UBC Undergraduate Research

Community Engagement : Sprouts’ History Kuo, Hilary; MacLennan, Sydney; Tang, Yu Qing (Sunnie); Wanalo, Mercy 2018-04-10

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Notice for Google Chrome users:
If you are having trouble viewing or searching the PDF with Google Chrome, please download it here instead.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
18861-Kuo_H_et_al_LFS_450_Community_Engagement_Report.pdf [ 6.2MB ]
18861-Kuo_H_et_al_LFS_450_Community_Engagement_Presentation.pdf [ 4.96MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 18861-1.0374154.json
JSON-LD: 18861-1.0374154-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 18861-1.0374154-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 18861-1.0374154-rdf.json
Turtle: 18861-1.0374154-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 18861-1.0374154-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 18861-1.0374154-source.json
Full Text
18861-1.0374154-fulltext.txt
Citation
18861-1.0374154.ris

Full Text

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report Community Engagement: Sprouts’ History Hilary Kuo, Sydney MacLennan, Yu Qing (Sunnie) Tang, Mercy Wanalo  University of British Columbia LFS 450 Themes: Community, Wellbeing, Food April 10, 2018 Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.1 Table of Contents Executive Summary 2 Introduction 3 Methodology and Methods 5 Results 8 Discussion 12 Recommendations and conclusion 14 Works Cited 19 Appendix 1. Sprouts Archives 20 Appendix 2. AMS Archives 24 Appendix 3. More detailed timeline of Sprouts’ history 26 Appendix 4. Interview script 28 Appendix 5. Folders for data collection 29     2 Executive Summary Sprouts, a student-run cafe, food store, and club, is currently involving hundreds of UBC students in providing sustainable food systems to the campus community through their values and initiatives. To mark the re-opening of Sprouts’ main cafe and store in September 2018, a two-way community engagement art piece has been collaboratively created to tell the unique story of how Sprouts became Sprouts, while uncovering a method to continue data collection for the organization moving forwards.  A Community Based Action Research methodology was used to facilitate ongoing, relevant, and informative research while including community stakeholders and researchers alike in the research activities. Both primary and secondary data collection methods were used to draw a more holistic picture of Sprouts’ history, and to include narratives of the direct beneficiaries of the organization. For secondary data a literature review was conducted along with an analysis of historical records kept by the organization as well as archival data held by the Alma Mater Society of UBC. In person unstructured interviews were conducted with five members of the Sprouts community.  From the data collected, we were able to develop a comprehensive timeline of Sprouts’ history starting from its inception and running through to current events. In order to create a more efficient method of data collection in the future, shared folders were created with categorized items that provide interesting information that were photographed during the investigation of the historical and archival data. The interviews, along with a more complete understanding of the history of Sprouts, contributed valuable insights in how the art piece should be designed and what key characteristics it should have.  There is opportunity to create a method of record keeping that embraces collaboration by creating a platform where resources can be uploaded and shared. In using something that allows different stakeholders to contribute, the hope is that records will be personalized to provide the qualitative stories that make history so valuable. Ideally, a shared space will also help increase transparency between club executives as they change year to year as well as the community at large.  The art piece needed to be created in a way that was collaborative and showcased the values of Sprouts. As such, we used only recycled materials, and designed it to be colourful and inviting. The painting took place at the Annual General Meeting where many Sprouts members contributed to its creation. In hosting more events like the group painting, we encourage Sprouts to continue collaborative projects that will foster a sense of community within the organization’s vast network.  Finally, it is encouraged that further research be undertaken to investigate other ways of engaging community and making spaces unique and welcoming. We encourage Sprouts to look to creating more partnerships with other key stakeholders on the university campus and advocate for other sustainable initiatives.  3 Introduction  Sprouts is a student-run non-profit organization based at the University of British Columbia (UBC) whose aim is to make healthy, affordable and sustainably produced food more accessible to the UBC community. Sprouts values of engagement, accessibility and sustainability are reflected in both their profitable (cafe, grocery store, Sprouts box) and outreach programs or initiatives (Community Eats and food workshops) (“Who We Are”). Over the years, Sprouts has evolved from a bulk buying co-operative in 1997 to the several arrays of initiatives currently run by 25 board members and about 150 student volunteers. To mark the re-opening of Sprouts main cafe and store in September 2018, Sprouts members hope to create an engaging and welcoming space that also represents its evolution and growth (“Who We Are”). The goal of our project is therefore to tell the story of Sprouts role in the food system through a living and engaging community art piece that showcases Sprouts values and allows for two-way community engagement. A secondary goal will be to propose an online database that will allow for the centralization of Sprouts resources since inception, and pave way for future record keeping.  Student run initiatives are vital to UBC’s Strategic plan on sustainability,  the Sprouts project aligns with UBC’s 20-Year Sustainability Strategy (UBC 20-Year Sustainability Strategy 7). The goal is to have “UBC model a sustainable and integrated food system that equally values environmental, social, and economic outcomes and assesses the impacts of food production, transformation, and consumption on environmental, personal, and community health” (UBC 20-Year Sustainability Strategy 7). Sprouts strives to make local, organic and fair-trade food more accessible to the UBC community, produce zero waste, 4 promote and support fair economic development, and operate a business where ethics, the environment and social responsibility take precedence over profits (“Who We Are”). Creation of an engaging community art piece that reflects Sprouts’ values will help foster discussions around ethical consumption and contribute to active engagement with our food systems. The UBC Social Economic Ecological Development Sustainability (SEEDS) initiative aims to leverage student expertise in achieving the university’s operational environmental and social sustainability goals (“About SEEDS”). Student-run organizations like Sprouts are essential for food literacy since they provide multiple opportunities for students to develop skills on sustainable food systems and create educational opportunities around health and nutrition, and global trade; fostering critical thought, ethical global citizenship and building communities that are food literate. Furthermore, a commitment to zero waste is paramount to the city of Vancouver meeting Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 11 (Sustainable cities and communities) by significantly reducing the proportion of urban solid waste regularly collected and generated by the city (Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform).  Benefits such as increasing student engagement with sprouts, increasing food accessibility and food literacy  with be brought forward to both the UBC community and society at large.  Our specific research objectives include: 1) to create a comprehensive narrative of Sprout’s history from interviews and document analysis, 2) to develop a meaningful community art piece that can increase awareness of Sprouts and engage the community in sustainable food systems while allowing for creative input from current and future Sprouts members, 3) to inform the development of an online database to serve as a historical repository of Sprout’s history, 4) highlight the various initiatives within Sprouts, their 5 interconnectedness and how they align with UBC’s strategic plan on sustainability, 5) conduct literature review on existing food system related community engagement art pieces for students organizations as well as best practices for historical archiving, and 6) contribute to student engagement with the food system by creating a community art piece that reflects and fosters Sprouts values of community engagement, increased food accessibility and sustainability, and increases food literacy.   Methodology and Methods Methodology The methodology used in this project will follow a Community-Based Action Research (CBAR) approach. CBAR refers to a way to generate research in community by involving all stakeholders as active and equal participants throughout the project. (Nasrollahi). The methodology for this project follows the design, gather, analyze, communicate, and use process outlined by Nasrollahi (18665) with the methods for collecting and using findings to create clear outcomes that will benefit the community partners. In collaborating with the Sprouts team, the project researchers are not acting as experts, but as facilitators and catalysts for change (Nasrollahi 18664). The results are intended to be useful and inspire a continuation of related research or programs after its conclusion.   Methods  Multiple methods are utilized to collect a whole systems overview of our project space. In order to develop a narrative of the history of Sprouts, the methods chosen draw 6 on existing assets within the community and at UBC. Both secondary and primary research was conducted. With a CBAR methodology in mind, the methods were drawn on a scope of using community resources and in collaboration with the community partner.   Secondary Data Literature Review We conducted a literature review to rationalize the importance of community engagement in sustainable food programs on university campuses. Using the UBC library online search tool, and databases like CABi, the research found relevant academic articles. Online searches of other community engagement art pieces was also conducted to find best practices as well as inspiration for the development of the Sprouts’ art piece. Keywords used for these searches included “community engagement art piece” or “methods for community engagement”. The literature review acted as a baseline for further delving into concepts relevant to this project and was a starting point for designing data collection plans.  Historical records  One resource available to the student team was the records kept by Sprouts. We had access to a physical collection of a variety of mediums. Photographs, letters, brochures, legacy menus, and other forms of primary data have remained in files over the course of Sprouts’ running, and were reviewed by the student team. Samples of this data is shown in Appendix 1. Photographs or scans of relevant pieces were recorded, including letters of support for Sprouts’ creation, photos of the UBC Food Cooperative Demonstration Garden.   7 Archival data Since Sprouts has been part of the Alma Mater Society (AMS) from its inception as a bulk buying club, the AMS archives provided another medium for looking  into Sprouts’ history. The archivist pulled files on the Natural Food Coop, and relevant documents were scanned and emailed to the student team. Data collected from the archives can be found in Appendix 2. The information in the archives included articles published in the student newspaper, the Ubyssey, old emails regarding Sprouts’ functioning as a business and club, and other documents like old constitutions.   Primary Data Personal interviews Given the collaborative nature of Sprouts as an organization, qualitative responses from personal interviews was chosen as an appropriate research method. A total of five participants were interviewed using an unstructured and informal interview process. The current president of Sprouts reached out to current volunteers and board members as well as past members, and provided their emails to the student team. The selection process of who was selected was conducted by the community partner, with the contact details provided to us with the participant’s permission. Seven potential interviewees were contacted via email, with five people responding to set up face-to-face interviews. The locations of interviews were chosen on campus at a location convenient for the participant, such as the AMS Nest. Interviewees were contacted on Wednesday, Feb 27, 2018 with the meetings occurring through the following two week period. 8  Results   Timeline We created a timeline of Sprouts’ history based on the data collected from Sprouts’ historical records and the AMS archives. Six key events are identified as key moments in the growth of Sprouts as a club (figure 1), though a more detailed timeline was also constructed (appendix 3). The timeline indicates significant events including location changes since Sprouts was first started in 1997.     Figure 1. Sprouts historical timeline   The information collected at the AMS Archives and the historical pieces held by the organization itself contained a variety of photos and documents. Some of the highlighted and most relevant items were photographed or scanned, and are included in appendices 2 and 3. In organizing these photos and documents, they have been organized as best as possible chronologically where dates were available and categorized by medium in the occasions where dates were unknown, and accessed in a communal folder online. These articles will contribute to the rough data collection plan proposed to Sprouts’ in collecting data moving forwards.  9 Narratives driving the art piece design Of a total of 7 current and past Sprouts volunteers and board members contacted, 5 participated in interviews. A full description of our script is included in appendix 4, though it is worth noting that given the unstructured and informal nature of the interviews, a lot of the conversations were often off script. Based on the interview answers and comments we collected, we created a word cloud that shows the frequency of each word as used by the interviewee (figure 2). The text font size is correlated to the number of times each word has been used during the interview. The most frequently used words including Sprouts, community, people, volunteer, and food are a good representation of Sprouts’ role on the UBC campus. Sprouts is a community club that engages everyone on campus to get connected through the passion of food. We selected the outstanding and community engagement related questions that were answered by the interviewees and which represented the most common answers to some of our more relevant questions (table 1).   Figure 2. Word Cloud indicates the most frequently used terms by the interviewees.  10 Table 1. Highlighted interview questions and responses Interview Question Response How would you describe Sprouts? “Sprouts is affordable, sustainable, volunteer/ student run, and non-profit food club for all the students on campus.”  What are the benefits of Sprouts to students and the UBC campus?  “Learning about food security and good food choice after Sprouts.”  “I like that is has taught me how to reduce my food waste.” How do you think we can better engage UBC students in the Sprouts initiative? “Sprouts executive should get more recognition for being a time consuming position.”  “People also don't know us without our own permanent space.” What should be included in the community art piece?  “Art piece should be able to change throughout time as the sustainable view can be changed by time.”  “Create a timeline with Sprouts history. For the new generation of the Sprouts to understand where Sprouts is from.” Do you think the Sprouts community would be interested in an event to create or install an art piece for the new location collaboratively? “Sprouts will definitely be willing to engage students. Students are generally interested in these events.”  “Strategic ways a mural can put different things together but still look collaborative. Getting more people's ideas. Make people more engaged. Getting everyone's voice.”  Creating the art piece The community engagement art piece design was created collaboratively with a Sprouts volunteer who has experience designing murals and the student team. It was designed with the intention of incorporating some of the desired characteristics interviewees wanted like being colourful and warm, and showing that it was created by students and not formally by an external professional. Vegetables growing in size were 11 selected to be familiar and show that this is a place where patrons can access good food. The outline of the fruits and vegetables was drawn on a recycled piece of wood fit to the dimensions of the future Sprouts counter.  Painting the art piece was done in a way that allowed other members of the Sprouts community to participate, in order to get the personalized feeling. The painting happened at the Sprouts Annual General Meeting on March 28, 2018 (figure 3 and figure 4). After painting, dates and descriptions were added, with the possibility of adding personalized photos to it in the future. The art piece includes a timeline with Sprouts history and different varieties of vegetable and fruits to represent Sprouts’ goals  of making local, organic, vegan food more accessible on campus (figure 5).    Figure 3. Initial design of the community engagement art piece 12  Figure 4. Painting the art piece during Sprouts Annual General Meeting                                 Figure 5. Sprouts community engagement art piece   Discussion   Sustainability values  In investigating the history of Sprouts using both primary and secondary data collection methods, we were able to create a comprehensive narrative of how Sprouts has evolved and where it has historically fit in with UBC’s campus sustainability initiatives. At 13 its core, from its initiation in 1997 as the UBC Bulk Buying Club, Sprouts has a foundation in student collaboration and bottom-up initiatives. In this way, it is clear that Sprouts has been a key contributor to campus wide community engagement, but has been unique in that it has attracted the participation mainly of students from a variety of backgrounds. This is demonstrated in the many formal letters of support Sprouts received when opening its storefront in 2004, showed in appendix 1, where stakeholders from the faculties of science, forestry and land and food systems, along with the AMS voiced their support.   The interviews illuminated the truly collaborative nature of the club, and showed how the involvement of students had helped facilitate more food sustainability on campus. One interviewee, for example, highlighted that now when they go grocery shopping, they “know not to think the produce is bad just because it’s not attractive” (Anonymous). They felt as though reducing food waste, as a key goal of Sprouts, was something they also came to incorporate in all other parts of their lives. Key benefits for volunteers and patrons that were revealed in both the interviews and archival information relating sustainability are:  - Learning about food security issues and how to make good food choices - Zero-waste policy helped them to acknowledge the importance of reducing waste - Promoting plant-based diets to UBC students and staff - Making local and organic food more accessible - Meeting interesting people from diverse background and sharing their passion for food. As mentioned by Pothukuchi and Molnar, urban universities can use their capacity to support sustainability ventures to leverage towards food sustainability (342). With Sprouts running as a community based campus organization, it is clearly contributing to 14 greater sustainability by acting as a model for success for students who participate in any of its initiatives.  Community engagement Not only does Sprouts instill sustainable values, it is a key player in creating community on campus. The literature review conducted in the early stages of the project clearly identified a link between campus community engagement and fostering food sustainability; for example, in a study by Levkoe and Wakefield, food spaces focussing on community engagement were shown to be essential for harbouring healthy, just, and democratic food systems (250). Based on the interviews we conducted, all Sprouts members enjoyed being in a part of this community of like minded people passionate about creating a healthy food system for our campus. That being said, the opening of the new cafe offers a unique opportunity to design a space that shows the same feel of inclusivity. Adding art, colour, and warmth was a clear articulation from interviews, and would allow the new space to reflect the old location with its warm walls and cozy atmosphere as was shown in archived photos.   Recommendations and conclusion Student run initiatives like Sprouts are vital towards the achievement of university sustainability goals. They increase students engagement with their community, promote food literacy and allow for more involvement with the food system.  Through conducting an extensive literature review, analysis of Sprout’s history and archives as well as interviewing Sprouts members, a comprehensive narrative of Sprouts was created that informed the development of a meaningful community art piece. In line with the  project 15 goal of  telling the story of Sprouts’ role in the food system through an engaging and living community art piece that showcases Sprouts’ values and allows for two-way community engagement, the art piece was created collaboratively at the Sprouts Annual General Meeting and after extensive consultation with Sprouts members. An online database (Google Drive)  was also created that will serve as a historical repository of Sprouts history (appendix 5). Analysis of the AMS archives and past documents that were held by the club allowed for the identification of significant dates and events that occured since Sprouts first started in 1997 and a timeline of these events was created. From the interviews it was clear that involvement with Sprouts promotes community engagement, since the members valued the community that they had created with other Sprouts members, and promotes sustainability values both at a personal and community level. All the members interviewed were more involved with  their food system as a result of their involvement with Sprouts.  In order to increase the success of student run initiatives like Sprouts, the following recommendations are proposed.  Recommendations for Future Research  In this SEEDS project, most research was done on archival data and literature review on other community initiatives. Recommended areas of research could include better methods of community engagement such as exploring the use of technological devices to attract and involve more community members. In our project, we considered using an electronic screen that shows a social media users’ message if they hashtag Sprouts on their social media post. We also considered making a community space that allows community members to plant small fruits and vegetables that can be shared with those in need. These are community engagement ideas that came up during our research of other 16 good community projects, but we did not have enough time nor funding to carry out these projects. Perhaps other LFS 450 projects could follow up on community engagement pieces that are more productive.   Future research can also be done on better methods of history keeping, which allows all community members including Sprouts members to review and add to the history of Sprouts in a more physical way other than using Google Drive. By allowing data collection to be something that is accessible by everyone and decentralized, record keeping could become in itself  be a way of promoting community building and transparency between board members and general volunteers, and even regular patrons of the club. Having something as simple as the aforementioned hashtag would create a way for everyone to contribute to documenting their narratives of Sprouts. Research into methods of keeping qualitative data, or designing a space online or in person to deposit photos or stories could be useful for Sprouts moving forward.  Sprouts is a non-profit student-run club that promotes sustainable eating on UBC campus, however not a lot of students know about it and other food places such as seedlings. Therefore, future LFS 450 projects could research on how to engage the greater UBC community to recognize and participate in sustainable food initiatives beyond existing networks. Exploring how to reach out to people who are typically involved in making less sustainable purchasing decisions or lack a sense of purpose or place are an example target group for this kind of study.     17 Recommendations for Action Some more immediate actions that can be taken to improve Sprouts presence on the UBC campus include continued building community, allowing data collection with more accessible folders and bringing more stakeholders on board; to continue community building, dialogue and collaboration are essential to the growth and success of student-run initiatives. Awareness of such initiatives either through formal and informal dialogue as well as collaboration with other student run initiatives and the university will not only increase Sprouts presence on campus but also encourage more support for such initiatives. Furthermore, initiation of community engagement events similar to the art piece creation event will also promote community building and  a sense of community. Important things to note will be to personalize the process as this will contribute towards making the final output more memorable.   It is also recommended that Sprouts data can be collected using accessible folders so that all data collected related to Sprouts can be well organized and stored in folders that are accessible by everyone to promote transparency and allow for easy retrieval of data to inform future decision making and an appreciation of the progress that Sprouts has made since 1997. Categorizing the data into different sections will also make the retrieval process more efficient. In a way, by having community members contribute to the documentation of Sprouts’ story can act as a community building exercise itself.  It is also important to bring more stakeholders on board. The Sustainable Food Access Referendum was a big milestone for student run food outlets on the UBC campus. There was an overwhelming amount of support from UBC students for the referendum in which every student will be contributing an annual fee of $0.30 to support sustainable food 18 initiatives on the UBC campus. Having more stakeholders on board will set Sprouts up for success now and in the future. Also, continued advocacy and lobbying to bring more stakeholders on board beyond just the students will ensure the continued success of student run initiatives like Sprouts. Having the AMS as well as the UBC staff (SEEDs staff) and faculty (Land and Food systems,) support such initiatives is essential for long term continuation when current Sprouts members graduate. Our group’s frequent interaction with the board members of Sprouts specifically the president and store coordinator gave as a unique appreciation of the time commitment and dedication that they put into running the Sprouts organization and managing about 150 student volunteers. Their commitment was very admirable considering that those positions are unpaid. The SEEDs staff should consider partnering with the Work Learn program to create specific paid positions within the Sprouts executive board.   19 Works Cited “About SEEDS”. UBC Sustainability, 2018. www.sustain.ubc.ca/courses-degrees/alternative- credit-options/seeds-sustainability-program/about-seeds. Accessed on Jan.22.2018. Anonymous. Personal Interview. 8 March, 2018. Levkoe, Charles Z., and Sarah Wakefield. "The Community Food Centre: Creating Space for a just, Sustainable, and Healthy Food System." Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 2.1 (2011): 249-68. ProQuest. Web. 25 Jan. 2018. Nasrollahi, Mohammad Ali. "A Closer Look at Using Stringer's Action Research Model in Improving Students’ Learning." (2014). Pothukuchi, Kameshwari, and Molnar, Samuel A. “Sustainable Food Systems at Urban Public Universities: A Survey of U-21 Universities: Sustainable Food Systems at Urban Public Universities." Journal of Urban Affairs, vol. 37, no. 3, 2015, pp. 341-359. Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform. United Nations Dept. of Economic and Social Affairs, 2018, www.sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300. Accessed on Jan.24.2018. UBC 20-Year Sustainability Strategy. 2014. www.sustain.ubc.ca/sites/sustain.ubc.ca/files/uploads/CampusSustainability/CS_PDFs/PlansReports/Plans/20-Year-Sustainability-Strategy-UBC.pdf. “Who we are”. UBC Sprouts, 2018. www.ubcsprouts.ca/whoweare/. Accessed on Jan.22.2018.     20 Appendix 1. Sprouts Archives  Letters of support for the Sprouts storefront in 2004 21  Natural Food Coop Constitution 22  AMS 2015 Club Award  23 Oatmeal event volunteer created poster  24 Appendix 2. AMS Archives Sprouts menu 2007  25  Ubyssey article on the opening of the Sprouts storefront   26 Appendix 3. More detailed timeline of Sprouts’ history 27          28 Appendix 4. Interview script Do you have any questions for us before we begin?  1. What is your relationship with Sprouts? a. What are some reasons that led you to become a part of the Sprouts community? 2. How would you describe Sprouts? 3. How would you describe your experience with Sprouts a. What do you like most about Sprouts b. What do you not like 4. How is Sprouts different now than it was when you first got involved, if it is different? 5. What are the benefits of Sprouts to students and the UBC campus, if any? a. In what ways has your involvement with Sprouts been beneficial to you?        6.  How do you think we can better engage UBC students in the Sprouts initiative?  We are looking to create a community engagement art piece in the new space, where the story of Sprouts will be shared.  1. In the opening of the new location, describe what your ideal vision of the cafe and store setting would be. What would it feel like or look like, and is there anything in particular you would like to see? 2. Is there anything that comes to mind that we should definitely include in the community art piece? 3. Do you think the Sprouts community or the UBC community more broadly would be interested in an event to create or install an art piece for the new location collaboratively? Are there any final comments you would like to share?   29 Appendix 5. Folders for data collection   Screenshot of shared folders and example of categorizing items  UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report Community Engagement: Sprouts’ History Hilary Kuo, Sydney MacLennan, Yu Qing (Sunnie) Tang, Mercy Wanalo  University of British Columbia LFS 450 Themes: Community, Wellbeing, Food April 10, 2018 Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.1 Table of Contents Executive Summary 2 Introduction 3 Methodology and Methods 5 Results 8 Discussion 12 Recommendations and conclusion 14 Works Cited 19 Appendix 1. Sprouts Archives 20 Appendix 2. AMS Archives 24 Appendix 3. More detailed timeline of Sprouts’ history 26 Appendix 4. Interview script 28 Appendix 5. Folders for data collection 29     2 Executive Summary Sprouts, a student-run cafe, food store, and club, is currently involving hundreds of UBC students in providing sustainable food systems to the campus community through their values and initiatives. To mark the re-opening of Sprouts’ main cafe and store in September 2018, a two-way community engagement art piece has been collaboratively created to tell the unique story of how Sprouts became Sprouts, while uncovering a method to continue data collection for the organization moving forwards.  A Community Based Action Research methodology was used to facilitate ongoing, relevant, and informative research while including community stakeholders and researchers alike in the research activities. Both primary and secondary data collection methods were used to draw a more holistic picture of Sprouts’ history, and to include narratives of the direct beneficiaries of the organization. For secondary data a literature review was conducted along with an analysis of historical records kept by the organization as well as archival data held by the Alma Mater Society of UBC. In person unstructured interviews were conducted with five members of the Sprouts community.  From the data collected, we were able to develop a comprehensive timeline of Sprouts’ history starting from its inception and running through to current events. In order to create a more efficient method of data collection in the future, shared folders were created with categorized items that provide interesting information that were photographed during the investigation of the historical and archival data. The interviews, along with a more complete understanding of the history of Sprouts, contributed valuable insights in how the art piece should be designed and what key characteristics it should have.  There is opportunity to create a method of record keeping that embraces collaboration by creating a platform where resources can be uploaded and shared. In using something that allows different stakeholders to contribute, the hope is that records will be personalized to provide the qualitative stories that make history so valuable. Ideally, a shared space will also help increase transparency between club executives as they change year to year as well as the community at large.  The art piece needed to be created in a way that was collaborative and showcased the values of Sprouts. As such, we used only recycled materials, and designed it to be colourful and inviting. The painting took place at the Annual General Meeting where many Sprouts members contributed to its creation. In hosting more events like the group painting, we encourage Sprouts to continue collaborative projects that will foster a sense of community within the organization’s vast network.  Finally, it is encouraged that further research be undertaken to investigate other ways of engaging community and making spaces unique and welcoming. We encourage Sprouts to look to creating more partnerships with other key stakeholders on the university campus and advocate for other sustainable initiatives.  3 Introduction  Sprouts is a student-run non-profit organization based at the University of British Columbia (UBC) whose aim is to make healthy, affordable and sustainably produced food more accessible to the UBC community. Sprouts values of engagement, accessibility and sustainability are reflected in both their profitable (cafe, grocery store, Sprouts box) and outreach programs or initiatives (Community Eats and food workshops) (“Who We Are”). Over the years, Sprouts has evolved from a bulk buying co-operative in 1997 to the several arrays of initiatives currently run by 25 board members and about 150 student volunteers. To mark the re-opening of Sprouts main cafe and store in September 2018, Sprouts members hope to create an engaging and welcoming space that also represents its evolution and growth (“Who We Are”). The goal of our project is therefore to tell the story of Sprouts role in the food system through a living and engaging community art piece that showcases Sprouts values and allows for two-way community engagement. A secondary goal will be to propose an online database that will allow for the centralization of Sprouts resources since inception, and pave way for future record keeping.  Student run initiatives are vital to UBC’s Strategic plan on sustainability,  the Sprouts project aligns with UBC’s 20-Year Sustainability Strategy (UBC 20-Year Sustainability Strategy 7). The goal is to have “UBC model a sustainable and integrated food system that equally values environmental, social, and economic outcomes and assesses the impacts of food production, transformation, and consumption on environmental, personal, and community health” (UBC 20-Year Sustainability Strategy 7). Sprouts strives to make local, organic and fair-trade food more accessible to the UBC community, produce zero waste, 4 promote and support fair economic development, and operate a business where ethics, the environment and social responsibility take precedence over profits (“Who We Are”). Creation of an engaging community art piece that reflects Sprouts’ values will help foster discussions around ethical consumption and contribute to active engagement with our food systems. The UBC Social Economic Ecological Development Sustainability (SEEDS) initiative aims to leverage student expertise in achieving the university’s operational environmental and social sustainability goals (“About SEEDS”). Student-run organizations like Sprouts are essential for food literacy since they provide multiple opportunities for students to develop skills on sustainable food systems and create educational opportunities around health and nutrition, and global trade; fostering critical thought, ethical global citizenship and building communities that are food literate. Furthermore, a commitment to zero waste is paramount to the city of Vancouver meeting Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 11 (Sustainable cities and communities) by significantly reducing the proportion of urban solid waste regularly collected and generated by the city (Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform).  Benefits such as increasing student engagement with sprouts, increasing food accessibility and food literacy  with be brought forward to both the UBC community and society at large.  Our specific research objectives include: 1) to create a comprehensive narrative of Sprout’s history from interviews and document analysis, 2) to develop a meaningful community art piece that can increase awareness of Sprouts and engage the community in sustainable food systems while allowing for creative input from current and future Sprouts members, 3) to inform the development of an online database to serve as a historical repository of Sprout’s history, 4) highlight the various initiatives within Sprouts, their 5 interconnectedness and how they align with UBC’s strategic plan on sustainability, 5) conduct literature review on existing food system related community engagement art pieces for students organizations as well as best practices for historical archiving, and 6) contribute to student engagement with the food system by creating a community art piece that reflects and fosters Sprouts values of community engagement, increased food accessibility and sustainability, and increases food literacy.   Methodology and Methods Methodology The methodology used in this project will follow a Community-Based Action Research (CBAR) approach. CBAR refers to a way to generate research in community by involving all stakeholders as active and equal participants throughout the project. (Nasrollahi). The methodology for this project follows the design, gather, analyze, communicate, and use process outlined by Nasrollahi (18665) with the methods for collecting and using findings to create clear outcomes that will benefit the community partners. In collaborating with the Sprouts team, the project researchers are not acting as experts, but as facilitators and catalysts for change (Nasrollahi 18664). The results are intended to be useful and inspire a continuation of related research or programs after its conclusion.   Methods  Multiple methods are utilized to collect a whole systems overview of our project space. In order to develop a narrative of the history of Sprouts, the methods chosen draw 6 on existing assets within the community and at UBC. Both secondary and primary research was conducted. With a CBAR methodology in mind, the methods were drawn on a scope of using community resources and in collaboration with the community partner.   Secondary Data Literature Review We conducted a literature review to rationalize the importance of community engagement in sustainable food programs on university campuses. Using the UBC library online search tool, and databases like CABi, the research found relevant academic articles. Online searches of other community engagement art pieces was also conducted to find best practices as well as inspiration for the development of the Sprouts’ art piece. Keywords used for these searches included “community engagement art piece” or “methods for community engagement”. The literature review acted as a baseline for further delving into concepts relevant to this project and was a starting point for designing data collection plans.  Historical records  One resource available to the student team was the records kept by Sprouts. We had access to a physical collection of a variety of mediums. Photographs, letters, brochures, legacy menus, and other forms of primary data have remained in files over the course of Sprouts’ running, and were reviewed by the student team. Samples of this data is shown in Appendix 1. Photographs or scans of relevant pieces were recorded, including letters of support for Sprouts’ creation, photos of the UBC Food Cooperative Demonstration Garden.   7 Archival data Since Sprouts has been part of the Alma Mater Society (AMS) from its inception as a bulk buying club, the AMS archives provided another medium for looking  into Sprouts’ history. The archivist pulled files on the Natural Food Coop, and relevant documents were scanned and emailed to the student team. Data collected from the archives can be found in Appendix 2. The information in the archives included articles published in the student newspaper, the Ubyssey, old emails regarding Sprouts’ functioning as a business and club, and other documents like old constitutions.   Primary Data Personal interviews Given the collaborative nature of Sprouts as an organization, qualitative responses from personal interviews was chosen as an appropriate research method. A total of five participants were interviewed using an unstructured and informal interview process. The current president of Sprouts reached out to current volunteers and board members as well as past members, and provided their emails to the student team. The selection process of who was selected was conducted by the community partner, with the contact details provided to us with the participant’s permission. Seven potential interviewees were contacted via email, with five people responding to set up face-to-face interviews. The locations of interviews were chosen on campus at a location convenient for the participant, such as the AMS Nest. Interviewees were contacted on Wednesday, Feb 27, 2018 with the meetings occurring through the following two week period. 8  Results   Timeline We created a timeline of Sprouts’ history based on the data collected from Sprouts’ historical records and the AMS archives. Six key events are identified as key moments in the growth of Sprouts as a club (figure 1), though a more detailed timeline was also constructed (appendix 3). The timeline indicates significant events including location changes since Sprouts was first started in 1997.     Figure 1. Sprouts historical timeline   The information collected at the AMS Archives and the historical pieces held by the organization itself contained a variety of photos and documents. Some of the highlighted and most relevant items were photographed or scanned, and are included in appendices 2 and 3. In organizing these photos and documents, they have been organized as best as possible chronologically where dates were available and categorized by medium in the occasions where dates were unknown, and accessed in a communal folder online. These articles will contribute to the rough data collection plan proposed to Sprouts’ in collecting data moving forwards.  9 Narratives driving the art piece design Of a total of 7 current and past Sprouts volunteers and board members contacted, 5 participated in interviews. A full description of our script is included in appendix 4, though it is worth noting that given the unstructured and informal nature of the interviews, a lot of the conversations were often off script. Based on the interview answers and comments we collected, we created a word cloud that shows the frequency of each word as used by the interviewee (figure 2). The text font size is correlated to the number of times each word has been used during the interview. The most frequently used words including Sprouts, community, people, volunteer, and food are a good representation of Sprouts’ role on the UBC campus. Sprouts is a community club that engages everyone on campus to get connected through the passion of food. We selected the outstanding and community engagement related questions that were answered by the interviewees and which represented the most common answers to some of our more relevant questions (table 1).   Figure 2. Word Cloud indicates the most frequently used terms by the interviewees.  10 Table 1. Highlighted interview questions and responses Interview Question Response How would you describe Sprouts? “Sprouts is affordable, sustainable, volunteer/ student run, and non-profit food club for all the students on campus.”  What are the benefits of Sprouts to students and the UBC campus?  “Learning about food security and good food choice after Sprouts.”  “I like that is has taught me how to reduce my food waste.” How do you think we can better engage UBC students in the Sprouts initiative? “Sprouts executive should get more recognition for being a time consuming position.”  “People also don't know us without our own permanent space.” What should be included in the community art piece?  “Art piece should be able to change throughout time as the sustainable view can be changed by time.”  “Create a timeline with Sprouts history. For the new generation of the Sprouts to understand where Sprouts is from.” Do you think the Sprouts community would be interested in an event to create or install an art piece for the new location collaboratively? “Sprouts will definitely be willing to engage students. Students are generally interested in these events.”  “Strategic ways a mural can put different things together but still look collaborative. Getting more people's ideas. Make people more engaged. Getting everyone's voice.”  Creating the art piece The community engagement art piece design was created collaboratively with a Sprouts volunteer who has experience designing murals and the student team. It was designed with the intention of incorporating some of the desired characteristics interviewees wanted like being colourful and warm, and showing that it was created by students and not formally by an external professional. Vegetables growing in size were 11 selected to be familiar and show that this is a place where patrons can access good food. The outline of the fruits and vegetables was drawn on a recycled piece of wood fit to the dimensions of the future Sprouts counter.  Painting the art piece was done in a way that allowed other members of the Sprouts community to participate, in order to get the personalized feeling. The painting happened at the Sprouts Annual General Meeting on March 28, 2018 (figure 3 and figure 4). After painting, dates and descriptions were added, with the possibility of adding personalized photos to it in the future. The art piece includes a timeline with Sprouts history and different varieties of vegetable and fruits to represent Sprouts’ goals  of making local, organic, vegan food more accessible on campus (figure 5).    Figure 3. Initial design of the community engagement art piece 12  Figure 4. Painting the art piece during Sprouts Annual General Meeting                                 Figure 5. Sprouts community engagement art piece   Discussion   Sustainability values  In investigating the history of Sprouts using both primary and secondary data collection methods, we were able to create a comprehensive narrative of how Sprouts has evolved and where it has historically fit in with UBC’s campus sustainability initiatives. At 13 its core, from its initiation in 1997 as the UBC Bulk Buying Club, Sprouts has a foundation in student collaboration and bottom-up initiatives. In this way, it is clear that Sprouts has been a key contributor to campus wide community engagement, but has been unique in that it has attracted the participation mainly of students from a variety of backgrounds. This is demonstrated in the many formal letters of support Sprouts received when opening its storefront in 2004, showed in appendix 1, where stakeholders from the faculties of science, forestry and land and food systems, along with the AMS voiced their support.   The interviews illuminated the truly collaborative nature of the club, and showed how the involvement of students had helped facilitate more food sustainability on campus. One interviewee, for example, highlighted that now when they go grocery shopping, they “know not to think the produce is bad just because it’s not attractive” (Anonymous). They felt as though reducing food waste, as a key goal of Sprouts, was something they also came to incorporate in all other parts of their lives. Key benefits for volunteers and patrons that were revealed in both the interviews and archival information relating sustainability are:  - Learning about food security issues and how to make good food choices - Zero-waste policy helped them to acknowledge the importance of reducing waste - Promoting plant-based diets to UBC students and staff - Making local and organic food more accessible - Meeting interesting people from diverse background and sharing their passion for food. As mentioned by Pothukuchi and Molnar, urban universities can use their capacity to support sustainability ventures to leverage towards food sustainability (342). With Sprouts running as a community based campus organization, it is clearly contributing to 14 greater sustainability by acting as a model for success for students who participate in any of its initiatives.  Community engagement Not only does Sprouts instill sustainable values, it is a key player in creating community on campus. The literature review conducted in the early stages of the project clearly identified a link between campus community engagement and fostering food sustainability; for example, in a study by Levkoe and Wakefield, food spaces focussing on community engagement were shown to be essential for harbouring healthy, just, and democratic food systems (250). Based on the interviews we conducted, all Sprouts members enjoyed being in a part of this community of like minded people passionate about creating a healthy food system for our campus. That being said, the opening of the new cafe offers a unique opportunity to design a space that shows the same feel of inclusivity. Adding art, colour, and warmth was a clear articulation from interviews, and would allow the new space to reflect the old location with its warm walls and cozy atmosphere as was shown in archived photos.   Recommendations and conclusion Student run initiatives like Sprouts are vital towards the achievement of university sustainability goals. They increase students engagement with their community, promote food literacy and allow for more involvement with the food system.  Through conducting an extensive literature review, analysis of Sprout’s history and archives as well as interviewing Sprouts members, a comprehensive narrative of Sprouts was created that informed the development of a meaningful community art piece. In line with the  project 15 goal of  telling the story of Sprouts’ role in the food system through an engaging and living community art piece that showcases Sprouts’ values and allows for two-way community engagement, the art piece was created collaboratively at the Sprouts Annual General Meeting and after extensive consultation with Sprouts members. An online database (Google Drive)  was also created that will serve as a historical repository of Sprouts history (appendix 5). Analysis of the AMS archives and past documents that were held by the club allowed for the identification of significant dates and events that occured since Sprouts first started in 1997 and a timeline of these events was created. From the interviews it was clear that involvement with Sprouts promotes community engagement, since the members valued the community that they had created with other Sprouts members, and promotes sustainability values both at a personal and community level. All the members interviewed were more involved with  their food system as a result of their involvement with Sprouts.  In order to increase the success of student run initiatives like Sprouts, the following recommendations are proposed.  Recommendations for Future Research  In this SEEDS project, most research was done on archival data and literature review on other community initiatives. Recommended areas of research could include better methods of community engagement such as exploring the use of technological devices to attract and involve more community members. In our project, we considered using an electronic screen that shows a social media users’ message if they hashtag Sprouts on their social media post. We also considered making a community space that allows community members to plant small fruits and vegetables that can be shared with those in need. These are community engagement ideas that came up during our research of other 16 good community projects, but we did not have enough time nor funding to carry out these projects. Perhaps other LFS 450 projects could follow up on community engagement pieces that are more productive.   Future research can also be done on better methods of history keeping, which allows all community members including Sprouts members to review and add to the history of Sprouts in a more physical way other than using Google Drive. By allowing data collection to be something that is accessible by everyone and decentralized, record keeping could become in itself  be a way of promoting community building and transparency between board members and general volunteers, and even regular patrons of the club. Having something as simple as the aforementioned hashtag would create a way for everyone to contribute to documenting their narratives of Sprouts. Research into methods of keeping qualitative data, or designing a space online or in person to deposit photos or stories could be useful for Sprouts moving forward.  Sprouts is a non-profit student-run club that promotes sustainable eating on UBC campus, however not a lot of students know about it and other food places such as seedlings. Therefore, future LFS 450 projects could research on how to engage the greater UBC community to recognize and participate in sustainable food initiatives beyond existing networks. Exploring how to reach out to people who are typically involved in making less sustainable purchasing decisions or lack a sense of purpose or place are an example target group for this kind of study.     17 Recommendations for Action Some more immediate actions that can be taken to improve Sprouts presence on the UBC campus include continued building community, allowing data collection with more accessible folders and bringing more stakeholders on board; to continue community building, dialogue and collaboration are essential to the growth and success of student-run initiatives. Awareness of such initiatives either through formal and informal dialogue as well as collaboration with other student run initiatives and the university will not only increase Sprouts presence on campus but also encourage more support for such initiatives. Furthermore, initiation of community engagement events similar to the art piece creation event will also promote community building and  a sense of community. Important things to note will be to personalize the process as this will contribute towards making the final output more memorable.   It is also recommended that Sprouts data can be collected using accessible folders so that all data collected related to Sprouts can be well organized and stored in folders that are accessible by everyone to promote transparency and allow for easy retrieval of data to inform future decision making and an appreciation of the progress that Sprouts has made since 1997. Categorizing the data into different sections will also make the retrieval process more efficient. In a way, by having community members contribute to the documentation of Sprouts’ story can act as a community building exercise itself.  It is also important to bring more stakeholders on board. The Sustainable Food Access Referendum was a big milestone for student run food outlets on the UBC campus. There was an overwhelming amount of support from UBC students for the referendum in which every student will be contributing an annual fee of $0.30 to support sustainable food 18 initiatives on the UBC campus. Having more stakeholders on board will set Sprouts up for success now and in the future. Also, continued advocacy and lobbying to bring more stakeholders on board beyond just the students will ensure the continued success of student run initiatives like Sprouts. Having the AMS as well as the UBC staff (SEEDs staff) and faculty (Land and Food systems,) support such initiatives is essential for long term continuation when current Sprouts members graduate. Our group’s frequent interaction with the board members of Sprouts specifically the president and store coordinator gave as a unique appreciation of the time commitment and dedication that they put into running the Sprouts organization and managing about 150 student volunteers. Their commitment was very admirable considering that those positions are unpaid. The SEEDs staff should consider partnering with the Work Learn program to create specific paid positions within the Sprouts executive board.   19 Works Cited “About SEEDS”. UBC Sustainability, 2018. www.sustain.ubc.ca/courses-degrees/alternative- credit-options/seeds-sustainability-program/about-seeds. Accessed on Jan.22.2018. Anonymous. Personal Interview. 8 March, 2018. Levkoe, Charles Z., and Sarah Wakefield. "The Community Food Centre: Creating Space for a just, Sustainable, and Healthy Food System." Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 2.1 (2011): 249-68. ProQuest. Web. 25 Jan. 2018. Nasrollahi, Mohammad Ali. "A Closer Look at Using Stringer's Action Research Model in Improving Students’ Learning." (2014). Pothukuchi, Kameshwari, and Molnar, Samuel A. “Sustainable Food Systems at Urban Public Universities: A Survey of U-21 Universities: Sustainable Food Systems at Urban Public Universities." Journal of Urban Affairs, vol. 37, no. 3, 2015, pp. 341-359. Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform. United Nations Dept. of Economic and Social Affairs, 2018, www.sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300. Accessed on Jan.24.2018. UBC 20-Year Sustainability Strategy. 2014. www.sustain.ubc.ca/sites/sustain.ubc.ca/files/uploads/CampusSustainability/CS_PDFs/PlansReports/Plans/20-Year-Sustainability-Strategy-UBC.pdf. “Who we are”. UBC Sprouts, 2018. www.ubcsprouts.ca/whoweare/. Accessed on Jan.22.2018.     20 Appendix 1. Sprouts Archives  Letters of support for the Sprouts storefront in 2004 21  Natural Food Coop Constitution 22  AMS 2015 Club Award  23 Oatmeal event volunteer created poster  24 Appendix 2. AMS Archives Sprouts menu 2007  25  Ubyssey article on the opening of the Sprouts storefront   26 Appendix 3. More detailed timeline of Sprouts’ history 27          28 Appendix 4. Interview script Do you have any questions for us before we begin?  1. What is your relationship with Sprouts? a. What are some reasons that led you to become a part of the Sprouts community? 2. How would you describe Sprouts? 3. How would you describe your experience with Sprouts a. What do you like most about Sprouts b. What do you not like 4. How is Sprouts different now than it was when you first got involved, if it is different? 5. What are the benefits of Sprouts to students and the UBC campus, if any? a. In what ways has your involvement with Sprouts been beneficial to you?        6.  How do you think we can better engage UBC students in the Sprouts initiative?  We are looking to create a community engagement art piece in the new space, where the story of Sprouts will be shared.  1. In the opening of the new location, describe what your ideal vision of the cafe and store setting would be. What would it feel like or look like, and is there anything in particular you would like to see? 2. Is there anything that comes to mind that we should definitely include in the community art piece? 3. Do you think the Sprouts community or the UBC community more broadly would be interested in an event to create or install an art piece for the new location collaboratively? Are there any final comments you would like to share?   29 Appendix 5. Folders for data collection   Screenshot of shared folders and example of categorizing items  Sprouts Community Engagement ProjectHilaryKuoSydneyMacLennanSunnieTangMercyWanaloPresentation outl ine❏ Background/Context ❏ Research goals and objectives ❏ Methods ❏ Key results ❏ Discussion❏ Preliminary recommendations for action and research❏ Conclusion  A framework for  community engagement and sustainable campus food systems...Student- run food outletsTwo- way community engagementUBC campus sustainability and SEEDSTo tell the story of Sprouts’  role in the food system through an engaging and living community art piece that showcases Sprouts’  values and allows for two-way community engagement. Background/context❏ Sprouts is a student-run non-profit organization based at UBC❏ Goal: To make healthy, affordable and sustainably producedfood more accessible to the UBC community.❏ Evolved to many initiatives currently run by 25 board membersand about 150 student volunteers.❏ Create an engaging and welcoming space at Sprouts Maincafe this fallDevelop a meaningful community art piece Inform the development of an online database Contribute to student engagement with the food systemCreate a comprehensive narrative of Sprout’s history from interviews and document analysisSpecific r esearch objectivesCommunity- based action researchAction Research CycleThinkActLookMethodsHistorical dataLiterature review InterviewsResults2013Seedlings opens1997 - 2003UBC Natural Food Coop 2007Reopen as a café and food store2017Sprouts reopens in the Pit2018Sustainable Food ReferendumA br ief histor y of Sprouts storefront opens in the SUB2004-2006“Sprouts is affordable, sustainable, volunteer , student run, and non- profi t food club for  al l  the students on campus.”How would you descr ibe Sprouts? Benefi ts?“ Learning about food secur ity and good food choice after  Sprouts.”“I like that is has taught me how to reduce my food waste.”“Sprouts executive should get more recognition for  being a time consuming position.”“People also don't know us without our  own permanent space.”Improvements? “Ar t piece should be able to change throughout time as the sustainable view can be changed by time.”“Create a timeline with Sprouts history. For  the new generation of the Sprouts to understand where Sprouts is fr om.”What should be included in the community ar t piece?From repurposed wood......to a piece of SproutsRecommendations for  actionContinue community buildingData collection moving forward using folders accessible by everyoneBring more stakeholders on board through initiatives such as the Sustainable Food Access Fund ReferendumCommunity bui ldingDesign things together. Emphasis on dialogue. Col laborativeRecord keeping in a way that is organized and transparent. Make i t personalPersonalize and make memories.AdvocacyLobbying to bring more stakeholders on board.Thank you!Any questions?

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.18861.1-0374154/manifest

Comment

Related Items