UBC Undergraduate Research

Stadium Neighborhood Underground Parkades and Water Storage Ding, Emily; Ferster, Connor; Jarvis, Taylan; Nhung, Sarah; Rodstrom, Jamie; Schaffer, Evan 2019-04-08

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Page 1 UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report Stadium Neighbourhood Underground Parkades and Water Storage Emily Ding, Connor Ferster, Taylan Jarvis, Sarah Nhung, Jamie Rodstrom, Evan Schaffer University of British Columbia CIVL 446 Themes: Water, Climate, LandApril 8, 2019Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.Page 2 Executive Summary The Stadium Neighbourhood is a planned residential development that incorporates a new university sports stadium located in the southwest of UBC campus. Thunderfish Consulting Ltd. was asked to design a stormwater management system and underground parkade for the new development. UBC Properties Trust requires that the stormwater system prevents overland flooding and maintains, or reduces, the flow demand on the outfall pipe located to the SW of the catchment area. The flow demand is based on the existing, pre-development rate, which is currently sufficient to prevent erosion at the outfall.  The selected design proposes to divide the site into three zones: • Zone 1 is the new stadium: the stadium collects its own rain water on its blue roof andstores the run-off in a concrete tank structurally built-in to the top-level of the stadium.The water is re-used as non-potable flushing water within the stadium.• Zone 2 is the athletic field which collects water, detains it underground, and releases itslowly through bioswales where the filtered run-off is further detained in a dry pond.• Zone 3 covers the residential buildings and roadways: water is collected in each buildingin green roofs, ground-infiltrated through permeable paving, or collected off ofimpermeable surfaces and directed into underground storage tanks. All stored water isthen released through a controlled release port to the outfall.In addition to being designed with sustainable development principles, the system releases water into the downstream stormwater system at approximately 35 L/s, an increase of 4 L/s from the estimated pre-development rate of 31 L/s. The proposed design is expected to be constructible within 8 months at a final cost estimate of $12.5 million dollars. Page 3 Table of Contents 1 Introduction 6 1.1 Responsibilities Summary Table .......................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 2 Overview of Design 7 3 Description of Key Design Components 10 3.1 Design Elements .......................................................................................................................... 11 3.2 Collection Systems ...................................................................................................................... 11 3.2.1 Pervious Pavers ................................................................................................................... 12 3.2.2 Green Roofs......................................................................................................................... 14 3.2.3 Athletic Field Collection ...................................................................................................... 15 3.3 Conveyance ................................................................................................................................. 18 3.3.1 Storm Sewer System ........................................................................................................... 19 3.3.2 Bioswales ............................................................................................................................. 20 3.3.3 Rain Gardens ....................................................................................................................... 21 3.4 Detention .................................................................................................................................... 23 3.4.1 Dry Pond .............................................................................................................................. 24 3.5 Site Discharge .............................................................................................................................. 26 3.6 Stadium Parkade ......................................................................................................................... 27 3.6.1 Road Access ......................................................................................................................... 28 3.6.2 Contribution to Storm Water Management ....................................................................... 29 3.6.3 Structural Design and Layout .............................................................................................. 30 3.6.4 Foundation System ............................................................................................................. 31 Page 4 3.6.5 Building Information Model (BIM) ...................................................................................... 31 4 Design Criteria, Standards, and Software 32 4.1 Design Criteria ............................................................................................................................. 32 4.2 Design Standards ........................................................................................................................ 33 4.3 Software Packages ...................................................................................................................... 33 5 Technical Considerations 34 5.1 Stormwater Through the Site and Physical Space ...................................................................... 34 5.2 Parkade & Community ................................................................................................................ 35 6 Stakeholder Analysis 35 6.1 UBC Properties Trust ................................................................................................................... 36 6.2 UBC SEEDS ................................................................................................................................... 37 6.3 UBC BOTANICAL GARDENS ......................................................................................................... 38 6.4 UBC Community and UBC Campus & Community Planning ....................................................... 39 7 Cost Estimate 41 8 Construction Schedule 41 8.1 Anticipated Construction Issues ................................................................................................. 41 8.1.1 Site Conditions .................................................................................................................... 41 8.1.2 Coordination ....................................................................................................................... 42 8.1.3 Cut and Fill .......................................................................................................................... 42 8.1.4 Erosion During Construction ............................................................................................... 42 9 Drawings, Specifications, and Maintenance Plan 43 10 References 44   Page 5 List of Figures Figure 1 Map highlighting proposed site for Stadium Neighbourhood ........................................................................ 6 Figure 2 Flow Chart of the Stadium Neighbourhood Stormwater Management System ............................................... 8 Figure 3 Design for Stormwater Management at Stadium Neighbourhood ................................................................. 9 Figure 4 Example of Partial Installation of Pervious Pavers ....................................................................................... 13 Figure 5 Example of Green Roof ............................................................................................................................. 14 Figure 6 Athletic Field Drainage System .................................................................................................................. 16 Figure 7 Herringbone Style Drainage System ........................................................................................................... 17 Figure 8 Traditional bioswale cross section ............................................................................................................. 21 Figure 9 Example of a rain garden showcased at UBC .............................................................................................. 22 Figure 10 Example of a Dry Pond ............................................................................................................................ 25 Figure 11 Parkade Traffic Flow ............................................................................................................................... 28 Figure 12 Current UBC Botanical Garden Map (Ponds Circled) ................................................................................. 39  List of Tables Table 1 Advantages and Disadvantages of the Preferred Design Strategy ................................................................. 10 Table 2 Required volume for tank storage on top floor of stadium ........................................................................... 30 Table 3: List of Software Packages .......................................................................................................................... 34  Appendices Appendix A: Detailed Design Drawings Appendix B: Cost Estimate  Appendix C: Construction Schedule & Work  Appendix D: Specifications Appendix E: Service-life Maintenance Plan Appendix F: Rational Method Appendix G: Calculations     Page 6 1 Introduction The Stadium Neighbourhood (“SN”) is a proposed development in the traditional unceded territory of the Musqueam and Tsleil-Waututh First Nation, currently occupied by the University of British Columbia, on a primarily green-field site near the intersection of East Mall and 16th Avenue. The purpose of the neighbourhood is to provide mid- and high-rise housing for UBC faculty, staff, and students. The neighbourhood includes the development of a new Thunderbird Stadium, from which the neighbourhood gets its name. The proposed site is outlined in Figure 1, which also highlights the 16th St Corridor catchment area in relation to UBC campus. Thunderfish Consulting was asked to explore design alternatives and conduct a detailed design for both the SN stormwater management system (“storm system”) and a parkade for the new stadium (“stadium parkade”).   Figure 1 Map highlighting proposed site for Stadium Neighbourhood Source: Google Maps   Page 7 SN is located on the relatively small, West 16th Avenue catchment area which drains through a series of creeks and ditches surrounding the UBC Botanical Garden to an outfall in the cliffs of Pacific Spirit Park. The primary purpose of the SN integrated stormwater management system is to protect the cliffs in Pacific Spirit Park from erosion by sustaining, or ideally reducing, the existing rate and volume of stormwater exiting the outfall. Additionally, the storm system must prevent flooding (pooling of water) and overland flow.  The purpose of the parkade is to supplement the capacity of the existing Thunderbird Parkade, located at Thunderbird Avenue at Wesbrook Mall, which provides parking capacity for stadium events. However, the new parkade will primarily be for community daily parking use and not for event parking.  This report discusses the detailed design of the SN and outlines construction plans and specifications, as well as a cost estimate and construction schedule.emi 2 Overview of Design Thunderfish Consulting used a multi-faceted approach that incorporated key components from various alternative designs. These include: storage tanks, blue & green roofs, bioswales, raingardens, pervious pavers, and a dry pond. Thunderfish identified these design components as effective methods to meet the project requirements of flood mitigation and net-zero runoff from SN to the W 16th Avenue catchment outfall. These design elements, that were chosen in combination, help to build resiliency into the storm system and improve adaptation to changes in the hydrological cycles due to climate change. The selected design is divided into three zones as seen in Figure 2, next page:   Page 8  Figure 2 Flow Chart of the Stadium Neighbourhood Stormwater Management System Figure 2 shows the delineation of the three zones for design purposes. In doing so, Thunderfish is capable of isolating calculations to determine flows, storage volumes, and infiltration in an expedient and concise manner. Also, though requiring further investigation, by defining Zone 2 and 3 as such, Thunderfish may choose to separate the discharges accordingly. One strategy is to have all zones flow to the dry pond in Zone 2, which discharges out to the adjacent 16th Street stormwater infrastructure. Alternatively, by isolating Zone 2 and 3 as separate systems, Zone 2 can discharge to 16th Street, and Zone 3 can be constructed to discharge to Stadium Road and its stormwater infrastructure. This may relieve stress on the outfall by increasing time of concentration and possibly discharging to a separate, alternative, outfall upstream of the one specified for this project.   Page 9 Primarily, the driving factor of the selected design is to incorporate as many low impact developments (LID) as possible and to decrease hard surface areas. The premise of incorporating LID is for each system to mimic natural processes in the hydrological cycle such as evaporation, transpiration, and infiltration. This method is known as biomimicry. By incorporating green infrastructure, it is anticipated that there will be less strain or need to upgrade existing infrastructure, which will reduce cost overall as the natural environmental processes will be self-sustainable. LID locations can be seen numbered in Figure 3, below.  Figure 3 Design for Stormwater Management at Stadium Neighbourhood   Page 10 Advantages and disadvantages of the proposed selected design are specified in Table 2:  Table 1 Advantages and Disadvantages of the Preferred Design Strategy Advantages Disadvantages Infiltration reduces demand on system Inevitable disturbance to natural habitat Stadium manages its own stormwater Tank storage and pervious pavers require (bi)annual maintenance   Tank storage allows for expandability Uncertainties regarding future environmental response to inclusion of partly natural systems Tank storage can interface with UBC Botanical Gardens for future re-use  Bioswales promote redundancy by draining to holding tanks  Stormwater diversion from Stadium Road reduces demand on outfall  Raingardens, permeable pavers, and green roofs enhance environment   3 Description of Key Design Components Thunderfish Consulting is responsible for the technical design of the stormwater management system at the Stadium Neighbourhood (SN) project of which, a significant design priority is managing on-site stormwater and designing for climate change resilience. In order to do so, an integrated stormwater management system is employed to allow for collection, conveyance, detention, and if necessary, site emergency discharge.  To design the storm system, anticipated flows are required for the site. These anticipated volumes can be calculated through modelling, by observing historical rainfall data and applying   Page 11 statistics on the likelihood of occurrence of storm severity. A common practice for designing stormwater infrastructure sizing is the use of Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves, which are an aggregate of historical rainfall data and probability of storm occurrence, to determine return periods for a specific location of interest. The IDF curve is used in conjunction with site area and ground characteristics to estimate a stormwater flow rate, or runoff rate. This anticipated runoff rate is used to determine the required capacity of the stormwater infrastructure. Technical design requirements are addressed in Section 8 Design Specifications and Requirements. 3.1 Design Elements The preliminary stormwater management plan for SN can be broken down into four sequential design elements: collection, conveyance, detention, and discharge. Stormwater will first be collected in various features in SN, conveyed through infrastructure to the detention facilities, and discharged at the outfall. Each element of design is broken up into various components that are designed to be sustainable and resilient. The aesthetics around community areas such as plazas and pathways, are emphasized in the designs since SN will be a high pedestrian traffic area during athletic events. Design elements for the parking structure will be discussed further. 3.2 Collection Systems The collection sites in the SN storm system include the following systems: • Green roofs • Pervious pavers and green space infiltration • Athletic field collection   Page 12 The design philosophy is to allow all surfaces to be a functional collection system that processes stormwater in some way. The intention is to eliminate hard surfaces that merely redistribute water to other locations but do nothing to slow or filter stormwater. This is a priority for SN because it allows for a more integrated and sustainable design through the addition of natural infrastructure, such as green space and pervious pavers.  The largest collector on site is the green space located in Zone 2, as seen in Figure 4 (page 9), covering approximately 2 hectares. This space is relied on for natural infiltration which is permissible given its distance of approximately 600m from the cliff outfall location. 3.2.1 Pervious Pavers Traditional pavements, such as concrete or asphalt, is impervious, meaning water cannot infiltrate through the hard surface and must drain to a sewer system. Permeable paving utilizes precast concrete, brick, stone, or cobbles and are placed with gaps to allow water to flow between them (Figure 4). A partial infiltration pervious paver system will be located at the promenade where all rainfall is intended to infiltrate into the underlying soil and drainage system. The promenade will act as the main pedestrian-cyclist friendly walkway connecting East Mall to the west area of the neighbourhood as well as to adjacent buildings. The pervious pavers system is ideal for SN along the promenade as it is a low traffic area with little to no vehicle use. The main goal with permeable paving is the reduction of stormwater runoff volume by infiltration. The reduction of runoff volume will reduce the amount of water to the outfall and, subsequently, erosion of the UBC cliffs.   Page 13  Figure 4 Example of Partial Installation of Pervious Pavers Source: Mississippi Watershed Management Organization The soils at UBC are comprised of silty sand with traces of gravel and cobbles and silt with traces of fine sand and gravel clasts (GeoPacific Consultants Ltd., 2006). A report compiled by Piteau Associates determined the mean hydraulic conductivity to be approximately 1,728 mm/hr with a standard deviation of 576 mm/hr (Piteau Associates, 2002). Due to design constraints, a 4.86 mm/hr hydraulic conductivity will be used instead which will allow for a one metre deep rock reservoir and a drain time of three days (Kerr Wood Leidal Associates; Lanarc Consultants; Goya Ngan, 2012). Water not infiltrated into the underlying soil will flow into the drainage system to the detention pond. More information regarding the dry pond can be found in Section 2.6.  Due to the design of permeable pavers, gaps in-between concrete units tend to fill with debris, referred to as surface plugging (Elgin Sweeper Company, n.a.). Erosion and sediment control measures should be taken into account to limit the amount of sediment entering the site during construction. Maintenance of permeable pavers requires regular cleaning to ensure water will continue to percolate through to the underlying layers. With regular maintenance pervious pavers are expected to last approximately 20 years.   Page 14 Permeable paving must conform to UBC Vancouver Campus Plan Part 3 Section 2.5.1: Surface Infrastructure – Paving and UBC Technical Guidelines 2018 Edition. 3.2.2 Green Roofs Green roofs at SN will contribute to just over 7800 square meters (or 0.78 hectares) of pervious area, while spanning a total of six rooftops. The SN stormwater management system uses extensive green roofs (Figure XX) to filter and reduce stormwater runoff on low- and mid-rise residential buildings. Extensive green roof (EGR) systems are typically designed to be no more than 6 inches in depth and require little to no irrigation. EGR systems are selected for use at SN due to their high performance, effectiveness, and relative low cost. The EGR systems have been designed to mimic a natural environment, while reducing operating and maintenance costs. They are also designed to meet specified engineering performance objectives (Miller, 2016).   Figure 5 Example of Green Roof EGR considers a number of subsystems, including drainage, plant support and nourishment, membrane protection, waterproofing, and insulation. A properly designed drainage system   Page 15 captures precipitation and reduces runoff volumes leaving the roof surface; EGRs also designed to provide protection against erosion, wind, surface ponding, and soil nutrient loss. Plant nourishment and support subsystems provide EGRs with an engineered water holding capacity, a means to prevent erosion within the system, and a sufficient medium for plant growth. The waterproofing systems act as a barrier between the vegetative system and the building’s underlying structural system. The insulation system is included as part of an EGR to contribute to the buildings overall energy saving capabilities.  At SN, the use of EGR systems contributes to the overall reduction of impervious surface on the site. Green roof systems are fast becoming a desirable alternative to traditional roof systems due to their ability to contribute to stormwater filtration, runoff reduction, and transpiration, while also contributing to whole building energy savings. Detailed design drawings can be found in Appendix A, and include both a typical EGR section and component detail. EGR specifications can be found in Appendix D. A typical EGR system can last between 30 and 50 years. The service-life maintenance plan can be found in Appendix E. 3.2.3 Athletic Field Collection The artificial turf athletic field comprises ~10% of the surface area of the proposed Stadium Neighbourhood with an area of ~12000 m2, indicating a significant source of surface water runoff and discharge. The drainage system will divert water collected from the field surface to bioswales leading to the dry pond downstream. The internal drainage installed on the field will conform to common field requirements that ensure proper field management for player safety and maintenance operations.   Page 16  Figure 6 Athletic Field Drainage System The drainage system is designed for a flat-surface field with a 0.5-1.5% slope can be seen in Figure 6, above. Once initial excavation is completed, the subsurface is to be compacted to adequate proctor density, lined with an impermeable liner, and filled with a base layer of gravel within the drainage trenches. PVC perforated pipes, typically 100mm in diameter, will be installed at min. 5 m - max 10 m spacing intervals with a minimum depth of 600 mm and a maximum 6% slope. The perforated pipes will direct the stormwater runoff to a main pipe (PVC or HDPE) drain (200 mm diameter) at the southwest side of the field, which will distribute the percolated stormwater to an outfall oriented at the southeast-most corner to be connected with the bioswale. Catch basins will be installed on the northeast side of the field in 0.5 m depressions for stormwater runoff not captured by the field drainage system and concrete liner with be installed around the perimeter to ensure water drains to the outlet.   Page 17 The design utilizes the fast/immediate percolation of artificial turf and granular subsurface to create effective drainage of the field, while ensuring all runoff is contained and diverted to the bioswale. Rather than allowing the water to infiltrate the native soil underneath the field, the drainage system will accommodate the net-zero design objective for the downstream outfall by collecting all stormwater runoff on the field. Field irrigation will also be captured by the drainage system to be diverted to the bioswale, and the irrigation system will be installed concurrently with the field drainage system. For future reference, the athletic field drainage design may be changed to the owner’s specification to incorporate a crowned field where the drainage layout is changed to a herring-bone design as seen in Figure 7.   Figure 7 Herringbone Style Drainage System Source: Synthetic Turf Council, 2011 Other concerns for the drainage design are as follows:   Page 18 • Ponding: generally, the design must accommodate 1-in-10 year storms, but in the event that larger storm surges occur, the field drainage system needs to be able to shed water quickly from the field to prevent ponding. • Percolation: subsurface materials will be designed according to common practice standards but will also need to be engineered to ensure water infiltrates quickly from the field surface in proportion to the hydro-climate of UBC. • Properly sized perforated pipes: the installed perforated pipes along the field must be designed to accommodate large storm events while also sized appropriately to not cause structural issues under specified surface loading. • Clogging: material may filter through the subgrade and clog the perforated pipes, causing blockages that inhibit drainage to the mainline; engineered sand subgrade or fine mesh wrapped around the perforated pipes may be used to ensure proper filtration of silty materials. • Efficient design for excavation: as the field is initially assumed to be flat-surface, the excavation for the drainage will reach an effective depth that is deeper than a crowned-surface drainage design; proper coordination with the underground parkade design will be necessary. • Lateral orientation of drainage pipes (herringbone, straight, etc.): a cost-benefit analysis may be performed to determine the most cost-efficient design in relation to the client’s needs. • Over compaction of subsurface: the native soil underneath the drainage system will need to be compacted to a specified proctor density to ensure structural integrity of the field, i.e. uniform level with no surface defects, while maintaining soil consolidation that will not crush the pipes due to loading from vehicles that may need to travel over the surface. 3.3 Conveyance Once collected in the above systems, the stormwater is transported through a series of conveyancing systems including:    Page 19 • An upgraded storm sewer system • Bioswales • Rain gardens As the objective of the project is to reduce the effect of stormwater runoff to pre-development levels, it must be managed according to the water that would have infiltrated or been stored naturally, but now, due to construction of buildings and hard surfaces, the stormwater runs off surfaces such as rooftops, parking lots, and sidewalks, i.e. impervious surfaces. Thunderfish Consulting has designed the above conveyance facilities to manage 1-in-10 year storm events and mitigate the destructive potential of extreme and rare storm events, such as 1-in-100 year events, by slowing the flow of water and filtering it prior to reaching the detention facilities. 3.3.1 Storm Sewer System Traditionally, surface water runoff is collected and conveyed through an underground pipe system to a receiving water body. However, this method can be harmful as high runoff volume can lead to erosion and poor water quality can introduce pollutants to downstream receiving waters. Thunderfish Consulting has identified the use of more sustainable practices such as source controls as a design priority over the traditional storm sewer system. However, the storm sewer system is still required to connect the low impact development (LID) features by conveying runoff from the features to the dry pond where open water conveyance via rain gardens is not available. The storm sewer system will also provide conveyance from the dry pond outlet to a connection with the existing storm sewer main on West 16th Avenue. The current storm sewer system serving the Stadium Road Neighbourhood site was constructed in the 1950’s and is expected to be nearing the end of its service life. Further, the development of SN will require the pipe system to be upgraded to properly service the site and meet current standards outlined by UBC and/or Metro Vancouver. The client has indicated a preference to the use of alternates to PVC   Page 20 material, including cast-in-place concrete, vitrified clay, or high density polyethylene (HDPE). Thunderfish Consulting has identified HDPE as the preferred design material for this project as the material is chemically inert, maintains structural strength, and has a long service life. Potential construction challenges for the storm sewer system include locating the existing storm sewer on West 16th to tie-into, improper pipe installation and connection to LID structures, and poor material quality. 3.3.2 Bioswales Traditional bioswales (Figure 8) behave like open ditches lined with grass to convey water to a discharge point. Types of bioswales include grassed channels, wet swales, and dry swales. Bioswales are intended to reduce runoff volumes and remove pollutants such as heavy metals and oil. Modern bioswales should incorporate native plants to promote further reduced runoff volume and pollutant removal. Water entering the channel can either directly infiltrate into the ground or can be drained into a perforated pipe underground. The designed sizing of bioswales is less approximately two hectares each as these areas are intended to hold minor storm events with low infiltration rates for the lining.   Page 21  Figure 8 Traditional bioswale cross section Source: sustain.ok.ubc.ca, IRMP Maintenance Manual Incorporating bioswales into SN is beneficial in that it is aesthetically pleasing and is able to naturally blend into the surrounding environment. Bioswales are an inexpensive method to convey water to the man-made dry pond while simultaneously filtering pollutants from the surface runoff. 3.3.3 Rain Gardens A rain garden (“RG”) is a landscape feature that is designed to capture rainwater runoff from nearby impervious surfaces such as roadways, rooftops, and parking lots as seen in Figure 9, below. They are engineered to convey stormwater runoff while also providing temporary storage that facilitates the infiltration of stormwater into the subsurface soil layers.   Page 22  Figure 9 Example of a rain garden showcased at UBC Source: planning.ubc.ca, Turning Rainfall into a Resource Our designed rain garden will receive stormwater runoff from both an inflow pipe and surface flow and will temporarily retain water within the sunken garden feature. The slope of the rain garden is designed to be 5% and the ratio of garden size vs. Impervious draining area capacity is 1:5, meaning that for every 50 m2 of rain garden, 250m2 of impervious area can be drained by the garden. This optimal capacity is dependent on regular maintenance of the rain garden by removing garbage and clearing grits so as to remove any obstructions. The rain garden is able to accommodate a maximum ponding of 3.2 inches. The topsoil layer is organic mulch and is deigned to be 500mm deep and has a permeability of 6mm/hr. This layer of topsoil is designed to achieve varying rates of infiltration as a way to reduce runoff and provide groundwater recharge. It also has the ability to remove various types of pollutants from stormwater with   Page 23 coordination in selecting plant species that enhance filtration. Specifications for this mulch is provided in Appendix D. The subsoil substructure is designed to be 700mm deep and will function to further increase the area for infiltration. Lastly, native plants such as shrubs, flowers, trees, and grasses were selected for all three rain gardens; specifications for these plants are available in Appendix D.  Challenges associated with the design and construction of RG systems include: • Size: RGs are most effective at smaller scales. • Siting: Multiple RGs distributed throughout a system are more effective than single systems. • Slopes/Grading: RGs are most effective on shallow slopes that promote infiltration and decrease erosion. • Maintenance: RGs’ dual purpose as a landscape feature and a stormwater filtration system requires proper education and training by the operator to ensure effectiveness and to promote long-term efficiency. Detailed design of RGs at Stadium Neighbourhood requires a total RG area of 502 m2. As such, three individual RGs with a minimum tributary width of 5 ft and measuring 100 m 122 m and 80m in length. A detailed section drawing is available in Appendix A.  3.4 Detention  A detention structure is designed to receive and hold stormwater from a storm event. Unlike retention systems which do not discharge stormwater, the water is released from detention structures via gravity flow, gradient, or capacity. More specifically, release rate is limited by the downstream system capacity. If the soil surrounding the detention structure is saturated and at   Page 24 capacity, water will be held in the detention system. However, as water slowly drains from the surrounding soil, water from the detention structure naturally flows into the surrounding areas.  3.4.1 Dry Pond A dry pond is a large, multipurpose recessed area, built at the low point of a site, with an outlet that controls outflow. The addition of a dry pond to the SN design adds resiliency in the stormwater detention process for extreme storm events while primarily acting as a green space when not detaining water the majority of the time. The dry pond provides stormwater detention for rainfall events that exceed the source controls upstream, namely storms with a return period between 1-in-10 years and 1-in-100 years. As such, the dry pond is designed for a hydraulic capacity of ~650 m3 as calculated in Appendix F. The dry pond is located in the southwest corner of the site situated in the brown-field of the old stadium, utilizing the low-point of the stadium neighbourhood to collect stormwater. Designing on-site stormwater storage for extreme events reduces destructive flows at the downstream cliff outfall to mitigate cliff erosion.  The dry pond is designed to detain and slowly release stormwater at a controlled flow rate to discharge to the W 16th Ave storm. This is accomplished through hydraulic design of the structure and sizing of the outlet to ensure a controlled, gravity-driven flow rate out of the dry pond through the outlet.  The dry pond is located at the low-point of the site to collect on-site stormwater, either through the integrated stormwater system or overland flows, using bioswales as the fore bay to filter out pollutants. The pond drains at the standard minimum drainage grade of 0.5% toward the outlet to ensure complete drainage after major storm events. The inlets and outlets are designed as   Page 25 pre-cast concrete headwalls, complete with upstream trash racks to prevent debris from entering the system. Upstream of the structure, a bioswale leads to the inlet culvert which runs through the inlet headwall. Downstream of the structure, the headwall and culvert discharge to UBC’s West 16th Avenue ditch system that drains to the cliff outfall. An emergency spillway outlet is designed at the top of the bank to provide emergency drainage in the event that the 100-year capacity is exceeded. A dry pond of similar concept is shown in Figure 10, below.  Figure 10 Example of a Dry Pond Source: Low Impact Development in Coastal South Carolina: A Planning and Design Guide A berm is constructed where topographically necessary to act as the banks of the dry pond and supply freeboard for storage. The berm can be constructed from native fill excavated during construction, providing savings in construction and material costs. The banks of the berm are designed at a 3-to-1 horizontal to vertical slope to ensure slope stability and are lined with   Page 26 grasses and native plants to mitigate bank soil erosion. The design allows for infiltration at the base of the dry pond, though this is anticipated to be insignificant due to the slow-draining geological characteristics of the site. Anticipated construction challenges include ensuring the drainage gradients in the dry pond are met as well as the potential use of poor quality native soil for berm construction. However, the topography of the current site includes a large sunken stadium area. The construction of the dry pond will require partially filling of this area which can be done with cut material generated from on-site excavation. Operations and maintenance for the dry pond will include annual sediment and debris removal, regular landscaping on the grassed area, annual berm stability inspections, and pipe condition inspections. The dry pond is an important part of the Stadium Neighbourhood system because it provides stormwater storage for extreme events and work to recover the ecosystem that had been damaged when constructing the existing stadium. Implementing water management processes such as a dry pond, storm water activity can be mitigated by preventing runoff from causing soil erosion downstream.    3.5 Site Discharge The site is located within the W 16th Avenue catchment where the primary surface runoff discharges at an outfall located within Pacific Spirit Park near the UBC Botanical Gardens (Kerr Wood Leidal, 2010). A secondary discharge point drains into Museum Creek (Kerr Wood Leidal, 2010). These outfalls are sensitive to past storm events causing flooding and erosion and,   Page 27 therefore, require special attention to construction of new developments upstream and climate change (UBC Campus + Community Planning, 2017). A site visit to the outfall was conducted on November 1, 2018 by Thunderfish to gain further understanding of cliff erosion sensitivity. With the development of SN there will be a reduction of permeable land and an increase of impermeable land that impact downstream flow rates at the outfall. Climate change and the development of hard surfaces will increase runoff volumes and the amount of short, high intensity rainfall events to the outfall. The objective of SN is to either maintain, mitigate, or have net-zero discharge at the outfall by replicating the hydrologic cycle via LIDs. Runoff volume of pre-development and post-development were calculated using the Rational Method and the Unit Area Release Rate Method. The Rational Method is commonly used to determine peak flow rate using runoff coefficients, rainfall intensity, and site area less than 30 ha. The Unit Area Release Rate (UARR) differs from the Rational Method in that it considers the uniform distribution of the storm sewer system based on a 1-in-5 year storm event per hectare (City of Calgary, 2011). It is determined the peak flow at pre-development is roughly 31 L/s based off a 2-year, 24-hour rainfall event. In the implementation of LIDs, the peak flow at post-development is roughly 35 L/s based off the same rainfall event. Peak flow will be increased by 4 L/s at the outfall.  3.6 Stadium Parkade A single-storey, underground parking structure was design for the new Thunderbird Stadium. The purpose of the parkade is to provide community-use parking for the regular users of the stadium facility, in addition to the inhabitants of the Stadium Neighbourhood: the new parkade is not intended for stadium “event parking” as this is accommodated with the already-existing Thunderbird Parkade. The   Page 28 stadium parkade is sized to accommodate only this community parking with a total of 141 spots, including four disability parking spaces.  Supporting documentation of the parkade design, including load assumptions, analysis results, and concrete calculations can be found in Appendix G.  Detailed design drawings can be found in Appendix A. The below is a discussion on the decisions made in producing the resulting design. 3.6.1 Road Access To discourage event parking use, Thunderfish Consulting altered the entrance of the parkade from the proposed dual entrance/exit on 16th Avenue to a single lane access off of southbound East Mall. This arrangement can be seen below in Figure 11. By allowing access to the parkade from SB East Mall only, traffic coming into UBC via 16 Avenue will not be able to access the parkade entrance without first driving to SW Marine Drive and looping around on Stadium Road.   Figure 11 Parkade Traffic Flow    Page 29 3.6.2 Contribution to Storm Water Management The new stadium parkade was originally conceived of as a component of the larger Stadium Neighbourhood SWMP where it was thought that the parkade itself could contribute as a water detention facility, with storage existing either in the parkade area or in a sub-grade vault below the car deck. A review of the topography of the Stadium Neighbourhood site and the proposed location of the new stadium revealed that the stadium and parkade would be located on the highest point on the site. This site would be unsuitable for water detention because all water would be naturally flowing away from it as opposed to toward it: storm water detention facilities are typically located at the bottom of a storm system for the purpose of buffering the release of water into the environment. Thunderfish Consulting decided to not utilize the parkade structure for stormwater detention because its location would necessitate pumping water against gravity solely for the purpose of detention. Thunderfish Consulting is instead proposing that the roof of the future stadium be a rainwater collector and that the top floor of the new stadium itself be host to a longitudinal tank, that spans the length of the stadium, to store rainwater at elevation. The pressure head available because of this elevated storage allows the stored water to be utilized in a gravity-fed system throughout the stadium for its daily water use. A particularly suitable application would be for toilet flushing as this does not require a potable water source. While the design of such a system is beyond the scope of this report, Thunderfish Consulting has performed an analysis of the potential water storage and proposed volume of a tank which would be suitable for this use in Table 3, next page:     Page 30 Table 2 Required volume for tank storage on top floor of stadium SVF (100 year event) Stadium Roof Area Runoff Coefficient (C1) Storage Volume Req’d (m3/(Area * C1) (m2)  m3 = (SVF*Area*C1) 0.1 4632 0.91 421  Thunderfish Consulting recommends a longitudinal storage vessel on the top of the stadium measuring 1m x 5m x 100m as can be seen in the conceptual figure below: 3.6.3 Structural Design and Layout The structural analysis and design of the parkade was performed in S-Frame with its Integrated Concrete Design module.  However, because the stadium parkade will be structurally supporting a full stadium, estimates were performed to determine the load of the new stadium. In doing so, the following assumptions were made: • The new stadium would structurally utilize mass timber as part of BC’s Wood First (2009) sustainability legislation; this would make the building significantly lighter than if it were entirely of concrete • The stadium would occupy a footprint of approximately 38 m x 115 m and would be approximately four to five storeys tall • A total of four stair cores, two that also include elevators, would be included in the stadium that would extend down to the parkade • The parkade would provide vehicle access at grade from East Mall but would only provide pedestrian access through the main floor of the stadium; this is to enhance community use of the stadium building Page 31 • The height of the parkade would allow for the entrance of “coach” style buses to enter(maximum of 4 m) to allow for the delivery and pick-up of visiting sports teams.3.6.4 Foundation System The stadium and parkade have been designed to sit upon a raft slab foundation. The reasons for this are as follows: • The parkade design is supported by 51 columns at a semi-regular spacing. Consideration wasgiven to utilizing pad footings but it was decided that the cost for specially excavating andforming each footing would be excessively fussy and time consuming.• In lieu of forming pad footings, consideration was also given to pile foundations; however thenumber of piles required would be equal, again, to the number of columns and the depth of pilesrequired for adequate bearing would make pile foundations excessively expensive.• The geotechnical report from GeoPacific Consultants (2006) suggest that the strata located at adepth of approximately 4m would be well suited for bearing. To reduce the costs of labourforming large pad footings under each column, it was decided to pour a raft foundation over thewhole area. The completed foundation would also serve as the car deck slab.The raft slab foundation has been reinforced to be able to support moment loads from the internal columns resulting from lateral movement. 3.6.5 Building Information Model (BIM) A decision was made to develop a building information model (“BIM”) for the parkade structure; this model was built in Autodesk Revit 2019. Whereas in a typical CAD drawing the only information that would be retained about the building would be 2-dimensional geometry data, BIM allows for the storage of both 3-dimension geometry data and non-geometrical information about building components, such as the materials they are made of. This information can be used for various analysis purposes, such as   Page 32 generating material take-offs, in addition to producing 2-dimensional construction drawings, automatically. The drawings attached in Appendix A, were generated directly from the parkade BIM.  4 Design Criteria, Standards, and Software 4.1 Design Criteria An integrated stormwater management plan (ISMP) is a sustainable approach to stormwater management that aligns with UBC’s goals of leadership in sustainability. The Thunderfish rationale for the design of the ISMP aligns closely with the UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program’s 15 thematic areas (UBC Sustainability, 2018). We focus primarily on the areas of climate, energy, water, land, materials, biodiversity, health, and wellbeing. In addition to the SEEDS thematic areas, Thunderfish Consulting Ltd. chose to incorporate six of Campus and Community Planning’s guiding principles in the development of SN (UBC Campus and Community Planning, 2018), these include:  • Build long term value  • Be a good neighbour  • Use the site to shape the place  • Enhance the ecology  • Design for flexibility and resilience  • Engage the community in a meaningful way  These guiding principles and thematic areas actively make up the triple bottom line, which comprises economic, environmental, and socio-cultural considerations. The triple bottom line is the main driving force in providing greater perspective and consideration of all aspects of the project design to be incorporated into the SN ISMP.     Page 33 For the purpose of this project, the design has no budgetary constraints, and, therefore, no economic requirements exist for the project. However, Thunderfish Consulting takes into consideration providing an economically feasible design in conjunction with environmental sustainability principles so that the project has real world significance considering UBC’s goals in implementing net zero infrastructure. 4.2 Design Standards Technical design of the integrated stormwater management system at SN will abide by the following technical guidelines, standards, and best management practices (BMP): • UBC Technical Guidelines 2018 Edition (Divisions 32 and 33)  • UBC Integrated Stormwater Management Plan (ISMP) 2017  • UBC ISMP Best Management Practices for Stormwater  • Metro Vancouver Stormwater Source Control Design Guidelines (2012)  • Greater Vancouver Regional District Best Management Practices for Stormwater  • Toronto Green Roof Construction Standard Supplementary Guidelines  • UBC Transportation Plan (Parking)  • UBC Structural Technical Guidelines  • Vancouver Building Bylaw 10908  • Vancouver Parking Bylaw 6059  • BC Building Code (2018)  • NBCC 2015  4.3 Software Packages Computer modelling software is an integral tool in the development of an efficient design for stormwater management at SN. Table 3 outlines a list of the software used by Thunderfish Consulting Ltd. during detailed design phase.   Page 34 Table 3: List of Software Packages Software Application AutoCAD Civil 3D Technical drawings, site layout, site analysis, site grading, quantity take-offs, material estimates Google Earth Pro Site reconnaissance, mapping ArcGIS/QGIS Site reconnaissance, storm main layout, topographical data analysis Microsoft Office Suite Report production, spreadsheet analysis, presentation materials, system flow chart, construction scheduling S-Frame Parkade structural analysis and concrete design Autodesk Revit Parkade BIM authoring and drawing generation  5 Technical Considerations Due to the fact that the location of SRN is in a densely populated area with sensitive downstream conditions, many technical considerations were taken into account during the design stages of this stormwater management plan.  5.1 Stormwater Through the Site and Physical Space One of the main goals of this SWMP was to reduce the volume at the outfall, which in turn erodes the cliffside. To achieve this, Thunderfish Consulting Ltd. decided to implement various stormwater management strategies in order to reduce runoff and therefore volume at the outfall. The main technical consideration was that the post development run-off had to be less than the pre-development run-off. As   Page 35 such, many low impact development (LID) strategies such as rain gardens, green roofs, pervious paver, and bioswales were implemented. We designed these LIDs in between pervious areas to purposefully breakup runoff and increase infiltration. Moreover, we wanted the natural infrastructure to contain native plants and vegetation, and we were able to do that through careful consideration and selection. Thunderfish Consulting Ltd. has prioritized environmental sustainability through the preservation of most trees on site, and a limited use of expensive and environmentally damaging material such as concrete. Additionally, innovation was a key component of our design, as we wanted the space to be multi-functional by allowing both community members, residents, visitors, and users. As such, we’ve designed unique elements such as a highly permeable turf surface for the athletic field, and a detention pond that is both effective and esthetically pleasing.   5.2 Parkade & Community  In the parkade, many technical considerations were undertaken throughout the design process. Firstly, the team decided to make the parkade underground, as that would be the least destructive to the plants in the area and it would also help capture more stormwater runoff. The entrance of the parkade is located in an area where it minimizes traffic congestion and potential hot spots for collisions. Serious emphasis was put on creating as many parking spots as possible, and further sustainability considerations were taken through the addition of a blue roof system. Lastly, the needs of the community and the clients put all technical considerations in to context. Major stakeholders such as UBC Botanical Gardens and the community were consulted in the design process, and all advice given by the client during meetings and correspondence were taken into our design. 6 Stakeholder Analysis Thunderfish Consulting has conducted a detailed stakeholder analysis and has identified the key stakeholders to be the following:   Page 36 • UBC Properties Trust • UBC Campus and Community Planning • UBC SEEDS • UBC Botanical Gardens • UBC Community For the purposes of the capstone project, we recognize the UBC Department of Civil Engineering as a minor stakeholder in the project. UBC Properties Trust and UBC Seeds are the clients in the project and are key stakeholders because they control essentials such as budget, deadlines, and support. UBC Botanical Gardens is a key stakeholder since they have property adjacent to SN, as well as immediately downstream of the site. Lastly, the UBC Community is a significant stakeholder because they are the ones who will interact with and live at SN for years to come. Once the four major stakeholders were identified, Thunderfish Consulting compiled information about their needs and interests through engagement such as community open houses and sit-down meetings.  Emphasis was put on designing various elements with their interests and needs in mind. By satisfying these major stakeholders’ needs, the lifespan of the project is increased as it decreases the probability of future work or redesign in the future.  6.1 UBC Properties Trust Founded in 1988, UBC Properties Trust (UBC PT) is a private property management company owned by the University of British Columbia. Its purpose is to manage UBC’s real estate assets such as family housing, residential buildings, and commercial developments for the financial benefit of UBC. The main interest of UBC PT for this project is functionality over cost. Elements of high functionality have been included in the final design. An example of this is the pervious pavers which populate all the walkways within SN. These pavers are highly effective in reducing   Page 37 stormwater runoff by creating space for infiltration to occur. However, the system of pervious pavers has a preliminary cost estimate of over $2 million. Thunderfish Consulting has decided to continue with the design while searching for value engineering opportunities, because of the high functionality of the pavers and their aesthetic appeal adding to the overall feeling of community. Also, the addition of green roofs is not essential for the system in order to reduce stormwater runoff to target rates, but the design includes them because they have high functionality by absorbing over half of its expected rainfall in addition to creating an aesthetically pleasing space. 6.2 UBC SEEDS The SEEDS sustainability program is a program within UBC that aims to advance campus sustainability initiatives and strategies. SEEDS is comprised of faculty, staff, and students and engages approximately 1,000 people every year. UBC SEEDS is the client for this preliminary stormwater management design at SN, and they are a key stakeholder. SEEDS and UBC have expressed the desire to take a natural systems approach to stormwater management. As a result, this criterion is integrated and emphasized in the design rationale. The traditional, more common approach to stormwater management is to increase the capacity of the subgrade infrastructure at roads or to build large retention or detention facilities. Rather than using unsustainable man-made materials, the stormwater management plan for SN will take a more natural approach by utilizing green elements such as bioswales and rain gardens that contain native plants for filtration and absorption.     Page 38 6.3 UBC BOTANICAL GARDENS Due to the topographical location in proximity to the Stadium Neighborhood, the UBC Botanical Gardens is significantly affected by runoff from the W 16th Ave catchment area. The proposed design will implement feedback from the UBC Botanical Gardens to ensure the design meets standards to mitigate and adapt to major concerns and constraints regarding stormwater.  In coordination with the Director of UBC Botanical Garden, Patrick Lewis, Thunderfish Consulting will communicate throughout the design of the Stadium Neighbourhood Stormwater Management Plan. In previous discussions, Mr. Lewis has emphasized the influence of upstream developments on the downstream creek conditions that run through the botanical garden. As the hydrological cycle of UBC is unique, storm events vary in rainfall intensity and duration. During more severe weather events, flooding of the creek beds has proved to be problematic, even resulting in pedestrian bridges being washed out, requiring costly repairs and maintenance. High intensity rainfall has also resulted in extreme discharge rates from the outfall, increasing likelihood of erosion of the surrounding cliff, which, as stated before, is a key consideration for Thunderfish project as a criterion to be resolved in designing the stormwater management for Stadium Neighbourhood.   Page 39  Figure 12 Current UBC Botanical Garden Map (Ponds Circled) Source: UBC Botanical Garden Collections UBC Botanical Garden has four major ponds, as seen in Figure 13, which are supplemented by municipal water to prevent them from drying up in summer climate. However, even during the rainy season, the water features at the gardens are still supplemented by municipal water with considerable amounts of water wastage due to unsustainable designs of the ponds and man-made streams. In conjunction with the stormwater design for the Stadium Neighbourhood, UBC Botanical Gardens suggest that stormwater runoff be retained on the proposed site. This water then may be used to supplement the garden’s water features as well as possible irrigation use in lieu of municipal water, provided the Botanical Gardens can develop the required infrastructure. 6.4 UBC Community and UBC Campus & Community Planning  To engage the community in a meaningful way is one of Thunderfish’s guiding principles for the SN project. Early on in the project, our team identified a number of key opportunities that Page 40 allowed our team to engage the local UBC Community through a number of engagement activities lead by UBC Campus and Community Planning. This resulted in Thunderfish team members attending an open house, where we spoke with both community members and key project proponents. Attending the open house event allowed our team to develop a greater understanding of the project’s primary goals and objectives, such as the preservation of green space and the promotion of the site’s local ecology. It also allowed our team to engage the community and identify some of the concerns that surround the project, such as the preservation of the existing trees on site. Thunderfish team members chose to attend a public talk lead by Charles Montgomery, a local Vancouverite and the author of Happy Cities. The talk focused on the SN project and its legacy to the UBC Community and emphasized the opportunities that exist within the SN project for establishing a holistic design approach that considers the blending of human comfort and environmental stewardship. A key takeaway of Montgomery’s talk is the idea that designers need to consider human well-being in their design. One way to do this is to facilitate an increase in the number of potential interactions between people by providing communal green space. An idea raised by the audience, a key proponent for considerations in our design, is to create and enable opportunities for community members to contribute to the SN project by leaving portions of the design unfinished and to be completed by the community. This helps to create a sense of place and belonging within the neighbourhood and enables community members to leave their mark on the project.   Page 41 7 Cost Estimate The cost estimate provides an estimation of consulting fees, construction costs, capital costs, and maintenance costs for the project, but does not include purchase of land. This document builds upon the final design cost estimate, and is to be reviewed and approved by the client prior to the start of the project construction. Total cost has been adjusted to current 2018 market conditions and is subject to change. It is projected that the cost is $ 12,541,276.28 as outlined in the cost estimate, included in Appendix B.  8 Construction Schedule The construction schedule, which includes a draft plan of construction work, is included in Appendix C. 8.1 Anticipated Construction Issues 8.1.1 Site Conditions While currently not developed, the location of the new Stadium Neighbourhood is not on an untouched site. Construction in the region had previously been conducted during the construction of the current Thunderbird Stadium. As such, we are anticipating that the geotechnical conditions are not consistent across the site. It is possible that the area may have been used as a dumping ground for overburden excavated from projects in decades past: material unsuitable for building may need to be excavated and replaced. Additionally, the geotechnical report revealed that there is a high likelihood of water lenses in the soil substrate. Additional coordination measures will need to be taken during excavation of the parkade to ensure that the site does not flood.    Page 42 8.1.2 Coordination Thunderfish Consulting’s scope of work is distributed throughout the construction schedule starting with the excavation and construction of the stadium parkade and continuing on throughout the project contributing to areas on and around the new buildings, the roadways, and the landscape. As such, coordination amongst trades that are typically disconnected (e.g. roofers who will be working on the green roof, carpenters who will be building formwork for the parkade, and landscapers who will be building bioswales and raingardens) will be critical to the success of the project.  8.1.3 Cut and Fill Currently existing on the site is a large mound of fill material of unknown origin. The location of the mound is approximately on the site of the new stadium. This causes a potential benefit of having pre-loaded the soil in that region: the additional pressure from the mound may have caused the soil beneath to become over-consolidated and potentially capable of sustaining higher foundation pressures. However, this material will need to be either utilized on the site, relocated, or disposed of.  Opportunity to use the material on site exists because of the need to fill in the existing Thunderbird Stadium however, it is unknown what the balance of material will be. A site survey at the beginning of the project will allow for estimates of cut and full balancing. 8.1.4 Erosion During Construction While the site is currently considered in a pre-development state, during the actual construction, there will be a significant risk of errant flow and soil erosion. This has been identified and erosion control measures have been identified in the project schedule as needing to be completed prior to any excavation or clearing.   Page 43 9 Drawings, Specifications, and Maintenance Plan Project drawings, specifications, and service-life maintenance plan are included in Appendix A, D, and E, respectively.     Page 44 10 References City of Camas (2009). Storm Sewer Systems Operation and Maintenance Manual. Camas, Washington. City of Calgary. (2011). Stormwater Management & Design Manual. Water Resources. City of Calgary. GeoPacific Consultants Ltd. (2006). Re: Geotechnial Investigation Report of Proposed Mixed Commercial/Residential Development Lot 10 - UBC South Campus, Westbrook Drive at 16th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. Vancouver, B.C. Kerr Wood Leidal. (2010, April n.a.). Risk Management Services. Retrieved from UBC Risk Management Services: http://riskmanagement.sites.olt.ubc.ca/files/2016/06/UBC-Drainage-Map-2010.pdf Kerr Wood Leidal Associates; Lanarc Consultants; Goya Ngan. (2012). Stormwater Source Control Design Guidelines 2012. Vancouver: Metro Vancouver. Piteau Associates. (2002). Hydrogeological and Geotechnical Assessment of Northwest Area UBC Campus, Vancouver. Vancouver, B.C. UBC Campus + Community Planning. (2017). Integrated Stormwater Management Plan. UBC Campus + Community Planning.  The University of British Columbia (2017). UBC Technical Guidelines, Storm Drainage. Vancouver, B.C.       CIVL446 – Capstone II  Final Design Report – Team 20   Appendix A: Detailed Design Drawings    Parkade Roof0T.O. Fnd. Wall-300T.O. Slab-4200T.O. Footing-4400B.O. Footing-5600ScaleChecked byDrawn byDateProject number2019-04-08 11:24:59 AMCover Sheet0001ParkadeStadiumNeighbourhood2019-04-08Connor FersterConnor FersterS00No. Description Date1 Issued for Construction 2019-04-08Stadium Neighrbourhood:Stadium ParkadeScaleChecked byDrawn byDateProject number2019-04-08 4:32:56 PMGeneral Notes0001ParkadeStadiumNeighbourhood2019-04-08Connor FersterConnor FersterS01GENERAL NOTESGENERAL REQUIREMENTS:1. STRUCTURAL DRAWINGS SHALL BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE SPECIFICATIONS AND OTHER PROJECT DRAWINGS BY OTHER DISCIPLINES.  ALL WORK SHALL CONFORM TO THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE CODES LISTED BELOW.2. CONTRACTOR SHALL VERIFY ALL DIMENSIONS AND ELEVATIONS RELATIONG TO EXISTING CONDITIONS BY MAKING FIELD SURVEYS AND MEASUREMENTS PRIOR TO COMMENCING FABRICATION OR CONSTRUCTION.3. THE GENERAL CONTRACTOR SHALL ENSURE THAT ALL CONSTRUCTION METHODS USED WILL NOT CAUSE DAMAGE TO ADJACENT BUILDINGS, UTILITIES, OR OTHER PROPERTY.  THIS REQUIREMENT IS PARTICULARLY IMPORTANT DURING FOUNDATION INSTALLATION.4. DETAILS LABELE 'TYPICAL' SHALL APPLY TO ALL SITUATIONS THAT ARE THE SAME OR SIMILAR TO THOSE SPECIFICALLY DETAILED. SEE DETAIL TITLES FOR APPLICABLITY OF A PARTICULAR DETAIL. TYPICAL DETAILS SHALL APPLY WHETHER OR NOT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY KEYED AT EACH LOCATION. THE ENGINEER SHALL HAVE FINAL AUTHORITY TO DETERMINE APPLICABILITY OF TYPICAL DETAILS.5. WHERE CONFLICTS EXIST BETWEEN STRUCTURAL DOCUMENTS, THE STRICTEST REQUIREMENTS, AS INDICATED BY THE STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS, SHALL GOVERN.6. NO STRUCTURAL MEMBERS SHALL BE CUT, NOTCHED, MODIFIED, OR OTHERWISE REDUCED IN STRENGTH UNLESS APPROVED BY THE STRUCTURAL ENGINEER.PRIMARY CODES AND SPECIFICATIONS1. GENERAL BUILDING CODE:A. BC BUILDING CODE 2018B. VANCOUVER BUILDING BYLAW2. CONCRETE CODES:A. CSA A23.1, CONCRETE MATERIALS AND METHODS OF CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION B. CSA A23.3, DESIGN OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES3. FORMWORK AND FALSEWORK CODES:A. CSA S269.3, CONCRETE FORMWORKB. CSA S269.1, FALSEWORK AND FORMWORKDESIGN LOADS:IMPORTANCE FACTOR: 1.0 (NORMAL)1. PARKADE ROOF SUPERIMPOSED DEAD LOAD @ 2..0 KPA2. LIVE LOADS: A. PARKADE ROOF LIVE LOAD @ 4.8 KPA - ASSEMBLY OCCUPANCYB. PARKADE FLOOR LIVE LOAD @ 4.8 KPA - ASSEMBLY OCCUPANCY4. WIND LOADS:A. LOADS BASED ON BCBC-18 FOR VANCOUVER CITY HALL50 YEAR WIND PRESSURE, q50 ..................................................................................................................0.45 KPAEXPOSURE FACTOR, Ce .....................................................................................................................................1.32INTERNAL PRESSURE GUST FACTORS, CgICpI...................................................................................-0.45 TO 0.30ASSUMED ROOF SLOPE......................................................................................................................4.8 DEGREES5. SEISMIC LOADS:A. GROUND ACCELERATIONS FROM ENVIRONMENT CANADA:Sa(0.2) Sa(0.1) Sa(0.2) Sa(0.3) Sa(0.5) Sa(1.0) Sa(2.0) Sa(5.0)0.467 0.712 0.879 0.886 0.786 0.441 0.266 0.083B. ASSUMED BUILDING PERIOD (Ta) @ 1.0 (BASED ON ASSUMED STADIUM HEIGHT OF 40M)C. SITE CLASS CD. Rd, Ro @ (4.0, 1.2)E. STa @ 0.441F. V @ 11.884 MNNo. Description Date1 Issued for Construction 2019-04-08CONCRETE1. ALL CONCRETE SHALL CONFORM TO CSA A23.1, HAVING A MINIMUM COMPRESSIVE STRENGTHAS SHOWN BELOW2. SUBMIT CONCRETE MIX DESIGN TO ENGINEER PRIOR TO PRODUCTION; NO WATER SHALL BEADDED TO THE CONCRETE AT THE SITE.3. THE OWNER WILL EMPLOYA A TESTING COMPANY TO CONDUCT SLUMP AND AIR ENTRAINMENT TESTS FOR EVERY BATCH THAT ARRIVES ON SITE. ADDITIONALLY, COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH TEST CYLINDERS WILL BE MADE ONCE PER DAY THAT CONCRETE IS BEING POURED ON SITE.4. BULL FLOAT CONCRETE SURFACES AND PROVIDE A LIGHT TROWEL FINISH TO PRODUCE A SMOOTH, NON-SLIP SURFACE FREE FROM RIDGES, VOIDS, AND MACHINE MARKS. EXTERIORCONCRETE WALKING SURFACES SHALL HAVE A LIGHT BROOM FINISH TO CREATE A NON-SLIP SURFACE. PROVIDE ROUGH SURFACE AT COLD JOINTS.5. KEEP CONTINUOUSLY MOIST ALL EXPOSED NON-FORMED SURFACES FOR A MINIMUM OF SEVENCONSECUTIVE DAYS AFTER PLACEMENT OF CONCRETE UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE.6. VIBRATE ALL CONCRETE. ENSURE ALL CONCRETE IS DENSE, FREE OF HONEY COMBING, ANDTHAT NO SEGREGATION OCCURS.CONCRETE PROPERTIESAPPLICATION   COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH (MPa) @ 28 DAYS EXPOSURE CLASSSLAB-ON-GRADE (INTERIOR)                  35 MPa                            NSLAB-ON-GRADE (EXTERIOR)             35 MPa       C-2RETAINING/FOUNDATION WALLS      30 MPa                      F-2COLUMNS 35 MPa               F-2EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL1. EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL MEASURES WILL BE IMPLEMENTED PRIOR TO, ANDMAINTAINED DURING CONSTRUCTION PHASES, TO PREVENT ENTRY OF SEDIMENT INTO WATER.ALL DAMAGED EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL MEASURES SHOULD BE REPARIED AND REPLACED WITHIN 48 HOURS OF INSPECTION.2. THE AMOUNT OF SITE AREA DISTURBED WILL BE MINIMIZED TO THE EXTENT THAT IT IS POSSIBLE TO DO SO.3. ALL ACTIVITIES, INCLUDING MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES, WILL BE CONTROLLED TO PREVENT THE  UNNECESSARY DISTRUBANCE OF SENSITIVE PRE-LANDSCAPED AREAS.STORM SEWERS1. ALL PUBLIC STORM SEWER AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION IS SUBJECT TO INSPECTION APPROVAL BY THE CITY OF VANCOUVER'S DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS.2. WATER QUALITY DEVICES WILL BE INSTALLED AND FUNCITONING PRIOR TO COMMENSING WITH INSTALLATION OF PAVEMENT FOR ALL AREAS DRAINIGN INTO THE WATER QUALITY SYSTEM.VEGETATION IN VEGETATIVE FACILITIES SHALL BE ESTABLISHED AND MECHANICAL DEVICES AND FILTER MEDIA SHALL BE INSTALLED. 3. ROOF DOWNSPOUT RUNOFF MUST BE RETAINED ON EACH SPECIFIC SITE LOCATION.DOWNSPOUTS SHALL NOT DRAIN TO THE STREET OR ANY ADJACENT PROPERTIES UNLESSUNLESS SPECIFIC APPROVED HAS BEEN OPTAINED. 4. ALL NEW CATCH BASINS WILL BE PROTECTED WITH A BARRIER OF SANDBAGS OR OTHER PERMEABLE FILTRATION BARRIER TO PREVENT ANY SEDIMENT THAT MAY HAVE GATHERED BEYOND THE EROSION CONTROL SYSTEM FROM ENTERING THE STORM SYSTEM.SITE CLEARING1. TREES AND OTHER EXISTING LARGE VEGETATION SHALL BE PRESERVED IN ITS CURRENT LOCATION AND SHALL NOT BE CUT, HARVESTED, OR DESTROYED WITHOUT OBTAINING PRIOR PERMISSION FROM EITHER THE SITE ENGINEER OR THE OWNER'S REPRESENTATIVE.2. SITE GRADING WILL DISTURB AS LITTLE OF THE EXISTING AREA AS POSSIBLE. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O123563S034S032S0647932 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 11518 64005200860010375862552002500270034029605050517525752600100024003400625075327975797587432500250011355038000113850ScaleChecked byDrawn byDateProject number1 : 2002019-04-08 11:33:59 AMParking plan0001ParkadeStadiumNeighbourhood2019-04-08Connor FersterConnor FersterS02No. Description Date1 Issued for Construction 2019-04-081 : 200Parking Plan1Parkade Roof0T.O. Fnd. Wall-300T.O. Slab-4200T.O. Footing-4400B.O. Footing-5600A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O3S03----2S067932 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 11518 6400Parkade Roof0T.O. Fnd. Wall-300T.O. Slab-4200T.O. Footing-4400B.O. Footing-56001 2 3 5 64S0345200 8625 10375 8600 5200Parkade Roof0T.O. Fnd. Wall-300T.O. Slab-4200T.O. Footing-4400B.O. Footing-56001 2 3 5 64S0345200 8625 10375 8600 5200Parkade Roof0T.O. Fnd. Wall-300T.O. Slab-4200T.O. Footing-4400B.O. Footing-5600A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O3S03 2S067932 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8000 11518 6400ScaleChecked byDrawn byDateProject number1 : 2002019-04-08 11:37:47 AMElevs & Sects0001ParkadeStadiumNeighbourhood2019-04-08Connor FersterConnor FersterS03No. Description Date1 Issued for Construction 2019-04-081 : 200South21 : 200West11 : 200Section 131 : 200Section 24S03S0312A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O123563S034S032S05420M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B15M @ 300 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 300 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B6 - 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20M (T)6 - 20M (B)6 - 20M (T)6 - 20M (B)6 - 20M (T)6 - 20M (B)6 - 20M (T)6 - 20M (B)6 - 20M (T)8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T 8-20M B 8 - 20M T 8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B 8 - 20M T 8-20M B8 - 20M T 8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T 8-20M B 8 - 20M T 8-20M B 8 - 20M T 8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B 8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B8 - 20M T8-20M B6 - 20M (B)6 - 20M (T)6 - 20M (B)6 - 20M (T)6 - 20M (B)6 - 20M (T)6 - 20M (B)6 - 20M (T)20M @ 200 B20M @ 200 T8 - 20M T8-20M B 8 - 20M T8-20M B20M @ 115 mm (T)15M @ 250 mm T20M @ 115 mm (B)15M @ 250 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 300 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 300 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm B15M @ 100 mm (T)15M @ 300 mm T15M @ 100 mm (B)15M @ 300 mm BScaleChecked byDrawn byDateProject number1 : 2002019-04-08 1:55:35 PMLevel 1 slab0001ParkadeStadiumNeighbourhood2019-04-08Connor FersterConnor FersterS041 : 200Parkade Roof1No. Description Date1 Issued for Construction 2019-04-08PLOT DATE: April 3, 2019 - /Users/jimjam/Downloads/C-100-STORMSEWERPLAN.dwgSCALE DATEDRAWN BY DESIGN BYCHECKED BY APPROVED BYDWG. NO.REV.DESIGN NO.NA1 OF 8REVDESIGN2015-11-01JR JRAPW APWSTORM SEWER PLANC-100ThunderfishConsulting Ltd.REV NO REVISIONS DATE DRAWN APPR'D1 ISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION 3/30/2019 JR APWISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTIONParkade Roof0T.O. Slab-4200B.O. Footing-5600I6-15M Stirrups @ 10015M Stirrups @ 3005-20M Long. Bars550Parkade Roof0T.O. Slab-4200B.O. Footing-560036506-15M Stirrups @ 10015M Stirrups @ 3008-20M Long. Bars664063100844015M Stirrups @ 10020-20M BarsScaleChecked byDrawn byDateProject numberAs indicated2019-04-08 2:00:40 PMColumn details0001ParkadeStadiumNeighbourhood2019-04-08Connor FersterConnor FersterS051 : 25Column Detail, 550mm side1 1 : 25Column Detail, 650mm side21 : 5Column Section3No. Description Date1 Issued for Construction 2019-04-08Windows OLE Object PLOT DATE: April 3, 2019 - /Users/jimjam/Downloads/STORMDETAILS.dwgSCALE DATEDRAWN BY DESIGN BYCHECKED BY APPROVED BYDWG. NO.REV.DESIGN NO.DESTROY ALL PRINTS BEARING PREVIOUS NO.NA1 OF 8REVDESIGN2019-03-30JR JRAPW APWSTORM SEWER DETAILSC-101ThunderfishConsulting Ltd.REV NO REVISIONS DATE DRAWN APPR'D1 ISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION 3/30/2019 JR APW1400 mmCOMPACTED BACKILLEMBEDMENT MATERIALPIPE BEDDINGSUITABLE FOUNDATION100 mmPIPE Ø300 mmFINISHED GRADEPIPE300 mmPIPE Ø 300 mm2500 mm1750 mm3000 mm200 mm1500mm450 mmPIPEWindows OLE Object PLOT DATE: April 3, 2019 - /Users/jimjam/Downloads/C-700-RainGarden-GreenRoof-Details.dwgSCALE DATEDRAWN BY DESIGN BYCHECKED BY APPROVED BYDWG. NO.REV.DESIGN NO.DESTROY ALL PRINTS BEARING PREVIOUS NO.NA1 OF 8REVDESIGN2019-03-30TJ/JR TJ/EDAPW APWRAIN GARDEN AND GREEN ROOF DETAILSC-102ThunderfishConsulting Ltd.REV NO REVISIONS DATE DRAWN APPR'D1 ISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION 3/30/2019 TJ/JR APWStructural Deck (Concrete)Waterproofing MembraneProtection CourseRoot BarrierDrainage LayerThermal InsulationAeration LayerMoisture Retention LayerOptional: Reservoir LayerFilter FabricEngineered Soil with Plants750 mm100 mmSecondaryOverflow Inlet100 mmGround CoverPlantingMulch Cover LayerGrowing Medium500 mm DepthOutflow Pipe toBioswale/Storm DrainSub Soil Structure1500 mmSecondaryOverflow Inlet100 mmGround CoverPlantingMulch Cover LayerGrowing Medium500 mm DepthOutflow Pipe toBioswale/Storm DrainSub Soil Structure1500 mmPerforated Drain PipeMin. 150 mm DiameterGravel ReservoirGeotextile Layer1200 mm1200 mmPLOT DATE: April 3, 2019 - D:\Education\CIVL446 - Capstone II\Drawings\Sections_-_Green-Roof_Rain-Garden_April3.dwgSCALE DATEDRAWN BY DESIGN BYCHECKED BY APPROVED BYDWG. NO.REV.??????????NA2 OF 21??????2019-04-03TJ TJGreen Roof DetailKMThunderfishConsulting Ltd.REV NO REVISIONS DATE DRAWN APPR'DISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTIONPLOT DATE: April 3, 2019 - D:\Education\CIVL446 - Capstone II\Drawings\Sections_-_Green-Roof_Rain-Garden_April3.dwgSCALE DATEDRAWN BY DESIGN BYCHECKED BY APPROVED BYDWG. NO.REV.??????????NA1 OF 22??????2019-04-03TJ TJTypical Extensive Green RoofSectionKMThunderfishConsulting Ltd.REV NO REVISIONS DATE DRAWN APPR'DISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTIONPLOT DATE: April 5, 2019 - H:\SRN-ENG.dwg??????????1 OF 10??????PERMEABLE PAVER DETAILThunderfishConsulting Ltd.REV NO REVISIONS DATE DRAWN APPR'D1 ISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION 3/30/2019 SN SNSCALE DATEDRAWN BY DESIGN BYCHECKED BY APPROVED BYDWG. NO.AS SHOWNSNSN SNSN2018-11-26C01REV.SECTION VIEWSCALE: NTSPERMEABLE PAVERSPARTIAL INFILTRATIONPLOT DATE: April 5, 2019 - H:\SRN-ENG.dwg??????????1 OF 20??????DETENTION POND DETAILSThunderfishConsulting Ltd.REV NO REVISIONS DATE DRAWN APPR'D1 ISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION 3/30/2019 SN SNSCALE DATEDRAWN BY DESIGN BYCHECKED BY APPROVED BYDWG. NO.NTSESES ESES2018-11-26C02REV.PLAN VIEWSCALE: NTSDETENTION PONDSECTION VIEWSCALE: NTSDETENTION PONDCIVL446 – Capstone II  Final Design Report – Team 20   Appendix B: Cost Estimate    THUNDERFISH CONSULTINGCOST ESTIMATEItem	 Description Unit Estimated	Quantity Unit	Rate Total	Price11 Permeable	Pavers1.1 Pavers Square Meters 6231 89.00$               554,559.00$             554,559.00$             554,559.00$             8,179.00$                 Item	 Description Unit Estimated	Quantity Unit	Rate Total	Price22.1 Pipe	Costs2.11 250 mm Lineal Meters 105 140.00$             14,700.00$               2.12 300 mm Lineal Meters 198 160.00$             31,680.00$               2.13 375 mm Lineal Meters 143 180.00$             25,740.00$               2.14 450 mm Lineal Meters 184 240.00$             44,160.00$               116,280.00$             2.2 Manhole	Costs2.21 1050 mm diameter Manhole Each 13 3,000.00$          39,000.00$               39,000.00$               2.3 Catch	Basin -$                           2.31 Standard Catch Basin Each 6 1,750.00$          10,500.00$               10,500.00$               165,780.00$             6,432.00$                 Item	 Description Unit Estimated	Quantity Unit	Rate Total	Price33 Rain	Garden3.1 Rain Garden Square Metre 502 220.00$             110,440.00$             110,440.00$             110,440.00$             9,534.00$                 Item	 Description Unit Estimated	Quantity Unit	Rate Total	Price44 Green	Roof4.01 Green Roof Square Meter 7839 170.00$             1,332,630.00$         1,332,630.00$         1,332,630.00$         78,390.00$               Item	 Description Unit Estimated	Quantity Unit	Rate Total	Price55.1 Concrete5.11 35 MPa Ready mix concrete Cubic Meters 7920 214.00$             1,694,880.00$         5.12 Reinforcing steel ton 1584 1,000.00$          1,584,000.00$         5.13 Formwork Unit 1 250,000.00$     250,000.00$             5.14 Heavy machinery, crane etc. Unit 1 350,000.00$     350,000.00$             3,878,880.00$         5.2 Labour5.21 Approximately 10 months crew/month 10 475,000.00$     4,750,000.00$         4,750,000.00$         8,628,880.00$         40,000.00$               Item	 Description Unit Estimated	Quantity Unit	Rate Total	Price77 Dry	Pond7.01 Dry Pond - 1 - 65,000.00$               65,000.00$               65,000.00$               3,670.00$                 11,003,494.00$       217,363.00$             1,320,419.28$         12,541,276.28$					ANNUAL MAINTENANCE COST SUBTOTALSUBTOTAL FOR TASKSTORM	SEWER	SYSTEMSUBTOTAL FOR TASKSUBTOTAL FOR TASKCONSTRUCTION COST SUBTOTALANNUAL MAINTENANCE COST SUBTOTALDRY	PONDSUBTOTAL FOR TASKCONSTRUCTION COST SUBTOTALANNUAL MAINTENANCE COST SUBTOTALCONSTRUCTION COST SUBTOTALSUBTOTAL FOR TASKSUBTOTAL FOR TASKGREEN	ROOFSUBTOTAL FOR TASKCONSTRUCTION COST SUBTOTALANNUAL MAINTENANCE COST SUBTOTALPARKADETAXES	(12%)PROJECT	TOTALPROJECT	SUBTOTALCONSULTING	FEE	SCHEDULESUBTOTAL FOR TASKANNUAL MAINTENANCE COST SUBTOTALTHUNDERFISH	CONSULTING	‐	FINAL	DESIGN	COST	ESTIMATESUBTOTAL FOR TASKCONSTRUCTION COST SUBTOTALPERMEABLE	PAVERSRAIN	GARDENANNUAL MAINTENANCE COST SUBTOTALCONSTRUCTION COST SUBTOTAL1 OF 1CIVL446 – Capstone II  Final Design Report – Team 20   Appendix C: Construction Schedule & Work     ID Task ModeTask Name Duration Start Finish Predecessors1 Site Preparation 9 days Wed 19-05-01Mon 19-05-132 Utility Locates 1 day Wed 19-05-01Wed 19-05-013 Layout survey 3 days Thu 19-05-02Mon 19-05-0624 Install perimeter fencing3 days Tue 19-05-07Thu 19-05-0935 Install erosion control3 days Thu 19-05-02Mon 19-05-0626 Build construction staging area2 days Fri 19-05-10 Mon 19-05-135,47 Transport heavy equipment2 days Fri 19-05-10 Mon 19-05-135,48 Complete site preparation0 days Mon 19-05-13Mon 19-05-136,79 Earthworks 28 days Tue 19-05-14Thu 19-06-2010 Clearing and grubbing5 days Tue 19-05-14 Mon 19-05-20811 Excavate site of stadium and parkade5 days Tue 19-05-21Mon 19-05-271012 Excavate site of other buildings20 days Tue 19-05-21Mon 19-06-171013 Shape detention pond2 days Tue 19-06-18Wed 19-06-1911,1214 Fill in existing stadium3 days Tue 19-06-18Thu 19-06-2011,1215 Complete earthworks0 days Thu 19-06-20Thu 19-06-2013,1416 Storm Sewer Construction18 days Tue 19-05-14Thu 19-06-0617 Layout survey for sewer1 day Tue 19-05-14Tue 19-05-14818 Excavate Trench 8 days Wed 19-05-15Fri 19-05-24 1719 Install pipe bedding3 days Mon 19-05-27Wed 19-05-291820 Engineering inspection1 day Thu 19-05-30Thu 19-05-301921 Install pipe surround material3 days Fri 19-05-31 Tue 19-06-042022 Compact trench backfill2 days Wed 19-06-05Thu 19-06-062123 Parkade and Stadium 64 days Fri 19-06-21 Wed 19-09-1824 Install foundationgwall shoring10 days Fri 19-06-21 Thu 19-07-041505-1306-20A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S2019, Half 2 2020, Half 1 2020, Half 2 2021, Half 1 2021, Half 2TaskSplitMilestoneSummaryProject SummaryInactive TaskInactive MilestoneInactive SummaryManual TaskDuration-onlyManual Summary RollupManual SummaryStart-onlyFinish-onlyExternal TasksExternal MilestoneDeadlineProgressManual ProgressPage 1Project: Project ScheduleDate: Sat 19-04-06ID Task ModeTask Name Duration Start Finish Predecessors25 Install dewatering equipment1 day Fri 19-06-21 Fri 19-06-21 1526 Layout survey of excavation1 day Mon 19-06-24Mon 19-06-242527 Install stadium utilities5 days Fri 19-06-21 Thu 19-06-271528 Install raft foundation rebar10 days Tue 19-06-25Mon 19-07-082629 Install column formwork5 days Tue 19-07-09Mon 19-07-152830 Install wall rebar 14 days Tue 19-07-09 Fri 19-07-26 2831 Install column rebar7 days Tue 19-07-09 Wed 19-07-172832 Pour concrete in raft slab (Continuous pour)1 day Mon 19-07-29Mon 19-07-2928,29,30,3133 Concrete slab curing time2 days Tue 19-07-30Wed 19-07-313234 Pour column and wall concrete2 days Thu 19-08-01Fri 19-08-02 3335 Column and wall curing5 days Mon 19-08-05Fri 19-08-09 3436 Install pre-cast stairs3 days Mon 19-08-05Wed 19-08-073437 Install parkade shoring 2 days Mon 19-08-05Tue 19-08-063438 Install Level 1 Formwork6 days Thu 19-08-08Thu 19-08-1536,3739 Install Level 1 Rebar15 days Fri 19-08-16 Thu 19-09-053840 Pour level 1 concrete1 day Fri 19-09-06 Fri 19-09-06 3941 Install plastic curing cover1 day Mon 19-09-09Mon 19-09-094042 Level 1 slab curing 7 days Tue 19-09-10 Wed 19-09-184143 Parkade Base Building Complete0 days Wed 19-09-18Wed 19-09-184244 Stadium Construction250 days Thu 19-09-19Wed 20-09-0245 Stadium construction (by 150 days Thu 19-09-19Wed 20-04-154209-18A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S2019, Half 2 2020, Half 1 2020, Half 2 2021, Half 1 2021, Half 2TaskSplitMilestoneSummaryProject SummaryInactive TaskInactive MilestoneInactive SummaryManual TaskDuration-onlyManual Summary RollupManual SummaryStart-onlyFinish-onlyExternal TasksExternal MilestoneDeadlineProgressManual ProgressPage 2Project: Project ScheduleDate: Sat 19-04-06ID Task ModeTask Name Duration Start Finish Predecessors46 Install parkade MEP, finishes (by others)40 days Thu 20-04-16Wed 20-06-104547 Install parkade elevators (by others)10 days Thu 20-06-11Wed 20-06-244648 Parkade Complete 0 days Wed 20-06-10Wed 20-06-104649 Install stadium collection tank (byothers)10 days Thu 20-06-25Wed 20-07-084750 Install stadium blue roof10 days Thu 20-07-09Wed 20-07-224951 Install Stadium MEP, Finishes (by others)100 days Thu 20-04-16Wed 20-09-024552 Stadium Complete 0 days Wed 20-09-02Wed 20-09-025153 All other buildings (by others)400 days Fri 19-06-21 Thu 20-12-3154 Other buildings base building construction400 days Fri 19-06-21 Thu 20-12-311555 Base buildings complete0 days Thu 20-12-31Thu 20-12-315456 Athletic Field Construction67 days Fri 21-01-01 Mon 21-04-0557 Grading of field sub-base3 days Fri 21-01-01 Tue 21-01-055458 Sub-base installation and compaction12 days Wed 21-01-06Thu 21-01-215759 Excavate collector trench10 days Fri 21-01-22 Thu 21-02-045860 Collector pipe installation5 days Fri 21-02-05 Thu 21-02-115961 Impermeable linerinstallation3 days Fri 21-02-12 Tue 21-02-166062 Field drainage installation8 days Wed 21-02-17Fri 21-02-26 6163 Gravel base placement + compaction5 days Mon 21-03-01Fri 21-03-05 6206-1009-0212-31A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S2019, Half 2 2020, Half 1 2020, Half 2 2021, Half 1 2021, Half 2TaskSplitMilestoneSummaryProject SummaryInactive TaskInactive MilestoneInactive SummaryManual TaskDuration-onlyManual Summary RollupManual SummaryStart-onlyFinish-onlyExternal TasksExternal MilestoneDeadlineProgressManual ProgressPage 3Project: Project ScheduleDate: Sat 19-04-06ID Task ModeTask Name Duration Start Finish Predecessors64 Concrete curb installation4 days Mon 21-03-08Thu 21-03-116365 Turf + infill placement12 days Fri 21-03-12 Mon 21-03-296466 Testing and site cleanup5 days Tue 21-03-30Mon 21-04-056567 Athletic Field complete0 days Mon 21-04-05Mon 21-04-056668 Detention Pond Construction64 days Fri 21-01-01 Wed 21-03-3169 Layout survey 1 day Fri 21-01-01 Fri 21-01-01 5470 Site and keyway excavation5 days Mon 21-01-04Fri 21-01-08 6971 Embankment construction + compaction12 days Mon 21-01-11Tue 21-01-267072 Outlet barrel, cradle, apron installation6 days Wed 21-01-27Wed 21-02-037173 Pond compaction 3 days Thu 21-02-04Mon 21-02-087274 Riser and skimmerinstallation3 days Tue 21-02-09Thu 21-02-117375 Emergency spillway 5 days Fri 21-02-12 Thu 21-02-187476 Granlar base and top soil 6 days Fri 21-02-19 Fri 21-02-26 7577 Site clean up and inspection3 days Mon 21-03-01Wed 21-03-037678 Landscaping 20 days Thu 21-03-04Wed 21-03-317779 Detention pond complete0 days Wed 21-03-31Wed 21-03-317880 Green Roof Installation108 days Thu 20-09-03Mon 21-02-0181 Procurement of green roof 30 days Thu 20-09-03Wed 20-10-145282 Material delivery 1 day Fri 21-01-01 Fri 21-01-01 5583 Set up green roof materials staging area1 day Fri 21-01-01 Fri 21-01-01 5584 Install roof membrane system7 days Mon 21-01-04Tue 21-01-128304-0503-31A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S2019, Half 2 2020, Half 1 2020, Half 2 2021, Half 1 2021, Half 2TaskSplitMilestoneSummaryProject SummaryInactive TaskInactive MilestoneInactive SummaryManual TaskDuration-onlyManual Summary RollupManual SummaryStart-onlyFinish-onlyExternal TasksExternal MilestoneDeadlineProgressManual ProgressPage 4Project: Project ScheduleDate: Sat 19-04-06ID Task ModeTask Name Duration Start Finish Predecessors85 Inspection by building engineering1 day Wed 21-01-13Wed 21-01-1383,8486 Install root barrier 4 days Thu 21-01-14Tue 21-01-19 8587 Install membrane protection layer2 days Wed 21-01-20Thu 21-01-218688 Install thermal installation1 day Fri 21-01-22 Fri 21-01-22 8789 Inspection by building engineer1 day Mon 21-01-25Mon 21-01-2586,87,8890 Install drainage panel3 days Tue 21-01-26Thu 21-01-288991 Install filter fabric 3 days Tue 21-01-26 Thu 21-01-288992 Spray substrate layer1 day Fri 21-01-29 Fri 21-01-29 9193 Rollout vegetative mats1 day Fri 21-01-29 Fri 21-01-29 9194 Inspection by design engineer1 day Mon 21-02-01Mon 21-02-0191,92,9395 Green Roof Base Complete0 days Mon 21-02-01Mon 21-02-019496 Rain Garden Installation35 days Fri 21-01-01 Thu 21-02-1897 Rain garden survey layout1 day Fri 21-01-01 Fri 21-01-01 5598 Rain garden excavation2 days Mon 21-01-04Tue 21-01-059799 Installation of sub-base and drainage layers5 days Wed 21-01-06Tue 21-01-1298100 Installation of collector pipe3 days Wed 21-01-13Fri 21-01-15 99101 Installation of concrete raingarden 10 days Mon 21-01-18Fri 21-01-29 100102 Installation of top soil and planting substrates4 days Mon 21-02-01Thu 21-02-04101103 Plantings and landscaping10 days Fri 21-02-05 Thu 21-02-18102104 Bioswale installation 25 days Tue 21-04-06Mon 21-05-1002-01A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S2019, Half 2 2020, Half 1 2020, Half 2 2021, Half 1 2021, Half 2TaskSplitMilestoneSummaryProject SummaryInactive TaskInactive MilestoneInactive SummaryManual TaskDuration-onlyManual Summary RollupManual SummaryStart-onlyFinish-onlyExternal TasksExternal MilestoneDeadlineProgressManual ProgressPage 5Project: Project ScheduleDate: Sat 19-04-06ID Task ModeTask Name Duration Start Finish Predecessors105 Survey layout of bioswales1 day Tue 21-04-06Tue 21-04-0666106 Excavation and hand shaping of bioswales5 days Wed 21-04-07Tue 21-04-13105107 Installation and compaction of sub-base3 days Wed 21-04-14Fri 21-04-16 106108 Installation of drainage layer3 days Mon 21-04-19Wed 21-04-21107109 Installation of top soils3 days Thu 21-04-22Mon 21-04-26108110 Plantings and landscaping10 days Tue 21-04-27Mon 21-05-10109111 Bioswale complete 0 days Mon 21-05-10Mon 21-05-10110112 Pervious pavers installation45 days Tue 21-04-06Mon 21-06-07113 Survey layout of pedestrian road1 day Tue 21-04-06Tue 21-04-0666114 Excavation and grading of sub-grade3 days Wed 21-04-07Fri 21-04-09 113115 Installation and compaction of gravel sub-base3 days Mon 21-04-12Wed 21-04-14114116 Installation and compaction of sand sub-base3 days Thu 21-04-15Mon 21-04-19115117 Installation of pavers30 days Tue 21-04-20Mon 21-05-31116118 Finishing of paversand clean-up5 days Tue 21-06-01Mon 21-06-07117119 Pervious pavers complete0 days Mon 21-06-07Mon 21-06-07118120 Landscaping 45 days Tue 21-06-08Mon 21-08-09121 Installation of plantings30 days Tue 21-06-08Mon 21-07-19119122 General landscaping45 days Tue 21-06-08 Mon 21-08-0911905-1006-07A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S2019, Half 2 2020, Half 1 2020, Half 2 2021, Half 1 2021, Half 2TaskSplitMilestoneSummaryProject SummaryInactive TaskInactive MilestoneInactive SummaryManual TaskDuration-onlyManual Summary RollupManual SummaryStart-onlyFinish-onlyExternal TasksExternal MilestoneDeadlineProgressManual ProgressPage 6Project: Project ScheduleDate: Sat 19-04-06Green Roof Construction Plan Note that all materials will be delivered to roofs via crane. 1. Procure all materials no less than one‐month prior to roof completion date. Ensure that vegetation layer is delivered to site during substrate install (item 12). 2. Procure crane and deliver on site to be ready following completion and final inspection of roof. 3. Deliver materials to site one day prior to roof completion and approval date. 4. Install roofing membrane system. 5. Inspection by the building engineer (ensure sufficient notice is provided). 6. Once approval of the proper install of item 5, install root barrier. 7. Install membrane protection layer. 8. Install thermal insulation. 9. Inspection by the building engineer (ensure sufficient notice is given prior to the completion of the insulation layer). 10. Install drainage panel. 11. Install filter fabric. 12. Spray substrate layer. 13. Roll out vegetative mats. 14. Inspection by the design engineer.  Storm Sewer Construction Plan 1. Survey site to locate proposed construction locations 2. Survey site to conduct utility locates 3. Conduct site grading as required 4. Excavate trench 5. Install pipe bedding 6. Inspection by the Engineer 7. Install pipe surround material 8. Compact trench materials 9. Surface restoration Permeable Paver Construction Plan 1. Survey site to locate proposed construction location  2. Conduct site grading as required 3. Excavation 4. Moisten, place, level, and compact subbase 5. Place edge restraints 6. Placement of weeping tile 7. Moisten, place, level, and compact base 8. Place and screed bedding material, ensure 50 mm depth 9. Placement of pavers  10. Fill joints and openings  11. Sweep surface to remove excess fill material 12. Inspect area for settlement and uneven pavers 13. Within six months, contractor to return for inspection and maintenance CIVL446 – Capstone II  Final Design Report – Team 20   Appendix D: Specifications        SPECIFICATIONS FOR REINFORCED CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE   The Work shall consist of:  Supplying of materials and the mixing and placing of reinforced cast-in-place concrete as shown  and described on the Drawings and in this Specification, including placing, vibrating, finishing and curing;  Supplying, fabricating, constructing, maintaining and removing temporary works, including falsework and formwork;  Heating and cooling concrete, if necessary;  Developing concrete mix design(s) that meets the performance requirements, including trial batches;  The quality control (QC) testing of all materials; and  Supplying and installing water seals and joint fillers (when applicable).  Concrete supplied under this Specification will be specified in accordance with  1. All  concrete  plant,  equipment,  and truck  mixers comply with the requirements of CSA  A23.1 and this Specification; 2. All materials to be used in the concrete comply with the requirements of CSA A23.1 and this Specification; 3. All the concrete mix design(s) satisfy the requirements of CSA A23.1 and this Specification; 4. Production and delivery of concrete will meet the requirements of CSA A23.1 and this Specification;  Contractor’s Performance Criteria  The submission shall include the Contractor’s performance criteria for each mix design including:   Placeability (i.e. pumping, buggies, truck chute, etc.)  Workability  Proposed slump and slump retention time  Set time  REFERENCES AND RELATED SPECIFICATIONS  All reference standards and related specifications shall be current issue or the latest revision at the date of tender advertisement.   References   ASTM D 75, Standard Practice for Sampling Aggregates  ASTM D 516, Standard Test Method for Sulfate Ion in Water  CSA S269.3, Concrete Formwork  CSA S269.1, Falswork and Formwork ASTM C1315, Standard Specification for Liquid Membrane-Forming Compounds Having Special PropertiesFor Curing and Sealing Concrete ASTM C 494, Standard Specification for Chemical Admixtures for Concrete   MATERIALS  1. Fine Aggregate Fine aggregate shall meet the grading requirements of CSA A23.1-14, be graded uniformly and not more than 3% shall pass a 75 um sieve.   2. Coarse Aggregate The maximum nominal size of coarse aggregate shall be 20 mm and meet the grading requirements of CSA A23.1-14, Table 11, Group II. Coarse aggregate shall be uniformly graded and not more than 1% shall pass a 75 um sieve.      3. Cementitious Materials Cementitious materials shall conform to the requirements of CAN/CSA A23.1 and shall be free from lumps. Normal portland cement, Type GU or GUb, or sulphate resistant, Type HS or HSb, shall be supplied unless otherwise specified on the Drawings.  4. Water  Water to be used for mixing and curing concrete or grout and saturating the substrate shall be potable, shall conform to the requirements of CSA A23.1 and shall be free of oil, alkali, acidic,  organic materials or deleterious substances.  5. Formwork Forms for exposed surfaces shall be made of good quality plywood in “like-new” condition and uniform in thickness, with or without a form liner.  Construction Method  1. Mixing Concrete All concrete shall be mixed thoroughly until it is uniform in appearance, with all ingredients uniformly distributed. In no case shall the mixing time per batch be less than one minute for mixers of one cubic metre capacity or less. The “batch” is considered as the quantity of concrete inside the mixer. This figure shall be increased by 15 seconds for each additional half cubic metre capacity or part thereof. The mixing period shall be measured from the time all materials are in the mixer drum.  2. Time of Hauling The maximum time allowed for all types of concrete to be delivered to the site of the Work, including the time required to discharge, shall not exceed 90 minutes after batching. Batching of all types of concrete is considered to occur when any of the mix ingredients are introduced into the mixer, regardless of whether or not the mixer is revolving. For concrete that includes silica fume, this requirement is reduced to 60 minutes.  3. Falsework and Formwork The design, fabrication, erection, and use of concrete formwork shall conform to the requirements of CAN/CSA A23.1 and CSA S269.3. All forms shall be oiled or otherwise treated to facilitate stripping. For narrow walls and columns, where the bottom of the form is inaccessible, or wherever  necessary, removable panels shall be provided in the bottom form panel to enable cleaning out of extraneous material immediately before placing the concrete. Falsework shall conform to CSA S269.1, Falsework for Construction Purposes. All falsework shall be designed and constructed to provide the necessary rigidity and to support the loads without appreciable settlement or deformation.  4. Pumping of Concrete When the Contractor chooses to pump the concrete, the operation of the pump shall produce a continuous flow of concrete without air pockets. The equipment shall be arranged such that vibration is not transmitted to the freshly placed  concrete  that  may  damage  the  concrete.  When  pumping  is  completed,  the  concrete  remaining  in  the pipeline, if it is to be used, shall be ejected in such a manner that there will be no contamination of the concrete or separation of the ingredients.  Cold Weather Precautions  1. General When the ambient temperature falls below 5°C or when there is a probability of it falling below 5°C within 24 hours of placing the concrete, the Contractor shall make provisions for heating the water, aggregates and freshly deposited concrete.  2. Aggregates Aggregates  shall  be  heated  to  a  temperature  of  not  more  than  65°C.  For  concrete containing  silica  fume,  the aggregate shall not be heated to more than 40°C. The heating apparatus and the housing for the aggregates shall be sufficient to heat the aggregates uniformly without the possibility of the occurrence of hot spots which may burn the materials.  3. Water    The water shall be heated to a temperature of not more than 65°C. For concrete containing silica fume, the water shall not be heated to more than 40°C. 4. Concrete The temperature of the mixed concrete shall not be less than 15°C and not more than 25°C at the time of placing in the forms. Temperature requirements for concrete containing silica fume shall be between 10°C and 18°C at the time of placing in the forms. Sufficient stand-by heating equipment must be available to allow for any sudden drop in outside temperatures and any breakdowns that may occur in the equipment.  5. Curing Requirements Water curing of concrete shall be terminated at least 12 hours before the end of the protection period during periods of freezing weather.  The curing compound shall be water based membrane forming and of a type approved by the Engineer. It shall conform to the requirements of ASTM C1315 and be applied as directed by the Manufacturer. The rate of each application shall not be less than the rate specified by the Manufacturer of the compound. If rain falls on the newly coated concrete before the film has dried sufficiently to resist damage, or if the film is damaged in any other manner during the curing period, a new coat of solution shall be applied to the affected portions equal in curing value to that specified above.  All superstructure concrete with a specified exposure class of C-XL or C-1 shall be wet cured for a minimum period of 7 days at a minimum temperature of 15°C and for the time necessary to attain 50% of the specified compressive strength.   6. Quality Control Sampling of concrete shall be carried out in accordance with CSA A23.1. When a concrete pump is used to place concrete, sampling shall be at the end of the discharge hose. Making and curing concrete test cylinders shall be carried out in accordance with CSA A23.1, except that the time for cylinders to reach the testing laboratory shall be between 20 and 48 hours. The test cylinders shall be cast by the Contractor in standard CSA approved moulds.   7. Open to Traffic The structure shall not be opened to traffic until the concrete has attained a minimum compression strength of 100% of the design strength. The Contractor shall be responsible for all costs associated with any additional testing that may be required to satisfy the strength requirement.   CIVL446 – Capstone II  Final Design Report – Team 20   Appendix E: Service‐life Maintenance Plan    CIVL446 – Capstone II  Maintenance Plan – Team 20 Service Life Maintenance Plan Storm Sewer System General Considerations  Service life of the sewer is anticipated to be 70 to 100 years, due to the longevity of HDPE pipeand concrete manholes. Consider workplace safety during maintenance, as manholes are classified as a confined spaceand H2S risk by WorkSafeBC. A sewer‐cleaning contractor may be retained for this work. Inspect the surrounding area for pollutant leaks and if discovered, remove the source.Inspection and Cleaning  Catch basins, headwalls (outlet structures) and inlets to be inspected cleared of debris annuallyin the fall and after major storms, and additionally as needed. Catch basins to be cleaned at 1/3 capacity for sediment trapping purposes (City of Camas, 2009). Manholes and lids to be inspected annually (City of Camas, 2009). Pipes to be flushed when sediment depth is greater than 20% of pipe diameter (City of Camas,2009). Pipes to be CCTV inspected for root intrusions, leakage and pipe cracks every 5 years or asneeded if a blockage occurs. Pipe inspection condition reports to follow National Association ofSewer Service Companies (NASSCO) Pipeline Assessment rating systems. Repairs to be conducted in a timely manner for any observed defect and damage.Green Roof The following sections give the expected service life of the green roof systems and outlines prominent regulatory considerations to considered during routine maintenance and inspection. An inspection and maintenance plan are also provided. The following list is non‐exhaustive and alternate factors may need to be considered by the operator. General Considerations  The typical service life of an extensive green roof is between 30‐50 years. After which, thecritical components of the green roof system will need to be replaced including the roofswaterproofing membrane, insulating layer, and root barrier system. Where routine maintenance and inspection is to occur near roof edges, WorkSafeBC: Part 11“Fall Protection” will need to be considered where required in addition to all other WorkSafeBCregulations.Inspection and Maintenance Plan Inspection prior to operation  Within 14 days of substantial completion the contractor must arrange for final inspection of thegreen roof system to verify conformance with the Manufacturer’s instructions.CIVL446 – Capstone II  Maintenance Plan – Team 20     The owner will assume responsibility for maintenance and upkeep of the green roof system following approval from the inspection agent. Establishment Period  Upon receiving approval of final inspection, the owner is responsible for ensuring establishment of the newly installed green roof system. The green roof system will be highly sensitive to changing environments during the establishment period and it is critical that the owner/operator pay special attention.   Proper maintenance and care during the establishment period is critical to the long‐term success of the green roof system. The following table outlines the various establishment periods in conjunction with the installation season (Columbia Green Roof Technologies, 2012)  Installation Season  Establishment Period Fall  Spring and summer of the following year Winter  Spring and summer of the following year Spring  Until onset of cool fall weather Summer  Through summer of the following year   The owner will be responsible for proper care of the green roof throughout the initial growing period. This will include the first two months after installation and into the first full growing season.  The watering schedule of the green roof system throughout the establishment period is product specific and will be based on the manufacturer’s warranty and recommendations. Use of an automatic irrigation system is recommended.  During extreme weather conditions routine watering may be altered from the standard practice. It is strongly recommended that the owner/operator stick to the manufacturer’s recommendations during extreme weather events, such as summer drought. Ongoing Maintenance  Following the establishment period, the green roof systems will be highly resilient to changing environments and will require less attention due to a strong root system and acclimated vegetation.  The focus of the owner/operator during the life of the green roof system will be on standard upkeep and observation.  Extensive green roof systems require far less maintenance than intensive green roof systems.  Consult the manufacturer to develop and establish a routine maintenance plan that is appropriate for a Vancouver climate.  Typical maintenance task will include: o Drain inspection, o Debris removal, o Weed control, o Fertilization, o Irrigation. CIVL446 – Capstone II  Maintenance Plan – Team 20     Most manufacturers will provide the owner/operator with a maintenance checklist that aids in the inspection process based on their unique product. It is advised that the owner/operator abide by the manufacturers recommendations to ensure the longevity and efficiency of the green roof system.  Permeable Pavers General Considerations  Service life of permeable pavers is anticipated to be 20 years  Pavers can be reused when maintenance is required in the underlying components Inspections and Maintenance Plan  Surface sweeping to be performed once or twice a year to mitigate sediment buildup.  Catch basins to be maintained as noted above in Storm Sewer System – Inspection and Cleaning.  Landscaped areas to sloped away from permeable pavers  Tripping hazards from uneven pavers can be repaired by removing a grouping of pavers and redistributing the bedding layer. Extra pavers should be kept in storage for future repairs.  In the event of snow, deicers are recommended in moderate and the use of sand should be avoided as it can lead to clogging and drainage issues.  Snow plowing can be use on pavers.  Rain Garden and Bioswales General Considerations  The service life of the rain gardens and bioswales are approximately 15 years.   Maintenance will ensure proper functionality of the infrastructure.   UBC Building Operations is responsible for maintenance  Inspections and Maintenance Plan  The rain gardens and bioswales are to be maintained at least once every 2 months with more frequent visits during the spring and fall periods so as to ensure plant health and remove obstructions.  Maintenance will include removal of garbage and debris from the bottom of the garden, and raking and removing leaves and weeds.   Garbage and debris removal are integral to the functionality of the infrastructure. As such, a detailed log shall be kept of obstructions and ongoing issues. If littering issues persist, additional garbage cans should be installed.  Athletic Field General Considerations  Service life of the athletic field is estimated to be around 30‐50 years   Routine maintenance and inspection is likely to ensure field surpasses estimated service life CIVL446 – Capstone II  Maintenance Plan – Team 20    Inspections and Maintenance Plan  Inventoried field components and deficiencies regularly noted, including unit costs for deficiency repair or replacement.  Inspection of field (especially low spots), irrigation system, fence lines, lighting systems, and structural components such as bleachers, roof, and on‐field items.  Annual compaction tests necessary to ensure subgrade is not compromised and verify drainage is to specifications.  Dry Pond General Considerations  Service life of the dry pond is estimated for 20‐30 years   Outlet control to have a service life of 50 years with annual inspection to integrate resiliency in the event that dry pond is not serviceable. Inspections and Maintenance Plan  Annual sediment and debris removal  Regular landscaping on the grassed area  Annual berm stability inspections  Pipe condition inspections   Works Cited Columbia Green Roof Technologies. (2012). Downloads. Retrieved 03 2019, from Columbia Green. Credit Valley Conservation. (2012). Low Impact Development Stormwater Management Planning and Design Guide. Mississauga, Ontario.         CIVL446 – Capstone II  Final Design Report – Team 20   Appendix F: Rational Method    PARAMETERS Symbol Value UnitTotal Site Area = AT 7.24 haTotal subcatchment Area = A 7.24 haUnit Area Release Rate = UARR 3.33 L/s/haRainfall Intensity = i 3.00 mm/hrLandscaped coefficient = CL 0.30Paved coefficient = CP 0.90Roof coefficient = CR 1.00Gravel coefficient = CG 0.50Landscaped area = AL 4.626 haPaved area = AP 2.288 haRoof area = AR 0.320 haGravel area = AG 0.000 haAllowable flow to main (A*UARR) = QALL 24.09 L/sCALCULATIONS:Actual runoff co-efficient from site = C2 0.52Actual flow to main from site (2.78*C2*i*A) = Q1 31.42 L/sRunoff co-eff of discharge (Qa/(2.78*I*A)) = C1' 0.40C2/C1' 1.30From the graph : SVF 0.18Req'd vol for 1:100 year event (SVF*A*C1'*1000) = V100 520.00 m3 #REF!PRE-DEVELOPMENTSUBCATCHMENT #1PRE-DEVELOPMENTPARAMETERS Symbol Value UnitTotal Site Area = AT 7.24 haTotal subcatchment Area = A 7.24 haUnit Area Release Rate = UARR 3.33 L/s/haRainfall Intensity = i 3.00 mm/hrLandscaped coefficient = CL 0.30Swale/Raingarden coefficient = Cs 0.15Woods/Trees coefficient = Cw 0.10Paved coefficient = CP 0.90Green roof coefficient = Cgr 0.75Stadium roof coefficient = CR 1.00Athletic field coefficient = Ca 0.90Pervious pavers coefficient = CG 0.50Landscaped area = AL 2.331 haSwale/Raingarden area = As 0.125 haWoods/Trees area = Aw 0.353 haPaved area = AP 0.670 haGreen roof area =  Agr 0.754 haRoof area = AR 0.941 haAthletic field area = Aa 0.656 haPervious pavers area = AG 1.411 haAllowable flow to main (A*UARR) = QALL 24.09 L/sCALCULATIONS:Actual runoff co-efficient from site = C2 0.57Actual flow to main from site (2.78*C2*i*A) = Q1 34.68 L/sRunoff co-eff of discharge (Qa/(2.78*I*A)) = C1' 0.40C2/C1' 1.44From the graph : SVF 0.21Req'd vol for 1:100 year event (SVF*A*C1'*1000) = V100 606.66 m3 pond dimensions 32m x 20mSUBCATCHMENT #1POST-DEVELOPMENTPOST-DEVELOPMENTCIVL446 – Capstone II  Final Design Report – Team 20   Appendix G: Calculations    CIVL 446 -THUNDERFISH CONSULTINGSTORM SEWER CALCULATIONS 1 of 1Consultant: THUNDERFISH CONSULTING Sheet 1 Of 1Project No.: CAPSTONE - STADIUM ROAD NEIGHBOURHOOD File Name: STRM_SEWERProject Description: STADIUM ROAD NEIGHBOURHOOD STORMWATER MANAGEMENTLocation: UBCSource Flow Ratio- Q (5) U/S D/S U/S D/S Grade Pipe Dia Mannings "n" Q Cap. V Cap. Length Q(5)/Q cap.From To - (L/s) (m) (m) (m) (m) % (mm) 0.013 (L/s) (m/s) (m) (min) %1 2 Building 23 67 64 65.2 62.5 0.2% 300 0.013 43 0.6 35 1.0 532 4 23 51 46 49.2 44.5 0.2% 300 0.013 43 0.6 47 1.3 533 4 Building 21 51 46 49.3 44.5 0.2% 250 0.013 27 0.5 35 1.1 794 6 44 51 46 49.1 44.5 0.2% 375 0.013 78 0.7 100 2.3 565 6 Building 18 51 46 49.3 44.5 0.2% 250 0.013 27 0.5 35 1.1 686 8 62 51 46 49.1 44.5 0.2% 375 0.013 78 0.7 43 1.0 797 8 Building 9 51 46 49.3 44.5 0.2% 250 0.013 27 0.5 35 1.1 348 9 71 51 46 49.1 44.5 0.2% 450 0.013 128 0.8 26 0.5 5610 11 Stadium 47 51 46 49.1 44.5 0.2% 450 0.013 128 0.8 75 1.6 3711 out-2 47 51 46 49.1 44.5 0.2% 450 0.013 128 0.8 83 1.7 37in-1 12 Dry Pond 118 51 46 49.2 44.5 0.2% 300 0.013 43 0.6 58 1.6 N/A12 13 118 51 46 49.2 44.5 0.2% 300 0.013 43 0.6 58 1.6 N/AManhole ReachTravel Time in PipePipe Invert Elev Sewer Design Ground ElevCIVL446 - Capstone 2Detailed Design PhaseGreen Roof Design Calculations 2019-04-08Stadium Road Neighbourhood Stormwater ManagementGreen Roof Design CalculationsGreen Roof Precipitation Retention Rate Data Unit Cost Runoff Coefficients, CSummer 80% Construction Lawn 0.30Winter 33% 16.00$       per sf Impervious Surfaces 0.90170.00$     m2 Woods/Trees 0.10Rainfall Data Annual Maintenance Porous Pavement 0.50IDF Data: YVR 0.55$    per sf Swale/Gardn 0.15Time, toc: 10 min 10.00$       m2 Green Roof 0.75Return Period: 10 yr Standard Roof 1.00Constants Avgerage Service Life (30-50 yrs)1 m = 1000 mm 40 yearsGreen Roof Sizing, Release Rate, and Cost Determination (Using the Rational Method)Roof Runoff Coefficient, CGross Roof Area, A [m2]Effective Roof Area, 0.8A [m2]Green Roof Area [m2]Intensity, I [mm/hr]Flow Rate, Q [m3/hr]Release Rate (Winter)[m3/hr]Release Rate (Summer)[m3/hr]Capital CostAnnual MaintenanceCostsGR-1 0.75 1625 1300 813 47.350 46 31 6 138,125.00$     8,125.00$        GR-2 0.75 1600 1280 800 47.350 45 31 6 136,000.00$     8,000.00$        GR-3 0.75 1615 1292 808 47.350 46 31 6 137,275.00$     8,075.00$        GR-4 0.75 2562 2050 1210 47.350 73 49 10 205,700.00$     12,100.00$      GR-5 0.75 1355 1084 1016 47.350 38 26 5 172,720.00$     10,160.00$      GR-6 0.75 4300 3440 3193 47.350 122 82 16 542,810.00$     31,930.00$      Total 0.75 13057 11751.3 7839 370.9 250.4 50.1 1,332,630.00$  78,390.00$      Green Roof Known Volume CapturedComponentCapacity(L/m2)Drainage Panel 14Protection Mat 5RoofGreen Roof Area(m2)Volume(L)GR-1 813 15,438              GR-2 800 15,200              GR-3 808 15,343              GR-4 1,210 22,990              GR-5 1,016 19,304              GR-6 3,193 60,667              Total 7,839 148,941            Assumptions and SourcesDesign Assumptions- All 6 roofs at Stadium Road Neighbourhood will have a green roof.- Only extensive green roofs are uses.- Rainfall data based on YVR IDF Curve for a TOC of 10 min. and a 10-year storm event.-Based on small site size, design flow are determined using the Rational MethodQ = CIA- Effective green roof area to be designed as 75% of actual roof area.- Design values are considered to be very general at the preliminary design stage.- Size of green roof based on Toronto Green Roof Construction Standard SupplementaryGuidelinesPrecipitation Retention Rate Source:https://greenroofs.org/about-green-roofs/Cost Data Source:- Amec Green Roofs Report 2013- https://stormwater.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/Cost-benefit_considerations_for_green_roofsRunoff Coefficients Source:"Green Values Stormwater Calculator Methodolog" ReportConcrete Slab Band S-FRAME Version 2017 Job #CIVL 439 Final Project© Copyright 1995-2018 by S-FRAME Software Inc. UBC #100 - 1234 Anywhere PlaceConnor Ferster April 8, 2019 AnyCity, AnyStatePh: 555-1234   Fax: 555-4321 4:50 PM AnyCountryConcrete Slab Band S-FRAME Version 2017 - NOT FOR COMMERCIAL USE Job #CIVL 439 Final Project© Copyright 1995-2018 by S-FRAME Software Inc. S-FRAME 2017     (c) S-FRAME Software Inc.FOR ACADEMIC USE ONLY.  NOT FOR COMMERCIAL USE.File Name: SummaryStatus AcceptableSection Name Consultant Maximum 1.000Concrete Slab Band               UBC V & T Util 0.254N vs M Util (+) 0.704Canadian Building Standards N vs M Util (-) 0.768CSA Standard A23.3-14, "Design of Concrete Structures"CSA Standard A23.1-04, "Concrete Materials and Methods of Concrete Construction"Design Aids, Manuals, and Handbooks"Concrete Design Handbook", Cement Association of Canada, 3rd Edition, 2006"Prestressed Concrete Structures", Collins and Mitchell, Prentice Hall Inc., 1991 (MCFT)Section Dimensions Material Properties Gross Properties Effective PropertiesT-Beam fc' = 35 MPa Zbar = 206 mm Ae = 720000 mm2b = 1200 mm fy (main) = 400.0 MPa Ybar = 0 mm Ie (y-y) = 11222xE6 mm4h = 450 mm fy (stir) = 400.0 MPa Ag = 720000 mm2 Ie (z-z) = 64800xE6 mm4bf = 1800 mm Wc = 2400 kg/m3 Ig (y-y) = 11222xE6 mm4 Ase (Y) = 450000 mm2hf = 300 mm Ws = 7850 kg/m3 Ig (z-z) = 64800xE6 mm4 Ase (Z) = 540000 mm2Poisson's Ratio = 0.2 Ashear (Y) = 450000 mm2 Je = 28303xE6 mm4Quantities (approx.) hagg = 20 mm Ashear (Z) = 540000 mm2Concrete = 1708 kg/m Es = 200000 MPa Jg = 28303xE6 mm4Steel = 75.6 kg/m Ec = 28165 MPa Mcr (Pos) = 163 kNmPrimary = 65.9 kg/m Gc = 11735 MPa Mcr (Neg) = -193 kNmSecondary = 9.7 kg/m fr = 3.55 MPaTop Bars Top Bar Info Bottom Bars Bottom Bar Info4-25M + 4-25M d' = 64 mm 6-25M + 2-25M d = 386 mmAs' = 4000 mm2 As = 4000 mm2As'/bh = 0.00741 As/bh = 0.00741dz = 35 mm dz = 35 mmShear Reinf. Face Steel Clear Cover10M @ 150 mm 2-15M Top = 40 mmOpen As = 400 mm2 Bottom = 40 mm2 Legs Side = 40 mmMin/Max Area of Top Steel Min/Max Area of Bottom SteelAs' (min) 1582 mm2 Acceptable As (min) 1380 mm2 AcceptableAs' 4000 mm2 As 4000 mm2As' (max) 13885 mm2 Acceptable As (max) 20827 mm2 AcceptableFactored Design LoadsLoad N T Vz My CommentCase/Combo (kN) (kNm) (kN) (kNm)1 -600.0 0.0 75.0 100.02 -500.0 0.0 125.0 -450.03 -300.0 0.0 100.0 -110.0UBC Page 1 #100 - 1234 Anywhere PlaceConnor Ferster April 8, 2019 AnyCity, AnyStatePh: 555-1234   Fax: 555-4321 4:50 PM AnyCountryConcrete Slab Band S-FRAME Version 2017 - NOT FOR COMMERCIAL USE Job #CIVL 439 Final Project© Copyright 1995-2018 by S-FRAME Software Inc. 4 -1400.0 0.0 88.0 100.05 -600.0 0.0 50.0 400.06 -300.0 0.0 50.0 400.07 -500.0 0.0 75.0 -125.08 -1500.0 0.0 19.0 -450.0N vs M Results Axial Utilization for M(+) Moment(+) UtilizationGLC 2 LC = 6 LC = 6Status Acceptable Nf = -300.0 kN Mf = 400.0 kNm Mn = 681.0 kNmUtilization 0.768 Nr (max) = -10450.4 kN Mr = 568.4 kNm Mp = 818.9 kNmMaximum 1.000 Utilization = 0.029 Utilization = 0.704Axial Utilization for M(-) Moment(-) UtilizationLC = 2 LC = 2Nf = -500.0 kN Mf = -450.0 kNm Mn = 699.4 kNmNr (max) = -10450.4 kN Mr = -586.1 kNm Mp = 830.2 kNmUtilization = 0.048 Utilization = 0.768Shear and Torsion Utilization Design Information Simplified Method (Beta and Theta Values)GLC 2 b = 1200 mm Beta = 0.210, Theta = 42.0° for Vc0Nf -500.0 kN dv = 334 mm Beta = 0.210, Theta = 42.0° for VcTf 0.0 kNm <= ¼Tcr As (Tens) = 4400 mm2Mf (y-y) -450.0 kNm Av = 200 mm2Vfz 125.0 kN Lambda = 1.00Vz(c+s) Util 0.254 Vsz = 168.3 kNVz&T(s) Util 0.000 Vcz = 324.0 kNTorsion Util 0.000 Vc0z = 324.0 kNStatus Acceptable Vrz = 492.3 kNUtilization 0.254 Tcr = 148.7 kNmMaximum 1.000 Spalling Reduction = 0.0%Method SimplifiedStirrup Requirements Maximum Shear StressMember Type Special Member Stress 0.312 MPaSpacing 150.0 mm Maximum 5.688 MPaMaximum 187.8 mm Status AcceptableStatus AcceptableStir. Not Req'd Tf <= ¼Tcr & Vfz <= Vc0zLongitudinal Steel RequirementsForce As Required Theta Load Case StatusTop Bars 1234.9 kN 4000.0 mm2 3632.0 mm2 42.0° 2 AcceptableBottom Bars 1119.0 kN 4000.0 mm2 3291.2 mm2 42.0° 6 AcceptableClear Horz Spacing between Top Bars Clear Horz Spacing between Bottom BarsScl 128.0 mm Scl 128.0 mmScl (min) 35.3 mm Scl (min) 35.3 mmStatus Acceptable Status AcceptableClear Vert Spacing between Top Bar Layers Clear Vert Spacing between Bottom Bar LayersStatus Not Applicable Status Not ApplicableUBC Page 2 #100 - 1234 Anywhere PlaceConnor Ferster April 8, 2019 AnyCity, AnyStatePh: 555-1234   Fax: 555-4321 4:50 PM AnyCountryConcrete Slab Band S-FRAME Version 2017 - NOT FOR COMMERCIAL USE Job #CIVL 439 Final Project© Copyright 1995-2018 by S-FRAME Software Inc. Crack Control - Top Region Crack Control - Bottom Region Crack Control - Face Steeldc 63.9 mm dc 63.9 mm Status Not ApplicableA (per bar) 19170.0 mm2 A (per bar) 19170.0 mm2 Steel Not Req'dfs 240.0 MPa fs 217.8 MPa Reason h <= 750 mmZ 25679 N/mm Z 23303 N/mmZmax 30000 N/mm Zmax 30000 N/mm Beam ExposureStatus Acceptable Status Acceptable InteriorLongitudinal Reinforcing Shear Reinforcingfy (min) 300.0 MPa fy (min) 300.0 MPafy (long) 400.0 MPa fy (stir) 400.0 MPafy (max) 500.0 MPa fy (max) 500.0 MPaStatus Acceptable Status AcceptableConcrete Strength Concrete Densityfc' (min) 20.0 MPa Wc (min) 1500.0 kg/m3fc' 35.0 MPa Wc 2400.0 kg/m3fc' (max) 80.0 MPa Wc (max) 2500.0 kg/m3Status Acceptable Status AcceptableCanadian Reinforcing BarsIndex Bar Diameter AreaDesignation (mm) (mm2)  1 10M 11.3 100.0  2 15M 16.0 200.0  3 20M 19.5 300.0  4 25M 25.2 500.0  5 30M 29.9 700.0  6 35M 35.7 1000.0  7 45M 43.7 1500.0  8 55M 56.4 2500.0List of MessagesNo Messages...UBC Page 3 #100 - 1234 Anywhere PlaceConnor Ferster April 8, 2019 AnyCity, AnyStatePh: 555-1234   Fax: 555-4321 4:50 PM AnyCountryConcrete Column S-FRAME Version 2017 Job #CIVL 439 Final Project© Copyright 1995-2018 by S-FRAME Software Inc. UBC #100 - 1234 Anywhere PlaceConnor Ferster April 8, 2019 AnyCity, AnyStatePh: 555-1234   Fax: 555-4321 4:48 PM AnyCountryConcrete Column S-FRAME Version 2017 - NOT FOR COMMERCIAL USE Job #CIVL 439 Final Project© Copyright 1995-2018 by S-FRAME Software Inc. S-FRAME 2017     (c) S-FRAME Software Inc.FOR ACADEMIC USE ONLY.  NOT FOR COMMERCIAL USE.File Name: SummaryStatus AcceptableSection Name Consultant Maximum 1.000Concrete Column  UBC V & T Util 0.119N vs M Util 0.926Canadian Building StandardsCSA Standard A23.3-14, "Design of Concrete Structures"CSA Standard A23.1-04, "Concrete Materials and Methods of Concrete Construction"Design Aids, Manuals, and Handbooks"Concrete Design Handbook", Cement Association of Canada, 3rd Edition, 2006"Prestressed Concrete Structures", Collins and Mitchell, Prentice Hall Inc., 1991 (MCFT)Section Dimensions Material Properties Gross Properties Effective PropertiesRectangular Column fc' = 35 MPa Zbar = 0 mm Ae = 325000 mm2b = 500 mm fy (vert) = 400.0 MPa Ybar = 0 mm Ie (y-y) = 11443xE6 mm4h = 650 mm fy (ties) = 400.0 MPa Ag = 325000 mm2 Ie (z-z) = 6770.8xE6 mm4Wc = 2400 kg/m3 Ig (y-y) = 11443xE6 mm4 Ase (Y) = 270833 mm2Ws = 7850 kg/m3 Ig (z-z) = 6770.8xE6 mm4 Ase (Z) = 270833 mm2Poisson's Ratio = 0.2 Ashear (Y) = 270833 mm2 Je = 14386xE6 mm4Quantities (approx.) hagg = 20 mm Ashear (Z) = 270833 mm2Concrete = 766 kg/m Es = 200000 MPa Jg = 14386xE6 mm4Steel = 123.1 kg/m Ec = 28165 MPaPrimary = 47.1 kg/m Gc = 11735 MPaSecondary = 76.0 kg/m fr = 3.55 MPaVertical Bars Ties Miscellaneous500 x 650  Column 15M Ties @ 100 mm Clear Cover = 40 mm20-20M Vert # Legs (Z-Direction) = 4As = 6000 mm2 # Legs (Y-Direction) = 4Rho = 1.85 %Tangential SpliceFactored Input LoadsLoad N T Vz My Vy Mz CommentCase/Combo (kN) (kNm) (kN) (kNm) (kN) (kNm)1 -600.0 0.0 75.0 100.0 25.0 -300.02 -500.0 0.0 125.0 -450.0 35.0 125.03 -300.0 0.0 100.0 -110.0 27.0 400.04 -1400.0 0.0 88.0 100.0 22.0 350.05 -600.0 0.0 50.0 400.0 100.0 200.06 -300.0 0.0 50.0 400.0 100.0 -200.07 -500.0 0.0 75.0 -125.0 31.0 -300.08 -1500.0 0.0 19.0 -450.0 112.0 -75.0Factored Design Loads (with Minimum Moments):Load Vz My Vy Mz Mres ThetaCase/Combo (kN) (kNm) (kN) (kNm) (kNm)UBC Page 1 #100 - 1234 Anywhere PlaceConnor Ferster April 8, 2019 AnyCity, AnyStatePh: 555-1234   Fax: 555-4321 4:49 PM AnyCountryConcrete Column S-FRAME Version 2017 - NOT FOR COMMERCIAL USE Job #CIVL 439 Final Project© Copyright 1995-2018 by S-FRAME Software Inc. 1 75.0 100.0 25.0 -300.0 316.2 252º2 125.0 -450.0 35.0 125.0 467.0 16º3 100.0 -110.0 27.0 400.0 414.8 75º4 88.0 100.0 22.0 350.0 364.0 106º5 50.0 400.0 100.0 200.0 447.2 153º6 50.0 400.0 100.0 -200.0 447.2 207º7 75.0 -125.0 31.0 -300.0 325.0 293º8 19.0 -450.0 112.0 -75.0 456.2 351ºN vs M Results Axial Utilization Moment UtilizationGLC 3 Nf = -300.0 kN Mf = 414.8 kNm Mn = 537.6 kNmStatus Acceptable Nr (max) = -6262.1 kN Mr = 448.0 kNm Mp = 634.4 kNmUtilization 0.926 Utilization = 0.048 Utilization = 0.926Maximum 1.000Theta 75ºShear and Torsion Utilization Shear Z-Direction Shear Y-Direction TorsionGLC 2 bw = 500 mm bw = 650 mm Tcr = 67.1 kNmNf -500.0 kN dv = 468 mm dv = 360 mm Tf = 0.0 kNm < 0.25 TcrVy(c+s) Util 0.034 As (Tens) = 3801 mm2 As (Tens) = 3645 mm2 Ignore Torsional EffectsVz(c+s) Util 0.119 Av = 800 mm2 Av = 800 mm2Vy&T(s) Util 0.005 Lambda = 1.00 Lambda = 1.00Vz&T(s) Util 0.024 Mf (y-y) = -450.0 kNm Mf (z-z) = 125.0 kNmTorsion Util 0.000 Vfz = 125.0 kN Vfy = 35.0 kNStatus Acceptable Vsz = 944.5 kN Vsy = 996.3 kNUtilization 0.119 Vcz = 130.9 kN Vcy = 138.0 kNMaximum 1.000 Vrz = 1075.3 kN Vry = 1134.3 kNMethod Simplified Vcz' = 102.2 kN Vcy' = 30.2 kNVrz' = 1046.7 kN Vry' = 1026.5 kNBeta = 0.180 Beta = 0.180Theta = 35.0° Theta = 35.0°Spalling Reduction = 19.2% Spalling Reduction = 14.8%Tie Spacing for Shear/Torsion Maximum Shear StressSpacing 100.0 mm Stress 0.684 MPaMaximum 500.0 mm Maximum 5.688 MPaStatus Acceptable Status AcceptableTie Spacing Tie DiameterS 100 mm Diam. 16.0 mmS (max) 312 mm Diam. (min) 5.9 mmStatus Acceptable Status AcceptableVertical Steel Area Status As/Ag Vertical Bar Splice TypeAs 6000 mm2 1.85 % Tangential SpliceAs (min) 3250 mm2 Acceptable 1.00 % Status AcceptableAs (max) 13000 mm2 Acceptable 4.00 %Vertical Bar Spacing Vertical Bar Diameter Minimum Number of Vertical BarsNy 5 Specified db (vert) 19.5 mm #Bars 20 SpecifiedUBC Page 2 #100 - 1234 Anywhere PlaceConnor Ferster April 8, 2019 AnyCity, AnyStatePh: 555-1234   Fax: 555-4321 4:49 PM AnyCountryConcrete Column S-FRAME Version 2017 - NOT FOR COMMERCIAL USE Job #CIVL 439 Final Project© Copyright 1995-2018 by S-FRAME Software Inc. Ny (max) 6.3 Allowed db (min) 16.0 mm #Bars 4 RequiredNz 7 Specified Status Acceptable Status AcceptableNz (max) 8.5 AllowedStatus AcceptableVertical Reinforcing Horizontal Reinforcingfy (min) 300.0 MPa fy (min) 300.0 MPafy (vert) 400.0 MPa fy (horz) 400.0 MPafy (max) 500.0 MPa fy (max) 500.0 MPaStatus Acceptable Status AcceptableConcrete Strength Concrete Densityfc' (min) 20.0 MPa Wc (min) 1500.0 kg/m3fc' 35.0 MPa Wc 2400.0 kg/m3fc' (max) 80.0 MPa Wc (max) 2500.0 kg/m3Status Acceptable Status AcceptableCanadian Reinforcing BarsIndex Bar Diameter AreaDesignation (mm) (mm2) 1 10M 11.3 100.0 2 15M 16.0 200.0 3 20M 19.5 300.0 4 25M 25.2 500.0 5 30M 29.9 700.0 6 35M 35.7 1000.0 7 45M 43.7 1500.0 8 55M 56.4 2500.0List of MessagesNo Messages...UBC Page 3 #100 - 1234 Anywhere PlaceConnor Ferster April 8, 2019 AnyCity, AnyStatePh: 555-1234   Fax: 555-4321 4:49 PM AnyCountry

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