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UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System Fu, Yudong (Sony); Jay, Brennan; Jenks, Bradley; Mann, Viraj; Morden, Jason; Poonian, Karm; Tingley, Brian 2018-04-09

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System - Team 9Yudong (Sony) Fu, Brennan Jay, Bradley Jenks, Viraj Mann, Jason Morden, Karm Poonian, Brian Tingley University of British Columbia CIVL 445Themes: Water, Community, Land April 9, 2018 Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, aswell as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.  UBC Emergency Potable Water Supply System – Detailed Design Report TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES  iiExecutive Summary Team 9 & Associates has been retained by the University of British Columbia's Social Ecological Economic Development Studies to create issue for construction drawings and detail specification to perform the construction of a secure water supply system for UBC and the surrounding community. The intent of this document is to provide an overview of the detailed design being undertaken for UBC’s secure water supply – specifically the design of the underground tank and distribution system, an updated Class B ‘Substantive’ cost estimate, detailed construction schedule and a service life and maintenance plan.  This will extend the previous findings and recommendations from the summary report issued by Team 9 on March 2, 2018. This report outlines the design inputs, methods, models, and outputs that have been used by Team 9 in the process of producing a final design. A summary of design recommendations are as follows: (1) Underground Storage Reservoir: Geotechnical Considerations – floating foundation design Structural Design Elements – loading conditions: (a) empty tank condition, (b) standing waves. Envelope – Concrete mix as per ACI standards, waterproofing from Kryton International (2) Distribution System: Pipe Design – 450 mm dia. class 50 ductile iron main with 1.0 m cover, minimum Pump Requirements – 5 vertical in-line centrifugal pumps in parallel  (3) Construction Schedule: Schedule – 30 days for watermain and 147 days for storage tank  (4) Class B ‘Substantive’ Cost Estimate: Life cycle cost – total life cycle cost (capital and O&M) over 50 years is estimated at $7.25 million.    Issue for construction (IFC) drawings, the primary deliverable of this report can be found in Appendix I.   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    iiiTable of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................... II LIST OF FIGURES .................................................................................................................................. IV LIST OF TABLES .................................................................................................................................... IV LIST OF EQUATIONS ............................................................................................................................. V  DISCLAIMER............................................................................................................................................ V  DEFINITIONS AND TERMINOLOGY ................................................................................................ VI 1 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................. 1   METHODOLOGY ........................................................................................................................... 1  SCOPE OF WORK .......................................................................................................................... 2 2 STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS .......................................................................................................... 3 3 PROJECT OVERVIEW .................................................................................................................... 4 2.1 KEY DESIGN COMPONENTS ......................................................................................................... 4 2.2 DESIGN CRITERIA & CONSTRAINTS............................................................................................. 5 2.2.1 Technical Criteria ................................................................................................................... 6 2.2.2 Non-technical Criteria ............................................................................................................ 6 4 BELOW-GRADE STORAGE TANK .............................................................................................. 7  DESIGN CRITERIA ........................................................................................................................ 8  STANDARDS & MODELLING SOFTWARE...................................................................................... 8  TECHNICAL CONSIDERATIONS & DESIGN OUTPUTS ................................................................... 8 4.3.1 Geotechnical ........................................................................................................................... 8 4.3.2 Structural............................................................................................................................... 11 4.3.3 Concrete Mix Design ............................................................................................................. 13 4.3.4 Envelope Design .................................................................................................................... 14 5 DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM ............................................................................................................. 16  DESIGN CRITERIA ...................................................................................................................... 16  STANDARDS & MODELLING SOFTWARE.................................................................................... 17  TECHNICAL CONSIDERATIONS & DESIGN OUTPUTS ................................................................. 18 5.3.1 Pump House .......................................................................................................................... 18 5.3.2 Distribution Main .................................................................................................................. 20 5.3.3 Temporary Distribution System ............................................................................................ 21 6 PUBLIC AWARENESS PROGRAM ............................................................................................ 23 7 SERVICE-LIFE MAINTENANCE PLAN  ................................................................................... 25  STORAGE TANK ......................................................................................................................... 25  DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM .............................................................................................................. 26 8 DETAILED CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE .............................................................................. 27  OVERVIEW OF GANTT CHART ................................................................................................... 27   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    iv ANTICIPATED CONSTRUCTION COMPLICATIONS & RISKS ........................................................ 27 9 CLASS B ‘SUBSTANTIVE’ COST ESTIMATE .......................................................................... 28  LIFECYCLE COST ....................................................................................................................... 28  PROJECT COST JUSTIFICATION .................................................................................................. 29 10 TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE ASSESSMENT .................................................................................... 30  ENVIRONMENTAL ...................................................................................................................... 30  SOCIAL ....................................................................................................................................... 30  ECONOMIC ................................................................................................................................. 31 11 CONCLUSION ................................................................................................................................. 32  12 REFERENCES ................................................................................................................................. 33  APPENDIX I – IFC DRAWINGS PACKAGE ...................................................................................... 34  APPENDIX II – SUPPLEMENTARY PUMP INFORMATION ......................................................... 47 APPENDIX III – PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION GANTT CHART ................................................ 48 APPENDIX IV – CLASS B COST ESTIMATE .................................................................................... 51 APPENDIX V – SAMPLE CALCULATIONS ...................................................................................... 55  List of Figures Figure 3-1: Proposed System Overview ........................................................................................................................ 5 Figure 4-1: Conceptual Underground Tank Plan and Section View ............................................................................. 7 Figure 4-2: Floating Foundation Method ..................................................................................................................... 9 Figure 4-3: Liquefaction Assessment .......................................................................................................................... 10 Figure 4-4: Standing Wave Analysis ........................................................................................................................... 13 Figure 4-5: Slab to Column Interface .......................................................................................................................... 15 Figure 4-6: Exterior Wall Detail ................................................................................................................................. 15 Figure 5-1: Distribution System Alignment ................................................................................................................. 16 Figure 5-2: EPANET Output ....................................................................................................................................... 18 Figure 5-3: System & Pump Curve(s) ......................................................................................................................... 19 Figure 5-4: Temporary Distribution Point Layout ...................................................................................................... 22 Figure 5-5: Conceptual Distribution Point Tap .......................................................................................................... 22 Figure 7-1: Repair Strategy for Crack Repair ............................................................................................................ 25 Figure 7-2: Water Quality Testing Device .................................................................................................................. 26 Figure 9-1: Capital Cost Breakdown .......................................................................................................................... 28 Figure A-1: 6PVF12-1-UL-1/7-P-MA-R Pump Curve (Grundfos, 2018) .................................................................... 47  List of Tables Table 1-1: Team Roles and Responsibilities .................................................................................................................. 2 Table 2-1: Project Stakeholders .................................................................................................................................... 3 Table 4-1: Floating Foundation Design Advantages .................................................................................................... 9 Table 4-2: Loading Parameters ................................................................................................................................... 11 Table 4-3: Rebar Design Schedule .............................................................................................................................. 12 Table 4-4: Structural Design Summary Table ............................................................................................................. 13 Table 4-5: Concrete Mix Design ................................................................................................................................. 14 Table 4-6: Wall Assembly ............................................................................................................................................ 14   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    vTable 5-1: Scenario A Demand Characteristics .......................................................................................................... 17 Table 5-2: Scenario B Demand Characteristics .......................................................................................................... 17 Table 5-3: Pump Energy Expenditure ......................................................................................................................... 20 Table 5-4: Temporary Distribution System Characteristics ........................................................................................ 21 Table 8-1: Construction Complications ...................................................................................................................... 27 Table 9-1: Lifecycle Cost Summary ............................................................................................................................. 29 Table 10-1: Environmental Impact Assessment Pillars ............................................................................................... 30  List of Equations  Equation 9-1: Net Present Value ................................................................................................................................. 29 Equation 9-2: Real Interest Rate ................................................................................................................................. 29  Disclaimer  This document has been prepared by Team 9 & Associates in accordance with generally accepted engineering and geoscientist practices and is intended for the exclusive use and benefit of UBC SEEDS.      UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    viDefinitions and Terminology  Metro Vancouver water supply line (supply line)   The main water pipe connecting UBC’s water distribution system to Metro Vancouver’s. It runs from Sasamat reservoir on West 16th Avenue, to the UBC campus.  Water demand/level of service estimate The estimated amount of water required by UBC and the surrounding community, during and emergency event.  Potable water Water that is safe to drink  Service population and service period The amount of people that are using the emergency water supply and for how long they are using it  Factor of Safety (FOS) An engineering term used to measure additional capacity of a design, to properly address safety concerns  Distribution point/station A predetermined location where users can go to access potable water during and emergency  Net present value   The value of something in today’s money, in contrast to it’s future value BEP Best efficiency point Pump Working Point As per system curve diagram – working point refers to the pump head (TDH) and flow rate (Q) TDH Total dynamic head O&M Operations and maintenance DI Ductile iron NBCC National Building Code of Canada     UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES  11 Introduction In the event of an emergency or a system malfunction - there is the potential for Metro Vancouver’s water supply line to UBC to fail, leaving roughly 68,000 students, faculty, staff and residents on campus without potable water. The University of British Columbia Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (UBC SEEDS) wishes to address the need for infrastructure resiliency on campus and design an emergency system that provides access to potable water during such an event.   Previously, Team 9 completed the preliminary design of the secure water supply system – which resulted in: (1) a water demand estimate for the campus and surrounding area (in an emergency event) of approximately 13,700 m3; (2) calculation of existing storage capacity at UBC’s Aquatic Centre; (3) a below-grade storage tank under the existing Rashpal Dhillon track and field oval – in addition to a distribution system to fulfill the estimated water demand; and (4) a building integrated water tower located at the Marine Drive residence. The remainder of this report provides detailed design deliverables to carry-forth with construction of the recommended system, as well as provide details on the operations and maintenance over its lifecycle.  Methodology Team 9 & Associates’ previously completed the preliminary design of UBC’s secure water supply system project. Team 9 has taken the preliminary design and produced detail drawings and technical specifications issued for construction. This was done by combing technical expertise, design standards and guidelines, and engineering modelling/calculations. The roles and responsibilities of Team 9 personnel to deliver these detailed design outputs for the final report submission are shown below in Table 1-1.      UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    2Table 1-1: Team Roles and Responsibilities TEAM MEMBER PROJECT ROLE SECTIONS COMPLETED Bradley Jenks - EIT  Water Resources Engineer Pump energy, distribution system hydraulics, cost estimate Brennan Jay - EIT Project Manager/Design Team Lead Storage Tank: geotechnical considerations, CAD drawings, scheduling, construction methods Brian Tingley - EIT Materials Engineer (Concrete Specialist) and Estimator Storage Tank: building envelope, CAD drawings, cost estimate Jason Morden - EIT Graphics Design Engineer/Water Sustainability Liaison Storage Tank: structural design, CAD drawings and public awareness considerations Karm Poonian - EIT Land Development Engineer/Business Lead Distribution: network characteristics and civil drawings Sony (Yudong) Fu - EIT Structural Engineer Storage Tank: structural design calculations and CAD drawings Viraj Mann - EIT Mechanical Systems Engineer and Scheduler Distribution: pump house detailing and civil drawings   Scope of Work The extents of the project are delineated by two main sections: (1) storage tank design, and (2) the distribution system – in addition to a combined cost estimate and construction schedule. Storage Tank Scope:  Site description – previous usage  Geotechnical assessment and design  Detailed design drawings (dimensions, plan view, section view  Structural loading conditions and design (reinforced concrete walls, footings and foundation)  Building envelope (waterproofing/sealant) Distribution System Scope:  Computer modelling of system demands  Design of a pump configuration to fulfill demand  Pipe system design for both connection to existing system and temporary lines  Pump house design It is to be noted that this report strictly conveys the inputs and outputs of the detailed design for UBC’s secure and resilient water supply system (as per list above).    UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    32 Stakeholder Analysis The emergency water supply and distribution system for the UBC campus will have considerable impact on the surrounding areas and the various stakeholders – identified in Table 2-1. A measure of success on any project considers the satisfaction of all its stakeholders. Consequently, an effective stakeholder engagement strategy must be employed during the detailed design phase. A successful stakeholder engagement strategy begins with building an early relationship with the members involved. Therefore, Team 9 will first inform the stakeholders about changes to their neighborhood that may affect them before, during and after the construction of the new system, and give them an opportunity to influence these decisions. To ensure these criteria are met, a community liaison officer (CLO) will be appointed, which will act as a communication channel from stakeholders to management, and vice versa. The CLO duties will include implementing stakeholder engagement strategies, policies and procedures and ensuring that stakeholder interests and expectations are analyzed and maintained throughout the delivery of the project. The CLO will also look after tracking and monitoring progress and outcomes of stakeholder engagement activities. For this project, Dr. Yahya Nazhat will be appointed as CLO. Table 2-1: Project Stakeholders  Local Shops/Business – Water user  Students/Faculty/Residents – Water user  First Nations – Water user, environmental protectors  Funder/Donors – Financiers  Metro Vancouver – Water suppliers  UBC Building Operation – O&M  UBC Properties Trust – Land usage   UBC Board of Governors     UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    43 Project Overview Team 9 & Associates’ developed a preliminary report to address the issue of securing potable water access on campus during an emergency event – such as an earthquake. Two main objectives communicated with UBC SEEDS in the design of a resilient supply system are: 1. Access to clean potable water during an emergency event at the University of British Columbia 2. Develop a feasible way of water storage and distribution on campus  2.1 Key Design Components Team 9 and Associates proposes a below-grade concrete tank - storing 8,800 m3 of potable water. Which, alongside the UBC Aquatic Center, will satisfy the requirement for potable water storage of approximately 13,700 m3 determined in the preliminary report. Specifically, two different components were used to address the total required storage volume: Design 1 – Below-grade storage tank ~ 8,800 m3 Design 2 – UBC Aquatic Centre swimming pool water supply ~ 4,900 m3  The location of the storage tank and pump house will be below the athletics track at Thunderbird Park, in conjunction with the UBC Aquatic Centre located in the north section of campus (Figure 3-1). Please note that Team 9 did not move forward with the building integrated water tower (BIWT) – as proposed in the preliminary report. This was previously agreed upon with UBC SEEDS due to its insignificant increase in storage volume, yet substantial increase in cost.   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    5  Figure 3-1: Proposed System Overview Regarding the distribution of water to users in an emergency event, the proposed system will consist of: 1. Pump house capable of lifting water to locations indicated in Figure 3-1, 2. 450mm ductile iron (DI) main connecting to UBC’s existing system (Scenario A), 3. Temporary distribution conduit used in Scenario B and C to distribution points 2.2 Design Criteria & Constraints Due to the nature of the project, design constraints were combined with design criteria to create a framework of goals for the preliminary and detailed design. Both technical and non-technical aspects are discussed below.   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    62.2.1 Technical Criteria (1) Resiliency – Given that the system designed must remain functional during an emergency, a resilient design is an imperative. (2) Environmental Responsibility – Mitigation of impact to the environment is considered throughout the entire life of the system, from construction to decommissioning. (3) Constructability and Permitting - The design requires conformance to all applicable standards and codes to ensure a smooth permitting process. Furthermore, the design needs to be considerate of common construction practices as well as the impact to the surrounding community. 2.2.2 Non-technical Criteria (1) Life-cycle Cost – Economics must be considered at every stage of the systems life. By considering this in the design process, UBC SEEDS can avoid unforeseen future costs. (2) Aesthetics – Creating an aesthetically pleasing design for all users and stakeholders. (3) Public Awareness – Ensuring all users of potable water at UBC are aware of the three (3) demand scenarios, the water restrictions that encompass them, and where to access their allotted quantity.   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    74 Below-grade Storage Tank The primary design element pertaining to storage is the below-grade water storage tank located at Thunderbird Park. The tank is responsible for the storage of 8,800 m3 of potable water, must have a resilient and durable design, and must be able to facilitate operation and maintenance over its lifespan. The preliminary plan and section drawings for the tank are shown in Figure 4-1. The large mass concrete storage tank provided unique design challenges including standing wave analysis and constructability. Team 9’s multi-disciplinary design team has produced a comprehensive design solution to meet the design criteria in an efficient and effective manner.  Figure 4-1: Conceptual Underground Tank Plan and Section View    UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    8 Design Criteria The underground tank’s primary design criteria include the following:  Have the capacity to hold the estimated amount of potable water.  Require a feasible amount of operation and maintenance demand over its stated 50-year design life.  Hold paramount a resilient design to ensure UBC has a secure source of water supply after an emergency event.  Uphold the highest quality of water standards to provide to student, faculty, staff and the surrounding communities.  The three principal design aspects are geotechnical, structural, and building envelope. Design strategies, procedures, checks and outputs are described in the following sections.  Standards & Modelling Software Notable design standards referenced for the tank design include:  UBC Building & Excavation Permit  NBCC – Section 9  Canadian Standards Association (CSA)  American Concrete Institute (ACI) Figures displayed in this section of the report and IFC drawings in Appendix I were prepared using Civil 3D and Bluebeam software.  Technical Considerations & Design Outputs 4.3.1 Geotechnical To achieve cost and time savings, Team 9 undertook a floating foundation design, which would require minimal site investigation. The floating foundation design was carried out in accordance with the CIVL 410 design guidelines (Nazhat, 2017). The floating foundation design is ideal for a number of reasons, shown below in Table 4-1.     UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    9Table 4-1: Floating Foundation Design Advantages Floating Foundation Design Advantages 1. While minor testing is recommended to confirm the level of the water table, a full-scale investigation is not required, 2. The assumed dense sand soil conditions will experience minor swelling, 3. The below grade tank will have exceptionally uniform structural loading, so foundation tilting is not expected to be a concern, 4. The shallow depth of excavation minimizes the chance of bottom heave or foundation wall collapse. The inputs to this design method include the foundation depth below grade of 4.65m, the soil density, and undrained shear strength. The design checks were carried out using an assumed soil density from the Piteau Report (provided by UBC), in conjunction with appropriate assumptions made by Team 9.  Design Procedure The basis of the design is that the weight of the soil material removed from the site is approximately equal to the weight of the new structure and its loadings once constructed. An overview of the design procedure is shown below (Figure 4-2), in addition to detailed sample calculations in Appendix V.  Figure 4-2: Floating Foundation Method Displaced Soil Weight = Weight of New Tank  Ws = Wt + Ww + Wc   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    10 Ws – Weight of Displaced Soil  Wt – Weight of Topsoil and Landscaping  Ww – Weight of Water  Wc – Weight of Concrete The percentage difference in the material weights is approximately 9% - which is within the acceptable range. Liquefaction As resiliency in the event of a disaster such as an earthquake is a key aspect of the below-grade tank design, a liquefaction assessment was carried out. A maximum ground acceleration of 4.0g and a magnitude 7 earthquake was used for the assessment. The results of the assessment are displayed in Figure 4-3 below. The factor of safety method was used.  Figure 4-3: Liquefaction Assessment As seen in the above figure, the factor of safety for liquefaction exceeded 1 for the depth of 15m below the bottom of the below grade tank. This is shown by the green region of the chart being above the red region of the chart. These results can be expected due to the dense nature of the sand, and the drained conditions assumed. 0 2 4 6 8 100.051.73.3556.658.39.9511.613.2514.9FOSDepth (m)Liquefaction Factor of Safety (FOS) - 3m Deep TankFOSFOS=1  UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    114.3.2 Structural The tank walls are designed to be foundation walls to support the vertical loadings from a one-story building with vertical and horizontal reinforcement placed based on the loading listed below: Table 4-2: Loading Parameters Live Load Dead Load Load from Soil Layer Above 200 kg/m2 360 kg/m2 15kPa  The overall dimensions were selected to satisfy the required loading conditions. The structural elements were designed as follows (see Appendix V for details).   Foundation Walls – determined in accordance to NBCC Table 9.15.4.2 and CSA 23.3 design criteria  The walls are subject to lateral forces from the surrounding soil and from stored water and ground water with design considerations of corrosion and seepage effects,  Two loading conditions are considered: the tank being empty as well as additional loading from standing waves caused by oscillation and ground movement from earthquakes,  Figure 4-2: Foundation Wall Loadings T-shaped Footings:  400mm joists spacing was used for top slab with a 3000mm span. Joists spans transfer loads to the footings and additional rebar cages and bending rebar were installed at the connections in accordance to CSA 23.3 Standard Structural Design Guidelines,   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    12 Footing widths and areas were decided based on the loads from the joists and the wall thickness, refer to NBCC section 9.17.6. Solid Concrete Columns, Interior Columns:  Interior columns are spaced at 3000mm on center in both directions within the tank to support the top slab and provide stability for the tank structure,  Slenderness checks were performed along with the consideration of lateral impact forces due to standing oscillations, see Appendix V: column slenderness check sample calculations, Interior Separation Wall:  One Interior Wall was designed to divide the tank in to two compartments for service and redundancy purposes, please refer to 3.3.4 Envelope Design.  The wall has the same structural design and specifications. However, it has double sided water impermeable layers to prevent seepage and potential corruption issues. Table 4-3: Rebar Design Schedule  Size Strength Reinforcing Corner Columns 300*300mm 40MPa 4-15M vertical with 10M at 300 Ties Foundation Walls 300*300mm 40MPa 1-15M Vertical with 10M at 400 Ties Interior Columns 250*250mm 35MPa 4-15M Vertical with 10M at 300 Ties Interior Walls 300*300mm 40MPa 4-15M vertical with 10M at 300 Ties  Additionally, in the event of an earthquake, standing waves could be produced inside the basin, which can affect the structural equilibrium of the tank. Through the application of standing wave theory, it was concluded there would be a maximum additional pressure of 15 kPa exerted at the base of the foundation wall, while the water surface would exert a maximum negative pressure of 12 kPa - Figure 4-4.     UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    13  Figure 4-4: Standing Wave Analysis below summarizes the storage tank design outputs explained above. Table 4-4 below summarizes the storage tank design outputs explained above. Table 4-4: Structural Design Summary Table Structural Components Designed Dimensions Footing Width and Area 1150 × 1150𝑚𝑚 Foundation Wall Thickness 300𝑚𝑚 Interior Column Size 250× 250𝑚𝑚 Interior Column Spacing 3000𝑚𝑚 Bottom Slab Thickness 250𝑚𝑚 4.3.3 Concrete Mix Design Concrete Mix design was developed through ACI Manual of Concrete Practice 2000, Part 1: Materials and General Properties of Concrete as well as CSA A23.1 Tables 1 through 17. Necessary properties of design are governed by structural design and exposure classes: 15MPa compressive strength and exposure to freeze/thaw conditions. The code specifies the following mix design for the design parameters:   00.511.522.53-15 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 20Water Depth (m)Pressure on Face of Wall (kPa)Pressure Distribution due to Earthquake-Induced Standing Waves  UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    14Table 4-5: Concrete Mix Design Concrete Mix Design Material Content (kg/m3) Water 193 Cement 482.5 Coarse Aggregate 933 Fine Aggregate 636 The specified mix design yields a compressive strength of 40 MPa, with an air content of 5%. Admixtures and other supplementary cementitious materials such as superplasticizer and fly ash can be used, but proportions of base mix design must be reconsidered. Self-sealing admixture, Kryton’s Krystol Internal Membrane (KIM) will be dosed at 2% by weight of cement because of waterproofing considerations.  4.3.4 Envelope Design The envelope design of the storage tank puts importance on a durable design with a water-tight seal. Considerations in design include but are not limited to: water intrusion/retention, water quality, and drainage. The triple-protection design at cold joints as well as double-protection from cracks along the wall surface are highlighted in  Table 4-6.  Table 4-6: Wall Assembly         Wall Assembly Layer Specification Thickness (mm) Exterior Drain-Rock ¾” aggregate size used around perforated pipes Approximately 300mm Filter Fabric and Drain-Mat SopraDrain 10-G 10mm Discrete Waterproofing Membrane Soprema Colphene Flam 180 3mm Specialized Integral Concrete Concrete base-mix batched with Kryton 𝐾𝐼𝑀்ெ(PRAH-rated) 300mm Waterstop Cementitious Slurry 𝐾𝑟𝑦𝑠𝑡𝑜𝑙 𝑊𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑟𝑠𝑡𝑜𝑝 𝑇𝑟𝑒𝑎𝑡𝑚𝑒𝑛𝑡்ெ using internal swelling method of application Along surface of cold joints Swelling Waterstop 𝐾𝑟𝑦𝑡𝑜𝑛𝑖𝑡𝑒்ெ  with resistance greater than 0.8 MPa of hydrostatic head N/A The prescribed design is able to withstand up to 0.8 MPa of hydrostatic head from interior of the tank, and any cracks that will form will be sealed through Kryton technology. This will minimize maintenance costs and limit the disruption of Thunderbird Field located above. Figure 4-5 and Figure 4-6 below illustrates the typical waterproofing measures located at the slab to column interface.   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    15 Figure 4-5: Slab to Column Interface   Figure 4-6: Exterior Wall Detail Application of the building envelope will be monitored by waterproofing professionals to ensure the successful application of the waterproof membrane, along with all Kryton products throughout the structure. Applicators will follow application instructions given by membrane distributors and the Kryton’s Application Instructions. Application instructions for all components of the building envelope can be found in the specification sheets on the provided IFC drawings (Appendix I).      UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    165 Distribution System The preliminary report generated by Team 9 (CIVL 445) outlined three scenarios (A, B, & C) for water demand during an emergency event at the University of British Columbia. Each scenario represented a different event, with “A” being the least severe, to “C” having the most significant impacts on potable water supply and access. Subsequently, an EPANET static hydraulic model was generated to provide demand estimates and correctly size the distribution network to meet design standards. Two demand scenarios (A and B) governed to address distribution constraints for the proposed system. The proposed distribution system alignment is displayed in (Figure 5-1) – an excerpt of the detailed design drawings.  Figure 5-1: Distribution System Alignment  Design Criteria Design criteria to be met by the distribution system is detailed in two separate components – pump requirements and distribution design. The pumping demand for Scenario A and B – the governing design cases – is detailed below: Scenario A: The main operating constraint is to deliver approximately 6.0 m of net positive suction head (NPSH) to UBC’s existing pump house, through means of a proposed tie-in 450mm dia. line (Table 5-1).    UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    17Table 5-1: Scenario A Demand Characteristics Flow (L/s) Pipe Material Pipe Diameter (mm) Pipe Length (m) Unit Headloss (m/km) UBC Pump House NPSH (m) 240 Ductile Iron 450 980 22 6 Scenario B: This situation represents conditions where the existing distribution system is down, thus temporary lines and faucet stations are prepared to convey potable water to meet the stated demands (Table 5-2). Table 5-2: Scenario B Demand Characteristics Distribution Point Flow (L/s) Pipe Material Diameter (mm) Length (m) Unit Headloss (m/km) Distribution Pressure (PSI) A 5.79 Rubber conduit 150 1130 1.56 25 B 2.90 75 260 12.70 31  The anticipated design life of the pump configuration – as per industry standards – is approximately twenty (20) years. The distribution system design must meet the standards discussed next in Section 4.2. UBC utilities specifications are held paramount to design outputs communicated through the IFC drawings in Appendix I. The distribution system will be designed for an anticipated lifetime of 50-years – which is consistent with the tank structure and typical estimates within industry. The main design criteria for the design of the distribution system are listed below:  Ability to convey demand stated in Table 5-1 and Table 5-2 while meeting pressure standards depicted in the City of Surrey Design guidelines (2016)  Ability to withstand earthquake forces and act as an independent system from UBC’s existing network  Standards & Modelling Software As previously noted – EPANET was utilized to generate pump requirements and pipe sizing for the proposed system. Additionally, AutoCAD Civil 3D was used to produce the IFC drawings found in Appendix I.   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    18 Figure 5-2: EPANET Output Design standards referenced for the distribution system include:  UBC Building & Excavation Permit  UBC Technical Guidelines – Section 33 Water Utilities  Master Municipal Construction Documents (MMCD)  American Water Works Association (AWWA)  Technical Considerations & Design Outputs 5.3.1 Pump House Typical water distribution utilities in the lower mainland require that maximum and minimum system pressures be met (20 psi and 150 psi, respectively), in addition to maximum velocities – thus, pumping head is required to fulfill the established demand stated in Section 5.1. Figure 5-3 below depicts the pump and system curves for the range of operating conditions discussed.   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    19 Figure 5-3: System & Pump Curve(s) The pump chosen is a Vertical In-Line Centrifugal Pump (6PVF12-1-UL-1/7-P-MA-R) with a 60 Hz, 30 HP motor and 10-inch impeller. The specifications were obtained from the Grundfos database (grundfos.com, 2018). Pump affinity laws were utilized to configure the pumps to meet the working points from the system curves, as well as near proximity to the best efficiency point (BEP). The pump house will have five (5) pumps in parallel (with an additional pump for redundancy purposes). Scenario A will utilize 4 pumps in parallel and Scenario B and C will utilize 1 pump with a variable frequency drive (VFD). Please see IFC design drawings of the proposed pump house in Appendix I and supplementary pump information in Appendix II. Furthermore, energy utilization of the pumps is displayed in  Table 5-3 for each emergency scenario developed. However, these values do not include routine pump maintenance of the system, which will be delved into in Section 7.2. 01020304050600 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400TDH (m)Flow (L/s)Scenario A System Curve 1 pump (6PVF12 -1-UL-1/7-P-MA-R)4 pump parallel (6PVF12 -1-UL-1/7-P-MA-R) Scenario B/C System Curve1 pump (75% impeller speed)Scenario A Working Point:H ~ 24 mQ ~ 240 L/sScenario B (temp.) Working Point:H ~ 19 mQ ~ 9 L/s  UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    20Table 5-3: Pump Energy Expenditure Demand Scenario Pump Working Point Pump Impeller Speed Pump Efficiency Pump Energy Consumption (kW) Duration (hrs.) Total Power Cost H (m) Q (L/s) A ~24 ~240 100 % 73.2 % 80 24 $ 288 B/C ~19 ~9 75 % 45.0 % 3.6 168 $ 92 C ~19 ~9 75 % 45.0 % 3.6 504 $ 275 Assumptions in the calculation of energy requirements include: an electricity price of $0.15 per kWh from BC Hydro’s website, and a flat loading pattern with no significant peaks. 5.3.2 Distribution Main Based on the EPANET outputs of Scenario A, Team 9 designed a 450mm ductile iron pipe for 980 lineal meters, which connects the proposed water tank to the existing 600mm watermain (see previous XX). The list below outlines the major design considerations; which follow all codes and bylaws stated in Section 5.2, notably MMCD, AWWA and UBC Utilities – Section 33:  Pipe material - Pipe shall be Class 50 ductile iron pipe manufactured to AWWA C151  Depth of watermain - Minimum cover over any water main pipe shall be 1.0m to the finished grade.  Max/min slope - Min slope shall be 0.1%. When slope exceeds 10%, the pipe must be anchored   Thrust block - Place concrete thrust blocks between valves, tees, wyes, bends and undisturbed soil  Separation from existing utilities - min 3 m horizontal clearance required from sewer piping.   Valve placement - Maximum distance between isolating distribution valves to be 100 m.  Joints - Shall be restrained and have a single rubber gasket for push-on bell and spigot type joints. In addition, all joints should be restrained with concrete reinforcement  Backfill/compaction/bedding - For trench backfill native backfill material may be used.   Cleaning/flushing & disinfection- Perform disinfection procedure and chlorine test and flush pipe.  Min pressure - Minimum design pressure for piping must be greater than 20 psi In addition to typical water utility design standards, all pipe joints shall be restrained with concrete joints to prevent the separation of the pipe and fittings caused by the thrust forces and earthquake loading. The purpose of using concrete restrained joints was to increase the resiliency of the pipe network. Further   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    21details and calculations can be seen on the design drawing package. Furthermore, please see Appendix I for the complete package of IFC design drawings, in which a plan-profile drawing summarizes the proposed distribution system.  5.3.3 Temporary Distribution System Based on EPANET outputs, the temporary distribution lines connecting the tank to distribution point A and B is displayed in Figure 5-4: Temporary Distribution Point Layout. Table 5-4: Temporary Distribution System Characteristics below details the system characteristics. Table 5-4: Temporary Distribution System Characteristics Distribution Point Conduit Length (m) Pipe O.D. (mm) A 1130 150 B 260 75 Rubber pipes are suggested because of the materials convenience to be easily stored, and because of its ability to be easily bent around buildings when routing.  Assuming that during scenario B and C, 25% of the population will be dependent on pool water, the temporary distribution pipes have been designed to service 75% of the expected population. It is expected that during scenario B and C the per capita demands will be much lower as water will primarily be used for drinking and sanitation purposes only, therefore no peaking factor was used.    UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    22 Figure 5-4: Temporary Distribution Point Layout  Figure 5-5: Conceptual Distribution Point Tap        UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    236 Public Awareness Program With the construction of this new water storage and distribution system, it is important to educate the public about its purpose and how it will best be used. This may be done by distributing information pamphlets in the residence buildings as well as a few other high traffic UBC buildings, such as the Nest. These pamphlets would educate people on how the emergency system works, and what to do in the case of an emergency. Additionally, the pamphlets provide tips on how to conserve water, which could potentially lower water demand, making the system more conservative. Upon completion of the project, it would also be advisable to have a mass email sent to all UBC students. This email would provide people with a brief overview of the system and let them know where to find more information. Ultimately, all people who would be using the system should be educated on a specific list of things to do in the case of an emergency. This list is as follows: 1. Stay calm. Emergencies like this have been prepared for. 2. Reduce water consumption. This can be done by not showering every day, not flushing the toilet frequently, not letting the tap run extra water when washing dishes and not doing laundry for the specified period. 3. If water is not available in your building, you will have to go to the nearest distribution station to receive your emergency ration. Please consult the map to see which station is the closest. When you arrive there, staff will be giving directions. Follow their directions and do not panic. Upon receiving your water ration, vacate the distribution station area in order to avoid overcrowding. In addition to education, it is also important to actively manage people when the emergency water system is in use. Steps need to be taken to ensure that users behave in a calm and orderly manner when collecting their ration of emergency water. This factor is most applicable to a large scale natural disaster, where there would likely be a higher sense of panic among users on the UBC campus. All water distribution stations should have staff directing people in their collection of water rations. This staff should be equipped with megaphones to give people directions/explanations, and to reassure people that there is   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    24enough water for everyone. To avoid users overcrowding the distribution stations, it is advised to have a temporary fence erected around each distribution station. People would line up and only a set number would be allowed inside the fence at one time. This would ensure fast and orderly distribution of the water.    UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    257 Service-life Maintenance Plan  The service-life maintenance plan for the proposed secure water supply system consists of a detailed description of the lifecycle servicing required (subsequent sections), in addition to a lifecycle cost.  Storage Tank Maintenance of the storage tank can include the following: concrete crack repair/structural repair, re-passivation of corroded rebar, and repair of seals and penetrations. The process of any type of repair must start with access to the inside of the tank. With a partition wall located in the center of the tank, perpendicular to the longest dimension, maintenance is possible. Once the valve is closed in the partition wall, one side is able to be repaired. Measures against major maintenance have been taken, such as seal-sealing cementitious products, cold joint protection, and exterior membranes with drain mats (warranties will be provided from distributors for up to 20 years); however, in the case of needing maintenance, Team 9 has set-up a detailed maintenance plan to use.  Crack repair of concrete walls and slabs are highlighted in Figure . Generally, the crack will be chiseled and filled with a repair mortar with high bond strength properties as well as fiber reinforcement. Applicators can check if the repair is satisfactory when there is no water present 48 hours after application. Wall penetrations from service pipes routing to the pump station can be repaired in a similar manner if visible leaks are present. In the case of major repair from a structurally-catastrophic event, Team 9 advises to contact a registered structural engineer to assess and provide a strategy for repair.  Figure 7-1: Repair Strategy for Crack Repair   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    26  Distribution System Maintenance over the service-life of the distribution system includes: 1. Semi-annual pump inspection of each pump in the five (5) parallel configuration detailed (each respective pump taken offline one at a time) – as per manufacturers website 2. Semi-annual system turnover – replace stagnant water with fresh water from Sasamat reservoir, and test distribution valves and components Furthermore, maintaining an adequate chlorine residual will be the primary disinfectant to prevent microbial growth in the tank. Chlorine levels in the tank and distribution system will be assessed on a weekly basis using a water quality testing device – as displayed in Figure 7-2 (dHgate.com, n.d.).  Moreover, a monthly flush-out routine will consist of recycling the storage volume into the existing system – through the operation of the tie-in valve connecting to the 600-mm supply line. The retention time of the tank (time to recycle the water) is approximately 15 hours. Unless specified by the owner – UBC SEEDS – no maintenance of the 450mm ductile iron distribution pipe itself is required.  Figure 7-2: Water Quality Testing Device   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    278 Detailed Construction Schedule  Overview of Gantt Chart The construction is broken down into two parts. First is the construction of the tank which is anticipated to last form May 1, 2018 to November 21, 2018 and governs the overall schedule, and second is the construction of the water main which happens in parallel and lasts from May,1 2018 to June 12, 2018. For a detailed breakdown of the schedule please refer to Appendix III (Gantt Chart).  Anticipated Construction Complications & Risks Considering the construction of new a major infrastructure system at UBC demands some foresight of potential issues that could be encountered during construction. The principal issue will be maintaining the utility of the rest of the sports fields, as well as minimizing the impact to the surrounding traffic and community. The table below summarizes potential construction difficulties and possible approaches to address them. Table 8-1: Construction Complications Potential Construction Difficulties Complications Presented Proposed Solution 1. Storage of excavated soil/backfill Space constraints Arrange for coordination with a site that needs preload material, excavated soil can be transported immediately off site 2. Groundwater and surface water Upward pressures on tank foundation Construction a sump pump in the excavation the facilitate dewatering during construction 3. Routing of traffic during water main installation Road shutdowns and delays Complete comprehensive traffic management plan – contact Team 9 for further details 4. Proximity to sports field users, particularly children, during tank construction Safety issues involving open excavations, heavy machinery, and dangerous materials Pay special attention to site security, signage, and safety fences 5. Construction Noise Close proximity to in use sports field presents safety issues and disruptions Coordinate noise intensive activities with schedule of adjacent sports field, alternatively perform tests to ensure construction noise will not be harmful or disruptive   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    289 Class B ‘Substantive’ Cost Estimate  Lifecycle Cost A Class B (substantive) cost estimate was developed for the project. The total lifecycle cost, detailed below is approximately $7.25 million (CAD) – in 2018 dollars, adjusted for future interest and inflation. The capital cost, including design fees, permitting, environmental aspects, management and construction is estimated to be approximately $3,190,000. It is to be noted that all line items are inclusive of material, labour and equipment. Figure 9-1 depicts the anticipated breakdown of capital cost for the project.  Figure 9-1: Capital Cost Breakdown Furthermore, the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs over the assumed 50-year service lifespan include maintenance, pump replacement/rehabilitation, chlorine testing and water turnover in the system. Therefore, the present value of operating costs, using a real rate of interest of -1.0% (interest accounting for inflation), and a lifetime of 50-years, equals approximately $3,720,000. This was done using the net present value (NPV) analysis tool (Equation 9-1), utilizing lifecycle time (t), yearly cashflow (C), and a real interest rate (r). The real interest rate was calculated with the following parameters: nominal interest rate (n) = 1.0%, and inflation (i) = 2.0% - detailed in Equation 9-2: 4%2%6%8%81%Capital Cost BreakdownProject ManagementPermitting/PlanningDesign FeesEnvironmentConstruction (inclusive oflabour, materials, andequipment)  UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    29Equation 9-1: Net Present Value 𝑁𝑃𝑉 = 𝐶(1 − (1 + 𝑟)ି௧)𝑟 Equation 9-2: Real Interest Rate 𝑛 =  ൫(1 + 𝑟) ∗ (1 + 𝑖)൯ − 1 Table 9-1 summarizes (to the nearest $10,000) the complete Class B cost estimate found in Appendix IV. Table 9-1: Lifecycle Cost Summary Real rate of interest (i) ~ -1.0%, Lifecycle (n) = 50 years Cost Item Contingency Yearly Cash Flow (Annuity) Present Value (PV) over 50-year lifecycle Capital Costs: Design and Project Management 20% N/A $290,000 Environmental Considerations 30% N/A $260,000 Permitting & Planning 20% N/A $60,000 Construction     Site Preparation & Mobilization 10% N/A $110,000     Storage Tank 10% N/A $1,360,000     Pump House 10% N/A $100,000     Distribution System 10% N/A $820,000 Sub Total: $3,190,000 Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Costs: Storage Tank Inspection & Water Quality Testing 20% $32,000 $2,120,000 Distribution System Maintenance and Pump Replacement 20% $25,000 $1,600,000 Sub Total: $3,720,000 GST (5%) $350,000 Total Lifecycle Projected Cost: $7,250,000 N/A = not applicable  Project Cost Justification Based on UBC’s 2017/2018 operations budget (vpfo.ubc.ca, 2017), approximately 121 million is allocated to capital spending. Assuming 10% goes towards utilities, and approximately 4% will be spent on the proposed tank and distribution system, the total budget per year amounts to $484,000. A simple payback period using the yearly budget for the project is 15 years. The additional social and environmental benefits UBC receives from the project also plays a major role to justify the design. The tank and distribution system will restore resiliency to UBC’s critical infrastructure for the foreseeable future.      UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    3010 Triple Bottom Line Assessment Team 9 and Associates has employed the triple bottom line assessment to ensure UBC SEEDS meets the environmental, social, and economic goals of the project. Addressing and evaluating the triple bottom line will be a valuable metric for the overall success of the project over its lifecycle.   Environmental During the construction of the emergency water supply system, the use of LEED certified, sustainable materials presents an opportunity to minimize the overall carbon footprint and environmental impact of the project. In addition, Team 9 has sought after local construction materials for the design and respective cost estimate. In addition, a high level Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) was established by Team 9. The five pillars of an EIA, and how they may affect the project are listed below in Table 10-1. Table 10-1: Environmental Impact Assessment Pillars EIA Pillar Project-Specific Considerations Health - Uncovering of hazardous soils during excavation - Potential of soil contamination during construction process Heritage - Possibility of uncovering sensitive artifacts belonging to First Nations Environmental - Greenhouse gases (GHG) emitted during construction Social - Disruption of major routes leading to UBC and campus recreation facilities for an extended period - Noise pollution from construction  Economic - Cost of project burdened on stakeholders (UBC, Vancouver)   Social  By implementing this design, UBC will become a leader in sustainable infrastructure innovations. Other universities and institutions, as well as surrounding communities throughout Metro Vancouver, will view UBC as a model for their own sustainable emergency infrastructure.    UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    31On a local scale, the community will have the peace of mind associated with the outstanding improvement to the resiliency of UBC’s water distribution system. Concurrent with the design and construction of the system, there is an opportunity to raise awareness regarding responsible water use in the surrounding community.   Economic The environmental and social benefits of the recommended secure potable water supply system design features strong synergy with both long and short term economic considerations. In the short term, the below-grade tank leaves on grade land free for further use and expansion. In the long term, major or minor emergency events can incur significant costs, both direct and indirect (fires, hospital failures, etc.). With the addition of a resilient emergency water supply, some of these costs are mitigated or eliminated completely.    UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    3211 Conclusion Team 9 & Associates’ has completed the detail design of a secure emergency water supply system for the University of British Columbia. The results of the detail design were (1) design of the underground tank and distribution system, (2) an updated Class B ‘Substantive’ cost estimate, (3) detail construction schedule and (4) service life and maintenance plan. The overall objective of the project put forth by UBC SEEDS was to design a resilient emergency water supply system to provide UBC a secure source of water in the event the connection to Metro Vancouver is severed. In summary, the detail design outputs outlined in this report are the following: 1) Below Grade Storage Tank – dimensions of 50x70x2.5m giving 8800m3 of storage volume, floating foundation design, T shaped footing, 250x250mm interior columns 3m O.C., 300mm interior separation wall, concrete to ACI standards and waterproofing as per Kryton Krystol.  2) Distribution system – 450mm Class 50 ductile iron water main, 5 vertical in-line centrifugal pumps in parallel, concrete thrust block, all joint restrained with concrete reinforcement, 6x10x2.5m concrete below grade pump house, temporary distribution for scenario B & C via temporary pipes and trucking 3) Construction scheduling - start date of May 1, 2018 and project completion for Nov 21, 2018. 30 days to complete water main installation and 147 days to complete storage tank 4) Class B Cost Estimate - The capital costs to construct and commission the secure water supply system is approximately $3.19 million (CAD). 50-year lifecycle O&M costs for the recommended design is nearly $3.72 million (CAD). Total lifecycle cost will be $7.25 million (CAD).   After review and consideration of Team 9's detail design report by UBC SEEDS, it is expected that the project will move into the construction phase.     UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    3312 References ACI Design Manual (2002). Section 6.3.2 of ACI 211.1-91.  CISC Steel Design Manual 10th Edition (2010), Moment Diagrams  City of Surrey Design Criteria Manual, (2016). Residual Pressure Requirements. Retrieved from https://www.surrey.ca/files/DesignCriteria.pdf  CIVL445-Project II-Secure Water Supply for UBC Vancouver Campus [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from https://connect.ubc.ca/  Dalley, A. and Marshall, S. (n.d.). UBC SEEDS Emergency Potable Water Planning for UBC [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from https://sustain.ubc.ca/sites/sustain.ubc.ca/  Dhgate. (n.d.). Best Water Tester Monitoring Water Quality Testing Portable Water Quality Ph/Cl2 Chlorine Tester Level Meter Ph Tester For Swimming Pool Spa Under $35.88. Retrieved March 31, 2018, from https://www.dhgate.com/product/water-tester-monitoring-water-quality-testing/270820720.html  Google Earth/Maps (2017). Retrieved from https://google/maps  Government of BC, (2017). bcenv_drinkingwaterguidelines_summarytable.pdf. Retrieved from https://www2.gov.bc.ca/  Metro Vancouver Regional GIS Maps. Retrieved from http://www.metrovancouver.org/business/gis/Pages/default.aspx  Canadian Commission on Building and Fire Codes. (2005). National building code of Canada, 2005. Ottawa, Ont.: National Research Council Canada, Institute for Research in Construction.  Piteau Associates (2002). Hydrogeological and Geotechnical Assessment of Northwest Area UBC Campus, Vancouver. Retrieved from https://connect.ubc.ca/  UBC Energy and Water Services (2014). UBC Emergency Response Plan - Water Utility. Retrieved from https://connect.ubc.ca/  UBC Energy and Water Services (2012). UBC-WAT-Model-Final. Retrieved from https://connect.ubc.ca/  UBC Technical Guidelines (2017). Section 33 10 00 Water Utilities. Retrieved from https://connect.ubc.ca/  UBC 2017/2018 Operations Budget (2017). Budget Overview. Retrieved from https://vpfo.ubc.ca  US Environmental Protection Agency (2002). Finished Water Storage Facilities. Retrieved from https://www.epa.gov/sites/production  UBC 2017/2018 Operations Budget (2017). Budget Overview. Retrieved from https://vpfo.ubc.ca   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    34        Appendix I – IFC Drawings Package   2329 WESTBROOK MALL, VANCOUVERSECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC CAMPUSLOT 22, DISTRICT LOT 6469, GROUP 1MARCH 2018INDEX OF DRAWING SHEETSDRAWINGS SHEET TITLE                                          DRAWING SHEET NO.COVER SHEET       18001-COVGENERAL NOTES AND DETAILS 18001-01WATER TANK COMPOSITE UTILITY PLAN  18001-02WATER TANK SECTION A-A DETAIL   18001-03WATER TANK PLAN VIEW 18001-04WATER TANK REBAR SPECIFICATION 18001-05WATERMAIN PLAN/ PROFILE STA. 0+000 TO 1+200 18001-06PUMP HOUSE 18001-07WATER TANK WALL TO SLAB DETAIL 18001-08WALL TO SLAB WATER PROOFING TANK DETAIL 18001-09TANK FOOTING WATERPROOFING DETAILS 18001-10WATERMAIN HGL 18001-11TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES FILE NO. 18001UBC LOCATION MAPNTSPACIFIC SPIRIT REGIONAL PARKPACIFIC SPIRIT REGIONAL PARKKioskKioskDN’× × ×MANUFACTURER'S NOTES (VIA WWW.KRYTON.COM):1.   ADD KRYSTOL INTERNAL MEMBRANE (KIM) TO READY MIX CONCRETE OR SHOTCRETE AT  A RATE OF 2% BY WEIGHT OF      CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS (INCLUDING FLY ASH AND OTHER SUPPLEMENTARY CEMENTING MATERIALS) TO A MAXIMUM DOSAGE OF      8 KG/M³ (13.5 LB. /CU. YD.)2.   COAT SURFACE AREA OF THE JOINT WITH KRYSTOL WATERSTOP TREATMENT AT A SPREAD RATE OF 1 KG/M2 (0.2 LB./SQ. FT.).3.   INSTALL KRYTONITE SWELLING WATERSTOP IN CENTER OF SLAB, USING KRYTONITE ADHESIVE AT A COVERAGE RATE OF 8-10      METERS (26-32 FT) PER CARTRIDGE.4.   CREATE A 40 MM X 40 MM (1.5 IN. X 1.5 IN.), TAPERING TO 30 MM (1.2 IN.), KEYWAY AT THE INTERSECTION WHERE THE TWO      CONCRETE SECTIONS MEET, THROUGH FORMING, OR WHILE THE CONCRETE IS IN A MOLDABLE PLASTIC STATE.5.   TIGHTLY PACK PREFORMED KEYWAY FLUSH TO THE SURFACE WITH KRYSTOL WATERSTOP GROUT AT A RATE OF 3.33 KG/M (2.23      LB./FT.)  UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    47Appendix II – Supplementary Pump Information   Figure A-0-1: 6PVF12-1-UL-1/7-P-MA-R Pump Curve (Grundfos, 2018)      UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    48       Appendix III – Proposed Construction Gantt Chart       UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    51      Appendix IV – Class B Cost Estimate   % $~3.5% of Design, Environmental, and Construction Costs 94,080$                 20% 18,816$                   112,896$                        ~2.0% of Construction Costs 46,760$                 20% 9,352$                     56,112$                          Additional ~1.0% added for permitting costsDetailed Design Services 150,000$               20% 30,000$                   180,000$                        Design Total 150,000$               20% 30,000$                   180,000$                        Environmental Compensation 200,000$               30% 60,000$                   260,000$                        Environment Total 200,000$               30% 60,000$                   260,000$                        Site Preparation/MobilizationSurvey layout and asbuilt records 1                   LS 20,000$                   20,000$                 10% 2,000$                     22,000$                          Mobilization and demobilization 1                   LS 12,000$                   12,000$                 10% 1,200$                     13,200$                          Traffic Control 1                   LS 12,000$                   12,000$                 10% 1,200$                     13,200$                          Insurance 1                   LS 6,000$                     6,000$                   10% 600$                        6,600$                            Material Payment and Performance Bonding 1                   LS 20,000$                   20,000$                 10% 2,000$                     22,000$                          Bid Bond 1                   LS 30,000$                   30,000$                 10% 3,000$                     33,000$                          Below Grade TankTank Construction    Field removal 3,744             m 2 6$                            20,592$                 10% 2,059$                     22,651$                              Excavation 11,232           m 3 9$                            101,088$               10% 10,109$                   111,197$                            Concrete      Corner Columns 0.4                m 3 90$                          32$                        10% 3$                            36$                                       Foundation Walls 186.3             m 3 90$                          16,767$                 10% 1,677$                     18,444$                                Interior Columns 21.0              m 3 90$                          1,890$                   10% 189$                        2,079$                                  Top Slab 874.0             m 3 90$                          78,660$                 10% 7,866$                     86,526$                                Bottom Slab 874.0             m 3 90$                          78,660$                 10% 7,866$                     86,526$                                Partition Wall 34.7              m 3 90$                          3,123$                   10% 312$                        3,435$                                  Footings 2.7                m 3 90$                          243$                      10% 24$                          267$                                     Concrete Waste 199.3             m 3 18$                          3,587$                   10% 359$                        3,946$                                Rebar      10-M 50                 Tonnes 2,320$                     114,840$               10% 11,484$                   126,324$                              15-M 92                 Tonnes 2,320$                     212,976$               10% 21,298$                   234,274$                            Formwork 3,211             m 3 85$                          272,935$               10% 27,294$                   300,229$                            Exterior Membrane 780               m 2 45$                          35,100$                 10% 3,510$                     38,610$                          Construction (inclusive of labour, materials, and equipment)UBC Secure Water Supply System Class B Cost EstimateCIVL 446 - Project No. IICost Element WorksheetCAPITAL COSTCost Element Quantity Unit Unit Price BASE ESTIMATECONTINGENCYTotal COMMENTSProject ManagementPermitting/PlanningDesign FeesEnvironment% $    24"x36" Steel Access Hatch 2                   ea 1,600$                     3,200$                   110% 3,520$                     6,720$                            Field Restoration    Track Installation 3,744             m 2 30$                          112,320$               10% 11,232$                   123,552$                            Landscaping 1                   LS 10,000$                   10,000$                 10% 1,000$                     11,000$                          Approvals & Testing    QA/QC 1                   LS 50,000$                   50,000$                 10% 5,000$                     55,000$                              Water Quality Testing 1                   LS 2,400$                     2,400$                   110% 2,640$                     5,040$                                Owner/bylaw officer approval 1                   LS 5,000$                     5,000$                   10% 500$                        5,500$                            Distribution SystemCivil Works    Asphault removal 1,960             m 2 30$                          58,800$                 10% 5,880$                     64,680$                              Excavation 2,940             m 3 55$                          161,700$               10% 16,170$                   177,870$                            450 mm dia. C900 980               m 200$                        196,000$               10% 19,600$                   215,600$                            450 x 450 x 150 mm dia. Tee and thrust block 2                   ea 1,000$                     2,000$                   10% 200$                        2,200$                                450 mm dia.  Gate Valve 10                 ea 1,400$                     14,000$                 10% 1,400$                     15,400$                              450 mm dia. 90 deg bend and thrust blocks 2                   ea 850$                        1,700$                   10% 170$                        1,870$                                Hydrants 10                 ea 4,500$                     45,000$                 10% 4,500$                     49,500$                              450 mm to 600 mm hot tap tie-in 1                   LS 15,000$                   15,000$                 10% 1,500$                     16,500$                              Structural filll and compact 2,940             m 3 50$                          147,000$               10% 14,700$                   161,700$                        Surface Restoration    50mm Asphalt 1,960             m 2 30$                          58,800$                 10% 5,880$                     64,680$                              Roadworks delineation 1                   LS 3,000$                     3,000$                   10% 300$                        3,300$                                Landscaping 1                   LS 10,000$                   10,000$                 10% 1,000$                     11,000$                          Approvals & Testing    Flush-out 1                   LS 4,000$                     4,000$                   10% 400$                        4,400$                                Water pressurization test 1                   LS 4,000$                     4,000$                   10% 400$                        4,400$                                Owner/bylaw officer approval 1                   LS 5,000$                     5,000$                   10% 500$                        5,500$                            Temporary Distribution Set-up    150mm Rubber Conduit 580               m 8$                            4,640$                   10% 464$                        5,104$                                75mm Rubber Conduit 460               m 6$                            2,760$                   10% 276$                        3,036$                                Pre-fabricated Tap Structure 2                   ea 6,000$                     12,000$                 10% 1,200$                     13,200$                          Pump HouseExcavation 40                 m 3 30$                          1,200$                   10% 120$                        1,320$                            Pre-fab underground building 1                   LS 25,000$                   25,000$                 10% 2,500$                     27,500$                          Pumps (6VPF12 1-UL-1/7-P-MA-R) In-line 5                   ea 5,000$                     25,000$                 10% 2,500$                     27,500$                          Electrical systems 1                   LS 10,000$                   10,000$                 10% 1,000$                     11,000$                          Conections/detailing 1                   LS 15,000$                   15,000$                 10% 1,500$                     16,500$                          Architectural features 1                   LS 10,000$                   10,000$                 10% 1,000$                     11,000$                          Construction Supervision 1                   LS 180,000$                 180,000$               10% 18,000$                   198,000$                        Construction Total 2,338,006$            239,401$                 2,577,406$                      CAPITAL COSTS SUB-TOTAL 3,186,415$                      CAPITAL COSTCost Element Quantity Unit Unit Price BASE ESTIMATECONTINGENCYTotal COMMENTS% $Storage TankInspection 1                   LS 5,000$                     5,000$                  20% 1,000$                     391,740$                        Water Quality Monitoring    Chlorine Dosing 12                 Monthly 1,500$                     18,000$                 20% 3,600$                     1,410,264$                          Testing 4                   Quarterly 1,000$                     4,000$                  20% 800$                        313,392$                        Distribution System & PumpsSystem Flush-out 4                   Quarterly 250$                        1,000$                  20% 200$                        78,348$                          Pump Inspection 1                   LS 10,000$                   10,000$                 120% 12,000$                   1,436,380$                      Pump Replacement 0.2                year 5,500$                     1,100$                  20% 220$                        86,183$                          O&M COSTS SUB-TOTAL 3,716,307$                      Tax GST @ 5% 345,136$                        TOTAL PROJECT LIFECYCLE COST 7,247,858$                  Cost Estimating Sources"Protech Consulting"RS Square MeansCity of Nanaimo - Cost SheetsReal rate of interest = -1.0%, timeline = 50 yearsContingency 20% due to an unforseen futureOPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE (O&M) - Lifecycle CostCOST ELEMENT Quantity Units Unit Price Annual CostCONTINGENCYNPV (50-year Lifecycle) COMMENTS  UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    55Appendix V – Sample Calculations  Geotechnical:  Floating Foundation Design Check Material Out Material In 𝑤௢ = 𝑤௦ = 𝐵௦ × 𝛾௦ 𝑤௜ = 𝑤௖ + 𝑤௪ + 𝑤௧ 𝑤௦ = 3𝑚 × 18௞ே௠య = 83.7௞ே௠య  𝑤௜ = ൬2𝑚 × 21.6𝑘𝑁𝑚ଷ൰ + ൬1.55𝑚 × 9.81𝑘𝑁𝑚ଷ൰+  ൬1.1𝑚 × 16.3𝑘𝑁𝑚ଷ൰ ≈ 76.4𝑘𝑁𝑚ଷ %𝐷𝑗𝑓𝑓 = 100 ×83.7 − 76.483.7= 8.8% 𝑤௢ − 𝑊𝑒𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑀𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑟𝑖𝑎𝑙 𝑅𝑒𝑚𝑜𝑣𝑒𝑑 𝑤௦ − 𝑊𝑒𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑆𝑜𝑖𝑙 𝑅𝑒𝑚𝑜𝑣𝑒𝑑 𝑤௜ = 𝑊𝑒𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑁𝑒𝑤 𝑀𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑟𝑖𝑎𝑙 𝑤௖ − 𝑊𝑒𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝐶𝑜𝑛𝑐𝑟𝑒𝑡𝑒 𝑤௪ − 𝑊𝑒𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑊𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑤௧ − 𝑊𝑒𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑇𝑜𝑝𝑠𝑜𝑖𝑙 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝐿𝑎𝑛𝑑𝑠𝑐𝑎𝑝𝑖𝑛𝑔  Foundation Depth Check  𝐹௦ = (42.14) ×10𝑘𝑃௔18 𝑘𝑁𝑚ଷ × 3𝑚= 7.8  Liquefaction Assessment Liquefaction Factor of Safety: 𝐹𝑂𝑆 =𝐶𝑅𝑅(𝐾ఙ ∗ 𝐾௠ ∗ 𝐾௔)𝐶𝑆𝑅> 1 𝐶𝑅𝑅 = 𝐶𝑦𝑐𝑙𝑖𝑐 𝑅𝑒𝑠𝑖𝑡𝑎𝑛𝑐𝑒 𝑅𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜 𝐶𝑅𝑅 = 𝐶𝑦𝑐𝑙𝑖𝑐 𝑆𝑡𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑠 𝑅𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜 𝐾௠ = 𝑀𝑎𝑔𝑛𝑖𝑡𝑢𝑑𝑒 𝐹𝑎𝑐𝑡𝑜𝑟 (𝑚𝑎𝑔𝑛𝑖𝑡𝑢𝑑𝑒 7) 𝐾௔ = 𝑆𝑙𝑜𝑝𝑒 𝐹𝑎𝑐𝑡𝑜𝑟 (𝑛𝑜𝑡 𝑎𝑝𝑝𝑙𝑖𝑐𝑎𝑏𝑙𝑒) 𝐾ఙ = 𝑂𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑏𝑢𝑟𝑑𝑒𝑛 𝐹𝑎𝑐𝑡𝑜𝑟 (0.75𝑚)   Structural:  Slenderness check for 250× 250𝑚𝑚 interior columns: fy=400MPa →  Ks =66,000𝐾𝑁 𝑚ଷൗ  Kf= 𝐾௦ × 𝐼௙ = 66,000 ×ଵଵଶ× 250ସ × 10ିଵଶ = 21.48𝐾𝑁 For Columns: ସாூ௟೎=ସ× భభమ×ଶହ଴ర×଴.଻଴.ହ×ଶ଺଴଴= 0.7 × 10଺𝑁 ∙ 𝑚𝑚  𝜓௕௢௧௧௢௠ =15.789.62= 1.64 𝜓௧௢௣ = 0.2 K=0.7(𝑓𝑟𝑜𝑚 𝐹𝑖𝑔. 𝑁10.15.1 𝐸𝑓𝑓𝑒𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑣𝑒 𝐹𝑎𝑐𝑡𝑜𝑟𝑠)   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    56௄௅௥=଴.଻×ଶ଺଴଴଴.ଷ×ଶହ଴= 24.3 > ଶହିଵ଴×଴.ହට మభలమఱ×మఱబ×మఱబ= 17.1 No slenderness check is needed.       Concrete Mix Design:  Mix Design Check Given from ACI Manual of Concrete Practice 2000, Part 1: Materials and General Properties of Concrete Volume Fraction of Water: 0.193 Volume Fraction of Cement: 0.15 Volume Fraction of Coarse Aggregate: 0.58 Volume Fraction of Air Content: 0.05 Calculation of Fine Aggregate Proportion  𝑉𝑓 𝐹𝑖𝑛𝑒 𝐴𝑔𝑔 = 1 − 𝑉𝑓(𝑤𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑟) − 𝑉𝑓(𝑐𝑒𝑚𝑒𝑛𝑡) − 𝑉𝑓(𝐶𝐴)− 𝑉𝑓(𝐴𝑖𝑟)  𝑉𝑓 𝐹𝑖𝑛𝑒 𝐴𝑔𝑔 = 1 − (0.193) − (0.15) − (0.58) − (0.05) = 0.27  Calculation of Weight Proportions of Materials, (𝑘𝑔/𝑚ଷ)  𝑊𝑒𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑃𝑟𝑜𝑝𝑜𝑟𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛, 𝑘𝑔 𝑚ଷ⁄= 𝑉𝑜𝑙𝑢𝑚𝑒 𝐹𝑟𝑎𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑥 𝐷𝑒𝑛𝑠𝑖𝑡𝑦 (𝑘𝑔 𝑚ଷ⁄ )  𝑊𝑒𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑃𝑟𝑜𝑝𝑜𝑟𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝑊𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑟, 𝑘𝑔 𝑚ଷ⁄ = 0.193  𝑥 1000 𝑘𝑔/𝑚ଷ = 193 𝑘𝑔/𝑚ଷ   Standing Wave Design:   UBC Secure Potable Water Supply System – Final Design Report   TEAM 9 & ASSOCIATES    57 Standing Wave Pressure Check Given through dimensional parameters Length 1 = 75m Length 2 = 45m Depth, D = 2.6m Wave Period = 29.7 seconds Wave Height, H = 1.5m (worst-case) Find Standing Wave Pressure at Water Surface Therefore, at water surface, S = 2.6m KD, found through tables = 0.351  𝑃𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑢𝑟𝑒, 𝑃𝑎 = (1000 𝑥 𝑔 𝑥 ℎ)+ (1000 𝑥 𝑔 𝑥 𝐻)𝑥(𝑐𝑜𝑠ℎ(𝐾𝑆))/(𝑐𝑜𝑠ℎ(𝐾𝐷))  𝑃𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑢𝑟𝑒, 𝑃𝑎 = (1000 𝑥 9.81 𝑥 0)+ (1000 𝑥 9.81 𝑥 1.5)𝑥(𝑐𝑜𝑠ℎ(0.351))/(𝑐𝑜𝑠ℎ(0.351)) = 14715 𝑃𝑎   Water Distribution:  Water Network Design Head Loss (Hazen-Williams)  𝐻. 𝐿. =  10.59𝐿𝐶ఉ𝐷ସ.଼଻  EPANET software used to model system, thus no calculations required.  Pumping Power (Scenario A) Power Required:   𝑃 = (𝑄 ∗ 𝜌 ∗ 𝑔 ∗ ℎ)/𝑒𝑓𝑓 where Q – flow rate, rho equals density, g is gravitational constant, and h = head, eff = pump efficiency Therefore, for one pump operating at its working point (see below figure): Q = 0.043 m3/s 𝜌 = 1000 kg/m3 g = 9.81 m/s2 h = ~37 m eff = 0.7 thus, 𝑃 =0.043 ∗ 1000 ∗ 9.81 ∗ 370.7= 𝟐𝟐. 𝟑 𝒌𝑾    Pump Energy Costs (Scenario A) Pump Energy  𝐸𝑛𝑒𝑟𝑔𝑦 𝑐𝑜𝑠𝑡 = 𝑃𝑜𝑤𝑒𝑟 ∗ #𝑝𝑢𝑚𝑝𝑠 ∗ 𝑑𝑢𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛∗ 𝑝𝑟𝑖𝑐𝑒 𝑝𝑒𝑟 𝑘𝑊ℎ  Therefore, Power = 22 kW/pump # of pumps = 4 Duration = 24 hours Price per kWh = $0.15 𝐸𝑛𝑒𝑟𝑔𝑦 𝑐𝑜𝑠𝑡 = 22𝑘𝑊 ∗ 4 ∗ 24 ℎ𝑟𝑠 ∗ $0.15 = $288  

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