UBC Undergraduate Research

UBC Emergency Water Supply System Bednar, Ashley; Cui, Caohan (William); Ganbold, Vee; Ge, Yuhang; Lee, Jay; Mann, Amiteshveer; Torres, Rojohn 2018-04-09

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report UBC Emergency Water Supply System - Team 13Ashley Bednar, Caohan (William) Cui, Vee Ganbold, Yuhang Ge, Jay Lee, Amiteshveer Mann, Rojohn Torres University of British Columbia CIVL 445Themes: Water, Community, Land April 9, 2018 Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.  P a g e  | i Executive summary The objective of this project is to design a water supply system for the University of British Columbia (UBC) Vancouver campus in the event of a failure of the system that supplies everyday water to the campus area. The proposed design for this project includes an underground storage tank (having a volume of approximately 7.7 ML), an onsite pump station, and a secondary water main supply. The underground storage tank and pump station is to be located under an existing rugby field, Ken Woods Field, that is west of Wesbrook Mall and south of Thunderbird Boulevard. When developing the concept of the underground tank, the team considered the adaptability in usage, utilization of space, visual aesthetics and minimizing environmental impacts. Moreover, in calculating the water demand, the team considered the future populations of UBC Vancouver and residents within an hour’s walking distance, totalling approximately 175,000 people. Additionally, emergency water in case of a fire was also included in the storage tank volume. A pump station was designed to accommodate the flow requirements during emergency situations. The Grundfos online tool was applied when choosing the required pump for achieving the population’s system demand. Likewise, a secondary water main will run under University Boulevard and connect to the existing water main at Blanca Street. This secondary water main will provide another water source connection from the greater Vancouver water district to the UBC campus area. Bentley WaterCAD was utilized to provide modelling results for this project. The proposed design will increase the resiliency of UBC’s water supply in the short and long term and provide an adequate water supply during crisis periods. A structural design was completed for the underground storage tank, which utilized the CSA design standards. The proposed underground tank will be constructed from reinforced concrete and a waterproof membrane will be wrapped around the exterior to reduce infiltration, contamination and leakage issues. Due to the geological profile of the site, a concrete mat foundation overlying a layer of compacted granular fill was considered. One metre of clearance from the top of the tank to the ground level is designed to provide   P a g e  | ii insulation for the stored water to prevent the water from freezing and to help protect the storage tank. The interior dimensions of the tank are 45m (length) x 35m (width) x 5m (height). A combined factored load, including live load and dead load, was used for design purposes. The ceiling slab for the tank was calculated to have a 300mm thickness. Additionally, 350mm thick concrete walls around the perimeter of the tank and 48 reinforced concrete columns (having a diameter of 500mm) were studied to support the ceiling slab and combined factored load. The Mononobe-Okabe Theory was used to ensure that the walls could withstand earthquake scenarios. Strip footings and a mat foundation were utilized in the design to accommodate the weight of the entire structure and combined factored load.                              P a g e  | iii Table of contents   1.0 Introduction 1 1.1 Purpose 2 1.2 Scope 2 1.3 Site Description 2 1.4 Design Overview 4 1.5 Methodology 4 1.6 Key Issues and Benefits 5 1.7 Contributions 7 2.0 Hydrotechnical Design 8 2.1 Population Demand 8 2.2 Storage Tank Volume 10 2.3 WaterCAD Modelling 11 2.4 Pump Station 14 2.4.1 Pump Design Criteria 14 2.4.2 Pump curves 15 2.5 Secondary Water Main 17 2.5.1 Water Main Design 18 2.5.2 Roadway and Landscape Rehabilitation 18 3.0 Structural Design of Underground Water Tank 20 3.1 Load Combination & Geotechnical 20 3.2 Slab Design 21 3.3  Column Design 22 3.4  Retaining Wall Design 24 3.5  Foundation and Strip Footing Design 26 3.6  Waterproof Membrane 26 4.0 Design Summary 28 5.0 Erosion and Sedimentation Control 29 6.0 Resolution Planning for Project Issues 30 7.0 Project Schedule 32 8.0 Cost Estimate 33 9.0 Emergency Response Plan 34 10.0 Discussion 35 Appendix A: Pump Station Layout   P a g e  | iv Appendix B: Secondary Water Main Design Drawings Appendix C: Structural Design Calculations for Storage Tank Appendix D: Structural Design Drawings for Storage Tank Appendix E: Project Schedule Appendix F: Project Cost Estimate Appendix G: Water Network Model   List of Figures  Figure 1: Storage Tank Site .................................................................................................. 3 Figure 2: One-Hour Walking Distance Radius from Storage Tank Location .......................... 9 Figure 3: City of Vancouver Zoning Map (City of Vancouver, 2016 ..................................... 10 Figure 4: Extended Period Simulation of the Storage Tank in an Emergency Conditions .... 14 Figure 5: Pump Curves for Fire and Normal Duty Pumps .................................................... 17 Figure 6: Top View of a Typical Column .............................................................................. 23 Figure 7: Column Design Summary .................................................................................... 24 Figure 8: Retaining Wall Design Summary .......................................................................... 25 Figure 9: Storage Tank Configuration with Pump Station………………………………………28    List of Tables  Table 1: Contribution Table ................................................................................................... 7 Table 2: PRV Station Overview ........................................................................................... 13 Table 3: Flow Rate Requirements ....................................................................................... 14 Table 4: Composition at the Location of the Storage Tank .................................................. 20 Table 5: CSA A23..3 Column Design Requirements ........................................................... 23 Table 6: Resolution Table ................................................................................................... 30   P a g e  | 1 1.0 Introduction   The purpose of this report is to design a secondary water supply system for the University of British Columbia (UBC) to alleviate potable water concerns when the main water source for the University is compromised. The design includes an onsite storage tank, a pump station, and a secondary water main to act as a secondary water supply source for the campus. All engineering components, including engineering materials and structural, hydrotechnical, geotechnical, and environmental engineering will be included in the design. UBC Vancouver requires a potable water supply for a peak population of 55,000 people per day with a long-term population growth of 70,000 people per day. Potable water requirements for UBC Vancouver include drinking water, research applications, equipment cooling, and other water uses. The supplier of potable water for the UBC Vancouver area is Metro Vancouver. Currently, potable water comes from the Greater Vancouver Water District Sasamat Reservoir in Pacific Spirit Park and travels through two separate water main pipes through the University Endowment Lands (UEL). If there is a failure of the water supply east of this location, UBC Vancouver would be without potable water. This would force the campus to shut down, and would be a health concern to the residents in the UBC area. Additionally, UBC Vancouver would likely become a refugee location for people within a one-hour walking distance during emergencies; therefore, the University would need to supply water to over 70,000 people per day. The project would also need to accommodate the water demand for the permanent residents and faculty of UBC Vancouver. There are also two pressure zones in the area, a high-pressure and a low-pressure zone. The high-pressure zone supplies water to the north side of the UBC Vancouver area, primarily supplying water to the academic and residential buildings. The low-pressure zone supplies water to the south side of the UBC Vancouver area, primarily supplying water for residential uses.   P a g e  | 2 1.1 Purpose   The purpose of this project is to design a water supply system for the UBC Vancouver campus in the event of a failure of the system that normally supplies water to the campus. In the event that there is a failure of the primary water supply from Sasamat Reservoir, the campus area would be without potable water. The lack of potable water would force the campus to shut down and would be a health concern to the residents in the UBC campus area. Additionally, nearby residents would likely take refuge in the UBC campus area during an emergency (i.e. after a major earthquake); therefore, the campus would need to accommodate the water demand for residents within a one-hour walking distance as well.  1.2 Scope   The project design must accommodate an emergency potable water supply to the UBC Vancouver campus and the population within a one-hour walking distance of the storage tank location. The water demand must also include storage requirements for fire flow in the event of an emergency. The scope for the detailed design of this project includes design components for the underground water storage tank, the secondary water main and the pump station. A detailed structural design for the water tank was also completed. Hydrotechnical modelling for the project was also done using a WaterCAD modelling program. Furthermore, road rehabilitation and erosion and sediment control was also examined and will be discussed in this report.   1.3 Site Description   The Rugby field (Ken Woods Field) adjacent to the thunderbird arena near Wesbrook mall was the selected location for the storage tank. This location is outside of the high density academic section of UBC Vancouver. As shown in Figure 1, the proposed site is a clear, level field. The site has no obstructions for construction activities and has easy access to   P a g e  | 3 Wesbrook Mall. This site is between the high and low pressure zone areas that are serviced by the existing water system of UBC Vancouver. Some benefits of having the storage tank at this location are: 1.   Direct access to the primary water main 2.   Easy access to the storage site 3.   Easily accessible to fire tenders for onsite filling 4.   Convenient access to the bulk fill users After construction of the storage tank is completed, the rugby field will be reconstructed for continued use.   Figure 1: Storage Tank Site  Furthermore, the secondary water main is to be installed under University Boulevard. This roadway is one of the primary roads that gains access to UBC Vancouver. The section of road where the secondary water main is to be installed includes a vegetated median and has large elevation changes. Access to this site will be easily accessible; however, traffic control may be necessary in some areas during construction.    P a g e  | 4 1.4 Design Overview The location of the design maximizes land use and visual aesthetics, while minimizing environmental impacts. An underground concrete storage tank is recommended to be constructed under the existing soccer fields near Westbrook Mall and Thunderbird Boulevard. The tank is designed to be unnoticed from the surface and the rugby field will remain in use after construction is complete. The project was designed to be resilient and sustainable. A proposed water main will run underneath University Boulevard and will provide a secondary water supply source; thereby, increasing the resiliency of the UBC Vancouver water supply system. The storage tank was designed to accommodate the current and future water demands while minimizing environmental impacts; thereby, creating a sustainable final product. In addition to the potable water supply, fire flow storage capable of accommodating a four-hour fire event needed to be accommodated. A pump station was also designed to accommodate the required flow rates during regular and emergency uses. The size of the storage tank was also determined in concurrence with the water demand (outflow) and supply (inflow) of the tank to ensure that peak and hourly demands would be met. The primary construction materials for the storage tank will include reinforced concrete and a waterproofing membrane installed around the exterior of the tank. The tank will be constructed on a mat foundation and will be covered by topsoil to avoid frost issues and help protect the tank. When the primary water source fails, the storage tank will accommodate immediate water demands and the secondary water main will replenish the storage tank when the water demand is low.  1.5 Methodology   As described in the preceding sections, this project aims to provide an emergency water supply to UBC’s water service area in the event of water supply failure from Sasamat reservoir. The design team assessed the population to be serviced in such an event (i.e. future UBC population as well as the population in a one-hour walking distance). From the   P a g e  | 5 calculated service population and the emergency water servicing loading rate (18 L/ca/d) the base water storage volume was assessed for different emergency durations. In addition to the base water storage, fire storage was assessed based on the land-use zoning of the campus. The pump station was designed to have redundancy (spare pump, backup power, etc.) and the ability to service the highest service elevation while delivering emergency water supply as well as the fire flows. After significant brainstorming, the design team shortlisted three options in the preliminary report: an above ground tank with a secondary water supply source, an underground tank with a secondary supply source, and a large underground storage tank without a secondary supply. The underground tank with a secondary water supply source was selected based on the project cost, land utilization, system redundancy, and the aesthetics of the infrastructure. The size of the tank was designed based on the volume of water needed for the two-day emergency water supply for the required population demand. Cylindrical columns were chosen to support the slab, soil and the live load on top. This column type was chosen because less erosion issues from water are expected when compared to square columns. To support the retaining wall, the team designed strip footings and a flat plate mat foundation for the support of the columns and the weight of the water. In the design calculations for the top slab, columns, and the foundation, the team followed the Concrete Handbook and the CSA 23.3 standards within. The “Design Recommendations for Storage Tanks and Their Supports with Tanks and Emphasis on Seismic Design” textbook was used for the retaining wall design  1.6 Key Issues and Benefits   The main issue that was considered during the preliminary phase was the effectiveness and resiliency of the design. Simply building a storage tank will provide the water demand during emergency cases, but only for a limited time. After the water storage depletes, another water   P a g e  | 6 source would be needed to replenish the water storage. Therefore, a secondary water main is essential in making the water system more resilient. The main purpose of the secondary water source is for emergency purposes; however, it can also be activated in the future as a support to the primary line when the water demand increases due to future population growth. Another issue was how to integrate the design within the UBC lands. Installing the tank under an existing soccer field was favourable because it maximizes land use and is visually appealing when compared to above ground storage tank options. During the design phase of the storage tank, determining the earthquake load proved to be challenging. Different techniques were studied on how to include earthquake load and ultimately Mononobe-Okabe (MO) theory was used. This is a safe assumption since the MO theory is widely used in seismic earth pressures for retaining walls. Lastly, the decision of making a concrete pad foundation was discussed extensively. Each column needed a square footing foundation and the walls required a strip footing to distribute the load from the column to the soil beneath. All the footings are to be constructed with one concrete pour, instead of adding another layer, to make the tank a closed system. The thickness of the pad was increased; however, this reduced the amount of material needed without compromising the stability of the structure.      P a g e  | 7 1.7 Contributions   This section discusses the contributions that each team member had for this project. These contributions are summarized in the table below.  Table 1: Contribution Table Team Member Contribution Table Team Member Contribution 1 Hydrotechnical design, methodology, storage tank volume, WaterCAD modelling, emergency response plan 2 Hydrotechnical design, site visit, introduction, purpose, project scope, site description, determining population demand, secondary water main design, erosion and sedimentation control, final editing and formatting  3 Structural design, site visit, column design write up, retaining wall design write up, tank size calculation, waterproof membrane discussion, contribution table 4 Hydrotechnical design, pump station design, hydrotechnical write up, cost estimate 5 Structural design, cost estimate, project schedule, resolution planning for project issues, tank size calculation, key issues and benefits, discussion 6 Structural design, structural drawings, table of contents, title page, methodology, load combination and geotechnical, tank size calculation 7 Structural design, memo, slab design calculation and write up, foundation and strip footing design write up, design summary       P a g e  | 8 2.0 Hydrotechnical Design  For the hydrotechnical design of this project, the population demand had to first be determined. Once the population demand was determined, the storage tank was then sized and hydrotechnical modelling was then done using WaterCAD. From the results of the WaterCAD modelling, the pumps for the pump station and the secondary water main were then designed. This section describes the hydrotechnical aspects required for this project.  2.1 Population Demand  The population demand used to calculate the capacity requirements for the storage tank was based on a combination of the UBC Vancouver population and the population of Vancouver residents within a one-hour walking distance of the storage tank location. Currently, the UBC population is approximately 55,000 people; however, this population is expected to grow to approximately 70,000 people in the future. To create a more resilient and sustainable final product, a UBC Vancouver population of 70,000 people was used for design purposes. Additionally, a population of approximately 27,000 was considered for the future projection of permanent residents and faculty of UBC Vancouver. The one-hour walking distance was based on an average walking speed of 1.5 m/s (Dean, 2000). From this walking speed, the one-hour walking distance was determined to be 5.4 km. Refer to Figure 2 for an aerial picture of this walking distance. The one-hour walking distance population was based on population statistics and zoning from the City of Vancouver. Two different calculation methods were used to determine the one-hour walking distance population.    P a g e  | 9  Figure 2: One-Hour Walking Distance Radius from Storage Tank Location  The first method was used to determine the population density for one and two-family dwelling districts. For this method, a population of people per hectare was determined based on existing zoning and population statistics. According to a population projection report prepared by Metro Vancouver, the average population per dwelling for one and two-family districts in 2006 was 3 and is projected to decrease to 2.73 by 2041 (Metro Vancouver, 2011). Since the storage tank is expected to be used in the near and projected future, a conservative number of 3 people per dwelling was used for design purposes. From the existing zoning maps for the area, Google maps (to determine how many existing lots there are) and a population of 3 people per dwelling, the population density for one and two-family dwellings was calculated to be 46 people per hectare. When multiplying this population density by the area within a one-hour walking distance, a total population of approximately 64,000 people was estimated to live within a one-hour walking distance of the storage tank location. Refer to Figure 3 for the zoning map used for the population estimation.   P a g e  | 10 The second method was used to determine the population density for multiple dwelling districts. For this method, the total number of people living in multiple dwelling districts in Vancouver (174,635 people in 2016) (City of Vancouver, 2017) was divided by the total area within Vancouver zoned as a multiple dwelling district to get a population density of 397 people per hectare. Note that this value included high rise and low rise apartments and is expected to be a conservative estimate. A total of approximately 14,000 people, living in multiple dwelling districts, are estimated to live within a one-hour walking distance of the storage tank location.   Figure 3: City of Vancouver Zoning Map (City of Vancouver, 2016)  2.2 Storage Tank Volume   The sizing of the emergency storage tank depended on the population serviced, loading rate for assigning demand, fire storage volume, and the duration of emergency servicing. Since UBC has few commercial developments, a fire flow of 150 L/s and a fire event of 4 hours was used to calculate the fire storage volume (2.16 ML). Based on the AWWA manual for servicing during an event of emergency, a loading rate of 18.9 L/ca/day was used to service   P a g e  | 11 approximately 175,000 people in the event of emergency. In calculating the total water demand, the design included a consumption that was based on the loading rate discussed above and fire storage (total demand = fire storage volume + base consumption volume). For the final design, a 48-hour emergency service duration was selected for sizing the reservoir and had a base emergency water consumption of 5.6 ML. The total design volume of the emergency storage tank was assessed at 7.7 ML. In a scenario where there is a secondary supply main (under University Boulevard), the supply line will aid in filling the tank during the low demand period (night hours) and will also directly service some areas in the pumped zone. The feasibility for the secondary main depends on the following factors: ● Capacity of Vancouver’s water system at the point of connection ● The extent of damage experience by Vancouver’s water distribution system ● The available hydraulic grade line (HGL) at the point of connection  During normal operation, to over turn the tank volume it is recommended to use the storage tank water for peak hour consumption and irrigation purposes. UBC’s water system has a maximum daily demand (MDD) of 300 L/s (i.e. 7 hours is the tank overturn time at MDD flows). It is recommended to operate the tank on the daily basis during Peak Hour Demand (PHD) to prevent water quality deterioration.  2.3 WaterCAD Modelling   Bentley WaterCAD was used as the hydraulic modelling software for analyzing various scenarios based on the model “UBC-WAT-Model-Final - October 24 2012” provided by the client. The water system was modelled under the following boundary conditions: 1. Physical system for year 2020   P a g e  | 12 2. PRV settings of the MDD 2020 scenario 3.  The ground elevation for the proposed tank and pump station location was 92 m 4.  The primary supply from the Sasamat reservoir was closed 5.  Existing pump station was out of service  After analyzing the ground elevations of the existing water supply network, the highest elevation of 101.4 m was recorded in the pumped zone. The pump station was designed to supply an HGL of 135 m at 33 L/s of emergency service flow. The pump station also has the ability to deliver the fire flow of 150 L/s at the same HGL. The proposed pump station comprises of a service pump, an emergency pump and a fire pump. This station will also have a standby power generator of 75kW for normal duty and 355kW for fire flow. A bulk station will also be constructed at the site to facilitate water service to people from the surrounding areas and to the fire trucks. As shown in figure 4, the lowest pressure of 48 psi is recorded at the highest service elevation. The lowest pressure recorded in the service area is well above the minimum required pressure of 40 psi. The PRV station at Blanca Street and University Boulevard was designed with two pressure reducing valves and to have a pressure setting of 44 psi. All the PRVs in the water distribution system are summarized in Table 2. Appendix G shows the model used for this project.     P a g e  | 13 Table 2: PRV Station Overview Station # PRV Diameter (mm) Elevation (m) Hydraulic Grade Setting (m) Pressure Setting (psi) Existing PRV Stations 1 PRV-1 150 79 123 63 PRV-1 Domestic 100 79 125 65 2 PRV-2 150 80 126 65 PRV-2 Domestic 100 80 128 67 3 PRV-3 300 85 129 62 4 PRV-4 200 84 130 65 5 PRV-5 200 94 129 50 6 PRV-6 300 94 127 47 7 PRV-7 250 91 126 50 8 PRV-8 200 88 136 68 PRV-8 Domestic 150 88 139 72 9 PRV-9 250 81 123 59 PRV-9 Domestic 100 81 126 64 Proposed PRV Station 10 PRV-10 200 92 120 40 PRV-10 Domestic 100 92 123 44  As shown in Figure 4, in an event where both the existing primary supply main and the proposed water main are out of service, the emergency storage tank can service the population for 66 hours at the assessed emergency service rate of 33 L/s. Therefore, this is the available time window that one of the two supply mains need to be restored. If the secondary supply main is operational, continuous emergency water supply can be provided without any disruption.   P a g e  | 14   Figure 4: Extended Period Simulation of the Storage Tank in an Emergency Conditions  2.4 Pump Station  Based on the tank size calculations, the team determined the various required water flow rate requirements for lower emergency water demand, higher emergency water demand and the minimum fire flow rate. The calculated flow rates can be found in Table 3 below. The minimum fire flow rate was calculated and referenced from Table A-6.5.3.6 found in the British Columbia Fire Code using a 200mm diameter pipe.            Table 3: Flow Rate Requirements Scenario Flow Rate Required Lower Emergency Flow Rate 32.3247 L/s Higher Emergency Flow Rate 128.9914 L/s Minimum Fire Flow Rate (200mm Pipe) 96.6667 L/s 2.4.1 Pump Design Criteria An on-site pump station was required near the proposed underground storage tank to enhance the pumping resiliency of the existing system. The pump station would maintain the Time (Hours)   P a g e  | 15 required pressure and service the higher elevations of the UBC Vancouver water distribution system, as well as during fire event scenarios. The pump station would be built on top of a precast concrete ground-level floor in a suitable location where it does not disturb the use of the soccer field and would also be easily accessible to the public as the pump station would have an option to build a bulk fill station on site. Based on the parameters of population, loading rate, fire requirements and the duration of the servicing, the proposed pump capacities were determined and are outlined below. ● One fire pump of 150L/s capacity ● One normal duty pump of 35L/s capacity ● One standby parallel pump of 35L/s capacity  The pump station will include a normal duty service pump, a standby pump, a fire pump, AC motors, an electrical generator and variable frequency drives installed on the pumps. Aside from the tank storage calculations, it was significant to estimate the hourly demand to accurately choose and design the suitable pumps, considering the morning peak hours from 6:00 AM to 9:00 AM with the mandatory fire flow requirements. The three pumps are configured in a parallel system and for the fire pump there will be an optional underground hook up installed above ground for fire truck access in case of a fire pump failure. The normal duty pump is intended to supply daily water demand, and the standby pump would only be activated for an emergency failure of the other operating pump. The detailed drawings of the pump station layout can be found in the Appendix A and D.  2.4.2 Pump curves From the online Grundfos tools based on the drinking water distribution pump applications and selections, the selected fire pump was NKG 200-315.1/335 50Hz, and the CR 150-6 50Hz pump was selected for the normal duty pumps. When choosing these two models, the team made a conservative engineering assumption that the temperature of the water during   P a g e  | 16 operation would be approximately 20 degrees celcius with a density of 998.2kg/m3. A hydraulic grade line of 135m is required to supply the water from the underground storage tank to the highest elevation point in the UBC distribution system. At the operating point for the fire pump, a flow rate of 149.7L/s, a net positive suction head (NPSH) of 7.09m, a total head of 143.8m and an efficiency of 70.9% is expected. At the operating point for the normal duty pump, a flow rate of 35.81L/s, a net positive suction head of 6.31m, a total head of 147.0m and an efficiency of 74.3% is expected. The pump curves, system curves and corresponding results are illustrated in figure 5 below. Furthermore, from the WaterCad analysis, it was confirmed that the chosen pumps are free from suction cavitations by meeting the NPSH requirements of the system. However, regular maintenance involving checking the pumps, valves and water meters is required to ensure that the pumps are free of clogs to avoid potential cavitation issues. Lastly, the chlorine residual samples would be taken from the water once a week and to a lab for water quality testing to fulfill the provincial drinking water quality requirements.    P a g e  | 17  Figure 5: Pump Curves for Fire and Normal Duty Pumps  2.5 Secondary Water Main   The secondary water main will be installed under University Boulevard from the UBC connection to Blanca Street. This section will describe details about the design and rehabilitation that is necessary for the secondary water main. Construction drawings for the secondary water main can be found in Appendix B.      P a g e  | 18 2.5.1 Water Main Design The secondary water main is to be installed 1.5m into the median of University Boulevard and is to extend from Blanca Street to approximately 1,100 m west where it will connect to the existing UBC water main. The east side of the secondary water main will connect to the existing 200mm diameter water main that runs under Blanca Street. The west side of this water main will connect to the existing 641 mm diameter water main that supplies water to UBC from Sasamat Reservoir. Since the area is earthquake prone, all pipe material shall be ductile iron (class 52) and all water main joints are to have wedge action restrained joints. The inside diameter of the pipe shall be 300mm. Valves are to be installed at a spacing of no more than 300m to allow for more efficient maintenance in the future. The extra valve installations will allow a section of the water main to be closed off and drained to reduce possible future maintenance/repair times, rather than requiring the entire secondary water main to be drained to conduct repairs. Since the City of Vancouver requires 300mm diameter water mains to have a minimum of 1.07 m of cover above the pipe, the pipe will be installed 1.1m below finished grade (City of Vancouver, n.d.). Also, as per the City of Vancouver engineering standards, all valve installations are to be resilient-seated gate valves. Air valves are also to be installed at all high points in the water main to allow air to leave the system. By introducing air valves, issues like water hammer, and therefore pipe leakage, can be reduced. The air valves will also alleviate low water pressure concerns.  2.5.2 Roadway and Landscape Rehabilitation Where it is necessary to install water mains under the road surface, the pipe trench shall be compacted to 100% proctor density (after installation of the water main) and the new road structure shall match the existing road structure. The existing road structure is to be confirmed during construction, since this information is not currently available. The final road rehabilitation is to meet the satisfaction of the site engineer. Where pipe construction and road rehabilitation is necessary at the Blanca Street and University Boulevard intersection, it   P a g e  | 19 will be the contractor’s responsibility to ensure that a minimum of one lane of traffic in all directions remains flowing at all times. Additionally, since the secondary water main is to be installed 1.5 m into the grassed median of University Boulevard, landscape rehabilitation will be necessary after the pipe installation and trench compaction has been completed. A minimum of 0.15 m of topsoil shall be placed at the surface of the trench and grass seed is to be spread over the trench to ensure that grass will grow back and the median will regain its original aesthetics.      P a g e  | 20 3.0 Structural Design of Underground Water Tank The design for the underground storage tank required a structural design to be completed. This section will discuss the structural design components required for the design and will provide details on the construction materials required for the tank. Structural calculations and construction drawings for the tank can be found in Appendix C and D, respectively.  3.1 Load Combination & Geotechnical  All the geotechnical data used in the design of the storage tank was derived from the “Hydrological and Geotechnical Assessment of Northwest Area” report. The report includes borehole information of certain locations throughout the UBC campus. Due to the lack of borehole studies at the location of the storage tank, the team selected four boreholes around the campus. Boreholes numbered 11, 12, 44, and 74 were taken into consideration as they were most closely located to the rugby field. The four borehole data were then interpolated to estimate the soil composition at the water storage tank location. The depth and composition is listed in table 4 below.  Table 4: Composition at the Location of the Storage Tank Soil Type Depth measured [m] Topsoil 0.1 Pure till 5.5 Mostly till with possibility of silt 7.0 Mostly till with possibility of sand 10.0  Therefore, the general ground composition of the rugby field was determined to be composed mostly of till with some silt. Density of the soil was taken as 2000 kg/m3, and the friction angle and shear modulus used for design purposes were 30 degrees and 200 MPa, respectively.   P a g e  | 21  For the calculation of the structural components of the tank, the load combinations were determined to calculate the total load of the soil. The dead load included the soil weight and the self weight of the concrete. The live load was taken as a full size bulldozer weighing 8 tons, which assumes that the live load after construction would not exceed the weight of the bulldozer. From the reinforced concrete handbook the two load combinations were as follows:           Total Load = 1.25 * (Dead Load) + 1.5 * (Live Load) = 33.8 kPa          Total Load = 1.4 * (Dead Load) = 37.8 kPa  For the calculation of the top slab of the storage tank, the load of the soil on top was governed by the second equation and taken as 37.8 kPa. For the calculation of the columns and the retaining wall, the self weight of the top slab was taken into consideration, which has a density of 2500 kg/m3.  3.2 Slab Design  A top slab, having dimensions of 45.7 m x 35.7 m (including retaining wall dimensions), was designed to support a combination of dead load and live load on top of the slab. The dead load included the weight of a 1 m soil depth and the slab self weight. The weight of the construction equipment was considered as the live load. Since the dead load was much heavier than the live load, the factored design load had to be 1.4 times the dead load. The top slab was designed as a two-way slab. The slab was only supported by columns in the middle and retaining walls at the edges. Therefore, the uniformly distributed loads carry in both directions. As a result, a two-way slab with reinforcement in both directions was necessary. Based on design requirements in the CSA standards, the slab thickness required   P a g e  | 22 was 300mm. The tributary area of each column was 5 m x 5 m. Therefore, the column strip (which is on top of every column) was 2.5 m with 15M reinforcement at the top of the slab and had a spacing of 150 mm in both directions. Also, the middle strip (which is between two columns) was 2.5 m with 15M reinforcement at the top and bottom of the slab and had a spacing of 330 mm in both directions. Appendix D shows detail drawings of the slab construction. A small increment of clear cover for rebar was used to prevent corrosion due to water. To connect the top slab and columns, the rebars in the columns were extended and bent at the top of the slab.  3.3  Column Design  Columns are one of the most common structural element to support the vertical load of a reinforced concrete storage tank. Since the tank is 45m in length and 35m in width, using a 5m x 5m square tributary area for each vertical column would allow for symmetry. This yielded to a total of 48 columns: 8 evenly spaced lengthwise and 6 evenly spaced crosswise. Circular columns with a diameter of 500mm were used rather than rectangular or square columns to provide better corrosion protection. Columns with edges would corrode easily under shifting water. The columns were determined to be “short columns” based on the ratio of the maximum unsupported length (Lu) over column diameter (D). The tributary area would resist a dead load of 26.978 KPa from the weight of the top slab and 1m deep soil, and a live load of 3.13 KPa from the weight of a dozer. An analysis of the load combinations was made based on the 2015 National Building Code of Canada, with all the varying cases considered and the governing value was calculated to be 961kN (38.431kPa); therefore, this was the load applied to each column for design purposes. After calculating the total load, axial and flexural load resistance of concentration load applied to the short column would be determined. Figure 6 shows that each short column is reinforced with 30M longitudinal rebar with 10M ties, and a 40mm clear cover for each   P a g e  | 23 column. The total area of longitudinal steel (Ast = 2,800 mm2) and the gross cross-sectional area (Ag = 196,350 mm2) were calculated first to determine the axial load resistance.  The factored axial load resistance of concrete and longitudinal reinforcement were found to be 4,026 kN and 952 kN respectively, based on the CSA A23.3 standard guideline. As a result, the calculated total factored axial load resistance was 4,978 kN for each reinforced concrete short column. As required by CSA A23.3, the final maximum axial load resistance should be decreased with the reduction factor 0.85 for spiral columns; thus, was equal to 4,231 kN. This is the load resistance for each column, and is larger than the applied load, which means the design satisfied the loading requirements.   Figure 6: Top View of a Typical Column  To finalize the complete design summary, a few of the components needed to be checked, as outlined by CSA A23.3 column design requirements. The following table lists the results of the longitudinal reinforcement ratio, minimum bar spacing, and maximum tie spacing. Figure 7 provides the column design summary in the elevation view.  Table 5: CSA A23.3 Column Design Requirements Criteria Requirement Longitudinal Reinforcement Ratio (%) 1.43 (Max: 1.57) Minimum Bar Spacing (mm) 42 Maximum Tie Spacing (mm) 480    P a g e  | 24  Figure 7: Column Design Summary 3.4  Retaining Wall Design  Since the storage tank will be underground, the retaining walls should be able to resist the lateral earth pressure from the soil and the axial loads from the top slab. The wall design followed the CSA A23.3 standard.  The three main calculations in designing retaining walls were bending moments and shear forces applied to the wall, concentrated effects of flexure and axial loads, and shear reinforcements. To determine the bending moments and shear forces, soil and seismic loads are both considered. Applying Mononobe-Okabe theory, the combined total bending moments were determined to be 165 kN (top) and 169 kN (bottom) and the combined shear forces were 195 KN/m (top) and -205 KN/m (bottom). Considering the combined effects of flexural and axial loads, the thickness of wall was obtained as 350mm. The calculated effective depth was 310mm by using 15M reinforcement bars and 30mm clear cover. The area of steel bars was calculated to be 1645mm2 and the   P a g e  | 25 bar spacing was 130mm in vertical direction, which complies with the CSA standard bar spacing limit. Both tension reinforcement ratio and gross cross-sectional area satisfy the CSA requirement as well. The entire retaining wall design and analysis for shear follows the CSA A23.3 standard and all of the key components conform with the requirements. The effective depth was used in calculating the concrete shear resistance, yielding to shear reinforcement being not required. However, CSA requires the prevention of minimum horizontal reinforcements in the walls regardless of design calculation. Two layers of 15M bars were used for the vertical reinforcement with 120mm bar spacing. Figure 8 illustrates the details of the retaining wall design. The reinforcement rebars were extended to the top slab and to the strip footings as shown in the final design scenario.  Figure 8: Retaining Wall Design Summary   P a g e  | 26 3.5  Foundation and Strip Footing Design  Two types of foundations were used in the storage tank design: strip footings and a mat foundation. The strip footings were designed to support the retaining walls and resist the soil pressure. By using the CSA standards, the strip footing and mat foundation designs required a thickness of 550 mm. Specifically, the design thickness for strip footing is slightly less than the mat foundation; however, to make construction easier, one thickness was used in both cases. The reinforcement for the strip footing was 25M rebar, spaced at 330 mm in the transverse direction and 25M rebar, spaced at 500 mm in the longitudinal direction.   The mat foundation supports the columns, the weight of the water inside the storage tank, and resists soil pressure. A square footing was initially designed for each column; however, a mat foundation was later designed because the square footings required were very close together. Therefore, instead of designing another slab underneath the square footings, all the square footings now essentially connect to each other and form a mat foundation. Based on the CSA standards, a mat foundation, having a 550 mm thickness was required. The reinforcement required in the mat foundation was 25M rebar, spaced 350 mm in both transverse and longitudinal directions.  Appendix D shows detail drawings for both the strip footings and the mat foundation. To connect the retaining walls and columns to the strip footings and the mat foundation, the same type of connection for the slab and columns was designed. The rebars in the retaining walls and columns were extended and bent at the bottom of the strip footings and mat foundations.  3.6  Waterproof Membrane  The waterproof membrane was a vital item needed for the concrete storage tank to inhibit infiltration of unwanted water and pathogens from contaminating the stored water. The team   P a g e  | 27 recommends providing a water proof membrane on all exterior walls and above the top slab of the storage tank, totalling an area of 2,375m2. The details of the quantity and unit cost of the waterproof membrane will be discussed later in the cost estimate section of this report.     P a g e  | 28 4.0 Design Summary  The concrete storage tank will be located under the existing rugby field, and the on-site pump station will be built above ground beside the tank. There will be inflow and outflow pipes located near the top and bottom of the north tank wall, respectively. The inflow pipe will connect to the existing water main underneath Wesbrook Mall. The outflow pipes will connect to the pump station and will be distributed throughout the water network within the UBC area. The figure below shows the configuration of the storage tank and pump house and can also be found in the construction drawings in Appendix D.    Figure 9:Storage Tank Configuration with Pump Station      P a g e  | 29 5.0 Erosion and Sedimentation Control   The construction of the underground water tank will require an erosion and sedimentation control plan to reduce environmental issues. A gravel pad of 0.20 m thickness, 9 m width, and 15 m length shall be placed at the site access location. The purpose of the gravel pad is to remove the clay soil from truck and equipment tires prior to the vehicle leaving the site. This will minimize the amount of soil from the site that is tracked onto Wesbrook Mall. Additionally, catch basin socks will be installed at all catch basins along Wesbrook Mall within 100 m of the site location and at the first 2 catch basin locations downhill of the site location. The catch basin socks will reduce the amount of sedimentation that enters the sewer system; thereby, decreasing negative effects to fish health and the aquatic habitat in the receiving waters of the sewer system. Silt fences will also be installed at the edge of the site where the ground slopes downward towards the existing ground. The silt fences will further prevent sedimentation from leaving the site.     P a g e  | 30 6.0 Resolution Planning for Project Issues An action plan to immediately deal with project issues can be critical to prevent adverse impacts on project tasks. The table below outlines possible problems that can be encountered during the construction phase and suggested solutions to mitigate these problems.  Table 6: Resolution Table Issues Cause Action Plan Soil Erosion and sedimentation Deep excavation  Tapered edges of the excavation (using 2 to 1 ratio) Heavy rain / Dust Control  Applying soil erosion & sedimentation control such as geotextiles Unexpected Costs Poor soil condition  Additional expenses due to poor soil condition (if occurs) is included in the proposed costs  Check the borehole logs to determine expected soil type Project Delays Incorrect Custom Order  If the specifications are similar, may use the material to avoid delays  Reorder the correct material but will delay the project Mistake due to outdated blueprints  Make sure all blueprints are dated and documented properly  Always provide the contractors with the most recent drawings Loss of Equipment and Materials Theft/Burglary  Material stockpiles should be monitored either by a security patrol or closed-circuit cameras  Equipment should be stored in a safeguarded area   P a g e  | 31 Safety and Welfare Accidents  Workers should always wear protective gears (hard hat, steel-toe shoes, laminated vest, eyewear and others)  Safety signs should be provided for people passing by  Report accidents immediately  Report near-misses to Project Manager so preventive measures can be taken  Could hire a safety officer for daily/weekly Safety Meetings  Semi-permanent scaffoldings should be checked regularly          P a g e  | 32 7.0 Project Schedule   This project is estimated to last 89 days, provided that there are no unforeseen major delays happening. The project is divided into two components: the construction of the secondary water source (Phase A), and the construction of the storage tank (Phase B). Phase B is further divided into three stages: stage 1 is the connection of the primary tank to the storage tank, stage 2 is the construction of the tank, and stage 3 is the post storage tank construction, which includes from backfilling to site clean up. Phase A and Phase B were planned to be constructed simultaneously to reduce the timeline of the project. It is assumed that the construction takes place during the summer because of reduced traffic flow from students and to minimize disturbances caused by noise and redirection of road traffic. For materials delivery, it is advised that the materials come to site at least 7 days early to avoid delays. This will give enough time for inspection, material testing, and reorder if changes occur. A problem that could delay the timeline is the presence of peats and organics in situ. Soil analysis of nearby sites were available, and these data were extrapolated to predict the soil composition of where the storage tank will be constructed. However, even if small, there is still a possibility that the soil contains peats and organics. As discussed in the resolution planning, deep soil mixing, or jet grouting could solve this problem. However, this will cause a 3 - 5 day delay, depending on the preparedness of the crew. The detailed schedule for this project is shown in Appendix E.     P a g e  | 33 8.0 Cost Estimate   The project is expected to cost $4,494,485, with an operating and maintenance annual cost of $70,650. As expected, the bulk of the cost comes from building the storage tank (including materials and labour), and construction of the pump station. The volume of the required materials was rounded up to ensure there is enough supplies on site and avoid delays due to orders and transport. This cost also includes miscellaneous expenses such as traffic control and soil erosion control. There is also a 10% increase on the overall cost as a contingency. The operating and maintenance costs are for the water tank, pump station, and the water lines. This assumes that 3 hours a week is needed for maintenance. The structure and infrastructure installed for this project is expected to have a minimum design life of 100 years. The detailed breakdown for the cost is found in Appendix F.     P a g e  | 34 9.0 Emergency Response Plan In the event of an emergency, where both the supply mains to the University of British Columbia are compromised (i.e. the existing primary supply from the sasmant reservoir and the proposed secondary supply from the vancouver water system via University Boulevard), the following emergency plan shall be followed by the water operations department of UBC: 1. Isolate the break 2. Check with the City of Vancouver about the performance of their distribution system 3. Issue a low water usage warning and inform operations to shutoff all the fountains and irrigation lines 4. Operate the new proposed pump station to deliver the emergency service volume 5. Assess the system for any breaks and continue to isolating any breaks found                     P a g e  | 35 10.0  Discussion   The construction of a storage tank and a secondary water main line is an effective solution in providing a resilient water source to UBC and its surrounding area in case of disruptions on the main water line. This upgraded water system will have an underground storage tank located under a rugby field near Wesbrook Mall, a secondary water main line that runs under University Boulevard, a pump station near the storage tank, and a PRV station along the secondary water line to control flow. The addition of the secondary water supply source was deemed necessary to add resiliency to the design. It will be beneficial in the future when population grows, and the main line cannot supply the water demand anymore. If both water mains fail, the storage tank takes over in supplying water to the residence. The tank will be able to supply water that lasts 66 hours. Therefore, this layered design provides a solution to short and long-term problems. To ensure success of the project during the construction period, it is recommended that the contractors should review the resolution planning and project issues outlined in section 6 of this report.      P a g e  | 36 References  Amirzehni, E. (2016). Seismic assessment of basement walls in British Columbia. Vancouver: University of British Columbia.   Brzev, S., & Pao, J. (2016, 3rd Edition). Reinforced Concrete Design . New York : Pearson.   Cement Association of Canada (2012, 3rd Edition). Concrete Design Handbook. Ottawa: Cement Association of Canada.  The City of Vancouver (2016) Utilities Design and Construction Manual, Engineering Services. Retrieved from http://vancouver.ca/files/cov/UtilitiesDesignConstructionManual.pdf [Accessed 2 Nov, 2017]  The City of Vancouver. (2017). Housing Characteristics Fact Sheet. Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: City of Vancouver. Retrieved from: http://vancouver.ca/files/cov/housing-characteristics-fact-sheet.pdf [Accessed 16 Oct, 2017].  City of Vancouver. (n.d.). SECTION 2: WATER DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS. Retrieved January 15, 2018, from City of Vancouver: https://www.cityofvancouver.us/sites/default/files/fileattachments/public_works/page/11852/section2_2017_watergeneralreq_final.pdf    P a g e  | 37 Dean, C. (2000). Walking speed over 10 metres overestimates. Clinical Rehabilitation, 417. Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11518442 [Accessed 1 Nov, 2017].  Fire Underwriters Survey (1999). Water Supply for Public Fire Protection. CGI Group Inc.  Grundfos Product Center (2018). Find products and solutions. Retrieved from https://product-selection.grundfos.com/front-page.html?qcid=342651142  Metro Vancouver. (2011). Regional Growth Strategy Projections: Population, Housing, and Employment. Vancouver: Metro Vancouver.  Nakashima, M. (2010). Design Recommendation for Storage Tanks and Their Supports with Tanks and Emphasis on Seismic Design. Japan: ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF JAPAN.  Office of the Fire Commissioner Ministry of Municipal Affairs (1998). The British Columbia Fire Code. Retrieved from: http://www.qp.gov.bc.ca/testing/wlap/firecode.htm [Accessed 1 Nov. 2017].  Piteau Associates Engineering Ltd. (2002). UBC Properties Trust: Hydrogeological and Geotechnical Assessment of Northwest Area UBC Campus, Vancouver. Vancouver.  Properwinston (2017, July 16). Back to Post: Underground Water Storage Tanks for Homes. Retrieved from: http://properwinston.com/underground-water-storage-tanks-for-homes/fire-protection-tanks-denton-greeley-water-storage-tanks-inside-underground-water-storage-tanks-for-homes/ [Accessed 1 Nov. 2017].     P a g e  | 38           Appendix A: Pump Station Layout     P a g e  | 39           Appendix B: Secondary Water Main Design Drawings   9496981001021049496981001021040+725 0+750 0+800 0+850 0+900 0+950 1+000 1+050 1+100INV. 98.74INSTALL 300mm GATE VALVEINV. ±95.52300mm DUCTILE IRON WATER MAINEXISTING GROUND300mm DUCTILE IRON WATER MAINEXISTING GROUNDINV. 98.40INV. 100.19INSTALL AIR VALVE0+000 0+050 0+100 0+150 0+200 0+250 0+300 0+350 0+375EXISTING 641mm WATER MAINNOTE: INVERT TIE-IN ELEVATIONIS APPROXIMATE AND IS TO BEVERIFIED DURING CONSTRUCTIONINSTALL PRV STATIONINV. 94.961.501.50INSTALL 300mm GATE VALVE INSTALL AIR VALVE300mm WATER MAINEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGE300mm WATER MAINEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGECONTRACTOR TO SAWCUT ASPHALT AND REHABILITATEROAD SURFACE AFTER WATER MAIN INSTALLATIONTO THE SATISFACTION OF THE ENGINEERINSTALL 300mm GATE VALVECONNECT 300mm WATER MAINTO EXISTING 641mm WATER MAININSTALL PRV STATIONSEE DETAILS ON DRAWING 002-001A 18 04 09 ISSUED FOR APPROVAL 001-001REV Y M D REVISION DESCRIPTION SUPVDRN DES CHK ENG APPPERMIT ENGINEERDRAWINGUBC SEEDSUBC WATER SUPPLYSECONDARY WATER MAINUNIVERSITY BOULEVARDSTATION: 0+000.000 TO 1+375.000U N I V E R S I T Y   B O U L E V A R DMATCHLINE DRAWING 001-002STATION 0+375.000LEGEND200 mm WATER MAINEXISTING 200 mm WATER MAINGATE VALVEAIR VALVEROAD REHABILITATION AREANOTES:1. ALL DIMENSIONS AND ELEVATIONS ARE IN METERS.2. ALL ELEVATIONS ARE TO GEODETIC DATUM.3. ALL NEW WATER MAIN PIPE MATERIAL IS TO BE DUCTILE IRON.4. LANDSCAPE REHABILITATION ABOVE THE NEW WATER MAININSTALLATION IS TO BE GRASS SEEDED AND A MINIMUM OF0.15m OF TOPSOIL IS TO BE PLACED UNDER THE GRASS SEED.5. ALL NEW ASPHALT REHABILITATION IS TO MATCH THE EXISTINGROAD STRUCTURE.6. ALL REHABILITATED AREAS ARE TO MEET THE SATISFACTIONOF THE SITE ENGINEER.7. ALL VALVES ARE TO BE RESILIENT-SEATED GATE VALVES.8. ALL PIPE JOINTS ARE TO HAVE WEDGE ACTION RESTRAINTS.0m5 10 15 HORZ 1:5000 0.5 1.0 1.5 VERT 1:50909294969810010290929496981001021+100 1+150 1+200 1+250 1+300 1+350 1+400 1+450 1+475INV. 88.54INV. 98.74300mm DUCTILE IRON WATER MAINEXISTING GROUND300mm DUCTILE IRON WATER MAINEXISTING GROUNDINV. 95.33INSTALL 300mm GATE VALVE0+375 0+400 0+450 0+500 0+550 0+600 0+650 0+700 0+7501.501.50INSTALL 300mm GATE VALVE300mm WATER MAINEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGE300mm WATER MAINEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGECONTRACTOR TO SAWCUT ASPHALT AND REHABILITATEROAD SURFACE AFTER WATER MAIN INSTALLATIONTO THE SATISFACTION OF THE ENGINEER3.00A 18 04 09 ISSUED FOR APPROVAL 001-002REV Y M D REVISION DESCRIPTION SUPVDRN DES CHK ENG APPPERMIT ENGINEERDRAWINGUBC SEEDSUBC WATER SUPPLYSECONDARY WATER MAINUNIVERSITY BOULEVARDSTATION: 0+375.000 TO 0+750.000U N I V E R S I T Y   B O U L E V A R DMATCHLINE DRAWING 001-001STATION 0+375.000MATCHLINE DRAWING 001-003STATION 0+750.000LEGEND200 mm WATER MAINEXISTING 200 mm WATER MAINGATE VALVEAIR VALVEROAD REHABILITATION AREA0m5 10 15 HORZ 1:5000 0.5 1.0 1.5 VERT 1:50NOTES:1. ALL DIMENSIONS AND ELEVATIONS ARE IN METERS.2. ALL ELEVATIONS ARE TO GEODETIC DATUM.3. ALL NEW WATER MAIN PIPE MATERIAL IS TO BE DUCTILE IRON.4. LANDSCAPE REHABILITATION ABOVE THE NEW WATER MAININSTALLATION IS TO BE GRASS SEEDED AND A MINIMUM OF0.15m OF TOPSOIL IS TO BE PLACED UNDER THE GRASS SEED.5. ALL NEW ASPHALT REHABILITATION IS TO MATCH THE EXISTINGROAD STRUCTURE.6. ALL REHABILITATED AREAS ARE TO MEET THE SATISFACTIONOF THE SITE ENGINEER.7. ALL VALVES ARE TO BE RESILIENT-SEATED GATE VALVES.8. ALL PIPE JOINTS ARE TO HAVE WEDGE ACTION RESTRAINTS.8688909294968688909294961+475 1+500 1+550 1+600 1+650 1+700 1+750 1+800 1+850CONNECT 200mm WATER MAINTO EXISTING 200mm WATER MAIN200mm DUCTILE IRON WATER MAIN200mm DUCTILE IRON WATER MAINEXISTING GROUNDEXISTING GROUND1+812.696W PL1+837.296E PLBLANCA ST.BLANCA ST.INV. (±90.66)INV. 90.35INV. 88.00INV. 87.84INV. 88.64INV. 87.88INSTALL 200mm GATE VALVEINSTALL 200mm GATE VALVENOTE: INVERT TIE-IN ELEVATIONIS APPROXIMATE AND IS TO BEVERIFIED DURING CONSTRUCTION0+750 0+800 0+850 0+900 0+950 1+000 1+050 1+100 1+150CONNECT 300mm WATER MAINTO EXISTING 200mm WATER MAININSTALL 300mm GATE VALVEINSTALL 300mm GATE VALVE300mm WATER MAIN300mm WATER MAINCONTRACTOR TO SAWCUT ASPHALT AND REHABILITATEROAD SURFACE AFTER WATER MAIN INSTALLATIONTO THE SATISFACTION OF THE ENGINEER1.501.50EXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING 200mm WATER MAINEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING ROAD EDGEEXISTING 200mm WATER MAIN2.596.006.10A 18 04 09 ISSUED FOR APPROVAL0m5 10 15 HORZ 1:5000 0.5 1.0 1.5 VERT 1:50001-003REV Y M D REVISION DESCRIPTION SUPVDRN DES CHK ENG APPPERMIT ENGINEERDRAWINGUBC SEEDSUBC WATER SUPPLYSECONDARY WATER MAINUNIVERSITY BOULEVARDSTATION: 0+750.000 - 1+150.000U N I V E R S I T Y   B O U L E V A R DMATCHLINE DRAWING 001-002STATION 0+750.000LEGEND200 mm WATER MAINEXISTING 200 mm WATER MAINGATE VALVEAIR VALVEROAD REHABILITATION AREANOTE:WHEN CONDUCTING WORK IN THE UNIVERSITYBOULEVARD AND BLANCA STREETINTERSECTION, THE CONTRACTOR IS TOENSURE THAT A MINIMUM OF ONE LANE OFTRAFFIC IN ALL DIRECTIONS IS MAINTAINEDNOTES:1. ALL DIMENSIONS AND ELEVATIONS ARE IN METERS.2. ALL ELEVATIONS ARE TO GEODETIC DATUM.3. ALL NEW WATER MAIN PIPE MATERIAL IS TO BE DUCTILE IRON.4. LANDSCAPE REHABILITATION ABOVE THE NEW WATER MAININSTALLATION IS TO BE GRASS SEEDED AND A MINIMUM OF0.15m OF TOPSOIL IS TO BE PLACED UNDER THE GRASS SEED.5. ALL NEW ASPHALT REHABILITATION IS TO MATCH THE EXISTINGROAD STRUCTURE.6. ALL REHABILITATED AREAS ARE TO MEET THE SATISFACTIONOF THE SITE ENGINEER.7. ALL VALVES ARE TO BE RESILIENT-SEATED GATE VALVES.8. ALL PIPE JOINTS ARE TO HAVE WEDGE ACTION RESTRAINTS.300mm WATER MAIN300mm WATER MAIN200mm GATE VALVE200mm GATE VALVE 100mmGATE VALVE100mmGATE VALVEPRESSUREREDUCINGVALVEPRESSUREREDUCINGVALVE200mm WATER MAIN 100mmWATER MAINFROM HIGHPRESSURE ZONESTATIONDISCHARGEA 18 04 09 ISSUED FOR APPROVAL 002-001REV Y M D REVISION DESCRIPTION SUPVDRN DES CHK ENG APPPERMIT ENGINEERDRAWINGUBC SEEDSUBC WATER SUPPLYSECONDARY WATER MAINUNIVERSITY BOULEVARDPRV STATION DETAILSNOTES:1. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS UNLESS SPECIFIEDOTHERWISE.2. ALL NEW WATER MAIN PIPE MATERIAL IS TO BE DUCTILE IRON.3. ALL VALVES ARE TO BE RESILIENT-SEATED GATE VALVES.4. ALL PIPE JOINTS ARE TO HAVE WEDGE ACTION RESTRAINTS.0m5 10 15 HORZ 1:5000 0.5 1.0 1.5 VERT 1:50SCALE: N.T.S.PRV STATION DETAIL  P a g e  | 40           Appendix C: Structural Design Calculations for Storage Tank   Sample CalculationSoil Tank DimensionDensity = 2000 kg/m3 Height = 5 mTop Height = 1 m Length = 45 mg = 9.81 N/kg Width = 35 mSoil Weight = 30901500 N Tributary Area = 1575 m^230901.5 kNDozers Concrete and Rebar PropertiesWeight = 8 tons/dozer f'c = 40 MPa78.48 kN fy = 400 MPa𝜙c = 0.65𝜙s = 0.85Assume Density = 2500 kg/m3λ = 1 for normal concreteɑ = 0.8 for normal concreteρb = 0.022Two Way Slab Design The slab acutally is 45.7m x 35.7m (including the thickness of retaining wall).Assume 0.5 m as diameter of cylinder columnAssume 48 columns=> 8 columns in length x 6 columns in widthTributary Area for Each Column in Middle of Tank (Worse Case)Length = 5 mWidth = 5 mClear Span, Ln = 4.5 mMin t = 150 mm (clause 13.2.3)t = 300 mmLoad CombinationDead Load - Soil Weight Fraction = 1.2530901.5 kN 1.419.620 kPaDead Load - Slab Weight7.358 kPaTotal DL = 26.978 kPaLive Load = Dozers Weight Fraction = 1.578.48 kN0.050 kPaLoad CombinationCase 1 = 1.25 x DL + 1.5 x LL33.797 kPaCase 2 = 1.4 x DL37.7685 kPaToal Load = 37.7685 kPaSlab Volumn = 7.5 m3 for one columnSlab Weight = 183.9 kN for one columnTry 15 M rebar30 mm cover (from table A.2)Abar = 200 mm^2d = 255 mmFactored MomentLn = 4.5 mMf = 478 kN*m% Mf Mdesign0.35 167 kN*m for positive Mf0.65 311 kN*m for interal negative Mf(Table 13.1)Column StripTotal Bending  Moment = 311 kN*mBending Moment for Column Strip =0.59Mf = 282 kN*mColumn Strip Width = 2500 mmWithin bbBend Width bb = 1400 mmDesign Moment Mf = 104 kN*mRequired Reinforcement Area As = 1207 mm^2 OkMin Reinforcement Area As min = 840 mm^3Required Spacing s = 232 mm OkMax. Spacing = Min(1.5hs or 250) = 250 mmDesign Reinforcement (area in mm^2) = 6.03 - 15M @ 232.03using 7-15M @ 220 (1400)ρ = 0.00392 < ρb = 0.022 OkOutside bbBend Width bb = 1100 mmDesign Moment Mf = 178 kN*mRequired Reinforcement Area As = 2159 mm^2 OkMin Reinforcement Area As min = 660 mm^3Required Spacing s = 102 mm OkMax. Spacing = Min(1.5hs or 250) = 250 mmDesign Reinforcement (area in mm^2) = 10.80 - 15M @ 101.89using 12-15M @ 95 (2400)Use 15M @150mm OC for column strip reinforcementMiddle StripMiddle Strip Width = 2500 mmDesign Moment Mf = 29 kN*mRequired Reinforcement Area As = 326 mm^2Min Reinforcement Area As min = 1500 mm^3Required Spacing s = 1533 mmMax. Spacing = Min(3hs or 500) = 500 mmDesign Reinforcement (area in mm^2) = 7.50 - 15M @ 333.33using 8-15M @ 330 (1600)Use 15M @330mm OC for middle strip reinforcementSlab Integrity ReinforcementConsidered LoadSoil = 19.620 kPaSlab = 2 x Slab Weight = 14.715 kPaDesign Load = 19.620 kPaVse = 491 kNAsb = 2453 mm^2Required Reinforcement = 12.26 -15Musing 14-15m, 7-15m in each derectionCircular Column DesignLoad CombinationDead Load (Soil) = 19.620 kPaLive Load = 3.139 kPaSlab Volumn = 7.5 m3 for one columnSlab Weight = 183.9 kNDead Load (Slab) = 7.358 kPaDL = 26.978 kPa Fraction = 1.25LL = 3.139 kPa Fraction = 1.5Load CombinationCase 1 = 1.25 x DL + 1.5 x LL38.431 kPaCase 2 = 1.4 x DL37.769 kPaToal Load = 38.431 kPaPf = 961 kNColumn ArrangmentAssume  0.5 m as diameter of cylinder columnAssume  48 columnsTributary Area for Each Column in Middle of Tank (Worse Case)Length = 5 mWidth = 5 mThickness of slab = 0.3 mLu = 5 mLu/D = 10 Short ColumnAssume 30 M rebar 40 mm CoverAbar = 700 mm^2# of bar = 4Ast = 2800 mm^2Ag = 196350 mm^2columns in lengthcolumns in width8 x 6=>Pro, c = 4026 kNPro, s = 952 kNPro = 4978 kNPro, max = 4231 kN Ok   CSA A23.3 Column Design RequirementsAst / Ag = 1.43%Max reinf. ratio = 0.08*Ag= 1.57%Minimum number of longitudinal reinforcement = 4 for columns for circular tiesMinimum bar spacing = 42 mm governs28 mm30 mmTie sizing should be 30% of the biggest longitudinal reinforcement bMax tie spacing = 480 mm governs480 mm500 mmDesign stirrup spacing = 400 mmLongitudinal Reinforcement Ratio =Retaining Wall DesignKv = 0.5*Kh = 0.23Kh = 0.46K = 0.597θ = 0.539F = 38 degrees 0.663225116δ = 15 degrees 0.261799388Kea = 0.868 0.984525986Pea = 0.084 N/mm2 0.85847509684.367 KN/m2 0.696486561.897989478Given:Thickness = 350 mmCover = 30 mmBase width = 1000 mmߛs = 20 kN/m3k0 = 0.5f'c = 40 MPafy = 400 MPa߶c = 0.65߶s = 0.8515M barDiameter 15 mmArea 200 mm2a) Detemining the design bending moment and shear forceshw = 5 mb = 1000 mmߛ0 = 10 kN/m3Po = 50 kN/m3P of Soil = 75 kPaP of Seismic = 85 kPaw1 = 75 kN/m2w2 = 10 kN/m2l = 5 mx = 2.5Bending Moment ShearRectangle (w1)M max = 156.250 kN V max (pos) = 187.5 kN/mM midpoint = 78.125 kN V max (neg) = ‐187.5 kN/mTriangle  (w2)M 1 = 8.333 kN V 1 = 7.5 kN/mM 2 = 12.50 kN V 2 = 17.5 kN/mM midpoint = 5.208 kNTotal (w1+w2)M 1 = 164.583 kN V 1 = 195.0 kN/mM 2 = 168.750 kN V 2 = ‐205.0 kN/mM midpoint = 83.333 kNb) Design the wall for concentrated effects of flexure and axial loadshu = 5000 mmCIP Foundation = 190 mmWall height >4m = 300 mm200 mmGoverns 300 mmDL 67.4 kN/mLL 31.4 kN/mE 212.5 kN/mMf = Mr 168.75 kN m 168750000 N mmFactored Axial Load1.25DL+1.5LL 131.35 kN/m1.0DL+1.0E 280 kN/mGovern 280 kN/mEffective Depth = 312.5 mmUse 310 mmTotal Steel Area = 1645 mm^2Spacing = 121.6156 mmUse 130 mmCheck allowed spacing3t = 1050 mms max = 500 mmGovern 500 mm> 130 mm Okayp = 0.005 < pb = 0.034 Okay*pb from table A.4Ag = 350000 mm2A min = 525 mm2< As = 3289 mm2 Okayc) Design for shearVf = 205 kN/mdv = 0.9d = 279 mm0.72t = 252 mmGoverns 279 mmߚ = 0.180Vc = 206.255 kN/mCheck Vf = 205 kN/m< Vc = 206.2552 kN/m OkayAh min = 700 mm/mRequired Bar Spacing = 122 mmUse 120 mmCheck allowed spacing3t = 1050 mms max = 120 mmGoverns 120 mmSince t=350mm > 210mm, use 2 layersStirrup = 10 mmSpacing = 255 mm*15M@130 Vertical*Use 15M@120 horizontalStrip Footings Support WallsAllowable Soil Presurec' = 0Height of soil = 6.3 mUnit Weight of Soil = 20 kN/m3Depth of GWT = 6.6 mUnit Weight of Water = 9.81 kN/m3Effective Stress = 126 kPaGamma = 13.133phi = 30 degreeNc = 37.16Nq = 22.46N gamma = 19.7Q ult = 2959.320 kPaFS = 3Q all = 986.440 kPaNot in practical, so use reasonable number Q all = 250 kPa1.) Determining the footing widthDL = 67.4 kN/mLL = 31.4 kN/mQ all = 250 kPaunit length = 1 mB ≥ 0.3952 muse 1 m2.) Determining the factored soil pressureA = 1 m^22Factored Soil Bearing, Qf = 131.35 kPaUse 130 kPaCover = 30 mmWall thickness, t = 350 mm3.) Determining the rquired footingthickness based on shearAssume Strip Depth = 300 mmUse  550 mmUsing 15M rebardb = 15 mmd = effective depth = 262.5 mmdv = shear depth = 236.25 mmVf = 11.5375 kN per unit lengthߚ = 0.21߶c = 0.65ߣ = 1f'c = 40 MPaVc = 203.955 kN per unit lengthVf < Vc Ok4.) Determining the flexural reinforcement based on the flexural design requirementsMf = 6.866 kN*mUse  7 kN*mMr = 7 kN*mAs = 77 mm^25.) Minimum ReinforcementsAg = 300000 mm^2As min = 600As < As min Not OkUse  600 mm^26.) Determin SpacingAbar = 200 mm^2 for 15M barS = 333 mmS max = 500 mmS < S max OkUse 330 mm7.) Design Minimum Reinforcement in the longitudinal directionAg = 300000 mm^2As min = 600 mm# of bars = 3S max = 500 mmSummaryLongitudinal Reinforcment 25M@500Flexural Reinforcement 3‐25M@330Square Footing for ColumnTributary Area = 25 m^2Load Per ColumnDL = 26.978 kPa 674.438 kNLL = 3.139 kPa 78.48 kNWeight of the ColumnDiameter = 0.5 mCross section = 0.196 m2Height = 5 mVolume = 0.982 m3 Per columnConc Density = 2500 kg/m3Unit Weight = 24.525 kN/m3Column Weight = 24.08 kN Per column# of Column = 48Total Column Volume = 47.124 m3Total Column Weight = 1155.713 kNWeight of WaterTotal Water Volume = 7827.876 m3Water Density = 1000 kg/m3Total Water Weight = 76791.465 kNWater Weight = 48.756 kPaWater Weight = 1218.912 kN Per columnLoad CombinatioinTotal DL = 1917.427 kNTotal LL = 78.48 kN1.25DL + 1.5LL = 2514.504 kN1.4DL = 2684.398 kNTotal Load = 2684.398 kNPropertylamda = 1 for normal concretephi c = 0.65phi s = 0.85f'c = 40 MPafy = 400 MPa1. Determine the footing plan dimensionsqall = 250 kPaA = P/qall = 7.984 m^2b = SQRT(A) = 2.826 muse 3 mA = 9 m^22. Determine the factores soil pressureqf = Pf/ A = 298.266 kPa3. Determine the required footing thicknessRequirment of 2‐way slabVf = Pf = 2684.398 kNvc = 1.562 MPaVc = vc x bo x d = Vf = 2684.398 kNbo x d = Vc/vc = 1.718 m^2bo = 4x(t+d)bo x d = 4dt + 4d^2 = Vc/vct = 0.5 m column diameterd = 0.451 muse  0.5 mcheck 4dt + 4d^2 = 2 OKbo = 3.806 mBeta c = t/t = 1vc = 2.343 MPaalpha s = 4 for interior columnvc = 2.732 MPaMin vc = 1.562 assumption was correctuse 15M rebardbar = 25 mmAbar = 500 mm^2cover = 30 mmh = 542.5 mmuse 550 mmd =  507.5 mmuse 500 mmRequirment of 1‐way slabdv = 450 mmVf  = qf x b x ((b‐t)/2‐dv) 715.839 kNbeta = 0.16Vc = 880.313 kNVf < Vc OK  P a g e  | 41           Appendix D: Structural Design Drawings for Storage Tank   REV Y M D REVISION DESCRIPTION SUPVDRN DES CHK ENG APPPERMIT ENGINEERDRAWINGREV Y M D REVISION DESCRIPTION SUPVDRN DES CHK ENG APPPERMIT ENGINEERDRAWING1.0035.005.005.00Strip FootingØ0.50Diameter ofColumnsAA0.55Section AANREV Y M D REVISION DESCRIPTION SUPVDRN DES CHK ENG APPPERMIT ENGINEERDRAWING001-002UBC SEEDSUBC WATER SUPPLYPUMP STATION DETAILEDA 18 03 18  P a g e  | 42           Appendix E: Project Schedule   ID Task ModeTask Name Duration Start Finish Predecessors1 Primary Water Main Construction 7 days Mon 18-06-04 Tue 18-06-122 Water Main Installation 5 days Mon 18-06-04 Fri 18-06-083 Water Main Pressure Test 1 day Mon 18-06-11 Mon 18-06-11 24 Water Main Chlorination Test 1 day Tue 18-06-12 Tue 18-06-12 35 Secondary Water Main Construction 77 days Mon 18-06-04 Tue 18-09-186 Transport of Equipment on Site 7 days Mon 18-06-04 Tue 18-06-127 Sawcut and Remove Road Asphalt 7 days Wed 18-06-13 Thu 18-06-21 68 Site Grading 7 days Fri 18-06-22 Mon 18-07-02 79 Water Main Construction 21 days Tue 18-07-03 Tue 18-07-31 810 Water Main Pressure Test 7 days Wed 18-08-01 Thu 18-08-09 911 Water Main Chlorination Test 7 days Fri 18-08-10 Mon 18-08-20 1012 Road Rehabilitation 21 days Tue 18-08-21 Tue 18-09-18 1113 Storage Tank Construction 44 days Wed 18-06-13 Mon 18-08-13 414 Transport of Equipment on Site 1 day Wed 18-06-13 Wed 18-06-13 415 Fencing 1 day Thu 18-06-14 Thu 18-06-14 1416 Topsoil & Sod Removal 2 days Thu 18-06-14 Fri 18-06-15 1417 Road Connection Construction 2 days Thu 18-06-14 Fri 18-06-15 1418 Excavation 14 days Mon 18-06-18 Thu 18-07-05 1619 Base Compaction 2 days Fri 18-07-06 Mon 18-07-09 1820 Foundation Construction 7 days Tue 18-07-10 Wed 18-07-18 1921 Formwork and Rebar 2 days Tue 18-07-10 Wed 18-07-11 1922 Pouring of Concrete 1 day Thu 18-07-12 Thu 18-07-12 2123 Concrete Finishing and Setting 3 days Fri 18-07-13 Tue 18-07-17 2224 Removal of Formwork 1 day Wed 18-07-18 Wed 18-07-18 2325 Wall Construction 11 days Thu 18-07-19 Thu 18-08-02 2426 Formwork and Rebar 4 days Thu 18-07-19 Tue 18-07-24 2427 Pouring of Concrete 3 days Wed 18-07-25 Fri 18-07-27 2628 Concrete Finishing and Setting 3 days Mon 18-07-30 Wed 18-08-01 2729 Removal of Formwork 1 day Thu 18-08-02 Thu 18-08-02 2830 Roof Construction 7 days Fri 18-08-03 Mon 18-08-13 2931 Formwork and Rebar 2 days Fri 18-08-03 Mon 18-08-06 2932 Pouring of Concrete 1 day Tue 18-08-07 Tue 18-08-07 3133 Concrete Finishing and Setting 3 days Wed 18-08-08 Fri 18-08-10 3234 Removal of Formwork 1 day Mon 18-08-13 Mon 18-08-13 3335 Post Storage Tank Construction 38 days Tue 18-08-14 Thu 18-10-04 3436 Intallation of Piping and Drainage 2 days Tue 18-08-14 Wed 18-08-15 3437 Leakage and Pressure Test 7 days Thu 18-08-16 Fri 18-08-24 3638 Installation of Waterproof Membrane 2 days Mon 18-08-27 Tue 18-08-28 3739 Backfill and Compaction 3 days Wed 18-08-29 Fri 18-08-31 3840 Reinstallment of Topsoil 2 days Mon 18-09-03 Tue 18-09-04 3941 Disinfecting Water and Cleaning Tank 2 days Wed 18-09-05 Thu 18-09-06 4042 Pump Station Construction 14 days Fri 18-09-07 Wed 18-09-26 4143 Sod Installation 3 days Thu 18-09-27 Mon 18-10-01 4244 Site Clean Up 3 days Tue 18-10-02 Thu 18-10-04 4327 03 10 17 24 01 08 15 22 29 05 12 19 26 02 09 16 23 30 07'18 Jun '18 Jul '18 Aug '18 Sep '18 OctTaskSplitMilestoneSummaryProject SummaryInactive TaskInactive MilestoneInactive SummaryManual TaskDuration-onlyManual Summary RollupManual SummaryStart-onlyFinish-onlyExternal TasksExternal MilestoneDeadlineProgressManual ProgressPage 1Project: Civil 445 Sched.mppDate: Sat 18-03-31  P a g e  | 43           Appendix F: Project Cost Estimate   UBC WATER SUPPLY - CONSTRUCTION COST ESTIMATESCHEDULE 'A'  -  Site Grading ITEM UNIT OF QUANTITY UNIT COSTNO. DESCRIPTION MEASURE PRICE1. Topsoil removal and haul to designated truck dump location m3 1,820 $4.50 $8,190.002.Common Excavation (clay soil) - Site Cuts to designated truck dump location m3 28,960 $5.00 $144,800.003.Clay soil relocation from designated truck dump location to be placed on top of finished storage tank (complete with compaction to 95% SPD) m3 19,200 $5.00 $96,000.004.Topsoil relocation from designated truck dump location to be placed on top of finished storage tank m3 1,820 $4.50 $8,190.005. Sod installation (Including labour) m2 6,060 $27.00 $163,620.00TOTAL = $420,800.00Note: Topsoil depth is assumed to be 0.30mSCHEDULE 'B'  -  Watermains ITEM UNIT OF QUANTITY UNIT COSTNO. DESCRIPTION MEASURE PRICE1. 300 mm Ductile Iron (Class 50) Water Main (Including All Fittings and labour) m(lin) 1150 $550.00 $632,500.002. Gate Valves c/w Box, Stem and Final Grade Adjustments- 300 mm  (Including labour) ea. 8 $4,100.00 $32,800.003. Manual Air Valve ea. 1 $5,000.00 $5,000.004. Pressure Reducing Valve Station ea. 1 $200,000.00 $200,000.005.Connection to Existing Pipe  -  All Water Main sizes (Including labour) ea. 3 $2,500.00 $7,500.006. Pressure Test Labour Hr. 50 $50.00 $2,500.007. Chorination Test Labour Hr. 50 $150.00 $7,500.00TOTAL = $887,800.00Note: Labour price for chlorine has been inflated to account for cost of chlorineSCHEDULE 'C'  -  Road Rehabilitation ITEM UNIT OF QUANTITY UNIT COSTNO. DESCRIPTION MEASURE PRICE1. Sawcut of removal of existing asphalt Labour Hr. 8 $100.00 $800.002. Granular Base Course  -  3-20A Gravel m2 350 $31.00 $10,850.00(Assume 300mm Depth)  (Including labour)3. Asphalt Base Course m2 350 $37.00 $12,950.00(Assume 85mm Depth)  (Including labour)4. Asphalt Surface Course m2 350 $22.00 $7,700.00(Assume 35mm Depth)  (Including labour)5. Contingency for addition asphalt rehabilitation m2 1000 $90.00 $90,000.00TOTAL = $122,300.00Note: Asphalt structures are approximate and are to be verified during constructionSCHEDULE 'D'  - Storage TankITEM UNIT OF QUANTITY UNIT COSTNO. DESCRIPTION MEASURE PRICE1. Granular Base Course  -  3-20A Gravel m2 7000 $31.00 $217,000.00(Assume 300mm Depth)  (Including labour)2. Concrete m3 1900 $271.00 $514,900.003. Steel Reinforcement30M m 1000 $5.60 $5,604.9025M m 9100 $4.00 $36,431.8515M m 33000 $1.60 $52,846.2010M m 700 $0.80 $560.494. Formwork lump sum 1 $17,500.00 $17,500.005. Waterproof Membrane m2 2375 $23.00 $54,625.006. LabourFormwork hrs 420 $40.00 $16,800.00Pouring of Concrete hrs 480 $40.00 $19,200.00Waterproof membrane installation hrs 120 $40.00 $4,800.00Steel Bars hrs 240 $40.00 -$ 9,600.00-         Site Preparation Labour (transport, fencing, excavation, etc) hrs 1,320 $80.00 -$ 105,600.00-    Post Tank Construction Labour (pressure test, backfill, etc) hrs 960 $80.00 -$ 76,800.00-       TOTAL = $1,132,268.44Note: Use 25M steel rebars; Storage Tank Dimension: 45m*35m*5mLabour price for pre and post construction are inflated to account for extra machineries usedSCHEDULE 'E'  -  Pump HouseITEM UNIT OF QUANTITY UNIT COSTNO. DESCRIPTION MEASURE PRICE1. Pump Station Lump Sum 1 -$ 1,500,000.00--$ 1,500,000.00- TOTAL = -$ 1,500,000.00- SCHEDULE 'F'  -  MiscellaneousITEM UNIT OF QUANTITY UNIT COSTNO. DESCRIPTION MEASURE PRICE1. Traffic Control Lump Sum 1 $10,000.00 -$ 10,000.00-       2. Erosion and Sedimentation Control Lump Sum 1 $15,000.00 -$ 15,000.00-       TOTAL = $25,000.00SUMMARY OF SCHEDULESITEMNO. DESCRIPTION COST1. SCHEDULE 'A'  -  Site Grading $420,800.002. SCHEDULE 'B'  -  Watermains $887,800.003. SCHEDULE 'C'  -  Road Rehabilitation $122,300.004. SCHEDULE 'D'  - Storage Tank $1,132,268.445. SCHEDULE 'E'  -  Pump House $1,500,000.006. SCHEDULE 'F'  -  Miscellaneous $25,000.007. 10% CONTINGENCY $406,316.84TOTAL = $4,494,485.28UBC WATER SUPPLY - ANNUAL OPERATION COST ESTIMATEITEM UNIT OF QUANTITY UNIT COSTNO. DESCRIPTION MEASURE PRICE1. Annual Labour Hours hr. 156 $80.00 $12,480.00TOTAL = $12,480.00Note: Annual labour hours assumes that 3 hours per week is necessary for maintenanceSCHEDULE 'X'  -  Pump Station Operation & MaintenanceITEM UNIT OF QUANTITY UNIT COSTNO. DESCRIPTION MEASURE PRICE1. Water Treatment and Pumping Station Operation day 365 $114.00 $41,610.002. Chlorine residual samples taken in the water once per week week 52 $110.00 $5,720.003. Maintain a daily record book at the water treatment plant, record and enter data in the log book day 365 $16.00 $5,840.004. Check routine maintenance on equipment incluidng pumps, valves and water meters lump sum 1 $5,000.00 $5,000.00TOTAL = $58,170.00Operation and Maintennace = $70,650.00  P a g e  | 44           Appendix G: Water Network Model   ==KKKKK KKSources: Esri, HERE, DeLorme, USGS, Intermap, INCREMENT P, NRCan, Esri Japan, METI, Esri China (Hong Kong), Esri Korea,Esri (Thailand), MapmyIndia, NGCC, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS User Community     REVISION                    0    PROJECT NO.                   446-2      DATE     FEB. 23, 2018University of British ColumbiaSupply ArrangementUniversity of British ColumbiaEmergency Pressures1:15,000Storage TankK Existing PRV Stations= Pump StationPressure (psi)<= 4041 - 6061 - 90> 90Proposed Secondary Supply MainExisting Pipeline Netwrok0 0.4 0.80.2KilometersProposed PRV ConnectionBlanca/ University Blvd.Break in Primary Supply MainsSasmat ReservoirHighest Service Elevation 101.4 mPressure 48 psiExisting Pump StationProposed Storage Tank Onsite Pump StationNote:- Supply HGL of 135 m from new Pump Station- 33 L/s emergency water supply from the   storage tank- Exisitng Pump Station inactive- Break in both primary supply mains- Secondary supply main not in operation- Storage tank is the only emergency supply   in this scenario- Highest service elevation is 101.4 mTEAM 13

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