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Secure Water Supply for UBC Vancouver Campus : Final Design Report Chen, Zihao; Gu, Enyu; Hu, Jiachen; Han, Mingda; Wu, Chen; Wu, Jiehang 2018-04-09

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report Secure Water Supply for UBC Vancouver Campus - Team 11 Zihao Chen, Enyu Gu, Mingda Han, Jiachen Hu, Chen Wu, Jiehang Wu University of British Columbia CIVL 445Themes: Water, Community, Land April 9, 2018 Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.FINAL DESIGN REPORT SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC VANCOUVER CAMPUS University of British Columbia - UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program April 9, 2018 Team#11 CHEN, ZIHAO  GU, ENYU HU, JIACHEN  HAN, MINGDA WU, CHEN WU, JIEHANG    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT ii  Executive Summary The Iron Head Ltd. (IHL) has been contracted with SEEDS (Social Ecological Economic Development Studies) Sustainability Program to work towards a better water supply system. The design includes a 450mm ductile iron water main underneath University Boulevard; two 600mm ductile iron pipe underneath Wesbrook Mall; and two storage tanks that have a total combined volume of 12,600 m3. This report summarizes the design progress and critical outcomes after the preliminary design. Some of the highlights are as follows: total flow in the distribution system is 153 L/s; the highest and lowest pressure in distribution system is at 205.5 psi and 49 psi respectively; the structure system of the concrete storage tank consists of a slab-beam-column system with walls. More details about our design can be found in the attached report. The new cost estimation of the whole project is $15,198,386, which includes $13,923,961 for the storage and auxiliary facility construction, and $1,274,425 for the pipeline replacement. The project construction will commence on May 1st, 2018, and the substantial completion will be achieved on Feb. 12th, 2019, with the full operation coming up on Mar. 26th, 2019.      SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT iii  TABLE OF CONTENTS List of Figures ............................................................................................................................. v List of Tables .............................................................................................................................. v 1.0 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 6 1.1 Task Distribution ........................................................................................................................... 6 1.2 Site Description ............................................................................................................................. 7 2.0 Design Overview................................................................................................................... 8 3.0 Design Criteria and Constraints ............................................................................................ 9 3.1 Design Capacity ............................................................................................................................. 9 3.2 Economic ....................................................................................................................................... 9 3.3 Construction Planning ................................................................................................................. 10 3.4 Environmental Consideration ...................................................................................................... 10 3.5 Sustainability Approach............................................................................................................... 11 3.6 Stakeholder Engagement ............................................................................................................ 11 4.0 PROPOSED NEW WATER MAIN .......................................................................................... 13 4.1 450mm WM Under University Boulevard .................................................................................... 13 4.1.1 Proposed Design.................................................................................................................... 13 4.1.2 Design Rationale.................................................................................................................... 14 4.1.3 Design Implementation/Construction .................................................................................... 14 4.2 600mm WM Under Wesbrook Mall ............................................................................................. 15 4.2.1 Overview ............................................................................................................................... 15 4.2.2 Proposed Design.................................................................................................................... 15 4.2.3 Design Rationale.................................................................................................................... 16 4.2.4 Design Implementation/Construction .................................................................................... 16 4.3 Computer Simulation .................................................................................................................. 17 4.4 Construction Plan of Water Main ................................................................................................ 18 5.0 PROPOSED RESERVOIR ....................................................................................................... 19 5.1 Methodology ............................................................................................................................... 19 5.1.1 Storage Capacity.................................................................................................................... 19 5.1.2 Software Package Used ......................................................................................................... 19 5.1.3 Regulatory Provisions ............................................................................................................ 20 5.1.4 Technical Consideration ........................................................................................................ 20 5.2 Structural Design of the Tank ...................................................................................................... 22 5.2.1 Materials and Tank Dimensions ............................................................................................. 23 5.2.2 Design Loadings ..................................................................................................................... 23    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT iv  5.3 Construction Plan of Storage Tank .............................................................................................. 24 6.0 STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT ............................................................................................ 25 6.1 Stakeholder Identification ........................................................................................................... 25 6.2 Engagement plan ......................................................................................................................... 26 7.0 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ................................................................................................. 29 7.1 Erosion & Sedimentation Process ................................................................................................ 29 7.2 Erosion and Sediment Control ..................................................................................................... 29 7.3 Water Erosion Control ................................................................................................................. 29 7.4 Wind Erosion Control .................................................................................................................. 31 7.5 Factors That Influence Erosion .................................................................................................... 32 7.6 Regulations.................................................................................................................................. 32 7.7 Inspections .................................................................................................................................. 33 8.0 MAINTENANCE SPECIFICATIONS AND PLANS ..................................................................... 34 9.0 CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULING & COST ESTIMATE .............................................................. 36 9.1 Construction Milestones ............................................................................................................. 36 9.2 Cost Estimate............................................................................................................................... 36 9.1 Estimate of Capital Cost............................................................................................................... 37 9.2 Estimate of Operating and Maintenance Costs ........................................................................... 38 10.0 References ................................................................................................................. 40 Appendix A – Issued for Construction Drawings ...................................................................... 42 Appendix B – Construction Schedule........................................................................................ 52 Appendix C – Cost Estimate ...................................................................................................... 54 Appendix D – Sample Calculation ............................................................................................. 60       SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT v  LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1 - Site Overview ........................................................................................................................... 7 Figure 2 – Proposed Distribution System Layout .................................................................................... 13 Figure 3 – EPAnet Simulation ................................................................................................................. 17 Figure 4 – Dewatering Bag ..................................................................................................................... 31 Figure 5 – Flocculation Tank ................................................................................................................... 31 Figure 6 – Silt Fence ............................................................................................................................... 32 Figure 7 – Smart Pig ............................................................................................................................... 35  LIST OF TABLES Table 1: Team List & Task Distribution ..................................................................................................... 6 Table 2: EPAnet Model Simulation Results ............................................................................................. 18 Table 3: Reservoir Section Properties of Structural Components ............................................................ 23 Table 4: Identified Internal Stakeholders ................................................................................................ 25 Table 5: Identified External Stakeholders ............................................................................................... 26 Table 6: Cost Estimate Summary ............................................................................................................ 37 Table 7: Construction Cost of Reservoir ................................................................................................. 38 Table 8: Construction Cost of Distribution System .................................................................................. 38 Table 9: Maintenance & Operational Cost summary .............................................................................. 39      SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 6  1.0 INTRODUCTION This design summary report is prepared on behalf of the Iron Head Ltd. (IHL) and will present the final design solution to the UBC SEEDS Water Supply Improvement Project. The main objective of our design is to scope and design a new water storage and supply system for UBC Point Grey campus in the event of Metro Vancouver water system failure. The secondary objective is to establish collaboration between the new systems with existing supply line to accommodate growing water demand. In brief, this report will present detailed information of design components, design inputs, and cost estimate of the project. Detailed Issued for Construction (IFC) drawings, cost estimate, and sample calculations are included in the Appendices.  1.1 TASK DISTRIBUTION The table below indicates the group contribution: TABLE 1: TEAM LIST & TASK DISTRIBUTION Team Member Report Contribution Team Member 1 Reservoir Control System Design SketchUp Modeling (Reservoir) & Cost Estimate (Reservoir) Yard Piping Drawings, Coordination & Formatting Team Member 2 Environmental Impact, Maintenance Specifications and Plans Site Descriptions Team Member 3 Design Criteria & Technical Consideration (Reservoir) Drawings of Design Component Team Member 4 Executive Summary & Introduction Cost Estimate (Pipe) & Schedule Water Main Design & Drawings Team Member 5 Stakeholder Engagement Reservoir Section, Base/Top Slab Structural Drawings, and Chamber Detail Drawings Team Member 6 Reservoir Construction Plan & Structural Design Reservoir Control System Analysis    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 7  1.2 SITE DESCRIPTION The project site is located in 272 – 6081 University Blvd, named Arthur Lord Field and Frank Buck Field on the southwest side of Wesbrook Mall with total land size 130m x 100m, which currently used as rugby fields for public and UBC student clubs. These two grassy areas were constructed in 1963 and elevation upgraded in 2015.  FIGURE 1 – SITE OVERVIEW The project scope also includes three new water mains on University Boulevard and Wesbrook Mall and another backup line on Wesbrook Mall. In addition, the inflow supply water main is connected to the existing main at W 16th Ave from Sasamat Reservoir. All three roads are prominent gateway for both cars and bikes entering and exiting UBC campus which are extremely busy during rush hours.     SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 8  2.0 DESIGN OVERVIEW The complete design consists of two parts: an improved distribution system and water storage tanks. The proposed distribution system includes three new water mains on University Boulevard and Wesbrook Mall and another backup line on Wesbrook Mall. The water main on University Boulevard connects to a distribution main on Tolmie Street which supplies water to the UBC campus. The other two mains on Wesbrook Mall are two dedicated water mains delivering water into the storage tanks and out of the storage tanks to the existing pump house. A backup line will supply water to low pressure zone in case of the Sasamat Reservoir failed. Slight changes to the existing system are required. Major improvements include a new valve to shut off a transmission line in Pacific Spirit Park, and pipe connection modifications on Wesbrook Mall and University Boulevard. The storage system consists of two separate tanks. Each rectangular storage tank has the same dimension and structure system, with a maximum storage capacity of 25,200 m3, and a minimum storage of 9,400 m3 for disaster portable water supply. The gravitational system is designed as a slab-beam-column system. The lateral system is designed as a moment frame with walls. The control system of each tank is independent, which can improve the ease of maintenance and minimize the impact in case of leakage and tank contamination.  To supply water to the main storage tanks under sport fields, a secondary water main will be added to the distribution system to deliver water to the new storage tanks. This water main will connect to the City of Vancouver transmission main on Tolmie St. and tie-in to the existing water main under University Boulevard where it meets Cleveland Trail. The water main will be under the centre boulevard.     SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 9  3.0 DESIGN CRITERIA AND CONSTRAINTS In order to finalize the design of water storage system and new water supply network, the design team has identified the criteria and constraints for the project by considering design capacity, economic impact, environmental impact, sustainability, and stakeholder engagement based on the requirements of clients and potential impacts to the local communities. 3.1 DESIGN CAPACITY The capacity should be the first priority for the design of the new water supply system. It is critical to determine the level of service of water supply during the crisis period with considerations of current water consumption of the campus, future population growth, seasonal variability of water demand, and water supply for refuge during large disasters. To satisfy the requirement of the clients and UBC land development plan, the construction site of the storage reservoir should be reasonably large for the design; In addition, the new system must be able to provide safe potable water at all times; a proper treatment system should be designed within the storage facility if required to ensure the water safety. Moreover, the proposed water supply network and pump stations in the new storage system need to be compatible with the existing distribution system. 3.2 ECONOMIC  Costs will escalate from incidents such as design changes, inaccurate cost estimation, or low efficiency due to technical difficulties of the project. Therefore, in order to minimize unnecessary cost associated with the above issues, the following actions need to be taken. The engineering design team should meet with the general contractor to go through the design and check for constructability in the early stage. The review meeting can identify obstacles before the construction starts and therefore, reduce the    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 10  chance of scope creep at later stages. Also, the development of water storage and water mains should try to avoid conflicts with existing infrastructure since it will be very inefficient to re-implement the interrupted sections of the network. In order to control project cost, it is necessary to establish the engineering cost estimate as well as project budget and cost control management plan. To address to the concern of exceeding the budget, advanced cost control method such as Earned Value Management (EVM) will be introduced to measure cost performance during the construction to ensure that the budget is under control. Last but not least, it is mandatory for the estimator to check each critical stage to ensure the project is on the right track and also find out errors and omissions from complex work process. 3.3 CONSTRUCTION PLANNING As the construction of the new system will be within the core part of campus area, the selection of construction methods and sequencing need to be a prime consideration at the final design stage so that the impact on public sectors can be minimized during construction. Consequently, the construction method for the water main and water storage system should try to prevent or minimize the adverse social, economic and environmental impact to the surrounding neighborhood, existing infrastructure and underground utilities.  3.4 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATION Potential negative environmental impacts to the local communities are always needed to take into considerations before the implementation stage of the project. The project team is dedicated to finding out the best solution on reducing carbon footprint and disruptions to the environment. The selection of building material and construction methods are major concerns throughout the process. The material    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 11  used for building the storage system needs to be environmentally friendly. Environmental controls’ method such as noise control should be implemented in order to minimize disruption to adjacent buildings and local environment. 3.5 SUSTAINABILITY APPROACH Sustainability performance of the proposed infrastructure is one of the key criteria for stakeholders to evaluate whether the project is environmentally friendly, socially responsible and energy efficient. In general, environmental controls such as dust control will minimize disruption to adjacent buildings and local environment. In addition, advanced technologies such as efficient piping systems that are leak-free should be implemented in both of the pump station and proposed water mains. Also, the well-insulated concrete foundation for the storage system can increase the reliability and reduce waste of water due to leakage.  Additionally, occupational health and safety management plan should be established based on the standards of UBC SEEDS sustainability program; interdependencies of landscape and flexibility in urban planning should also be considered during the design stage. 3.6 STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT Every successful project requires a high degree of collaboration with multiple parties and stakeholders who will be involved in the project. In general, the overall principles of successful engagements are the followings: be respectful during the engagement; be open minded and transparent in decision making; be willing to adapt the public suggestions if possible; and also, be willing to listen to the public. A stakeholder engagement analysis will be performed before conceptual design stage to ensure that the stakeholder interests are under consideration. The design team will discuss with the stakeholders about the critical design criteria and provide appropriate correspondence to address the potential future    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 12  impacts. Moreover, substantive discussion and reasonable changes of the design needs to be considered in order to accommodate the concerns of local communities.  It is critical to communicate with relevant stakeholders during the planning and execution phases, so that the public concerns can be addressed promptly. In addition, since underground construction might be required for this project, potential road closures will impact access to certain areas. The contractor is obligated to inform the public about the purpose of the project and how the project will affect the local communities during construction phase. Therefore, a public hearing for the final design is needed to ensure all stakeholders are well informed.      SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 13  4.0 PROPOSED NEW WATER MAIN Three new water mains are proposed to be built for the new water distribution system. The Figure 2 is showing a schematic of the new pipe layout.  FIGURE 2 – PROPOSED DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM LAYOUT 4.1 450MM WM UNDER UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD A 450mm Ductile Iron water main is proposed to be built under the University Boulevard.  4.1.1 PROPOSED DESIGN The proposed water main is to be 450mm ductile iron pipes. The total length of the pipe is approximately 1300 lm. The pipes shall be Class 50 ductile iron pipe manufactured to AWWA C151; cement mortar lined to AWWA C104 and coated 1 mil. thick asphalt. Joints are to be single rubber gasket for push-on bell and spigot type joints to AWWA C111. Fittings are to be ductile to AWWA C110 suitable for pressure rating of 2,415 kPa. Cement mortar lined to AWWA C104. Minimum design    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 14  pressure for piping 1,210 kPa. Minimum cover of the pipe shall be 1.0m and trench details shall as per MMCS section 02666 (UBC, 2017). For detailed drawings, please refer to University Boulevard Water Main drawings in the Appendix A. 4.1.2 DESIGN RATIONALE The addition of this pipe is to improve the number of transmission line that can deliver water to UBC Point Grey campus. At the moment, all UBC water supply is coming from the Sasamat water reservoir on the 16th Ave. The water to the reservoir is supplied by a single pipe running along the 16th Ave. The reservoir is responsible to provide water for both high pressure and low-pressure zones in UBC. If the transmission line on the 16th Ave. failed or the Sasamat reservoir is contaminated, there will be no back-up water transmission line to provide potable water for both institutions and households. Therefore, a secondary water transmission is proposed to be implemented and connect to a different transmission line from City of Vancouver. The old pipe under Cleveland Trail in the Pacific Spirit Park will be shut off and the new water main under University Boulevard will be tie-in to the existing water main which is delivering water to the pump house in UBC. With the pipe size of 450mm and pressure of 73 psi from the COV transmission line (Vancouver GIS, 2018), the simulation in EPANET indicates that the proposed line can provide a maximum flow of approximate 140L/s, which can satisfy our projected future water demand for UBC and UEL areas. 4.1.3 DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION/CONSTRUCTION Please refer to construction drawings for location and layout of the pipes. The pipe should be installed as per MMCD section 02666. The water pipe should be kept a minimum 3m horizontal space from sanitary and storm sewer. A minimum 750mm clearance is required from all other services. Valves and thrust blocks shall be installed as per MMCD Section 02666. Thrust blocks shall be placed between    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 15  valves, tees, wyes, plugs caps, bends and undisturbed ground as shown on the drawings. Notify the consultants if there are any utility crossings during construction. To prevent damage to existing utilities, excavate the last 300mm over utility by hand. Hot taps to tie-in the pipes may be requested in writing and done only with prior written permission from the manager, Mechanical Distribution Services, UBC Energy & Water Services (UBC, 2018).  4.2 600MM WM UNDER WESBROOK MALL Two 600mm Ductile Iron pipes will be install and run parallel under Wesbrook Mall and are responsible to deliver water in and out of the storage tanks.  4.2.1 OVERVIEW The two 600mm DI pipe will be running under Wesbrook Mall and are dedicated to deliver water to the storage tank, and out of the storage tank to the pump house. The existing 600mm pipe will be temporarily shut off and reconnect to the new proposed 600mm water main and storage tanks. 4.2.2 PROPOSED DESIGN The proposed water mains are to be 600mm ductile iron pipes. The total length of the pipes is approximately 1,700 lm. The pipes will be installed under Wesbrook Mall from the intersection of University Boulevard and Wesbrook Mall, and Frank Buck Field on Westbrook Mall. The pipes shall be Class 50 ductile iron pipe manufactured to AWWA C151; cement mortar lined to AWWA C104 and coated 1 mil. thick asphalt. Joints are to be single rubber gasket for push-on bell and spigot type joints to AWWA C111. Fittings are to be ductile to AWWA C110 suitable for pressure rating of 2,415 kPa. Cement mortar lined to AWWA C104. Minimum design pressure for piping 1,210 kPa. Minimum cover of the pipe    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 16  shall be 1.0m and trench details shall as per MMCS section 02666 (UBC, 2017). For detailed drawings, please refer to University Boulevard Water Main drawings in the Appendix A. 4.2.3 DESIGN RATIONALE These two pipes are dedicated pipe to deliver water to the storage tanks. The existing pipe that delivering water to booster pump house for high pressure zone is a nominal 600mm pipe. To minimize the pressure disturbance to the existing pump station and still be able to supply adequate amount of water, a 600mm is selected to deliver water from transmission main to storage tank. The other outflow 600mm pipe in conjunction with the pump house that will be built with the storage tank will keep the inflow pressure to the pump house the same. This is to avoid any potential operational risks due to pressure changes. From the simulation in the EPANET model, it indicates that the high pressure in the high-pressure zone will increase from 197.5 psi to 205.5 psi. 4.2.4 DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION/CONSTRUCTION Please refer to construction drawings for location and layout of the pipes. The pipe should be installed as per MMCD section 02666. The water pipe should be kept a minimum 3m horizontal space from sanitary and storm sewer. A minimum 750mm clearance is required from all other services. Valves and thrust blocks shall be installed as per MMCD Section 02666. Thrust blocks shall be placed between valves, tees, wyes, plugs caps, bends and undisturbed ground as shown on the drawings. Notify the consultants if there are any utility crossings during construction. To prevent damage to existing utilities, excavate the last 300mm over utility by hand. Hot taps to tie-in the pipes may be requested in writing and done only with prior written permission from the manager, Mechanical Distribution Services, UBC Energy & Water Services (UBC, 2018).     SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 17  4.3 COMPUTER SIMULATION We used EPANET to simulate the system status under loadings. With the EPANET model provided on connect, we modified the pipe layout to reflect our new proposed design. The result from model shows us that our design can fully function under UBC peak day water demand. Figure 3 shows the simulation result with colored pressure nodes at each junction  FIGURE 3 – EPANET SIMULATION As we can see in the simulation result, the UBC remains the same pressure zoning as before and pressure fluctuation is very minimal. Table 2 is a summary table of the important simulation results.    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 18  TABLE 2: EPANET MODEL SIMULATION RESULTS  Existing Proposed Total Flow (LPS) 149.3 L/s 153 L/s Highest Demand (LPS) 37.3 L/s 38.7L/s High Pressure (m / psi) 138.9m / 197.5 psi 144.5m / 205.5 psi Low Pressure (m / psi) 29m / 41 psi 35m / 49 psi 4.4 CONSTRUCTION PLAN OF WATER MAIN The water main replacement will first start on University Boulevard. Phase 1 is the proposed 450mm water main. It will start on Blanca St. and will be installed from East to West and join at the existing water main on University Boulevard. but not tie-in to the water main. Phase 2 is the proposed 600mm water main underneath the Wesbrook Mall. The two parallel pipes will be laid down at the same time and connect to the pump chamber in the water storage tank. Phase 3 is tie-in the two water mains on university boulevard. Phase 4 is to tie-in the 450mm water main to transmission main on Tolmie St. Phase 5 is to to connect the 600mm lines to the existing system after the water storage tanks are commissioned. The valve at the WM under the Imperial Trial shall be closed after the system is in commissioned. The water main construction is expecting to take total of 92 business days.        SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 19  5.0 PROPOSED RESERVOIR  The proposed reservoir is located on the southbound of Wesbrook Mall and consists of a twin concrete tank equipped with separated control systems. The following section illustrates the design approach and detailed parameters of the twin-tank system. 5.1 METHODOLOGY  5.1.1 STORAGE CAPACITY The storage capacity of the reservoir is determined based on the future maximum daily demand of the campus, fire protection flow requirement, and emergency storage demand. The maximum daily demand (MDD) is predicted based on the previous MDD and population data from the Water Consumption Statistic Report produced by Metro Vancouver from 2013 to 2016. These three storage components are summed proportionally with a total required storage capacity of 21,600 m3. There are numerous risks associated with a single underground concrete tank with a volume over 20,000 m3, such as seismic design issue, leakage and contamination issues, and maintenance issue. To mitigate these risks, we have proposed a twin-tank storage system. 5.1.2 SOFTWARE PACKAGE USED SAP2000 is used as the modeling and static analysis of underground storage tank. Four load cases adopted from the ACI code will be tested to find out the flexural, shear and torsional demand of the critical section of the system. The main sources of gravitational loading are from water, soil, and concrete. Then the amount of reinforcement can be determined based on the result of the structural analysis. Earthquake analysis is also performed to check whether the system satisfy the minimum requirements as stated on the National Building Code of Canada.    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 20  5.1.3 REGULATORY PROVISIONS The project is held under the regulations of UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program and should follow all rules set by the UBC Infrastructure and Service Planning as well as UBC Campus and Community Planning. For the construction of water storage system, all structures are mandatory to meet or exceed minimum requirements for infrastructure design in the Nation Building Code of Canada. Specific requirements regarding local geotechnical or climatic condition should follow the standard of British Columbia Building Code and City of Vancouver By-laws. In addition, water supply is provided by Metro Vancouver and therefore, water pressure is set by Metro Vancouver. During the construction of the new water main, all design criteria and construction methods should meet the requirements of Metro Vancouver and conflicts should be avoided with existing underground facility. The Design standards of the distribution system and water storage system will follow the standards set by UBC Sustainability Development Policy#5, American Water Works Association, and CSA Standards as applicable. 5.1.4 TECHNICAL CONSIDERATION  This section will mainly discuss the technical consideration for the underground storage tank from the environmental, geotechnical, structural and construction perspective.  • Environmental ○ Sediment Erosion The construction of the underground storage tank will require a large scale of excavation. In fact, the exposure of clear soil surfaces, and the temporary storage of excavated topsoil entail a high risk of sediment erosion during the rainy season. Erosion and sediment control have to take place to minimize the impact to the construction site.     SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 21  ○ Noise Pollution Noise nuisance from operation of construction equipment, tracked excavator and vehicles are inevitable. Excessive noise on site can disrupt the daily operation of the campus and the living of local communities. Therefore, the contractor need to make sure all machine is well maintained and perform in a suitable noise level; no work is carried out between 6pm to 7am during the construction period. ○ Air Quality Local air pollution can be caused by exhaust emission from the operation of construction equipment. Due to the heavy excavation and openness of the field, dust pollution will very likely take place in the construction site. To address this issue, contractor can control the on-site dust emissions by spraying water while excavating. • Geotechnical (foundation) Underground soil should have adequate bearing capacity to support the storage system; the site should have minimal impact on its surrounding areas and underground utilities. (Assessment, 2002) Given the current design of the underground storage tank, the soil properties under the Arthur Lord Field need to be further investigated to ensure the performance of the foundation. In addition, the whole system will be very heavy after the tank is filling up with water; pile foundations are being considered since the it can effectively transfer to load to a deeper layer of soil which is stronger enough to support the heavy structure. • Material Selection Water leakage is one of the expected problems given the design of underground storage system. In fact, it is very likely to have the leakage problem for concrete tanks that continuously have water in    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 22  storage. It is also difficult and costly to repair the leakage spot especially in the underground environment. Waterproofing concrete can increase the longevity of the concrete tanks. Water stopper and hydrophobic coating spray can also help the layer to repel water. • Structural We also anticipate some challenges associated with the underground water storage design. To make the concrete storage tank structurally sound, the largest load combination scenario needs to be analyzed in order to determine the governing loading. Flexural, shear, and torsional strength of each individual components in the system need to be checked by the CSA concrete code. Also, in order to balance the heavy bending moment at the corner of the storage tank, special design of footing need to be considered. • Contamination Since the storage tank has high volumes of water, it should be monitored more often due to its vulnerability of development of stagnated water. Stagnation can lead to water contamination because potential hosts such as files and water fleas can bring bacteria to the water body. Mixing system can help eliminate the problem by mixing the denser layer of water from the bottom to the less dense surface water to avoid stagnation. In addition, having two separated tanks with a bypass connection can also lower the risk of contamination of all storage water. 5.2 STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF THE TANK As it was mentioned earlier, the design and installation of the underground storage tank was a challenge because of insufficient record on the UBC area as well as technical difficulties. The technical difficulties include first, the design of the gravitational system of the storage tank. Since the tank is significant in volume, a large amount of load is due to water and it will have to be transferred to foundation, the slab-   SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 23  beam-column system has to be designed to have enough capacity to sustain the loading. The second difficulty is to design for lateral loading from soil and water. The third technical difficulty is to design for sloshing effect and earthquakes. 5.2.1 MATERIALS AND TANK DIMENSIONS The major materials used for the storage tank is concrete and steel rebar. Each storage tank has a dimension of 120 m in length, 30 m in width, and 4 m in depth, with a maximum storage capacity of 12,600 m^3. The maximum water level is 3.5 m and the minimum water level is 1.3 m. The top slab has a thickness of 150 mm and the bottom slab has a thickness of 450 mm. The walls have a thickness of 250 mm. The beam cross section has a dimension of 500 mm x 800 mm. The column cross section has a dimension of 500 mm x 500 mm. Table 3 summarizes the structure components of the design. TABLE 3: RESERVOIR SECTION PROPERTIES OF STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS Component Width Height Rebar Sizing # of rebar Beam 500 mm 800 mm 30M 15 Column 500 mm 500 mm 30M 16 Top Slab 1000 mm 150 mm 15M 5 Bottom Slab 1000 mm 450 mm 15M 5 5.2.2 DESIGN LOADINGS Design loads are obtained from structure analysis by using SAP2000. The design bending moment is 1800 kNm and the design shear is 500 kN for beam. The design compression load for column is 1200 kN.     SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 24  5.3 CONSTRUCTION PLAN OF STORAGE TANK The construction of the tank will start on July 19th, 2018. The first phase of the construction involves excavation and preparation on site. The second phase of the construction will be building the foundations and constructing the side walls of the tank. Onto the next phase, the walls will be finished, and the support columns will be under construction. Next phase will be constructing the formwork and concreting of the roof. For the final phase, manhole will be constructed, and an overall inspection will be done.       SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 25  6.0 STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT 6.1 STAKEHOLDER IDENTIFICATION The water supply system upgrade is associated with large-scale construction. During the construction, there is a potential of occupying the public facilities for a relatively long period of time. For pipeline renovating, the road above will be excavated and closed. And for concrete storage, the sports field above will be unavailable during construction. It is crucial to consider all impacted stakeholders and get their support in order to move on smoothly. A general way to achieve that is to give out enough information and follow up to their concerns. The different interests of the stakeholders give good reason to identify the stakeholder parties and develop engagement plan for them respectively. The following tables list the identified stakeholders and summarize the interests and the importance of them. TABLE 4: IDENTIFIED INTERNAL STAKEHOLDERS Internal stakeholders Interest Importance UBC Ensure functionality of campus and invest in a new system with quality to meet future need. High Consultant Interest Medium Project contractor Interest Medium       SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 26  TABLE 5: IDENTIFIED EXTERNAL STAKEHOLDERS External stakeholders Interest Importance First nation community Good protection of the aboriginal lands and the culture. Medium Local residents Live in a convenient and comfortable environment. High School staff and students Unaffected access to school and normal usage of the utilities. High Visitors and business owners Easy access from outside to the destinations and enjoyable environment around the service. Medium Sports field users Suitable facilities for sports activities Low 6.2 ENGAGEMENT PLAN An engagement plan for each party is suggested based on the preliminary stakeholder analysis presented above.  UBC • Update the design with the Campus administrator; provide detailed information of the project progress on a weekly basis. • Hold bi-weekly meeting to communicate important problems with the campus representatives and get their feedback. Consultant • We as the consultant are responsible for planning the engagement activities and carrying out analysis on the engagement outcomes. The consultant should schedule weekly meeting inside the team to discuss feedback from other stakeholders and improve the engagement process.     SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 27  Project Contractors • Assign engineers to the construction site for solving urgent technical issues and performing quality control. • Schedule weekly meeting with consultant to update construction timeline and report construction quality. First Nation Community • Identify the involved first nation community with the database tool and build connection with their representatives at the first phase of the project.  • Hold workshop to explain the project and possible impact and seek for any input. • Establish analysis of the feedback and continuously keep track of the first nations’ needs. Local Residents • Contact the local resident communities before project starts to setup public workshops that outline the construction timeline and process. • Gather major concerns from the residents; identify the residents with different concerns and invite them to form group that represent themselves. • Address concerns respectively from each group and communicate decisions regarding their interests monthly. School Staff and Students    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 28  • Work with the university to notify the ongoing project on campus and encourage input from the staff and students. • Hold open houses on campus to introduce the benefit of the project and the temporary impact on the existing facilities. • Give estimation on the affected services and the duration of shutoff. Update the estimate status as the construction goes on. Visitors and Business Owners • Consult the campus transportation department and plan for alternative routes to keep the traffic functional. • Distribute information at the major transportation destinations including UBC hospital, Thunderbird sports centre, and Westbrook Village to give notice to the visitors and business owners. • Hold one-on-one meeting with the local business and service institution to make accommodations to special requirements. • Deploy appropriate signage and traffic control team around construction site to organize and guide the traffic. Sports Field Users • Communicate with sports field users and estimate the demand on the sports field.  • Work with the university to invite the users to use the other facilities in the vicinity and help with the transfer or refund of the memberships.    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 29  7.0 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT 7.1 EROSION & SEDIMENTATION PROCESS Erosion is a natural process of soil detachment that can be accelerated by construction activities and sediment is the eroded material suspended in water or wind. In general, over 80% of the erosion problems on construction sites are a result of raindrop impacts, which becomes extremely critical during Winter time in Vancouver.  7.2 EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL Climate can affect erosion rate; human activities like construction can also affect erosion rate. According to the studies done by ESCA BC (Erosion and Sediment Control Association of British Columbia), accelerated erosion from construction can be up to 1000 times greater than the natural rate of erosion. Sedimentation is another construction consequence that can impact infrastructure and involve costly cleanup such as clogged storm sewer systems and local flooding. For our project, erosion and sedimentation can greatly impact the repairing cost and construction delays, as well as the profitability. No matter how minimal one impact is, our team considered the cumulative effect of multiple impacts that can affect our natural environment. In the following section, potential environmental impacts during construction and the control measures we used to prevent and eliminate those impacts will be discussed.  7.3 WATER EROSION CONTROL    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 30  Erosion and Sediment Control, which short as ESC, is a rapidly changing field. The key factors in water erosion control are to intercept and manage off and on-site runoff. This limits the potential for soils to be eroded and form sediments in surface runoff. In addition to the traditional approaches such as sedimentation pond and retention pond, a host of new approaches and practices will be considered by our team for this project. Based on our construction schedule, different ESC methods and plans will be used for different construction phase. In the beginning, all stockpiles created by field excavation will be covered using qualified stockpile cover, and any other erodible surfaces will be covered using polythene covers. As the construction moving forward, space will be a problem for sedimentation pond and retention pond. As such, flocculation tank and dewatering bags will be used to replace ponds. Although the cost for flocculation tank can be as high as $5,000 CAD per month, it is a must-have investment which included in our final cost estimation. Because of our 4-meter-deep tank height, few relatively steep slopes will be created by excavation. To protect these steep slopes during construction, the long slope will be break up into several shorter ones and the flow off slope will be directed. By doing so, the potential of erosion for our site can be reduced by 55%.    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 31   FIGURE 4 – DEWATERING BAG  FIGURE 5 – FLOCCULATION TANK 7.4 WIND EROSION CONTROL Due to the low humidity and low precipitation in Vancouver’s summer, wind erosion control is particularly important for our site. Because of the dry weather condition, fugitive dust will be formed once there is wind or other air flow caused by construction vehicles and equipment. In addition, Wesbrook mall has very busy traffic during rush hours, which makes more dynamic air flows than other sites. Although it is hard to eliminate wind erosion from its source, method like silt fence, wind barrier and water spraying will be used during construction to minimize dust. Usually, dust control requires    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 32  staying ahead of the problem, thus, for our project, control methods and equipment will be implemented before the construction start to meet government’s regulations.  FIGURE 6 – SILT FENCE 7.5 FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE EROSION Soil type is one of the biggest factors that influence erosion rate. Different soil types have different characteristics regarding to the potential of being eroded. For example, sandy soil is easily to be detached by flowing water, however, clay soil has lower potential to be eroded. In general, the soil erodibility is decided by the composition percentage of sand, silt clay and organics. As the percentage of sand and silt increases, the erodibility goes up; and as the percentage of organics and clay increases, the erodibility goes down. Due to the complex relationship between soil type and erodibility, our team will have the soil sample from the site examined before construction start. After determining the composition of the site soil, specific control method can be applied in addition to those general control methods. 7.6 REGULATIONS According to federal fisheries Act, no person shall disrupt or destroy fish habitat and no deleterious substance shall be deposited in habitat area. In addition, different municipal governments have different    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 33  BY-LAW regarding to Erosion and Sediment Control. For example, the BY-LAW NO.16138 of City of Surrey states that the TSS (Total suspension Solid) discharged into the sewage system cannot exceed 75mg/L (CITY OF SURREY BY-LAW NO. 16138). For our project, although UBC or City of Vancouver does not have a specific BY-LAW for Erosion and Sediment Control, due to our diligence of being civil engineers, we use the highest requirement among all other municipalities’ regulation as our reference, which is 25 NTU in Winter and 20 NTU in Summer.  7.7 INSPECTIONS Base on BC-CESCL creed, a paper trail that documents compliance with all permit conditions throughout the life of the project is needed, and the ESC Plan should detail the inspection procedures including time, location, personnel and method used.   In addition, the importance of maintenance has been supported by a survey of BMPs (Best Management Practices) by the King County Conservation District (Manual of Best Management Practices for Maintenance of Agricultural Waterways in King County). The results indicate that the major reason for BMP failure is poor maintenance. Therefore, BMPs should be inspected regularly, particularly before, during, and after a major storm (Greater Vancouver Regional District Best Management Practices Guide for Storm Water). To make sure the inspections will be done on time and under the city regulations, a site inspection company will be hired to do the job, which take the responsibility of recording, inspecting and reporting.      SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 34  8.0 MAINTENANCE SPECIFICATIONS AND PLANS The three major components of our design are pipe distribution system, pump station and twin concrete tank. Every one of them needs a different maintenance method and plan. Detecting and repairing leaks will be the most cost-effective way we planned to maintain the two underground water tanks. Unnoticed leaks are costly occurrences in underground water tanks, and many may only be found when they become visible at the surface. However, leaks detected and repaired early will only incur minor costs. The way we planned to make sure leaks do not go unnoticed is to get the tank inspected regularly and monitor the distribution carefully. If the system has experienced a noticeable drop in water pressure, an unexplained sudden increase in water use, or water loss greater than 10%, then a leak may be found, and priority attention is required.To reduce operating costs and conserve, all the data including water pressure and water usage will be monitored through system 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and annual inspection and cleaning will be done on time. Besides, Documentation will be accurate, consistent, current, and accessible to be a useful tool in deciding priorities and establishing an emergency plan. Each tank has separate control valves including a valve chamber, a flowmeter chamber, and a drain chamber. Inspection on the reservoir will be performed on a monthly basis in summer and every three months in other seasons. For distribution pipeline system, all equipment along a pipeline will be carefully inspected and maintained, both inside and outside. The method we used to inspected pipeline is called inspection gauges, also known as smart pigs. They are highly sophisticated machines equipped with GPS tracking and sensors. These smart pigs will travel inside the pipe to identify and locate anything out of the ordinary, like small cracks or corrosion (Smart Pigs). When a smart pig inspection detects a defects,    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 35  pipeline inspector will conduct an integrity dig, which involves excavating a section of buried pipeline. Integrity digs give pipeline inspector a clearer view of the pipeline to determine if it needs repair or replacement.   FIGURE 7 – SMART PIG Two steps are designed to maintain the Pumps. The first step is to clean out the cooling fans. The debris and dust may build up around cooling fans to create overheating issues. The second step is to spray anti-corrosion product on exposed steel. Anti-corrosion spray can extend the life of a pump and make a real difference to the smooth running of a pump. In addition, regular checking will be scheduled annually for wear and tear.      SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 36  9.0 CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULING & COST ESTIMATE 9.1 CONSTRUCTION MILESTONES We drafted a high-level construction plan for the entire project. A summary of the construction milestone dates is as follow: ● Start of WM on University Boulevard: May 1, 2018 ● Finish of WM on University Boulevard: June 25, 2018 ● Start of WM on Wesbrook Mall: June 26, 2018 ● Finish of WM on Wesbrook Mall: September 5, 2018 ● Start of Reservoir Construction: May 1, 2018 ● Underground Piping Start: July 5, 2018 ● Underground Piping Finish: July 18, 2018 ● Reservoir Concrete Structure Start: July 19, 2018 ● Reservoir Main Structure Finish: January 11, 2019 ● System Commissioning: April 19, 2019 The total construction days from start to finish are expected to be 254 days. A detailed schedule can be found in Appendix B.  9.2 COST ESTIMATE Based on the final design detailed in the previous section, a Class B project cost estimate was prepared. The total cost of the project is comprised of the first costs, including permitting, project management,    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 37  construction, 15% of contingency, PST (7%), and the annual operating and maintenance fees. A breakdown of these costs is summarized in Table 6 below. TABLE 6: COST ESTIMATE SUMMARY  Capital Cost Operation & Maintenance Total Cost Distribution System $1,247,813 $ 26,612 $1,274,425 Storage System $ 13,794,361 $ 129,600 $ 13,923,961 Total Cost Over 1-Year Period $ 15,198,386 Changes from the preliminary cost estimate include the change from single underground concrete tank to twin-tank with separated control system, and a change to the contingency allowance arising from the upgrade from a “Class C” estimate to “Class B”. A detailed estimate can be found in Appendix C. 9.1 ESTIMATE OF CAPITAL COST Table 7 and 8 summarize the contractor costs to fully implement the proposed design of the reservoir and distribution system. The costs are broken into major divisions as per specified in the Master Municipal Construction Documents (MMCD), 2009 edition. All estimates are exclusive of PST (7%), GST (5%), and contingency.       SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 38  TABLE 7: CONSTRUCTION COST OF RESERVOIR Code Scopes Cost Estimate 01 00 00 General Conditions $368,891 02 00 00 Site Construction $3,768,811 03 00 00 Concrete $3,982,689 16 00 00 Electrical $1,278,791 22 00 00 Plumbing $818,045 33 00 00 Utilities $162,000 N/A Miscellaneous $831,214  Total $11,210,371  TABLE 8: CONSTRUCTION COST OF DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM Code Scopes Cost Estimate 01 00 00 General Conditions $139,779 02 00 00 Site Construction $276,122 33 00 00 Utilities $598,169  Total $1,014,070 9.2 ESTIMATE OF OPERATING AND MAINTENANCE COSTS Regular maintenance and examination are highly required for underground water supply system to prevent leakage and contaminant issues. The lifespan for each project component is anticipated to be 50 years for the concrete reservoir and 75 years for the proposed water main system. Therefore, the operating and maintenance costs are estimated based on the approximate costs per square meter and per linear meter on a one-year span, respectively. Table 9 lists the detailed estimates of each component.     SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 39  TABLE 9: MAINTENANCE & OPERATIONAL COST SUMMARY Maintenance Category Quantity Unit Rate Price Concrete Reservoir 7,200 m2 18 $129,600 Pump Station 1 N/A 25,000 $25,000 Water Main 3.1 km 520 $1,612    Total: $156,212  It should be noted that a one-year warranty will be provided by the contractor after project substantial completion. Thus, the values above exclude any costs to correct major performance deficiencies that would fall under warranty conditions.     SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 40  10.0 REFERENCES 1. BC-CESCL Course booklet.pdf [PDF]. (2015, September 28). ESCA BC. 2. Best Management Practices Guide for Stormwater [PDF]. (1999, October). Vancouver: Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District. 3. CITY OF SURREY BY-LAW NO. 16138 [PDF]. (2006). Surrey: Council of the City of Surrey. 4. Manual of Best Management Practices for Maintenance of Agricultural Waterways in King County [PDF]. (2012, April). King County: Department of Natural Resources and Parks April 2012 Water and Land Resources Division. 5. Pipeline Pigging with Smart Pigs. (n.d.). Retrieved April 03, 2018, from http://smartpigs.net/ 6. UBC Technical Guidelines_Water Utilities_331000-2017. 2017 Edition. Section 33 10 00. Water Utilities 7. CISC. (2015). The Handbook of the Steel Construction.  8. NRC. (2015). The National Building Code of Canada 2015. 9. MMCD (2009). Master Municipal Construction Documents 2009. 10. Water Service Department. (2013). Water Consumption Statistics Report. Retrieved from http://www.metrovancouver.org/services/water/WaterPublications/2013_Water_Consumption_Statistics_Report.pdf 11. Water Service Department. (2014). Water Consumption Statistics Report. Retrieved from http://www.metrovancouver.org/services/water/WaterPublications/2014_Water_Consumption_Statistics_Report.pdf    SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 41  12. Water Service Department. (2015). Water Consumption Statistics Report. Retrieved from http://www.metrovancouver.org/services/water/WaterPublications/2015_Water_Consumption_Statistics_Report.pdf 13. Water Service Department. (2016). Water Consumption Statistics Report. Retrieved from http://www.metrovancouver.org/services/water/WaterPublications/2016_Water_Consumption_Statistics_Report.pdf 14. UBC Properties Trust (2002, September) Hydrogeological and Geotechnical Assessment of Northwest Area UBC Campus, Vancouver. Retrieved from Connect UBC  15. UBC Properties Trust (2015, June 2) Land Use Plan for The University of British Columbia Point Grey Campus. Retrieved from Connect UBC      SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 42        APPENDIX A – ISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS IRON HEAD CONSULTING LTD2205 LOWER MALL. VANCOUVER, BCSECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBCVANCOUVER CAMPUS 272 - 6081 UNIVERSITY BLVD.CIVL446-011APR-07-2018C-001COVERSHEETISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION1 07/041. ALL WORK SHALL MEET OREXCEED MINIMUMREQUIREMENTS OF THECURRENT EDITION OF THEBRITISH COLUMBIA BUILDINGCODE 2012, ASSOCIATEDSTANDARDDS REFERENCED INTHAT CODE, AND LOCALSTANDARS AND BYLAW ASAPPLICABLE.2. CONFIRM SIZE ANDLOCATIONS OF OPENINGS WITHMECHANICAL AND ELECTRICALCONTRACTORS. REPORT ANYDESCREPANCIES TOCONSULTANT BEFOREPROCEEDING WITH WORK.NOTICE:THE CONTRACTOR IS RESPONSIBLE FORDETERMINING THE EXISTENCE, LOCATION ANDELEVATION OF ALL SUCH UTILITIES AND/ORSTRUCTURES AND IS RESPONSIBLE FORNOTIFYING THE APPROPRIATE COMPANY,DEPARTMENT OR PERSON(S) OF ITS INTENTIONTO CARRY OUT ITS OPERATIONS.THE EXISTENCE, LOCATION AND ELEVATION OFUTILITIES AND/OR CONCEALED STRUCTURES ATTHE PROJECT SITE ARE NOT GUARANTEED BYIRON HEAD CONSULTING LTD.IRON HEAD CONSULTING LTD2205 LOWER MALL. VANCOUVER, BCSECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBCVANCOUVER CAMPUS 272 - 6081 UNIVERSITY BLVD.CIVL446-011APR-07-2018C-002GENERALARRANGEMENTISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION1 07/041. ALL WORK SHALL MEET OREXCEED MINIMUMREQUIREMENTS OF THECURRENT EDITION OF THEBRITISH COLUMBIA BUILDINGCODE 2012, ASSOCIATEDSTANDARDDS REFERENCED INTHAT CODE, AND LOCALSTANDARS AND BYLAW ASAPPLICABLE.2. CONFIRM SIZE ANDLOCATIONS OF OPENINGS WITHMECHANICAL AND ELECTRICALCONTRACTORS. REPORT ANYDESCREPANCIES TOCONSULTANT BEFOREPROCEEDING WITH WORK.DETAIL "A"450mm DI WM450mm GVV422760mmDETAIL "B"’Tie-in at Ex. WMTie-in at COV Ex. WMC-003WATERMAINISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION1 07/04’Connecting to StorageTank Pump ChamberConnecting to Ex.600mm WM onUniversity Blvd.C-004WATERMAINISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION1 07/04IRON HEAD CONSULTING LTD2205 LOWER MALL. VANCOUVER, BCSECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBCVANCOUVER CAMPUS 272 - 6081 UNIVERSITY BLVD.CIVL446-011APR-07-2018S-001ROOFPLANISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION1 07/041. ALL WORK SHALL MEET OREXCEED MINIMUMREQUIREMENTS OF THECURRENT EDITION OF THEBRITISH COLUMBIA BUILDINGCODE 2012, ASSOCIATEDSTANDARDDS REFERENCED INTHAT CODE, AND LOCALSTANDARS AND BYLAW ASAPPLICABLE.2. CONFIRM SIZE ANDLOCATIONS OF OPENINGS WITHMECHANICAL AND ELECTRICALCONTRACTORS. REPORT ANYDESCREPANCIES TOCONSULTANT BEFOREPROCEEDING WITH WORK.IRON HEAD CONSULTING LTD2205 LOWER MALL. VANCOUVER, BCSECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBCVANCOUVER CAMPUS 272 - 6081 UNIVERSITY BLVD.CIVL446-011APR-07-2018S-002BASEPLANISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION1 07/041. ALL WORK SHALL MEET OREXCEED MINIMUMREQUIREMENTS OF THECURRENT EDITION OF THEBRITISH COLUMBIA BUILDINGCODE 2012, ASSOCIATEDSTANDARDDS REFERENCED INTHAT CODE, AND LOCALSTANDARS AND BYLAW ASAPPLICABLE.2. CONFIRM SIZE ANDLOCATIONS OF OPENINGS WITHMECHANICAL AND ELECTRICALCONTRACTORS. REPORT ANYDESCREPANCIES TOCONSULTANT BEFOREPROCEEDING WITH WORK.IRON HEAD CONSULTING LTD2205 LOWER MALL. VANCOUVER, BCSECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBCVANCOUVER CAMPUS 272 - 6081 UNIVERSITY BLVD.CIVL446-011APR-07-2018S-003ELEVATIONSISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION1 07/041. ALL WORK SHALL MEET OREXCEED MINIMUMREQUIREMENTS OF THECURRENT EDITION OF THEBRITISH COLUMBIA BUILDINGCODE 2012, ASSOCIATEDSTANDARDDS REFERENCED INTHAT CODE, AND LOCALSTANDARS AND BYLAW ASAPPLICABLE.2. CONFIRM SIZE ANDLOCATIONS OF OPENINGS WITHMECHANICAL AND ELECTRICALCONTRACTORS. REPORT ANYDESCREPANCIES TOCONSULTANT BEFOREPROCEEDING WITH WORK.250 EXTERIOR WALLScale: 1:10500 * 500 COLUMN DETAILScale: 1:100 500 1000IRON HEAD CONSULTING LTD2205 LOWER MALL. VANCOUVER, BCSECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBCVANCOUVER CAMPUS 272 - 6081 UNIVERSITY BLVD.CIVL446-011APR-07-2018S-004SECTIONDETAILSISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION1 07/041. ALL WORK SHALL MEET OREXCEED MINIMUMREQUIREMENTS OF THECURRENT EDITION OF THEBRITISH COLUMBIA BUILDINGCODE 2012, ASSOCIATEDSTANDARDDS REFERENCED INTHAT CODE, AND LOCALSTANDARS AND BYLAW ASAPPLICABLE.2. CONFIRM SIZE ANDLOCATIONS OF OPENINGS WITHMECHANICAL AND ELECTRICALCONTRACTORS. REPORT ANYDESCREPANCIES TOCONSULTANT BEFOREPROCEEDING WITH WORK.IRON HEAD CONSULTING LTD2205 LOWER MALL. VANCOUVER, BCSECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBCVANCOUVER CAMPUS 272 - 6081 UNIVERSITY BLVD.CIVL446-011APR-07-2018M-001CHAMBERDETAILSISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION1 07/041. ALL WORK SHALL MEET OREXCEED MINIMUMREQUIREMENTS OF THECURRENT EDITION OF THEBRITISH COLUMBIA BUILDINGCODE 2012, ASSOCIATEDSTANDARDDS REFERENCED INTHAT CODE, AND LOCALSTANDARS AND BYLAW ASAPPLICABLE.2. CONFIRM SIZE ANDLOCATIONS OF OPENINGS WITHMECHANICAL AND ELECTRICALCONTRACTORS. REPORT ANYDESCREPANCIES TOCONSULTANT BEFOREPROCEEDING WITH WORK.   SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 52         APPENDIX B – CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE   ID Task ModeTask Name Duration Start Finish1 Start 0 days Tue 5/1/18 Tue 5/1/182 Water Main on University Blvd.40 days Tue 5/1/18 Mon 6/25/183 Trench Excavation 20 days Tue 5/1/18 Mon 5/28/184 Piping 25 days Tue 5/8/18 Mon 6/11/185 Landscape 10 days Tue 6/12/18 Mon 6/25/186 Water Main Construction Wesbrook Mall52 days Tue 6/26/18 Wed 9/5/187 Trench Excavation 15 days Tue 6/26/18 Mon 7/16/188 Piping 40 days Thu 6/28/18 Wed 8/22/189 Landscape & Paving 10 days Thu 8/23/18 Wed 9/5/181011 Reservoir & Pump Station254 days Tue 5/1/18 Fri 4/19/1912 Procurement 30 days Tue 5/1/18 Mon 6/11/1813 Mobolization & Layout7 days Tue 5/1/18 Wed 5/9/1814 Bulk Excavation 40 days Thu 5/10/18 Wed 7/4/1815 Underground Piping 10 days Thu 7/5/18 Wed 7/18/1816 Reservoir & Pump Station Concrete Pour110 days Thu 7/19/18 Wed 12/19/1817 Reservoir & Pump Station Backfill30 days Thu 12/20/18Wed 1/30/1918 Landscaping 20 days Thu 1/31/19 Wed 2/27/1919 Process & Mechanical150 days Mon 7/30/18Fri 2/22/1920 Electrical Installation 30 days Mon 12/3/18Fri 1/11/1921 Comissioning 55 days Mon 2/4/19 Fri 4/19/1922 Finish 0 days Fri 4/19/19 Fri 4/19/195/14/19Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr MayApril May June July August September October November December January February March April MayTaskSplitMilestoneSummaryProject SummaryInactive TaskInactive MilestoneInactive SummaryManual TaskDuration-onlyManual Summary RollupManual SummaryStart-onlyFinish-onlyExternal TasksExternal MilestoneDeadlineProgressManual ProgressPage 1Project: Water Main & Pump StatDate: Sun 4/8/18   SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 54         APPENDIX C – COST ESTIMATE   SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC VANCOUVER CAMPUSUBC SEEDSApril 08, 2018        Man Hr  Rate Qty Unit  Rate Qty Unit  Rate Qty  Rate 01 43 00 Office & Site Staff 259  $            75.00 1  $                       1,500  $            20,925 01 55 00 Traffic Control 1  $                    10,000  $            10,000 01 59 50 Temporary FacilitiesTemporary Toilets, Offices, Drinking Water1  $                    25,000  $            25,000  $            55,925 02 07 00 Sitework Demolition & Removal Topsoil Removal 86  $            30.00 1 ea  $          24,876  $            27,450 Excavation 172  $            46.00 86 hr  $                 250  $            29,362 Disposal 1  $                    20,780  $            20,780 02 51 00 Asphalt Paving Asphalt Restore 1  $                       7,000  $               7,000 02 90 00 Landscaping 1  $                    50,000  $            50,000  $         134,592 N/A Pipe Placement  $         17,333 1  $                       7,000  $         195,471 N/A Disinfection 1  $                    17,000  $            17,000  $         212,471 402,988$         01 43 00 Office & Site Staff 360  $            75.00 1  $                       1,500  $            28,500 01 55 00 Traffic Control 1  $                    15,000  $            15,000 01 59 50 Temporary FacilitiesTemporary Toilets, Offices, Drinking Water1  $                    30,000  $            30,000  $            73,500 02 07 00 Sitework Demolition & Removal Topsoil Removal 90  $            30.00 1 ea  $          25,800  $            28,500 Excavation 180  $            46.00 90 hr  $                 250  $            30,780 Disposal 1  $                    21,797  $            21,797 02 51 00 Asphalt Paving Asphalt Restore 1  $                    20,000  $            20,000 02 90 00 Landscaping 1  $                    20,000  $            20,000  $         121,077 02 33 00 Trench ExcavationSubtotal:Water Main on Wesbrook Mall01 - General ConditionsSubtotal:02 - Site ConstructionCode Description ItemLabour Material Equipment Subcontract02 - Site Construction02 33 00 Trench ExcavationSubtotal: Total Water Main on University Blvd.01 - General ConditionsSubtotal:University Blvd. Water Main Total:33 - Utilities $              105,338.00  $                72,800.00 Subtotal:SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC VANCOUVER CAMPUSUBC SEEDSApril 08, 2018        Man Hr  Rate Qty Unit  Rate Qty Unit  Rate Qty  Rate N/A Pipe Placement  $         27,000 1  $                       7,000  $         324,389 N/A Disinfection 1  $                    17,000  $            17,000  $         341,389 535,966$         938,954$         140,843$         1,247,813$    Code Description ItemLabour Material Equipment Subcontract Total Water Main Contingency (15%)Total Water Main Construction Cost (incl. O&P, PST) $              183,989.00  $             113,400.00 Subtotal:Wesbrook Mall Water Main Total:Water Main Total:33 - UtilitiesSECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC VANCOUVER CAMPUSUBC SEEDSApril 08, 2018        Man Hr  Rate Qty Unit  Rate Qty Unit  Rate Qty  Rate 01 10 50 Surveying 24  $         145.00 1  $                       1,500  $               4,980 01 33 01 Project Record Documents 1  $                       2,000  $               2,000 01 41 00 Material Testing Soil Compaction & Concrete Testing 116  $         200.00 2  $                       3,000  $            29,186 01 43 10 Project Manager 1600  $            60.00  $            96,000 01 43 20 Project Coordinator 1600  $            35.00  $            56,000 01 43 50 Safety Officer 80  $            60.00  $               4,800 01 44 00 Site Superintendent 1600  $            65.00  $         104,000 01 51 10 Temporary Power Design, Install, and Consumption 10 MO  $          350.00 1  $                       8,000  $            11,500 01 55 00 Traffic Control 1  $                       8,000  $               8,000 01 59 50 Temporary FacilitiesTemporary Toilets, Offices, Drinking Water10 MO  $          100.00 12 MO  $     1,550.00 1  $                       1,500  $            21,100 01 71 00 Waste Management Container Rental, Cleaning 40  $            40.00 12 MO  $          200.00  $               4,000  $         341,566 02 07 00 Sitework Demolition & Removal16,800 m2 Demolition 78  $            38.05 5,040 m3  $             13.50 78 hr  $          160.00  $            83,396 Silt Fence 97  $            33.50 387 m  $             10.00  $               7,111 Cleaning 160  $            33.50 10 MO  $          500.00 10 MO  $          850.00  $            18,860 Pile Setup 7  $                       6,000  $            42,000 Pile Driver 105  $                              75  $               7,875 Ecavation 1069  $            37.50 80,185 m3  $             13.50 1069 hr  $          160.00  $    1,293,651 Backfilling 988  $            37.50 44,445 m3  $             30.00 988 hr  $          205.00  $    1,572,858 Trenching 12  $            34.00 596 m 12 hr  $          225.00  $               3,087 02 66 80 Yard Piping 1  $                 350,000  $         350,000 02 90 00 Landscaping Topsoil Placement, Hydro Seeding 16,800 sqm  $                6.00 1  $                    10,000  $         110,800  $    3,489,639 Underground Rectangular Concrete ReservoirExcavation, Trenching, and Backfilling02 22 3002 15 00 Sedimentation & Erosion ControlPiling Total 01 - General Conditions02 - Site ConstructionItemSubtotal:Subtotal:Code DescriptionLabour Material Equipment SubcontractSECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC VANCOUVER CAMPUSUBC SEEDSApril 08, 2018        Man Hr Rate Qty Unit Rate Qty Unit Rate Qty RateForman 640  $            50.00 12,753 sqm  $            32,000 Labour 12,753  $            41.45 12,753 sqm  $             20.00  $         783,652 03 20 00 Concrete Reinforcement Materials & Off Loading 592,552 kg  $                2.25  $    1,333,243 Materials & Pouring 6,956  $            40.98 6,956 m3  $          150.00 1  $                    40,000  $    1,368,412 Pumping 6,956 m3  $                4.00 366.09287 hr  $          180.00  $            93,720 03 35 05 Concrete Finishes 30,633 sqm  $                2.50  $            76,584  $    3,687,611 400mm dia. SS Pipe 368  $            37.50 724 lm  $             58.53 724 lm  $                1.12  $            56,987 400mm SS 90 deg. Elbow 2  $            37.50 10 ea  $             99.79  $               1,073 400mm T 4  $            37.50 14 ea  $             99.79  $               1,547 400mm BV 2  $            44.50 2 ea  $      6,260.00  $            12,609 400mm Gate Valve 4  $            44.50 4 ea  $   15,727.00  $            63,086 150mm dia. SS Pipe 82  $            37.50 204 lm  $             60.34 204 lm  $                1.03  $            15,594 150mm SS 90 deg. Elbow 3  $            37.50 10 ea  $             10.89  $                   221 150mm T 1  $            37.50 2 ea  $             10.99  $                      59 150mm Gate Valve 2  $            44.50 2 ea  $      1,850.00  $               3,789 Miscellaneous 1  $                 350,000  $         350,000 Contingency 50% 1  $                 252,483  $         252,483  $         757,449 16 00 00 Electrical 1  $            1,184,065  $    1,184,065  $    1,184,065 33 44 01 Manholes & Catchbasins 1  $                 150,000  $         150,000  $         150,000 Subtotal:Total03 10 00 Concrete Forming03 30 00 Cast-in-Place ConcreteEquipmentMaterialSubtotal:LabourDescription Item03 - Concrete33 - UtilitiesCodeSubcontract22 - PlumbingSubtotal:16 - ElectricalSubtotal:22 11 13 Process PipingSECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC VANCOUVER CAMPUSUBC SEEDSApril 08, 2018        Man Hr Rate Qty Unit Rate Qty Unit Rate Qty Rate05 00 00 Metals 1  $                 355,220  $         355,220 06 00 00 Wood & Plastics 1  $                    59,203  $            59,203 07 00 00 Thermal & Moisture Control 1  $                 177,610  $         177,610 08 00 00 Doors & Windows 1  $                    59,203  $            59,203 09 00 00 Finishes 1  $                 118,407  $         118,407  $         769,643 10,379,973$ 1,556,996$    13,794,361$ SubcontractTotalReservoir Contingency (15%)Total Reservoir Construction Cost (incl. O&P, PST)Subtotal:MiscellaneousCode Description ItemLabour Material EquipmentReservoir Total:   SECURE WATER SUPPLY FOR UBC FINAL DESIGN REPORT 60         APPENDIX D – SAMPLE CALCULATION     H L W water lvlDepth of soil on top 2.5 m dimension of tank 5 120 30 4Sands, loamy sands 1.8 g/cm^3 Top Bottom Walls1800 kg/m^3 Shell properties 0.15 0.3 0.25Dead load 4710150 kg 1308.375 kg/m^2 12830.78 N/m^2 Volume of conc 1960.113 m^3 u/w concrete 2403 kg/m^3Live load 900000 kg 250 kg/m^2 2451.663 N/m^2 volume of water 14101 m^3 u/w water 1000 kg/m^3water 14101000 kg 3916.944 kg/m^2 38412.1 N/m^2soil 16200000 kg 4500 kg/m^2 44129.93 N/m^2 top/bottom slab 3600 m^2uplift 12600000 3500 34323.28Load combination Lateral: Water Soil1 83264 N/m^22 159641 N/m^2 Wall Long 9417600 N 15892200 N3 101291 N/m^2 Wall short 2354400 N 3973050 N4 17849 N/m^25 28219 N/m^2Reinforcement in Flexure 1.3U 207533 N/m^2Direct Tension/hoop reinforcement 1.6U 255426 N/m^2Excess shear 1.3U 207533 N/m^2Compression+flexure 1.0U 159641 N/m^2  Property of Concrete Design Factors MSA 20 mmf'c 25 Mpa 2.50E+07 N/m^2 \phi_s 0.85Density of Concrete 1800 kg/m^3 \rho_b 0.022727 \phi_c 0.6517640 N/m^3 \alpha_1 0.8125Ec 16200.66572 Mpa 16200665722 N/m^2 \beta_1 0.9075 0.9075Property of Steel Cover 40 mm 0.04fy 400 Mpa 400000000 N/m^2Cross Section of Beam Deflection Control Cross Section of ColumnProperty of Rebar Area(mm^2) b 500 mm 0.5 m h_min 452.381 b 500 mmStirrup 10 M 100 h 800 mm 0.8 m h>h_min? YES h 500 mm15 M 200 L 10000 mm 10 m20 M 300 d 730 mm h-7025 M 500 d' 70 mm30 M 700Design Beam Check mmFlexural Resistance kNm Tension at bottom 1800 Spacing of longitudinal reinforcement 42 1.4db Maximum number of bars per layer:Mr(from Sap2000) 962.9031818 kNm Tension on Top 655 28 1.4MSA #of Rebars 5As from Direct Method 4638.548519 mm^2 Asb 9090.909 mm^2 Steel Failure 30 Rebar Size 30# of rebarsActual As(mm^2) Spacing: 42 If section fits? YESLongitudinal 10 M 100 47 470015 M 200 24 4800 Compression Steel20 M 300 16 4800 a 421.575 mm Total As 8011.219 mm^225 M 500 10 5000 Mrb 1604.83864 kNm # of tension steel 1030 M 700 7 4900 Mr1 962.903182 kNm # of compression steel 5Actual Mr Mr2 837.096818 kNm Two layers of 5 Tensiona 257.5147929 mm Cr2 1146.70797 kN One layer of 5 CompressionMr 1022.112426 kNm If capacity>loading A's 3372.6705 mm^2 30MYES As2 3372.6705 mm^2 The water table is at 3mShear Resistance Shear from Sap2000 500 kNdv 657 mmbeta 0.18 min reinforcement0.138805069 no reinforcement For being conservative, choose beta with no reinforcement.Vc 148.1917622 kNVs 351.8082378 kN Check if the section is ok:s 181.5951792 mm maxVr 1334.531 OKs_max 600s 533.3333333 mmgoverning s 181.5951792 mm 180 mmColumn Check M1 from Sap2000 0 kNm Pf 1200 kN Assume non-sway but may not actually be the case.M2 from Sap2000 400 kNm M1 should always be smaller than M2. Real case should have k somewhere between pinned and fixed.Slenderness Check Lu 4 m 4000 mmFixed k 0.5 kLu/r 13.85641Pinned k 1 27.71281from loading 57.05443Can slenderness be ignored? YESMoment Maginificationcm 0.6\beta_d 0.75 From assumption, may or may not be valid.EI 1.92865E+13 N*mm^2Pc-fixed 47587.54813 kN Check if min eccentricity satisfiedYESPc-pinned 11896.88703 kN use \rho_t 0.03Magnification Factor-fixed 0.620875216 7500 mm^2 # of rebars 15MF-pinned 0.693232061 \gamma 0.7 5 rebars on each sideDesign Mr 277.2928244

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