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Research on Mycelium Construction Materials Seo, Joomi; Luo, Yan Jun 7, 2016

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 UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student ReportJoomi Seo, Yan LuoResearch on Mycelium Construction MaterialsVOL 500June 07, 201611302160University of British Columbia Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or a SEEDS team representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.Research on Mycelium Construction MaterialsPrincipal Researchers:Joseph Dahmen, Assistant Professor, U.B.C. School of Architecture and Landscape ArchitectureAmber Frid-Jimenez, Associate Professor & Canada Research Chair, Emily Carr University of Art & DesignResearch Assistants:Yan Luo, M.Arch Graduate student, U.B.C. School of Architecture and Landscape ArchitectureLily Mead Martin, M.A.A. Graduate student, Emily Carr University of Art & DesignJoomi Seo, M.Arch Graduate student, U.B.C. School of Architecture and Landscape Sponsors: U.B.C. SEEDS Program Campus & Community Planning GRAND National Centre of ExcellenceContact: Joseph Dahmen, jdahmen@sala.ubc.caAmber Frid-Jimenez, amberfj@ecuad.ca20153Table of ContentsIntroduction1. Mycelium Growth Experiments Experiment A-1: Re-generating Growth on Ecovative Mycelium Blocks  Experiment A-2: Examination of Surface after Re-growth Experimentation  Experiment A-3: Continuation of Re-growth Experimentation  Experiment B-1: Continuation of Re-growth Experimentation with Saw Dust  Experiment B-2: Conneting Mycelium Blocks  Experiment C: Water Dripping Friction Test  2. Mycelium Block Surface Documentation 3. Mycelium Chair Series Documentation        4. Local Mycelium       Shiitake Mushroom Oyster MushroomDiscussion & Future Work              5. Compression Test              6. Conceptual Design I       7. Conceptual Design II       46712132024272947575860687177914IntroductionOverview This research project evaluates mycelium-based biocomposite materials for use in an architectural installation to be constructed on the UBC campus during the summer of 2015. Mycelium biocomposites typically consist of cellulosic agricultural waste bound together by mycelium, the scientific term for the web-like root structure of mushroom. These biocomposites offer the promise of achieving structural performance with minimal environmental impacts. The research establishes basic performance criteria and aesthetic qualities of mycelium biocomposites, and explores the feasibility of producing these materials locally using regional mycelium strains and substrate materials. The mushroom biocomposites investigated use of agricultural waste as medium, and mycelium as binding agent. Mycelium is the vegetative part of fungus that grows within the agricultural waste. As mycelium fills the growth medium, it is then cooked to stop expansion. This is the base of one mycelium block. By alternating the recipe of the growth medium, the growing time, and the strength of the material can be controlled, as well as surface texture. It is a home-compostable, bio-based, renewable, biodegradable material.The research investigates three alternatives for mushroom biocomposites: 1. Using a ready-made block available commercially through Evocative, a company            located in upstate New York2. Molding blocks or larger forms using commercially available growth kits consisting            of mycelium and agricultural waste, available from the same company3. Fabricating blocks from locally sourced mycelium strains and substratesThe research encompasses fabrication of blocks as well as design operations and material coatings. Computer aided fabrication process such as Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) system and parametric design methodologies is to be explored. The aim is to produce a spatial condition that would enrich the social life on UBC campus while demonstrating the functional and aesthetic possibilities of mycelium-based biocomposites in our built environment. 5Objectives The research conducted to date has the following objectives• Define the steps to create mycelium-based biocomposite blocks• Describe the aesthetic characteristics of mycelium-based biocomposite blocks at            various stages of growth and decay• Assess the feasibility of fabricating blocks with local strains and substrate materials• Establish the likely effect of weathering on the blocks• Determine the best method for building with these materials and valuate the overall             feasibility of constructing an installation with mycelium-based biocomposite blocks            on the UBC campus1.Mycelium Growth ExperimentWe examine material manipulation enabled by recolonization of dry mycelium blocks. The following experiments involve regrowth, using mycelium as bonding medium and water resistance test. 7Experiment Started on 2014-10-15Experiment Ended on 2014-10-22Objectives:Examine the recolonization of mycelium and/or contamination and document the processDevise a method to provide ideal moisture level for recolonizing the blocks with myceliumExperiment A-1: Re-generating Growth on Ecovative Mycelium BlocksMaterial Included:3 slices from GIY block (Ecovative)3 slices from treated blcok (Ecovative)Moisture Contolling Factor:Set #1: Spraying water on the sponge everydaySet #2: Spraying water on the sponge every 2 daysSet #3: Spraying water on the sponge every 3 days(All the slices soaked in water for one day)Outcomes:There is clear development of mycelium with GIY Block which takes about less than 24 hours to be re-colonized. The Treated Block does not show sign of mycelium regrowth.  In Experiment A-2, fragments from GIY block can be re-moulded and takes any kind of form as the mycelium bonds the wood chips and forms a thicker skin on the exterior. 8Observation Day 1:   2014-10-16Set #1- GIY BlockSigns of fungal colonization, but less than others slices.Set #1- Treated BlockNo change visible.Set #2- GIY BlockMost visible signs of fungal coloni-zation. Partial distribution of white coloration.Set #2- Treated BlockNo change visible.Set #3- GIY BlockSome signs of fungal colonization. Partial distribution of white color-ation.Set #3- Treated BlockNo change visible.Set #1 Procedure:Spraying water on the sponge everydaySprayedSet #2 Procedure:Spraying water on the sponge every 2 daysSprayedSet #3 Procedure:Spraying water on the sponge every 3 daysSprayed9Observation Day 2:   2014-10-17Set #1- GIY BlockFull distribution of white coloration. Some original parts visible.Set #1- Treated BlockNo change visible.Set #2- GIY BlockFull distribution of white coloration. Seems thicker layer of distrubution than others. Set #2- Treated BlockVisible signs of Cobweb mold contamination about 30% of the surface. Set #3- GIY BlockFull distribution of white coloration. Fairly covers the surface.Set #3- Treated BlockVisible signs of Cobweb mold contamination about 10% of the surface.Set #1 Procedure:Spraying water on the sponge everydaySprayedSet #2 Procedure:Spraying water on the sponge every 2 daysNot SprayedSet #3 Procedure:Spraying water on the sponge every 3 daysNot Sprayed10Observation Day 3:   2014-10-18Set #1- GIY BlockFull distribution of white coloration. No contamination detected. Still reveals some part of the surface.Set #1- Treated BlockNo change visible.Set #2- GIY BlockFull distribution of white coloration. No contamination detected. Still thickers than others.Set #2- Treated BlockVisible signs of Cobweb mold contamination 100% of the surface. Balck heads appear.Set #3- GIY BlockFull distribution of white coloration. No contamination detected.Set #3- Treated BlockVisible signs of Cobweb mold con-tamination about 50% of the sur-face. Balck heads appear.Set #1 Procedure:Spraying water on the sponge everydaySprayedSet #2 Procedure:Spraying water on the sponge every 2 daysSprayedSet #3 Procedure:Spraying water on the sponge every 3 daysNot Sprayed11Observation Day 4:   2014-10-19Set #1- GIY BlockFull distribution of white coloration. No contamination detected.Set #1- Treated BlockVisible signs of Cobweb mold con-tamination about 5% of the surface. Set #2- GIY BlockFull distribution of white coloration. No contamination detected.Set #2- Treated BlockVisible signs of Cobweb mold con-tamination all around the surfaces.Set #3- GIY BlockFull distribution of white coloration. No contamination detected.Set #3- Treated BlockVisible signs of Cobweb mold con-tamination all around the surfaces.Set #1 Procedure:Spraying water on the sponge everydaySprayedSet #2 Procedure:Spraying water on the sponge every 2 daysNot SprayedSet #3 Procedure:Spraying water on the sponge every 3 daysSprayed12GIY Slice Set #1 (Day 1) Dried GIY Slice Set #1 (Day 15) Experiment A-2: Examination of Surface after Re-growth ExperimentationNote: The GIY Slice Set #1 was dried and the surface is documented.The GIY Slice Set #1 from Experiment A has been dried for surface observation. The entire surfaces are covered with newly colonised mycelium, and some part - especially the top part of the slice - seems to have had contamination with grey spots. 13GIY Slice Set #2 (Day 1) Growing Continued GIY Slice Set #2 (Day 20) Experiment A-3: Continuation of Re-growth ExperimentationNote: The GIY Slice Set #2 was covered with ziplock bag and the surface is documented.In the course of the experiment, the slice is exposed to natural sun light.(Day 24) (Day 27) The GIY Slice Set #2 from Experiment A has been sprayed everyday for a week in the beginning. And then it was sprayed every 3-4 days to control the humidity. It was contained in a ziplock bag with plastic container and a sponge and the water was sprayed onto the sponge.After the Experiment A, a blob that is about 8mm in diameter on the ziplock bag surface is observed. It seems to move along the plastic surface.At Day 24, the blob has been transforming and growing a new surface, and the previous one has changed the colour to yellow.14GIY Slice Set #3 (Day 1) Growing Continued GIY Slice Set #3 (Day 20) Note: The GIY Slice Set #3 stays in the same condition and the surface is documented.In the course of the experiment, the slice is exposed to natural sun light.(Day 24) (Day 27) The GIY Slice Set #3 from Experiment A has been sprayed everyday for a week in the beginning. And then it was sprayed every 3-4 days to control the humidity. It was contained in plastic container with a sponge and the water was sprayed onto the sponge.After the Experiment A, a blob that is about 10mm in diameter on the myselium surface is observed. The surface of the blob seems to be condensed myselium or some sort.At Day 24, the blob has been transforming and growing a new surface, and the previous one has changed the colour to yellow.15Nagative Part of Chair Series #2(Before the Experiment)  (Day 1) Note: The nagative part of the Chair Series #2 from GIY was put into a plastic bag and the surface is document-ed. In the course of the experiment, the slice was not exposed to natural sun light.(Day 3) (Day 7) This negative part of Chair Series #2 from GIY block has been sprayed everyday until Day 7. The plastic bag was not completely sealed so that there is air flowing.At Day 3, condensation on the myselium surface is observed. The whole piece seems to be covered with mycelium.At Day 7, there seem to be symptoms of contamination with molds around the grey spots. However the molds seem to grow on the side where it is open to the air rather than on the surface that is touching the plastic bag.16GIY Slice Set #2: Surface Observation after Drying With both GIY Slice set #2 and #3, there is clear shrinkage after a long period of time of drying.17GIY Slice Set #3: Surface Observation after Drying 18Nagative Part of Chair Series #2: Surface Observation after Drying 1920Saw Dust Bag #1(Before the Experiment)  (Day 1) Experiment B-1: Continuation of Re-growth Experimentation with Saw DustNote: The saw dust from cutting with band saw was put into a ziplock bag and the surface is documented. In the course of the experiment, the saw dust was not exposed to natural sun light.(Day 3) (Day 7) This bag of saw dust from GIY block has been sprayed everyday until Day 7. It was realised that the humidity level was too high as the speed of colonisation was relatively slow. Since Day 7, it was sprayed very occasionally by observation (only when there was no high percentage of condensation). And the sealed ziplock bag was open to allow more air.At Day 25, the saw dust is completely colonised  and the powder is bonded with healthy mycelium.21Saw Dust Bag #2(Before the Experiment)  (Day 1) Note: The saw dust from cutting with band saw was put into a ziplock bag and the surface is documented. In the course of the experiment, the saw dust was not exposed to natural sun light.(Day 3) (Day 7) This bag of saw dust from GIY block has been sprayed every 3days until Day 7. It was realised that the humidity level was too high as the speed of colonisation was relatively slow. Since Day 7, it was sprayed very occasionally by observation (only when there was no high percentage of condensation). And the sealed ziplock bag was open to allow more air.At Day 25, the saw dust is completely colonised and the powder is bonded with mycelium as well as symptoms of contamination with molds. However the molds seem to grow on the side where it is open to the air rather than on the surface that is touching the ziplock bag.22Saw Dust Bag #1: Surface Observation after Drying The saw dust is completely covered with a thick layer of mycelium.23Saw Dust Bag #2: Surface Observation after Drying 24Experiment B-2: Conneting Mycelium BlocksNote: Two pieces of GIY slices were put into a ziplock bag and the capability of mycelium as bonding material. The same re-colonization process has been applied to allow mycelium’s growth. The two GIY Slices were moisturized and kept in a ziplock bag for seven days to reactivate the mycelium colonization. After the mycelium was re-colonized the two pieces are bonded together. It is evident no external adhesive is required to put two pieces together. 252627Experiment Started on 2014-10-21Experiment Ended on 2014-10-22Objectives:Find out how the block mass can stand against water impact.Experiment C: Water Dripping Friction Test Material Included:1 slice from treated block (Ecovative)Water Impact Contolling Factor:Set #1: Water dripping 3L/1hr for 12 hours Set #2: Water dripping 27L/1hr for 1 hourOutcomes:Material does not disintegrate due to the moisture, but physical impact. The degree of physical impact makes difference in terms of the material subtraction. 28Set #2Set #18mm radius7mm deep27L/hr for 1 hr5mm radius3mm deep27L/hr for 1 hr 3L/hr for 12hrAs part of the material research, this section documents the surface texture under different methods of tooling. From surface that is milled by CNC to the ones that have been re-colonized, this document explores possible ways to integrate a variety of texture for the installation project.2.Mycelium Block Surface Documentation30Band Saw Cut Piece from GIY Block (g-1)31CNC Cut from Treated Block (t-1)CNC Cut from Treated Block (t-2)32CNC Cut from Treated Block (t-2)33CNC Cut from GIY Block (g-2)CNC Cut from GIY Block (g-2)34CNC Cut from GIY Block (g-3)CNC Cut from GIY Block (g-3)35CNC Cut from GIY Block (g-3)CNC Cut from GIY Block (g-3)36Band Saw Cut from GIY Block (g-4)37Band Saw Cut from GIY Block (g-4)Band Saw Cut from GIY Block (g-4)38Band Saw Cut from GIY Block (g-5)Band Saw Cut from GIY Block (g-5)39Band Saw Cut from GIY Block (g-5)Band Saw Cut from GIY Block (g-5)40Band Saw Cut from GIY Block (g-6)Band Saw Cut from GIY Block (g-6)41Band Saw Cut from GIY Block (g-7)42Treated Block Teared by Hand (t-3)Treated Block Teared by Hand (t-3)43Treated Block Teared by Hand (t-4)44Band Saw Cut from Treated Block (t-5)45Treated Block from Ecovative (t-6)46Treated Block from Ecovative (t-6)Treated Block from Ecovative (t-6)3.Mycelium Chair Series DocumentationThe form of chair provides haptic experience with the mycelium building material. In this section, there are three different forms that were cut and coated with non-toxic materials such as white glue and natural wax.  48Chair Series #1Bank Saw cut with white glue coating49Chair Series #2CNC cut with white glue coating and soy wax50Chair Series #2CNC cut with white glue coating and soy wax51Chair Series #3CNC cut with white glue coating 52Chair Series #3CNC cut with white glue coating 535455564.Local MyceliumThe blocks here were made from mushrooms available in Vancouver: Oyster mushroom and Shiitake. This documents the process of moulding them and the blocks after drying.58Shiitake MushroomShiitake mushroom was already fruiting before the process of moulding has begun. The image at the bottom is taken while the moulding was just initiated. Shiitake has distinctive texture and colour compared to Oyster mushroom59The image above is the day 1 after the putting into the container for moulding. After 7 days of re-colonization, the block is dried for 10 days. There is clear evidence of contamination with molds where the green and black spots are. Shiitake mushroom appears to be more brittle and easy to break even after drying. 60Oyster MushroomAfter purchsed in a bag, the mushroom spore with substrate has been re-moulded in a plastic container. The mycelium of Oyster mushroom appears similar to the one with Ecovative. 61The image on top shows the block dried for 10 days after 7 days of re-colonization. There is no contamination with mold, and the growth of mycelium seems clear. Oyster mushroom’s mycelium appears identical to the one with Ecovative. Interesting texture remains on top where it was exposed to air inside the moulding container. 62Oyster Mushroom Block Samples636465666768Discussion & Future WorkThe research conducted to date has shown that it is feasible to build a temporary installation with mycelium based biocomposites on the UBC campus. Preliminary findings indicate that is should be possible to fabricate blocks locally using regional strains and materials. This route will require physical infrastructure as follows:▪ Contamination-controlled enclosed workspace of 300SF with stable            temperature.▪ Incubation and drying space of  200 SF.▪ Access to steam pressure cooker or autoclave for sterilization of substrate            materials prior to inoculation.▪ Vacuum forming equipment for molds.In addition to the physical requirements above, additional materials research must be conducted in the following areas:▪ Identify local source of substrate (local agricultural waste such as sawdust            or straw). ▪ The growing process can take up to 20 days depending of fungi species.             For this reason, space we need has to be available for an extensive amount            of time. ▪ Local mycological expertise to match strain to substrate and to address            unanticipated future concerns.69ConclusionMycelium biocomposites offer the promise of achieving structural performance with minimal environmental impacts. The research establishes basic performance criteria and aesthetic qualities of mycelium biocomposites, and determines that producing these materials locally using regional mycelium strains and substrate materials is feasible. The research finds that the organic structure of mushroom mycelium can be used as self-assembling binding agent. Mycelium as building construction material is a new area in building technology. Despite the limited information available, we found that we can successfully fabricate mycelium blocks using regional materials.  Although the initial findings are promising, additional research will be required to determine appropriate match of local mycelium strains and substrates, and physical infrastructure will be necessary.70715.Compression TestCompression tests are performed to determine the structural performance of mycelium blocks. Each specimen is cylinder that is approximately 4 inch in diameter and 8 inch in height.72EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa27.9 7.7 264 95 7088.22 1953.1 0.2755 39.9639 0.2755EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa26.5 6.6 270 95 7088.22 1839.9 0.259572 37.6477 0.259602004006008001000120014001600180020000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)02004006008001000120014001600180020000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa27.9 7.7 264 95 7088.22 1953.1 0.2755 39.9639 0.2755EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa26.5 6.6 270 95 7088.22 1839.9 0.259572 37.6477 0.2596020040060810121468200 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)02004006008001000120014001600180020000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)Cylinder #1Cylinder #273EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa27.5 6.9 248 95 7088.22 1213.9 0.171256 24.8386 0.1713EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa24.3 6.1 259 95 7088.22 1532.8 0.216246 31.3639 0.216202004006008001000120014000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)020040060080010001200140016000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa27.5 6.9 248 95 7088.22 1213.9 0.171256 24.8386 0.1713EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa24.3 6.1 259 95 7088.22 1532.8 0.216246 31.3639 0.216202004006008001000120014000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)020040060080010001200140016000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)Cylinder #3Cylinder #474EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa24.2 6.1 252 95 7088.22 1356.4 0.19136 27.7544 0.1914EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa25.1 6.3 272 95 7088.22 1642.2 0.23168 33.6024 0.231702004006008001000120014000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)0200400600800100012001400160018000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa24.2 6.1 252 95 7088.22 1356.4 0.19136 27.7544 0.1914EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa25.1 6.3 272 95 7088.22 1642.2 0.23168 33.6024 0.231702004006008001000120014000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)0200400600800100012001400160018000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)Cylinder #5Cylinder #675EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa26 6.5 259 95 7088.22 1275.4 0.179932 26.097 0.1799EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa18 4.5 277 95 7088.22 1237.3 0.174557 25.3174 0.1746RESULT:Average Compression Strength 0.2125 N/mm2 30.8232 PSI 21668.97 kgf/m2Average Unit Weight  262.625 gw/ safety accounted 0.0708 N/mm2 10.2744 PSI 7222.99 kgf/m202004006008001000120014000 5 10 15 20LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)02004006008001000120014000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa26 6.5 259 95 7088.22 1275.4 0.179932 26.097 0.1799EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa18 4.5 277 95 7088.22 1237.3 0.174557 25.3174 0.1746RESULT:Average Compression Strength 0.2125 N/mm2 30.8232 PSI 21668.97 kgf/m2Average Unit Weight  262.625 gw/ safety accounted 0.0708 N/mm2 10.2744 PSI 7222.99 kgf/m202004006008001000120014000 5 10 15 20LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)02004006008001000120014000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)Cylinder #7Cylinder #876ConclusionMycelium blocks produced under our current method yield in average 10 PSI in compressive strength. In comparison, XPS foam typically has a compressive strength of 10-25 psi. This is by far the most successful batch of samples recolonized by using ready-made mushroom kit. These samples typically have thick cell walls with a cream color appearance covering the exterior of the sample surface. The thickening of the “skin” is a self protective mechanism to prevent moisture loss under warm temperature. EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa26 6.5 259 95 7088.22 1275.4 0.179932 26.097 0.1799EXTENSION (mm) TIME (Min) Weight(g) d(mm) area(mm2) peak load(N) N/mm2 PSI Mpa18 4.5 277 95 7088.22 1237.3 0.174557 25.3174 0.1746RESULT:Average Compression Strength 0.2125 N/mm2 30.8232 PSI 21668.97 kgf/m2Average Unit Weight  262.625 gw/ safety accounted 0.0708 N/mm2 10.2744 PSI 7222.99 kgf/m202004006008001000120014000 5 10 15 20LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)02004006008001000120014000 10 20 30LOAD (N)EXTENSION (mm)TIME (Min)LOAD (N)776.Concept Design I We began the design process by looking at multiple sites on UBC campus. Multiple scenarios have been taken into consideration.78Concept Design Option 11. Perforated Room2. Mushroom Cloud3. Mushroom Open House4. Mushroom Chair3m6m2.6m79Rendering #1: Entrance area of Buchanan Building 80Rendering #2: Interior view of the space81PLANPlan1. Perforated Room2. Mushroom Cloud3. Mushroom Open House4. Mushroom ChairConcept Design Option 282LONGITUDINAL SECTIONLongitudinal Section 83CROSS SECTIONCross Section 84Mushroom cloud form study elevation view85Mushroom cloud form study perspective view862m3.5mOriginal blocksOriginal blocks trimmedBlocks with mycelium saturated surface87Time, Construction, Life Cycle of Buildings, Demolition, Material881. Perforated Room2. Mushroom Cloud3. Mushroom Open House4. Mushroom ChairConcept Design Option 3ABANDONED BUILDING BEFORE THE DEMOLITION PROCESSMUSHROOM FACADE WITH A MUSHROOM SCREENING ROOM CONNECTEDTEMPORARY SCREENING ROOMINSIDE THE BUILDING89Rendering: Interior view of the space901. Perforated Room2. Mushroom Cloud3. Mushroom Open House4. Mushroom Chair2.605m 2.792m0.3m209 pieces of400mm x 175mm x 100 mmblocksConcept Design Option 4917.Concept Design IIThe current site is located at the intersection of University Boulevard and Main Mall. We propose to integrate the organic mushroom wall and digital displays to create a tangible experience going through the outdoor installation.   92OPTION 193Elevation1:100Plan1:100- 3m tall, 30cm thick wall- Arch form in plan - Concept of threshold - Larger surface for projections- Video screen showing pictures of demolition and constructionipad and iphone screens recycled94OPTION 295- 3m tall, 15cm thick wall- Two arches combined (two sectional views of dome)- Arches intersecting provides structural support- Video screen showing pictures of demolition and constructionElevation1:100Plan1:100ipad and iphone screens recycled

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