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Investing in the Future : Improving Financial Literacy among Students in UBC Chang, Edward; Nauss, Nicole; Rui, Ellie; Sutter, Sam; Yao, Lynette 2018-03-21

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Sustainability Program Student Research Report Investing in the Future: Improving Financial Literacy Among Students in UBC Edward Chang, Nicole Nauss, Ellie Rui, Sam Sutter, Lynette Yao University of British Columbia COMM 486M Themes: Community, Finance, Health, Wellbeing March 21, 2018Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Sustainability Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student research project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore, readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Sustainability Program representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.[DOCUMENT TITLE] [Document subtitle] [DATE] [COMPANY NAME] [Company address] INVESTING IN THE  Improving Financial Literacy among Students in UBC FUTURE:PREPARED FOR: UBC Enrolment Services TEAM 2  Edward Chang Nicole Nauss 34093138 Ellie Rui 29970143 Sam Sutter 31660137 Lynette Yao  14515134 Information has been redacted from this report to protect personal privacy. If you require further information, you can make an FOI request to the Office of University Council.1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY As of now, Enrolment Services (ES) is providing financial wellness support for UBC students. The current initiatives are not gaining sufficient traction, which is why our team has formed a series of recommendations to enhance these services. The purpose of this report is to identify the issues ES is currently facing, specifically in regards to international students, and to provide strategic initiatives to circumvent these problems.   Client Information ES provides a broad scope of registrarial services to support UBC students with various offerings. ES’ overarching strategic goal is that current and prospective students encounter a “holistic, engaged and outstanding” experience during their time at UBC. In order for this to happen, ES aims to grow their financial wellness “peer program” as well as the general financial wellness program at UBC. Within ES, there are currently 42 Enrollment Services Professionals (ESPs) and 3 associate ESPs. The ESPs offer individual advising to all UBC students in the area of finances; specifically, financial wellness strategy involving budgeting, student loans, scholarships, and emergency funding.  Students are able to take advantage of these offerings by attending workshops, watching webinars and meeting with advisors one on one. Current programs are being advertised through cohort emails, notifying faculty directly, posts to UBCfyi and additional information on their website. Decision Making After our team discussed ES’ ongoing efforts and options, we have determined that despite decent offerings, they need to improve delivery methods and relevancy. Our project aims to provide strategic recommendations to enable ES to have the following outcomes: Increase student awareness and participation by offering programs suited to international students’ most relevant financial wellness concerns; and overall improved financial literacy for international students. In order to achieve the outcomes shown above, our team has identified three phases of recommendations for ES. We believe that previously ES has been somewhat neglecting international students – which is a large portion of UBC’s population. Thus, within the first phase, our goal is to increase promotion among these international students. In the second phase, we recommend expanding and improving the Financial Wellness Peer Program. As more international students become aware of ES’s financial wellness offerings, they will be more likely to become involved in the peer program. Finally, in phase three, to bring the previous two recommendations together we have generated an entirely new offering – peer-led financial literacy workshops. Our report is designed to take ES through our process of identifying the issues at hand, developing methods to overcome them, and providing any financial implications. Additionally, in order to ensure the success of the implementations, we formed success metrics and risk and mitigation strategies. 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction…………………………………………………………………………..………………………………………………..3 Situational Analysis………………………………………………………..…………………………………..………………….4 • Internal Analysis…………………………………………………………………………….…………………………………………………………………..4 • External Analysis…………………………………………………..……………………….…………………………………………………………………..5 • Customer Analysis……………………………………..………………….…………………………………………………………………………………..7 • Issues Analysis…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..8 Recommendations……………………………………………….………………..………………………………………………9 • Recommendation 1………………………………………………………………………..…………………………………………………………………10 • Recommendation 2……………………………………………………………….…….……………………………………………………………………11 • Recommendation 3…………………………………………….………………...…………………………………………………………………………12 • Success Metrics…………………………………………………….…………………………………………………………………………………………13 • Risks/Mitigation………………………………………………..………………………...……………………………………………………………………14 Implementation………………………………………………………………….…………………………………………………15 • Project Timeline……………………………………………….………………………………………………………………………………………………15 • Financials…………………………………………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………16Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………….………………………………………………18 Appendix…………………………………………………………………………………………….…………………………………19 • Appendix 1: Mission Model Canvas…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………19 • Appendix 2: Value Proposition Canvas………………………………………………….………………………………………………………20 • Appendix 3: SWOT Analysis……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………21 • Appendix 4: Competitive Analysis………………………………………………………………….………………………………………………22 • Appendix 5: Survey Questions………………………………………………………………………….……………………………………………23 • Appendix 6: Survey Questions – Funding Source……………………………..…………………………………………………………24 • Appendix 7: Survey Questions – Topic Interest……………………………………………………………………………………………25 • Appendix 8: Example Marketing Plan……………………………………………………………………………………………………………26 • Appendix 9: Example Lesson Plan…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………27 • Appendix 10: Financials – Phases 1 & 2…………………………………………………………………………………………………………28 • Appendix 11: Financials – Phase 3…………………………………………………………….……………………………………………………29 3 ES’ Financial Wellness team aims to “Support students’ overall success and wellness by providing students with the information, tools, and resources they need to develop financial wellness prior to arriving at UBC, throughout their degree, and after graduation”1. ES’ overarching strategic goal is that current and prospective students encounter a “holistic, engaged and outstanding” experience during their time at UBC. To make this happen, ES aims to grow UBC’s financial wellness program.  ES’ Financial Wellness team currently offers students a variety of ways to increase their financial literacy and understanding of how to achieve financial wellness. Students can attend workshops, watch webinars and meet with advisors one on one. To market its services to students, ES sends out cohort emails, reaches out to faculty, posts in the “UBCfyi” and offers information on its website. ES has recently launched a new volunteer program, Financial Wellness Peers, which involves peer to peer sharing of financial knowledge.  Because ES is a nonprofit organization we have created a Mission Model Canvas, see Appendix 1, in order to map out the program’s operations. The main goal of this project is to identify what international students need and want to learn regarding financial wellness, and the most effective forms for delivery based on student needs. While overall feedback of the current programs is good, ES hopes to increase attendance, awareness, and engagement to further their goal of helping all students increase their financial literacy and wellness at UBC. 1  Low, C., et al. (January 25th, 2018). COMM 486 Project: Money Management 101. UBC Sauder School of Business. Retrieved February 5th, 2018 from: http://blogs.ubc.ca/comm486mconnolly/files/2018/01/COMM-486-Enrolment-services-SEEDS-presentation.pdf. 4 After conducting a SWOT Analysis, see Appendix 2, we have identified several key strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats facing ES’ Financial Wellness team. In terms of strengths, ES offers a great selection of workshop themes. The workshops also receive mostly positive feedback from students indicating that the content is useful to them. Furthermore, ES has a very passionate team. Despite these strengths a couple of key weaknesses exist, especially with regards to international students. First, the workshops attract mostly domestic students and not international students. Second, international students are mostly unaware of the financial wellness services that ES offers. The most notable opportunity that we have identified for ES is the potential to learn from what other universities are offering their students in terms of financial wellness services. The fact that most international students are not aware of ES’ offerings is also a great marketing opportunity. A substantial threat we have identified is an increasing workload amongst students which could result in students having less time to seek ES’ financial wellness services. Furthermore, if UBC slashed its funding for ES, this would negatively impact the organization to a great extent.  5 ES’ Financial Wellness team aims to educate university students about financial wellness. There are many similar programs around the globe and we have identified various political, economical, social and technological factors impacting all such programs.  Political: Financial wellness programs at universities around the globe are at the mercy of the complex political climate of the university that they belong to. The stringent political nature of most universities often means that initiating changes can be slow. For example, creating a course at UBC cannot be done immediately and requires numerous complicated steps and the involvement of many different departments2. Another example of the impact of politics on these programs is the fact that ES likely would not be able to bring in representatives from banks because doing so could be seen as favouritism. These political systems are dynamic; they often change with the coming and going of leaders and senior staff. Furthermore, universities can be influenced by provincial and even national political systems, the impacts of which trickle down to impact programs such as ES.  Economical: On a small economic scale, programs such as ES are heavily impacted by the amount of funding they receive from their institutions. On a broader scale, the extent to which students require financial wellness services could be impacted by both the Canadian and global economies. If either of these economies are experiencing tough times, domestic and/or international students might be more likely to be stressed about their financial situations and therefore might be more likely to seek financial education and assistance. Similarly, if economies are healthy then there might be less demand for such programs because students might feel more confident about their financial situations.  2  Guidelines for New Course Proposals. (n.d.). The University of British Columbia. Retrieved from: https://senate.ubc.ca/vancouver/curriculum-submission-guide/cat1-curriculum/guidelines-new-course-proposals. 6 Social: A key social trend impacting financial wellness programs is the notion that millenials are struggling with financial literacy more so than previous generations; Forbes reported that “a surprising number of [millenials] do lack a basic understanding of finance”3. She explains that this is in part due to the fact that “millennials have to divide their time and attention among more distractions than any previous generation”. This trend suggests that university financial wellness services are needed now more than ever. Another social trend worth highlighting is more specific to UBC: the increasing number of international students enrolling at UBC. UBC’s 2016/2017 Enrolment Report showed that the total number of international students at both UBC campuses had increased by 60% between 2012 and 20164. This trend is important for this report specifically because our team is investigating ES’ Financial Wellness offerings with regards to international students in particular.  Technological: Programs such as ES are impacted by the various technological advances that can alter and enhance student learning. For example, an increasing number of students might prefer online learning through webinars and podcasts rather than attending a workshop in person. Other notable trends include collaborative technologies5 and gaming and simulation technologies6. Furthermore, these programs must keep up to date with new technology channels through which to promote their services such as through social media and email. 3  Landrum, S. (August 4th, 2017). Millennials, Technology And The Challenge Of Financial Literacy. Forbes. Retrieved from: https://www.forbes.com/sites/sarahlandrum/2017/08/04/millennials-technology-and-the-challenge-of-financial-literacy/#936ceb228e6f. 4 Redish, A. and Mathieson, C. (January 9th, 2017). University of British Columbia 2016/17 Annual Report on Enrolment, p. 13. University of British Columbia. Retrieved from: https://senate.ubc.ca/sites/senate.ubc.ca/files/downloads/UBC%20Enrolment%20Report%202016-17_Final%20-%209%20Jan%202017.pdf. 5  Perkins, K. (2018). 4 Ways Technology Impacts Today’s Higher Education. AVI Systems. Retrieved from: https://www.avisystems.com/blog/ways-technology-impacts-higher-education/. 6 11 Ed Tech Trends to Watch in 2017. (January 18th, 2017). Campus Technology. Retrieved from: https://campustechnology.com/Articles/2017/01/18/11-Ed-Tech-Trends-to-Watch-in-2017.aspx?Page=3. 7 ES’ Financial Wellness team’s “customers” are UBC students. The service caters to undergraduate, graduate, domestic and international students. This report focuses specifically on international students. ES explained in their presentation that their workshop attendees are mostly domestic students.  In 2017, UBC welcomed 16,322 international students (a 13% increase from the previous year); “one of the most diverse populations of international students in Canada” consisting of students from 150 different countries7. The top five countries were: China, the United States, India, Korea and Japan.   Our research shows that international students, both undergraduate and graduate, feel less financially responsible than domestic students, but are more confident in their financial literacy. That being said, more international students than domestic students have felt financial distress during their time at UBC. A vast majority of international students receive financial support from their family. Most international students are unaware that UBC offers financial wellness services while at the same time believe that UBC does not offer enough financial wellness services. The top three financial topics of interest for this user group are investing, awards and budgeting.  7 Ten things to know about international student enrolment. (August 28th, 2017). University of British Columbia. Retrieved from: https://news.ubc.ca/2017/08/28/ten-things-to-know-about-international-student-enrolment/. 8 Based on our previously mentioned analyses, we have identified a few key areas that our recommendation will seek to improve for international students: Awareness and reach: • International students are much more likely to feel that there is not enough financial support on campusand are also less likely to be aware of the options readily available to them when compared to domesticstudents.Attendance and engagement: • ES report a desire to have more students attending their in-person and online workshops. Going beyondjust attendance and getting international students engaged with the programs and workshops willcertainly help.International students have been growing by over 1,000 undergraduate students per year for the past four years (UBC) compared to domestic enrolments which have been relatively stable. By focusing on these areas of improvement, we believe our recommendation will help ES scale their financial offerings to support UBC’s fastest growing segment. We hope to make UBC not only a place of mind for academics, but also give students peace of mind about their financial situations.  9 Based on our situational analysis and issues, we have come up with the following strategy to improve Financial Wellness’ offerings and reach: 1. Increase promotion among international students2. Expand and improve the financial wellness peer program3. Create Wellness Peer-led financial literacy in-class workshopsWe believe that this strategy will help us not only close the gap between international students and domestic students in terms of Financial Wellness’ reach, but also to engage more international students with the Financial Wellness Peer program to shape workshops to be more inclusive of all demographics of students. This would be further bolstered by having Wellness Peers run in-class workshops to include even more students in their offerings, hopefully creating a positive feedback loop of involvement and attendance. 10 Current marketing efforts appear to target both groups uniformly, but ES report that fewer international students attend workshops, and our studies show that a smaller proportion of international students are aware of the resources available to them while at the same time are more likely to feel financial distress during their degree. With this in mind, we recommend creating a marketing strategy which specifically caters to international students, targeting both locations where they frequent and topics that specifically pertain to them. ES already targets programs such as Jump Start, the UBC Graduate Student Orientation, Imagine Day, and student residences. These events are primarily catered towards first years however, as it seems that most students seem to forget about the financial wellness services offered.  Our recommendation is to go beyond email and purely digital methods of communication, as while ES currently does a great job at marketing through email channels, these methods can easily be missed by students who skim through inboxes. We believe that increasing in-person advertising in novel ways would help attract more awareness and interest in the financial wellness services offered by ES, such as partnering with international student clubs to host events, or boothing in the bookstore where students of all years would visit in the beginning of the year. We have included an example marketing plan targeting international student in appendix 8. The goals we hope to achieve from this include increased awareness of the programs and workshops offered by ES, and increased attendance for workshops pertaining to them. We also hope to get more international students aware of and interested in the Financial Wellness Peers program, in order to support our next phase. 11 As more international students become aware of and engaged in the financial wellness offerings by ES, they would be more likely to become involved in the Wellness Peer Program. To further leverage this, we recommend expanding the Wellness Peer program not just in terms of the number admitted, but also the level of involvement and the tools available to Wellness Peers. We believe the greatest strength of the Wellness Peers program is the decentralization of knowledge they enable, as most existing programs and communication appear to only reach a small subset of international students. Some of our main recommendations include the following: 1. Ensure international students are included in planning/research of workshops or word-of-mouth/socialmedia marketing.2. Create an online forum using a technology such as Piazza as a resource for students to collaborativelyask and answer finance-related questions, with Wellness Peers as moderators. This would allowworkshops to go beyond the scheduled times, enabling students perhaps too shy to ask questions inperson to find answers. Wellness Peers could also potentially refer students to other services providedby ESPs if they cannot directly answer a question.3. Run online or in-residence student-led workshops during evening hours to allow students with packedschool schedules to attend workshops. As many existing workshops are held during class hours, it maybe difficult for students with packed schedules to attend. The evening in-residence workshops would beable to provide international students with a convenient way to attend, and online evening workshopswould make it easier for commuters to tune in. These online workshops could also be archived on theonline forum, enabling students to refer back to workshops as needed.We believe that with more international students involved, Wellness Peers and ES will be able to create workshops and resources more catered to the needs and interests of international students, and provide greater learning opportunities for all students in UBC. 12 To bring the previous two recommendations together, we recommend using the strengthened Wellness Peer program to introduce in-class financial literacy workshops, taught by the Wellness Peers and facilitated by ES. Our end goal would be to target as many students as possible, developing a general workshop for each year with information most relevant to them. This would involve both ESPs and Wellness Peers at first to plan and develop workshops for each year level, with 4 separate workshops. We have a sample plan in appendix 9. Next, we recommend partnering with a single department to run a pilot program to test how well this program would scale. As ES has reported a good rapport with partnering with English classes to make in-class announcements, we believe that they would make a good fit for this. We believe this can start with partnering with professors most willing to champion these workshops, so the initial scale we’d recommend would be one or two workshops per year. If the workshops are well-received, we would recommend searching for additional partners in each department to branch out, using the initial partner instructors as champions of the program to encourage others to follow. This would all be done while continuing the existing workshops delivered through traditional methods, encouraging students within the in-class workshops to spread the word of existing workshops to their friends. We saw this as the best way to reach as many students as possible and provide them with topics relevant to their needs. Of course, as the workshops scale up, we would recommend scaling the Wellness Peers in accordance. Our reasoning behind this is that both international and domestic students have expressed strong interest in attending such a workshop if it is worth a small percentage of their final grade; 72% of the students we surveyed reported a medium to strong interest in attending such a workshop. The training, planning, and instructing would also develop Wellness Peers and other financial literacy workshops held by ES, further strengthening their offerings. 13 In order to measure the success of the implementations, we have come up with success metrics for each phase of the plan. To evaluate the progress of the promotion strategy, we would recommend seeing if there is an increase in the number of international students attending events held by ES as well as the number of applications for the Wellness Peer program. For assessing the work on expanding the Wellness Peer Program, we would recommend looking at the popularity of the initiatives created by Wellness Peers in terms of number of attendees at the in-person events and the number of unique visitors in the new online resources/workshops. Additionally, it would be important to see how many new initiatives are created to specifically cater to the demands of international students.  Finally, for the in-class workshops, we would recommend using student feedback to evaluate the short-term and long-term effectiveness by distributing surveys once immediately after the workshop and again three months later. To judge the organizational response to the workshops, we recommend monitoring demand to expand the workshops from other professors or faculties after running the pilot. Lastly, it would be important to see whether Wellness Peers see the workshops as being helpful for the students and also to determine whether their responsibilities are manageable when done alongside their coursework. 14 We have identified some risks associated with our three-phase implementation plan, along with mitigation strategies for each. Predominantly, the biggest risk we foresee is poor reception or attendance in new initiatives. The best way to mitigate this would be to do as much student research as possible. While we have included our survey results in appendix 5-7, ES is currently doing a great job in collecting data before and after workshops, and we believe this data should serve as the basis for creating new initiatives. Given all we have suggested in expanding the Wellness Peer program, it is also likely that students in the program may become overburdened with school or other extracurriculars. Possible mitigations we came up with include creating a free elective course for Wellness Peers to enrol in to give them a dedicated time block to work on initiatives. Additionally, all the Wellness Peers we surveyed expressed interest in financial compensation for their duties. Paying the Wellness Peers as TAs could enable them to free up time that would be spent at a part-time job and focus more on their initiatives. For the in-class workshops, there is a risk that students may skip the class. To mitigate this, we believe that using marks as an incentive would be quite effective; as mentioned before, 72% of the students we surveyed expressed interest in an in-class workshop worth a small percentage of their course marks. Additionally, setting topics for these courses would likely be an iterative process to determine the most relevant and interesting topics, so it would be helpful to regularly review and renew the topics. Lastly, there is the risk that there are political barriers towards setting up in-class workshops in any department. To mitigate this, we recommend seeking champions within departments to pilot the project to show others the results and usefulness of the workshops. Change is always made easier when champions inside the organization support and spread the new initiatives. Additionally, looking into providing incentives to students to attend outside of class workshops for departments which do not choose to cooperate may be helpful.  15 We have prioritized the strategies in terms of need, task difficulty, and benefits of accomplishing the activities. We saw that the most critical area of improvement was awareness of current services to International students, hence we recommend to first focus on marketing current services and Wellness Peer positions. With more international students aware of and engaged with the offerings, we believe expanding the Wellness Peer program by building the online forum and developing additional workshops will further increase awareness and engagement among international students. Lastly, the most expensive and involved project: creating the in-class workshops. With more international students engaged, the Wellness Peers would be able to develop lesson plans which cater to all populations of students. Launching the pilot first before expanding will allow the Wellness Peers to evaluate results and improve on any issues they see before scaling to the next level. Of course, throughout the timeline we recommend continuously monitoring and evaluating results. 16 As previously explained, we have three phases of recommendations for ES. Within the first phase, our main goal is to promote the financial wellness services to international students. Although it is difficult to accurately split up international and domestic students for promotional purposes, we will be distributing material to where international students frequent, while also mass distributing material to common places around campus. The promotional material at this point in time will be flyers, brochures, and posters which will amount to a total of $4,300.  Within our first and second phase we have budgeted a total amount of $8,880 for public relations, in which nearly 10% of that is included in the second phase relating to the wellness peer program. We recommend budgeting for approximately $8,160 over the next four years to pay for labour hours for attending popular events such as Jump Start, Graduate Student Orientation, Imagine Day, and classroom visits. The remaining $720 will be towards expanding the wellness peer program, specifically in-residence workshops which will also help gain publicity.   Finally, in order to revamp the website we recommend hiring a professional for a one-time fee of approximately $5,000. This will help with online forums, workshops and optimizing the website’s traffic.  Total phase one and two costs amount to a total of $18,900. 17 As previously stated, our third phase of recommendations consists of wellness peer-led in-class workshop. In year two, the program will not be running as of yet, so the expenses will consist of course development and marketing initiatives. Since the course will not start until year three, we recommend budgeting $2,000 for workshop development and an additional $1,000 for marketing initiatives in year two. The third year being the first year of operation, we expect two workshops running through the term with eight students each. As the fourth year comes along, we expect to maintain six workshops per term with eight students participating in each workshop. Finally, in the last year of our five-year plan, we project twenty workshops each term with twenty-four participants respectively.   As required by UBC’s UTA II pay rates, each TA must work at $15.32 per hour. We tailored this into a TA position, but ES is welcome to implement it as an unpaid position simply for students to gain experience. 18 While Enrolment Services is currently doing a good job with workshops and their ambitious Wellness Peer program, we believe there are a few opportunities to improve on for the international student segment. By increasing promotion, expanding the wellness program, and developing new in-class workshops, we believe that Enrolment Services’ Financial Wellness team will be able to get closer towards their goal of supporting students’ success and wellness throughout their degree and after graduation. 19 20 21 22 23 Enlarged view at https://goo.gl/forms/xQudvGL0IqWkvhMl2 24 25 Remaining questions: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1WCci5g59miE0hPX32BTXxvnozWY4E2dA 26 27 Sources: Current financial wellness workshops run by Enrolment Services and York University’s Introduction to Personal Finance syllabus (http://apps.eso.yorku.ca/domino/html/outlines/crsoutlines.nsf/webdisplay-courseoutlines/2016f-apadms2541a-03?OpenDocument)  28 Assumptions: Graduate Student Orientation • 2 to 3 times per year• 4-6:30 pm @ International House• 2 employees per sessionLabour Costs • Average of $30 per hour (including benefits they receive)Jumpstart • 2 hours per day, 2 employeesImagine day • 4 hours of boothing, 2 employees on siteOnline & In-residence Workshops • 2 per semester, 1 hour each• 2 employees per workshopClassroom Visits • More in the first two years, less afterwards• 10 hours each week, two employees29 

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