UBC Undergraduate Research

UBC Emergency Water Supply System Colin, Irving; Gordon, Erin; Henderson, Meaghan; Menezes, Wolvi; Mung, Dorothy; Pan, Wendy; Scott, Jeremy 2018-04-09

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report UBC Emergency Water Supply System - Team 12Irving Colin, Erin Gordon, Meaghan Henderson, Wolvi Menezes, Dorothy Mung, Wendy Pan, Jeremy Scott University of British Columbia CIVL 445Themes: Water, Community, Land April 9, 2018 Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Aquastor Inc. has been selected to design an emergency water supply system for the University of British Columbia’s Vancouver Campus. There is currently no water supply on campus and failure of existing supply lines from Metro Vancouver would result in no water supply in the area. Aquastor has designed a resilient system to provide the campus with water during emergency situations. Based on current and future use, and applications of World Health Organization and AWWA Guidelines, a capacity of 10 million litres has been selected.  Aquastor’s design consists of two five million litre reinforced concrete tanks, constructed underneath UBC’s Ken Woods Field. A secant pile wall system will resist lateral loading, while a friction pile foundation system will increase earthquake resistance and bearing capacity.   Construction will take approximately six months, with estimated completion in October 2018. The overall cost of the project is $12.8 million. The completed project will provide emergency water supplies to the Vancouver campus, while minimally impacting the environment and surrounding areas. The design is extremely resilient and has a high factor of safety, and is the best option for this design.  ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................................ i 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Site Overview ...................................................................................................................................... 1 1.3 Project Objective and Scope of Work ................................................................................................. 2 1.4 Design Criteria ..................................................................................................................................... 3 1.5 Desgn Issues ........................................................................................................................................ 5 1.6 Design Overview ................................................................................................................................. 5 1.6.1 Tank Overview ............................................................................................................................. 5 1.6.2 Pipe System Overview ........................................................................................................... 6 2.0 Design Tools and Guidelines ................................................................................................................... 7 2.1 Technical Considerations .................................................................................................................... 7 2.2 Specifications ...................................................................................................................................... 9 2.3 Software .............................................................................................................................................. 9 2.3.1 SAP ............................................................................................................................................... 9 2.3.2 AutoCAD ..................................................................................................................................... 10 2.3.3 EPANET ....................................................................................................................................... 10 2.3.4 SkecthUp .................................................................................................................................... 12 2.4 Standards .......................................................................................................................................... 12 2.4.1 American Water Works Association .......................................................................................... 12 2.4.2 National Building Code of Canada ............................................................................................. 13 2.4.3 Canadian Foundation Engineering Manual ................................................................................ 13 2.4.4 Canadian Standards Association ................................................................................................ 13 2.4.5 UBC Technical Guidelines ........................................................................................................... 13 3.0 Design Outputs ...................................................................................................................................... 14 3.1 Geotechnical and Foundation Components ..................................................................................... 14 3.1.1 Secant Pile Walls ........................................................................................................................ 14 3.1.2 Friction Piles ............................................................................................................................... 15 3.2 Structural Components ..................................................................................................................... 17 3.2.1 Roof Slab .................................................................................................................................... 17 3.2.2 Columns ..................................................................................................................................... 18 3.2.3 Baffle Walls ................................................................................................................................ 18  iii  3.2.4 Wall ............................................................................................................................................ 20 3.2.5 Floor Slab.................................................................................................................................... 21 3.3 Pipe Network .................................................................................................................................... 22 3.3.1 Inflow Connection ...................................................................................................................... 23 3.3.2 Outflow Connection ................................................................................................................... 24 3.3.3 Tank to Tank Connection ........................................................................................................... 25 3.3.4 Emergency Bypass ...................................................................................................................... 26 3.3.5 Pumps......................................................................................................................................... 27 3.4 Additonal Components ..................................................................................................................... 29 3.4.1 Emergency Hose System ............................................................................................................ 29 3.4.2 Back-Up Generator .................................................................................................................... 30 4.0 Construction Plan and Sequencing ....................................................................................................... 31 4.1 Site Preparation .......................................................................................................................... 31 4.1.1 Pre-construction investigation ............................................................................................ 31 4.1.2 Site Organization ................................................................................................................. 31 4.1.3 Vehicle Access and Hauling Routes ..................................................................................... 32 4.2 Mainline Construction................................................................................................................. 34 4.2.1 Tank Construction ............................................................................................................... 34 4.2.2 Pipeline Construction .......................................................................................................... 36 4.3 Testing & Service Tie-in ............................................................................................................... 40 4.4 Backfill and Site Restoration ....................................................................................................... 41 4.5 Anticipated Issues ....................................................................................................................... 41 5.0 Maintenance Plan ................................................................................................................................. 43 5.1 Observations Required After Construction ................................................................................. 43 5.2 Tank Maintenance ...................................................................................................................... 43 5.2.1 Rationale for Maintenance ................................................................................................. 43 5.2.2 Maintenance Procedure ..................................................................................................... 43 5.2.3 Repairs................................................................................................................................. 45 5.2.4 Safety Considerations ......................................................................................................... 45 5.3 Pipe Maintenance ....................................................................................................................... 46 5.3.1 Flushing ............................................................................................................................... 46 5.3.2 Physical Repairs ................................................................................................................... 47 5.4 Cost ............................................................................................................................................. 47  iv  6.0 Cost Estimate .................................................................................................................................. 48 7.0 Schedule ................................................................................................................................................ 50 8.0 Reccomendations for Design Improvement ......................................................................................... 51 9.0 References ............................................................................................................................................ 52 Appendix A: Detailed Design Drawings ......................................................................................................... 1  LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1: Tank Location on Ken Woods Field ................................................................................................ 2 Figure 2: SAP Model .................................................................................................................................... 10 Figure 3: EPANET Model ............................................................................................................................. 12 Figure 4: Secant Pile Details ........................................................................................................................ 15 Figure 5: Friction Piles Details ..................................................................................................................... 16 Figure 6: RC Roof Slab Details ..................................................................................................................... 17 Figure 7: RC Column Detail ......................................................................................................................... 18 Figure 8: Effects of Baffle Walls on water Level Variations ........................................................................ 19 Figure 9: Baffle Wall Configuration ............................................................................................................. 20 Figure 10: RC Wall Detail ............................................................................................................................. 21 Figure 11: RC Floor Slab Detail .................................................................................................................... 22 Figure 12: Excerpt of Detailed Inflow Connection Design .......................................................................... 23 Figure 13: Excerpt of Detailed Outflow Connection Design ....................................................................... 25 Figure 14: Excerpt of Detailed Tank-Tank Connection Design .................................................................... 26 Figure 15: Excerpt of Bypass Detailed Design ............................................................................................. 27 Figure 16: Inline Pump Curves .................................................................................................................... 29 Figure 17: High Level Site Flow and Organization ....................................................................................... 32 Figure 18: Heavy Construction Vehicle Inflow (Blue) and Outflow (Red) ................................................... 33 Figure 19: Proposed Soil Disposal Soil and Route ....................................................................................... 34 Figure 20: Polyethylene Wrapping Around Ductile Iron Pipe (DIPRA, 2016) .............................................. 38 Figure 21: Typical Backfill with Bedding and Compacted Fill Material ....................................................... 39  LIST OF TABLES Table 1: Cost Estimate Overview ................................................................................................................ 49 Table 2: Schedule Overview ........................................................................................................................ 50      1  1.0 INTRODUCTION  1.1 BACKGROUND  The Vancouver Campus of the University of British Columbia (UBC) does not have any water storage facilities. Water is currently supplied from Metro Vancouver’s Sasamat reservoir and carried to the campus via two water mains, each several kilometers long. In the event of an emergency and subsequent failure of the existing water supply the campus and its users would be left without water. Aquastor is pleased to present the following design for a new emergency water storage system for the UBC’s Vancouver campus. The design has been created with the following objectives in mind:  To supply enough water during an emergency to allow relatively normal operation to continue;  The storage system will withstand potential earthquakes, as it is located in an area highly susceptible to earthquakes;  During construction, minimal disruption to the university will occur;  Impact to the environment will be minimized during construction and operation of the system. 1.2 SITE OVERVIEW  The chosen location for this project is Ken Woods Field, in the southern half of the UBC campus, which can be seen in Figure 1 below.   2   FIGURE 1: TANK LOCATION ON KEN WOODS FIELD This location is close to the center of the existing water distribution system, is located in the high pressure zone of campus and is close to the main campus. The water storage system is to be placed underground, to ensure no impact to UBC’s aesthetic after completion. Ken Woods Field is a turf field, which will allow it to be easily rolled up and stored during construction and then reinstalled afterwards.  As Ken Woods Field is used for many events, Aquastor has designated an area south of the field to serve as a temporary replacement for the duration of construction, to minimize impacts on the surrounding community. 1.3 PROJECT OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE OF WORK  The design presented here has been developed to provide water storage on the campus, which will continue to function in the event of an emergency. The overall scope of work includes the water storage tanks and all structural, geotechnical and hydrotechnical components they are comprised of and all piping and utilities infrastructure required for the tanks to connect to UBCs existing water distribution  3  system. A complete review of UBCs current water distribution network was not completed and it is recommended that this occurs in a future project. 1.4 DESIGN CRITERIA The main design problem is to provide sufficient water supply to the UBC campus and meet demands, both current and future, in the event of a failure of the current system. Since Vancouver is in a high earthquake risk zone, the scope of the design problem includes providing a resilient emergency water supply system while minimizing catastrophic and environmental impacts to the UBC campus. The provided final detailed design satisfies the criteria outlined below and is governed by the design loadings as follows. Design Loadings  Structural Gravity Demands: o Dead Load of 16 kPa (1 m soil cover); o Dead Load of 23 kPa (Distributed self-weight of concrete tank over circular area); o Dead Load of 69 kPa (Distributed weight of water over circular area); o Live Load of 4.8 kPa (Athletic field users);  Structural Lateral Demands: o Interior tank water pressure of 4.9 kPa; o Seismic base demands from 0.381g peak ground acceleration, per NBCC; o Lateral Earth Pressure of 16 kPa;  Hydraulic Demand Flow: o 40 L/s through distribution pipes.   4  Design Criteria 1. Design Life: The two concrete reinforced tanks are designed for 35 years with regular maintenance and waterproof membrane provided. An excess of 100 years is expected as the design life of the ductile iron distribution pipeline. 2. Capacity: A detailed analysis of the various water demands, including population, the UBC Hospital, academic labs and fire flow was undertaken to determine an appropriate capacity. For five days of emergency water supply, a 10,000,000 L capacity is adopted. 3. Water Quality: Aquastor conformed to standards (AWWA, UBC Technical Guidelines) during preliminary design and water quality will be managed with consideration of water turnover and recirculation within the tanks. 4. Resiliency: One emergency that could occur is an earthquake so the water storage must be seismically resistant. Seismic considerations have played heavily into design of the system to ensure maximum resiliency during the design earthquake with return period of 2475 years. 5. Safety: Risk analysis of stability and safety of the structure in populated areas is undertaken in the preliminary design phase, in order to minimize impacts to the neighborhood in event of a failure. 6. Codes and standards: The detailed designs adhere to the following required codes and standards: American Water Works Association (AWWA), UBC Technical Guidelines, Canadian Standards Association (CSA), Canadian Foundation Engineering Manual, and 2015 National Building Code of Canada (NBCC).  5  1.5 DESIGN ISSUES During detailed design, effort was made to address issues such as reducing environmental and community impact of the project, as well as efficiently using the space on campus for the storage system. The provided final detailed design addresses the issues outlined below. 1. Public/Stakeholders: An effective First Nation Engagement Plan must be prepared and disruption to everyday operation and recreation of UBC should be minimized. 2. Environmental: Impacts on the environment of UBC will be kept to a minimum and drainage, soil erosion and any other adverse environmental impacts have been considered in the design. 3. Cost: The design is optimized with efficient cost trade-off while minimizing expenses for operation and maintenance. 4. Location: Limited space is available on UBC campus that will not lead to neighbourhood disruption. Location needed to meet requirements for the size of the tanks and related systems while minimizing disruption and was selected to fulfill these needs. 5. Construction Schedule: Care must be taken to ensure that disruption to campus life from construction is minimized. 1.6 DESIGN OVERVIEW 1.6.1 TANK OVERVIEW The design consists of two 7000 m3 concrete tanks to allow for redundancy in case of a failure.  Concrete was chosen as the building material because of its durability, constructability, and low cost. The tanks will be placed under Ken Woods Field in the high pressure zone of UBC. The tanks are 36 m in diameter and 7.7 m deep. Each tank is designed to hold 5000 m3 of water, with 1.8 m of freeboard. There will be columns placed throughout the tanks to accommodate roof, soil, and above ground loads, and baffle  6  walls throughout the tanks to reduce the dynamic force of the water in the event of an earthquake. Secant piles surround the tank and are connected to the roof slab to resist lateral earthquake loads. Friction piles will be arranged in a circular pattern underneath the tank to help support the weight in low bearing capacity soil. Tank access will be through a ventilated hatch and ladder that connects to the edge of Ken Woods Field. 1.6.2 PIPE SYSTEM OVERVIEW The tanks are connected to the distribution system through a 200 mm inflow pipe and a 450 mm outflow pipe. The outflow pipe is approximately 1 km long and connects to the existing 600 mm UBC main. The tanks are connected by a 450 mm pipe and bypass system that will allow either tank to remain operational if the other fails during an emergency. The tank system will be equipped with one submersible pump for water distribution and one recirculation pump to promote water turnover within the tanks. Chlorine will be injected as required to ensure water quality remains acceptable.          7  2.0 DESIGN TOOLS AND GUIDELINES  2.1 TECHNICAL CONSIDERATIONS There are a number of technical considerations for this project. These include earthquake risks, water quality, structural reinforcement and pressure zones.  Earthquake Risks The UBC campus is located in an area of high earthquake risk and therefore earthquake risks must be accounted for. The National Building Code of Canada (NBCC) requires structures to be designed for 2%/50 years risk or the 1 in 2475 year earthquake. Using the 2015 NBCC the seismic hazard for 2%/50 years for this location (latitude: 49.258179, longitude: -123.243375), is a peak ground acceleration (PGA) of 0.381g where g = 9.81 m/s2, gravitational acceleration. The soil at this site is predicted to have a high chance of liquefaction. Both the PGA and the high liquefaction potential were considered during design, resulting in a robust and resilient design. Water Quality It is important for water quality in both the storage tanks and distribution system to be maintained. It is recommended that water turnover is approximately 1/3 per day with complete turnover every 3 to 5 days to avoid old water, which can result in microbial activity as the chlorine residual drops.  The American Water Work Association (AWWA) recommends a maximum of 5 days between complete turnovers to avoid excessive water age.  During regular operation of the system water will be cycled through the system and distribution system as it is used and complete turnover will occur every three days. Mixing is also required in storage systems as it mitigates any stagnant water or short-circuiting of water. Velocity differences during filling and emptying in normal operation, combined with baffle walls, will allow for appropriate mixing.  8  In the emergency situation, the worst case scenario has been assumed for water quality: that complete failure of Metro Vancouver’s system occurs and the storage tanks are the only source of water on campus, with no ability to be additionally filled. In this case, Aquastor has design for a five day storage capacity to align with AWWA requirements for water age. Chlorine residual will be constantly monitored throughout the five days and booster disinfection will be added by hand if quality drops below acceptable levels. A recirculation pump will be installed in the tanks to avoid stagnant water and facilitate mixing. Structural Reinforcement Load demands on the tank’s structural components are high. Furthermore, the concrete slab elements experience high bending moments due to two-way loading and moderate spans of 5 m between column supports. To increase the capacity and ductility of the concrete, steel reinforcement was used in the design of all tank elements. In addition to higher bending capacity and axial force capacity, the reinforced concrete tank elements experience ductile failure modes governed by the steel reinforcement, which conforms to CSA standards. Pressure Zones The UBC campus is segregated into two pressure zones: high and low. The high pressure zone is serviced from a pump house that distributes water at 100 psi. The low pressure zone is gravity fed at Metro Vancouver’s operating pressure, approximately 60 psi. The two pressure zones are separated and distinguished by a series of pressure reducing valves. To ensure an inflow rate to the system of 40 L/s, the tanks were placed in the high pressure zone.  9  2.2 SPECIFICATIONS A list of required technical specifications can be found in Appendix B and are incorporated into the Issue for Construction (IFC) drawings found in Appendix A.  The specifications cover technical requirements related to the construction work and installation, site preparation and quality of workmanship for all structural, geotechnical and hydrotechnical components of the design. In all cases, work should be carried out exactly as described in the Technical Specifications and IFC Drawings and to the satisfaction of the Owner. In cases of discrepancy, work should be carried out in accordance with the Technical Specifications, which take precedence in all cases. 2.3 SOFTWARE 2.3.1 SAP To confirm the structural design hand calculations were accurate, SAP2000 was used to model the structural capacity of tank, including the floor slabs, the perimeter walls, and the roof slabs. The dimension of the components, material properties, loads, and load combinations were modelled according to the results from hand calculation.   The dynamic load from the water, the lateral load from the soil, and the uplift from the soil are not considered in this analysis. The friction piles are modeled as spring supports at the bottom of the tank. The secant piles are not modeled and there is no lateral load from the soil assigned to the perimeter walls.   After running the simulation, the deflection and the bending moment of all members are checked to make sure the concrete would not fail. The picture below shows the analysis of the floor slab of the tank as an example. The maximum bending moment (among all three directions) throughout the floor slab is  10  color coded and the largest bending moment read from Figure 2 (orange in this case, which corresponds to 1700 kNm to 3400 kNm) is compared to the capacity of the structure.   FIGURE 2: SAP MODEL 2.3.2 AUTOCAD The drafting and drawing software, AutoCAD, is used to create all the detailed issued for construction drawings enclosed with this report. The drawings are drawn to scale with appropriate dimensions and drawings notes, annotated in AutoCAD. Aquastor is confident in the delivered drawings and its accuracy to standard construction practices. 2.3.3 EPANET To analyze the existing distribution system on UBC the program EPANET was used. A file was provided by the client with the entire system prebuilt to scale. EPANET allowed Aquastor to clearly view the high and low-pressure zones distinguished by the pressure reducing valves. This was vital in determining the final location for the water storage tanks. The program also provided the specific diameters of every  11  water line on campus, showing the existing 600mm water main from Sasamat reservoir that the constructed water tanks will connect to. An EPANET simulation also allowed Aquastor to see the effect the water tanks would have on the pressures of the existing distribution system.  Using this existing system, an additional node, representing the water tanks, was placed on the EPANET model. Placed in the location of the Ken Woods field, the node was assigned a demand of 39 L/s, the inflow rate that the water tanks will require to achieve a water turnover rate of 3 days. After implementing this change and analyzing the model it was found that all pressures and velocities remained within acceptable values. The outflow pipe connecting to the pipe that connects Sasamat Reservoir to the UBC Pump house connects before the UBC Pump house and is outside of UBC’s pressure zones. Thus, this connection was not modelled on EPANET as it would not affect pressures or velocities in the distribution system.  However, the existing EPANET model provided initially did not work when run. For a successful run, several pipe diameters had to be changed on the model and were given estimated diameters based on other values in the system.   12   FIGURE 3: EPANET MODEL 2.3.4 SKECTHUP SketchUp was used during the preliminary design phase of this project. A model of the preliminary design was made to help conceptualize the tank and pipe network for the preliminary presentation. Once the design moved into the detailed design phase, other programs such as SAP, AutoCAD and EPANET were used to make detailed drawings and analyze the system. 2.4 STANDARDS 2.4.1 AMERICAN WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION American Water Works Association (AWWA) standards for equipment and material used in treatment and distribution of drinking water.  13  2.4.2 NATIONAL BUILDING CODE OF CANADA The 2015 Nation Building Code of Canada (NBCC) was followed for all structural components and foundations. The entire system complies with the seismic design hazards and requirements found in the NBCC.  2.4.3 CANADIAN FOUNDATION ENGINEERING MANUAL  The Canadian Foundation Engineering Manual was used as a guideline in the design of the secant pile walls and friction piles. All geotechnical work was compared to this, to ensure it was completed to an acceptable standard.  2.4.4 CANADIAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION The Canadian Standards Association (CSA) was followed for structural and reinforced concrete components.  2.4.5 UBC TECHNICAL GUIDELINES UBC Technical Guidelines were followed for all distribution piping and accessories, to ensure the design complies with requirements specific to the UBC Vancouver campus.      14  3.0 DESIGN OUTPUTS 3.1 GEOTECHNICAL AND FOUNDATION COMPONENTS Ken Woods Field is located at the south end of the UBC campus. Soil information for design was based on Hydrogeological and Geotechnical Assessment of Northwest Area UBC Campus, Vancouver from Piteau Associates (2003), which focused on soil conditions at the north end of campus. Lacking other sources of information, this data was assumed to be applicable for the south end of campus as well. Two boreholes, one located near the existing powerhouse and one near Acadia Drive, were the closest to the site and information from those boreholes was used in design. Soil at the site was determined to be mostly a sand and silt mixture, with silt layers. Most of the UBC campus is within the Quadra 1 sand unit, which is a well-sorted and medium grained sand. A high water table, approximately 1 m below surface, was assumed. Due to lack of site information, more conservative site conditions were assumed, which includes a high water table. A high chance of liquefaction was assumed, based on the soil conditions, high water table and the chance of leakage from one of the tanks. 3.1.1 SECANT PILE WALLS The assumed soil conditions would create difficulties excavating down to the required 8 m, resulting a large excavation with huge side slopes. The lateral loads from earthquakes are large and would require excessive reinforcement in the tank walls. As a solution to both these issues, a secant pile wall was designed. The secant pile wall consists of a single row of interlocking piles, which will circle around the outside of each tank.  Secant pile walls consist of a series of soft piles, followed by the installation of reinforced piles in between. The resulting wall has been designed to resist all lateral loading, from both soil and seismic loads. The secant pile walls will be installed first, and excavation will occur after. The walls will  15  provide enough resistance that a much smaller area will need to be excavated and large side slopes will not be required. The soft piles are unreinforced concrete piles, with a diameter of 0.9 m. The reinforced piles that will be installed second also have a diameter of 0.9 m and will overlap 0.15 m on either side of the soft piles, as can be seen in Figure 4 below. This will result in an effective diameter of 0.6 m for all secant piles. Each tank will be encircled by 205 piles, for a grand total of 410 secant piles, each extending 30 m deep.    FIGURE 4: SECANT PILE DETAILS Calculations related to secant piles can be found in Appendix E drawings can be found in Appendix A and specifications can be found in Appendix B. The construction plan, including secant pile installation can be found in Section 4.0.   3.1.2 FRICTION PILES Friction piles were selected to help support the weight of the concrete tank on low bearing capacity soil and to mitigate possible liquefaction conditions. The piles were designed using the Canadian Foundation Engineering Manual assuming the following parameters:  16      • γsoil = 16 KN/m3     • γconcrete = 24 KN/m3     • Weight Tank & Water= 86052 KN     • ɸ = 27º     • Nq = 18 Note that the bearing capacity factor Nq was obtained by using a bearing capacity factor vs Friction angle graph. After analyzing multiple pile diameters and depths, 600 mm diameter piles hammered to a depth of 20m were chosen. Each pile has a bearing capacity of 1935 KN, therefore 45 piles are needed to support the weight of a full tank. The design uses 49 friction piles for contingency. The minimum spacing between piles was calculated to be 2.5 m, however the spacing between piles varies from 3 m to 7.7m. To evenly distribute the resistance of the piles on the tank, they were placed in circular layers underneath the tank. To ensure that the load could be treated as a distributed load along the bottom of the floor slab, concrete cones were attached to the top of each pile as shown in Figure 5.  FIGURE 5: FRICTION PILES DETAILS  17  Detailed Calculations for the friction piles are found in Appendix E and the drawings are found in Appendix A. Refer to Section 4.0 for the friction pile construction plan and sequence. 3.2 STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS The structural components of the tank are made entirely of steel reinforced concrete. The components were designed in accordance with CSA guidelines. Sample calculations can be found in Appendix E, and full detail drawings can be found in Appendix A.  3.2.1 ROOF SLAB The gravity loads mentioned in Section 1.4 are evenly distributed on the roof slab. The slab is 300 mm thick, 39 m in diameter and has reinforcement in both directions. Dimensions meet deflection control requirements, per CSA A23.3, and the selected thickness is suitable. The slab was designed as many smaller two way slabs, supported on all four corners by columns. The worst case flexural failure condition was established, and all reinforcement was designed to resist this moment. The constant reinforcement spacing provides a conservative design that is easy to construct. Minimum temperature reinforcement is provided and CSA standards are met. The roof slab detail is shown in Figure 6. The roof slab extends beyond the tank walls and rest on the secant piles with a 500 mm thick gap between the walls and piles. This is to ensure the tank structure and secant piles will have the same lateral displacement during an earthquake and reduce seismic damages.  FIGURE 6: RC ROOF SLAB DETAILS  18  3.2.2 COLUMNS Following the load path, gravity load from the roof slab is evenly distributed to the 25 evenly spaced columns throughout the tank, and the tank wall. Columns reduce the span length of the roof slap and distribute the bending moment demands. The cylindrical column was designed by estimating the shape as a smaller square. The columns were designed to resist buckling. The columns are concentrically loaded, so the minimum eccentricity was calculated to determine the bending moment in the columns. Conservative assumptions were made and a high factor of safety was chosen to account for the dynamic load of the water in the event of an earthquake. The diameter of the cylindrical columns is 500 mm, and they are 6.8 m tall, and the column detail can be found in Figure 7.     FIGURE 7: RC COLUMN DETAIL 3.2.3 BAFFLE WALLS In the event of an earthquake the external excitation of the surrounding ground will result in extreme sloshing of the water inside the tank. To prevent excessive damage from this hydrodynamic load, baffle walls will be installed inside of the tank to minimize and suppress the effects of sloshing.   19  As found in “Earthquake Resistant Engineering Structures VIII” the direct effects of baffle walls on the water level variations during an earthquake are shown below. The scaled down model of a 10,000 m3 tank is directly comparable in size to Aquastor’s design. When baffles are placed perpendicular to a flow they change the direction of the flow and suppress the magnitude of fluid slosh. Additionally, the baffles will be perforated to break up the main water jet into a more uniform current over a larger area.   FIGURE 8: EFFECTS OF BAFFLE WALLS ON WATER LEVEL VARIATIONS Additionally, the baffle walls will provide a means to direct the flow of water inside the tank during normal operation. This increases the chlorine contact time and results in a more even chlorine distribution providing a more effective disinfection process. Water will flow in a serpentine path from one end of the tank to the other as shown below.  Five large baffle walls will be installed inside of each water tank to effectively separate the tank into smaller sections. Each baffle wall will be attached and mounted to the columns inside of the tank and will be constructed out of concrete.   20   FIGURE 9: BAFFLE WALL CONFIGURATION 3.2.4 WALL  The wall of the tank was designed as a basement wall. The design consists of two curtains of rebar, in both the vertical and horizontal directions. Two curtains of rebar are required since the wall thickness is greater than 250 mm. The wall is 350 mm thick and 6.8 m tall. Because the secant piles help resist the lateral load of the soil, it was assumed that the greatest load on the walls would be from the water when the tank was full. The walls are designed for the worst case scenario, further adding to the safety of the design. Axial load from the roof slab is not assumed in the analysis, as this is a more conservative assumption. A detail of the wall is shown in Figure 10.  21   FIGURE 10: RC WALL DETAIL 3.2.5 FLOOR SLAB The design gravity loads are transferred to the floor slab, along with the weight of the water and the upward force from the soil. It was determined that the punching shear failure mode of the floor slab would be a moment at the base of a column. This moment is created by the force from the soil underneath the tank. The worst case design scenario occurs when the tank is empty. To resist this moment, the thickness of the concrete slab was increased to 750 mm, as well as the amount of reinforcement. The alternative method is to design the floor slab according to foundation design; however, the chosen method of analysis is intended to be conservative to account for underestimation of loads. As a result, the floor slab is thicker than the standard slabs. Again, the entire slab was designed to resist this worst case scenario. This makes the design more conservative, more likely to resist an earthquake, and easier to construct. A detail of the floor slab is shown in Figure 11. The load path is completed through the transfer of loads from the floor slab to the foundation piles.   22   FIGURE 11: RC FLOOR SLAB DETAIL 3.3 PIPE NETWORK The pipe network is designed to operate in parallel with the existing system to ensure minimal disruption to the existing network and to reduce any additional operating procedures and expenses. As described earlier, the pipe network design comprises of four main components: 1. Inflow Connection; 2. Outflow Connection; 3. Tank-Tank Connection; 4. Emergency Bypass. The new system complies with AWWA, NSF 61, and UBC Technical Guidelines. All new pipes are specified Class 50 ductile iron and includes the necessary valves to allow for isolation during maintenance and repairs. Flexible couplings will be included in the designed pipe lengths to ensure two points of flexibility to accommodate for differential settlement between the existing pipes and the new tanks. All connections to active UBC water mains will be done through “wet taps” which allows  23  connections to be made with gate valves so that the existing distribution system will experience no interruptions. 3.3.1 INFLOW CONNECTION The new 200 mm inflow connection will connect UBC’s existing 250 mm distribution line to the western face of the southern tank. The connection will be made perpendicular to the existing distribution line using a wet tap which means a 200 mm gate valve will be needed at this location. This gate valve, along with the gate valve just before the connection to the southern tank, will ensure proper isolation during maintenance and repairs. A check valve is also included in the design to ensure the correct direction of water flow. Flexible couplings are included in the designed pipe lengths to ensure two points of flexibility to accommodate for differential settlement between the existing pipes and the new tanks, as seen in Figure 12 below. Further details on the connection and appurtenances including the flexible couplings and valves can be found in the detailed design drawings in Appendix A. FIGURE 12: EXCERPT OF DETAILED INFLOW CONNECTION DESIGN  24  3.3.2 OUTFLOW CONNECTION The new 450 mm inflow connection will connect the tanks to UBC’s existing 600 mm main distribution line. The existing distribution line is one of two water mains which feeds water from Metro Vancouver to UBC’s pump house. The tanks are connected to UBC’s existing system in this way to utilize the current pumping system that UBC has in place to reduce the amount of new infrastructure introduced in this capital project.  The connection to UBC’s existing 600 mm main will be completed using a wet tap which means a 450 mm gate valve will be needed at this location. The connection will be made perpendicular to the existing distribution main. This gate valve, along with the gate valve just before the connection to the northern face of the northern tank, will ensure proper isolation during maintenance and repairs. Additionally, to avoid back flow into the tank and to ensure water flows in the correct direction when supplying UBC during regular operation and emergency situations, a 450 mm check valve is also included at this location. Flexible couplings are included in the designed pipe lengths to ensure two points of flexibility to accommodate for differential settlement between the existing pipes and the new tanks. Further details on the connection and appurtenances including the flexible couplings and valves can be found in the detailed design drawings in Appendix A.   25   FIGURE 13: EXCERPT OF DETAILED OUTFLOW CONNECTION DESIGN 3.3.3 TANK TO TANK CONNECTION A new 450 mm connection was designed to allow flow between the two emergency reservoirs during regular and emergency operating scenarios. The connection is a straight length of pipe which includes gate valves at both ends to ensure proper isolation during maintenance and repairs. Flexible couplings are included in the designed pipe lengths to ensure two points of flexibility to accommodate for differential settlement between the new tanks. Further details on the connection and appurtenances including the flexible couplings and valves can be found in the detailed design drawings in Appendix A.   26   FIGURE 14: EXCERPT OF DETAILED TANK-TANK CONNECTION DESIGN 3.3.4 EMERGENCY BYPASS To improve the resiliency of the design and to provide contingency in the case of failure in the tanks or connections to between the tanks, an emergency bypass was included in the network design. The bypass was designed to ensure operation of the new network would continue in the case of failure in either one of the tanks. This is also important to the maintenance of the tanks, as the water level can be drawn down in one of the tanks while the second tank is able to continue operating. This is described further in Section 5.0.   The emergency bypass network includes two components – the bypass of the southern tank and the bypass of the northern tank.  For the bypass of the southern tank there is a direct connection to the new inflow connection and the northern tank, completely isolating the southern tank from the system. This allows maintenance and repairs to be made without taking the network offline. This network includes two 200 mm gate valves and a 200 mm short radius 90 degree elbow. The gate valves ensure isolation of this bypass line so it is not used during regular operation. For the bypass of the northern tank, there is a direct connection from the southern tank to the 450 mm outflow line. Through the use of this connection, water can flow from the southern tank directly to the  27  distribution line, completely isolating the northern tank from the system. This allows maintenance and repairs to be made without taking the network offline. This network includes two 450 mm gate valves and two 450 mm short radius 90 degree elbows. The gate valves ensure isolation of this bypass line so it is not used during regular operation.  FIGURE 15: EXCERPT OF BYPASS DETAILED DESIGN 3.3.5 PUMPS 3.3.5.1 INLINE PUMPS To promote a water turnover rate of 3 days, it was determined that the outflow pumps would be run 24/7 achieving a flow rate of 40 L/s. With this design, both tanks will experience complete water turnover approximately every 3 days and is the least expensive option compared to running the pump at a higher horsepower for a faster water turnover rate.  The outflow line connects directly to the pipe that connects Sasamat Reservoir to the UBC Pump house. As this connection is before the UBC Pump house, it is outside of the UBC pressure zones, however  28  based on the EPANET model it operates at pressures around 60 psi. Taking into account the elevation difference between the tank locations and the pump house, and the friction loss along the 950 meters of pipe, it was determined that a pump head of 40 meters was required to meet the pressures of the intersecting pipe.  To meet these specifications two 625S300-2-AA Grundfos submersible pumps were selected to provide a constant outflow of 40L/s at 40 meters of head. The corresponding pump curve is shown below and an efficiency of 71.3% will be achieved. A variable frequency drive will be attached to each pump and the flow rate will be slowed to 23 L/s in the event of an emergency to ensure water supply for a period of 5 days.  The existing pressure inside of the UBC distribution system is sufficient to provide the 40 L/s of inflow required to replenish the water that is leaving the tank at the same rate.   29   FIGURE 16: INLINE PUMP CURVES 3.3.5.2 CIRCULATION PUMPS To facilitate flow between the two tanks, circulation pumps will be added to the entrance of each tank. As flow enters the first tank at 40L/s, the circulation pumps ensure flow travels to the second tank in sequence at the same flow rate. This prevents the upstream tank from filling faster than the downstream tank. And ensures consistent flow of 40L/s throughout the system. These pumps will be submersible 625S150-1-A pumps as provided by Grundfos.  3.4 ADDITONAL COMPONENTS 3.4.1 EMERGENCY HOSE SYSTEM In the scenario that the pumping station at the UBC powerhouse, or the constructed water main to the powerhouse is compromised in the event of an earthquake, a hose system will be provided to allow the  30  water tanks to be accessed as a ‘point of use’ system.  A 30 m long and 125mm diameter supply hose, comparable to the hoses used in firefighting scenarios, will be provided for each water tank. The supply hoses are designed to operate at pressures of up to 200 psi which is comparable to the pressure provided by the pump at the water tanks. During normal operation the hoses will be stored in the basement of the UBC Baseball Indoor Training Centre.  3.4.2 BACK-UP GENERATOR If power is lost for an outstanding period of time, and emergency backup generator is provided to supply the required 25 kW to operate all pumps in the system. It is recommended that the Generac Protector, Automatic Standby Generator (120/240V Single-Phase) be used, however other comparable models are also acceptable. If required, trained personnel will disconnect the electrical connection between the pumps and the UBC electrical grid and reroute the wiring to the generator. When not in use, the backup generator will be stored with the hoses in the basement of the UBC Baseball Indoor Training Centre.   31  4.0 CONSTRUCTION PLAN AND SEQUENCING The overall construction is scheduled in four phases: site preparation, mainline construction, testing & service tie-in, and backfill & site restoration. The general construction logistics are to complete construction connecting the pipe to the pump house at the same time as the tank construction. Both tanks will be constructed at the same time to maximize efficiency. Testing will be carried out when the pipes and the tanks are ready. The main site will not be backfilled until the tanks have passed the test to minimize the amount of rework for repair. Following is a detailed description of the construction sequence. 4.1 SITE PREPARATION 4.1.1 PRE-CONSTRUCTION INVESTIGATION Before construction starts, the engineers in charge will walk through the site with the owner’s representatives and the construction manager. Investigations will be carried out as a final confirmation of the site condition. This will not only make sure the site condition has not changed since the start of the design phase, but also bring all parties together to witness and reach an agreement on the site condition. 4.1.2 SITE ORGANIZATION The project will start with setting up the fences, site trailers, and construction signs. The site layout is arranged to optimize the travel distances of various construction activities while avoiding all safety hazards. The current high-level site layout ensures adequate access to laydown and storage areas. The laydown area should have adequate space to store additional excavated material and can be extended if necessary. Site trailers would also be located near the laydown area; most likely in the southern portion near the vehicle access point. Additionally, there will be adequate room for excavators, dump trucks and  32  other necessary heavy construction vehicles around the tank construction area. A high-level version of the site layout can be seen in the Figure 17 below. Further information on heavy vehicle access is covered in Section 4.1.3.  FIGURE 17: HIGH LEVEL SITE FLOW AND ORGANIZATION 4.1.3 VEHICLE ACCESS AND HAULING ROUTES To control traffic flow of heavy construction vehicles through the work site, one directional flow has been selected to be the ideal solution. As described in Figure 18 below, the blue lines indicate construction vehicle flow into the construction laydown area and the red lines indicate construction vehicle outflow. This will help increase consistency in truck routing to avoid the number of roads and pedestrians impacted by construction vehicles in regard to noise, dust, and safety. Additionally, it will  33  prevent heavy vehicles from turning left into the laydown area which will reduce congestion and obstruction to commuters on the UBC campus.  FIGURE 18: HEAVY CONSTRUCTION VEHICLE INFLOW (BLUE) AND OUTFLOW (RED) The selected hauling site, for the large amount of soils that will need to be disposed of, is the Vancouver Landfill. The proposed site is approximately 30 km from the construction site at UBC. The contractor must submit soil samples for every load to ensure they comply with the strict guidelines set by Vancouver Landfill to ensure soils can be disposed of at this location. In the case of contaminated soils, alternative dump sites need to be considered and approved before the start of excavation.  34   FIGURE 19: PROPOSED SOIL DISPOSAL SOIL AND ROUTE 4.2 MAINLINE CONSTRUCTION 4.2.1 TANK CONSTRUCTION  The tank construction will start after the site has been set up. It includes the construction of the foundation system, the tanks, tank interior, and the roof slab. 4.2.1.1 THE FOUNDATION SYSTEM The turf field on site will first be stripped away to make room for construction. The secant piles will be built before the excavation. This is because the secant piles are designed to resist the lateral loads from the soil and no shoring or over-excavation is required during excavation.  For the construction of secant piles, first, holes will be drilled for every other secant piles according to the designed layout. Pre-assembled concrete forms and rebar cages will then be sent down before the concrete is poured. Then the rest the piles will be poured with the same method. The secant piles for  35  the two tanks will be constructed simultaneously. Once the secant piles are complete, excavation begins. When the site has been excavated to the designed depth, the friction piles will be driven into the soil. The soil will be graded and prepared for tank construction. 4.2.1.2 TANKS The floor slab will be poured continuously for each tank to avoid construction joints, which may cause potential leakage. Temporary walkways will be established before, during, and shortly after the placement of the floor slab. Once the concrete floor slab has gained adequate strength, the construction of walls and columns will start simultaneously. As water stops will be used at the base of the perimeter walls, special attention is needed to ensure their positive positioning. The procedures specified in the code will be strictly followed to ensure the water tightness of the tanks. Each wall or column will be poured in a continuous operation without horizontal joints. An enriched fine-aggregate mix shall be used at the base of the walls and columns to improve embedment of the horizontal base water stop and the reinforcement. The perimeter wall of each tank will also be poured in a continuous operation to avoid vertical joints. 4.2.1.3 TANK INTERIOR The tank interior construction will happen before the roof slab is poured for the ease of construction. The membraned will be applied to the walls, slabs and the columns at the same time as long as the site is not overcrowded. The membranes over the construction joints at the base of the walls and columns will be lapped with extra care.  36  The submersible pump, ladders will be installed prior to the application of the membrane in the adjacent area to avoid undesired penetration. The submersible pumps will be sufficiently braced according the instruction given by the manufacturer. Rough cleaning of the tank interior will be done before the roof slab is constructed as it is still accessible from the top. 4.2.1.4 ROOF SLAB The construction of the roof slab will proceed after the tank interior in two stages. Stage one will be the majority of the slab area leaving a smaller area for removing the scaffolding and formworks for stage one. Extra precaution should be taken when setting up the scaffolding to make sure the waterproof layer is not damaged. All equipment and temporary installations will be removed from the tank before the construction of stage two roof slab. The scaffolding and the formwork will be removed from the roof hatch of the tank once the concrete has gained sufficient strength. The connection between the two pours will be arranged in accordance with the structural load path and special attention is needed to ensure structural integrity. 4.2.2 PIPELINE CONSTRUCTION The piping system is not in the critical path of this project. Trench excavation can start at the beginning of the project followed by soil improvement if needed, pipe installation, and backfill. The detailed schedule will be coordinated with UBC traffic planning to minimize disruption. The pipe connecting the two tanks will be constructed after the bulk excavation is complete. Two holes will be drilled through the interlocked secant piles at the connection. 4.2.2.1 EXCAVATION Pipe laying supervisor should plan the excavation work, equipment and manpower to fit the plans provided as well as carefully investigate the construction site before moving equipment on site. The trench must be wide enough to permit proper installation of the pipe and to allow room to assemble  37  joints and tamp backfill around the pipe. Size of pipe, type of soil, and type of excavating equipment govern the width. Pavement should be broken in straight lines using appropriate tools and methods. It is required that pipe be installed with a minimum earth cover as specified by UBC Technical Guidelines. Trench depth and type of soil encountered are vitally important because they govern the need for shoring the trench during water main installation. Further boreholes and soil testing will need to be completed before the type of shoring procedure is determined; however, from current data available sheet piling and temporary shoring will be needed in most areas. Pavement removal is also part of trench excavation and should be completed using straight line cuts outside of the wheel path. Rock must be excavated so that it will not be closer than 6-inches to the bottom and sides of the pipe for diameters up to 24-inches and no closer than 9-inches for diameters 30-inches or larger. When excavation is complete, a bed of sand, crushed stone, or earth free from stones or large clods should be placed on the bottom of the trench and leveled and tamped to the abovementioned depths. A straightedge can be used to check the bottom of the trench to detect high points of rock that may protrude through the cushion. (DIPRA, 2016). 4.2.2.2 COMPACTION The trench bottom should be even to give the barrel of the pipe soil support for its full length. Soft subgrade may prove a problem in swampy areas or in loose sand. The trench bottom can be improved by adding crushed stone up to 2-inches in diameter. The stones should be compacted and, if necessary, additional stone added to bring the trench bottom up to proper grade line. Bumping the pipe with the backhoe bucket in order to obtain grade is discouraged due to the possibility of such practice causing damage to the pipe and/or lining. In extreme cases, it may be necessary to drive piling and use cross bracing or clamp the pipe to pile caps to maintain line and grade. Appropriate thickness design procedures for pipe on supports should be used in this instance (DIPRA, 2016).  38  4.2.2.3 PIPE LAYING The material specified by UBC technical guidelines for all new water mains is ductile iron. Upon receiving the material, it should be carefully inspected for damage that may have occurred in transit. Material found to be defective due to manufacture or damaged during shipment should be recorded in the delivery receipt or similar document by the carrier’s agent. The polyethylene tube should completely cover the pipe before it is lowered into the trench. A shallow bell hole in the trench bottom should be made to be able to lower the pipe and make up the joint. Ensure the polyethylene wrap is overlapped at the ends of the pipe where it should be secured with circumferential tape.  FIGURE 20: POLYETHYLENE WRAPPING AROUND DUCTILE IRON PIPE (DIPRA, 2016) Restrained mechanical joints will be used to secure the pipe lengths together and resist thrusting forces as an alternative to thrust blocks where space is limited or soil behind the thrust block may be disturbed; otherwise regular mechanical joints will be used. The mechanical joint has four parts: a flange cast with the bell; a rubber gasket that fits in the bell recess; a gland, or follower ring, to compress the  39  gasket; and tee head bolts and nuts for tightening the joint. Joint assembly is very simple and requires only one tool — an ordinary ratchet wrench. (DIPRA, 2016). 4.2.2.4 BACKFILL Carefully backfill the trench according to the procedures in AWWA C600 Standard and UBC Technical Guidelines. To prevent damage during backfilling, allow adequate slack in the tube at the joint. Backfill should be free of cinders, rocks, boulders, nails, sticks, or other materials that might damage the polyethylene. Avoid damaging the polyethylene when using tamping devices.  FIGURE 21: TYPICAL BACKFILL WITH BEDDING AND COMPACTED FILL MATERIAL 4.2.2.5 BLOW OFFS AND VENTS The discharge for blowoffs and drains should be installed so that there is no possibility of sewage or other contamination entering the water main. The blowoffs and drains should discharge above ground and have an air gap of at least two pipe diameters at the sewer or receiving stream. Air release and vacuum vents should be provided at high points in the line as well as in areas of negative pressure. All dead ends on new mains should be closed with plugs or caps that are suitably restrained to prevent blowing off under pressure. All dead ends should be equipped with suitable blowoff or venting devices (DIPRA, 2016).  40  4.3 TESTING & SERVICE TIE-IN The pipes will be filled from a local hydrant, followed by tests and inspections by the engineers, owner’s representatives, and relevant authorities. Newly installed pipelines are normally pressure tested to confirm proper installation of joints and fittings. When the new pipeline is initially filled, a calculation of a volume of make-up water is determined according to the size and length of the pipeline being tested. The make-up water allowance accounts for the absorption of water by the lining and the extension (lengthening) of pipe joints due to the thrust forces that occur when the pipeline is first pressurized. The allowance is not a measure of leakage through improperly installed joints (DIPRA, 2016).  Then the tank will be disinfected to meet the standard for receiving drinking water. All new water systems or extensions to existing systems should be disinfected in accordance with ANSI and AWWA before being placed in service. Disinfection of mains will be accomplished with chlorine or other disinfecting agents through the continuous feed, slug, or tablet method. Following chlorination, the main should be flushed as soon as possible (within 24 hours) since prolonged exposure to high concentrations of chlorine can damage the seal and coat of system components. After the final flushing, bacteriological tests should be performed in accordance with state and local regulations to ensure that there are no coliform organisms.  The tanks will be filled to its maximum water level for 24 hours. During the next 72 hours, the drop of water level will be measured to compare against calculated water loss due to the evaporation. If the water loss is within an acceptable range, the project will proceed to the next step. Otherwise the testing will be extended to 5 days, by the end of which the average water loss will be used to compare to the standard.  41  4.4 BACKFILL AND SITE RESTORATION Once the tanks have passed the water tightness test and necessary repair has been undertaken, the site will be backfilled and graded. The turf field will be laid as original and the surrounding landscape will be restored at the same time. 4.5 ANTICIPATED ISSUES 1. Removal of scaffoldings and formworks The removal of the scaffoldings and formworks of the roof slab will be challenging as the tank is an enclosed space with a small roof hatch opening. The issue will be addressed by pouring the concrete in two stages. The first stage will be the majority of the area with the scaffoldings and concrete forms being transported through the smaller area left behind. Then the scaffolding and formworks for stage two pour will be transported through the roof hatch.  2. Narrow space between secant piles and tank walls Narrow spaces between the secant piles and the tank walls is also a challenge while constructing the formwork of the roof slab between the wall and the secant piles. Extra safety precaution will be taken to avoid hazard of confined space. 3. Integrity of interior waterproof layer The waterproof layer at the interior of the tank can be damaged while the roof slab is being constructed. The ends of the scaffoldings should be wrapped to avoid scratching or penetration of the membrane.  4. Pipe connection through secant piles Holes will have to be drilled through the interlocked secant piles for the pipes. Special attention is needed to make sure the structural integrity is not compromised.    42  5. Continuous pour of tank walls  To avoid construction joints that may lead to water leakage, the 7m tank walls will be poured in one continuous operation. The mixing of aggregates and cement required extra attention to ensure adequate bonding.    43  5.0 MAINTENANCE PLAN 5.1 OBSERVATIONS REQUIRED AFTER CONSTRUCTION  Once construction is complete a series of tests are required to ensure the system is operating as intended, as detailed in Section 4.3. “To verify the source of water from a suspected leak, it may be helpful to check for chlorine or use a non-toxic dye inside the tank” (AWWA). The most effective way to locate leaks is to use a trained diver to place a water-proofing membrane or a sterile cotton ball over a suspicious crack or rock pocket. The diver should have an underwater camera, as well as underwater note-writing material.  5.2 TANK MAINTENANCE  All maintenance procedures are according to AWWA standards.  5.2.1 RATIONALE FOR MAINTENANCE  Preventive maintenance will always be less expensive than crisis maintenance. Without regular maintenance possible faults caused from the construction process or even over time, may go without notice. If not repaired, these can result in costly fixes, or in extreme cases, compromise the tank system.  It should be noted that having an underground tank means that the water is kept much cooler. This combined with the lack of light, means that algae growth is eliminated. This elongates the lifespan of equipment such as pumps and valves and ensures that the water quality remains high and suitable for use. Concrete also keeps water much cooler than any other material so there is a far less likelihood of algae or other growth (Versatile Tanks, 2017).  5.2.2 MAINTENANCE PROCEDURE Tanks should be examined after one year of service or during any time there is a suspected problem.   44  1. Constantly monitor tank water pressure and water levels.  If water levels vary outside of normal levels, the tank will be valved off and the water level will be checked. Suitable water tightness is achieved if the tank does not lose more than 0.05% of its full-tank volume in a 24-hour period 2. Monthly visual inspections Assess the condition of the surrounding field and analyze the pressure and flow data from the tank.  A qualified plumber should also carry out a routine check on back flow prevention valves inside the tank once every 12 months. 3. Conduct a comprehensive investigation every 5 years American Water Works Association (AWWA) states that, “Tanks should be washed out and inspected at least once every five years.” (AWWA M42-88). A trained diver is employed to inspect the tank. All valves and pumps will be closed and turned off prior to inspection. Divers will locate any possible defects or cracks along the interior of the wall, roof, and floor surface by locating silt buildup or releasing an indicator such as a USEPA/NSF approved dye or a sterile cotton ball.  Leaks can also be found in the tank, when the tank is drained and observed from the inside. The tank must first be washed out and drained before inspection begins. The key duties are as follows. Check Sanitary Conditions: roof openings, access hatches, low spots, vents, overflows. Check Structural Conditions: foundations, ladders, walls, baffle walls, cracks, and erosion.  Check Coating Conditions: type of current coating, thickness of coating, adhesion/cohesion, and typical life of an interior coating is 12-15 years.   45  Check Safety Conditions: OSHA standards, ladders, fall prevention, access hatches, and handrails. After inspection is complete and after leaving the tank, check that all access hatches are locked.  With the redundancy of having two water storage tanks, when performing a full maintenance check on one of the tanks, the other tank can remain in operation due to the constructed bypass system in the pipes. This prevents the entire system from being compromised in the rare event that an earthquake occurs during a dry inspection of one of the tanks.  “Underground water tank inspections can also be performed with a robot, which eliminates the need to drain the tank and does not require lock out/tag out procedures or confined space permits, because no one enters the tank. However, to perform a robotic inspection the underground tank must be equipped with a manway at least 24 inches wide.” (Henderson, 2017) 5.2.3 REPAIRS If the tank fails the water tightness test or has any other defects found through the inspection process, the tank shall be repaired after permission from UBC.  Rock pockets and other defective concrete can be repaired using Epoxy Injection Grouting. The defective concrete is removed and replaced with non-shrink aggregate grout and bonded to the concrete using an epoxy agent. When epoxy grouting is needed, a low-viscosity, two-component, water-insensitive, nontoxic epoxy-resin system with an inline metering and mixing system will be used and procedure will follow procedures provided by AWWA D115-95.  5.2.4 SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS  Safety conditions of fixed ladders are as per 29 CFR 1910.27:  Minimum design load of 200 lbs;  46   12 in. rung distance;  16 in. minimum side rail distance;  7 in. toe clearance;  15 in. clearance from centerline;  30 in. headroom. The water tank is a confined space and the washout inspection team must have a minimum of a 3-person crew and follow the permit required confined space rules. This includes having at minimum an Attendant, Entrant, and Supervisor.  Under water observations undertaken by a diver should never occur without carefully observing safety procedures. All valves at outlets should be guarded or closed, and suitable lighting should be provided. 5.3 PIPE MAINTENANCE  The pipe network will undergo regular maintenance to guarantee the water quality and pressure being delivered to UBC. The following sections outline the tests, procedures and standards we will follow though the lifetime of the pipe network. 5.3.1 FLUSHING Flushing of the system will be mandatory after the initial installation of the pipe network, and after any maintenance efforts. Flushing will help evacuate foreign material within the system which can cause leakage at the valves. By opening and closing valves multiple times during the expected line pressure and flow will push foreign material out of the system. Table 9 of the Ductile Iron Pipe Installation Guide outlines the required flow rates needed to flush out pipes of different diameters. To ensure the safety of the campus, service will be temporarily disrupted until the pipe system is properly flushed and disinfected.   47  5.3.2 PHYSICAL REPAIRS  Throughout the lifetime of the pipe network, it will be exposed to various risks for damage including corrosion, ingrown roots and freezing. To avoid extended service disruption, regular maintenance is going to be conducted throughout the network. To help facilitate maintenance, we will have an inventory of repair material onsite including but not limited to joint split sleeves, interior joint seal devices and bell clamps. Physical maintenance of pipes will also follow the sanitary and disinfecting procedures outlined in AWWA C651 to ensure the integrity of system. To ensure the safety of the workers and the public during repairs, AWWA standard safety procedures will be followed. To further guarantee safety, only experienced crews will be contracted for repairs, and all repairs will be followed by hydrostatic pressure tests and a thorough flushing of the system.  5.4 COST Maintenance costs covering the lifetime of the system are estimated to be 30% of the total cost of the project.  48  6.0 COST ESTIMATE The detailed cost estimate was completed through the use of RS Means which has an accurate and extensive database for labour, material, and equipment rates. The estimate was split into 2 parts, one focused on the tank and one focused on the pipe network. The 2016 Standard Format was used to organize line items which is also consistent with RS Means. To ensure no construction costs were missed, the construction plan to account for all the labour, material and equipment costs for each component of both the tank and the pipe network was used. Once all the unit rates were filled in quantities calculated during the design phase were used to obtain a base cost for the project. Each item was marked up 20% for contingency and an additional 15% for overhead and profit to give a price of $5,606,322.96 for the tank and $2,763,990.45 for the pipe network. To obtain the cost of the whole project, administration, management, planning, design and other critical items were added to the construction costs to give a grand total of $12,891,832.70. A Breakdown of the estimate is featured below, however the detailed estimate can be found in Appendix C.   49  TABLE 1: COST ESTIMATE OVERVIEW     50  7.0 SCHEDULE The construction of the tanks will take 25 weeks from May 1st, 2018 to October, 22th, 2018.  Following is a table summarizing the milestones for all stages. A Gantt chart of the construction schedule with detailed activities can be found in Appendix D.  TABLE 2: SCHEDULE OVERVIEW Construction Stages Dates Foundation system May 8th, 2018 - July 13th 2018 Storage system July 17th, 2018 - September 12th, 2018 Pipe construction May 4th, 2018 - June 20th, 2018 Service tie-in and testing September 13th, 2018 - September 25th, 2018 Backfill and site restoration September 25th, 2018 - October 22th, 2018     51  8.0 RECCOMENDATIONS FOR DESIGN IMPROVEMENT To analyze and provide a solution to the design problem, a number of reasonable design assumptions were made. If more site data and accurate water model are provided, the proposed water supply and distribution design can be significantly improved in terms of structural performance, cost and construction impacts. The following is list of recommendations for design improvement.  EPANET Model: An accurate EPANET water model would be helpful to determine if the implementation of the design would work within the existing system. For a successful run, several pipe diameters had to be changed on the model based on estimated values;  Below Grade Behavior during Earthquake: More information and expertise on the behavior of below grade concrete during an earthquake is required to better design the structural components of the tank. Currently, the tank is designed for earthquake risks by assuming larger load factors;  Dynamic Analysis: Access to finite element analysis software will be helpful to allow us to model our design more accurately and reduce the number of assumptions made, and potentially a program that could model dynamic loads such as an earthquake;  Additional Site Condition Data: CPT testing and additional borehole samples for the soil in the area so there  is a better idea of the soil quality and the improvements that would have to be made to reduce liquefaction risks;  Additional Utilities Data: Survey data of below ground utilities to detect any potential clashes of existing and proposed utilities.    52  9.0 REFERENCES   Allan, G. R., P.E., & Krugger, R. (2012). Shining a light on distribution storage water quality. Journal of the New England Water Works Association, 126(1), 16-21. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/login?url=https://search-proquest-com.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/docview/1009077949?accountid=14656 AWWA Staff (2005a). Standard for Wire- and Strand-Wound Circular, Prestressed Concrete Water Tanks. Denver, CO: American Water Works Association. AWWA Staff. (2005b). Water Chlorination/Chloramination Practices and Principles. Denver, CO: American Water Works Association.  AWWA Staff. (2005c). Water Distribution Operator Training Handbook. Denver, CO: American Water Works Association. AWWA Staff. (2005d) Standard for Circular Prestressed Concrete Water Tanks with Circumferential Tendons. Denver, CO: American Water Works Association BenzuJK. (2011). Thumb rules for designing a Column layout [Blog Post]. Retrieved from http://www.civilprojectsonline.com/building-construction/thumb-rules-for-designing-a-column-layout-building-construction/ Brebbia, C.A., & Maugeri, M. (2011). Earthquake Resistant Engineering Structures VIII. Retrieved from: https://books.google.ca/books?id=N514UytMXgwC&pg=PA295&lpg=PA295&dq=baffle+walls+for+earthquake+resistance&source=bl&ots=m8_-jUsckp&sig=yffsvtXrB6Sm2Yxb3KLTcfYdfR8&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjwsMeLwsTXAhWiiFQKHVhVB3EQ6AEIOjAH#v=onepage&q&f=false Brzev, S., & Pao, J. (2013). Reinforced concrete design: A practical approach. Toronto, ON: Pearson Learning Solutions.  BTL Liners. (2016). Essentials for Choosing Potable Water Tank Lining. Retrieved from http://www.btlliners.com/potable-water-tank-lining/ Canadian Geotechnical Society. (2006). Canadian Foundation Engineering Manual, 4th Edition. Richmond, BC: BiTech. A3 City of Vancouver. (2016). Utilities Design and Construction Manual. Retrieved from http://vancouver.ca/files/cov/UtilitiesDesignConstructionManual.pdf Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association. (2016). Installation Guide for Ductile Iron Pipe. Goldem, CO: Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association. Duer, M. (2011). Passive Mixing Systems Improve Storage Tanks Water Quality. Opflow, Volume 37. Retrieved from: https://www.awwa.org/publications/opflow/abstract/articleid/28265.aspx  Fellenius, B.H. (2017). Basics of Foundation Design: Electronic Edition.  Grundfos Canada. (2018, February 15). Retrieved from https://ca.grundfos.com/  53  Hadhoud, H. (2012). Design of Water Tanks: Part (2) Underground Tanks [Powerpoint slides]. Retrieved from http://www.unimasr.net/ums/upload/files/2012/Dec/UniMasr.com_e48fa8fd40d2b46112e58cd94471f1be Hendersen, E. (2017). Maintaining an Underground Potable Water Tank. Retrieved from https://foresternetwork.com/daily/water/water-storage/maintaining-an-underground-potable-water-tank/ Klein, D.R., Ebrahimi, G., Navilloz, L., & Thurm, B. (2014). Water Management at UBC. Retrieved from: http://watergovernance.sites.olt.ubc.ca/files/2014/08/UBC-IRM-Strategy-with-a-Water-Lens-FINAL-1.pdf Marquez, D., Lau, D.T., & Qu, F.  (1997). Earthquake-resistant design of liquid storage tanks. Ottawa: National Library of Canada = Bibliothèque nationale du Canada. National Building Code of Canada, 2015. (2016, February 10). Determine 2015 National Building Code of Canada seismic hazard values. Retrieved from: http://www.earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca/hazard-alea/interpolat/index_2015-en.php Piteau Associates. (2002). Hydrogeological and Geotechnical Assessment of Northwest Area UBC Campus, Vancouver. Vancouver, BC.  Raito, Inc. (2017). Liquefaction Prevention. [online] Available at: https://www.raitoinc.com/applications/liquefaction-prevention/ [Accessed 26 Nov. 2017]. Reinforced Polypropylene Geomembrane. (n.d.). Retrieved November 25, 2017, from http://www.geomembrane.com/products/reinforced-polypropylene-geomembranes.html Suroor, H., Galagoda, M., & McGhee, C. (2008). Design and Construction of Circular Secant Pile Walls in Soft Clays. International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering, Arlington, VA, USA, 2008.  Tomlinson, M. & Woodward, J. (2008). Pile Design and Construction Practice: Fifth Edition. New York, NY: Taylor and Francis.  UBC Building Operations. (2017). UBC Technical Guidelines: Section 33 10 00 Water Utilities. Vancouver, BC.  UBC Campus and Community Planning. (2015). Land Use Plan for The University of British Columbia Point Grey Campus. Vancouver, BC.  UBC Energy & Water Services. (2014). Emergency Water Response Plan Water Utility. Vancouver, BC.  Versatile Tanks. (2017) Underground Concrete Water Tanks – Your Definitive Guide. Retrieved From http://www.versatiletanks.com.au/underground-concrete-water-tanks/             APPENDIX A: DETAILED DESIGN DRAWINGS DRAWING INDEX00 - COVER PAGE01- TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS02 - PLAN OVERVIEW03- PLAN LAYOUT04 - WALL AND COLUMN DETAILS05 - FLOOR AND ROOF SLAB DETAILS06 - FRICTION AND SECANT PILE DETAILS07 - PIPE SYSTEM OVERVIEW08 - INFLOW FROM EXISTING SYSTEM09 - INFLOW TO TANK10 - TANK TO TANK CONNECTION11 - OUTFLOW FROM TANK12 - OUTFLOW TO EXISTING SYSTEM13 - BYPASS VALVEUBC WATER STORAGE SUPPLY SYSTEMISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTIONAPRIL 2018SITE LOCATIONTECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONSCONSIDERED IN DESIGNOVERVIEW PLAN LAYOUT1SCALE: 1:1000R18m TANKR18m TANKKEN WOODSFIELDWARRENFIELDDOUG MITCHELLTHUNDERBIRDSPORTS CENTRER0.25 CONCRETECOLUMN5 COLUMNS @ 5m4.97 4.977.29 7.298.004.977.298.007.294.975 COLUMNS @ 5mR0.9 SECANT PILES350mmTHICK WALL500mmTHICK GAPR0.3 FRICTION PILE3.50mRADIAL SPACING350mmTHICK WALL500mmTHICK GAPR0.9 SECANT PILESR0.25 CONCRETECOLUMNCONCRETE BAFFLE WALLSPPPSUBMERSIBLE OUTFLOW PUMPRECIRCULATION PUMP450mm OUTFLOW PIPER0.9 SECANT PILESCONCRETE BAFFLE WALLSR0.25 CONCRETECOLUMN200mm INFLOW PIPERECIRCULATION PUMP450mm CONNECTOR PIPESCALE: 1:150PLAN VIEW WITH COLUMNS3SCALE: 1:150PLAN VIEW WITH FRICTION PILES4PLAN VIEW OF TANKS2SCALE: 1:350INFORMATION ONLYAQUASTORISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION0303 04.18NOTES:   1.  DETAILS WERE DESIGNED ACCORDING TO SPECIFICATIONS FOUND ON DRAWING 01 A A10M TIE8x25M BARS15M @ 165mm25M @ 130mmB B15M @ 165mm25M @ 130mmSECTION A-AEXTERIOR WALL6SCALE: 1:10TYPICAL INTERIOR TIED COLUMN5SCALE: 1:10SCALE: 1:10SECTION B-BSCALE: 1:10TIES @ 210mmTIES @ 410mm500mmSPACING AS PER CSA GUIDELINES25M BARS10M TIES100mm COVER1.4db MIN. DISTANCEAS PER CSA GUIDLINES35mm350mm6800mmTOTAL COLUMN LENGTH 6800mm350mmFLOOR SLAB FLOOR SLABROOF SLABFOR COLUMN TO ROOFSLAB CONNECTIONSEE DETAIL 8FOR FULL FLOOR SLABDETAIL SEE DETAIL 7FOR FULL FLOOR SLABDETAIL SEE DETAIL 7FOR FULL ROOF SLABDETAIL SEE DETAIL 875mm COVER75mm COVER100mm COVERNOTES:1. DETAILS WERE DESIGNED ACCORDINGTO SPECIFICATIONS FOUND ONDRAWING 0112x15M @ 260mm12x15M @ 125mm15M @ 330mm12x15M @ 260mmSECANT PILE WALLINTERIORCOLUMN10M TIES25M BARS25M BARS25M BARS10M TIES @400mm22x35M @ 90mm350mm 500mm900mmROOF SLAB8SCALE: 1:10FLOOR SLAB7SCALE: 1:10300mmFOR FULL COLUMNDETAIL SEE DETAIL 5FOR FULL WALLDETAIL SEE DETAIL 6FOR FULL SECANT PILEDETAIL SEE DETAIL 960mm  COVER750mmTOTAL LENGTH 36000mm50mm  COVERNOTES:1. BOTH FLOOR AND ROOF SLABS ARECIRCULAR WITH A DIAMETER OF 36m2. DETAILS WERE DESIGNED ACCORDINGTO SPECIFICATIONS FOUND ONDRAWING 018x25M10M TIE12x15M @ 125mmC CTYPICAL SECANT PILE9SCALE: 1:10SECTION C-CSCALE: 1:10TIES @ 400mm900mm25M BARS10M TIESTOTAL PILE LENGTH 45000mmROOF SLAB100mm COVERFOR FULL ROOF SLABDETAIL SEE DETAIL 8TYPICAL FRICTION PILE10SCALE: 1:10SECTION D-DSCALE: 1:10LOAD DISTRIBUTION CONETIES @ 400mmTOTAL PILE LENGTH 2000mm25M BARS10M TIES60mm COVER8x25M10M TIELOAD DISTRIBUTION CONELOAD TRANSFERREDFROM FLOOR SLAB TOFRICTION PILENOTES:1. DETAILS WERE DESIGNED ACCORDINGTO SPECIFICATIONS FOUND ONDRAWING 01PPPPLAN SYSTEM OVERVIEW11SCALE: 1:100AQUASTORISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION03 04.1807OUTFLOW CONNECTIONPAGE 12INFLOW CONNECTIONPAGE 08TANK OUTFLOW CONNECTIONPAGE 11NORTH TANK BYPASSPAGE 13SOUTH TANK BYPASSPAGE 13TANK INFLOW CONNECTIONPAGE 09TANK TANK CONNECTIONPAGE 10NOTES:1. DETAILS WERE DESIGNED ACCORDINGTO SPECIFICATIONS FOUND ONDRAWING 01250mm (10") EXIST. UBCDUCTILE IRON200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE200mm(8") BRANCH PIPE CONNECTIONAND REINFORCING COLLAR200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 CHECK VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)300mm STUB (TYP.)300mm STUB (TYP.)20mm DIA. EXTENSION ROD C/W50mm SOCKET AND PIN WITHIN150mm OF SURFACESERVICE BOX AE CONCRETE250mm (10") EXIST. UBCDUCTILE IRON200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE200mm(8") BRANCH PIPE CONNECTIONAND REINFORCING COLLAR200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 CHECK VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)300mm STUB (TYP.)300mm STUB (TYP.)PLAN 200mm INFLOW FROM EXST.13SCALE: 1:10AQUASTORISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION03 04.1808PROFILE  200mm INFLOW FROM EXST.12SCALE: 1:10HARNESS ASSEMBLY DETAIL (TYP.)14SCALE: 1:2NOTES:1. DETAILS WERE DESIGNED ACCORDINGTO SPECIFICATIONS FOUND ONDRAWING 01250mm (10") EXIST. UBCDUCTILE IRON200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE200mm(8") BRANCH PIPE CONNECTIONAND REINFORCING COLLAR457mm (18") GATE VALVECONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUTCONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUT457mm (18") DOUBLEDOOR CHECK VALVECONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUTR0.25 CONCRETECOLUMNCONCRETE BAFFLE WALLSPPPSUBMERSIBLE OUTFLOW PUMPRECIRCULATION PUMP450mm OUTFLOW PIPER0.9 SECANT PILESCONCRETE BAFFLE WALLSR0.25 CONCRETECOLUMN200mm INFLOW PIPERECIRCULATION PUMP450mm CONNECTOR PIPE200mm 90 DEGREE SHORTRADIUS ELBOWDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 CHECK VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)TYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)200 mm (8")NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50TYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)250mm (10") EXIST. UBCDUCTILE IRON200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE200mm(8") BRANCH PIPE CONNECTIONAND REINFORCING COLLAR200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 CHECK VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)PPPSEAL AROUND OPENING WITH 300mm MIN LAP AT THE END (TYP)DRILL- IN HOOK DOWELS EMBEDDEDINTO PRECAST CONCRETE WALL (TYP.)450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVECONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUT200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE200mm TEE CONNECTIONDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50300mm STUB (TYP.)300mm STUB (TYP.)300mm STUB (TYP.)300mm STUB (TYP.)300mm STUB (TYP.) 300mm STUB (TYP.)CONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUTSEAL AROUND OPENING WITH 300mm MIN LAP AT THE END (TYP)DRILL- IN HOOK DOWELS EMBEDDEDINTO PRECAST CONCRETE WALL (TYP.)450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)450mm TEE CONNECTIONDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50450mm TEE CONNECTIONDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE 300mm STUB (TYP.)TYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)200mm 90 DEGREE SHORTRADIUS ELBOWDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50200mm 90 DEGREE SHORTRADIUS ELBOWDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50600mm (24") EXIST. UBCDUCTILE IRON450 mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE450mm(18") BRANCH PIPE CONNECTIONAND REINFORCING COLLAR450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 CHECK VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)300mm STUB (TYP.)600mm (24") EXIST.UBC DUCTILE IRON450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE450mm (18") BRANCH PIPE CONNECTIONAND REINFORCINGCOLLAR450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 CHECK VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)300mm STUB (TYP.)20mm DIA. EXTENSION ROD C/W50mm SOCKET AND PIN WITHIN150mm OF SURFACESERVICE BOX AE CONCRETE20mm DIA. EXTENSION ROD C/W50mm SOCKET AND PIN WITHIN150mm OF SURFACESERVICE BOX AE CONCRETECONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHENINTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OFCONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACEOF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUTSEAL AROUND OPENING WITH 300mm MIN LAP ATTHE END (TYP)DRILL- IN HOOKDOWELS EMBEDDEDINTO PRECAST CONCRETE WALL (TYP.)TYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)WALL INFILL AND CONCRETEBLOCKOUT DETAIL (TYP.)200mm 90 DEGREE SHORTRADIUS ELBOWDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50NEW DUCTILE IRONCLASS 50 GATE VALVE20mm DIA. EXTENSIONROD C/W 50mm SOCKETAND PIN WITHIN150mm OF SURFACESERVICE BOX AECONCRETEEXTENSION ROD AND SERVICEBOX (REFER TO DETAIL 21)200 mm (8")NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50TYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)WALL INFILL AND CONCRETEBLOCKOUT DETAIL (TYP.)200mm 90 DEGREE SHORTRADIUS ELBOWDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50CONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHENINTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OFCONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACEOF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUTSEAL AROUND OPENING WITH 300mm MIN LAP ATTHE END (TYP)DRILL- IN HOOKDOWELS EMBEDDEDINTO PRECAST CONCRETE WALL (TYP.)WALL INFILL AND CONCRETEBLOCKOUT DETAIL (TYP.)16SCALE: 1:2200mm TANK INFLOW CONNECTION15SCALE: 1:5AQUASTORISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION03 04.1809NOTES:1. DETAILS WERE DESIGNED ACCORDINGTO SPECIFICATIONS FOUND ONDRAWING 01250mm (10") EXIST. UBCDUCTILE IRON200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE200mm(8") BRANCH PIPE CONNECTIONAND REINFORCING COLLAR457mm (18") GATE VALVECONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUTCONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUT457mm (18") DOUBLEDOOR CHECK VALVECONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUTR0.25 CONCRETECOLUMNCONCRETE BAFFLE WALLSPPPSUBMERSIBLE OUTFLOW PUMPRECIRCULATION PUMP450mm OUTFLOW PIPER0.9 SECANT PILESCONCRETE BAFFLE WALLSR0.25 CONCRETECOLUMN200mm INFLOW PIPERECIRCULATION PUMP450mm CONNECTOR PIPE200mm 90 DEGREE SHORTRADIUS ELBOWDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 CHECK VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)TYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)200 mm (8")NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50TYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)250mm (10") EXIST. UBCDUCTILE IRON200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE200mm(8") BRANCH PIPE CONNECTIONAND REINFORCING COLLAR200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 CHECK VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)PPPSEAL AROUND OPENING WITH 300mm MIN LAP AT THE END (TYP)DRILL- IN HOOK DOWELS EMBEDDEDINTO PRECAST CONCRETE WALL (TYP.)450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVECONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUT200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE200mm TEE CONNECTIONDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50300mm STUB (TYP.)300mm STUB (TYP.)300mm STUB (TYP.)300mm STUB (TYP.)300mm STUB (TYP.) 300mm STUB (TYP.)CONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUTSEAL AROUND OPENING WITH 300mm MIN LAP AT THE END (TYP)DRILL- IN HOOK DOWELS EMBEDDEDINTO PRECAST CONCRETE WALL (TYP.)450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)450mm TEE CONNECTIONDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50450mm TEE CONNECTIONDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE 300mm STUB (TYP.)TYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)200mm 90 DEGREE SHORTRADIUS ELBOWDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50200mm 90 DEGREE SHORTRADIUS ELBOWDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50600mm (24") EXIST. UBCDUCTILE IRON450 mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE450mm(18") BRANCH PIPE CONNECTIONAND REINFORCING COLLAR450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 CHECK VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)300mm STUB (TYP.)600mm (24") EXIST.UBC DUCTILE IRON450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE450mm (18") BRANCH PIPE CONNECTIONAND REINFORCINGCOLLAR450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 CHECK VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)300mm STUB (TYP.)20mm DIA. EXTENSION ROD C/W50mm SOCKET AND PIN WITHIN150mm OF SURFACESERVICE BOX AE CONCRETE20mm DIA. EXTENSION ROD C/W50mm SOCKET AND PIN WITHIN150mm OF SURFACESERVICE BOX AE CONCRETECONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHENINTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OFCONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACEOF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUTSEAL AROUND OPENING WITH 300mm MIN LAP ATTHE END (TYP)DRILL- IN HOOKDOWELS EMBEDDEDINTO PRECAST CONCRETE WALL (TYP.)TYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)WALL INFILL AND CONCRETEBLOCKOUT DETAIL (TYP.)200mm 90 DEGREE SHORTRADIUS ELBOWDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50NEW DUCTILE IRONCLASS 50 GATE VALVE20mm DIA. EXTENSIONROD C/W 50mm SOCKETAND PIN WITHIN150mm OF SURFACESERVICE BOX AECONCRETEEXTENSION ROD AND SERVICEBOX (REFER TO DETAIL 21)CONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUTCONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUTTYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)SEAL AROUND OPENING WITH 300mm MIN LAP AT THE END (TYP)DRILL- IN HOOK DOWELS EMBEDDEDINTO PRECAST CONCRETE WALL (TYP.)450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS) 300mm STUB (TYP.)450mm TEE CONNECTIONDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50PLAN TANK - TANK CONNECTION17SCALE: 1:16AQUASTORISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION03 04.1810NOTES:1. DETAILS WERE DESIGNED ACCORDINGTO SPECIFICATIONS FOUND ONDRAWING 01CONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUTSEAL AROUND OPENING WITH 300mm MIN LAP AT THE END (TYP)DRILL- IN HOOK DOWELS EMBEDDEDINTO PRECAST CONCRETE WALL (TYP.)450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)450mm TEE CONNECTIONDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE 300mm STUB (TYP.)AQUASTORISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION03 04.1811PLAN 450mm TANK OUTFLOW CONNECTION18SCALE: 1:10NOTES:1. DETAILS WERE DESIGNED ACCORDINGTO SPECIFICATIONS FOUND ONDRAWING 01600mm (24") EXIST.UBC DUCTILE IRON450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE450mm (18") BRANCH PIPE CONNECTIONAND REINFORCINGCOLLAR450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 CHECK VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)300mm STUB (TYP.)EXTENSION ROD AND SERVICEBOX (REFER TO DETAIL 21)600mm (24") EXIST. UBCDUCTILE IRON450 mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE450mm(18") BRANCH PIPE CONNECTIONAND REINFORCING COLLAR450mm (18") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 CHECK VALVETYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)300mm STUB (TYP.)NEW DUCTILE IRONCLASS 50 GATE VALVE20mm DIA. EXTENSIONROD C/W 50mm SOCKETAND PIN WITHIN150mm OF SURFACESERVICE BOX AECONCRETEAQUASTORISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION03 04.1812PLAN 450mm OUTFLOW TO EXST.20 SCALE: 1:10PROFILE  450mm OUTFLOW TO EXIST.19 SCALE: 1:10EXTENSION ROD AND SERVICE BOX21SCALE: 1:8NOTES:1. DETAILS WERE DESIGNED ACCORDINGTO SPECIFICATIONS FOUND ONDRAWING 01200mm 90 DEGREE SHORTRADIUS ELBOWDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50TYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVECONTACT LENGTH (TYP.)CONCRETE WALL INFILLROUGHEN INTERFACE (TYP.)INSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLOUTSIDE FACE OF CONCRETE WALLCONCRETE BLOCKOUT200mm (8") NEW DUCTILEIRON CLASS 50 GATE VALVE200mm TEE CONNECTIONDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50300mm STUB (TYP.)TYPICAL HARNESS INSTALLATION ANDTIE-ROD (C/W FLEXIBLE COUPLING/AND JOINT RESTRAINT  HARNESS)200mm 90 DEGREE SHORTRADIUS ELBOWDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50200mm 90 DEGREE SHORTRADIUS ELBOWDUCTILE IRON CLASS 50AQUASTORISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION03 04.1813PLAN NORTH TANK BYPASS23 SCALE: 1:10PLAN  SOUTH TANK BYPASS22SCALE: 1:10NOTES:1. DETAILS WERE DESIGNED ACCORDINGTO SPECIFICATIONS FOUND ONDRAWING 01        APPENDIX B: TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS ACI CONCRETE 301-16 Specifications for Structural Concrete 302.1R-15 Guide to Concrete Floor and Slab Construction 347R-14 Guide to Formwork for Concrete 360R-10 Guide to Design of Slabs-on-Ground 364.11T-15 Managing Alkali-Aggregate Reaction Expansion in Mass Concrete 421.3R-15 Guide to Design of Reinforced Two-Way Slab Systems 311.4R-05: Guide for Concrete Inspection 350.3-06 Seismic Design of Liquid-Containing Concrete Structures and Commentary  439.4R-09 Report on Steel Reinforcement - Material Properties and U.S. Availability (Reapproved 2017) ITG-4.2R-06 Materials and Quality Considerations for High-Strength Concrete in Moderate to High Seismic Applications SP-127: Earthquake-Resistant Concrete Structures--Inelastic Response and Design 304: Measuring, Mixing, Transporting, and Placing Concrete 305: Hot Weather Concreting 306: Cold Weather Concreting 308: Curing Concrete CSA CONCRETE A23.1-14/A23.2-14 - Concrete materials and methods of concrete construction / Test methods and standard practices for concrete S269.3-M92(R2013) - Concrete Formwork A3000-13: Cementitious Materials Compendium A23.1 - Concrete Materials and Methods of Concrete Construction  A23.2 - Test Methods and Standard Practices for Concrete A23.3 - Design of Concrete Structures  A23.4 Precast Concrete - Materials and Construction G30.18 - Carbon Steel Bars for Concrete Reinforcement  W186 - Welding of Reinforcing Bars in Reinforced Concrete Construction  G164 - Hot Dip Galvanizing of Irregularly Shaped Articles   O86 - Engineering Design in Wood (Limit States Design)  S269.1 - Falsework for Construction Purposes  S269.3 - Concrete Formwork A3000 - Cementitious Materials Compendium A283 Qualification Code for Concrete Testing Laboratories ASTM   CONCRETE ASTM C125-18 Standard Terminology Relating to Concrete and Concrete Aggregates ASTM C33/C33M-16e1 Standard Specification for Concrete Aggregates ASTM D4258-05(2017) Standard Practice for Surface Cleaning Concrete for Coating ASTM C150 / C150M - 17 Standard Specification for Portland Cement A704 / A704M - 17 Standard Specification for Welded Steel Plain Bar or Rod Mats for Concrete Reinforcement D1752 - Standard Specification for Stainless Steel Bolts, Hex Cap Screws, and Studs  F593 - Standard Specification for Preformed Sponge Rubber Cork and Recycled PVC Expansion Joint Fillers for Concrete Paving and Structural Construction  C309 - Standard Specification for Liquid Membrane-Forming Compounds for Curing Concrete C260 - Standard Specification for Air Entraining Admixtures for Concrete C157 - Standard Test Method for Length Change of Hardened Hydraulic-Cement Mortar and Concrete C494 - Standard Specifications for Chemical Admixtures for Concrete C1433 - Standard Specification for Precast Reinforced Concrete Monolithic Box Sections for Culverts, Storm Drains and Sewers  A36 - Standard Specification for Carbon Structural Steel  PIPE A674 – Polyethylene Encasement for Ductile Iron Pipe for Water or Other Liquids A716 - Ductile Iron Culvert Pipe A746 - Ductile Iron Gravity Sewer Pipe MAPEI CONCRETE 03 01 30   Maintenance of Cast-In-Place Concrete 03 06 00   Concrete Admixtures Xypex Chemical Corp CONCRETE 03 05 00   Integral Waterproofing of Concrete NMS PILES 31 08 13 - PILE LOAD TESTING 31 61 13 - PILE FOUNDATIONS, GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 31 63 23 - BORED CONCRETE PILES 31 62 13.19 - PRECAST CONCRETE PILES EXCAVATION 31 22 16.13 - ROADWAY SUBGRADE RESHAPING 31 23 33.01 EXCAVATING, TRENCHING AND BACKFILLING 31 23 16.26 ROCK REMOVAL PIPES 33 11 00 - GROUNDWATER SOURCES 33 14 16 - SITE WATER UTILITY DISTRIBUTION PIPING 33 14 16.13 - INCOMING SITE WATER UTILITY DISTRIBUTION PIPING 33 65 16 - DISTRIBUTION PIPING - PVC - FRP ADSC PILES Specifications for the Construction of Secant and Tangent Pile Wall Systems Using Drilled Shafts ANSI/AWWA PIPES C104/A21.4 - Cement-Mortar Lining For Ductile Iron Pipe and Fittings C105/A21.5 – Polyethylene Encasement for Ductile Iron Pipe Systems C110/A21.10 - Ductile Iron and Gray Iron Fittings C111/A21.11 - Rubber-Gasket Joints for Ductile Iron Pressure Pipe and Fittings C115/A21.15 – Flanged Ductile Iron Pipe with Ductile Iron or Gray Iron Threaded Flanges C116/A21.16 – Protective Fusion-Bonded Coatings for the Interior and Exterior Surfaces of Ductile Iron and Gray-Iron Fittings C150/A21.50 – Thickness Design of Ductile Iron Pipe C151/A21.51 - Ductile Iron Pipe, Centrifugally Cast C153/A21.53 - Ductile Iron Compact Fittings C600 - Installation of Ductile Iron Water Mains and Their Appurtenances C606 - Grooved and Shouldered Joints C651 - Disinfecting Water Mains VALVES C500 - AWWA Standard for Metal-Seated Gate Valves for Water Supply Service MSS PIPES SP-60 – Connecting Flange Joint between Tapping Sleeves and Tapping Valves SP-111 - Gray Iron and Ductile Iron Tapping Sleeves ASME VALVES B16.34 Valves – Flanged, Threaded, and Welding End  B16.1 Cast Iron Pipe Valves Flanges and Flanged Fittings  B16.5 Pipe Flanges and Flanged Fittings – NPS ½ Through NPS 24  ANSI/NSF Standard 61 VALVES/PIPES/OTHER Drinking Water System Components-Health Effects           APPENDIX C: COST ESTIMATE  Quantity             Line Number             Description             Unit             Material             Labor             Equipment                            Total              Ext. Mat.             Ext.Labor             Ext. Equip.             Ext. Total             Total Estiamte $                       1,922,071.97 Planning 1% of Construction Base Estimate 62,002.32$                             Maintenance 30% of Construction Base Estimate 1,860,069.65$                         $                          372,013.93 Preliminary Design 2% of Construction Base Estimate 124,004.64$                           Detailed Design Services 4% of Construction Base Estimate 248,009.29$                            $                          930,034.82 Environmental Compensation 20.00% -$                   15.00% -$                   930,034.82$                            $                    3,826.70 20.00% 765.34$              15.00% 574.01$               $                              5,166.05 2 023213100020Subsurface investigation, boring and exploratory drilling, initial field stake out & determination of elevations, for borings Day -$              734.16$        69.19$            803.35$           -$                   1,468.32$              138.38$              1,606.70$                     20.00% 321.34$              15.00% 241.01$              2,169.05$                               2 023213100100Subsurface investigation, boring and exploratory drilling, drawings showing boring details Total -$              335.00$        -$                335.00$           -$                   670.00$                 -$                   670.00$                        20.00% 134.00$              15.00% 100.50$              904.50$                                  2 023213100200Subsurface investigation, boring and exploratory drilling, report and recommendations from P.E. Total -$              775.00$        -$                775.00$           -$                   1,550.00$              -$                   1,550.00$                     20.00% 310.00$              15.00% 232.50$              2,092.50$                                $                791,120.32 20.00% 158,224.06$       15.00% 118,668.05$        $                       1,068,012.43 50 030130620100Patching concrete, floors, small area, regular grout, 1/4" thick S.F. 1.83$            2.08$            -$                3.91$               91.50$                104.00$                 -$                   195.50$                        20.00% 39.10$                15.00% 29.33$                263.93$                                  1428.55891 031113050015C.I.P. concrete forms, aluminum, smooth face, buy, 3' x 8', includes material only SFCA 15.88$          -$              -$                15.88$             22,685.52$         -$                       -$                   22,685.52$                   20.00% 4,537.10$           15.00% 3,402.83$           30,625.45$                             212 031519100030Anchor bolts, hooked type, single, 1/2" diameter x 8" long, installed in fresh concrete, includes nut and washer, excludes template Ea. 1.74$            2.73$            -$                4.47$               368.88$              578.76$                 -$                   947.64$                        20.00% 189.53$              15.00% 142.15$              1,279.31$                               1996.996 033053400500Structural concrete, in place, chimney foundation (5000 psi), over 5 C.Y., includes forms(4 uses), Grade 60 rebar, concrete (Portland cement Type I), placing and finishing C.Y. 214.26$        156.15$        1.10$              371.51$           427,876.36$       311,830.93$          2,196.70$           741,903.98$                 20.00% 148,380.80$       15.00% 111,285.60$       1,001,570.37$                        16.8971095 033053400700Structural concrete, in place, column (4000 psi), square, up to 1% reinforcing by area, 12" x 12", includes forms(4 uses), Grade 60 rebar, concrete (Portland cement Type I), placing and finishing C.Y. 476.14$        790.08$        104.12$          1,370.34$        8,045.39$           13,350.07$            1,759.33$           23,154.79$                   20.00% 4,630.96$           15.00% 3,473.22$           31,258.97$                             16.8971095 033113700400Structural concrete, placing, column, square or round, pumped, 12" thick, includes leveling (strike off) & consolidation, excludes material C.Y. -$              42.54$          21.30$            63.84$             -$                   718.80$                 359.91$              1,078.71$                     20.00% 215.74$              15.00% 161.81$              1,456.26$                               1996.996 033513300150Concrete finishing, fresh concrete flatwork, floors, basic finishing for unspecified flatwork, bull float, manual float & broom finish, incl edging and joints, excl placing, striking off & consolidating S.F. -$              0.54$            -$                0.54$               -$                   1,078.38$              -$                   1,078.38$                     20.00% 215.68$              15.00% 161.76$              1,455.81$                               10 038216100300Concrete impact drilling, for anchors, up to 4" D, 1/2" dia, in concrete or brick walls and floors, includes bit cost, layout and set up time, excl anchor Ea. 0.07$            7.51$            -$                7.58$               0.70$                  75.10$                   -$                   75.80$                          20.00% 15.16$                15.00% 11.37$                102.33$                                   $                    3,214.07 20.00% 642.81$              15.00% 482.11$               $                              4,338.99 189.127472 071213200012Membrane waterproofing, on slabs, felt, 1 ply, mopped S.F. 0.56$            0.66$            0.23$              1.45$               105.91$              124.82$                 43.50$                274.23$                        20.00% 54.85$                15.00% 41.13$                370.21$                                  161.809059 071213200015Membrane waterproofing, on walls, felt, 1 ply, mopped S.F. 0.56$            0.66$            0.23$              1.45$               90.61$                106.79$                 37.22$                234.62$                        20.00% 46.92$                15.00% 35.19$                316.74$                                  226 079216105800Joint sealants, rigid joint sealants, tapes, sealant, PVC foam adhesive, 1/16" x 1/4" C.L.F. 11.97$          -$              -$                11.97$             2,705.22$           -$                       -$                   2,705.22$                     20.00% 541.04$              15.00% 405.78$              3,652.05$                                $                       637.28 20.00% 127.46$              15.00% 95.59$                 $                                 860.33 4 081213130025Frames, steel, knock down, hollow metal, single, 16 ga., up to 5-3/4" deep, 3'-0" x 6'-8" Ea. 92.69$          43.23$          -$                135.92$           370.76$              172.92$                 -$                   543.68$                        20.00% 108.74$              15.00% 81.55$                733.97$                                  Tank ConstructionEnvironmentCost Estimate Contingency Overhead and ProfitDivision 08 - OpeningsDivision 07- Thermal and Moisture ProtectionDivision 03 - ConcreteDivision 02 - Existing ConditionsPlanningDesign4 089516107000 Louvers, vinyl gable vent, 8" x 8" Ea. 14.11$          9.29$            -$                23.40$             56.44$                37.16$                   -$                   93.60$                          20.00% 18.72$                15.00% 14.04$                126.36$                                   $                  52,197.15 20.00% 10,439.43$         15.00% 7,829.57$            $                            70,466.15 3 015433202150Rent piledriving hammer steam/air 15000 ft lbs @60 bpm, Incl. Hourly Oper. Cost. Week -$              -$              4,268.90$       4,268.90$        -$                   -$                       12,806.70$         12,806.70$                   20.00% 2,561.34$           15.00% 1,921.01$           17,289.05$                             3 015433202050Rent piledriving hammer steam/air 4150 ft lbs @225 bpm, Incl. Hourly Oper. Cost. Week -$              -$              2,968.95$       2,968.95$        -$                   -$                       8,906.85$           8,906.85$                     20.00% 1,781.37$           15.00% 1,336.03$           12,024.25$                             21 015419500200Crane crew, daily use for small jobs, 25-ton truck-mounted hydraulic crane, portal to portal Day -$              410.40$        1,041.20$       1,451.60$        -$                   8,618.40$              21,865.20$         30,483.60$                   20.00% 6,096.72$           15.00% 4,572.54$           41,152.86$                              $             3,299,059.62 20.00% 659,811.92$       15.00% 494,858.94$        $                       4,453,730.49 51833.281 310513100200Soils for earthwork, common borrow, spread with 200 HP dozer, includes load at pit and haul, 2 miles round trip, excludes compaction C.Y. 14.62$          2.75$            5.38$              22.75$             757,802.57$       142,541.52$          278,863.05$       1,179,207.14$              20.00% 235,841.43$       15.00% 176,881.07$       1,591,929.64$                        98 310660140500Piling special costs, cutoffs, concrete piles, plain Ea. -$              92.75$          -$                92.75$             -$                   9,089.50$              -$                   9,089.50$                     20.00% 1,817.90$           15.00% 1,363.43$           12,270.83$                             7774.99215 311413230200Topsoil stripping and stockpiling, topsoil, sandy loam, ideal conditions, 300 HP dozer C.Y. -$              0.25$            0.84$              1.09$               -$                   1,943.75$              6,530.99$           8,474.74$                     20.00% 1,694.95$           15.00% 1,271.21$           11,440.90$                             2591.66405 311413230300Topsoil stripping and stockpiling, topsoil, sandy loam, adverse conditions, 300 HP dozer C.Y. -$              0.45$            1.52$              1.97$               -$                   1,166.25$              3,939.33$           5,105.58$                     20.00% 1,021.12$           15.00% 765.84$              6,892.53$                               51833.281 312316462200Excavating, bulk, dozer, open site, bank measure, sand and gravel, 80 HP dozer, 150' haul B.C.Y. -$              3.19$            2.77$              5.96$               -$                   165,348.17$          143,578.19$       308,926.35$                 20.00% 61,785.27$         15.00% 46,338.95$         417,050.57$                           51833.281 312319200100Dewatering, excavate drainage trench, with backhoe, 2' wide x 3' deep C.Y. -$              6.93$            3.16$              10.09$             -$                   359,204.64$          163,793.17$       522,997.81$                 20.00% 104,599.56$       15.00% 78,449.67$         706,047.04$                           180 312319200600Dewatering, pumping 8 hours, attended 2 hours per day, 2" diaphragm pump used for 8 hours, includes 20 LF of suction hose and 100 LF of discharge hose Day -$              183.46$        26.30$            209.76$           -$                   33,022.80$            4,734.00$           37,756.80$                   20.00% 7,551.36$           15.00% 5,663.52$           50,971.68$                             1998.03156 312319300020Wells, for dewatering, with steel casing, 10' to 20' deep, 2' diameter, minimum V.L.F. 37.66$          7.92$            2.59$              48.17$             75,245.87$         15,824.41$            5,174.90$           96,245.18$                   20.00% 19,249.04$         15.00% 14,436.78$         129,930.99$                           742.108525 312319400200Wellpoints, single stage system, 2.0 labor hours per LF, installation and removal LF Hdr -$              99.22$          -$                99.22$             -$                   73,632.01$            -$                   73,632.01$                   20.00% 14,726.40$         15.00% 11,044.80$         99,403.21$                             51833.281 312323130300Backfill, 6" layers, compaction in layers, hand tamp, add E.C.Y. -$              19.34$          -$                19.34$             -$                   1,002,455.65$       -$                   1,002,455.65$              20.00% 200,491.13$       15.00% 150,368.35$       1,353,315.13$                        618 316213232800Prestressed concrete piles, 20" diameter, 4" wall, priced using 200 piles, 50' long, unless specified otherwise, excludes pile caps or mobilization V.L.F. 75.48$          7.89$            5.90$              89.27$             46,646.64$         4,876.02$              3,646.20$           55,168.86$                   20.00% 11,033.77$         15.00% 8,275.33$           74,477.96$                              $                    2,776.68 20.00% 555.34$              15.00% 416.50$               $                              3,748.52 1 412213190100Jib cranes, wall hung, cantilever, 1/2 ton capacity, 8' span Ea. 1,999.28$     777.40$        -$                2,776.68$        1,999.28$           777.40$                 -$                   2,776.68$                     20.00% 555.34$              15.00% 416.50$              3,748.52$                                $             4,152,831.82  $                       5,606,322.96  $                  18,762.23  $                            25,329.01 2 023213100020Subsurface investigation, boring and exploratory drilling, initial field stake out & determination of elevations, for borings Day -$              558.15$        70.40$            628.55$           -$                   1,116.30$              140.80$              1,257.10$                     20.00% 251.42$              15.00% 188.57$              1,697.09$                               10 023219100020Subsurface investigation, test pits, hand digging, light soil C.Y. -$              48.04$          -$                48.04$             -$                   480.40$                 -$                   480.40$                        20.00% 96.08$                15.00% 72.06$                648.54$                                  4374.453 024113175010Demolish, remove pavement & curb, remove bituminous pavement, up to, 3" thick, excludes hauling and disposal fees S.Y. -$              1.42$            2.27$              3.69$               -$                   6,211.72$              9,930.01$           16,141.73$                   20.00% 3,228.35$           15.00% 2,421.26$           21,791.34$                             100 029110100100Field testing equipment, sampling & testing soil/sediment, sample collection, field samples, sludge Ea. -$              8.83$            -$                8.83$               -$                   883.00$                 -$                   883.00$                        20.00% 176.60$              15.00% 132.45$              1,192.05$                                $                  65,793.51 20.00% 13,158.70$         15.00% 9,869.03$            $                            88,821.24 70 260543100200Trench duct, steel with cover, standard adjustable, straight, single compartment, depths to 4", 12" wide L.F. 352.44$        18.26$          -$                370.70$           24,670.80$         1,278.20$              -$                   25,949.00$                   20.00% 5,189.80$           15.00% 3,892.35$           35,031.15$                             Division 26 - ElectricalWaterWorks ConstructionDivision 41 - Material Processing and Handling EquipmentDivision 31 - EarthWorksDivision 15 - EquipmentDivision 2 - Existing ConditionsTank Subtotals1 262413100300Switchboards, no main disconnect, 4 wire, 120/208 V, 600 amp, incl CT compartment, excl CT's or PT's Ea. 4,272.00$     585.15$        -$                4,857.15$        4,272.00$           585.15$                 -$                   4,857.15$                     20.00% 971.43$              15.00% 728.57$              6,557.15$                               2 262416100200Load centers, 1 phase, 3 wire, main lugs, indoor, 120/240 V, 100 amp, 8 circuits, incl 20 A 1 pole plug-in breakers Ea. 91.31$          209.99$        -$                301.30$           182.62$              419.98$                 -$                   602.60$                        20.00% 120.52$              15.00% 90.39$                813.51$                                  1 262419200100Motor starter, size 1, FVNR, type A, fusible, NEMA 1 Ea. 1,548.60$     108.73$        -$                1,657.33$        1,548.60$           108.73$                 -$                   1,657.33$                     20.00% 331.47$              15.00% 248.60$              2,237.40$                               1 263213132300Generator set, diesel, 3 phase 4 wire, 277/480 V, 100 kW, incl battery, charger, muffler, & day tank, excl conduit, wiring, & concrete Ea. 29,797.20$   2,344.75$     585.48$          32,727.43$      29,797.20$         2,344.75$              585.48$              32,727.43$                   20.00% 6,545.49$           15.00% 4,909.11$           44,182.03$                              $                367,171.11 20.00% 73,434.22$         15.00% 55,075.67$          $                          495,681.00 12033.15 312316462200Excavating, bulk, dozer, open site, bank measure, sand and gravel, 80 HP dozer, 150' haul B.C.Y. -$              1.74$            2.82$              4.56$               -$                   20,937.68$            33,933.48$         54,871.16$                   20.00% 10,974.23$         15.00% 8,230.67$           74,076.07$                             120 312319200600Dewatering, pumping 8 hours, attended 2 hours per day, 2" diaphragm pump used for 8 hours, includes 20 LF of suction hose and 100 LF of discharge hose Day -$              100.49$        26.76$            127.25$           -$                   12,058.80$            3,211.20$           15,270.00$                   20.00% 3,054.00$           15.00% 2,290.50$           20,614.50$                             3350 312319400110Wellpoints, single stage system, 0.75 labor hours per LF, installation and removal LF Hdr -$              27.81$          -$                27.81$             -$                   93,163.50$            -$                   93,163.50$                   20.00% 18,632.70$         15.00% 13,974.53$         125,770.73$                           820.21 312319300020Wells, for dewatering, with steel casing, 10' to 20' deep, 2' diameter, minimum V.L.F. 37.35$          5.97$            2.63$              45.95$             30,634.84$         4,896.65$              2,157.15$           37,688.65$                   20.00% 7,537.73$           15.00% 5,653.30$           50,879.68$                             12033.15 312323130400Backfill and compact, by hand, 6" layers, 2 passes 8" lifts, compaction in layers, roller compaction with operator walking, add to above E.C.Y. -$              4.02$            2.51$              6.53$               -$                   48,373.26$            30,203.21$         78,576.47$                   20.00% 15,715.29$         15.00% 11,786.47$         106,078.23$                           12033.15 312323200022Cycle hauling(wait, load, travel, unload or dump & return) time per cycle, excavated or borrow, loose cubic yards, 10 min wait/load/unload, 8 C.Y. truck, cycle 6 miles, 15 MPH, excludes loading equipment L.C.Y. -$              3.07$            4.21$              7.28$               -$                   36,941.77$            50,659.56$         87,601.33$                   20.00% 17,520.27$         15.00% 13,140.20$         118,261.80$                            $                110,495.27 20.00% 22,099.05$         15.00% 16,574.29$          $                          149,168.61 4185 321216130160Plant-mix asphalt paving, for highways and large paved areas, binder course, 3" thick, no hauling included S.Y. 14.01$          0.80$            0.77$              15.58$             58,631.85$         3,348.00$              3,222.45$           65,202.30$                   20.00% 13,040.46$         15.00% 9,780.35$           88,023.11$                             110 321416100012Brick paving, without joints, (4.5 brick/SF), 4" x 8" x 1-1/2" S.F. 3.40$            6.62$            -$                10.02$             374.00$              728.20$                 -$                   1,102.20$                     20.00% 220.44$              15.00% 165.33$              1,487.97$                               3280.84 321613130404Cast-in place concrete curbs & gutters, concrete, wood forms, straight, 6" x 18", includes concrete L.F. 8.33$            4.84$            -$                13.17$             27,329.40$         15,879.27$            -$                   43,208.66$                   20.00% 8,641.73$           15.00% 6,481.30$           58,331.69$                             3280.84 321723130020Painted pavement markings, acrylic waterborne, white or yellow, 4" wide, less than 3,000 LF L.F. 0.13$            0.08$            0.04$              0.25$               426.51$              262.47$                 131.23$              820.21$                        20.00% 164.04$              15.00% 123.03$              1,107.28$                               10 329643200100Tree transplanting, tree removal, shrubs, broadleaf evergreen, 18"-24" high, dig & lace Ea. -$              16.19$          -$                16.19$             -$                   161.90$                 -$                   161.90$                        20.00% 32.38$                15.00% 24.29$                218.57$                                   $             1,485,178.21 20.00% 297,035.64$       15.00% 222,776.73$        $                       2,004,990.58 3400 330110100060Corrosion resistance, wrap and coat, add to pipe, 8" diameter L.F. 5.72$            -$              -$                5.72$               19,448.00$         -$                       -$                   19,448.00$                   20.00% 3,889.60$           15.00% 2,917.20$           26,254.80$                             10 330561100020Storm drainage manholes, frames and covers, frames & covers, including footing, excavation and backfill Ea. 17,000.00$   7,500.00$     10,000.00$     34,500.00$      170,000.00$       75,000.00$            100,000.00$       345,000.00$                 20.00% 69,000.00$         15.00% 51,750.00$         465,750.00$                           170 331413152060Water supply distribution piping, ductile iron pipe, cement lined, mechanical joint, no fittings, 18' lengths, 8" diameter, class 50, excludes excavation or backfill L.F. 81.59$          9.69$            3.81$              95.09$             13,870.30$         1,647.30$              647.70$              16,165.30$                   20.00% 3,233.06$           15.00% 2,424.80$           21,823.16$                             2 331413900120Water supply distribution piping, thrust block, 90 elbow, 8 inch diameter, excludes excavation or backfill Ea. 80.03$          14.98$          16.03$            111.04$           160.06$              29.96$                   32.06$                222.08$                        20.00% 44.42$                15.00% 33.31$                299.81$                                  3280.84 331413152060Water supply distribution piping, ductile iron pipe, cement lined, mechanical joint, no fittings, 18' lengths, 18" diameter, class 50, excludes excavation or backfill L.F. 244.77$        22.29$          8.76$              275.82$           803,051.21$       73,120.08$            28,750.00$         904,921.29$                 20.00% 180,984.26$       15.00% 135,738.19$       1,221,643.74$                        Division 31 - EarthWorksDivision 33 - UtilitiesDivision 32 - Exterior Improvements2 331413900120Water supply distribution piping, thrust block, 90 elbow, 18 inch diameter, excludes excavation or backfill Ea. 240.09$        34.90$          37.35$            312.34$           480.18$              69.81$                   74.70$                624.69$                        20.00% 124.94$              15.00% 93.70$                843.33$                                  4 331419100010Valves, water distribution, 8" Gate Valve $2,628.00 9.69$            3.81$              2,641.50$        10,512.00$         38.76$                   15.24$                10,566.00$                   20.00% 2,113.20$           15.00% 1,584.90$           14,264.10$                             6 331419100010Valves, water distribution, 18" Gate Valve $25,744.00 22.29$          8.76$              25,775.05$      154,464.00$       133.72$                 52.58$                154,650.30$                 20.00% 30,930.06$         15.00% 23,197.55$         208,777.91$                           1 331419100010Valves, water distribution, 8" Check Valves $3,737.00 9.69$            3.81$              3,750.50$        3,737.00$           9.69$                     3.81$                  3,750.50$                     20.00% 750.10$              15.00% 562.58$              5,063.18$                               1 331419100010Valves, water distribution, 18" Check Valves 29,799.00 22.29$          8.76$              29,830.05$      29,799.00$         22.29$                   8.76$                  29,830.05$                   20.00% 5,966.01$           15.00% 4,474.51$           40,270.57$                              $             2,047,400.33 $2,763,990.45$8,370,313.40167,406.27$                           292,960.97$                            $                          418,515.67  $                          418,515.67  $                     12,891,832.70 Construction Supervision Water Works SubtotalManagement (3.5%)Managenemt Reserve (5%)GST (5%)TotalConstruction Subtotal        APPENDIX D: SCHEDULE  ID Task Name Duration Start Finish Predecessors0 Underground watertank 124.5 days Tue 5/1/18 Mon 10/22/181 Project start 0 days Tue 5/1/18 Tue 5/1/182 Site set-up 3 days Tue 5/1/18 Thu 5/3/18 13 Stripping the field 2 days Fri 5/4/18 Mon 5/7/18 24 Foundation system 49 days Tue 5/8/18 Fri 7/13/185 Secant piles 30 days Tue 5/8/18 Mon 6/18/18 36 Excavation 10 days Tue 6/12/18 Mon 6/25/18 5FF+5 days7 Friction piles 10 days Tue 6/26/18 Mon 7/9/18 68 Grading 4 days Tue 7/10/18 Fri 7/13/18 79 Storage System 43 days Mon 7/16/18 Wed 9/12/1810 Floor slab 9 days Mon 7/16/18 Thu 7/26/1811 Formwork and rebars 5 days Mon 7/16/18 Fri 7/20/18 812 Concrete pouring 0.5 days Mon 7/23/18 Mon 7/23/18 1113 Concrete curing 3 days Mon 7/23/18 Thu 7/26/18 1214 Formwork stripping 0.5 days Thu 7/26/18 Thu 7/26/18 1315 Perimeter walls 12 days Fri 7/27/18 Mon 8/13/1816 Formwork and rebars 7 days Fri 7/27/18 Mon 8/6/18 1417 Concrete pouring 1 day Tue 8/7/18 Tue 8/7/18 1618 Concrete curing 3 days Wed 8/8/18 Fri 8/10/18 1719 Formwork stripping 1 day Mon 8/13/18 Mon 8/13/18 1820 Columns 6 days Fri 7/27/18 Fri 8/3/1821 Formwork and rebars 2 days Fri 7/27/18 Mon 7/30/18 1422 Concrete pouring 0.5 days Tue 7/31/18 Tue 7/31/18 2123 Concrete curing 3 days Tue 7/31/18 Fri 8/3/18 2224 Formwork stripping 0.5 days Fri 8/3/18 Fri 8/3/18 2325 Tank interior 8 days Tue 8/14/18 Thu 8/23/1826 Lining 6 days Tue 8/14/18 Tue 8/21/18 1927 Baffle walls 3 days Mon 8/20/18 Wed 8/22/18 26FS-2 days28 Service connection detailing 1.5 days Wed 8/22/18 Thu 8/23/18 2629 Pump Installation 1.5 days Tue 8/14/18 Wed 8/15/18 1930 Cleaning of the tank 0.5 days Thu 8/23/18 Thu 8/23/18 2831 Roof slab 14 days Fri 8/24/18 Wed 9/12/1832 Formwork and rebars - stage 1 3 days Fri 8/24/18 Tue 8/28/18 2533 Concrete pouring - stage 1 0.5 days Wed 8/29/18 Wed 8/29/18 3234 Concrete curing - stage 1 3 days Wed 8/29/18 Mon 9/3/18 3335 Formwork stripping - stage 1 0.5 days Mon 9/3/18 Mon 9/3/18 3436 Formwork and rebars - stage 2 1 day Tue 9/4/18 Tue 9/4/18 355/115 22 29 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 1 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 2 9 16 23 30 7 14 21 28 4 11Apr '18 May '18 Jun '18 Jul '18 Aug '18 Sep '18 Oct '18 Nov '18TaskSplitMilestoneSummaryProject SummaryInactive TaskInactive MilestoneInactive SummaryManual TaskDuration-onlyManual Summary RollupManual SummaryStart-onlyFinish-onlyExternal TasksExternal MilestoneDeadlineCriticalCritical SplitProgressManual ProgressPage 1Project: Underground watertanDate: Sun 4/8/18ID Task Name Duration Start Finish Predecessors37 Concrete pouring - stage 2 0.5 days Wed 9/5/18 Wed 9/5/18 3638 Concrete curing - stage 2 3 days Wed 9/5/18 Mon 9/10/18 3739 Formwork stripping - stage 2 0.5 days Mon 9/10/18 Mon 9/10/18 3840 Formwork and scaffolding removal from the tank1 day Tue 9/11/18 Tue 9/11/18 35,3941 Roof hatch installation 1 day Wed 9/12/18 Wed 9/12/18 4042 Piping System 34 days Fri 5/4/18 Wed 6/20/1843 Trench Excavation 30 days Fri 5/4/18 Thu 6/14/18 244 Soil improvement 30 days Mon 5/7/18 Fri 6/15/18 43SS+1 day45 Pipe installation 30 days Tue 5/8/18 Mon 6/18/18 44SS+1 day46 Backfill 30 days Wed 5/9/18 Tue 6/19/18 45SS+1 day47 Connection to pumps 1 day Wed 6/20/18 Wed 6/20/18 4648 Serivce Tie-in and Testing 8.5 days Thu 9/13/18 Tue 9/25/1849 Tank interior disinfection 0.5 days Thu 9/13/18 Thu 9/13/18 4150 Service tie-in 1 day Thu 9/13/18 Fri 9/14/18 49,4251 Testing 7 days Fri 9/14/18 Tue 9/25/18 5052 Backfill and Site Restoration 19 days Tue 9/25/18 Mon 10/22/1853 Backfill 5 days Tue 9/25/18 Tue 10/2/18 5154 Grading 1 day Tue 10/2/18 Wed 10/3/18 5355 Landscape 10 days Wed 10/3/18 Wed 10/17/18 5456 Site clean-up 3 days Wed 10/17/18 Mon 10/22/18 5557 Project completion 0 days Mon 10/22/18 Mon 10/22/18 56 10/2215 22 29 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 1 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 2 9 16 23 30 7 14 21 28 4 11Apr '18 May '18 Jun '18 Jul '18 Aug '18 Sep '18 Oct '18 Nov '18TaskSplitMilestoneSummaryProject SummaryInactive TaskInactive MilestoneInactive SummaryManual TaskDuration-onlyManual Summary RollupManual SummaryStart-onlyFinish-onlyExternal TasksExternal MilestoneDeadlineCriticalCritical SplitProgressManual ProgressPage 2Project: Underground watertanDate: Sun 4/8/18        APPENDIX E: SAMPLE CALCUALTIONS   Structural:  Roof Slab       Columns       Walls    Floor Slab  Load Determination  Pump Design For 3 day water turnover, 72 hours (t) = 259200 seconds Pipe Diameter = 0.45m Pipe Length  = 950m Pipe Roughness (e) = 0.12mm (Ductile Iron) Kinematic viscosity (𝑣) =  10-6 m2/s Pipe Pressure = 65psi = 448,000 Pa Pressure head = 𝑃𝛾𝑤 = 448,000𝑃𝑎9810𝑁𝑚3 = 45.67m Powerhouse elevation = 88m Field Elevation = 94m Water tank has an elevation (z) 6m higher than that of the power station 𝑄 =𝑉𝑡=10,000𝑚3259200𝑠= 𝟎. 𝟎𝟑𝟖𝟔𝒎𝟑𝒔= 38.6𝐿𝑠  𝑅𝑒𝑦𝑛𝑜𝑙𝑑𝑠 𝑁𝑢𝑚𝑏𝑒𝑟 (𝑅𝑒) =4𝑄𝑣πD=4 ∗ 0.0386𝑚3𝑠10−6𝑚2𝑠 ∗ 𝜋 ∗ 0.45𝑚= 𝟏𝟎. 𝟗 ∗ 𝟏𝟎𝟒 𝐹𝑟𝑖𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝐹𝑎𝑐𝑡𝑜𝑟 (𝑓) = (−1.8 ∗ log10( (𝑒𝐷3.7)1.11+6.9𝑅𝑒 ))−2= (−1.8 ∗ log10( (0.12𝑚𝑚450𝑚𝑚3.7)1.11+6.910.9 ∗ 104 ))−2= 𝟎. 𝟎𝟏𝟖𝟖 𝑃𝑢𝑚𝑝 𝐻𝑒𝑎𝑑 (ℎ𝑝) =𝑃𝛾𝑤− 𝑧 +8𝑓𝐿𝜋2𝑔𝐷5𝑄2 = 45.67𝑚 − 6𝑚 +8 ∗ 0.0188 ∗ 950𝑚𝜋2 ∗ 9.81𝑚2𝑠 ∗(0.45𝑚)5(0.0386𝑚3𝑠)2= 𝟑𝟔. 𝟑𝟐𝒎 𝑃𝑜𝑤𝑒𝑟 (𝜔𝑃) =  𝛾𝑤𝑄ℎ𝑝 = 9810𝑚3𝑠∗ 0.0386𝑚3𝑠∗ 36.32𝑚 = 𝟏𝟑𝟕𝟒𝟔 𝑾 = 13.75𝑘𝑊  𝐻𝑜𝑟𝑠𝑒𝑝𝑜𝑤𝑒𝑟 (𝐻𝑃) =𝑊745.7𝑊𝐻𝑃=13746 𝑊745.7𝑊𝐻𝑃= 𝟏𝟖. 𝟒 𝑯𝑷 BC Hydro rate = $0.0829/kW*h 𝑃𝑜𝑤𝑒𝑟 𝐶𝑜𝑠𝑡 ($) = 𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑒 ∗ 𝑡 ∗ 𝜔𝑃 =$0.0829𝑘𝑊 ∗ ℎ∗ 72ℎ ∗ 13.75𝑘𝑊 = $𝟖𝟐. 𝟎𝟓 𝒆𝒗𝒆𝒓𝒚 𝟑 𝒅𝒂𝒚𝒔  Secant Piles Soil PropertiesBeta 0.3 Excavation Ultimate End Bearing: 22508.292 kNUnit weight 18 kN Height 7.7 m Ultimate Shaft Friction: 3676.82 kNFriction angle 27 B, diameter 36 m Qult 26185.108 kNNq 18 alpha 1 FOS 3.1533203Surcharge 16 PilesConcrete Diameter 0.6Unit Weight 24 kN Area of base 0.282743339Phi concrete 0.9 Area of Pile Shaft 56.54866776Circumfrence of secant pile wall:Depth Vert Stress kPa Pore Water kPa Vert Effective Stress, kPa Unit Tip Resistance, kPa Unit Side Friction, kPa 122.52211 m1 18 9.81 8.19 147.42 2.4572 36 19.62 16.38 294.84 4.914 Number of Piles:3 54 29.43 24.57 442.26 7.371 204.203524 72 39.24 32.76 589.68 9.828 Total Piles 2055 90 49.05 40.95 737.1 12.2856 108 58.86 49.14 884.52 14.7427 126 68.67 57.33 1031.94 17.1998 144 78.48 65.52 1179.36 19.6569 162 88.29 73.71 1326.78 22.113 Equations10 180 98.1 81.9 1474.2 24.5711 198 107.91 90.09 1621.62 27.027 Vert Effective Stress, σv (z*γ)-(z*γw)12 216 117.72 98.28 1769.04 29.484 Unit Tip Resistance Nq*σv13 234 127.53 106.47 1916.46 31.941 Unit Side Friction β*σv14 252 137.34 114.66 2063.88 34.398 Ultimate End Bearing Nq*Ab*Unit Tip Resistance15 270 147.15 122.85 2211.3 36.855 Ultimate Shaft Friction 0.7*Ap*Unit Side Friction*Tan(φc)16 288 156.96 131.04 2358.72 39.31217 306 166.77 139.23 2506.14 41.76918 324 176.58 147.42 2653.56 44.22619 342 186.39 155.61 2800.98 46.68320 360 196.2 163.8 2948.4 49.1421 378 206.01 171.99 3095.82 51.59722 396 215.82 180.18 3243.24 54.05423 414 225.63 188.37 3390.66 56.51124 432 235.44 196.56 3538.08 58.96825 450 245.25 204.75 3685.5 61.42526 468 255.06 212.94 3832.92 63.88227 486 264.87 221.13 3980.34 66.33928 504 274.68 229.32 4127.76 68.79629 522 284.49 237.51 4275.18 71.25330 540 294.3 245.7 4422.6 73.71Unit weight 16 Diameter (m) 0.6Unit weight concrete24friction angle27 Ab (m) 0.282743339Weight of Full Tank (Kn)86052.6693Nq 18Z (m) AsAverage Sigma vtan(friction angle)Fs Psu (Kn) Sigma v Fb Po Pbu (Kn) Volume W (Kn) Pu (Kn)Number of piles neededMinimum Spacing (m)5 3 40 0.509525578 7.337168322 22.01150497 80 1440 80 429.769875 1.413716694 33.92920066 417.8521793 206 2.210 6 80 0.509525578 14.67433664 88.04601987 160 2880 160 859.53975 2.827433388 67.85840132 879.7273686 98 2.315 9 120 0.509525578 22.01150497 198.1035447 240 4320 240 1289.309625 4.241150082 101.787602 1385.625568 63 2.420 12 160 0.509525578 29.34867329 352.1840795 320 5760 320 1719.0795 5.654866776 135.7168026 1935.546777 45 2.525 15 200 0.509525578 36.68584161 550.2876242 400 7200 400 2148.849375 7.068583471 169.6460033 2529.490996 35 2.630 18 240 0.509525578 44.02300993 792.4141788 480 8640 480 2578.61925 8.482300165 203.575204 3167.458225 28 2.735 21 280 0.509525578 51.36017826 1078.563743 560 10080 560 3008.389125 9.896016859 237.5044046 3849.448464 23 2.840 24 320 0.509525578 58.69734658 1408.736318 640 11520 640 3438.159 11.30973355 271.4336053 4575.461713 19 2.945 27 360 0.509525578 66.0345149 1782.931902 720 12960 720 3867.928875 12.72345025 305.3628059 5345.497971 17 350 30 400 0.509525578 73.37168322 2201.150497 800 14400 800 4297.69875 14.13716694 339.2920066 6159.55724 14 3.155 33 440 0.509525578 80.70885154 2663.392101 880 15840 880 4727.468625 15.55088364 373.2212072 7017.639519 13 3.260 36 480 0.509525578 88.04601987 3169.656715 960 17280 960 5157.2385 16.96460033 407.1504079 7919.744807 11 3.365 39 520 0.509525578 95.38318819 3719.944339 1040 18720 1040 5587.008375 18.37831702 441.0796086 8865.873106 10 3.470 42 560 0.509525578 102.7203565 4314.254973 1120 20160 1120 6016.77825 19.79203372 475.0088092 9856.024414 9 3.575 45 600 0.509525578 110.0575248 4952.588617 1200 21600 1200 6446.548125 21.20575041 508.9380099 10890.19873 8 3.6Ф = Friction Angle600 mm Pile Capacity CalculationFb = net ultimate resistance per unit area of baseLegendAb = Area of Base of PilePu = Ultimate Load Capacity of the PileW=Self Weight of the PilePbu = Ultimate resistance at the base EquationsPo = Overburden pressure at level of the baseNq = Bearing Capacity FactorAs = Surface Area of pile shaft in contact with the soilFS = Average Ultimate Side resistance per unit areaZ = DepthSoil PropertiesPsu Pbu W DesignTank PropertiesPile PropertiesPsu = Ultimate side shear resistance on the pile shaft𝑃𝑢 = 𝑃𝑠𝑢 + 𝑃𝑏𝑢 − 𝑊𝑃𝑏𝑢 = 𝐴𝑏 𝐹𝑏 + 𝑃𝑜𝐹𝑏 = 𝑁𝑞 ∗ σvσv=unit weight * Z𝑃𝑜 = σv𝑃𝑠𝑢 = 𝐴𝑠 ∗ 𝐹𝑆𝐴𝑠 = 2π*radius*z𝐹𝑆 = ே௤ହ଴*σv*tanФ

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