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UBC Stormwater Detention : Multiuse Stormwater Detention Infrastructure Chen, Hanpeng; Howes, Rebecca; King, Suzanne; Priest, Jordan; Van Der Mark, Nicola; Toi, Andrew 2019-04-05

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report UBC Stormwater Detention: Multiuse Stormwater Detention InfrastructureHanpeng Chen, Rebecca Howes, Suzanne King, Jordan Priest, Nicola Van Der Mark, Andrew Toi University of British Columbia CIVL 445/446 Themes: Water, Climate, Land April 5, 2019 Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”. Executive Summary RAJNS Consulting has prepared final design of a multiuse stormwater detention facility for the University of British Columbia (UBC) and UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program. The project site is located southwest of the Centre for Comparative Medicine (CCM) at the intersection of Southwest Marine Drive and Wesbrook Mall in Vancouver, BC. The site is north of the Point Grey Cliffs which are susceptible to erosion from runoff and infiltration during storm events, which is a main constraint to design. Further, climate change and land use changes are exacerbating these issues. The design includes two distinct elements: a stormwater bioswale with underground water detention tank; and, a structural facility targeted for use by cyclists – a key project stakeholder.  Three stormwater quality improvement methods are integrated into the detention centre. Upon review of past stormwater quality monitoring programs, it was determined that oil and grit separation is necessary to treat stormwater flows from the north and bioretention would provide appropriate quality improvements. Based on a hydrological and hydraulic analysis of the South Slopes Catchment, the detention chamber will consist of 20, 100 m long, 1050 mm diameter interconnected pipe lengths sloped 0.5% to the southeast which tie into Junction S6D-S26A at the inlet and Junction T6D-S25 at the outlet. This design combines natural bioretention soil and HDPE detention chambers to provide water storage in the event of a 100 year, 24 hour storm event.  Through consultation with key stakeholders and considering themes of Resilient Cities, the detention centre will also feature a clubhouse for the UBC Thunderbird Cycling Club. Designed based on BC Building Codes and the National Building Code of Canada the clubhouse will feature showers and change rooms, a repair centre, and ample bicycle storage. Due to the scope of this project, structural design is limited to foundation loading, material selection, and placement planning. The estimated load of the building will be 22.5 kPa which will be transferred to a 1 m deep strip foundation founded on Site Class C type glacial till. The structure will be built with an emphasis on timber design and no retaining walls are required on the site.  Located at the corner of Wesbrook Mall and Southwest Marine Drive the detention centre will act as a gateway to campus. Welcoming visitors, students, and faculty will be two precast concrete stormwater detaining Supertree structures incorporated with the UBC Gateway sign. The Supertrees, 2 m in diameter at the base, will be erected on 4 steel pile and cap foundation via a 4-dowel system to transfer their 7,535 kg load. Construction is estimated to take 8 months and should begin May 2019. An Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is not required for a project of this scale, however, RAJNS has identified potential construction-caused environmental concerns and presents mitigation options. The total estimated cost of the design is $16.34 million, including engineering fees and 30% contingency. The overall design established is a multi-modal and integrated hub for community and university cyclists, elevating UBC’s reputation as a global leader in sustainability.   Table of Contents Table of Figures ................................................................................................................................. v List of Tables ..................................................................................................................................... v 1 Introduction.............................................................................................................................. 1 2 Design Criteria .......................................................................................................................... 3 2.1 Hydrological Analysis ........................................................................................................................ 3 2.2 Hydraulic Analysis ............................................................................................................................. 5 2.2.1 Site Hydraulics ........................................................................................................................... 8 2.3 Stormwater Quality ........................................................................................................................... 9 2.4 Soil Classification ............................................................................................................................. 10 2.5 Stakeholder Requirements ............................................................................................................. 11 3 Major Project Components ..................................................................................................... 11 3.1 Detention Chamber......................................................................................................................... 11 3.1.1 Flow Regulation Tank .............................................................................................................. 11 3.2 Water Quality Improvement ........................................................................................................... 13 3.2.1 Rain Garden............................................................................................................................. 13 3.2.2 Bioretention Filtration ............................................................................................................. 14 3.2.3 Geomembrane Liner ................................................................................................................ 14 3.2.4 Oil and Grit Separator ............................................................................................................. 15 3.3 Structural Components ................................................................................................................... 15 3.3.1 Supertrees ............................................................................................................................... 15 3.3.2 Clubhouse Design .................................................................................................................... 15 3.4 Environmental and Social Consideration ........................................................................................ 16 3.4.1 Sustainability ........................................................................................................................... 16 3.4.2 UBC Gateway Structure ........................................................................................................... 16 4 Standards and Software Packages .......................................................................................... 17 5 Technical Considerations ........................................................................................................ 17 5.1 Vancouver Campus Plan ................................................................................................................. 17 5.2 Integrated Stormwater Management Plan ..................................................................................... 17 5.3 UBC Technical Guidelines................................................................................................................ 17 5.4 UBC Construction TMP Terms of Reference ................................................................................... 18 5.5 Draft Plan for Construction Work ................................................................................................... 18 5.5.1 Construction Activities and Anticipated Timelines .................................................................. 18 5.5.2 Potential Negative Effects from Construction Activities and Mitigation Measures ................ 19 5.6 Construction Schedule and Cost Estimate ...................................................................................... 19 5.7 Service Life Maintenance Plan ........................................................................................................ 20 5.7.1 Detention Chamber ................................................................................................................. 20 5.7.2 Oil and Grit Separator ............................................................................................................. 20 5.7.3 Rain Garden............................................................................................................................. 20 5.7.4 Pump and Flow Regulation Box .............................................................................................. 20 5.7.5 Clubhouse ................................................................................................................................ 21 5.8 Traffic Management Plan (TMP) ..................................................................................................... 21 6 Conclusion and Recommendations ......................................................................................... 24 7 References .............................................................................................................................. 25 Appendix A: Sample Calculations ..................................................................................................... 1 Peak Flows..................................................................................................................................................... 2 Rainfall Intensities ......................................................................................................................................... 4 Detention Chamber Dimensions and Orientation ........................................................................................ 6 Rain Garden .................................................................................................................................................. 8 Orifice Size .................................................................................................................................................... 9 Appendix B: Specifications ............................................................................................................. 26 Detention Chamber .................................................................................................................................... 26 Earthworks .................................................................................................................................................. 31 Pump Specification ..................................................................................................................................... 32 Bioretention Soil Mix Design ....................................................................................................................... 34 Oil and Grit Separator (OGS) ....................................................................................................................... 36 Appendix C: Construction Schedule ............................................................................................... 38 Appendix D: Cost Estimate ............................................................................................................. 40 Appendix E: Detailed Design Drawings ........................................................................................... 42                      Table of Figures Figure 1: South Slopes Catchment .................................................................................................. 3 Figure 2: 10 year and 100 year 24 hour Hyetographs .................................................................... 5 Figure 3: 100 year 24 hour Per Hectare Runoff .............................................................................. 7 Figure 4: 100 year 24 hour Runoff Volume to be Detained ........................................................... 8 Figure 5: Rainfall and Runoff of Subcatchment C-USL-44 under 10 year 24 hour Design Storm ... 9 Figure 6: Spiral Drain and Site Location (UBC Vancouver Campus: Integrated Stormwater Management Plan, 2017) .............................................................................................................. 10 Figure 7: Schematic View of Flow Regulation Box ........................................................................ 12 Figure 8: Relation Between Orifice Size and Water Depth ........................................................... 12 Figure 9: Rain Garden Cross Section ............................................................................................. 14 Figure 10: Building Service Life Maintenance Timeline ................................................................ 21 List of Tables Table 1: Team Member Contributions............................................................................................ 2 Table 2: Return Period Rainfall Intensities & Design Flows ............................................................ 4 Table 3: Catchment Parameters ..................................................................................................... 6 Table 4: Design Parameters .......................................................................................................... 13 Table 5: Rain Garden Design Result .............................................................................................. 13    1  1 Introduction The purpose of this report is to present the final design of a multiuse stormwater detention facility for UBC’s South Campus to UBC and UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program. Throughout the design process, UBC’s Integrated Stormwater Management Plan (ISMP), key stakeholders, and the Vancouver Campus Plan (VCP) were thoroughly consulted to inform the design direction.  The existing stormwater management system servicing UBC’s South Campus poses a severe risk of flooding under major storm conditions. The environmentally sensitive Point Grey Cliffs will experience increased erosive damage during major floods which will also negatively impact water quality exiting campus. In addition, climate and land use changes will further negative impacts of flooding on the built and natural infrastructure within the area by increasing the severity and frequency of flooding. Therefore, in accordance with UBC’s ISMP, the technical project objectives met by this design are to mitigate potential flooding impacts from major storms, minimize the flooding impacts on the surrounding cliffs in Point Grey and neighbouring water courses, and improve the quality of stormwater leaving campus to standards exceeding those of provincial and federal policy. To achieve the technical design criteria the impacts of land use and climate change were assessed to determine their influence on hydrological, hydraulic, and water quality analysis’. These analyses influenced the stormwater detention system; dictating sizing, orientation, and stormwater improvement methods.  Equally, this final design considers emerging themes of Resilient Cities, most notably, that of multiple uses. Therefore, beyond meeting the technical design objectives, a secondary purpose for this project was determined through analysis of key project stakeholders to understand what groups will use and benefit from this facility. From stakeholder engagement meetings, it was determined the greatest net sum benefit would be the resulting clubhouse for the UBC Thunderbird Cycling Club.  The aesthetic and social design is separate from the technical objectives and is informed by the VCP. The VCP provides specifications to ensure this design will accentuate the natural west coast beauty, achieve a cross-campus design cohesiveness, and realize a design quality befitting to a globally significant University. This objective is achieved through the installation of Supertrees and a UBC gateway structure that will bring attention and notoriety to the detention facility. Further, the clubhouse features locally sourced materials and a west coast inspired design while the selected site plantings drives a cohesiveness among built infrastructure in the South Campus. The area southwest of the Centre for Comparative Medicine (CCM) on UBC’s South Campus has been identified as the optimal location for the installation of a stormwater detention facility. The 1.3-hectare site is located northwest of the intersection at Southwest Marine Drive and Wesbrook Mall. This area is near the UBC Farm and an extensive green area which allows for a seamless integration of the infrastructure project with the existing natural environment and is a relative low point in the South Slopes Catchment as defined in UBC’s ISMP.  3  2 Design Criteria 2.1 Hydrological Analysis A hydrological analysis of the South Slopes Catchment was completed as defined in the UBC ISMP using the Rational Method. We estimate the 2 year, 10 year, 25 year, and 100 year return period peak flows that will be directed onto the site via underground stormwater networks or overland runoff. Stormwater that enters the upstream reaches of the South Slopes Catchment storm system will flow downstream into the storm sewers adjacent to the site. However, we believe that overland flow from the upper reaches of the South Slopes Catchment will be diverted along major flood pathways, such as West 16th Avenue and Wesbrook Mall. The South Slopes catchment has an area of 1.5 km2 and an average slope of 2.1%. Figure 1 shows the South Slopes Catchment area used in the estimate as well as the longest direct overland flow path to the site. Using the future runoff coefficients from the Land Use Assessment we estimate the site’s runoff coefficient to be 0.4 by the year 2030. Rainfall intensities for each return period are based on Vancouver Intl A Rain Gauge (ID: 1108395). Using the Hathaway formula, we estimate the time of concentration for the overland flow of the South Slopes Catchment to be 1.4 hours.   Figure 1: South Slopes Catchment  4  We used the rainfall intensities for the 1.4 h design storm to determine their associated peak flow. Rainfall intensities and peak flows for each return period are outlined in Table 2. Calculations of all design flows are found in Appendix A. Table 2: Return Period Rainfall Intensities & Design Flows Return Period Intensity (mm/hr) Peak Flow (m3/s) 2 year 8.9 4.1 10 year 14.4 6.6 25 year 18.0 8.2 100 year 24.6 11.3  Rainfall volume of the 10-year and 100-year return period storms are required to assess the rainfall pattern over the catchment and site. Using the Vancouver Intl A Rain Gauge (ID: 1108395) IDF table we estimated the volume for the 2, 10, 25, and 100 year storms at durations of 1, 2, 6, 12, and 14 hours. We developed a hyetograph for the 10 year and 100 year return period 24 hour storm. Applying a factor of 30% for climate change, we estimate a rainfall intensity of 3.89 mm/hr for the 10-year 24 hour storm and 5.42 mm/hr for the 100 year 24 hour storm. The corresponding 10 year 24 hour storm and 100 year 24 hour storm cumulative depths from the IDF table are 93.24 mm and 130.00 mm, respectively. Calculations of the rainfall volumes for the various storms considered are found in Appendix A. A SCS Type 1A distribution was applied to form the rainfall distribution due to its predominant application throughout the rain forested areas of the pacific northwest. Figure 2 displays the resulting hyetographs for the 10-year and 100-year return period design storms. 5   Figure 2: 10 year and 100 year 24 hour Hyetographs Under the applied rainfall distribution pattern, the maximum intensity experienced is 21.4 mm/hr for the 10 year 24 hour storm, and 29.9 mm/hr for the 100 year 24 hour storm. 2.2 Hydraulic Analysis The primary purpose of site redevelopment is to integrate strategies that will minimize potential flooding from large storm events, minimize erosion of the Point Grey cliffs, and improve the quality of stormwater leaving campus. To assess the extent of flooding that would be incurred on site we reviewed existing stormwater patterns, runoff patterns, and infiltration. The EPA SWMM model provided by the University of British Columbia was used to model the capacity of the existing stormwater system as well as the surface of the South Slopes Catchment to assess its need for storage. We aim to mimic naturalized flow conditions, and therefore require estimates of peak flow of the site catchment contributing area under pre-development conditions. To estimate the required volume of storage we assessed the difference in runoff volume between pre-development and post-development conditions. Estimates are completed on a per hectare basis and then scaled to reflect the entirety of the South Slopes Catchment area. The catchment parameters outlined in Table 3 are applied to the model to reflect pre-development and post-development conditions. 6  Table 3: Catchment Parameters Catchment Parameter Pre-Development Post-Development Area (Ha) 1 1 Width (m) 100 100 % Slope 2.1 2.1 % Impervious 10 80 N-Imperv: Mannings N for impervious area 0.025 0.025 N-Perv: Mannings N for pervious area 0.25 0.25 Dstore-Imperv: Depth of depression storage on impervious area (mm) 2 2 Dstore-Perv: Depth of depression storage on pervious area (mm) 10 5 %Zero-Impverv: Percent of impervious area with no depression storage 5 20  We ran the model under the 100 year return period 24 hour design storm and produced the runoff hydrographs for pre-development and post-development conditions outlined in Figure 3.  7   Figure 3: 100 year 24 hour Per Hectare Runoff We determined the peak flow under pre-development and post-development conditions for the 100 year 24 hour storm to be 0.02 m3/s per hectare and 0.13 m3/s per hectare, respectively. We used 0.02 m3/s per hectare as the maximum allowable outflow, therefore, any additional flow must be retained by the stormwater system. To determine the required volume to be retained per hectare, we determined the volumetric difference between the pre-development and post-development flows that would maintain flow below 0.02 m3/s. The yellow line in Figure 4 represents acceptable post-development runoff flow rates per hectare. We estimate that 1119.3 m3 of storage is required per hectare of land. The blue shading represents the volume of stormwater that must be retained in storage. 8   Figure 4: 100 year 24 hour Runoff Volume to be Detained Given the site’s total catchment area of 1.27 ha we estimate the overall storage requirements for the site to be 1422 m3. 2.2.1 Site Hydraulics Unlike the surrounding area within the South Slopes Catchment, the site itself is intended to maintain close to naturalized conditions following development. A lower impervious percentage will allow for increased infiltration of runoff. Subcatchment C-USL-44 from the EPA SWMM model appropriately represents the site’s expected runoff conditions. The percent impervious cover of the catchment is approximately 7% and the catchment slope is approximately 2.5%. Figure 5 displays the rainfall and runoff expected on the subcatchment under the 10 year 24 hour design storm.  9   Figure 5: Rainfall and Runoff of Subcatchment C-USL-44 under 10 year 24 hour Design Storm The runoff hydrograph indicates a peak runoff of 0.22 m3/s will be experienced within the area. As previously stated, post-development overland runoff levels are to be managed to mimic pre-development runoff conditions. Minimal changes are expected to be made to impervious cover on the site, however removal of existing trees will reduce the site runoff coefficient and the impact of climate change will result in a slight increase in runoff flows. It is expected that bioswales and rain gardens included in the site design will have sufficient capacity to retain this excess runoff for the 2 year, 5 year and 10 year storms. These features will also easily adapt to the fluxes of seasonal rainfall trends. 2.3 Stormwater Quality Although UBC has monitored stormwater discharges from campus in the past, monitoring programs were inconsistent and irregularly run. The current stormwater quality for the South Slopes Catchment is unknown as the discharge data available for review is relevant to the North Catchment, via the spiral drain, shown at the top of Figure 6 below, taken from the UBC ISMP, the project site is noted at the bottom of the figure.  10   Figure 6: Spiral Drain and Site Location (UBC Vancouver Campus: Integrated Stormwater Management Plan, 2017) Effluent from UBC Farm is expected to contain substances listed under Section 4 of the CAN/CGSB-32.311-2015 Report, Organic production systems: Permitted substances lists. Outside the impacts associated with runoff from UBC Farm, the data available for the North Catchment should closely reflect the conditions of the South Slopes Catchment. Stormwater discharge from the North Catchment resembles that of Lower Mainland municipalities. Stormwater quality in the Lower Mainland is most impacted by heavy urbanization which introduces contaminants via road drainage and naturally occurring groundwater which exceeds quality guidelines for heavy metals.  2.4 Soil Classification Based on the provided geotechnical assessment report for Wesbrook Mall and 16th Avenue, the soil classification at Wesbrook Mall and Southwest Marine Drive can be interpolated to be class C and the groundwater table to be negligible. Type C class sites are typified by dense soil and soft rock.  11		2.5 Stakeholder	Requirements		As	a	multi-use	stormwater	infrastructure,	the	secondary	use	of	the	site	caters	to	bicyclists	including	UBC	students,	staff	and	faculty	who	cycle,	and	various	UBC	Thunderbird	Sports	teams	(Cycling	Team,	Cycling	Club,	Triathlon	Club).	Consultation	with	the	UBC	Cycling	Team	revealed	stakeholder	requirements	including:	a	sizeable	clubhouse	with	secure	bike	storage;	washrooms	with	shower	and	change	room	facilities;	and,	a	workshop	area	to	repair	bicycles.	Ventilation	and	passive	airflow	features	can	aid	in	drying	of	wet	cycling	equipment.	The	road	onsite	will	be	paved	asphalt	to	accommodate	narrow	road	bike	tires.	Undercover	bike	locks	and	repair	stations	will	be	installed	and	seating	areas	provided	outside	the	clubhouse	structure.	3 Major	Project	Components	3.1 Detention	Chamber	The	detention	chamber	will	be	installed	in	the	southeast	corner	of	the	site.	The	design	incorporates	semi-perforated	aluminized	corrugated	metal	pipes	to	detain	a	catchment	runoff	volume	of	1422	m3.	The	chamber	will	consist	of	20	pipes,	1070	mm	in	external	diameter	and	100	m	long.	The	intake	into	the	system	will	be	connected	to	Junction	S6D-S26A	through	a	26.6	m	long,	1050	mm	diameter	PVC	pipe.	A	weir	will	be	placed	at	the	pipe	inlet	to	regulate	flows	entering	the	chamber.	The	outlet	of	the	chamber	system	will	be	connected	to	the	flow	regulation	box	and	pump,	which	then	connects	to	the	system	at	Junction	T6D-S25	with	a	125.9	m	long,	400	mm	diameter	PVC	pipe.	The	chambers	will	be	sloped	at	0.5%	towards	the	southwest	of	the	site.	The	pipes	have	been	designed	to	be	80%	full.	A	general	detail	of	the	chamber	plan,	profile,	and	cross	section	is	shown	in	Appendix	E.	3.1.1 Flow	Regulation	Tank		The	detention	chamber	connects	with	the	Flow	Regulation	Box.	The	flow	regulation	box	consists	of	two	chambers	as	shown	in	Figure	7.	In	the	lower	chamber,	there	is	a	pump	to	lift	water	into	the	upper	chamber.	In	the	upper	chamber,	there	is	an	orifice	on	the	wall.	The	exit	of	the	flow	regulation	box	will	connect	with	the	existing	storm	sewer.	The	design	criteria	of	a	flow	regulation	box	are	to	limit	the	maximum	outflow	rate	to	less	than	1.2	m3.	Our	design	can	achieve	this	goal	by	carefully	selecting	the	size	of	the	orifice	on	the	wall.	In	a	small	storm	event,	storm	water	flows	into	the	system	at	a	rate	less	than	1.2	m3	and	the	flow	regulation	box	will	discharge	the	storm	water	immediately.	In	a	large	storm	event,	water	can	quickly	gather	into	the	lift	station	and	start	to	discharge	at	an	optimum	rate	earlier,	hence	requiring	a	smaller	detention	chamber.		The	flow	regulation	box	is	3	meters	in	diameter	and	6	meters	in	height.	The	flow	regulation	box	will	be	constructed	on	the	south-east	side	of	corner	of	the	project	site.	To	limit	the	maximum	flow	rate	to	less	than	1.2	m3,	Bernoulli’s	Equation	is	used	to	find	the	relation	between	orifice	size	and	maximum	allowed	water	level	in	the	tank	as	shown	in	Figure	8.	A	diameter	of	400	mm	and	maximum	water	level	of	2.4	m	above	the	orifice	is	used	in	our	design.	The	pump	curve	and	efficiency	curve	are	provided	in	Appendix	B.	12   Figure 7: Schematic View of Flow Regulation Box  Figure 8: Relation Between Orifice Size and Water Depth   13		3.2 Water	Quality	Improvement	3.2.1 Rain	Garden	On-site	source	control	measures	were	designed	to	allow	better	management	of	rainwater	and	to	reduce	the	overland	flow	rate.	The	rain	garden	will	be	built	around	the	site	to	collect	overland	runoff	from	the	site	and	adjacent	CCM	property.	Using	the	simplified	rainfall	capture	method,	the	depth	of	the	top	soil	required	to	capture	the	rainfall,	as	well	as	the	required	rock	pit	depth,	was	calculated.	The	parameters	used	to	calculate	the	top	soil	depth	are	based	on	Metro	Vancouver	Storm	Water	Source	Control	Design	Guidelines	2012.	Table	4	summarizes	design	parameters	used	to	calculate	the	topsoil	depth.	Table	4:	Design	Parameters	Area	 17249	m2	Impervious	Percentage	 20%	Evaporation	Rate	 1mm/day	Porosity	of	Rock	Pit	 35%	Infiltration	Rate	 1.5mm/hr	2year,	24hr	-Rainfall	IDF	data	 	 2.3mm/hr	Wilting	Point	 0.05	Width	of	Rain	Garden	 2m	Length	of	Rain	Garden	 280m		The	Calculation	of	topsoil	layer	and	rock	pit	in	the	rain	garden	were	based	on	the	assumption	that	the	proposed	rain	garden	is	2m	wide.	The	rain	garden	will	be	place	around	the	South	and	East	side	of	the	site.	By	using	IDF	curve	provided	by	Regional	IDF	provided	by	Metro	Vancouver,	the	total	input	volume	was	calculated	as	137.3	m3.	To	capture	all	of	the	run-off,	A	rain	garden	with	0.45m	top	soil	and	0.4m	drain	rock	depth	will	be	installed	as	illustrated	in	Figure	9.			The	calculated	values	obtained	using	the	Simplified	Rainfall	Capture	Method	are	listed	below	in	Table	5.		Table	5:	Rain	Garden	Design	Result	Input	Volume	 137.3	m3	Evaporation	 6.06	m3	Infiltration		 20.16	m3	Growing	Medium	Absorption	 50.4	m3	Top	Soil	Depth	 0.45m	Rock	pit	Depth	 0.4m	 14 Figure 9: Rain Garden Cross Section3.2.2 Bioretention Filtration Stormwater entering the detention chamber will be treated through biofiltration and bioretention to decrease levels of pollutants to levels in compliance with federal and provincial water quality legislation. To improve the quality of stormwater leaving the detention facility, a bioretention filter will be installed to a depth of 450 mm at all locations outside of the paved bike path, club building and Super tree footprint, and rain garden areas. A soil mix of 40% compost and 60% screen or utility sand will provide an infiltration rate of 25 to 50 mm/hr. The primary expected storm flow contaminants at the detention centre will be heavy metals from existing groundwater conditions and effluent from UBC Farm which will contribute substances listed under Section 4 of the CAN/CGSB-32.311-2015 Report, Organic production systems: Permitted substances lists. Bioretention and biofiltration methods have been shown to significantly decrease the concentration of heavy metals and the expected substances from UBC Farm in effluent (Improving Stormwater Quality, 2016). 3.2.3 Geomembrane Liner To avoid infiltration into the upper soil strata which has been found to cause erosion at the Point Grey Cliffs, an impermeable, geomembrane liner will be placed below all installations which facilitate infiltration. 15  3.2.4 Oil and Grit Separator In compliance with the Stormwater Quality at UBC report, an oil and grit separator will be installed to treat stormwater contaminated by road drainage entering the detention facility. Site topography dictates storm flows will not be entering the detention facility through the south side. To the west of the site, storm flows will traverse UBC Farm prior to entering the detention facility so will contain fractional amounts of road drainage. Therefore, the intake system will be installed along the northeast edge of the detention facility to accept the primarily road drainage storm flows from Wesbrook Mall and the grounds of the Centre for Comparative Medicine (CCM) prior to entering the site of the detention facility. The intake system will consist of a 170 m long, 800 mm half pipe which runs parallel to the northeast edge of the site. The half pipe will be covered by grating to allow water and mid-sized particulates to pass through while ensuring large debris does not enter the system. A 0.5% slope from the west to east will allow storm flows to flow through to the oil and grid separator, detail shown in drawing C-05. The oil and grit separator is designed for the 2 year, 24 hour storm event such that oils and greases will float to the top on the intake side of the barrier and grits and other particles will settle to the bottom while the treated water will flow to the outlet side.  3.3 Structural Components This project features two main structural elements: the UBC Supertree gateway structure and UBC cycling clubhouse building providing storage and public washrooms. 3.3.1 Supertrees The Supertrees will act as a beacon and gateway structure for community members entering the south end of campus. The Supertrees will be erected upon a pile and pile cap foundation. The design of the Supertrees themselves will be subcontracted out. A pile cap foundation with four 0.4 mm diameter steel piles which the base of the Supertrees will connect into using 4 dowels to transfer the Supertree load down into the piles is proposed. The base of the two Supertrees will be approximately 2 m in diameter with a pile cap foundation that will pass the edge of the Supertree base by 0.5 m yielding a foundation with a diameter of approximately 3 m. The approximate weight of the of the Supertrees is 7535 kg including the weight of the concrete, steel, solar and plant panels. The soil bearing capacity for the glacial till on site is approximately 12 200 kg/m2. Given these values, a minimum pile cap area of 0.5 m² is estimated and will be achieved due to the diameter of the trunk base. Calculations of this foundation is found in Appendix A. and detailed drawings of the foundation can be found in Appendix E. 3.3.2 Clubhouse Design The clubhouse superstructure will feature locally sourced timber construction and typical basement retaining wall foundation design giving the building a basement for storage. The 16  clubhouse will also feature a green roof and a covered entrance with bike racks. The building footprint itself will be 630 m². The loading on the building is estimated to be: 3.5 kPa dead load and 4.79 kPa live load for the main and first floor with a service limit state snow load of 1.64 kPa and roof loading of 2 kPa and 2.4 kPa for the dead and live loads, respectively. The building foundation is a strip foundation with a minimum depth of 1 m for frost protection with special considerations for drainage. As noted, the site soil is glacial till and some special considerations may need to be accounted for when completing detailed design of the foundation. The building’s loading is estimated to be 22.5 kPa, the load of the soil was calculated at 18.7 kN/m², and the soil surcharge was calculated to be 2.8 kN/m² which is used in the design of the foundation layout. It is important to note that the slab must be installed prior to backfill over 1 m in height to avoid sliding of the foundation. Detailed design drawings of the foundation can be found in . 3.4 Environmental and Social Consideration 3.4.1 Sustainability Creating a sustainable campus is a key goal of the Vancouver Campus Plan, a guiding design criterion for our infrastructure. As such, the stormwater management system will promote a natural systems approach using rainwater. Technical design and sizing of stormwater management features is based on future rainfall scenarios with consideration for climate change. Where possible soil, drainrock, and vegetation are of local varieties and are sourced locally. In accordance with the Vancouver Campus Plan, the design uses native and edible plants in low maintenance and simple landscaping schemes in a pesticide-free regime. Low Impact Design features include a green roof over the Clubhouse, rain gardens and bioswale to capture run-off leading into an oil-grit separator, and passive air conditioning in the Clubhouse building. To increase infiltration, permeable pavement will be used in the bicycle parking area and surrounding the outdoor picnic benches.  The green infrastructure components can all contribute toward LEED certification if UBC SEEDS wishes to pursue this. Overall, the choice to incorporate a cycling hub with the stormwater features on site makes it a uniquely sustainable project. It sets UBC apart as a world leader in stormwater management and sustainable transit. Appendix E. 3.4.2 UBC Gateway Structure The Vancouver Campus Plan indicates that two Gateway structures will be located at West 16th Avenue and SW Marine Drive and at West 16th Avenue and Wesbrook Mall. The location of our project site is classified as a secondary gateway. As a gateway, our site will instil pride and identity in UBC’s community showcasing it to visitors around the world. The gateway structure is to be fabricated by a sub-contractor off-site and will be constructed of sustainable and rust-proof steel. The dimensions of the gateway structure are 2.5 meters high, 1 meter deep, and 3.5 meters wide. It will be located at the south-east corner of the site and cohesive with the 17 style of the Supertrees. The foundation will be similar to the Supertrees, 1 meter deep pile cap concrete. 4 Standards and Software Packages The standards used throughout conception, design, and planning include: ● UBC Technical Guidelines (Technical Specifications for Architects and Engineers);● Canadian Environmental Quality Guidelines and the British Columbia Approved WaterQuality Guidelines: Aquatic Life, Wildlife, and Agriculture Summary Report (March2018);● BC Building Code; and● National Building Code of Canada.The software packages and their purposes used in project completion include: ● EPA SWMM 5.1: Used to model the stormwater system, South Slopes Catchment, and10-year and 100-year return period design period storms for the Hydraulic Assessment;and,● AutoCAD: Used to generate preliminary design drawings and final IFC drawings.5 Technical Considerations 5.1 Vancouver Campus Plan The VCP influenced the social and aesthetic objectives throughout the design process. The VCP provides specifications to ensure this design will accentuate the natural west coast beauty, achieve cohesive design across campus, and realize a design quality befitting to a globally significant University. Land use changes are also detailed in the VCP and informed changes to the runoff coefficients considered in the hydrological and hydraulic analyses.  5.2 Integrated Stormwater Management Plan UBC’s ISMP influenced the identification of major technical design criteria and was consulted for catchment delineation, zoning requirements, and current stormwater quality. 5.3 UBC Technical Guidelines The UBC Technical Guidelines provided several documents outlining technical design criteria governing several components of the project. This list includes procurement and contract requirements, in addition to concrete, masonry, metals, fire suppression, plumbing, and earthwork specifications. 18  5.4 UBC Construction TMP Terms of Reference The UBC Construction Traffic Management Plan (TMP) terms of reference and project information for was used to develop a TMP for this specific project. This document outlines necessary information required before the project can be approved. 5.5 Draft Plan for Construction Work 5.5.1 Construction Activities and Anticipated Timelines A list of primary construction activities and the anticipated timelines are presented in the following paragraphs: Site Mobilization (early May 2019) Site mobilization is expected to last for one week and includes installing a fence around the site, installation of temporary construction trailers, and running temporary services. The construction laydown area will be on the south end of the site, adjacent to SW Marine Drive. Excavation (May, July, & August 2019) Excavation will be completed in three sections and involve removing a depth of approximately 1 m of soil (volume of 30,050 m3). The first excavation period will be three days in May for the structural foundation. The second excavation period will be three days in July for the pump, oil and grit separator and rain gardens. The final excavation will take place over three days place for the detention tank. Approximately half the excavated volume will be stored onsite and reutilized as a landscaping soil for the bioswale and rain gardens. Drive Piles and Pour Foundations (May 2019) Once excavation is completed, the piles will be driven into the ground and the slabs will be poured. The piles will support the Clubhouse building, as well as the Supertrees, Gateway structure and the oil and grit separator.  Clubhouse Building (June - December 2019) Once the piling is completed, the Clubhouse Building will be constructed. Construction of the Clubhouse is the activity with the longest duration. Stormwater Infrastructure (July 2019) Once excavation and piling is completed, the pump and oil and grit separator infrastructure will be installed. The pump installation will include formwork, concrete pouring and installation. The oil and grit separator is pre-fabricated and will be installed along with a half pipe drainage grate and, finally, tied into the detention tank area.  The detention tank will be installed last, first by lining the excavated area with geotextile lining, then assembling the pipes making up the tank, and then finishing installation and tie-in.  Equipment Installation (August 2019) 19 Enclosures with equipment pre-installed will be placed on concrete pads, followed by mechanical and electrical connections. Supertree and Gateway Structure Installation (September 2019) Once piling is completed, the Supertree and Gateway structures will be erected. These features will be constructed off-site by sub-contractors. The Supertrees will then be encased with steel mesh and planting. Planting, Landscaping and Paving (September - October 2019) Planting and landscaping will commence as soon as all the equipment is in place. The asphalt road will be graded and paved during the same period.  Outdoor Fittings (November 2019) Following planting and paving, the bike racks, bike tool bars, picnic tables, garbage receptacles and signage will be installed on site. The lighting features will be installed and connected.   Startup and Commissioning (December 2019) Once installation is completed, the startup and commissioning will take place followed by operation of the facility, which is planned for December 2019. 5.5.2 Potential Negative Effects from Construction Activities and Mitigation Measures Construction of the proposed mulituse stormwater infrastructure and cycling hub will be completed using conventional construction methods and will follow standard construction best management practices. The contractor will be responsible for the detailed methods of construction. Outlined below are potential negative environmental effects of from construction activities along with proposed mitigation measures. The final decision regarding mitigation measures to be employed will be the responsibility of the contractor. The construction process with the greatest potential for negative environmental effects is construction of the foundation for the Clubhouse building. This work requires the use of various pieces of heavy equipment, which will be on site at different periods of the construction process. Potential heavy equipment includes bulldozers, front-end loaders, small trucks, backhoes, bobcats, dump trucks, compactors, ready-mix concrete trucks and cranes.  Part of the construction process will include planting numerous native species and trees in the surrounding area of the detention tank. There are also several trees that will be removed during excavation. The tree removal application process for the UBC Campus will be followed to minimize issues.  5.6 Construction Schedule and Cost Estimate The updated construction schedule and cost estimate can be found in Appendix C and Appendix D. The construction will take approximately 8 months with the longest construction activity 20 being the Clubhouse Superstructure. The final cost is estimated to be $16.34 million including 30% contingency, before engineering fees and GST.  5.7 Service Life Maintenance Plan 5.7.1 Detention Chamber The detention chamber will be equipped with several 8-inch diameter cleanouts placed on the manifolds. The top of the cleanouts can be accessed from ground level and provide an access-point for vacuum or water-jetting hoses used to clean the system. Cleanout should be conducted a minimum of once every year. The rain garden and bioswale features will require periodic checking for exposed soil. Re-mulching will be conducted on an ongoing base as needed. A cover of vegetation and rocks should be maintained regularly. Maintain a cover of decorative rock around the inlet and overflow area to protect the soil. Bi-annual vacuuming of permeable pavement should be completed to inhibit sediment build-up and invasive plant species growth. During inspections, elevations of sediment height should be taken from each riser and cleanout. These elevations should be recorded on the Inspection and Maintenance log sheet. Also during the inspection, personnel should be looking for blockages to inlet or outlet stubs. Inspection of the pre-treatment unit upstream of the system should always be inspected at this same time. Refer to the manufacturer’s recommendations for inspecting and maintaining the pre-treatment unit.  5.7.2 Oil and Grit Separator Once per year the oil and grit separator must be serviced by a vac truck; all effluent and sediment particles in the tank be removed. Ease of service is facilitated by the installation of the access hatch for the oil and grit separator being installed in the northeast corner of the site. Locating the access hatch at this location, detailed in the Site Plan, Appendix E, drawing C-01, will facilitate access to the tank via the boom arm of a vac truck pulled into the northeast entryway of the detention facility. This locating of the vac truck during servicing will impede entering cyclist traffic from the northeast, leaving the southwest entry open, and leave clear Wesbrook Mall for vehicular traffic. The use of an oil grit separator will reduce the frequency of maintenance and service required for the detention tank because water entering the tank will be semi-treated.  5.7.3 Rain Garden The rain garden is designed to have longevity and little maintenance.  Maintenance is required to remove sediments accumulated. 5.7.4 Pump and Flow Regulation Box Inspection for the pump in the flow regulation box is once per year as recommended by the manufacturer. 21 5.7.5 Clubhouse According to research by RDH Consulting, the service life maintenance timeline for an average building - similar to the Clubhouse building - is shown in Figure 10: Building Service Life Maintenance Timeline. We predict that large asset renewal expenditures will likely be required during Stage 3 and Stage 4 of the building’s lifetime.  Figure 10: Building Service Life Maintenance Timeline 5.8 Traffic Management Plan (TMP) As the construction activities of this project will impact the public domain and activities on campus, a traffic management plan is required. The main objectives of this plan are to maintain public safety, minimize impact on the university, and provide adequate access for all modes of transportation. As mentioned in the Technical Considerations section, this plan was developed in accordance with the UBC Construction Traffic Management Plans terms of reference and project information form. Project Information Project Owner UBC Properties Trust Contact Information Lead Contractor: Jorden Hutten - 778-887-6959 Key Onsite Staff: Nicole Peterson - 604-323-8612  Will Markson - 778-290-5708  Becky Rousell - 778-469-2356 22 Time Periods Monday to Friday, 7am to 5pm Affected Areas Intersection of Southwest Marine Drive and Wesbrook Mall Communications Notification of delay Communication and notification of construction activities and associated traffic changes will be posted online Construction Traffic Employees Approximately 15-20 employees will be working on site at all times Vehicles Approximately 2-3 construction vehicles will be arriving and departing the site during peak hour on any given day Times Construction traffic will arrive primarily between 6 to 7am when material delivery needs to be done, but this may vary Access Route Construction vehicles may access the site via Wesbrook Mall Delivery Location A location south of the site adjacent to Southwest Marine Drive has been identified for delivery Storage Location A location west of the site adjacent to Southwest Marine Drive has been identified for material storage Traffic Management Measures Basis This TMP is consistent with the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Canada and BC Manual of Standard Traffic Signs Traffic Management See Figure 8 below for temporary traffic control measures Detour Routes Right westbound lane of Southwest Marine Drive will be blocked off during construction hours, all westbound traffic will use a single lane Signs See Figure 8 below for temporary signage 23 Buildings Closest buildings to the construction, the CCM and NRC, both should not be majorly obstructed by construction activities Bicycle Parking No current bicycle parking on site; however this will be made available upon completion of construction Transit 49 UBC bus stop westbound will be temporarily moved 200 meters west of its original location, eastbound stop will be unaffected Parking Roadside parking will be prohibited on both Southwest Marine Drive and Wesbrook Mall within 200 meters of the site Emergency Vehicles Access to site from Wesbrook Mall Clean-up Contracted with UBC Operations for duration of project Figure 8 : Temporary Traffic Control Measures and Signage 24  6 Conclusion and Recommendations Specifications and design drawings provided for the multiuse stormwater detention facility located on UBC’s south campus are to be executed by the general contractor. It is ultimately the discretion of the contractor and sub-contractors to follow the industry construction standards and to use best judgement.  Stormwater management features have been designed to detain a 100-year storm scenario. This is a conservative design and was chosen to address the uncertainty in future storm events that is presented with changing climate. It is recommended that a periodic flow monitoring program may be useful to track flows through the detention tank.  As mentioned in the service life maintenance plan, it is recommended that in the first year of operation the tank is flushed at least twice. The system may benefit from occasional CCTV filming to ensure no bottlenecks.  Finally, it is recommended that the structural elements on site are regularly maintained through UBC Building Services. The UBC Cycling Club and other sports teams that will use this site as a Clubhouse should share in upkeep responsibility through funding and sponsorship. This design will stand out as a uniquely sustainable and multiuse hub for cyclists and the UBC Community as a whole.       25 7 References BIORETENTION SOIL MIX REVIEW AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR WESTERN WASHINGTON. (2009, January). Retrieved from Washington State University: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download;jsessionid=9D3D66D721A26FBCE87DAEFDD17C8020?doi=10.1.1.431.4124&rep=rep1&type=pdf Improving Stormwater Quality. (2016, May 24). Retrieved from PennState Extension: https://extension.psu.edu/improving-stormwater-quality Pump Curve. (2019, 04 04). Retrieved from GrundFOS Product Centre: https://product-selection.grundfos.com/product-detail.product-detail.html?from_suid=155415932152209019019465231282&hydraulicgroup=525618550&pumpsystemid=542985202&qcid=546862520 UBC Vancouver Campus: Integrated Stormwater Management Plan. (2017, March 5). Retrieved from UBC Campus + Community Planning: https://planning.ubc.ca/sites/planning.ubc.ca/files/images/UBC_ISMP_Final2017.pdf 1 Appendix A: Sample Calculations 2 Peak Flows Project: Stormwater Project II  Date: 2019-03-19Hydrological AssessmentStation Name: Vancouver Intl AID: 1108395Area A (km2) 1.49Length L (km) 2.22Max Elev Hmax (m) 104Min Elev Hmin (m) 57Avg Slope S (m/m) 0.021171Runoff Coefficient r 0.408Time of Concentration tc (Hathaway)1.426319725 hrReturn Period 100 yr 25 yr 10 yr 2 yrCoefficient A A = 32.2 A = 22.5 A = 17.7 A = 10.7Coefficient B B = -0.641 B = -0.59 B = -0.561 B = -0.513Coefficient t0 t0 = 0.093 t0 = 0.038 t0 = 0.015 t0 = 0I = A*(t+t0)^b I = A*(t+t0)^b I = A*(t+t0)^b I = A*(t+t0)^bClimate Change Coefficient 30%Intensity I (mm/hr) 24.62741 I (mm/hr) 17.96625 I (mm/hr) 14.41812 I (mm/hr) 8.918063Intensity w/ Climate Change 32.01563 23.35612 18.74356 11.59348Volume for Storm Duration Tc 45.66453 33.31329 26.73431 16.53601Peak Flow Q100 = CiA/3.6 Q25 = CiA/3.6 Q10 = CiA/3.6 Q2 = CiA/3.6Q100 (m3/s) 8.66406 Q25 (m3/s) 6.320625 Q10 (m3/s) 5.072376 Q2 (m3/s) 3.137424Q100 (m3/s) w/CC 11.26328 Q25 (m3/s) w/CC 8.216812 Q10 (m3/s) w/CC 6.594088 Q2 (m3/s) w/CC 4.0786514 Rainfall Intensities Project: Stormwater Project II Date: 2019-03-19Hydrological AssessmentReturn Period 100 yr 25 yr 10 yr 2 yrClimate Change Coefficient 30%Volume for Storm Duration 1h 28.03 20.85 16.82 10.41Volume w/ Climate Change 36.439 (mm) 27.105 (mm) 21.866 (mm) 13.533 (mm)Volume for Storm Duration 2h 41.24 28.6 22.43 14.03Volume w/ Climate Change 53.612 (mm) 37.18 (mm) 29.159 (mm) 18.239 (mm)Volume for Storm Duration 6h 67.46 47.75 38.25 25.54Volume w/ Climate Change 87.698 (mm) 62.075 (mm) 49.725 (mm) 33.202 (mm)Volume for Storm Duration 12h 74.39 62.87 54.98 39.05Volume w/ Climate Change 96.707 (mm) 81.731 (mm) 71.474 (mm) 50.765 (mm)Volume for Storm Duration 24h 99.98 82.93 71.72 50.19Volume w/ Climate Change 129.974 (mm) 107.809 (mm) 93.236 (mm) 65.247 (mm)6 Detention Chamber Dimensions and Orientation Tank Dimensions 𝑉𝑤𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑟 = 1422 𝑚3 Pipe 𝐷 = 1.050 𝑚 𝐴0 = 0.90 𝑚2 *Assumed pipe is maximum 80% full𝐴 = 0.90 ∗ 0.8 𝐴 = 0.72 𝑚2  𝐿 =𝑉𝐴𝐿 =  1422 𝑚30.72 𝑚2𝐿 = 19756 𝑚 *20 pipes of 100 m length will be used𝐿 =  100.0 𝑚 *1/2 a pipe diameter of spacing between consecutive pipes𝑊 = 1050 ∗ 20 +10502∗ 19 𝑊 =  31.5 𝑚 Volume of the Tank 𝑉𝑡𝑎𝑛𝑘 =  𝑛 ∗ 𝐿 ∗ 𝐴0  +  2 ∗ 𝑊 ∗ 𝐴0 𝑉𝑡𝑎𝑛𝑘 = 20 ∗ 100.0 𝑚 ∗ 0.9 𝑚2 + 2 ∗ 31.0 𝑚 ∗ 0.9 𝑚2 𝑉𝑡𝑎𝑛𝑘 = 1924 𝑚3  Volume of water in the Tank 𝑉𝑡𝑎𝑛𝑘 =  𝑛 ∗ 𝐿 ∗ 𝐴 +  2 ∗ 𝑊 ∗ 𝐴 𝑉𝑡𝑎𝑛𝑘 = 20 ∗ 100.0 𝑚 ∗ 0.72 𝑚2 + 2 ∗ 31.0 𝑚 ∗ 0.72 𝑚2 𝑉𝑡𝑎𝑛𝑘 = 1484 𝑚3  7 Tank Orientation 𝐸𝑙𝐼𝑛𝑙𝑒𝑡 = 55.26 𝑚 𝐷𝐼𝑛𝑙𝑒𝑡 = 4.1 𝑚 𝐸𝐼𝑂𝑢𝑡𝑙𝑒𝑡 = 51.26 𝑚 𝐷𝑂𝑢𝑡𝑙𝑒𝑡 = 2.23 𝑚 *Assume 0.5% slope on all pipes (2.86 degrees)𝐷𝑊𝑖𝑑𝑡ℎ = 𝑊 ∗ tan 𝛼 𝐷𝑤𝑖𝑑𝑡ℎ = 31.5 ∗ tan 2.86 𝐷𝑤𝑖𝑑𝑡ℎ = 1.57 𝑚 𝐷𝐿𝑒𝑛𝑔𝑡ℎ = 𝐿 ∗ tan 𝛼 𝐷𝐿𝑒𝑛𝑔𝑡ℎ = 100 ∗ tan 2.86 𝐷𝐿𝑒𝑛𝑔𝑡ℎ = 5.00 𝑚 𝐷𝑇𝑜𝑡𝑎𝑙 = 𝐷𝑤𝑖𝑑𝑡ℎ +  𝐷𝐿𝑒𝑛𝑔𝑡ℎ 𝐷𝑇𝑜𝑡𝑎𝑙 = 1.57 𝑚 + 5.00 𝑚 𝐷𝑇𝑜𝑡𝑎𝑙 = 6.57 𝑚 Excavation Volume * Assume 2:1 side slopes* For ease of construction 𝐷𝑇𝑜𝑡𝑎𝑙  has been approximated to 7 m𝑉 = 𝐿 ∗ 𝑊 ∗ 𝐷𝑇𝑜𝑡𝑎𝑙 + 𝐿 ∗  𝐷𝑇𝑜𝑡𝑎𝑙 ∗2 ∗  𝐷𝑇𝑜𝑡𝑎𝑙2+ 𝑊 ∗ 𝐷𝑇𝑜𝑡𝑎𝑙 ∗  2 ∗  𝐷𝑇𝑜𝑡𝑎𝑙2𝑉 = 100 ∗ 31.5 ∗  7 + 100 ∗  7 ∗2 ∗  72+ 31.5 ∗  7 ∗  2 ∗  72𝑉 = 28471  𝑚3   8  Rain Garden Input Volume = (Tributary Area) * (Capture Rainfall Amount) = (Lot area) * (Percent Impervious) * (72% 2-yr, 24-hour rainfall) = (17300 m2) * (0.2 impervious) * (0.72 * 2.3mm/hr *24hr) = (17300 m2 * 0.2) * (39.7 mm) = 137.3 m3 Capture Volume = Evaporation + Growing Medium + Rockpit + Infiltration = 6 m3 + 50.4 m3 + 20.1 m3 + 78.4 = 154.9 m3 Where: Evaporation = (24 hour evaporation) * (surface area)  = (1 mm/day) * (17300 m2 * (1 - 0.65)) = 6.06 m3 Growing Medium = (Volume of growing medium) * (Field Capacity – Wilting Point) = (2m * 280m *0.45) * (0.25 – 0.05) = 50.4 m3 Infiltration = (24 hour infiltration) *(surface area) = (1.5 mm/hr * 24 hr) *(2m *280m) = 20.16 m3 Rock Pit for the rain garden  = Volume of rock pit* available water content = rock pit length * width * proposed depth * water content = 280m * 2 m * 0.3 m * 0.35 = 78.4 m3  Capture Volume > Input Volume, Design is Ok   9 Orifice Size 𝑀𝑎𝑥𝑖𝑚𝑢𝑚 𝑓𝑙𝑜𝑤 𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑒 𝑄 = 1.2 𝑚3/𝑠 = 1200 𝐿/𝑠 𝐼𝑓 𝑂𝑟𝑖𝑓𝑖𝑐𝑒 𝐷𝑖𝑎𝑚𝑒𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑖𝑠 400𝑚𝑚 𝐶𝑟𝑜𝑠𝑠 𝑠𝑒𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑎𝑟𝑒𝑎 𝐴 =𝜋𝑑22=𝜋 ∗ (400𝑚𝑚)22= 0.13𝑚2 𝐹𝑙𝑜𝑤 𝑉𝑒𝑙𝑜𝑐𝑖𝑡𝑦 𝑉 =𝑄𝐴=1.2 𝑚3/𝑠0.13𝑚2= 9.55 𝑚/𝑠 𝐿𝑜𝑠𝑠 𝐶𝑜𝑒𝑓𝑓𝑖𝑐𝑖𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑜𝑟𝑖𝑓𝑖𝑐𝑒 = 0.5 𝑉𝑒𝑙𝑜𝑐𝑖𝑡𝑦 𝑃𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑢𝑟𝑒 =𝑣22𝑔= (9.55 𝑚/𝑠)2 ÷ 2𝑔 = 4.65 𝑚 𝐿𝑜𝑠𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑠𝑒𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 = 𝑣𝑒𝑙𝑜𝑐𝑖𝑡𝑦 𝑝𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑢𝑟𝑒 ∗ 𝐿𝑜𝑠𝑠 𝐶𝑜𝑒𝑓𝑓𝑖𝑐𝑖𝑒𝑛𝑡 = 4.65 𝑚 ∗ 0.5 = 2.32𝑚 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19   20 21   22   23   24 25 26 Appendix B: Specifications Detention Chamber Aluminized Type II (ALT2) Corrugated Metal Pipe (CMP) Underground Detention and Infiltration Standard Specification 1.0 GENERAL 1.1 This item shall govern the furnishing and installation of Underground Detention and Infiltration Systems for all types, sizes and designations as shown on the plans. 1.2 Contractor shall furnish all labor, materials, equipment and incidentals necessary to install the CMP System, appurtenances and incidentals in accordance with the Drawings and as specified herein. 1.3 A stormwater treatment device upstream of the CMP System is recommended as the appropriate means of pretreating for the purpose of extending the maintenance interval on the CMP System and reducing the life cycle cost. Both engineered solutions shall be provided by a single supplier/manufacturer.  Filtration by wrapping a system with geotextile is not an acceptable means of pretreatment.   1.4 Applicable provisions of any Division shall govern work in this section. 1.5 American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) 1.5.1 AASTHO Design Section 12 – Soil-Corrugated Metal Structure Interaction Systems 1.5.2 AASHTO Construction Section 26 – Metal Culverts 1.5.3 AASHTO M36 – Standard Specification for Corrugated Steel Pipe, Metallic-Coated for Sewers and Drains 1.5.4 AASHTO M274 – Standard Specification for Steel Sheet, Aluminum-Coated (Type 2), for Corrugated Steel Pipe 1.6 American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) 1.6.1 ASTM A760: Standard Specification for Corrugated Steel Pipe, Metallic-Coated for Sewers and Drains 27   1.6.2 ASTM A929:  Standard Specification for Steel Sheet, Metallic-Coated by the Hot-Dip Process for Corrugated Steel Pipe  1.6.3 ASTM A798:  Standard Practice for Installing Factory-Made Corrugated Steel Pipe for Sewers and Other Applications  1.6.4 ASTM A998:  Standard Practice for Structural Design of Reinforcements for fittings in Factory-Made Corrugated Steel Pipe for Sewers and Other Applications 1.7 Site layout drawings, product specifications, materials, corrugation, gage, hydraulic storage data and supported calculations of proposed alternatives shall be submitted to the EOR for review at a minimum of 10 working days prior to bid closing.  1.8 Shop drawings shall be annotated to indicate all materials to be furnished and installed under this section, and all applicable standards for materials, required tests of materials and design assumptions for structural analysis:  1.8.1 Before installation of the CMP System, Contractor shall obtain the written approval of the EOR for the stormwater system and the installation drawings.  1.9 All proposed alternatives to the CMP System shall conform to applicable above referenced AASHTO and ASTM specifications.  NCSPA provides design service life guidance for certain products up to 100 years in recommended environments.     2.0 MATERIALS  2.1 Aluminized Type II material shall conform to the applicable requirements of AASHTO M274 or ASTM A929.  CMP shall be manufactured in accordance with the applicable requirements of AASHTO M36 or ASTM A760.  2.2 The pipe sizes, gauges and corrugations shall be as shown on the project plans. Joint performance requirements are published in Division II, Section 26.4.2, of the current edition of the AASHTO Bridge Construction Specifications.      2.3 Soil tight, gravity flow, non-pressure, drainage pipe joints shall conform to AASHTO M36 and ASTM A760.  Minimum joint spacing shall be 10 ft.    2.4 Overlapping of adjacent pipes are not permitted and appropriate banding must be utilized in order to properly secure individual pipes in place.   28 2.5 Integral End Sections:  Each barrel of the CMP System shall either be connected to a fitting composing a manifold for hydraulic distribution or have an integrated bulkhead to resist loading at the end/start of the barrel, end cap sections shall not be permitted.  2.6 Material selected shall be flame resistant and capable of retaining 80% of strength when subjected to a temperature of 400 degrees Fahrenheit for one hour. 2.7 All fittings shall be manufactured prior to arriving on the jobsite to ensure structural integrity.  Fitting reinforcement shall be in accordance with ASTM A998 and reinforcing details.   Bulkhead design and fabrication does not vary with differing coatings on the steel components.   2.8 The manufacturer of the CMP System shall be one that has regularly been engaged in the engineering design and production of these systems for at least fifteen (15) years and which has a history of successful production, acceptable to the EOR.  In accordance with the Drawings, the CMP System shall be supplied by: Contech Engineered Solutions 9025 Centre Pointe Drive West Chester, OH, 45069 Tel: 1 800 338 1122 2.9 Sampling, testing, and inspection of metal sheets and coils used for manufacturing the CMP System shall be in accordance with to the above applicable referenced specifications.  All fabrication of the product shall occur within the United States.   3.0 PERFORMANCE 3.1 The CMP System proposal shall be sized in accordance to the design provided and approved by the Engineer of Record (EOR).  Any Contractor deviating from the design shown on the plans, to include:  material, footprint, etc., shall provide to the EOR a summary report on stage-storage curves, design calculations, HydroCAD modeling and engineering drawings.  3.2 The CMP System shall comprise of manhole access with minimum dimensions of 24 inches diameter to provide adequate inspection and maintenance without restrictions and obstructions to entry into interior of the CMP System.  Manholes shall be provided to allow full entry into and visual inspection of the complete CMP System, at a minimum as to allow full maintenance of the CMP System.  Cleanouts or inspection 29 ports are not acceptable access points for maintenance and inspection nor are any other alternatives which do not allow for full entry into the system. 3.3 CMP spacing, gage (thickness) and stone base thickness can be altered with consultation from Contech Engineered Solutions, LLC.  3.4 The CMP System shall be designed for a minimum HS-20/HS-25 final live loading conditions.  The CMP System shall meet HS-20/HS-25 loading requirements with a minimum of 12-inches of cover to bottom of flexible pavement for pipe spans less than or equal to 96 inches and 18 inches of cover to bottom of  flexible pavement for pipe spans greater than 96 inches.   3.5 The CMP System shall be designed so as the hydraulic grade line will increase evenly throughout whereas transverse movement from one storage compartment to another shall not be permitted.  All storage compartments shall be connected via manifold (or connecting pipe) versus by transporting stormwater through stone.     3.6 A stormwater pretreatment device is recommended upstream of the CMP system as follows: 3.6.1 Infiltration: Where feasible, the selected stormwater treatment device upstream of an infiltration system shall be a filter system and have General Use Level Designation (GULD) for Basic Treatment by the Washington State Department of Ecology or demonstrate equivalent performance in independently verified field testing following a peer reviewed testing protocol, and must be sized consistent with the system producing those results.   3.6.2 Detention: Where feasible, the selected Stormwater treatment device upstream of a detention system shall be a separator system and have GULD for Pretreatment by the WADOE or demonstrate equivalent performance in independently verified field testing following a peer reviewed testing protocol, and must be sized consistent with the system producing those results.    3.6.3 Selected pretreatment stormwater device shall incorporate a physical barrier capable of capturing and retaining trash and debris (i.e.: floatable and neutrally buoyant materials) for all flows up to the treatment capacity of the device. 3.6.4 The application of wrapping a system with geotextile of any branding or material type, that allows the passage of stormwater, shall not be regarded as an acceptable treatment or pretreatment device.   30 3.6.5 The manufacturer of the selected Stormwater treatment device shall have been regularly engaged in the engineering design and production of systems for the physical treatment of Stormwater runoff for 15 years.   3.6.6 In order to not restrict the Owner’s ability to maintain the stormwater pretreatment device, the minimum dimension providing access from the ground surface to the sump chamber shall be 20 inches in diameter. 4.0 EXECUTION 4.1 The CMP System installation shall be in accordance with AASHTO Standard Specifications for Highways Bridges, Section 26, Division II or ASTM A798 and in conformance with the project plans and specifications.  4.2 The CMP System shall be installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations and related sections of the contract documents.  Handling & assembly shall be in accordance with National Corrugated Steel Pipe Association’s (NCSPA) recommendations.   4.3 For temporary construction vehicle loads, an extra amount of compacted cover may be required over the top of the pipe.  The Height-of-Cover shall meet the minimum requirements shown in the table below.  The use of heavy construction equipment necessitates greater protection for the pipe than finished grade cover minimums for normal highway traffic.   Minimum Cover (ft) Requirements Pipe Span Axle Loads (kips) (inches) 18 - 50 50 - 75 75 - 110 110 - 150 12  - 42 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.0 48 - 72 3.0 3.0 3.5 4.0 78 - 120 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.0  126 - 144 3.5 4.0 4.5 4.5 4.4 Minimum cover may vary, depending on local conditions.  The contractor must provide the additional cover required to avoid damage to the pipe.  Minimum cover is measured from the top of the pipe to the top of the maintained construction roadway surface.   31   4.5 Refer to the Contech’s Corrugated Metal Pipe Detention Design Guide for additional guidance regarding installation, inspection and maintenance.  4.6 The contractor shall follow Occupational Safety and Health Association (OSHA) guidelines for safe practices in executing the installation process in accordance with the manufacturer/supplier installation recommendations.  4.7 Backfill material shall be placed in 8 inch loose lifts and compacted to 90% AASHTO T99 standard proctor density.  4.8 Supplier will conduct an on-site preconstruction meeting with the contractor prior to the scheduled delivery date of the CMP System. Earthworks Prior to and during excavation a rigorous dewatering and infiltration monitoring program shall be implemented to avoid seepage into the shallow aquifer. Berms shall be installed in locations consistent with runoff direction to avoid infiltration and, where the monitoring program detects seepage into the shallow aquifer, further berms or other methods as discussed with the earthworks engineer shall be installed to mitigate the seepage. Outside of the bioretention filter area, excavated soils from the site may be reused as fill provided that any unsuitable material and any building rubble or deleterious material is excluded. An impenetrable geomembrane liner shall be installed on all exposed subgrade prior to commencement of backfill works. 32 Pump Specification Product name S3.50.A240.2010.10.74E.C.566.G.N.D.61H Product No. 9.8E+07 EAN 5.7E+12 Technical Actual calculated flow 1270 l/s Max flow 1380 l/s Resulting head of the pump 5.645 m Head max 16 m Actual impeller diameter 22.3 in Type of impeller 3-CHANNEL Maximum particle size 5.31 in Primary shaft seal SIC-SIC Secondary shaft seal SIC-CARBON 33 Curve tolerance ANSI/HI11.6:2012 3B Cooling jacket with cooling jacket Materials Pump housing DUCTILE IRON Pump housing EN 1563 EN-GJS-500-7 Pump housing AISI ASTM A536 70-50-05 Impeller Ductile iron Impeller EN 1563 EN-GJS-500-7 Impeller AISI ASTM A536 70-50-05 Motor Cast iron Motor EN 1561 EN-GJL-250 Motor AISI ASTM A48 35B Installation Range of ambient temperature 32 .. 104 °F Type of connection ANSI Size of outlet port 24 inch Pressure stage PN 10 Maximum installation depth 65.6 ft Inst dry/wet DRY/SUBMERGED Auto-coupling 9.8E+07 Frame range 74 Liquid Liquid temperature range 32 .. 104 °F Liquid temperature during operation 68 °F Density 62.29 lb/ft³ Electrical data Power input - P1 160 kW Rated power - P2 201 HP Main frequency 60 Hz Rated voltage 3 x 460 V Voltage tolerance -100 Max starts per. hour 10 Rated current 255/ A Maximum current consumption 255 A Starting current 1730 A Rated current at no load 106 A Rated speed 712 rpm Motor efficiency at full load 94% Motor efficiency at 3/4 load 94% Motor efficiency at 1/2 load 93% 34 Number of poles 10 Start. method star/delta Enclosure class (IEC 34-5) IP68 Insulation class (IEC 85) H Explosion proof no Ex-protection standard N Motor protection KLIXON Length of cable 49.2 ft Cable type H07RN-F AT Cable size 2X4X70MM2+1X10X1,5MM2 Cable resistance 0.27 mOhm/m Winding resistance 0.034 Ohm Cos phi 1/1 0.79 Cos phi 1/2 0.65 Cos phi 3/4 0.75 Controls Moisture sensor with moisture sensors Water-in-oil sensor with water-in-oil sensor Others Net weight 8600 lb Gross weight 8600 lb Sales region Namreg (Pump Curve, 2019) Bioretention Soil Mix Design Bioretention soils shall be installed per reference to standard drawing C-07. Bioretention soils shall comprise of either: - a 40% compost to 60% screen or utility sand volumetric mix or; - if topsoil is a component of the mix, 35% compost topsoil mix to 65% screen or utility sand volumetric mix. The compaction characteristics of the bioretention soil mix will be tested using ASTM D1557 Method B. 85% percent of maximum dry density is the target density where the bioretention soil mix is placed in 225mm lifts and lightly boot packed. The permeability will be tested using ASTM D 2434 with a target permeability is 25-50 mm/hr. Compaction and permeability tests will be performed on a 1.0 sq.m lift (225mm). 35 The screen or utility sand component shall be comprised of 2-4% fines passing #200 sieve The below details the general gradation guideline: Sieve Size Percent Passing ⅜” 100 #4 95-100 #10 75-90 #40 25-40 #100 4-10 #200 2-5 Quantitative tests and producer documentation for the compost component should have the following specifications: - Material must be in compliance with WAC chapter 173-350 section 220, and be made from Type 1, 2, or 3 feedstock. Type 1 feedstock is recycled plant waste, including agricultural, yard, pre-consumer food, and cardboard; Type 2 is manure and bedding; Type 3 is post consumer food, biosolids (sewage sludge), and other materials judged low in contaminants but potentially high in pathogens. Type 4 feedstock is mixed municipal solid waste, industrial solid wastes and other materials judged high risk for toxics, contaminants or pathogens. - Organic matter content between 45% and 65% as determined by loss of ignition test method. - pH between 5.5 and 8.0. - Carbon:nitrogen ratio between 20:1 and 25:1 for most landscapes. A CN ratio of 30:1 to 35:1 is preferred for native woody plantings, especially in restoration projects, because it supports these plants and minimizes weed growth. - Maximum electrical conductivity of 6 mmhos/cm (or 4 mmhos/cm for sites east of the Cascades where there is less rainfall to leach salts from BSM). - Moisture content range between 35 and 50%. - No viable weed seeds. - Manufactured inert material (plastic, concrete, ceramics, etc.) should be less than 1% on a dry weight or volume basis (as required by WAC 173-350-220). - Metals should not be in excess of limits in the following table (from WAC 173-350-220). 36 Metal Limit (mg/kg dry weight) Arsenic ≤ 20 ppm Cadmium ≤ 10 ppm Copper ≤ 750 ppm Lead ≤ 150 ppm Mercury ≤ 8 ppm Molybdenum ≤ 9 ppm Nickel ≤ 210 ppm Selenium1 ≤ 18 ppm Zinc ≤ 1400 ppm Note: the bioretention soil mix design specification is compiled based on the Washington State University technical memorandum (BIORETENTION SOIL MIX REVIEW AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR WESTERN WASHINGTON, 2009). Oil and Grit Separator (OGS) Follow all instructions including the sequence for installation in the shop drawings during installation. Drawing C-05 provides standard detail, installation sequence provided by Manufacturer. OGS internal components supplied by the Manufacturer for attachment to the precast concrete vessel shall be pre-fabricated, bolted to the precast and watertight sealed to the precast vessel surface prior to site delivery to ensure Manufacturer’s internal assembly process and quality control processes are fully adhered to, and to prevent materials damage on site. The OGS vessel shall be cylindrical and constructed from precast concrete riser and slab components. The precast concrete OGS internal components shall include a fiberglass insert bolted and watertight sealed inside the precast concrete vessel, prior to site delivery. Primary internal components that are to be anchored and watertight sealed to the precast concrete vessel shall be done so only by the Manufacturer prior to arrival at the job site to ensure product quality.  Only profile neoprene or nitrile rubber gaskets that are oil resistant shall be accepted.  For Canadian projects only, gaskets shall be in accordance to CSA A257.4-14. Mastic sealants, butyl tape/rope or Conseal CS-101 alone are not acceptable gasket materials.  37 All precast concrete sections shall be level and inspected to ensure dimensions, appearance, integrity of internal components, and quality of the product meets CAN/CSA-A257.4-14 specifications.  The fiberglass portion of the OGS device shall be constructed in accordance with ASTM D2563, and in accordance with the PS15-69 manufacturing standard, and shall only be installed, bolted and watertight sealed to the precast concrete by the Manufacturer prior to arrival at the project site to ensure product quality. The installation of the precast concrete OGS stormwater quality treatment device shall conform to CAN/CSA-A257.4-14, CAN/CSA-A257.4-14, CAN/CSA-S6-00. The Contractor shall furnish all labor, equipment and materials necessary to offload, assemble as needed the OGS internal components as specified in the Shop Drawings. 38 Appendix C: Construction Schedule RAJNS	ConsultingBicycle	Paradise	Multiuse	Stormwater	Detention	Construction	ScheduleMonth:Week:Day: M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa Su M T W Th F Sa SuDescriptionDuration	(working	days)Start Finish Date: 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 81. SITE	PREPARATION 23 01-May 09-Aug1.1	Mobilization 5 01-May 07-May1.2	Clearing	and	Grubbing 5 07-May 14-May1.3	Construction	Staging 3 14-May 16-May1.4	Traffic	Management	Set-up 2 20-May 21-May1.5	Excavation	for	Structural	 3 22-May 24-May1.6	Excavation	for	Pump,	Oil	and	Grit	Separator,	and	Rain	Gardens 3 08-Jul 10-Jul1.7	Excavation	for	Detention	Tank 2 07-Aug 09-Aug2. STRUCTURAL	-	BUILDING 257 27-May 06-Dec2.1	Formwork	for	Club	House	Building 5 27-May 31-May2.2	Drive	Piles	for	Supertrees	and	Gateway	Structure 2 27-May 28-May2.3	Delivery	and	Pour	Concrete	Superstructure	Foundation	and	Pile	Cap	Foundation	for	Supertree	 10 03-Jun 14-Jun4.4	Superstructure	Construction 240 17-Jun 06-Dec3. STORMWATER	-	PUMP	INSTALLATION 35 27-May 12-Jul3.1	Pump	Chamber	Formwork 5 27-May 31-May3.2	Pump	Chamber	Concrete	Pour 10 03-Jun 14-Jun3.3	Pump	Chamber	Construction	and	Installation 20 17-Jun 12-Jul4. STORMWATER	-	OIL	AND	GRIT	SEPARATOR 16 15-Jul 26-Jul4.1	Installation	of	Prefabricated	Oil	and	Grit	 5 15-Jul 19-Jul4.2	Half	pipe	drainage	grate	installation 10 15-Jul 26-Jul4.3	Tie-in	to	detention	tank	zone 1 19-Jul 19-Jul5. STORMWATER	-	RAIN	GARDENS 12 22-Jul 07-Aug5.1	Trenching 5 22-Jul 26-Jul5.2	Geotextile	Lining 2 29-Jul 31-Jul5.3	Placement	of	Rock,	Top	Soil,	Vegetation	and	 5 01-Aug 07-Aug6. STORMWATER	-	DETENTION	TANK 12 12-Aug 23-Aug6.1	Geotextile	Tank	Lining 5 12-Aug 16-Aug6.2	Pipe	Assembly 2 15-Aug 16-Aug6.3	Pipe	Installation	and	Tie-ins 5 19-Aug 23-Aug7. STRUCTURAL	-	SUPERTREES	&	GATEWAY 12 03-Sep 13-Sep7.1	Supertree	Erection	and	Casing 9 03-Sep 13-Sep7.2	Gateway	Erection 3 11-Sep 13-Sep8. SOIL	WORKS 15 16-Sep 11-Oct8.1	Insert	soil	cells	and	backfill	with	soil 5 16-Sep 20-Sep8.2	Infill	vegetation	and	planting 10 30-Sep 11-Oct9. ROADWORKS 12 30-Sep 16-Oct9.1	Pave	road	through	site 5 30-Sep 04-Oct9.2	Grade	entrance	and	exit	ramps	and	pave 2 07-Oct 08-Oct9.3	Paint	green	thermoplastic	bicycle	markings 2 14-Oct 15-Oct9.4	Installation	of	Permeable	Pavement 3 14-Oct 16-Oct10. MISCELLANEOUS 8 04-Nov 15-Nov10.1	Installation	of	bicycle	infrstructure 1 04-Nov 04-Nov10.2	Installation	of	Picnic	tables,	signage,	trash 2 04-Nov 05-Nov10.3	Installation	of	lighting	and	connection 5 11-Nov 15-NovTotal 402 01-May 06-DecOct-19 Nov-19 Dec-19May-19 Jun-19 Jul-19 Aug-19 Sep-1928 29 30 31 3223 24 25 26 2718 19 20 21 2216 1713 14 1510 11 121 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 940 Appendix D: Cost Estimate RAJNS	ConsultingBicycle	Paradise	Multiuse	Stormwater	Detention	InfrastructureCost	EstimateEstimated	costs	before	taxes	and	engineering	fees.Description Qty Price Unit Total1. SITE	PREPARATION1.1	Moblilization	and	Demobilization 1 $50,000 L.S. $50,0001.2	Clearing	and	Grubbing 7 $1,350 days $9,4501.3	Excavation 30050 $45 m3 $1,352,2501.4	Onsite	storage 100 $30 m3 $3,0001.5	Staging	of	temporary	facilities 1 $20,000 L.S. $20,0001.6	Traffic	control	 1 $40,000 L.S. $40,000Site	Preparation	Total $1,474,7002. ROADWORKS2.1	Grading	of	entrances	and	exits 2 $1,200 days $2,4002.2	Grading	of	on-site	roadway 5 $1,200 days $6,0002.3	Graded	gravel	(road	underlay) 150 $52 m3 $7,8002.4	Asphalt	 112.5 $50 m2 $5,6252.5	Thermoplastic	road	paint	(bicycle	markings) 20 $350 m2 $7,000Roadworks	Total $28,8253. SOIL	&	LANDCAPING3.1	Sand 550 $48 m3 $26,1253.2	Crushed	Gravel 662.5 $55 m3 $36,4383.3	Soil	Cells 5350 $560 m3 $2,996,0003.4	Top	Soil 5900 $85 m2 $501,5003.5	Geotextile	Membrane 5900 $5 m2 $29,5003.6	Planting	(shubs	and	aquatic	plants) 1 $50,000 L.S. $50,000Soil	&	Landscaping	Total $3,639,5634. STRUCTURAL4.1	Concrete	foundations 525 $210 m2 $110,2504.2	Structure	(UBC	Cycling	Club	House	and	Facilties)* 1 $3,500,000 L.S. $3,500,0004.3	Supertrees	(delivery	and	installation) 2 $250,000 L.S. $500,000Structural	Total $4,110,2505. STORMWATER5.1	400	mm	PVC	Pipe 130 $430 lin.m. $55,9005.2	1050	mm	HDPE	Contech	DuroMaxx	Detention	Chamber 2063 $1,250 lin.m. $2,578,7505.3	Oil	Grit	Separator 1 $62,000 L.S. $62,0005.4	Pump	and	Connection 1 $135,000 L.S. $135,0005.5	Half	Pipe	Grate 1 $75,000 L.S. $75,000Stormwater	Total $2,906,6506. MISCELLANEOUS6.1	UBC	Gateway	Structure	and	Installation 1 $50,000 L.S. $50,0006.2	Bicycle	Racks 10 $400 each $4,0006.3	Public	Access	Bicycle	Tool	Rack 2 $930 each $1,8596.4	Aluminum	Picnic	Tables	 10 $1,050 each $10,5006.5	Traffic	signage 6 $119 each $7146.6	LED	Outdoor	Lighting	 30 $5,000 each $150,0006.7	Supersave	Construction	Fencing 3937 $48.00 roll	(10.16	lin.m) $188,976Miscellaneous	Total $406,049Subtotal	 $12,566,037Contingency	(30%) $3,769,811Total	 $16,335,847*Cost	of	UBC	Cycling	Club	House	Superstructure	is	based	on	estimated	cost	of	UBC	Baseball	Training	Centre42 Appendix E: Detailed Design Drawings D:\6_praca\firmy\YourSpreadsheets\_ icons and history\YS logo.jpgDETENTIONTANKSGATEWAYSIGNAGEPAVEDROAD36.0m15.0m6.0mCLUBHOUSE LAYOUTCOVEREDENTRANCEINTERIOR BUILDINGLAYOUT BY OTHERSABTO OIL GRITSEPARATIONGRATEFLOWCONTROLTANKOIL GRITSEPARATOREXISTINGSTORMWATERPIPEBENCHEDMANHOLESUPERTREESC-02HC-06DC-05CC-04C-08D:\6_praca\firmy\YourSpreadsheets\_ icons and history\YS logo.jpg36.0m15.0m6.0mCLUBHOUSE LAYOUTCOVEREDENTRANCEINTERIOR BUILDING LAYOUT BY OTHERSAB SCALE: 6:1C-03C-03D:\6_praca\firmy\YourSpreadsheets\_ icons and history\YS logo.jpg0.2m0.61m e/wSECTION ATYPICAL PAD FOOTINGSCALE: 20:11m MIN FROST COVER0.3M RISER2 OF 15M DOWELS3 OF 15M e/wCOLUMN AS PERBUILDING PLANSC-020.25m0.76mSECTION BBUILDING FOUNDATIONSCALE: 20:11m MIN FROST COVERDRAINAGEBY OTHERS0.08m CLR.0.05m CLR.15M VERTS @ 0.3m o/c ON OUTSIDEOF HORIZ (BACKFILL SIDE)15M HORIZ @ 0.5m o/c + 1 @ TOPANCHOR BOLTS AS PERPART 9 OF BCBCWALL FRAMINGTOP OF EXTERIOR GRADE0.61m0.25mBASEMENT SOGREQUIRED TO BECOMPLETED PRIOR TOEXTERIOR BACKFILLOVER 1m15M DOWELS @ 152mmo/c TO BOTTOM OFFOOTING15M TOP TRANSVERSE@ 406mm o/c0.63m0.864mC-02D:\6_praca\firmy\YourSpreadsheets\_ icons and history\YS logo.jpg0.70m3.00m0.40m STEEL PILE1.4m EMBED2.00mSTEEL PILE TO PENETRATE CAP 0.10m0.05m CLR.0.08m CLR.BASE OF SUPERTREEDOUBLE MAT 20MAT 375mm o/c4 OF 20M AT 125mmo/c HOOKED INTOSTEEL PILE WITH0.4m EMBED INTOCONCRETEPLAN VIEW -SUPERTREE FOUNDATIONSCALE: 20:1SECTION CSUPERTREE FOUNDATIONSCALE: 20:11.00mBASE OF SUPERTREE0.4m Ø STEEL PILESANCHOR BOLTS AS PERPART 9 OF BUILDING CODE0.05m CLR.4 OF 20M AT 125mm o/cHOOKED INTO STEEL PILEWITH 0.4m EMBED INTOCONCRETED:\6_praca\firmy\YourSpreadsheets\_ icons and history\YS logo.jpgOUTLET RISER &MAINTENANCE ACCESSOIL INSPECTION PORTWEIRSECTION EOIL & GRIT SEPARATORSCALE: 30:1 C-01Ø1.22m2.03m0.28m2.00m1.50mTO SUITFINSHEDGRADEELEVATION915 [36"] MIN.0.51m0.38mSECTION DOIL & GRIT SEPARATORSCALE: 30:1 C-01D:\6_praca\firmy\YourSpreadsheets\_ icons and history\YS logo.jpg0.6m2.4mFLOW REGULATION BOX3mWATER LEVEL DETECTORORIFICE HEIGHT 400MMWATER INLETWATER OUT FLOWLOWER CHAMBER - LIFTSTATIONSLOPE 5%3mD:\6_praca\firmy\YourSpreadsheets\_ icons and history\YS logo.jpgSECTION HBUILDING FOUNDATIONSCALE: 20:1 C-01INFLOW/RUNOFFBOWL (TEMPORARYSTORAGE)SANDY FILL MEDIAUNDERDRAINS(GRAVEL LAYER) DRAINAGEEVAPORATIONIN-SITU SOIL EXFILTRATION IN-SITU SOILCONSTRUCTIONIMPACTED LAYERSECTION FBIO-RETENTIONSCALE: 10:1 C-012m0.4m0.35m0.45mSECTION GRAIN GARDENSCALE: 20:1 C-01D:\6_praca\firmy\YourSpreadsheets\_ icons and history\YS logo.jpgDETENTION CHAMBERPLAN VIEW1050mm OUTLETTO FLOWREGULATION TANK1050mm INLETFROM OIL &GRIT SEPARATOR1070mm DIAMETER SEMI PERFERATED ALUMINUM COROGATED  METAL PIPE TYP.100m31.5mD:\6_praca\firmy\YourSpreadsheets\_ icons and history\YS logo.jpg31.5m0.45m TOP SOIL1.57m0.5°1070mm SEMI-PERFERATEDALUMNI CORRUGATEDMETAL PIPEDETENTION CHAMBEREAST EDGE SECTION55.3m EL.53.7m EL.D:\6_praca\firmy\YourSpreadsheets\_ icons and history\YS logo.jpg48.7m EL.31.5mDETENTION CHAMBERWEST EDGE SECTION55.26m EL.Coletanche BituminousGeomembrane (BGM) LinerD:\6_praca\firmy\YourSpreadsheets\_ icons and history\YS logo.jpg

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