staff, and faculty population by introducing them to enjoyable ways to get active and educating them on how to maintain such a lifestyle. UBC Recreation facilitated this goal by not only offering material resources to the campaign, but also with their inherent belief that being physically active in any capacity is beneficial for physical and mental health. The events that took place during this year’s campaign ranged from drop-in skating to ballroom dance lessons to a nutrition workshop to Afro-Caribbean Zumba. UBC Recreation offered several of their facilities, including the Student Recreation Centre and the Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Arena, to house some of MoveUBC’s events. With such a wide variety of activities taking place over the whole month of February, it allowed for many options for the UBC population to engage in. This opportunity provided for us highlighted the learning environment and learning from our community partners in what they need to execute a month long event while keeping in line with their goals.  A third common theme among our interviews was having high expectations from MoveUBC regarding their organization and communication. According to all three UBC Recreation representatives, those expectations were met this year. The operations coordinator was particularly impressed with the MoveUBC director of 2019, providing examples of their efficient communication and organization skills:   “Usually [the MoveUBC director] was the main contact.. So say we wanted to do something with Wellbeing [committee], we’d be like ‘hey we want to offer like a discounted rate for yoga classes for people that go to the wellness center” so then we’d talk to [the MoveUBC director’ who would then in turn coordinate with them”. “Thankfully with [the MoveUBC director] and all the previous positions or people who have been in that position … [they] usually have their calendar pretty set beginning of the year so we are well-aware and have a lot of time to set up everything for them”.  According to Bretthauer-Mueller et al., 2008, one main characteristic possessed by an ideal partners is being reliable. Judging from the answers provided by the interviewees regarding their collaboration with the MoveUBC director, the director could be considered an ideal partner. The UBC Recreation Operations Coordinator said that they could “usually just phone [the MoveUBC director] to figure out what was going on” in situations where they found themselves stuck, such as when a piece of equipment has been misplaced. Additionally, the UBC Aquatics Centre Director said they had a “really good relationship with [the MoveUBC director]” and that the partner process was “so simple”.  This demonstrates the MoveUBC director’s reliability as a leader as they were there to support help when needed.    The primary limitation in our study was the lack of study participants, as it was difficult to find representatives who were interested in participating and had time to participate at this time of the year. Our initial goal was to have five-to-six interviewees, but majority of the organizations we reached out to either declined to participate, or had their hands full with events, spring break camps, and other priorities. There were also instances where the team leaders and project managers that were working directly with MoveUBC in the past, were no longer a part of the organizations, therefore the organizations had no one to comment on their experiences. Additionally, a handful of the representatives we reached out to were on vacation and would not be able to participate until a later date. We provided organizational partners with interview alternatives such as Skype interviews and phone interviews, but responses were still limited. We managed to conduct interviews with three organizations with the help of the director of MoveUBC, and although valuable data was collected, having a larger sample size would have enhanced our study even more.  A second limitation was having to switch our project scope part-way through our execution. We started the project with wanting to recruit current partners of MoveUBC to learn about their contributions to the campaign and their opinions on their collaborative partnership with MoveUBC organizers. We later switched to recruiting past partners of MoveUBC and partners who have never contributed to the campaign instead, as it was suggested to us that it would be more helpful for the campaign organizers to understand why organizations may have decided to stop contributing to MoveUBC or to not contribute at all. This limitation is closely associated with the first limitation, as we struggled to find partners who we could get into contact with and who actually had experience working with MoveUBC in the past due to constant employee turnover. Due to this occurrence, we were limited in both time and resources to gather sufficient data.  The final limitation had to do with human error. Due to the subjective nature of the interview process, human error may play a factor in the types of follow up questions asked or not asked and if the interviewer was able to ask all of the questions. In the instance of this project it was the later, where an interviewer was not able to ask the interviewee the complete list of questions as designated by the group. As with the other limitations this leads to a lack of sufficient data.    Recommendations for Client  Two out of three of the partners we interviewed explicitly agreed to continue being a partner with MoveUBC for next year. While the third partner did not explicitly agree, it seems they intended on joining again in future campaigns judging from the rest of their interview content. For recommendations, the representative of UBC Recreations Operations believed that the effective communication and organization with MoveUBC helped their contribution to the campaign run smoothly, indicating that those components must be prioritized in partnerships in future campaigns. One suggestion from UBC Recreation’s Operations Coordinator to make expectations of their contributions more clear is to provide them with detailed statistics of the event post-execution. Rather than simply notifying them of whether or not their event was successful, it would be more insightful for the operations staff to know specifically what components of their contribution worked well so they know where to focus their energy in future   campaigns.  While communication between partners in MoveUBC seemed to be efficient, communication between student volunteers and UBC Recreation staff for MoveUBC events could be improved, as mentioned by the UBC Recreations Operations Coordinator. To improve this, an orientation event just for student volunteers could be implemented to help them become more familiarized and comfortable with the facilities and staff before the events take place, rather than having them experience learning curves during the execution of the events. Moreover, since the partners we interviewed generally had positive experiences working with MoveUBC, the next step would be expansion of the campaign. The UBC Aquatics Centre director suggested teaming up with the Wesbrook Village Community Centre to reach the neighbouring population. Those residing in Wesbrook Village may not necessarily all be UBC students and staff but the goal of MoveUBC and the UBC recreation partners align in terms of getting participants physically active and engaged, which would make this expansion beneficial.                                    Appendix A Sabrina’s Interview  Sabrina (S): Okay, do you wanna just start off by talking about what you do here at UBC rec?  Interviewee (I): Yeah definitely. So, I am the operations coordinator. So (censor) and I are the two that oversee all the operations staff. So the desk staff, essentially. Um, and then outside of that, anything that has to do with bookings in the facilities goes through us.. the drop-in sports, and the fitness memberships also run through our department as well. So that’s sort of the three main things that we do. And outside of that we still coordinate with like varsity, TSC, things like that to coordinate the studio space or help them with getting equipment. But the main thing is bookings, fitness memberships, and the front desk staff.  S: Okay. Cool. And so kind of – I’m going to start with more general questions. So what does physical activity mean for UBC rec?  I: In like a broad term?   S: Yeah like how would you define physical activity?  I guess in our eyes it would be the act of moving, really. Depending on the program we’re applying it towards, it could be just getting people walking around campus. So.. through MoveUBC things like that, just, initiatives of getting standing desks. It could be as simple as that. Or having people come in to do tournaments, intramural leagues, going to the gym. So… pretty broad term. Essentially the base value– getting people active and moving.  S: Active and moving, cool. And kind of on a similar scope, how would you define health and good health?  I: Good health.. tough to say. ‘Cause it can be really individualized on that as well. So for good health, I think as a general rule it would be being active and eating healthy, at least within what your body dictates as being healthy. ‘Cause some people obviously can eat less on a diet and still be okay. Some people can- have to be more cautious with what they’re eating to remain in that sort of healthy sphere of being active and being able to be active and not have like a negative effect, if they’re say, walking around campus or just doing something that is required for their daily life.   S: Yeah that’s true.  I: Yeah, its really individualized on that end. So, it could be if someone is in a wheelchair or something like that. It can definitely be different compared to someone else. So, for them it’d just like be like offering them the schedule for when we do wheelchair basketball or seeing if there’s movements on campus that have people going through on walks or strolls around the area. So, was there like a certain group of people that you’re looking at? Or just everyone in general?    S: Umm, it was more of like everyone in general. Like general according to everyone. Um, okay, so next I want to ask what values are important to your organization, so UBC rec?  I: What values?  S: Yeah.  I: One of the top ones that we have is definitely inclusivity. So, the big thing that we try to do is to make sure that everyone is able to participate and anything that they would like to participate in. And keeping things as open as possible. And accommodating towards students or public’s needs towards it. So that would definitely be the top value for us.   S: Okay. Cool. Um, when you, when UBC rec works with other organizations, either on campus or off, what do you guys look for when you, like, form that partnership or collaboration? What are your expectations?  I: Are you thinking in terms of sponsorships?  S: Yeah, like..  I: For sponsorship, I’m not quite sure honestly. Typically, anything that has to do with like a large partnership or a sponsor goes through the staff that worked at the arena. So usually by the time they’re working with us, they’ve already gone through that end and it’s just sort of “here is one of our new partners”. This is what we have agreed upon so it’s like– say there’s a group on campus that we are now partnered with. So, it’s like “oh okay so they get a discount on maybe gym bookings or with the AMS”. We have set times where the different clubs can come in and those times will always be set aside for AMS to be available to book. So it’s usually the tail-end that comes to us so everything is already set in place. Just mostly in regards to any sort of like large scale sponsorships or deals with companies. Typically, what we have if it’s a public group that’s coming in, it's usually they’re wanting to rent a gym space or they’re wanting specific things from us, which we can offer. Less on the long-term deals side.   S: Okay. So, it sounds like they– because of what you guys do, they kind of just utilize the resources you guys, like, offer.  I: Yeah. Is there like a certain scenario you’re looking more towards?  S: Yeah, since this is more geared towards MoveUBC, like did you have any expectations working with that campaign?   I: Uh, not really any expectations. Typically, with MoveUBC, the physical activity coordinator that’s here, which was Liz, but she’s now moved to Switzerland.  S: Oh wow.    I: So there’s always been that position that’s worked in this office before. Um, it’s now going to be (censor) that’s taking over. Not quite sure when that’s happening. But typically they work alongside us but not like fully alongside us. It would be whenever those campaigns or movements coming out– in Liz’s case she would come to us a few months early and then coordinate if there’s something that desk staff have to do. Maybe have her come to the meeting or she would prepare slides for us. But typically if there’s anything MoveUBC related, we would accommodate fully since it’s something important or coincides with a lot of our beliefs. So, the most recent campaign, during that reading week, we offered free gym access to staff, the faculty, if they’re needing gym space or studio space that’s when we help coordinate all that with them. So it’s, in terms of that, usually all we’re doing is either offering support from staff in terms of being like an information post. Like the passports were delivered and given out from the desk at the SRC. The ARC was one of the locations for one of those words that people were trying to find for their passport. So, things like that. If they come and ask us, then sure. We’ve got plenty help here with that. And then depending on some of the movements that they’re doing throughout the year- so if it’s like a one-off event then that’s when we have to talk with (censor), who’s the fitness program coordinator. So that would be constructional programs, PT, boot camps, things like that.   S: Yeah.  I: So depending on the course, usually [the MoveUBC director] would’ve talked [the fitness coordinator] first to make sure it’s not interfering with any of his programming. Typically, not anything that has to do with like wellness on campus, we go through [the fitness coordinator] first and then they coordinate. ‘Cause a lot of times we offer instructors for them as well.  So its kind of like if they’re wanting to do like a yoga class, usually they’ll come to us, we’ll check the studio schedule and figure out when would work best for them and then we would also loop [the fitness coordinator] in as well. And then “do they need another instructor? Or are they looking for us to host a class for them?”, so sort of a few people all get roped into one situation and then we sort of split off to figure out the best route for them to host their session. Especially with all the wellbeing movements on campus. Usually [the MoveUBC director] was the main contact. So, say we wanted to do something with wellbeing, we’d be like “hey we wanna offer like a discounted rate for yoga classes for people that go into the wellness center” so then we’d talk to [the MoveUBC director] who would then in turn coordinate with them so, we sort out of all of that. Depends on who is needing what it would go either way.  S: Okay. So, it sounds like that there’s a lot of moving parts and moving people to get this really moving efficiently. So, I would– would you say that communication is like one of the number one things, like smooth communication?  I: Oh yeah definitely.  S: Yeah, okay. Yeah. Well that goes like without saying, about good communication  I: Thankfully with [the MoveUBC director] and all the previous positions or people who have   been in that position. It’s always- usually they have their calendar pretty set the beginning of the year. So, we are well-aware and have a lot of time to set up everything for them. For the MoveUBC month we were pretty much set on everything in November.  S: Oh wow  I: So we had a lot of leeway for those where it gives us adequate time to tell our staff everything that’s coming out. So there’s never been any issues on that end. But yeah, its usually well in advanced that everything’s planned out by then. Or at least they know the key dates and then closer to the dates we’re like “okay – this is, we at least know what’s happening” and then we’ll have the final details beforehand. But everything will already be booked in, it’s just we’re not sure what type of yoga class it is or who the instructor is but we know you need the studio from like 5-6 every Tuesday for the month. So, we’ll have it already set aside.   S: Okay. Yeah. That’s good. And have you guys, UBC rec, been a part of MoveU since the very beginning?  I: Umm. I believe so. I’ve only been here for one year. I was a desk staff previously. And (censor) who’s in the position before that, we were– I think that was sort of in the beginning days of them setting everything up. So, we’ve always been involved with it. But I’m not sure the full extent of our involvement. Like I know previously reading week, the free gym access has been done. Not sure how many years it was done, though.  S: Yeah, from what I know, it’s a new campaign. Quite new.   I: This year [the MoveUBC director] definitely added a lot more into the campaigns. So, I think this year is seeing a lot more involvement from us. Unfortunately, previous years, not too familiar with what’s been done. It definitely seems like it’s increased over the last year.   S: Yeah. Okay. Um, so considering that you do work quite closely with the MoveU organizers, do you think anything could be improved? In terms of like preparation, organization, communication? I know you’ve only been here for about a year but is there anything that comes to mind?  I: The only times we’ve ever had like small issues sometimes is student staff that were volunteering for it. There was a few times where there was like miscommunication between where like certain supplies were kept. It was never– there was never any large issues. It was like they would come in looking for– like I know for the.. yoga rave? Whichever one they were using the paint for, one of them they were looking for paint, essentially. And they were quite sure it was.. so there was times like that where we weren’t sure where they were storing the supplies. So, we couldn’t really help them. Could be in like one of the seven different places but only it only happened like a couple times. It was usually like really small things like that. And we would usually just phone [the MoveUBC director] to figure out what was going on. Cuz typically the students would come in a week or two prior event starting. And they would do a practice round of like where everything is, get everything together. So, I think it was just those first few times   when they were starting to do that, there was a few miscommunications on that with like the room numbers where things were kept.   S: Okay. Was that this year’s or like?  I: Yeah back in September or so. All my dates are kind of merging into one to be honest over this last year. We’ve had so many things happen with like the new facility and everything. Umm. But yeah typically it was just small things like that.   S: Small like miscommunications.  I: Or it was like the student staff coming in for the first time, coming to the recreation facilities and like shy to talk to us to find help like where zap straps are, stuff like that. On that end, the most that probably could’ve been done was just to having a really good orientation day for them. Coming in, introducing them to the full-times that they would most likely be talking to. Which they started to do later on. And those were the extent of any sort of issues that we had, communication-wise.  S: Okay. I guess that’s good. It’s not a super big thing.  I: Yeah. Not that significant actually.  S: Nothing drastic yeah. Umm. So, you guys like I said, you work very closely and you provide them with like a lot of resources for MoveU. So, what did you guys want to accomplish by working with this campaign?   I: Umm. I think the biggest thing that we’re wanting to accomplish was just one of our main initiatives over the last two years was increasing inclusivity and like working more with on campus groups and the wellness center. So by working with MoveUBC it coincided with a lot of the movements we’re looking towards. So, one of the more recent ones we were working on was including Asian females that were new to sport into. I forget what programs we were running for them. I think it was a variety that they were doing. There was a lot of things like that that we’re trying to do more so on campus. Getting the groups in that aren’t as accustomed to the fitness center, ‘cause it can be kind of intimidating coming in for your first time just seeing like a ton of lifting platforms and a bunch of huge guys that are just sort of standing there. Um. Especially with the ARC opening. We were branding that more towards people that are new to fitness.   S: Yeah. I could see that.  I: A lot of the movements that were targeting people that were unused to the environment, unused to sort of fitness in general. We definitely wanted to branch out and do more of that. Those were sort of the main, main things we’re trying to achieve this year with them. Thankfully [the MoveUBC director] was looking towards that as well so it helped with a lot of the cross-over we had.    S: That’s good. Yeah. You kind of already answered this. Your target audience sounds like its people who are not so …  I: Our department specifically, our target audience would be students first. Depending on who you talk to within recreation, it’s a little bit different. As a whole, we always prioritize students first. But then let’s say if you go out into the arena, you’re sort of looking at students but then also large outer groups. They do a lot of concerts and stuff out there, so they have a pretty far outreach compared to what we do here. So, we do obviously focus on staff and faculty stuff as well. Public, not so much of a focus currently. Our next year is more pushed towards the staff and faculty involvement. Pretty much across the board all of us, students are first for what we wanna do. Since it is student recreation centre, so we always wanna make sure that student staff are priority here too. We’re wanting to make peoples campus experience best as possible and not just have the gym rented out to public groups 90% of the time.  S: Yeah that’s fair. I don’t know if this question applies because its: what resources were needed for the execution of your events. But it sounds like you guys supply those resources, am I right?  I: Yeah, typically depending on the event– so say it’s a yoga event. Yoga mats and the instructors would typically be through the fitness programs. So that’d be through the fitness program coordinator. We normally, from us, we’re mainly supplying the space that’s being used. But as a whole we’ll supply instructors, we’ll supply equipment for it, spaces, we supply staff if we need it for like helping bring in supplies or coordinating people when they’re coming in. and then any of the smaller items or specialty items usually are brought in by MoveUBC. And then any promo goods would be done by them. But depending on the promo goods, they may order it through the marketing department. So, the marketing department, if they’re doing larger orders usually has the context. Actually, this is a good example. This was one of the bags that [the MoveUBC director] ordered. So we had all the pens like this but had the MoveUBC logo on it. There was the pins, notepads, things like that. So depending on the quantity that theyre ordering, a lot of the time it’ll be through marketing. And then it’s just like an internal transfer. It would need different accounts to pay for it. And then for the smaller goods, so like Fitbits or prizing like that, usually its just order from either supplier or through our sponsorships. So, I know for one of the events, one of our sponsors was lululemon. So they would go and talk with sponsorship teams at the arena and then the arena would then sort of find out who the supplier is and then get in contact that way. So it’s a lot of like, depending on what you’re wanting to order usually you’ll talk to sponsorship and marketing first and then “hey do we actually have..” so it’s sort of the sponsor that could hook us up with something or at least give us a discount on ordering these items.    S: So it sounds like you have all those people that you need just.. there. Yeah.  I: I’m not sure how familiar you are with how many facilities there are but I believe there’s 13 total? Let me see there’s .. one.. two.. three..  S: Like on campus?    I: Yeah, there’s nine main facilities and 13 total locations so depending on the resources that they are needing it could really be like someone from anywhere for that. But the main ones that MoveUBC will be working with will be us and the arena. The arena in terms of sponsorships. But for space-wise, there might be some use with fields. I’m not sure if they did anything on the south end of campus in the fields area. So, between the arena and the football stadium there’s like baseball fields, soccer fields, all of that is run through us as well so depending on the field space, you’re going to one of the different people that figures that out. And I can’t remember if there was anything done down there.  S: I don’t – like I know a lot of the stuff was like in the life building, for sure. And like I think like in Osborne, yeah.   I: That’s another– yeah. And also in the Life building too there’s a whole other like life building ambassador that they would go through for renting that space out. Potentially AMS if they’re wanting to do more than the five, four studios that we have potentially. Cuz the AMS has their own studios as well. There’s also building stress that they might go through as well. Say if they’re wanting to do like an outdoor event, more so than just doing a walk-around, if they like actually have– like let’s say they want to rent the area between the alumni center and the nest, like that outdoor pavilion. There’s like certain people they have to talk to for that. It’s sort of all over the place depending on the event that they wanna do.   S: Oh okay. So, what about like, in terms of resources like, having the support that you need. Like people that are there .. it sounds like you have..?   I: It depends on the event. So usually they will find their own volunteers and she has her own student staff as well when we’re working with her. And then there’s the larger team of MoveUBC as well that are at the other facilities who I – the one downside is that we only ever really worked with [the MoveUBC director]. But she has other partners that are at different facilities that she worked with as well. But the main point of contact that we just went through was just liz for everything. So some of the stuff she might have been asking on behalf of other people. Not quite sure, unfortunately, too much on that end, how much of that was done. but typically there was a few of them that worked with them on projects for MoveUBC, MoveU month. I know there was a few other people that were working on it but we never really met any of them since everything we just did was straight through [the MoveUBC director]. I can’t talk too much on that unfortunately since we’ve only really worked, or at least myself, have worked with [the MoveUBC director]. [The new MoveUBC director] would have a bigger scope of that probably. If you can get him to find time. But he would have the best idea, sort of the whole branch of that entire department. Since for us, at least we only ever worked with [the MoveUBC director]. And then like the student staff that she had coming to help her as well. And  then if she ever needed anything from us typically it would just be with helping set up or if she needed us to have an extra desk staff on to help like coordinate people coming in or come to our meetings to let the staff know of events that are coming out. So they did act as like an information post for the movements, or giving out prizing ‘cause they could store Fitbits and stuff that we could keep in the safe here and then we would just have a list at the desk and then we would be the ones to   help give out prizing so at least it doesn’t go missing.   S: That’s good then that you had enough hands there. Okay, um. Do you have any recommendations for MoveUBC to maybe improve how they work with the people who are involved? Like you and maybe other organizations that they work with?  I: Umm. Not really, honestly. It was really, really easy and straightforward to work with them. ‘Cause essentially all the campaigns that they’re running they knew exactly what they needed for it. And then if there was anything extra they would ask us like “hey is there anything you can donate towards prizing”. They would always come to us months in advance or two so. Honestly no. it was really well organized on [the MoveUBC director’s] behalf so no complaints there.  S: That’s really good. Okay. Kind of the same question but, do you have recommendations for MoveUBC to improve the overall experience for like the target audience? I guess the public? Like how can they better achieve their goals?  I: The downside is we never really saw the stats for their events.   S: Like just UBC Rec? Or everyone?  I: I would assume like, I’m sure [the new MoveUBC director] probably saw the stats from the events. Just to see how the coordination of everything went. We would sort of be told “yeah it was successful” or not but we wouldn’t be seeing like “successful and we were trying to target 500 people but we got 400 people to come in”. We never really saw any of that ‘cause unfortunately it doesn’t really affect us in any way, what those numbers are. It’s more so on their end like okay yeah this event was successful, we wanna do it again next year. And then they’d just tell us “yup this worked well, we would like that spacing next year” and we’d be like “sure”. ‘Cause on our end it’s– we obviously want to see them succeed. But the amount of time it would take for them to sort of explain all of that to us is not really worth it on their part either so for us we’re typically at least, in my position, we’re just sort of helping them get the space and run the event. And then like the marketing department and stuff will help them do all of their promotions and stuff like that. So, I’m sure either [the new MoveUBC Director] or the marketing team would be more in touch with the actual success on a data scale rather than us just being like “great. We know this year was really successful. We had more people than last year”. What the exact number is, I’m not quite sure. But typically yeah we’re just sort of told “yeah it was good” or “it was what we were expecting”.  S: Are you guys usually like– do you guys usually attend the events that are held here? Do you get to see the turnouts?  I: Yeah. So especially with all the events in the studio. I’m here Tuesday to Saturday so I always get to see the ones that are done on the weekends, so we see people there. And we see that there’s always people that are doing classes. I’m just not sure.. like let’s say we’re doing an instructional program. We know that we need at least 8 people or something in this class for it to run efficiently. I’m not sure what the numbers are like for them, for what they’re looking for. Say   if they’re trying to target this one demographic on campus that’s maybe like 5000 people over the entire campaign. Are they just trying to get half of those in or a quarter.. I’m not quite sure on that end what the percentages that they’re looking for. I’ve seen people at their events but if its how many they’re hoping for or more.. Unfortunately on that it’s not really reflected to us too much. It’s more just “here’s what’s coming up. Here’s what we’re wanting to do. It was successful we’re wanting to do it again” or “we’ve done this one campaign now were targeting a new group for next year” kind of thing.  S: Yeah. Like I guess you already said this. Like they wouldn’t really be worth it for them to explain it to you, right? In terms of improving how it would be executed in the future?  I: Yeah. Every so often we get total numbers. Especially if its towards movements that we’re trying to do. But, usually it’s sort of lumped in with everything that has to do with student activity. So we’ll look at like a percentage of student engagement across all programs that were offered. But typically we won’t see an entire breakdown of it ‘cause for us at least we’re just sort of looking at how many students total attended all the events this year, and what percentage of students were a part of UBC Recreation as a whole, and how’s that number looking as a percentage-wise and what can we shoot for next year to see that number go up. Yeah, usually we’re just looking at that main number and then depending on the department they’re looking at, the more specified numbers. But for us in general, for fitness and drop-in sports, we’re just looking at a total number.  S: Yeah. You’re just taking what you need. Umm, this questions a bit– concerning how you guys are involved. Are you guys considering to be a part of MoveUBC in the future?  I: Yeah definitely. It’s really nice working with them. It’s cool to see the different programming that they’re able to bring into the space that either we’re not able to offer or we just haven’t thought of offering. So, its cool to have that different perspective that they’re bringing in and allowing someone else to offer this program within our space is great. It allows us to offer more and have more running within our facility and can’t really say no to that.  S: Yeah. And I feel like without UBC Rec, there would be no MoveUBC.   I: I feel like there would be still something along those lines. It would just be a little more difficult to run since it would probably be more of an AMS initiative. So they would probably do a lot more on the staff/faculty side and try to do more of the movements like “yeah, do your step counters each week” or “do the weekly climb the stairs down to wreck beach”. But I think it would definitely be a lot harder to hit a larger audience of students since they’d be way more limited for space they could use. So, its definitely nice that they’re able to partner with us. We can offer them the gyms and the studios compared to having like a couple studios and a conference space the AMS has.   S: Yeah there’s tons of space you guys have. Umm, I think that is it. Do you have anything you wanna let me know in regards of how you think this campaign went or anything you’re excited about for future MoveU?    I: I think one of the things I’m most excited for is to see sort of what the next campaigns are looking at  are. Especially with the most recent one, where they’re targeting the Asian female demographic. Especially with the international students. I’m interested to see if they’re going to continue on that route with like an international focus or if they’re going to target another demographic or how they’re gonna go from that. ‘Cause from what I’ve heard they had a good turnout for a lot of their events they were doing. So, it’d be interesting to see if they continue on that trend or if they wanna do a different area. I just like seeing the different ideas that they’re doing cuz obviously they’ll always be doing like yoga rave, party Zumba, a lot of those big events will continue in each year. It’s those smaller events that I kinda look more forward to ‘cause it’s interesting to see how them in the wellness center are targeting different groups on camps and sort of seeing how we can also help them with that too.   S: Okay. That’s cool. Alright. I think I got everything I needed.   I: Awesome.                                  Appendix B  Jamie’s Interview Jamie (J):Thank you for coming, do you have an idea of what this whole research question is about?   I (Interviewee): Based off the consent form in terms of improving ubc, as far as I know.  J: Yep so yea that’s pretty much we’re getting the feedback and we’re trying to see what we can recommend for the ubc like the bigger people who organize it better. So let me ask you this question first. What does physical activity mean to you?  I: Physical activity means physical engagement, means any kind of movement whether it be for leisure or sport and in respect to my area aquatics it can mean stretching, exercise, therapeutic, swim, it could mean leisure in the hot tub or recreating with our basketball hoops, family fun focus, and here at the aquatic center, we’re a campus community competition amenity so we’re trying to serve all three groups at once.  J: Oh ok interesting….if you could define health what would it be and what components of it would define good health?  I: If I could define health, umm, health respect to physical and mental well being, I would say.  J: Yeah, the other one is what would define it to be good, how would you be in optimal health?  I would say if someone is happy with their current mental and physical wellbeing.  J: Alright, so this one’s a long question. But your organization has obviously been a partner with move ubc before. So what made did you decide to become a partner again?  I: For a number of reasons, philosophically this is something we want to be doing. We want to engage in students with the community and staff faculty population in movement and in getting them going and we support their active wellbeing, part of the reason would be in addition to getting people to the aquatic centre despite all of our undergraduate that pay their athletics direct fees having free access to the facility, not enough see it so MoveUBC, it was  a no brainer to us we want people in the facility and we strategically positioned our moveubc ward at the end of the facility so they would have to walk through and see everything before they get to the ward.  J: Was it like that before with the old aquatic centre?  I: I’m not familiar, i’ve only been here a couple of years, i know it was different, it was definitely not as accessible as it is now  J: Because it’s a little more outdated right?    I: Right, the old aquatic centre i believe was built in 67 or 76.  J: Oh my ok, yeah . So what other paths or events have you done before and have they always been continuous or did you have to change the curriculum a bit. Like every year?  I: What do you mean? With MoveUBC, this is our first time as soon as I know running with MoveUBC.  J: Oh, this year is the first time the aquatics centre is partnered with MoveUBC?  I: As far as I know, again I’m not sure, (anonymous) which is the operations coordinator, she may have some more insights as to what ran. But we’ve run a number of different events that we want to get the staff, faculty, and community here whether it be sports days for instance, you know run de-stressing days for the students during exam times where we’ll have a class that has treated them to get them in the steam sauna just to relax and destress. So we do a lot of physical activity that way.  J: Can you see these events that happen this year occuring again for next year?  I: Yeah, I hope so I mean that’s the plan, we would love to.  J: It’s like a funding issue is it or is it staff?  I: Not as far as I know, I know (anonymous), she left and she spearheaded this movement or at least this MoveUBC contest I guess. I’m not sure if it’s a funding issue. (anonymous), our director would know more about that as he would approve the funding or not but in terms of investment from the aquatic centre side, it was very low, so we’d be more than happy to support this event again.  J: So what values are important to your organizations, UBC REC?  I: Yeah, so again in general it’s seeing more of our community students faculty, spin it into any kind of recreation whether it be leisure or competition we want to support as many things as possible.  J: So for the next one when partnering with different organizations what do you look for in those partnerships and what are you expectations.  I: It depends, philosophically we want to ensure that we are aligned with respect to you know active living and healthy and again one of our directors, (anonymous), wants us to engage more partnerships, getting people active, getting them out and about, whether it be therapeutic or whether it be sport minded there’s a business component of it as well but at the same time philosophically we want to be doing these things based off our unit plan to support the university and that comes down from santa ono and the rest of the directors    J: What organizations are you partnered with this year, do you know?  I: Partnerships that’s a good one...I’m not sure which organizations we are partnered with, we work a lot through with the musqueam band which is fantastic getting different groups out here into the facility that may not be open to this, diversity and inclusion is all fundamentally important to us. Right now I am running a current initiative with hampton place so I’ve essentially taken an instructor to there, I’m running an aquafit class out of hampton place, it’s the first time we’ve done that here at UBC REC. Normally people would come to our facility but specifically with this group, they don’t have the same mobility or the same accessibility to get to the aquatic centre so we take an instructor to their pool, so that’s an interesting one. It’s the first time we ever done that so we want to increase that.  J: So right now, it’s like a little trial run?  I: Yep, definitely a trial run, I mean with a lot student groups whether it be synchronized swimming or a lot of our sport teams you know we want to partner to get their events in here as well.  J: Ok cool, do you think MoveUBC has improved in terms of preparation organization and communication from past years?  I: I’m not sure, I couldn’t tell you. This is my first year working with MoveUBC?  J: What did you think for marketing and everything this year?  I: Yeah I thought it was great, I thought the initiative and the event was fantastic, the contest was great because it got people all over campus. I thought the choices, because I did the contest myself as a staff, I thought the choices were great because it got you all over campus in addition it wasn’t just sport or recreation based it was healthy eating, it was what other great amenities do we have on campus, the botanical garden so i thought it was great, I’d love to see it expanded further in future years, just offer different offerings and some of the same ones as well.  J: Mmm for sure, what about any things you can improve on this year, do you think there’s any?  I: I’m not sure, I thought the little brochure was really well instructed.  J: Easy to understand?  I: Yeah, I thought it was easy to understand, well designed, I’d like to see more advertisement on moveubc, I’m not sure what promotion activities were done promoted outside of our newsletters and those kinds of things.  J: I know they go to like different classrooms and do a little spiel about it, but I think this year, I don’t know if they did too much of that, I only had it happen once.    I: Yeah, I’m not sure as a staff, I don’t see those things. Yeah, I don’t know if we have promotion events, for instance we have events throughout campus, like the strombola festival coming out, we have a number of different events through January and February and we’re looking to do MoveUBC around the same time so there’s a lot of events to capitalize on, they may have already used those events for promoting MoveUBC I’m not aware of, but that would be my suggestion as well, we’re going to use those events.  J: What does your department hope to achieve by becoming a partner of MoveUBC?  I: I think part of it is again, whether it’s getting people into the facility or not it was getting people active and engaged, showing the facility to new participants or new community staff members it would be great, you know it wasn’t about getting people for registrations or money, it was “let’s show them the pool, let’s show them what amazing space we have” and then go from there.  J: Ok, and who is your target audience and did you reach this audience this year?  I: On my end, I mean it was everyone who was able to participate, we definitely want to see more students in here because again, it is a free amenity for them and we want to help support programs for them. We didn't get a fair number of staff here as well so we do just want to see a lot of new faces as far as i know i did see a lot of new faces go through the aquatic centre. I think with respect to move ubc and what we did as well as the contest it was an easy location because it was fairly central.  J: What was this contest?  I: So this contest as far as i recall, there were two types. The first one was you go to a minimum of 4 different places and you find a special word. Ours, I believe was ‘splash’ and you write it down on a little booklet, and getting four or more would make you eligible to draw for prizes like a fitness class or fitbit. If you were able to get all fourteen words across campus as well as across westbrook village, you would enter for the grand prize which was a bike and a dinner for two.  J: That was awesome, I didn’t actually know about this contest.  I: As far as I know, that was the big push from MoveUBC. This contest that ran almost a month long i think. And i guess MoveUBC day which was Feb 28, we were also there as staff were supporting active wear day and wearing our own active wear.  J: What resource did you end from the university for the execution of the events?  I: So there was promotional posters, we had buttons, we had some stickers, we headed to the front desk, all our staff wore moveubc buttons, but yeah, in terms of graphics, it was all provided by MoveUBC and we’d like to see them again.    J: Did you get everything that you needed?  I: I think so, I can’t speak for the entire team but as far as I know, we got everything we needed. Could there be more? Yeah but at the same time, it comes down to funding and how much were you willing to invest in marketing materials.  J: So for the next one, what are your recommendations for MoveUBC to improve their partnering process and I was thinking expansion maybe along those lines? Do you have any ‘oh I want to partner with LFS for this’ or that kind of thing?  I: I’m not sure, with (anonymous) we had a really good relationship so she simply asked us if we would like to be part of this and we said ‘yes absolutely’ and that was it, that was as simple as our partner process was. Rooms for improvement for the actual process I’m not sure, I’m not sure how (anonymous) approached some of the other groups whether it be the healthy soup place or some other departments I’d imagine it was much of the same because participants wouldn’t get exposure to some of those places.  J: And so for this next one, similar to the last one, but what do you think MoveUBC can do to reach more of the general public?  I: I think it’s more promotional activities, promotional pamphlets, whatever it may be, we did partner with Wesbrook Village Community Centre, I think there’s more opportunities there, again we have a number of yoga studios, whatever else it may be, get some of those people out there. Yeah, I think it’s getting people aware of what amenities they have around here and some of them are free whether it’s the ropes course, the forest, or whatever it may be.  J: I know UBC is a little city in itself.  I: It certainly is, we have a huge population of people living here. Exactly, and it’s a wide range, we have students with their families, kids, seniors that live in and around campus along with faculty.  J: And the next one I think is pretty much given but are you willing to be a partner again?  I: Of course, we’d be more than happy to partner again.  J: That’s awesome.            Appendix C  Henry’s Interview  1.What does physical activity mean to your organization?   Physical activity is a strong pillar of UBC Recreation, as we are constantly promoting physical activity through awareness, active engagement, education, and research. Ultimately we want to reduce barriers and highlight the positive impacts of well-being, which includes physical health and activity.   2. If you could define health, what would it be and what components of it would define good health?   Total health embodies physical, mental, and spiritual health. To have good health, you must actively work towards being physically healthy, mentally healthy and spiritually healthy. This could mean a variety of things to different people, but you cannot achieve total health without working on each of these pillars.  3. What values are important to your organization?  UBC Recreation values participant experience, wellbeing, inclusivity, and sustainability. We strive to uphold these values by increasing physical activity throughout the UBC community, providing excellent programming, and building community.   4. When partnering with other organizations, what do you look for in that partnership/what are your expectations?  When partnering with other organizations, we look for someone who is passionate and agrees with our values and mission statement. Partnerships are all about a shared commonality and working together to achieve a goal. A partner will help to enhance engagement opportunities and help to promote within their community. We would also ensure that we do our part to reciprocate and promote within our community. Both organizations would need to uphold the expectations and requirements of the partnership in order to maintain a healthy partnership.   5. Do you think MoveUBC has improved in terms of preparation, organization, and communication from past years? If yes, how so? If no, how would you have hoped the campaign would have improved? E.g., was it a straightforward process?   Yes, we were contacted months before the MoveUBC campaign was launched and was provided a full packet that contained information that we could supply to our clients and customers. We   participated in the Wellbeing Challenge that encouraged participants to travel to various locations on campus and learn about how they can get involved and improve their overall wellbeing. The website contained a lot of information, not only for partner organizations but for participants and the community. It was straightforward and listed out all the deadlines for the required information that we needed to provide the MoveUBC team. We received a package of instructions, pens, pins, posters, and other promotional material to help advertise the MoveUBC initiative.   6. What did your department hope to achieve by becoming a partner of MoveUBC?  Our facility wanted to promote the sport of tennis and encourage people in the UBC community to get involved. We hope that people in the UBC community will see tennis as an opportunity to get physically active and improve their wellbeing. This could be in after-school programs, breaks in the middle of the day or during the lunch hour, or encouraging faculty and staff to bring their children to the facility. The UBC Recreation department hopes to promote physical activity and wellbeing to the entire UBC community and wants the MoveUBC initiative to be a year-long commitment to all participant groups. We want total wellbeing to be supported by the physical activity programming that we offer across campus. Our diverse programs and expertise will encourage others to incorporate physical activity in their everyday lives.   7. Who was your target audience? Did you reach this audience?  Our target audience for our event was beginner tennis players or people who had never received previous instruction but knew how to play. We wanted to provide the platform for people to learn more about how they can be involved in the sport of tennis. We had 37 people attend who had never taken any programming at our facility before. We encouraged those participants to return and register for programs and facility bookings in the future. 2 participants registered on that evening and we are unsure if more registered for programming after the session.   8. What resources were needed for the execution of your event(s)? Were you able to obtain all necessary resources?  Our facility staff were mainly responsible for creating the materials needed to execute the beginner workshops. Outside of our facility, we required the assistance to promote the event. This was done so through the MoveUBC team and our UBC Recreation marketing department. We had no problem advertising and selling our event as it sold out 3 weeks beforehand.   9. What are your recommendations for MoveUBC to improve the partner process and experience?  I felt that this year there we were able to effectively promote our event and our facility through this process. This year there was a considerable amount of communication and resources provided by the MoveUBC team, in comparison to previous years. I feel that these days social media is a great tool when promoting any organization or event. If we were provided tools specifically designed to use on different social media platforms (newsletters, facebook, etc) like   photos or other multimedia, this could help in the united promotion of MoveUBC across all partner organizations.                                              Appendix D Interview Questions:  1. What does physical activity mean to your organization?  2. If you could define health, what would it be and what components of it would define good health?  3. Are you aware of the MoveUBC campaign?  4. Has your organization been a partner of MoveUBC before? If yes, why did you choose to not become a partner again?/If no, why haven’t you chosen to become a partner? (depending on whether or not they have participated before, it would be just one or the other “if yes” or “if no”, not both).  5. What values are important to your organization?  6. When partnering with other organizations, what do you look for in that partnership/what are your expectations?  7.  Do you think MoveUBC has improved in terms of preparation, organization, and communication from past years? If yes, how so? If no, how would you have hoped the campaign would have improved? E.g., was it a straightforward process?  8. What did your department hope to achieve by becoming a partner of MoveUBC?  9. Who was your target audience? Did you reach this audience?  10. What resources were needed for the execution of your event(s)? Were you able to obtain all necessary resources?  11. What are your recommendations for MoveUBC to improve the partner process and experience?  12. What are your recommendations for MoveUBC to improve the overall experience for the general public?  13. Are you willing to be a partner of MoveUBC again in the future? Why?    References  Aqua Fitness Classes. (2019). Retrieved from: ​https://recreation.ubc.ca/aquatics/aqua-fitness/​.  Braun, V., & Clarke, V. (2006). Using thematic analysis in psychology. ​Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3​(2), 77-101.  Bretthauer-Mueller, R., Berkowitz, J. M., Thomas, M., McCarthy, S., Green, L. A., Melancon, H., ... & Dodge, K. (2008). Catalyzing community action within a national campaign: VERB™ community and national partnerships. ​American Journal of Preventive Medicine​, ​34​(6), 210-221.  Chodzko-Zajko, W., & Schwingel, A. (2009). Transnational strategies for the promotion of physical activity and active aging: The world health organization model of consensus building in international public health.​ Quest, 61​(1), 25-38. doi:10.1080/00336297.2009.10483598  Iancovich, V. (2015). ​Using social media to get students moving: MoveU​. Retrieved from: https://www.utoronto.ca/news/using-social-media-get-students-moving-moveu Loprinzi, P. D., & Beets, M. W. (2014). Need for increased promotion of physical activity by health care professionals.​ Preventive Medicine, 69​, 75-79. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.09.002  Move UBC A campus-wide campaign to encourage movement! (2019).​ ​[PDF file]. Retrieved from​ ​https://canvas.ubc.ca/conversations#filter=type=inbox  Move UBC. (2019). Retrieved from ​https://move.ubc.ca/​. Ooms, L., Leemrijse, C., Collard, D., Schipper-van Veldhoven, N., & Veenhof, C. (2018). Characteristics of insufficiently active participants that benefit from health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) promotion programs implemented in the sports club setting. Bmc Public Health, 18​(1), 685-13. doi:10.1186/s12889-018-5579-2 Wong, F., Huhman, M., Asbury, L., Bretthauer-Mueller, R., McCarthy, S., Londe, P., & Heitzler, C. (2004). VERB™—a social marketing campaign to increase physical activity among youth. ​Preventing Chronic Disease, 1​(3).   The University of British Columbia      KIN 464 Evaluation of Staff and Departmental Partnerships of Move UBCJamie Chan, Sumayya Dean, Sabrina Gaspar, Henry Liang, and Lorenzo Victoria Move UBC is a month-long, annual health and fitness campaign targeted at University of British Columbia (UBC) students, faculty, and residential community. The intent of this campaign is to decrease sedentary behaviour and increase daily physical activity, which can ultimately help decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, anxiety, and some cancers in the population (“Move UBC”, 2019). Move UBC relies greatly on its partners to host exciting and engaging events throughout the month, and the future growth of Move UBC largely depends on partnership contributions. Move UBC PurposeThe purpose of this study is to assess and evaluate the experiences of past staff and departmental partners of Move UBC in order to provide recommendations for Move UBC to be the most supportive and helpful they can be for their partners. Collecting data from past partners provides us with valuable insight about what Move UBC is doing right, and what needs to be worked on in order to form effective partnerships. This information is essential for future campaigns as it will help Move UBC navigate their partnerships in the following years.ParticipantsUBC Aquatics CentreUBC Recreation OperationsUBC Tennis CentreThree past partners of Move UBC that are branches of UBC Recreation Methods Our InterviewQualitative data was collected by conducting semi-structured interviews with each of our three participants, all of whom were initially contacted through emailTwo participant interviews were conducted in person, and the           third interview was conducted as an open-ended questionnaire via          email to better fit the third participant's schedule   In-person interviews were recorded using a recording device and     then transcribed   This data, along with the emailed interview data, was thematically analyzed to identify common themes and create suggestions for Move UBCOur semi-structured interviews included at least 12 questions regarding each partner’s awareness and opinions of Move UBC, their values and expectations when it comes to forming partnerships with other organizations, and their relationship with Move UBC organizersIn regards to their relationship with Move UBC organizers, we wanted to further understand if the partners required more help and resources in the form of software, time flexibility, and other methods of support from Move UBCWe also asked them to compare and contrast their opinions and experiences regarding the execution of this year’s campaign and of previous years FindingsRecommendations for Move UBCOrientation events to help partners and event volunteers become more familiarized and comfortable with the campaign and events before they take placeTeam up with the Wesbrook Village Community Centre to reach the neighbouring population Provide post-event detailed statistics to gauge the event's success as an indicator for whether or not to host events in future yearsReferencesMove UBC. (2019). Retrieved from https://move.ubc.ca/.AccessibilitySuccessful advertising efforts  got many participants involved, but difficult to gauge the success of events without statisticsMove UBC made it easy for students, staff, and others to access various eventsVolunteers need training to help guide event attendeesInclusivity and Participant ExperiencePartners were interested in offering a wide variety of activities to suit everyoneEach partner organization wished to establish and uphold strong values in the communityTheir main reasons for becoming involved with MoveUBC were to increase student participation and build community engagementSatisfactionPartners appreciated Move UBC's high level of organization and attention to detail Move UBC had open communication and engagement with partners months in advanceUBC Recreation partners were content with the provided  promotional material "Passionate people drive the Move UBC campaign""A partner will help to enhance engagement opportunities and help to promote within their community"

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