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Move UBC Campaign Evaluation Uy, Kyle; Anthony, Matthew; Mifflin, Kyle; Standish, Ian; Gatchalian, Brandon 2019-04-02

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report         Move UBC Campaign Evaluation Kyle Uy, Matthew Anthony, Kyle Mifflin, Ian Standish, Brandon Gatchalian University of British Columbia KIN 464 Themes: Health, Wellbeing April 2, 2019        Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.    Group 10 Kyle Uy  Matthew Anthony  Kyle Mifflin  Ian Standish  Brandon Gatchalian    Kin 464 Final Report - Move UBC April 2, 2019  Professor: Negin Riazi                Executive Summary  This project involved data collection and analysis of the Move UBC physical activity initiative at the University of British Columbia campus occurring each February. We began by looking into prior literature on the topic of student health and wellbeing on university campuses, trying to better understand our target population for the Move UBC initiative. Through this research we discovered that students require adequate physical stimulation, as well as mental health support to successfully complete university. We then conducted a survey of undergraduate and graduate students at UBC to ascertain their engagement with, and knowledge of the initiative. The survey returned results indicating low student awareness of Move UBC in both undergraduate and graduate populations, along with low engagement in the events offered by the minority population that was aware of the initiative. Graduate students were found to have an even higher level of unawareness compared to their undergraduate counterparts. Survey respondents indicated that event timing, and lack of appeal of event options were two leading deterrent factors in their lack of desire or ability to attend Move UBC events. We propose that the Move UBC organizers look to improve their target audience awareness and engagement with the campus community through three recommendations: 1) Aggressively use social media and in-class announcements to promote events, 2) Spread event info to graduate student societies and email lists, 3) Refocus event timing structure, along with streamlining event offerings. Through these changes we believe that Move UBC can not only provide a greater, more long-lasting impact on the undergraduate and graduate student populations at UBC, but on the university community as a whole.    Introduction  Move UBC is a yearly campaign in February on the UBC Vancouver campus that aims to promote student, as well as other campus user groups’ health and wellbeing through increased physical activity (PA). PA is an important part of mental and physical health, and programs such as this have the potential to be impactful for the community at large. This project aims to collect insight into the Move UBC campaign’s effectiveness and use that information to develop tools and strategies to further the development and influence of the program in the future. To understand the environment of student health prior to beginning our inquiry into Move UBC, a number of academic articles, as well as “grey literature” (non-academic titles) will be explored throughout this report.  Literature Review  Health and PA promotion can be a complicated matter; often the best course of action to get a diverse group of individuals involved in their personal wellbeing can be elusive. St Leger (2005) discusses the most effective ways to promote health and wellbeing in students in his peer-reviewed article “Protocols and Guidelines for Health Promoting Schools”. Leger discusses the Health Promoting School (HPS) approach to addressing a schools’ cumulative health. This approach analyzes various aspects that play a role in an individuals’ health and wellbeing (Leger, 2005). Leger states the essential elements of the HPS approach as healthy school policies (food, rules, regulations, etc.), the school's physical environment (building, grounds, play space), the school's social environment (relationships; both peer, and with faculty) and individual health skills and action competencies. Leger explains that when HPS is utilized to its full potential, student benefits are seen throughout school life and will carry on through individuals’ adult lives as well. Through the implementation of HPS protocols, Leger argues that even small changes or additions to existing programs or strategies can make a significant difference in student health. In relation to Move UBC, using these strategies to build a knowledge base and promote positive PA experiences for students will make health wellbeing a priority in campus culture. As well, it will effectively lead to individuals wanting to “move” more throughout the day. These strategies are put into place to aid in the promotion of PA and the building of a health-focused community. The research study conducted by Cardon et al. (2012) produced similar findings to Leger (2015), pertaining to the Move UBC campaign. The study discusses comprehensive strategies that schools may utilize to implement a promotion of physical activity within schools. Additionally, Cardon et al. (2012) address the necessity to identify and anticipate the contextual barriers and facilitators before the implantation of these strategies become opportunities for students. The consideration of contextual barriers and facilitators within potential intervention settings is supported by socioecological models on health promotion, which recognize multiple influences on health behavior at personal and environmental levels (Cardon et al., 2012). Though developing evidence-based strategies was successful through their study, Cardon et al. (2012) identify the substantial room for improvement on other fronts of PA improvement; most notably concluding that extracurricular strategies can contribute to adequate levels of PA, however, efforts are needed to further increase implementation of said strategies. This study does lack in some important aspects, for example not addressing the target population’s likelihood of participating. This may share a similar link to the Move UBC  campaign since UBC has a large population of students who commute to and from campus. Commuter students may impact the outreach possible, as a large portion of the student population may not have as much access to the program as those who are living on campus. Strategies focusing on individuals, rather than the sole implementation of gross community PA opportunities may then be necessary to achieve the goal of widespread PA promotion and healthy behavior adoption. Physical activity programs can be harnessed for good in many diverse ways; this can take the form of combating issues that initially are not obvious benefactors of PA. David J. Skornton (2012) discusses in his grey literature article ways in which college campuses can prevent and further secure the safety of their students (Skornton, 2012). The article covers four major points of interest including high-risk drinking, hazing, mental health promotion, and concussion prevention. Promoting health on college campuses varies widely no matter what aspect you approach it from; whether it be promoting easier access to physical activity environments and programs or giving students and faculty a place to feel safe no matter their situations. Alcohol is the most widely used drug on campuses, and therefore many problems can arise from the use and peer pressured use of alcohol in different events. According to Skornton (2012), measures such as the dissemination of data to correct students’ misconceptions of alcohol use can significantly decrease heavy drinking by up to 44% over 10 years. In addition, hazing rituals occur in over 55% of students in, and alcohol is used in over 50% of hazing ceremonies (Skornton, 2012). These further highlights a few of the stressors prevalent in college life, above and beyond a heavy course load and waking early. Rather, college represents a significant change in an individual’s life that can be difficult to get through alone. Universities need to take a comprehensive approach to promote mental health, and physical activity is a great place to start (Skornton, 2012). This is significant in the case of Move UBC, as the program developers need to be cognizant of their target student audience as these individuals are highly influenced by these diverse health impacts throughout their college lives. If PA can be used to curb negative health behaviours in an attractive and engaging way, these stressors could possibly be reduced. Further investigating the impact mental health has on students, a study conducted by The Globe and Mail by Chiose (2016), reported on the evident correlation between mental stress and decreased physical wellbeing, as well as an increased likelihood of suicide in post-secondary students. The online news article “Reports of mental health issues rising among postsecondary students: study” summarizes data collected from the National College Health Assessment. A survey was completed by 44,000 students from 41 different Canadian postsecondary institutions in 2016. The findings of this survey indicate that within a three-year period, there have been substantial changes in students’ reports of perceived wellbeing. Chiose (2016) summarizes that the number of students reporting serious consideration of suicide has increased by 9.5% since 2013. In addition to this, only 22% of students in 2016 have reported the same level of physical activity to that of 2013. Lastly, students indicated a decreased amount of sleep as a result of stress and anxiety. However, Chiose also explains that these reports may be a step in the right direction by discussing how students in 2016 may be more comfortable discussing their mental health than in 2013. Positive findings from this study include decreased rates of drunk driving, as well as binge drinking. The goal of this news article is to raise awareness of the diminishing wellbeing of postsecondary student’s mental and physical health. Further research towards discovering why there has been such a substantial change within a three-year period could prove beneficial. Thus,  an increased number of student health initiatives that could help decrease student mental stress could be beneficial, as well as enacting programs that provide positive health strategies may further improve student wellbeing and openness. Move UBC and other events/initiatives like it are perfectly poised to take advantage of these opportunities to bolster mental and physical health, to promote increased wellness across the university population.  Methods  Study Population Our selected interest group for the Move UBC initiative are non-participants, and we are specifically comparing graduate students to undergraduate students. Graduates will be defined as any individual attending a professional school on campus, or those completing a masters or PhD at UBC Vancouver. Undergraduates will be defined as any individual completing a bachelor’s degree in any year (1-6+), provided the student is attending university on a full time (9 credits or more) basis. There are approximately 10,533 Graduate students at UBC, making up 16.7% of the UBC population. There are also approximately 53,000 undergraduate students at UBC making up 83.3% of the population, however the total number of undergraduate students who are also full-time is not released by the university. This population is important to understand if Move UBC intends to reach and facilitate positive impact for the maximum number of students at the school. Henchy (2013) found that all students at university (undergraduate and graduate) experienced significant positive influences on their academic, mental, and physical health when they participated in campus recreation programs. This is significant as it demonstrates the possible benefits that an effective implementation of Move UBC could have on the greater campus population. Wyatt & Oswalt (2013) further discuss that self reported mental health of undergraduate students is significantly lower than that of their graduate counterparts, indicating that initiatives may need to be further focused on undergraduate students to holistically promote wellbeing on campus. Move UBC must ascertain how their efforts in prior years resulted in unawareness or lack of interest in the program for all students across campus (both graduate and undergraduate). Non-participants are arguably more important than past participants to connect with, as they may be able to provide information on barriers to Move UBC’s program effectiveness, while also providing insight on how we might go about increasing participation in subsequent years.  Selected Methodology For this study we conducted data collection through the distribution of an online survey using UBC’s survey distribution program, Qualtrics. We attempted to distribute the survey half to undergraduate, and half to graduate student participants. We believe a survey is a structured, concise manner to gain quantitative and qualitative insights on what can be improved about prior iterations of Move UBC, and to create a general knowledge about Move UBC awareness across campus. A survey approach also allows for easy distribution and a larger sample size by quickly distributing online so that we can connect with our target population (non-participants) more efficiently. The online distribution was accomplished mainly through social media channels; the investigators published survey links on undergraduate and graduate student Facebook pages, along with reaching out individually to potential respondents that the investigators knew at the university. The survey distributed took no longer than 10-15 minutes to complete thoroughly,  and each participant is presented with a consent form (Appendix A) at the beginning of the survey that will inform them of any risks, along with all information necessary to fully understand the scope of the data collection and usage. The survey questions (Appendix C) are designed to obtain demographic data about the participants, information on barriers to participation, as well as proposed improvements/changes to the program in the future. This data set is important for three reasons:    1. Demographic data is paramount to understanding what section of the student population is not participating in the Move UBC program. 2. Barriers to participation, such as communication deficits and marketing initiatives not reaching the target audience, are important to understand as these need to be optimized for the target population in subsequent years to maximize attendance. 3. Proposed changes to the program should be explored to see if there are specific events or initiatives that Move UBC could include in the future that would increase attendance.  We obtained a total of 36 responses to the survey; 26 Undergraduate and 10 Graduate. More responses overall to the survey from graduate students would have been optimal in order to demonstrate more concrete trends, however these are our final numbers.   Data Analysis Raw data collected through the survey yielded quantitative results due to the nature of the questions posed and answer options provided (Appendix C). The data is visually represented where appropriate using various bar charts, and all raw data (Appendix B) has been made available to KIN 464 course TAs through the collaborate feature on Qualtrics. The quantitative data visualizations allows a more transparent view of trends and patterns amongst survey responses. The Likert scale was one method used to collect and breakdown quantitative data in the survey, when disseminating future Move UBC event options. Responses have been measured, grouped, and compared; in order to produce a more accurate representation of the participants responses. This was then analyzed using descriptive and regression analysis techniques. Regression analysis allows us to examine the influence of one or more independent variables on a particular dependent variable. This manifests in our survey responses by identify which factors influenced the respondents ability to attend events or not. Descriptive analysis provides us with an easily digestible representation of the trends and tendencies in our student populations, as they indicated their interactions with the Move UBC initiative in the past, and its outlook into the near future.  Findings  Our survey ascertaining awareness and attendance of Move UBC events between undergraduate and graduate students received 36 responses, 26 (72.2%) of which were undergraduate students, while 10 (27.8%) were graduate students. From these 36 individual responses, all were students currently enrolled in the University of British Columbia, however there were 34 (9 or more credits) full time students and 2 outliers who were part time students (less than 9 credits).   The survey revealed that the majority of participants were business students (27.8%) while there was 1 (2.8%) education student. There were also Kinesiology (19.4%), Arts (16.7%), Applied Science (13.9%), Science (8.3%), LFS (5.6%) and Medicine students (5.6%). The survey also exhibited that there was an equal split of 18 to 18 individuals who were commuters and non-commuters to UBC each school day, of which we did not see a marked difference in awareness or engagement in the Move UBC events. As our survey was proposed to benefit future Move UBC events, we therefore had to understand how much physical activity individuals at the university were undertaking on a weekly basis from our respondents.  Fig. 1 Most of our responses came from students who claimed to do more than 7 hours of PA a week; with 13 individuals giving this response (Fig. 1). 4 individuals indicated they either did under an hour of PA, or were in the range of 5-7 hours a week. The other respondents claimed to be in between the ranges of 3-5hr (8 people) or 1-3hr (7 people) of PA per week. 17 students claimed to be doing more than 5+ hours of PA a week, and 28 (77.8%) of the total 36 respondents thought that their weekly PA levels were adequate enough to maintain proper health, while 5 (13.9%) people did not think they were in an adequate range to maintain health and 3 (8.3%) were unsure of their levels of physical activity in comparison to health levels. These individuals tended to have a good grasp on their activity level needs, with ParticipACTION (2018) recommending adults aged 18-64 years of age get 150 minutes (2.5 hours) of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week. With those ranges in mind, ~25 respondents would make this weekly requirement.        Fig. 2  In our survey, after asking the necessary demographic and introductory questions in order to obtain general information on respondents daily lives, we moved on to more specific questions based around Move UBC. From the survey data, we discovered that 75% (27 people) of the respondents were not aware of the Move UBC events prior to this survey, while 9 individuals were aware of Move UBC (Fig. 2). Out of the 9 people who knew of Move UBC, 5 of them attended an event this year while the other 4 did not attend. For individuals who had not heard of Move UBC, we provided a short description of what Move UBC events entailed and asked if individuals would attend now that they are informed. Only 58% of respondents said yes. Out of the 10 graduate student responses, there was only 1 respondent that had heard of Move UBC before. This indicates that 89% of individuals who have heard of Move UBC are undergraduate students. Interestingly, although not surprising, was that the sole individual who had heard of Move UBC that was in graduate school was enrolled in the faculty of Kinesiology; students in Kinesiology tend to be more informed on active and healthy lifestyles in comparison to alternate faculties due to the nature of their studies. Another interesting finding was which faculties were more aware of Move UBC in comparison to others. As 7 of the 9 individuals who said they knew about Move UBC were either Kinesiology or Medicine students; 78% of the students that were aware of Move UBC were in a faculty that is based around health. Overall there were 7 Kinesiology students that responded to the survey and 6 out of the 7 knew about Move UBC; therefore 86% of the students in Kinesiology were aware of the events.          Fig. 3   Out of the 9 individuals who had heard of Move UBC, 6 of them heard about Move UBC from word of mouth, while others heard from routes such as social media, posters, websites or newsletters (Fig. 3). Despite the majority of people finding out about this through word of mouth, the majority of 35 respondents (68.6%) explained that the best way of informing them of events such as these was social media, while the next closest response was through in-class announcements. We decided that it would help the future of Move UBC if we found out what inspires and motivates individuals to become more active, through this we find how to intrigue more people to participate in events. The highest inspirations explained by 34 respondents was from gaining fitness levels, mood boosts and lowering stress levels.   Fig. 4    In order to gain a greater understanding of what specific types of events appeal to the majority of our sample population, we asked how interested individuals would be in each event class (organized sport, nutrition seminars, fitness classes, yoga class, mental health talks, in-class movement breaks, aquatic classes) (Fig. 4). A majority of respondents (25.7%) indicated they were very interested in in-class movement breaks, but our findings also stated that 22.9% of respondents said they were not at all interested in these same in-class activities, demonstrating a polarization of the sample population. The most universally agreeable event type was organized sport events, with over 50% of respondents indicating that they are at least somewhat interested in these types of Move UBC initiatives in the future (and almost 70% are cumulatively interested to some degree). The least agreeable event type was aquatic classes, with >50% of respondents indicating to some degree that they are not interested in participating in this type of event in the future.  Fig. 5   In the fitness and health industry there are many forms of barriers individuals encounter that limit their ability to participate in PA. As for our survey, the majority of individuals claimed that “timing” is the biggest reason that would prevent them from attending a Move UBC event (Fig. 5). 26 individuals explained that if the Move UBC event coincided with school or work commitments they would not attend. The next greatest barrier that posed our respondents was the lack of benefits foreseen, which 12 respondents selected. The other barriers that respondents indicated a concern with were lack of appeal to events, lack of access at certain times, uncomfortable feelings with going to an event alone and lack of confidence with their personal skill levels in fitness/health activities.       Fig. 6   Out of the 5 individuals that had attended a Move UBC event before, we wanted to know what events they went to (respondents were allowed to select as many events as they had gone to, not just one) (Fig. 6). All 5 had attended a health promotion event, while 2 attended a fitness or speaking event. The other events that were attended by 1 person were organized sports, walking or an unspecified event. With no individuals having attended an aquatics related event, this further corroborates the lack of desire for these events to be held by the general student population we surveyed.   Discussion  Through the survey findings it is evident that the primary reason both undergraduate and graduate students have not attended Move UBC events is because they are simply unaware of them. Only 9 (25%) of the 36 students we surveyed were previously aware of such events, one (11.1% of aware participants) of which was a graduate student. This may indicate that undergraduate students now are more aware of Move UBC than previous undergraduates, possibly as a result of recent increases in publicization across campus this year (this was not specifically addressed in our survey though, so that is a potential limitation). However, due to the general lack of awareness, it is important to address how individuals hear about these events and how to further publicize them. The survey gave insight into how these individuals were becoming aware of Move UBC events, indicating that 66% of the previous attendees heard about the events through word of mouth, 55% social media, 33% posters and websites, 22% other, and only 11% through a newsletter (Fig. 3). It is clear that additional marketing strategies such as advertising and promotion is necessary in order to grow awareness of Move UBC in order to increase attendance rates and overall success of the program. These marketing materials should be focused around digital proliferation techniques in the future, as they are low cost, low time commitment, reach a large proportion of the UBC student body, and are environmentally sustainable.   Fig. 7  Due to the potential differences in interests that may be related to which faculty a student is in, it is important to acknowledge which faculties are currently aware and unaware of Move UBC; 66.7% of kinesiology students had heard of Move UBC while only 11.1% of business, arts, and medicine students had heard of it, and 0% of applied science, science, land and food systems, and arts students were aware of Move UBC (Fig. 7). The strong statistical discrepancy between faculties awareness clearly indicates that kinesiology students are much more aware of Move UBC; which is not surprising due to the health and fitness relation to the faculty itself. Therefore, increased marketing towards non-kinesiology students could result in increased awareness to a much larger population, ultimately resulting in a more active and healthy student body. This study faced a number of limitations that could have affected results, or confounded future projections for Move UBC’s success rate. Firstly, distribution channels were rather limited for the survey. The investigators distributed the survey mainly through Facebook groups, and private messages on that platform.   Fig. 8   While many respondents indicated that social media is a preferred method of contact (Fig. 8), the lack of diversity in respondent profiles may have come from the narrow distribution channel selected. In future research opportunities, distributing surveys in person across campus, as well as online, would most likely provide a more general (random) sample of the population. Secondly, the lack of ability for follow-up questions limits our ability to understand how some respondents may have interpreted various survey questions. This further confounds the data collected due to respondents possibly choosing an option they did not agree with for the sole reason that they had to select something to move on. If we were to re-run this study, we would allow for the by-passing of questions on the survey, and we would also like to conduct a qualitative component to our research in the field to gain more in depth thematic knowledge on why individuals liked/disliked Move UBC. Lastly, our sample size was fairly small. With only 36 respondents at a university comprised of 50,000+ students, it is difficult to obtain a representative sample of the UBC population. In the future, with a longer horizon for data collection, we would like to increase the sample size to gain a more holistic view of the student population. We believe these results and data are not only limited in their application to the Move UBC initiative. Extrapolation of the results is encouraged for other PA promotion programs that are looking to engage a similar young-adult demographic. The results outlining the types of events individuals in this demographic profile want to attend, along with the best methods for reaching out to them are invaluable to a diverse set of physical activity and health promotion organizations that are looking to more effectively engage with their clientele.  Recommendations  While Move UBC has undoubtedly changed the PA engagement on campus for the better during a stressful second semester midterm season (February), it has areas that could benefit greatly from more focused attention. Following are three of our specific recommendations, backed up by survey response data, to aid Move UBC in becoming a more impactful source for health and wellbeing on campus.  1. The vast majority of respondents are not aware of Move UBC events (75%). Therefore, a need exists to focus on promotion materials. 66% of respondents that had heard about Move UBC did so through word of mouth, although respondents indicated this isn’t the best way to reach them. Move UBC should focus on student’s preferred methods of communication for these event types: Social media, In-class announcements, and Email (Fig. 8). This will help raise awareness about Move UBC’s presence on campus, positively affecting engagement rates in events.  2. Graduate students are much more likely to be unaware of Move UBC events than undergraduate students (Fig. 2). This is further exacerbated through lack of awareness in applied science, science, land and food systems, and arts faculties (Fig. 7). Spreading info about events through graduate student societies, especially those in the aforementioned faculties should raise awareness and subsequently engagement. This can be accomplished  through posting on Facebook groups, contacting graduate society executives, and by going to classes or labs to give a short presentation before lectures begin.  3. 42% of respondents said they would not like to attend a Move UBC event even after they knew what it was (Appendix C, question 12; Appendix D). This may be due to barriers of participation (Fig.5), though we were not able to directly correlate these variables due to a lack of follow up question ability; but this large group of respondents should be addressed. We believe that by offering more diverse time slots (more activities outside of class hours, or on weekends), and by focusing on the most popular event types (Fig. 4: organized sport, in-class movement breaks), more individuals may wish to/be able to engage with Move UBC events in the future on campus.      References  Cardon, G. M., Acker, R. V., Seghers, J., Martelaer, K. D., Haerens, L. L., & Bourdeaudhuij, I. M. (2012). Physical activity promotion in schools: Which strategies do schools (not) implement and which socioecological factors are associated with implementation? ​Health Education Research,27​(3), 470-483. Doi:10.1093/her/cys043  Chiose, S. (2016). ​Reports of mental health issues rising among postsecondary students: study​. Retrieved from https://www.theglobeandmail.com  Leger, L. S. (2005). Protocols and Guidelines for Health Promoting Schools. ​Promotion & Education, ​12(3-4), 145-147. Doi: 10.1177/1025382050120030112  ParticipACTION. (2018). Activity Guidelines. Retrieved from https://www.participaction.com/en-ca/benefits-and-guidelines/adults-18-to-64  Skorton, D. J. (2012). Promotion of Student Health and Wellbeing on College Campuses. Retrieved from https://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-j-skorton/student-health-_b_1862344.html  Henchy, A. (2013). The perceived benefits of participating in campus recreation programs and facilities: A comparison between undergraduate and graduate students. ​Recreational sports journal​, 37(2), 97-105.   Ong, A. D., & Weiss, D. J. (2000). The Impact of Anonymity on Responses to Sensitive Questions 1. ​Journal of Applied Social Psychology​, ​30​(8), 1691-1708.  Wyatt, T., & Oswalt, S. B. (2013). Comparing mental health issues among undergraduate and graduate students. ​American journal of health education​, 44(2), 96-107.    Appendices  Appendix A - Consent Form and Respondent Signatures        Respondent Signatures from Consent Forms* (*Pulled from Qualtrics)                                            Appendix B - Raw Data  *The raw data is contained on Qualtrics and has been shared with our TA, Thalia Otamendi, for viewing and analysis.     Appendix C - Survey Questions          Appendix D - Move UBC attendance post-awareness description (Q12)    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report         Move UBC Campaign Evaluation Kyle Uy, Matthew Anthony, Kyle Mifflin, Ian Standish, Brandon Gatchalian University of British Columbia KIN 464 Themes: Health, Wellbeing April 2, 2019        Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.    Group 10 Kyle Uy  Matthew Anthony  Kyle Mifflin  Ian Standish  Brandon Gatchalian    Kin 464 Final Report - Move UBC April 2, 2019  Professor: Negin Riazi                Executive Summary  This project involved data collection and analysis of the Move UBC physical activity initiative at the University of British Columbia campus occurring each February. We began by looking into prior literature on the topic of student health and wellbeing on university campuses, trying to better understand our target population for the Move UBC initiative. Through this research we discovered that students require adequate physical stimulation, as well as mental health support to successfully complete university. We then conducted a survey of undergraduate and graduate students at UBC to ascertain their engagement with, and knowledge of the initiative. The survey returned results indicating low student awareness of Move UBC in both undergraduate and graduate populations, along with low engagement in the events offered by the minority population that was aware of the initiative. Graduate students were found to have an even higher level of unawareness compared to their undergraduate counterparts. Survey respondents indicated that event timing, and lack of appeal of event options were two leading deterrent factors in their lack of desire or ability to attend Move UBC events. We propose that the Move UBC organizers look to improve their target audience awareness and engagement with the campus community through three recommendations: 1) Aggressively use social media and in-class announcements to promote events, 2) Spread event info to graduate student societies and email lists, 3) Refocus event timing structure, along with streamlining event offerings. Through these changes we believe that Move UBC can not only provide a greater, more long-lasting impact on the undergraduate and graduate student populations at UBC, but on the university community as a whole.    Introduction  Move UBC is a yearly campaign in February on the UBC Vancouver campus that aims to promote student, as well as other campus user groups’ health and wellbeing through increased physical activity (PA). PA is an important part of mental and physical health, and programs such as this have the potential to be impactful for the community at large. This project aims to collect insight into the Move UBC campaign’s effectiveness and use that information to develop tools and strategies to further the development and influence of the program in the future. To understand the environment of student health prior to beginning our inquiry into Move UBC, a number of academic articles, as well as “grey literature” (non-academic titles) will be explored throughout this report.  Literature Review  Health and PA promotion can be a complicated matter; often the best course of action to get a diverse group of individuals involved in their personal wellbeing can be elusive. St Leger (2005) discusses the most effective ways to promote health and wellbeing in students in his peer-reviewed article “Protocols and Guidelines for Health Promoting Schools”. Leger discusses the Health Promoting School (HPS) approach to addressing a schools’ cumulative health. This approach analyzes various aspects that play a role in an individuals’ health and wellbeing (Leger, 2005). Leger states the essential elements of the HPS approach as healthy school policies (food, rules, regulations, etc.), the school's physical environment (building, grounds, play space), the school's social environment (relationships; both peer, and with faculty) and individual health skills and action competencies. Leger explains that when HPS is utilized to its full potential, student benefits are seen throughout school life and will carry on through individuals’ adult lives as well. Through the implementation of HPS protocols, Leger argues that even small changes or additions to existing programs or strategies can make a significant difference in student health. In relation to Move UBC, using these strategies to build a knowledge base and promote positive PA experiences for students will make health wellbeing a priority in campus culture. As well, it will effectively lead to individuals wanting to “move” more throughout the day. These strategies are put into place to aid in the promotion of PA and the building of a health-focused community. The research study conducted by Cardon et al. (2012) produced similar findings to Leger (2015), pertaining to the Move UBC campaign. The study discusses comprehensive strategies that schools may utilize to implement a promotion of physical activity within schools. Additionally, Cardon et al. (2012) address the necessity to identify and anticipate the contextual barriers and facilitators before the implantation of these strategies become opportunities for students. The consideration of contextual barriers and facilitators within potential intervention settings is supported by socioecological models on health promotion, which recognize multiple influences on health behavior at personal and environmental levels (Cardon et al., 2012). Though developing evidence-based strategies was successful through their study, Cardon et al. (2012) identify the substantial room for improvement on other fronts of PA improvement; most notably concluding that extracurricular strategies can contribute to adequate levels of PA, however, efforts are needed to further increase implementation of said strategies. This study does lack in some important aspects, for example not addressing the target population’s likelihood of participating. This may share a similar link to the Move UBC  campaign since UBC has a large population of students who commute to and from campus. Commuter students may impact the outreach possible, as a large portion of the student population may not have as much access to the program as those who are living on campus. Strategies focusing on individuals, rather than the sole implementation of gross community PA opportunities may then be necessary to achieve the goal of widespread PA promotion and healthy behavior adoption. Physical activity programs can be harnessed for good in many diverse ways; this can take the form of combating issues that initially are not obvious benefactors of PA. David J. Skornton (2012) discusses in his grey literature article ways in which college campuses can prevent and further secure the safety of their students (Skornton, 2012). The article covers four major points of interest including high-risk drinking, hazing, mental health promotion, and concussion prevention. Promoting health on college campuses varies widely no matter what aspect you approach it from; whether it be promoting easier access to physical activity environments and programs or giving students and faculty a place to feel safe no matter their situations. Alcohol is the most widely used drug on campuses, and therefore many problems can arise from the use and peer pressured use of alcohol in different events. According to Skornton (2012), measures such as the dissemination of data to correct students’ misconceptions of alcohol use can significantly decrease heavy drinking by up to 44% over 10 years. In addition, hazing rituals occur in over 55% of students in, and alcohol is used in over 50% of hazing ceremonies (Skornton, 2012). These further highlights a few of the stressors prevalent in college life, above and beyond a heavy course load and waking early. Rather, college represents a significant change in an individual’s life that can be difficult to get through alone. Universities need to take a comprehensive approach to promote mental health, and physical activity is a great place to start (Skornton, 2012). This is significant in the case of Move UBC, as the program developers need to be cognizant of their target student audience as these individuals are highly influenced by these diverse health impacts throughout their college lives. If PA can be used to curb negative health behaviours in an attractive and engaging way, these stressors could possibly be reduced. Further investigating the impact mental health has on students, a study conducted by The Globe and Mail by Chiose (2016), reported on the evident correlation between mental stress and decreased physical wellbeing, as well as an increased likelihood of suicide in post-secondary students. The online news article “Reports of mental health issues rising among postsecondary students: study” summarizes data collected from the National College Health Assessment. A survey was completed by 44,000 students from 41 different Canadian postsecondary institutions in 2016. The findings of this survey indicate that within a three-year period, there have been substantial changes in students’ reports of perceived wellbeing. Chiose (2016) summarizes that the number of students reporting serious consideration of suicide has increased by 9.5% since 2013. In addition to this, only 22% of students in 2016 have reported the same level of physical activity to that of 2013. Lastly, students indicated a decreased amount of sleep as a result of stress and anxiety. However, Chiose also explains that these reports may be a step in the right direction by discussing how students in 2016 may be more comfortable discussing their mental health than in 2013. Positive findings from this study include decreased rates of drunk driving, as well as binge drinking. The goal of this news article is to raise awareness of the diminishing wellbeing of postsecondary student’s mental and physical health. Further research towards discovering why there has been such a substantial change within a three-year period could prove beneficial. Thus,  an increased number of student health initiatives that could help decrease student mental stress could be beneficial, as well as enacting programs that provide positive health strategies may further improve student wellbeing and openness. Move UBC and other events/initiatives like it are perfectly poised to take advantage of these opportunities to bolster mental and physical health, to promote increased wellness across the university population.  Methods  Study Population Our selected interest group for the Move UBC initiative are non-participants, and we are specifically comparing graduate students to undergraduate students. Graduates will be defined as any individual attending a professional school on campus, or those completing a masters or PhD at UBC Vancouver. Undergraduates will be defined as any individual completing a bachelor’s degree in any year (1-6+), provided the student is attending university on a full time (9 credits or more) basis. There are approximately 10,533 Graduate students at UBC, making up 16.7% of the UBC population. There are also approximately 53,000 undergraduate students at UBC making up 83.3% of the population, however the total number of undergraduate students who are also full-time is not released by the university. This population is important to understand if Move UBC intends to reach and facilitate positive impact for the maximum number of students at the school. Henchy (2013) found that all students at university (undergraduate and graduate) experienced significant positive influences on their academic, mental, and physical health when they participated in campus recreation programs. This is significant as it demonstrates the possible benefits that an effective implementation of Move UBC could have on the greater campus population. Wyatt & Oswalt (2013) further discuss that self reported mental health of undergraduate students is significantly lower than that of their graduate counterparts, indicating that initiatives may need to be further focused on undergraduate students to holistically promote wellbeing on campus. Move UBC must ascertain how their efforts in prior years resulted in unawareness or lack of interest in the program for all students across campus (both graduate and undergraduate). Non-participants are arguably more important than past participants to connect with, as they may be able to provide information on barriers to Move UBC’s program effectiveness, while also providing insight on how we might go about increasing participation in subsequent years.  Selected Methodology For this study we conducted data collection through the distribution of an online survey using UBC’s survey distribution program, Qualtrics. We attempted to distribute the survey half to undergraduate, and half to graduate student participants. We believe a survey is a structured, concise manner to gain quantitative and qualitative insights on what can be improved about prior iterations of Move UBC, and to create a general knowledge about Move UBC awareness across campus. A survey approach also allows for easy distribution and a larger sample size by quickly distributing online so that we can connect with our target population (non-participants) more efficiently. The online distribution was accomplished mainly through social media channels; the investigators published survey links on undergraduate and graduate student Facebook pages, along with reaching out individually to potential respondents that the investigators knew at the university. The survey distributed took no longer than 10-15 minutes to complete thoroughly,  and each participant is presented with a consent form (Appendix A) at the beginning of the survey that will inform them of any risks, along with all information necessary to fully understand the scope of the data collection and usage. The survey questions (Appendix C) are designed to obtain demographic data about the participants, information on barriers to participation, as well as proposed improvements/changes to the program in the future. This data set is important for three reasons:    1. Demographic data is paramount to understanding what section of the student population is not participating in the Move UBC program. 2. Barriers to participation, such as communication deficits and marketing initiatives not reaching the target audience, are important to understand as these need to be optimized for the target population in subsequent years to maximize attendance. 3. Proposed changes to the program should be explored to see if there are specific events or initiatives that Move UBC could include in the future that would increase attendance.  We obtained a total of 36 responses to the survey; 26 Undergraduate and 10 Graduate. More responses overall to the survey from graduate students would have been optimal in order to demonstrate more concrete trends, however these are our final numbers.   Data Analysis Raw data collected through the survey yielded quantitative results due to the nature of the questions posed and answer options provided (Appendix C). The data is visually represented where appropriate using various bar charts, and all raw data (Appendix B) has been made available to KIN 464 course TAs through the collaborate feature on Qualtrics. The quantitative data visualizations allows a more transparent view of trends and patterns amongst survey responses. The Likert scale was one method used to collect and breakdown quantitative data in the survey, when disseminating future Move UBC event options. Responses have been measured, grouped, and compared; in order to produce a more accurate representation of the participants responses. This was then analyzed using descriptive and regression analysis techniques. Regression analysis allows us to examine the influence of one or more independent variables on a particular dependent variable. This manifests in our survey responses by identify which factors influenced the respondents ability to attend events or not. Descriptive analysis provides us with an easily digestible representation of the trends and tendencies in our student populations, as they indicated their interactions with the Move UBC initiative in the past, and its outlook into the near future.  Findings  Our survey ascertaining awareness and attendance of Move UBC events between undergraduate and graduate students received 36 responses, 26 (72.2%) of which were undergraduate students, while 10 (27.8%) were graduate students. From these 36 individual responses, all were students currently enrolled in the University of British Columbia, however there were 34 (9 or more credits) full time students and 2 outliers who were part time students (less than 9 credits).   The survey revealed that the majority of participants were business students (27.8%) while there was 1 (2.8%) education student. There were also Kinesiology (19.4%), Arts (16.7%), Applied Science (13.9%), Science (8.3%), LFS (5.6%) and Medicine students (5.6%). The survey also exhibited that there was an equal split of 18 to 18 individuals who were commuters and non-commuters to UBC each school day, of which we did not see a marked difference in awareness or engagement in the Move UBC events. As our survey was proposed to benefit future Move UBC events, we therefore had to understand how much physical activity individuals at the university were undertaking on a weekly basis from our respondents.  Fig. 1 Most of our responses came from students who claimed to do more than 7 hours of PA a week; with 13 individuals giving this response (Fig. 1). 4 individuals indicated they either did under an hour of PA, or were in the range of 5-7 hours a week. The other respondents claimed to be in between the ranges of 3-5hr (8 people) or 1-3hr (7 people) of PA per week. 17 students claimed to be doing more than 5+ hours of PA a week, and 28 (77.8%) of the total 36 respondents thought that their weekly PA levels were adequate enough to maintain proper health, while 5 (13.9%) people did not think they were in an adequate range to maintain health and 3 (8.3%) were unsure of their levels of physical activity in comparison to health levels. These individuals tended to have a good grasp on their activity level needs, with ParticipACTION (2018) recommending adults aged 18-64 years of age get 150 minutes (2.5 hours) of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week. With those ranges in mind, ~25 respondents would make this weekly requirement.        Fig. 2  In our survey, after asking the necessary demographic and introductory questions in order to obtain general information on respondents daily lives, we moved on to more specific questions based around Move UBC. From the survey data, we discovered that 75% (27 people) of the respondents were not aware of the Move UBC events prior to this survey, while 9 individuals were aware of Move UBC (Fig. 2). Out of the 9 people who knew of Move UBC, 5 of them attended an event this year while the other 4 did not attend. For individuals who had not heard of Move UBC, we provided a short description of what Move UBC events entailed and asked if individuals would attend now that they are informed. Only 58% of respondents said yes. Out of the 10 graduate student responses, there was only 1 respondent that had heard of Move UBC before. This indicates that 89% of individuals who have heard of Move UBC are undergraduate students. Interestingly, although not surprising, was that the sole individual who had heard of Move UBC that was in graduate school was enrolled in the faculty of Kinesiology; students in Kinesiology tend to be more informed on active and healthy lifestyles in comparison to alternate faculties due to the nature of their studies. Another interesting finding was which faculties were more aware of Move UBC in comparison to others. As 7 of the 9 individuals who said they knew about Move UBC were either Kinesiology or Medicine students; 78% of the students that were aware of Move UBC were in a faculty that is based around health. Overall there were 7 Kinesiology students that responded to the survey and 6 out of the 7 knew about Move UBC; therefore 86% of the students in Kinesiology were aware of the events.          Fig. 3   Out of the 9 individuals who had heard of Move UBC, 6 of them heard about Move UBC from word of mouth, while others heard from routes such as social media, posters, websites or newsletters (Fig. 3). Despite the majority of people finding out about this through word of mouth, the majority of 35 respondents (68.6%) explained that the best way of informing them of events such as these was social media, while the next closest response was through in-class announcements. We decided that it would help the future of Move UBC if we found out what inspires and motivates individuals to become more active, through this we find how to intrigue more people to participate in events. The highest inspirations explained by 34 respondents was from gaining fitness levels, mood boosts and lowering stress levels.   Fig. 4    In order to gain a greater understanding of what specific types of events appeal to the majority of our sample population, we asked how interested individuals would be in each event class (organized sport, nutrition seminars, fitness classes, yoga class, mental health talks, in-class movement breaks, aquatic classes) (Fig. 4). A majority of respondents (25.7%) indicated they were very interested in in-class movement breaks, but our findings also stated that 22.9% of respondents said they were not at all interested in these same in-class activities, demonstrating a polarization of the sample population. The most universally agreeable event type was organized sport events, with over 50% of respondents indicating that they are at least somewhat interested in these types of Move UBC initiatives in the future (and almost 70% are cumulatively interested to some degree). The least agreeable event type was aquatic classes, with >50% of respondents indicating to some degree that they are not interested in participating in this type of event in the future.  Fig. 5   In the fitness and health industry there are many forms of barriers individuals encounter that limit their ability to participate in PA. As for our survey, the majority of individuals claimed that “timing” is the biggest reason that would prevent them from attending a Move UBC event (Fig. 5). 26 individuals explained that if the Move UBC event coincided with school or work commitments they would not attend. The next greatest barrier that posed our respondents was the lack of benefits foreseen, which 12 respondents selected. The other barriers that respondents indicated a concern with were lack of appeal to events, lack of access at certain times, uncomfortable feelings with going to an event alone and lack of confidence with their personal skill levels in fitness/health activities.       Fig. 6   Out of the 5 individuals that had attended a Move UBC event before, we wanted to know what events they went to (respondents were allowed to select as many events as they had gone to, not just one) (Fig. 6). All 5 had attended a health promotion event, while 2 attended a fitness or speaking event. The other events that were attended by 1 person were organized sports, walking or an unspecified event. With no individuals having attended an aquatics related event, this further corroborates the lack of desire for these events to be held by the general student population we surveyed.   Discussion  Through the survey findings it is evident that the primary reason both undergraduate and graduate students have not attended Move UBC events is because they are simply unaware of them. Only 9 (25%) of the 36 students we surveyed were previously aware of such events, one (11.1% of aware participants) of which was a graduate student. This may indicate that undergraduate students now are more aware of Move UBC than previous undergraduates, possibly as a result of recent increases in publicization across campus this year (this was not specifically addressed in our survey though, so that is a potential limitation). However, due to the general lack of awareness, it is important to address how individuals hear about these events and how to further publicize them. The survey gave insight into how these individuals were becoming aware of Move UBC events, indicating that 66% of the previous attendees heard about the events through word of mouth, 55% social media, 33% posters and websites, 22% other, and only 11% through a newsletter (Fig. 3). It is clear that additional marketing strategies such as advertising and promotion is necessary in order to grow awareness of Move UBC in order to increase attendance rates and overall success of the program. These marketing materials should be focused around digital proliferation techniques in the future, as they are low cost, low time commitment, reach a large proportion of the UBC student body, and are environmentally sustainable.   Fig. 7  Due to the potential differences in interests that may be related to which faculty a student is in, it is important to acknowledge which faculties are currently aware and unaware of Move UBC; 66.7% of kinesiology students had heard of Move UBC while only 11.1% of business, arts, and medicine students had heard of it, and 0% of applied science, science, land and food systems, and arts students were aware of Move UBC (Fig. 7). The strong statistical discrepancy between faculties awareness clearly indicates that kinesiology students are much more aware of Move UBC; which is not surprising due to the health and fitness relation to the faculty itself. Therefore, increased marketing towards non-kinesiology students could result in increased awareness to a much larger population, ultimately resulting in a more active and healthy student body. This study faced a number of limitations that could have affected results, or confounded future projections for Move UBC’s success rate. Firstly, distribution channels were rather limited for the survey. The investigators distributed the survey mainly through Facebook groups, and private messages on that platform.   Fig. 8   While many respondents indicated that social media is a preferred method of contact (Fig. 8), the lack of diversity in respondent profiles may have come from the narrow distribution channel selected. In future research opportunities, distributing surveys in person across campus, as well as online, would most likely provide a more general (random) sample of the population. Secondly, the lack of ability for follow-up questions limits our ability to understand how some respondents may have interpreted various survey questions. This further confounds the data collected due to respondents possibly choosing an option they did not agree with for the sole reason that they had to select something to move on. If we were to re-run this study, we would allow for the by-passing of questions on the survey, and we would also like to conduct a qualitative component to our research in the field to gain more in depth thematic knowledge on why individuals liked/disliked Move UBC. Lastly, our sample size was fairly small. With only 36 respondents at a university comprised of 50,000+ students, it is difficult to obtain a representative sample of the UBC population. In the future, with a longer horizon for data collection, we would like to increase the sample size to gain a more holistic view of the student population. We believe these results and data are not only limited in their application to the Move UBC initiative. Extrapolation of the results is encouraged for other PA promotion programs that are looking to engage a similar young-adult demographic. The results outlining the types of events individuals in this demographic profile want to attend, along with the best methods for reaching out to them are invaluable to a diverse set of physical activity and health promotion organizations that are looking to more effectively engage with their clientele.  Recommendations  While Move UBC has undoubtedly changed the PA engagement on campus for the better during a stressful second semester midterm season (February), it has areas that could benefit greatly from more focused attention. Following are three of our specific recommendations, backed up by survey response data, to aid Move UBC in becoming a more impactful source for health and wellbeing on campus.  1. The vast majority of respondents are not aware of Move UBC events (75%). Therefore, a need exists to focus on promotion materials. 66% of respondents that had heard about Move UBC did so through word of mouth, although respondents indicated this isn’t the best way to reach them. Move UBC should focus on student’s preferred methods of communication for these event types: Social media, In-class announcements, and Email (Fig. 8). This will help raise awareness about Move UBC’s presence on campus, positively affecting engagement rates in events.  2. Graduate students are much more likely to be unaware of Move UBC events than undergraduate students (Fig. 2). This is further exacerbated through lack of awareness in applied science, science, land and food systems, and arts faculties (Fig. 7). Spreading info about events through graduate student societies, especially those in the aforementioned faculties should raise awareness and subsequently engagement. This can be accomplished  through posting on Facebook groups, contacting graduate society executives, and by going to classes or labs to give a short presentation before lectures begin.  3. 42% of respondents said they would not like to attend a Move UBC event even after they knew what it was (Appendix C, question 12; Appendix D). This may be due to barriers of participation (Fig.5), though we were not able to directly correlate these variables due to a lack of follow up question ability; but this large group of respondents should be addressed. We believe that by offering more diverse time slots (more activities outside of class hours, or on weekends), and by focusing on the most popular event types (Fig. 4: organized sport, in-class movement breaks), more individuals may wish to/be able to engage with Move UBC events in the future on campus.      References  Cardon, G. M., Acker, R. V., Seghers, J., Martelaer, K. D., Haerens, L. L., & Bourdeaudhuij, I. M. (2012). Physical activity promotion in schools: Which strategies do schools (not) implement and which socioecological factors are associated with implementation? ​Health Education Research,27​(3), 470-483. Doi:10.1093/her/cys043  Chiose, S. (2016). ​Reports of mental health issues rising among postsecondary students: study​. Retrieved from https://www.theglobeandmail.com  Leger, L. S. (2005). Protocols and Guidelines for Health Promoting Schools. ​Promotion & Education, ​12(3-4), 145-147. Doi: 10.1177/1025382050120030112  ParticipACTION. (2018). Activity Guidelines. Retrieved from https://www.participaction.com/en-ca/benefits-and-guidelines/adults-18-to-64  Skorton, D. J. (2012). Promotion of Student Health and Wellbeing on College Campuses. Retrieved from https://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-j-skorton/student-health-_b_1862344.html  Henchy, A. (2013). The perceived benefits of participating in campus recreation programs and facilities: A comparison between undergraduate and graduate students. ​Recreational sports journal​, 37(2), 97-105.   Ong, A. D., & Weiss, D. J. (2000). The Impact of Anonymity on Responses to Sensitive Questions 1. ​Journal of Applied Social Psychology​, ​30​(8), 1691-1708.  Wyatt, T., & Oswalt, S. B. (2013). Comparing mental health issues among undergraduate and graduate students. ​American journal of health education​, 44(2), 96-107.    Appendices  Appendix A - Consent Form and Respondent Signatures        Respondent Signatures from Consent Forms* (*Pulled from Qualtrics)                                            Appendix B - Raw Data  *The raw data is contained on Qualtrics and has been shared with our TA, Thalia Otamendi, for viewing and analysis.     Appendix C - Survey Questions          Appendix D - Move UBC attendance post-awareness description (Q12)    PartnersUniversity of British Columbia – Faculty of Kinesiology Move UBC Awareness & EngagementAnalyzing Undergraduate and Graduate Student Participation in the Move UBC Physical Activity InitiativeKyle Uy, Matthew Anthony, Kyle Mifflin, Ian Standish, Brandon GatchalianSummaryThis project examined the Move UBC initiative at the University of British Columbia. We collected data through a survey of undergraduate and graduate students at UBC to ascertain their engagement with, and knowledge of the program. The survey indicated low student awareness and engagement of Move UBC in both undergraduate and graduate populations. Graduate students were found to be less aware when compared to their undergraduate counterparts. Survey respondents indicated that event timing, and lack of appeal of event options were the two leading deterrent factors in their lack of desire or ability to attend Move UBC events. Study Methods• Study Population○Our selected interest group for the Move UBC initiative are non-participants, and we are specifically comparing graduate students to undergraduate students.• Data Analysis○Responses have been measured, grouped, and compared; in order to produce a more accurate representation of the participants responses. This was then analyzed using descriptive and regression analysis techniques.○Descriptive analysis provides us with an easily digestible representation of the trends and tendencies in our student populations, as they indicated their interactions with the Move UBC initiative in the past, and its outlook into the near future.• Selected Methodology○For this study we conducted data collection through the distribution of an online survey using UBC’s survey distribution program, Qualtrics. We believe a survey is a structured, concise manner to gain quantitative and qualitative insights on what can be improved about prior iterations of Move UBC, and to create a general knowledge about Move UBC awareness across campus.Limitations + ExtrapolationThis study faced a number of limitations that could have affected results, or confounded future projections for Move UBC’s success rate; including distribution channel limitations, lack of follow up availability, and limited sample size.We believe these results and data are not only limited in their application to the Move UBC initiative. Extrapolation of the results is encouraged for other PA promotion programs that are looking to engage a similar young-adult demographic. The results outlining the types of events individuals in this demographic profile want to attend, along with the best methods for reaching out to them are invaluable to a diverse set of physical activity and health promotion organizations that are looking to more effectively engage with their clientele.Graduates11% of graduate students were aware of Move UBC but 0% had ever attended an event. After reading a short description of a Move UBC event, 44.4% of graduates indicated that they would be interested in attending. 40% of graduates believed that the programs offered would not be beneficial to them, and 30% would not attend due to having to commute to the eventUndergraduates30.8% of undergraduate students were found to be previously aware of Move UBC. The vast majority of which were kinesiology students (55.6%). Undergraduate students reported much higher levels of physical activity per week and reported that their physical activity levels were adequate to maintain health. After a short description of a Move UBC program, 47.6% of undergraduates reported that they would not be interested in attending.RecommendationsIncrease MoveUBC awareness | through marketing initiatives and utilization of various platforms such as social media, in class announcements, and emailsTarget awareness | in all faculties, focusing on increasing graduate student awareness, in order to reach a larger population and increase overall engagement on campusMore diversified timing and availability of events | such as outside of class hours or during weekends. As well as prioritizing popular events such as organized sport and in-class movement breaks.BarriersFindingsThe survey comparing attendance of Move UBC events between undergraduate and graduate students received 36 responses, 26 (72.2%) of which were undergraduate students, 10 (27.8%) were graduate students. It was discovered that only 9 (25%) of the respondents were aware of MoveUBC events prior to this survey. Of the 9 students who knew of MoveUBC, only 5 of them had attended an event before. Within the 10 graduate responses, there was only 1 respondent who had heard of MoveUBC before. Therefore, 89% of students who have heard of Move UBC are undergraduates. What was interesting and not surprising about this result was that the sole individual who had heard of MoveUBCthat was in graduate school was enrolled in the faculty of Kinesiology, where students are more informed on active and healthy lifestyles in comparison to alternate faculties. Another interesting finding was which faculties were more aware of MoveUBC in comparison to others. As 7 of the 9 individuals who said they knew about Move UBC were either Kinesiology or Medicine students. That makes 78% of the students in that were aware of MoveUBC were in a faculty that is based around health. Overall there were 7 Kinesiology students that responded to the survey and 6 out of the 7 knew about MoveUBC, which makes that 86% of the students in Kinesiology were aware of the events. 

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