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Centennial Lunar New Year Festival Planning Project Marshall, Elaine; Johnson, Deanna; Lu, Leon; Kallas, Nadine Nov 26, 2015

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 UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student ReportDeanna Johnson, Elaine Marshall, Leon Lu, Nadine KallasCentennial Lunar New Year Festival Planning ProjectKIN 465November 26, 201513811942University of British Columbia Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS Program provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or a SEEDS team representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.            UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report     Centennial Lunar New Year Festival Planning Project Elaine Marshall, Deanna Johnson, Leon Lu, Nadine Kallas University of British Columbia Kin 465 November 26, 2015          Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS representative about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.       Centennial Lunar New Year Festival Planning Project University of British Columbia Kin 465 November 26. 2015    Elaine Marshall    Deanna Johnson                                                       Leon Lu       Nadine Kallas     Table of Contents  I. Executive Summary………………………………………………………………………………1 Purpose Objective Methods Findings II. Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………….2 III. Background……………………………………………………………………………………….2 IV. Methods……………………………………………………………………………………………3 Making the Survey Administering the Survey V. Findings and Discussion………………………………………………………………………….5 VI. Recommendations………………………………………………………………………………...7 General Recommendations Specific Yoga Program Recommendations VII. Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………….11 VIII. Reference list…………………………………………………………………………………….12 IX. Appendix A: Survey……………………………………………………………………………..14 X. Appendix B: Data………………………………………………………………………………..16 XI. Appendix C: Work Plan………………………………………………………………………...20 XII. Appendix D: Midterm Progress Report……………………………………………………….25                   1  Executive Summary Purpose: The purpose of this project was to work with the UBC Equity & Inclusion Office and UBC Recreation to plan a physical activity program, which fosters interculturalism, for the UBC Centennial Lunar New Year Festival in February 2016. Objective: Create and administer an inclusive survey, targeted at Asian women. The survey should identify barriers, marketing strategies, and interests regarding physical activity and UBC’s Centennial Lunar New Year Festival. Methods: After initial meetings with Alden Habacon (Director of Intercultural Understanding Strategy Development for UBC) and Liska Richer (SEEDS Manager), an initial survey was created. This draft survey was given to Suzanne Jolly for review (Physical Activity Manager at UBC Athletics and Recreation). After being revised the survey was sent to Alden, Liska, and Suzanne for final feedback. The survey was administered through both an online and paper version. Three main methods were used to collection response: personal networks, campus groups and asking people face to face in the AMS Student Nest. Out of our total 177 responses, about 20% came from personal connections, 20% came from campus groups, and 60% came from face to face interactions. Findings: 135 Asian women responded to the survey. As this was the target demographic, the findings come from these responses. 62% of respondents were interested in yoga. At UBC’s Lunar New Year Festival, about 66% of respondents expected to see traditional Lunar New Year elements. When respondents were questioned about barriers to participation, lack of previous experience was identified as the number one barrier (54% of Asian females). Even though time was not listed as an option, 28% of participants wrote time as a reason they do not participate in the “other” open ended box. Students revealed that friends and social media (such as Facebook), are the two top ways they find out about events around campus. Recommendations: The proposed physical activity program is a beginner’s yoga class that fosters meaningful relationships between participants and promotes physical and mental wellbeing.   2   Introduction  Alden Habacon, the Director of Intercultural Understanding Strategy Development for UBC, is planning the UBC Centennial Lunar New Year Festival for February 2016. The purpose of the project was to work with Alden, part of the Equity & Inclusion office, and UBC Recreation to plan an activity for the Centennial Lunar New Year Festival. The activity was required to promote intercultural connections between students, physical activity and the Lunar New Year theme of refocusing on health. In addition, the project will contribute to the social sustainability of campus by working in collaboration with the SEEDS Sustainability Program. Originally, the project encompassed planning all logistics of the physical activity program; including, promotion, set-up, equipment requirements and a plan for volunteer recruitment. Ultimately, in the interest of quality, course time constraints, and effectiveness, expectations were compiled and narrowed into a survey that focused primarily on Asian women and the Centennial Lunar New Year Celebration. The result and analysis of our survey, rather than the logistics of the event, became our main deliverable. The objective was to use analysis of the survey to inform the recommendations for the physical activity program.   Background In February 2016 UBC will be celebrating the Centennial Lunar New Year Festival. According to the Chinese zodiac, year 2016 will mark the year of the monkey (China Highlight, 2015). For people born in the year of the monkey, 2016 will be considered a prosperous year; foreshadowing a period of prosperity in health, job seeking, and love relations (China Highlight, 2015).The common theme of Lunar New Year is a time for family reunion, renewal and preparation for a fresh year. There is a misconception of Lunar New Year often being referred to as “Chinese New Year,” but Lunar New Year is celebrated by many other distinct cultures around the world. Lunar New Year is a significant time for UBC students and staff of Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, Tibetan, and Japanese heritage (The University of British 3  Columbia, 2015). At UBC the event will attempt to incorporate all cultures that celebrate, or would like to celebrate, Lunar New Year.  The Equity and Inclusion office and UBC Recreation are planning the Centennial Lunar New Year Festival that will take place on February 5th 2016,  and will promote interculturalism and physical activity at UBC. The event hopes to create cross-cultural relationships amongst students of different backgrounds. All festival activities will take place in the AMS Student Nest. Along with the physical activity event there will also be a dragon performance, hopefully involving 100-200 students, as well as many other activities.   Methods Making the Survey The focus of our research was on Asian women. This was based on our initial meeting with Liska (SEEDS Manager) and Alden where we were informed that Asian women are the least active on campus, as reported by UBC Recreation. A survey was chosen as the research method to target this population. Surveys have been identified effective tools for discovering social, economic, and cultural factors that influence participation in physical activity (Allender et al., 2006). The making and administering of the survey became the focus of our project and the results ultimately led to our final recommendations. First, a rough draft of the survey was created and brought to Suzanne Jolly (Physical Activity Manager at UBC Athletics and Recreation). She gave initial feedback and provided concrete ways in which the survey could be improved. Taking her suggestions into account, the survey was revised and sent to Alden, Liska and back to Suzanne for final suggestions. After receiving their comments, final changes were made to the survey. From the feedback, three major considerations stood out for the survey, as outlined below. The first key consideration, for making the survey, was how to determine ethnicity in an inclusive way. Since the focus was on Asian women the first draft of the survey asked about ethnicity, but only listed “Asian” and “other” as options. Through feedback and literature review it was discovered that this 4  was not inclusive. As an article by Aspinall (2002) states, the term “Asian” has different meanings in different societies. For the purpose of our study the focus was on anyone who identified with any Asian culture therefore, eight Asian identity options were created. For the complete set of options please refer to Question 2 in Appendix A. The second significant challenge was word choice. This was evident primarily with the term “physical activity” and the activities people associate with the term. In literature review and the discussion with Suzanne it was discovered that many people regard physical activity as something that is high intensity and sometimes competitive (Caspersen, Powell, & Christenson, 1985). The focus of the project was not on high intensity activities, but more broadly looking at any activity that got the body moving for more than 10 minutes. Therefore, the final survey only used the term “activity” and was defined underneath the question as actions that move the body for more than 10 minutes (see Question 3 Appendix A). Getting answers that were specific to what could be implemented in the program was another major consideration. This was primarily an issue with the question, “What is a reason that you do not participate in activities?”. From the literature it had already been identified that cost and lack of time were two of the main reasons people do not participate (Lee, Frisbee, & Ponic, 2014). The purpose of the survey, however, was to identify barriers to participation at UBC that could be addressed with the physical activity planned for the Centennial Lunar New Year Festival. Therefore, the question was phrased as “besides cost, what is a reason you do not participate in activities?” A list of options was created that did not include time or cost, although these answers were still mentioned in the “other” open ended option in the results (see Figure 10 Appendix B). Administering the Survey    To administer the survey three main sources were used: personal networks (20% of responses), campus groups (20% of responses) and asking people face to face in the AMS Student Nest (60% of responses). 5  Personal networks included a group member getting her sorority to complete the survey. While this served as an effective means for administration, there were challenges regarding implicit bias in the use of personal networks. Implicit bias is the natural tendency to prefer “in-groups” (Cureton, 2015). The group could not rely only on personal connections because, as UBC Kinesiology students, most personal connections were to groups already involved in physical activity. If only personal networks had been used, the sample would not have been representative of the entire UBC Campus. The second source was campus groups. This included reaching out to a number of clubs on campus, including the Hong Kong Student’s Association, and requesting they post a link to the survey on their Facebook page. The problem with this method, however, is that most people do not want to complete optional surveys when there is no incentive. Therefore, while clubs provided a way to target the specific population desired, they did not provide the quantity of data the project required. Finally, the most successful method for responses was face to face soliciting in the sub. Group members approached people sitting at tables in the AMS Student Nest and asked them to complete the survey. While this was the most time consuming method, it ultimately was the most successful and rendered the greatest number of responses.  Findings and Discussion The purpose of the survey was to discover barriers to participation in physical activity and activities of interest for a target population. Therefore, our first three questions were designed to filter out the target population of Asian women. Of the 177 responses to the survey, 135 identified with the target group. From the 135 participants, an analysis was conducted on their responses.  The survey was used to avoid making assumptions about what activities a certain group would prefer and which activities would be beneficial, also known as ethnocentrism (Cureton, 2015). Therefore, Question 4 from Appendix A asked what activities the respondents were interested in. Participants had a list of seven activities to choose from and an “other” option where they could fill in the activity. The overwhelming majority of the people (63%) chose yoga, followed by swimming and dance. The full set of 6  responses are found in Figure 6 in Appendix B. Asking people for their preferred activity allowed for a recommendation to be made, one that was not based on personal assumptions and previously held expectations. Another focus was finding whether low participation rates was due to organizational, cultural, or communication related barriers. In the survey question, regarding barriers (Question 5 Appendix A), it was intended to excluding cost as a barrier to participation. From this question, the number one reason for lack of participation was lack of previous experience (54% of respondents). This is consistent with the BCRPA (n.d.) article which mentions lack of general skills in team and sport play as a barrier to women. This trend also relates to the physical activity projects in Kin 465, in which many students participated in activities they had never tried before, and mentioned they would not have participated in otherwise because of lack of previous experience. The next most significant response was “other”, in which 47% of participants indicated specific reasons why they did not participate in activities. Responses were categorized into groups using common keywords (see Figure 10 Appendix B). 56% of these responses, which makes up 28% of total participants, revealed time as a significant barrier. This trend correlates with a study where women of an ethnic minority reported this barrier as a result of familial and work responsibilities (Eyler et al., 1998). However, assuming that the majority of our participants were students, this barrier more likely stems more from commitment to their academic timetable and transportation to and from campus, and less from caregiving responsibilities. Other reasons that were related to gender and cultural barriers, such as lack of same sex classes, had low response rates and thus were disregarded as potential barriers when making program recommendations. As indicated, lack of previous experience and time were the top two statistically significant barriers identified by our survey. Therefore, our recommendations attempt to combat these barriers.    Another aspect of the final program was how to market the event. To address this, the survey contained a question surrounding how people find out about events on campus. The data indicated that a significant majority of students discover campus events through social media and direct contact with 7  friends (see Figure 7 Appendix B). This will be used to inform the marketing strategies in the recommendations. Finally, respondents were asked what they expected to see at the Centennial Lunar New Year Festival (Question 8 Appendix A). When analyzing this question, data was grouped into categories as shown in Figure 9 Appendix B, revealing that food and dance (specifically lion and dragon) were the most popular expectations. Students also responded with other traditional practices such as red envelopes, which are monetary gifts given in Chinese culture during Lunar New Year celebrations, and the sharing of traditional Chinese food. Other than dance, no proposed activities were physical. In addition, the lion and dragon dances are already planned for another part of the festival. Therefore, rather than Question 8, the responses from Question 3 were used to make the activity recommendation. The Question 8 responses helped provide specifics around the activity.  A limitation to the survey was language, as the survey was only available in English. While no participants indicated that they did not understand a question when completing the survey, there may have been misunderstandings regarding certain words. This was also seen in a study by Warnecke et al. (1997), which found that gender and ethnicity may influence the interpretation of broad-based words such as “physical activity”. In Question 4 of the survey, participants were asked an open ended question regarding what language they prefer to use outside of class (see Question 4 Appendix A). Many people indicated multiple languages and it was unclear if one of those languages was preferred over another in a physical activity setting. The next question, about barriers, included “language barrier” as an option. In Figure 6 in Appendix B, language was shown to be less significant when compared to other barriers, with only 15% of respondents choosing language as a barrier. In addition, some people who chose language as a barrier had given “English” as their preferred language outside of class. Therefore, it was again unclear what language they would prefer classes to be taught in. With the inconsistency of results, analysis, and barriers, there was not enough information to make a conclusive recommendation about language for the program. As UBC is an English speaking school, and no other language showed to be more inclusive, the 8  program will run in English. Further research into language barriers for UBC Recreation programs is encouraged.  Recommendations General Recommendations A large scale yoga class, aimed at fostering interculturalism and therefore forming cross-cultural connections between students on campus, is recommended for the UBC Lunar New Year Festival. Interculturalism is the view that everyone benefits when connections are actively encouraged between people of different cultures, therefore it is important to have the activity include interactions to help foster those connections (Collingwood Neighbourhood House, n.d.). In addition, in order to benefit both physical and mental wellbeing, physical activity must create meaningful relationships (Lee et al., 2014). This is another an aspect of interculturalism. Interculturalism will create feelings of wellbeing and foster a more inclusive UBC community. Due to these goals, the program will be different from traditional yoga in the sense that it will be less structured and more interactive. This recommendation stems for the fact that most participants, in our survey, were interested in yoga (see Figure 4 Appendix B). Respondents also revealed lack of previous experience as a significant barrier for participation in activities, therefore our program will be a beginner’s yoga class. When advertising this event, it is recommended to use careful wording so that potential participants will not feel the need to have previous yoga experience to come to the event. Participants expect to see Asian tradition at UBC’s Lunar New Year Festival (see Figure 9 Appendix B). From this finding we propose encompassing a red theme and handing out red envelopes. In Chinese culture red represents luck and envelopes symbolize feelings of happiness and wealth surrounding the celebrations (China Highlights, 2015). Red envelopes will be given to participants and will have inspirational quotes about health, an interesting fact about Lunar New Year, and random prizes which can act as an incentive for participation. In the spirit of increasing physical activity, amongst Asian female students, prizes should be given as free passes to participate in UBC Recreation programming. 9  Although it is recommended that the yoga class occurs at a time of day when students will be most available, it is recognized that time is a difficult barrier to address. From our research, there was little evidence of a cohesive time of day when most students can take time for physical activity. For this reason, through personal experience, and discussion with Suzanne it was determined that the AMS Student Nest is busiest during lunch time hours. Therefore, we recommend having our program occur our one hour program between the hours of 11am and 2pm.  The physical activity will be a beginner’s yoga class because the analysis of the survey identified lack of previous experience as a significant barrier to activity participation. When advertising this event, it is recommended to use careful wording so that potential participants will not feel the need to have previous yoga experience. Phrases include, “beginner’s yoga”, “new interactive yoga” and “try it for the first time”. This is in contrast to phrases such as “all levels welcome”, which may deter potential participants as it implies some participants will have a lot of experience, perpetuating the discomfort due to inexperience. Not only is the language in advertising key, but also the method of marketing. A Facebook initiative should be implemented by creating a campus wide Facebook event page. UBC students can invite friends to the event, fostering interest and awareness. A hashtag initiative, as a slogan for our physical activity event at the Centennial Lunar New Year Festival, will also be implemented. The slogan “#MonkeyYogaUBC”, can be used by students as a strategy for spreading the word amongst friends. A hashtag allows people to follow the specific event by clicking on the hashtag and seeing other people’s social media posts from the same event. This helps maintain easy connections between participants, allowing them to maintain connection through social media.  To address the finding of friends surrounding marketing strategies, we recommend enlisting four core volunteers from different circles around campus (faculties, clubs, sports programs, etc.) to recruit participants from their various personal networks. This is also based on the use of personal networks to administer the survey which produced a large amount of responses in an efficient manner due to personal 10  involvement in a campus group. The charismatic volunteer leaders, from different social networks around campus, can each use their clout within their respective networks to effectively reach a variety of people.  Specific Yoga Program Recommendations In order to provide an enjoyable physical activity, while still fostering interculturalism and maintaining connections to the UBC Centennial Lunar New Year Festival, the follow structure is proposed for the yoga class: 15 minutes of yoga, followed by 10 minutes of interactions with others, then 15 minutes again of yoga, then 10 minutes of interaction with others, ending with 10 more minutes of yoga.  The first 15 minutes will be dedicated to the start of a traditional, beginner yoga class. The yoga class will start with an intention to be kept in mind throughout the class and described to participants by the instructor. This intent will surround Lunar New Year and the theme of renewing one’s self for the New Year. People will silently reflect on what they are going to do differently this year for themselves, and others. In addition, the instructor will mention other major events surrounding the 2016 Lunar New Year celebration. In order for physical activity to foster interculturalism, create meaningful relationships and educate surrounding Lunar New Year culture we propose the addition of partner interactions through yoga. One of the activities recommended is the execution of balance poses (boat pose, tree pose, eagle pose, etc.). While holding the pose each partner must answer two questions about themselves and then move to another partner. The instructor will provide the questions and they will focus on the sharing of past experiences. The second section of partner activities will consist of the mirror game, where participants must attempt to match their partner’s movements as smoothly and seamlessly as possible. In addition, the instructor will have participants switch partners and create shapes or images with their bodies. Participants may be required to make a monkey or lantern and can chose to be in contact with each other if they please, or simply explore ideas for making the shapes next to each other. These activities allow for personal interaction and traditional Lunar New Year elements, while still maintaining the integrity of a yoga class. 11  During these activities participants will interact with 3-5 other participants, hopefully fostering relationships through communication and sharing of experiences. The instructor will verbally prompt partners to introduce themselves to each other each time they change partners. In previous experience with partner dance classes, such as a Bachata Latin Dance class, group members have found that they did not introduce themselves to their dance partners because they were never prompted to nor given the time to. This made the experience uncomfortable and did not allow for the fostering of meaningful relationships despite physical contact. Therefore, introductions will be stressed by the instructor during the partner sections of the class. At the end of the class everyone will thank each person they interacted with in order to provide final closure and an extra opportunity for interaction regarding attending other Lunar New Year Activities together.  Conclusion  The purpose of this project was to create a program that fosters interculturalism for the UBC Centennial Lunar New Year Festival. Following the creation and administration of a survey targeted at Asian women, the official recommendation is to have a beginner’s yoga class that is interactive and fosters meaningful relationships between participants. The program addresses the important barriers of lack of previous experience and time, found in the survey results, to create a program that is as inclusive and enjoyable as possible. The program will take place between 11am and 2pm in the AMS Student Nest on February 5th, 2016.    12  References:  Allender, S., Cowburn, G., & Foster, C. (2006). Understanding participation in sport and physical activity among children and adults: a review of qualitative studies. Health education research, 21(6), 826-835. doi: 10.1093/her/cyl063 Aspinall, P. J. (2002). Who is Asian? A category that remains contested in population and health research. Journal of Public Health, 25, 91-97. doi: 10.1093/pubmed/fdg021 BC Recreation & Parks Association and Heart & Stroke Foundation of BC & Yukon (n.d.) Physical Activity Strategy: Why Don’t People Participate? Accessed November 15 2015.  Caspersen, C. J., Powell, K. E., & Christenson, G. M. (1985). Physical activity, exercise, and physical fitness: definitions and distinctions for health-related research. Public Health Reports, 100(2), 126–131. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1424733/ China Highlights. (2015). Chinese Spring Festival 2016. Retrieved from http://www.chinahighlights.com/travelguide/special-report/chinese-new-year/ Collingwood Neighbourhood House. (n.d.). Interculturalism 101. Retrieved from http://blogs.ubc.ca/kcureton/files/2014/09/intercltralism101.-Renfrew-Collingwood-INTERactive.pdf Cureton, K. (2015, September 15). KIN 465 Glossary of Terms. Retrieved from http://blogs.ubc.ca/kcureton/files/2014/08/KIN-465-Glossary-of-Terms1.docx Eyler, A. A., Baker, E., Cromer, L., King, A. C., Brownson, R. C., & Donatelle, R. J. (1998). Physical activity and minority women: a qualitative study. Health Education & Behavior, 25(5), 640-652. doi: 10.1177/109019819802500510 Lee, D. S., Frisby, W., & Ponic, P. (2014). Promoting the Mental Health of Immigrant Women by Transforming Community Physical Activity. Making It Better: Gender Transformative Health Promotion, 111.  The University of British Columbia. (2015). Lunar New Year 2015. Retrieved from http://diversity.ubc.ca/lunarubc/ 13  Warnecke, R. B., Johnson, T. P., Chavez, N., Sudman, S., O'rourke, D. P., Lacey, L., & Horm, J. (1997). Improving question wording in surveys of culturally diverse populations. Annals of epidemiology, 7(5), 334-342. doi:10.1016/S1047-2797(97)00030-6 14  Appendix A: Survey  Hi,  We are Kinesiology students working with the Equity and Inclusion Office and UBC Recreation to program activities for the UBC Centennial Lunar New Year Festival that foster intercultural connections between students, and physical activity and health. This is an informal survey used to gather data on current students’ interests, with a specific focus on encouraging the participation of Asian female students, including trans* women of Asian descent. Asian female students have been found to be least active in the programs offered by UBC Recreation. The following survey also aims to identify their barriers to participation and potential activities of interest for female students and transgender women of Asian descent.     trans* is an umbrella term that refers to all of the identities within the gender identity spectrum Question 1a Do you identify as female?  Yes  No  Question 1b Do you identify as a transgender woman?  Yes  No  Question 2 Please choose as many of the following that apply:    Asian   Asian Canadian or Canadian of Asian Descent  East Asian (Chinese, Japanese, Korean)  South Asian   South East Asian (Laotian, Filipino, Vietnamese, Malaysian, Indonesian, etc.)  Hapa or Mixed-race Asian  Not racially Asian, but born or raised in East Asia, South Asia or South East Asia.  Not racially Asian, but raised in an Asian family  None apply   Question 3 What activities are you interested in? *For the purpose of this survey “activities” are defined as things where you are moving your body for longer than 10 minutes.   Group strength training classes  Aerobics class (ex. Barre, Pilates, water aerobics)  Dance (Please specify what type) ______________________  Martial Arts (ex. Karate, tai chi)  Yoga (e.g. vinyasa, hatha, chair yoga)  Swimming  Walking Groups  Other (please specify) __________________________ 15   Question 4 What language do you prefer to use outside of class?  _____________________________  Question 5  Other than costs, what is a reason you do not participate in activities?  Language barrier  Lack of same sex classes  Inadequate resources (ex. Clothing, shoes, equipment)   Lack of previous experience  Activities are not culturally accessible to me   Activities are not accessible to those with my disability   I don’t think I need physical activity    Other (please specify) __________________________   Question 6 How and where do you learn about activities happening on campus  Friends  UBC Recreation website  Posters  Facebook/social media  In person promotion  Other (please specify) ________________________  In February 2016 UBC will be hosting a Centennial Lunar New Year Festival that will span over three days in the Nest. Lunar New Year marks the Year of the Monkey in traditional Chinese zodiac. For many families in Canada and around the world including Korean, Chinese, Vietnamese, Tibetan and Japanese families, this is a time for tradition, celebration, and family reunions. It is also a time for renewal and preparing for a fresh year.  Question 7 Would you participate in an activity during the Lunar New Year festival that brought women of different cultures together around physical or mental wellbeing?   Yes  No  Maybe  Depends on the activity  Question 8 At UBC’s Lunar New Year Festival, I would expect to see the following activities:  ________________________________________________________  Question 9 We’d love to hear your ideas. If you have a suggestion, please provide it below:  ________________________________________________________ 16  Appendix B: Data Figure 1:  Report from survey Question 1a, “Do you identify as female?” Response Chart Percentage Yes   100.0% No   0.0% Figure 2: Report from survey Question 1b, “Do you identify as a transgender woman?” Response Chart Percentage Count Yes   0.7% 1 No   99.3% 133  Total Responses 134 Figure 3: Report from survey Question 2, “Please choose as many of the following that apply”  17  Figure 4: Report from survey Question 3, “What activities are you interested in?” Response Chart Percentage Count Group strength training class   25.8% 34 Aerobics class (ex. Barre, Pilates, water aerobics)   24.2% 32 Dance (Please specify what type(s) of dance)   28.0% 37 Martial Arts (ex. karate, tai chi)   17.4% 23 Yoga (e.g. vinyasa, hatha, chair yoga)   62.1% 82 Swimming   33.3% 44 Walking groups   17.4% 23 Other, please specify   17.4% 23  Total Responses 132  Figure 5: Report from survey Question 4, “What language do you prefer to use outside of class?” Response Chart Percentages Count English    54% 73 Mandarin   15% 20 Chinese   11% 15 Cantonese   10% 14 Korean   7% 10 other    0% 1     18  Figure 6: Report from survey Question 5, “Other than costs, what is reason you do not participate in activities?  Response Chart Percentage Language barrier   15.2% Lack of same sex classes   6.1% Inadequate resources (ex. clothing, shoes, equipment)   20.5% Lack of previous experience   53.8% Activities are not culturally accessible to me   6.1% Activities are not accessible to  those with my disability   0.8% I don't think I need physical activity   3.8% Other, please specify   37.1% Figure 7: Report from survey Question 6, “How and where do you learn about activities happening on campus?”   19  Figure 8: Report for survey Question 7, “Would you participate in an activity during the Lunar New Year festival that brought women of different cultures together around physical or mental wellbeing?”    Response Chart Percentage Count Yes   22% 30 No   5% 7 Maybe    36% 49 Depends on the activity   36% 49  Total Responses 135  Figure 9: Report for survey Question 8, “At UBC’s Lunar New Year Festival, I would expect to see the following activities:” Note: only 102 respondents filled out this question.  Response Chart Percentages Count Lion and/or Dragon Dance   26% 27 Food   24% 25 Other    17% 18 Tradition/Red Envelopes   16% 17 Games   6% 7 Fireworks   4% 5 Yoga   2% 3  Figure 10: Report for survey Question 8 “other” responses, “At UBC’s Lunar New Year Festival, I would expect to see the following activities:” Responses Count Percent  of Total Respondents Lack of time 38 59% Lazy 8 13% Other 6 9% Cost 5 8% Not Interested 5 8% Transportation Issues 2 3% Total 64  20  Appendix C: Work Plan KIN 465 CBEL Projects Work Plan Name of Project: Centennial Lunar New Year Festival Planning Project  Purpose(s) of Project (“why are we doing this?”): The purpose of this project is to work with the Equity and Inclusion office and UBC Recreation to plan activities for the Centennial Lunar Festival that promote intercultural connections between students, physical activity and the theme of refocusing on health.  Students will be given a specific time slot to program and may be asked to review and make recommendations on other planned activities, using an intercultural lens. Deliverables (“what are we going to create?”): -Progress report -Final report with executive summary and recommendation. The report will further detail the plan for the event and recommendations for future festivals to foster intercultural connections between students, faculty and staff -Presentation for the Equity and Inclusion Office -Detailed recommendations for a program during the Lunar New Year Festival that addresses interculturalism, health and physical activity The plan will include details regarding equipment requirements, logistics and a plan for volunteer recruitment Methods (“how are we going to do this?”): 1) Research Lunar New Year 2) Meet with UBC staff and determine what exactly is expected 3) Plan a complete program to be used during the actual event 4) Create a detailed plan 5) Consider other ways in which the festival can become more intercultural and create connections between students, faculty, and staff Project Members Skills/Interests Role(s) in the project  Availability  Elaine Marshall -Previous studies in public health and political science Contact Person Liaison – responsible to make initial contact, set up Monday 9am-3pm, Tuesday 12:30-4pm, Wednesday 9-3pm, Thursday 11-4pm, Friday 9-3pm 21  -Gymnastics sport background -Genuinely care about humanity meetings and maintain contact, and gather feedback on deliverables Deanna Johnson -interested in the effects of ageism (currently taking a seminar class about ageism) - previous experience playing and coaching curling Keeping notes of what has been talked about in meetings brainstorm activity ideas Monday: 9-2, Tuesday: 1-3, Wednesday: 9-11, Thursday: 1-4, Friday: 9-4 Leon Lu -worked with individuals from many different culture -interested to creating an inclusive community event -research about potential programs -draft survey questions to present to group -brainstorm activity ideas Everyday: 11am-5pm Nadine Kallas -experience with physical activity and health promotion projects on campus -interested in research/analyzing barriers to physical activity in minority groups - Enjoy spending free time outdoors, hiking, and running.  -compile survey data and analyse results to present to group -brainstorm activity ideas Mondays/Wednesdays 11am-4pm Tuesdays/Thursdays 1pm-4pm Friday 11am-1pm  Project Component Specific Task  What do you need in order to get this done? Who is responsible? When is this due? First meeting with Contact Person Email contact person to introduce your group and ask for a meeting -learn people’s availability Elaine Marshall Sept 22 Meet with the contact person and discuss project goals and details -Read the background information listed on the course blog before mtg -begin filling out workplan All Wk of Sept 20 or 28 22  class requirements Workplans due via email to Kat/Shawn and community partner  -complete workplan with detailed timeline and organization of work Leon Lu By Oct 1 Midterm Progress report due via email to Kat/Shawn and community partner  -see instruction on blog (some of the timelines are changed) Deanna Johnson Oct 22, end of day Report  -see instruction on blog All group members Date will be assigned Presentation -see instruction on blog All group members Date will be assigned Peer Evaluation -reflect on your group members’ contribution to the project All group members Dec 3 Community Partner Initial Meeting Receive details and expectations on project; present   -come to the meeting with questions and expectations of our own -thoroughly research project, organization and Lunar New Year All (including Alden and Liska) Wednesday, Sept, 23 Lunar New Year research and past activities -Lit review Initial preparation for community partner meeting  -Research general understanding of Lunar New Year All group members Wednesday, Sept 23 Complete  independent research  -Using information from meeting with community partner to research certain aspects of the Lunar New Year more in depth  All group members Monday, September 28 Creating Idea Brainstorm possible ideas based on research  All group members Monday Sept 28 23   Select specific event and what will be needed to go through with it   All group members Monday Sept 28 Create an outline for what needs to be decided/booked, including volunteers, promotion, instructors, etc.  -Meet with various clubs in UBC All group members Monday Oct 19th Field Research meeting with UBC contacts -Suzanne -Vantage -GSS  Compile Research Questions -draft questions for survey -a clear understanding of the information regarding demographics and information we wish to collect All group members Monday October 5th Meeting with Suzanne  -determine what questions can be used, ethical concerns All group members plus Suzanne Tuesday October 6th Set up meeting with Vantage and GSS via Alden  - contact information Alden and Elaine Monday October 5th    Finalize research questions and Methods. Send to Alden for final feedback -revise research questions based on feedback from Suzanne, Vantage and GSS Feedback  All group members Monday October 12th Thursday October 22nd  Conduct field research -survey questions All group members By October 22nd By October 26th Creating Idea Brainstorm possible ideas based on research  -data from field research All group members Monday October 26th By November 2nd 24  -knowledge of common things in Lunar New Year Celebrations Select specific event and what will be needed to go through with it  -figure out timeslot available -determine what resources will be needed (equipment, etc…) All group members and Alden Monday October 26th By November 2nd Create an outline for what needs to be decided/booked, including volunteers, promotion, instructors, etc. -knowledge of the resources available -knowledge of target demographic All group members Monday October 26th By November 2nd Final meetings with Contact Person Write final report in order to present -plan for event -target demographic research -background knowledge  All group members Monday November 2nd Week of November 2nd Meet with Contact Person and get their feedback on final project -schedule meeting -create summary presentation All group members and Alden and Liska Week of November 2nd November 4th Give final amended project to Contact Person -amend project according to feedback from contact person All group members Monday November 9 Final Edits  Edit report/Finalize Report  -make changes based on feedback from Aldena and Liska All group members Monday November 16 Create presentation -based on feedback from Alden and Liska All group members Monday November 16 25  Appendix D: Midterm Progress Report October 22nd, 2015  To date we have met with Alden, Liska, and Suzanne to discuss the nature of the project and what we hope to get out of it as the end deliverables. We have determined that the focus for our project will be on how to get Asian women more involved in physical activities on campus, specifically at the Lunar New Year festival. We have been working on creating a survey that will be administered the week of October 26th. We also met with Joanne from Vantage College to make an effort to reach out to those students. She put us in contact with student leaders that we will be meeting with to do a more in depth interview that centers on our survey questions. We have also reached out to a number of clubs at the university, including the CVC, CSSA, and some of the sororities. We are waiting to hear back to determine how we can administer the survey to their members In terms of the final deliverables for this project, it has changed slightly since our first meeting with Alden. Originally we were planning on creating the activity which would include the where, when, what, of the activity. As well were going to create a group that would carry the project forward after this course is done. We have added more research on to the project and so part of our final deliverable will now include more general information on how to get Asian women more involved in UBC Recreation, not just for the Lunar New Year festival. The final deliverable for Alden will not be as detailed, as originally planned, but it will include our recommendation for which activity to do and how to market it to students. Recommendations will specifically target Asian women. We will include ideas for how this project can be continued by a future Kin 465 class. The form of the final deliverable will be discussed at our next meeting with community partners, November 4th. The next step is conducting the research, which will be completed the week of October 26th. We will then analyze the data and begin our recommendations, creating our report and final presentation. As previously mentioned we have a meeting on November 4th to further discuss our project with Alden. We are planning on having another meeting the week of the 23rd, so we will receive feedback before our final report on November 26th. There is also the possibility of presenting for UBC Recreation, along with some of the other Kin 465 groups, but that date has yet to be determined. The rest of timeline is in our updated work plan.  

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