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Investigating the desirability and feasibility of incorporating more local, seasonal and sustainably… Yip, Pearl; Uede, Taryrn; Singh, Serena; Wong, Bonnie; Tendean, Megawati Apr 11, 2008

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report       Investigating the Desirability and Feasibility of Incorporating more Local, Seasonal and Sustainably Produced Food Products into the Agricultural Student’s Undergraduate Society (AgUS) Weekly BBQ Menus Pearl Yip, Taryrn Uede, Serena Singh, Bonnie Wong, Megawati Tendean  University of British Columbia AGSC 450 April 11, 2008           Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.   Scenario 8   Investigating the Desirability and Feasibility of Incorporating more Local, Seasonal and Sustainably Produced Food Products into the Agricultural Student’s Undergraduate Society (AgUS) Weekly BBQ Menus  April 11, 2008  Group 26 Pearl Yip Taryrn Uede Serena Singh Bonnie Wong Megawati Tendean       Abstract UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 2  Institutions obtain food from large distributors, giving no support to local farms. As a result, food traveling long distance causes an absence of fresh food choices in the market as well as a lack of community awareness in regards to food origin and food production methods. With this in mind, we initiated a project to improve food security as well as sustainability of the AgUS Wednesday Night Barbeque (BBQ) dinners. In the past, the University of British Columbia Food Security Project (UBCFSP)’s goal was to strengthen the relationship between the Agricultural Student’s Undergraduate Society (AgUS) and UBC farm. In our project, we have opted to focus mainly on the BBQ with consideration for various factors: the relationship with neighbouring farms, sustainability (seasonal, local, and affordable), cultural, the development of a nutritious food menu, and building up connections within the Land and Food Systems (LFS) community. In essence, we have integrated all the knowledge obtained over the years from the Land, Food, and Community series into the BBQ. The project established a relationship between AgUS and neighbouring farms and reiterated the main concept within LFS – the connection between land and food. The ecological footprint of the BBQ has been analyzed and evaluated. A faculty wide survey was developed in collaboration with Group 14 and sent out to the LFS community. Menus were developed accordingly and their nutritional content analyzed. Utilizing these menus, neighbouring farms were contacted as suppliers for the BBQ. Finally, the BBQ’s ecological footprint was reanalyzed taking into consideration the suggested changes. This UBCFSP will then be passed on to next year’s AgUS committee. Upon approval, the recommendations will be implemented for the 2008-2009 school year. This project can serve as a guide for future implementations of sustainable food services within other faculties to further improve UBC food security.  Introduction The key goal of UBCFSP, a project within the Land and Food Systems faculty is to build food security and sustainability within UBC and other local communities. The transition of the faculty name from Agriculture Science to Land and Food Systems was to ensure that “healthy and sustainable land and food systems [will not] be underestimated as the foundation that touches almost every area of our lives and the lives of our local and global UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 3  communities” (LFS website1). The vision as well as the mission statement of the faculty is “focused around human health, a sustainable food system, and the responsible use of finite land and water resources” (LFS website2). The goal of our project will be directly based on this focus, in particular, we will be concentrating on the initiatives of building strong community connections and creating local collaborations (LFS Website2). Originally a five-year plan, the UBCFSP takes the form of community-based action research (CBAR). The UBCFSP allowed the teaching team of AGSC 450 to extend this research to the student bodies; therefore, collecting valuable experience as well as cumulative knowledge. As part of the ongoing process of UBCFSP, our key goal is to maintain a sustainable food system at UBC.     The Land and Food Systems constituency club, AgUS began to build connection with UBC Farm in 2000 by sporadically getting local produce from the farm for the Wednesday night BBQ (Scenario 2 Group 29, 2007). In 2008, two groups (26 and 14) are working to improve the sustainability of Wednesday Night BBQs by incorporating more local and sustainably farmed produce. To achieve this, we aimed to purchase local produce from small scale farms with sustainable farming methods. In addition, we aimed to purchase meat from a close – looped pasture based meat production farm where several types of livestock are raised and animal welfare is actively practiced. The Wednesday night BBQ menu from September 2008 to April 2009 would be developed between the two groups, each group being responsible for two menus for each month of the school year. Our paper will begin with a problem statement, our vision statement and value assumptions. Next we will describe our methodology, findings, results, and discussion. Finally, we will address obstacles that were encountered and challenges particular to our project, recommendations for our future colleagues, and our reflections on the project. Problem definition While AgUS already utilize local businesses such as New Apple Farm Market and Jackson’s Meat Market for produce and meat, a lot of the foods are prepackaged and processed. The food is not always local and is rarely organic or farmed by sustainable methods. In order to reduce the ecological footprint of the BBQ, more UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 4  local, organic or sustainably produced produce, and fresh foods will need to be incorporated into the dinners. As the biggest restriction comes from the seasonality of fresh local foods, the BBQ menus needed to be altered in order to incorporate these local produce. As more local and seasonal produce were incorporated, we would be able to strengthen our relationship with UBC farm by utilizing their produce. This will also decrease the ecological footprint of the BBQ as UBC farm is close and utilizes sustainable production methods. The task at hand was to plan a whole school year of BBQ menus for the school year of 2008-2009. Divided among two groups, we were responsible for two menus each month from September to November and January to March. In December and April, only one menu was developed, making a total of 14 menus for the year. The task aimed to enhance the linkage between neighbouring farms (UBC farm or other farms with their ecological footprint as an indicator) and the AgUS. The goal for this project was to increase the amount local, seasonal and sustainable food utilized at the BBQs. In addition, we wanted to strengthen our relationship with UBC farm for both awareness as well as ecological purposes. If the produce from UBC farm is unavailable or inadequate for our needs, we will approach other local farms or explore alternative produce suppliers with high value for produce yet small ecological footprints. This scenario is implemented into the UBCFSP 2008 to “interact with communities involved in the activities of promoting sustainable agricultural production, food security, and the health of human communities…” (UBCFSP, 2008, p. 3). Interacting with neighbouring farms can benefit the LFS community in various aspects. The staffs, graduates and undergraduates can have a choice of fresher food which would be more nutritious, every week. The awareness of where and how the food is produced can be enhanced, increasing the BBQ audience’s knowledge towards our food security system. Furthermore, this will support local farmers in sustainable agricultural production. This scenario drives home the mission that “the importance of healthy and sustainable land and food systems cannot be underestimated as the foundation that touches almost every area of our lives and the lives of our local and global communities” (1LFS, 2005). UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 5  From a global economical aspect, smaller scale farms have a larger more stable income(Halweil, 2000). During the industrialization period, most produce were grown by large scale farms which were located in far regions and transported to world wide food suppliers(Halweil, 2000). In the US, farmers received a significant drop in consumer food dollar from 40 cents to 7 cents in the time frame of 1910 to 1997 (Halweil, 2000). The consumer food dollar was mostly transferred to food processors, market distributors and food store retailers (Lang & Heasman, 2004). This resulted in the bankruptcy and elimination of many small scale farms, which lead to an expansion of large scale farms (Halweil, 2000). This discouraged many local farmers from staying in the business and as a result, the choices of fresh food available to the consumers decreased and in turn, so did their awareness of the origin of food in the market(Halweil, 2000).  In our UBCFSP, we want to offer benefits to producers, providers, as well as students, faculty and staff. We understand that the changes we are making in the BBQ menus may only have a small impact on campus sustainability; however, this project can act as a guidebook for future campus sustainable project.  Vision Statement and Value Assumptions The vision statement of UBCFSP includes 8 guiding principles. The goal of UBCFSP: is to “protect and enhance the diversity and the integrity of the natural ecosystem and resources that supports it” (Rojas et al., 2007). This can be achieved by taking into consideration the economic, ecological, social criterions (UBCFSS, 2002-2006).  We agree with 7 of the guiding principles. In our scenario, we considered the ecological footprint to be a major indicator for determining the food sources for the BBQ. The definition of local we decided upon was such that the food product, produce or meat, was produced within British Columbia. In doing so, we were able to decrease food miles. The method of production is also important. We ranked farms utilizing sustainable farming methods or organic methods higher than those utilizing conventional methods. The inputs (cutlery, plates, etc.) used in the BBQ dinner are reusable and the food waste is composted through the general UBC composting UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 6  system. Also, the menus we aimed to develop were “affordable, available, accessible, culturally, ethically and nutritionally appropriate, and safe and can adapt to changes” (Rojas et al. 2007). The cost of the BBQ dinner is $5 and culturally appropriate featuring different cuisines. In addition, there is a choice of vegetarian and meat containing menus. The menus are also nutritionally analyzed. By giving out surveys to our own faculty members as well as some non-faculty members, we were able to become aware of the feelings of the community. Encouraging them to participate in the BBQ dinner and to take on personal responsibility within the community will promote awareness of the sustainability that local seasonal food can provide. The following guideline did not coincide with our project: “contains a balance of imported and local foods that come from socially and ecologically conscious producers to ensure long-term financial viability” (Rojas et al. 2007). By using local food we aimed to minimize food miles, increase nutritional value and improve the economic impact of the BBQ. “Every dollar earned by a BCfresh vegetable grower generates $6 to $7 in income for other British Columbians. The BCfresh vegetable industry helps support over 6,000 families throughout the province who earn their livelihood on farms or in the agri-business community” (BCfresh, 2007). Long-term financial viability of the BBQ is; however, as our project only pertains to the upcoming year and since long term financial viability is hard to achieve due to continuous food price fluctuations, it is important that plans for the subsequent years be planned with the same goals. Methodology Community Based Action Research (CBAR) is the overarching methodology that has been employed in the UBCFSP in the past. Similarly, scenario 8 is a collaborative CBAR project which involved our group as researchers and various partners such as Group 14, UBC farm, and AgUS. Together, we are committed to creating changes in our community’s food system by incorporating more local and seasonal produce and sustainable practices into the BBQ. Both participants and researchers were engaged together in collecting the UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 7  information (look), reflecting on the information to get more understanding about the nature of the problem (think), and developing solution that benefits all parties involved (act) (Stringer,1999). Literature Review Our literature review included previous findings by AGSC 450 students, local food procurement initiatives in other universities as well as books and publications related to food security. The review focused on reports from 2004 to 2007 and especially from the 2007 group reports (Group 4, 6, 9, 29). The focus of our literature review was to identify key issues arising from previous research and also to gain insights for our project.  Evaluating the BBQ’s Sustainability by using Sustainability Indicators To evaluate the sustainability of the BBQ, various sustainability indicators were developed. The indicators chosen were used to evaluate the ecological, environmental, and social sustainability of the BBQ. The ecological aspect included the measurement of miles traveled in order for the food to reach the UBC campus. This was analyzed based on the CO2 emitted during transport of the ingredients from the farm to UBC. In addition, the miles traveled to and from the grocery stores to purchase the food was also analyzed. We also evaluated the amount of processed and packaged food in comparison to food products in their raw form utilized at the BBQ. The waste management program of the BBQ was also analyzed to determine the impact of the BBQ’s waste on the environment.  The social indicators utilized included the amount of people that attended the BBQ as well as the breakdown of which faculty these attendees were from. Also evaluated was the amount of volunteers required to put on the BBQ, whether it be preparation of food, cooking, or cleaning up. To measure the economic sustainability of the BBQ, the income and expenses of the BBQ over a month were evaluated to determine its financial stability. Community Members Survey UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 8  An online survey was developed by Group 14 and 26 in collaboration and sent to all LFS community members, including the staff, faculty and students (Appendix B). The main purposes of this survey was to obtain insights into what people think about the current state of the BBQ and also their response towards and willingness to pay for local meals at the BBQ.  The electronic survey was designed using Survey Monkey and distributed through Cathleen Nichols from March 7 to March 26, 2008. The quantitative data from the responses were summarized using mean values and standard deviations. Written responses were also summarized. Interview & Class Presentation On March 12, 2008, we listened and talked with UBC Farm representatives, Program Coordinator Mark Bomford and the Marketing Coordinator Amy Frye, about their goals and possible challenges in supplying the food providers at UBC, including the AgUS.  An interview with the future AgUS president was conducted after the menu development was finalized (Appendix C). Through the interview, we found out their interest in and concerns about implementing our menus, the anticipated budget for next year and the willingness of the AgUS members in helping other faculties in setting up similar events.  Menu Design and Analysis Nutritious menus were designed based on the availability of fruit and vegetables for each month. Other factors that were considered when designing the menu was the budget, ingredient quantities, time for cooking and available kitchen equipment. The information about the availability of seasonal fruits and vegetables were obtained from the Act Now BC website and different cook books and websites were used for choosing the menu (2008). The nutritional contents of the designed menus for each BBQ dinner were analyzed using the EATracker program from Dietitians of Canada which provided an analysis on caloric, macronutrient and micronutrient contents. This evaluation was compared to the recommended intake per meal for a 20 year old, 130 lb female who is 5 feet and 5 inches. The nutritional content of a sample current BBQ dinner was also analyzed and UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 9  compared to those of the proposed menu. The amount of each ingredient required was adjusted to 100 servings (approximate number of people who come to BBQ) and the menus were combined together in a cook book. Contacting the Farms Farms that could potentially supply the produce needed for the BBQ were ranked using the following criteria: distance from the UBC campus, farming practices, and the size of the farm. For example, a small-scale farm utilizing sustainable farming practices such as crop rotations and integrated pest management that is in Delta ranked higher than a larger farm using fertilizers and pesticides located in the Okanogan. Pricing also played a slight role in our decision. However, the prices of the produce are not already set and are hard to obtain. In addition, a budget of $500 is fairly flexible. Therefore, our decisions were not centered on the price of the produce. After calculating the total amount of produce and meats required on a per week bases for the designed menus. We sent the information through email to the selected local farms together with our project introduction and the ethics consent form to get an idea on what the farms could provide. In addition, we could also get an idea on their interest in becoming a part of our project. These emails were followed up with phone calls a few days after the emails were sent.  Findings Previous UBCFSP Findings Last year’s project on the AgUS BBQ focused on obtaining local products from UBC Farm. The survey given to AgUS members by Group 29 showed high interest in strengthening their relationship with UBC Farm. However, some major barriers that were identified by the survey included reliability of the farm to supply weekly, communication with the farm, limited menu options due to produce availability and added cost which would constrain AgUS finances (Group 19, 2007). Similar challenges have also been identified for other food providers at UBC attempting to utilize the farm as a source of produce (Group 3, 6, 13, and 23, 2006). Moreover, according to UBC Farm representatives, the possibility of supplying the produce beyond the end of October is low due to UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 10  high demand (Group 29, 2006). Group 3 and 13 (2006) as well as Group 29 (2007)  proposed  agreements/contracts between UBC Farm and UBC Food Providers including AgUS to ensure product availability; the agreement would include the approximate quantities demanded, ordering schedules and service expectations (billing and payment parameters, storage service, notifications if order could not be filled completely). Group 29 (2007) also suggested expanding AgUS’ kitchen equipment and surveying the LFS community about the quality of the BBQ.  The idea of building a root cellar is also suggested as it can extend the shelf-life of produce which would allow UBC Farm to supply the produce throughout the year including the off-season period (Group 6 and 13, 2006). Aside from UBC Farm as a food supplier, some groups from 2006 (Group 19) and 2007 (Group 4, 6, 9) also looked for various alternatives in bringing more local produce from other local producers to UBC Food Services (UBCFS) and Alma Mater Society Food Services (AMSFS). According to Group 19 (2006), most of the meat and eggs obtained by UBCFS and AMSFS are already from local producers. While Allied Foods (a food supplier of UBCFS) supply many produce items from US during Canadian growing systems, they are willing to find local sources for certain products if UBCFS make the request (Group 9, 2007). Some local food initiatives by Group 4 and 6 (2007) include the incorporation of local produce supplied by Small Potatoes Urban Deliveries (SPUD) to Sage Bistro menu and implementation of local organic BC apples supplied by Discovery Island Organics (DIO) to UBC Residences.  What have Other Universities Done? The University of Toronto (U of T) has showed its commitment in bringing more local food to the campus by establishing partnership with Local Flavour Plus, a non-profit organization that certifies local farmers and processors and connects them with purchasers. Currently, a number of food outlets and residences in the U of T have serve fresh and seasonally items that come from certified farmers. The local products are delivered to campus by distributors which integrate the certified farmers or distributed by the local producers themselves. Chefs have also tried working with seasonal menus and this program has obtained a good response from UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 11  students and community members not only due to the great taste but also because of the great benefits in helping the environment and supporting the local community. The U of T is aiming to increase the amount of local food used in their food services every year (U of T, 2006). The sustainable food project in Yale University was started in 2001 and focused on two main projects: 1) the establishment of an urban farm on an overgrown plot of land at the university and 2) the local food initiative in the university’s dining halls. The Yale Farm was established in 2003 and serves as an educational resources and a model of sustainable agriculture. The fruits and vegetables produced by the farm are sold to a farmer’s market, restaurants, and donated Yale dining hall on special occasions. The local food initiative started with a test kitchen in the dining hall of Berkeley College, one of the dining halls in the Yale University. The meals in the test kitchen were prepared using as many local and sustainable ingredients as possible. Although the shift to local ingredients requires more preparation time and has higher cost compared to conventional foods, the pilot project was a huge success with high demand. Due to the response, the local food initiative was expanded to other dining halls (Yale University, 2008). Evaluating the BBQ’s Sustainability by using Sustainability Indicators Our group examined the ecological footprint of the food products used as ingredients for the BBQ for one particular dinner and whether they were local or imported; we defined local as within the confines of the province of British Columbia.  We found that of the twenty-seven items used by the BBQ, 22% were locally produced or grown; 33% were produced or grown within Canada but outside of B.C.; and 44% of the food products used at the BBQ were from international sources and countries such as Thailand, Turkey and Italy.  These international produced food products greatly decrease the sustainability of the BBQ in terms of environmental sustainability and also increase the ecological footprint of the BBQ.  UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 12  A second indicator of sustainability that our group looked at was the amount of food products used that were processed and/or packaged.  We found that nearly all the ingredients used for the BBQ were processed in some manner whether just simple processing such as washing and packaging of fresh vegetables and fruits or more heavily processed foods like soy milk and chick peas.  The processing of the ingredients used at the BBQ can decrease the environmental sustainability of the BBQ through the use of energy in the manufacturing process and the use of unsustainable packaging materials.  A third indicator of sustainability which coincides with the first is the total distance the food traveled to get to the BBQ.  Most of the ingredients for the BBQ were bought from grocery stores that are found within the vicinity of UBC.  Another indicator of sustainability for the BBQ that we examined was the waste created by the BBQ and the treatment of that waste.  We found that most of the vegetable trimmings and unusable leftovers are composted along with the plate scraping during the clean-up of the BBQ.  We also found that packaging materials such as paper, plastic and metal are recycled.  All other waste that is not compostable or recyclable is thrown away in the regular garbage.  In order to reduce the waste produced, the AgUS uses reusable utensils such as metal cutlery, plastic and glass plates; all the utensils used are washed during the cleanup after the BBQ.  We also examined the social indicator of sustainability through the number of volunteers the BBQ currently utilizes each week and the number of people attending the weekly BBQs.  We found that the BBQ requires between six to eight volunteers to prepare, cook and serve the dinner; and four to six people for assisting with the cleanup after the BBQ.  Through the survey we learned the faculty breakdown of the people attending the BBQ:  95% of respondents were from the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and the other 5% were made up by the faculties of Forestry and Engineering.  UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 13  Another sustainability indicator we looked at was the economic sustainability of the BBQ.  We took a sample from a week in January and learned that it took approximately $330 to purchase all the ingredients for the BBQ.  The income from that same week in January showed the BBQ earned approximately $365, which means a profit of only $35.  Contacting the Farm As previously mentioned, our first step in approaching the farm was by email. The produce farms contacted were UBC farm, Westham Island Herb farm, Mary’s Garden, and Ralph’s Farm Market. After three days of waiting, only UBC Farm responded to our email (Appendix A). According to Amy, the produce that they could supply us include: parsley, mint, chives, green beans, carrot, rhubarb, broccoli, cauliflower, turnips (in fall), cucumber (in September), lettuce (in fall), and bell peppers (if grown this year) (2008). Moreover, she mentioned that the produce will be available for pick up or delivered to UBC on Friday afternoon after they are harvested. For the product prices, she has asked us to refer to the 2007 price list for the most accurate data (Frye, April 4, 2008). The only other response was from Ralph’s Farm Market, however, our order (approx. 7 kg of vegetable, 5 kg of fruit per week) was too small for delivery. In order to deliver to Vancouver, they require a minimal order of around 30 cases (Merk, 2008, pers. comm). Ralph, the owner of the farm, suggested that we purchase produce from Top Ten Produce on 10th Avenue, where he sell some of his local products (2008).   Of the meat farms we approached, we got a good response from Family Farm Natural Meats Ltd; they seem genuinely interested to become the supplier for the BBQ. This farm is located at Forest Grove, B.C which is 487 km away from UBC (Google map). Despite the distance, we chose this farm because they can supply us with all the meat we want. With the amount that we required, which is around 8 kg/week or 70.4 lbs/month or 4 specific types of meat each equal to 11 lbs, they are willing to deliver the meat to UBC once a month free of charge. UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 14   An interview was conducted with the incoming president for the 2008-2009 school year, Kirsten Flood, to determine whether or not the AgUS would be interested in implementing this project. We also wanted to determine what improvements could be made and how receptive AgUS would be to our suggestions. The interview followed the format of the questionnaire in Appendix C.  Interview with AgUS President  When asked if the AgUS would be interested in implementing our project, Flood was interested but had concerns about the suggested menus. While the salad and entrée options are deemed as feasible, the dessert menus do not fit their criteria. As they utilize a small oven in AGORA, they had limited capabilities of cooking elaborate desserts. As a result, the dessert options that are too elaborated would not be carried out. We also wanted to explore the possibility of preserving foods available in the summer months so to be able to use them all year long. However, as most AgUS members are not residents of Vancouver, many of them will not be available in the summer. In addition, the AgUS is also not currently interested in helping other faculties set up similar events. This is because the AgUS feels that there could be additional improvements to their own BBQ and these improvements should be made prior to helping other faculties start a BBQ of their own. Discussions What have Other Universities done? The University of Toronto and Yale have positioned themselves as a model of food sustainability. Both of the universities were taking small but progressive steps to make significance change, which provides us with valuable insights that the UBCFSP can learn from. In regards to AgUS, although it is just a small part of UBC, through the implementation of more local and seasonal produce and meat, we believe the AgUS can make great contribution toward the campus food sustainability. Similar to Yale University where the local food initiative started from one dining hall and expanded to other halls, if our project succeeds, we would like to see other local food UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 15  initiative in other faculties in UBC. However, according to incoming president Kirsten Flood, the expansion of the BBQ is not currently a viable option. Evaluating the BBQ’s Sustainability by using Sustainability Indicators As stated in our findings section for sustainability our definition of local is within the province of B.C., we chose this area because our group decided that for the seasonality of the menu this region could provide the necessary ingredients while reducing the food miles and environmental impact of the BBQ.  The findings from our analysis of the sustainability of the AgUS Wednesday Night BBQ suggests that the AgUS could improve the environmental and economic sustainability of the BBQ by using more local, organic and seasonal sources for ingredients and increasing the cost of the dinners. Our group defined local as within B.C. and from there researched and sought out local sources for the many ingredients the AgUS uses during its weekly dinners. This will not only reduce the distance the food must travel to get to UBC but will also increase the environmental sustainability of the BBQ. For most of the ingredients used we were able to find local farms and a small percentage of these were organic. By developing menus which matched the seasonal availability of the farms we were able to maximize the amount of local ingredients accessible for the menus and reduce the environmental impact of having to buy foods from international sources or farms using greenhouses.  By finding local sources for BBQ ingredients the AgUS could decrease the amount of packaging required for food products and thereby decrease the amount of waste produced by the BBQ.  Also by sourcing local, seasonal ingredients the amount of processing would be reduced and together these would combine to increase the environmental sustainability of the BBQ.   Through the survey we also learned that even though most of the people attending the BBQ were from LFS a percentage were from other faculties.  Our group feels that by increasing awareness of the BBQ to people UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 16  outside the LFS faculty the AgUS could not only increase the social sustainability of the BBQ by helping to create connections with other people from the UBC community; but could also increase the economic sustainability of the BBQ by increasing profits through the increased number of people attending the dinners.  Looking specifically at the economic sustainability of the BBQ we examined the expenses and income which the AgUS provided.  By sampling a week in January we were able to get an approximate amount for the cost of purchasing ingredients for the BBQ.  Using this same week we were able to approximate the income from the BBQ; according to this analysis the BBQ’s profits were $35 and there were 73 people attending and paying for the BBQ this week (volunteers eat for free). In our survey we asked if people would pay more that the current $5 charge if the dinner offered was produced from ingredients that were local, seasonal and organic.  64% of people who replied to the survey indicated that they would be willing to pay more for a dinner that included those sourced ingredients.  By increasing awareness and sourcing local, seasonal and organic ingredients the AgUS could increase the economic sustainability of the BBQ; and could create a profit which could go to special projects to further increase the sustainability of the BBQ Survey Results  Over a span of three weeks from March 7 to March 26, groups 26 and 16 conducted a survey to find out information on the Wednesday Night BBQ.  The survey looked at past attendance to the event.  It also sought the opinions and preferences of the respondents towards the BBQ’s food security and menus.  The goal of the survey was to see if the changes that scenario 8 is striving to implement at the BBQ would be supported by the community that the BBQ serves.  For this reason, the electronic survey that utilized Survey Monkey was open to the entire public but only advertised to the Land and Food Systems (LFS) faculty through email.  The response to the survey was fair, garnering 155 responses.  A majority of respondents were undergraduate students from the faculty of LFS (see figure 1).   UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 17   The survey found that just over 50% of the respondents have attended a BBQ in the past (see figure 3.).  Most of these individuals attended occasionally and not on a regular basis; whereas 16.9% reported that they attended all the time (see table 2.).  The 42.7% of the respondents who had never attended a BBQ mostly claimed that they were too busy, that it did not fit their schedule or that they had no one to go with (see table 1.).  Since the BBQ has always been held on a Wednesday night, it may cause confusion if the date were to be changed. Also, since there is no way to meet the needs of every individual’s schedules, a change in date or time would not likely increase the attendance. 2% of the respondents reported that they did not know what the BBQ is; however, this maybe due to the fact that not all of the respondents were from the faculty of LFS.    When asked where respondents had first heard about the BBQ, most reported that an AgUS representative came to one of their classes to promoted it or that they had heard by word of mouth from a friend (see table 3.).  Having AgUS members go into classes, especially first year classes, seems to be an effective method of advertisement and should be done at least once a term.     A majority of respondents would like to see ethnic foods at the BBQ.  Through the implementation of the suggested menu, a variety of culturally influenced meals will be served from week to week.  For example, meals inspired by Indian, Greek, Chinese and Japanese cooking have been included throughout the year.   The survey found that 1.7% of the respondents were vegan, but 13.9% would prefer that there be a vegan option at the BBQ.  7.3% of the respondents said that they would be more inclined to attend the BBQ if there was a vegan option offered. This may indicate that there are individuals that are not strictly vegan but whom would eat a vegan meal if it were available.  The survey also questioned the demand for a meal composed of raw foods to be offered, with 9.3% of respondents voting in preference for it.  The decision to provide a vegan option maybe made in the subsequent years to come and the decision should be influenced by an increase in demand.  If these UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 18  two alternatives were to be made available, more volunteers would be required for planning and preparation of the meal and a price increase may be necessary.  A large percentage of respondents would like to see seasonal, local and/or organic foods being used in the menus (see table 5.).  If the suggested menus are utilized, the advertisement of their seasonal and local ingredients may prove to increase BBQ attendance.  Advertisement of the source of the foods, like the farms or wholesalers used, should also take place.  This is due to the fact that 72.6% of the respondents reported that they did not know where the food served at the BBQs came from.  Michael Pollan, in the Omnivore’s Dilemma, a Natural History of Four Meals, describes the disconnection from its food source that America is facing (2006).  This disconnection is described to be one of the main sources confusion that is being seen when people are trying to decide what foods they should eat (Pollan, 2006).    The BBQ currently uses a lot of processed and commercialized foods due to the convenience that these foods provide.  Some of the survey respondents expressed concern towards this and would like to see less of these foods used in the BBQs.  This was reflected when the aspects of food security were questioned in the survey where only 19.4% of individuals thought that that BBQ was sustainable or appropriate (see figure 13.).     Most respondents are meat eaters or selective meat eaters (see figure 7.).  There were several other medically influenced diet limitations that were brought to attention though the survey such as the existence of individuals that are celiac, lactose intolerant or require diets low in sugar.  Although it is impossible to cater to the needs of ever individual it may be a good idea in the future to have at least one meal a year that takes into consideration different diet limitations such as these.  If a special meal is to be served, advertisement would be crucial in promoting the meal to the target audience.    The BBQ is currently priced at $5.00 a plate and 95.3% of the respondents view this price as being affordable.  69.6% of the respondents said that they would be willing to pay a higher price if the food served at the UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 19  BBQ was seasonal and/or local.  A reasonably accepted price increase would be to $6.00 (see figure 8).  This would allow for an increased spending budget at $600.00 up from $500.00.  The survey also revealed that people are concerned with the food safety at the BBQ and the environmental impacts of the BBQ’s wastes. A good suggestion would be for the AgUS to supplement the cost of the Food Safe I program for its volunteers.  The program is often organized by Agora executives for Agora’s volunteers at the start of the volunteer term and collaboration between the AgUS and Agora in organizing a course session maybe possible. While plates and cutlery are not of concern as they are mostly reusable. If paper plates were used, they would be composted. The leftovers from the BBQ are often stored and utilized by AgUS members or given away to the community members. If the food cannot be stored or has spoiled after being stored for too long, it would be composted.   According to the survey, most respondents view the meal as being nutritionally balanced (see figure 12.).  From analyzing past meals served it can be seen that past meals were balanced in terms of nutritional content.  The suggested menu’s meals have been analyzed using the Dieticians of Canada’s Eat Tracker program.  A good suggestion would be to print off a copy of the provided charts, found with the menu, to display during the BBQ.  This will allow interested individuals to see a nutritional evaluation of their meal.     The survey found that not very many people have volunteered in the past for the BBQ; however, over 50% of these individuals say that they would like to volunteer for future BBQs.  This can be seen as a good sign for the future of the BBQ and it would be a good idea to put effort into recruiting individuals to volunteer.  Advertising the opportunity and conveying the idea that new volunteers are welcome is important.  Expressing the benefits of volunteering for and/or attending the BBQ like, networking opportunities, meeting new people and feeling a sense of connection with their faculty would likely encourage people to volunteer or attend.     Survey Error Analysis UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 20   The survey results are fairly representative of the LFS populations.  However, bias may have occurred due to the fact that many of the respondents may have been specifically from the Agsc 450 class due to class awareness of the project and willingness to support fellow students’ projects.  The results may also be skewed due to the fact that AgUS members and people directly associated with the BBQ maybe more inclined to take the survey because they have a personal interest in the BBQ.  Another factor that affected the results is the fact that not all of the respondents were associated with the faculty of LFS.  Finally, even though the survey had a fair number of respondents in general, some of the questions had lower response rates due to individuals choosing to skip questions.     Menu Development  The main goal of scenario 8 is to bring food security to the Wednesday Night BBQ by featuring seasonal foods grown locally in hopes of reducing the BBQ’s negative impact on the environment; supporting the local economy; creating meals that have undergone little nutrient loss during transportation and bringing us closer to the sources of the food we consume.  In order to plan menus containing the maximum percentage of local foods, the Act Now BC’s seasonally available B.C. fruits and vegetables charts were utilized (Act Now BC).  The menu also incorporates meat from animals that are raised in sustainable, non-cruel conditions and that are slaughtered at SPCA certified slaughter houses.   Besides the demand that exists for seasonal and local foods to be served at the BBQs, according to the survey conducted, there is also a demand for meals that feature different ethnic foods.  This is not surprising seeing that the city of Vancouver has a highly diverse cultural makeup (City of Vancouver).  Due to this diversity, people are used to having easy access to imported foods that allow us to experience the flavours of the world.  Being restricted to using local foods limits the possibilities of the menu and often substitutions had to be made to the menu if the required ingredients were not available locally.  Nevertheless, for half of the BBQs held throughout UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 21  the year a menu involving a starter, main dish and desert was created and many of the meals had ethnic influences like Japanese, Greek, Chinese and Indian.   Other limiting factors for the BBQ were the limitations of the venue and available equipment.  The BBQs are held in Agora, the McMillian building’s student’s social area.  The BBQs utilize 2 burners, an oven and a grill to prepare the meals.  There are also time, money and volunteer limitations.  This is because each meal must be prepared in approximately 4 hours and there are often a limited number of volunteers to help.  The budget for each BBQ is $500 and must feed approximately 100 people, some of whom are vegetarian and some of whom are not.  The recipes used in the menu are fairly simple and should require, for the most part, little prep work.  Each menu has been adjusted to feed 100 people with a ratio of 50% vegetarian to 50% non-vegetarian, which has proven in the past to be a good estimation.        An approximate nutritional evaluation of each meal was analysed using the Dieticians of Canada EATracker and was based on the nutritional need of a hypothetical female who was 20 years of age and who weighed 130lb and was 5 feet 5 inches.  The results from the diet analysis are rough estimates and are limited in accuracy due to the fact that the food data base did not contain all necessary ingredients and because assumptions had to be made involving the portion sizes that an individual would consume.   Farms Our choices on the local farms to be contacted were based on the type of products that they can supply and the distance to UBC. To minimize the ecological footprint, we were trying to get a farm that could supply us with variety of products. We were also trying to get alternative supplier besides UBC Farm to anticipate limited and unpredictable supply from UBC farm. However, some of the challenges that we faced included the lack of response from farms and according to one of the farms that we talked to, it seemed that the amount that the BBQ required was a bit too small for them to deliver to UBC (Merk, April 4, 2008, pers. comm.). As mentioned in an UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 22  email from Amy Frye, some of the produce that we required could be supplied by UBC Farm. One thing that we noticed is that UBC farm has different seasonal produce availability than the ones that we saw in Act Now BC website. As a result, for some of the months, we could not rely on UBC farm to supply us. Our group was thinking that AgUS should get as much as they can from UBC farm and get the rest of the produce required from grocery stores that sell local produce around UBC area. One of the stores that we found is Choices Markets. Choices Markets have seven branches in Vancouver area and the one that is closest to us is the Kitsilano store. Besides selling local and seasonal produce, Choices Markets also established a sustainability program which promotes recycling programs among their customers (Choices Markets, 2008). The other alternative is Top Ten Produce which was suggested by one of the farms that we contacted. This store is located on 10th avenue and it also sells many local and seasonal produce.     Due to its locality and direct connection to the university, UBC farm seemed to be an ideal produce source for the BBQ. Served as a model of sustainable farm, UBC farm is the last working farm in Vancouver (UBC Farm, 2008). According to the class presentation by Mark Bomford presentation on March 12, 2008, UBC farm is currently looking forward to increase more campus connections with food outlets in UBC. The current proportion of the sales are: 66% from Saturday farm markets, 11% from Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and 19% from direct sales to Vancouver restaurants and UBC food outlets. However, the farm is working on having ideal proportions of the sales by supplying more produce to CSA and for direct sales. Limited and unpredictable supply due to high demand of the produce is the main challenges faced by incorporating UBC farm produce (Bomford, 2007, class presentation). Nevertheless, according to Amy Frye, UBC Farm might be able to supply AgUS since it is a small event (March 12, 2008, pers. comm.). If the farm is not able to provide enough food to support the BBQ, Biovia Organic Link is an option. This company tries to source as much low ecological footprint produce first, only using produce with a higher ecological footprint if not possible. The company delivers weekly and would provide more stability (Sophia Baker-French, pers. comm.). UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 23  Family Farm Natural Meats seemed really interested in being involved in our project. Located at Forest Grove, B.C, this farm is a small family farm that raised their livestock based on natural principals, “no antibiotics, growth-hormones, or feed with animal by. It sells products such as grass-fed beef, pasture-raised pork, pasture-raised lamb and free range chicken and turkey (Family Farm Natural Meats, 2008). Looking at the way Family Farm Natural Meats operates remind us on Joel Salatin’s Polyface farm in Michael Pollan’s book, The Omnivore’s Dilemma. As Salantin’s farm, Family Farm Natural Meats also offers something “beyond organic” through its sustainable farming practices (Pollan, 2006; Family Farm Natural Meats, 2008). The animals are fed with their appropriate diets (no cow is fed with grain) and are constantly rotated on pasture to give them access to fresh grass, which at the same time allows them to fertilize the pasture. As a result, no chemical fertilizers and machinery are needed to improve the field. Animals are also treated humanely and are allowed to roam in nature and not confined in cage. Thus animals raised in this farm are healthier, happier and leaner. About the business arrangement, the order can be put in advance and are guaranteed when a down-payment has been issued and balance owing at the time of delivery. Prior to delivery date, the customer will also be contacted to finalize the arrangements. The farm also supports local economy by selling and delivering its products only within BC (Family Farm Natural Meats, 2008).  We anticipated that there will be an increase in the ingredients costs by incorporating local products. However, as mentioned in the previous section, about 64.2% respondent say that they would be more inclined to come if the foods were local, organic and seasonal and 69.6% of the respondents agree to pay more. Thus, we believe that an increase in number of people attending the BBQ and increasing the price will help compensating for the increase in ingredients cost.   Interview with the Incoming AgUS President  Kirsten Flood, the incoming AgUS President expressed concerns in regards to the dessert menu suggested. Due to the limited equipment available to the AgUS as well as time constrain allocated to prepare for UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 24  the BBQ, the AgUS feels that more emphasis should be placed on the central part of the meal – the salad and the main course. To overcome this problem, alternative desserts could be utilized and developed by a Wednesday Night BBQ Planner. This Wednesday Night BBQ Planner position could be filled by advertising to the dietetic and FNH department of the LFS. In addition, fundraising events could be held to assist with the funding issues so to purchase more equipment for the BBQ. While AgUS might be concerned with the time associated with such events, the scenario 8 group from AGSC 450 could explore this possibility further.  To extend the shelf life of the seasonal produce available during the fall months, we propose that the food be preserved during the summer months. However, since most of the AgUS members do not reside in Vancouver, they will be going home during the summer months and would not be available to help. To overcome this problem, we suggest a class in preservation of food be held during the summer and preserve food sources purchased utilizing AgUS funding, thus providing a source of local food even during the winter months where local and seasonal produce is much harder to come about.  The AgUS is currently not interested in assisting other faculties with food initiatives. This is because the AgUS feels that there could be more improvements on their BBQ. If our project deems to be useful, this project can serve as a guide book to other faculties in creating food initiatives. In addition, if the fundraising initiative can assist in improving the AgUS’s food preparation facilities, the AgUS might be more inclined to help other faculties set up food initiatives.  Recommendations For the AgUS:  The AgUS should maintain a relationship with UBC farm to increase the amount of produce utilized at the BBQ. This can be done by either utilizing menus that contain the most seasonal local ingredients (such as the example menus) or by planning the menus around these produce. By contacting the farms at least one month ahead of time, they would be able to get an idea of what the farm can provide and plan their menus accordingly. If UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 25  there is a problem with the availability of the resources the AgUS needs, they could also jointly order produce from Biovia Organic Link with Agora to meet those needs.  Many attendees and students in the community are not aware of the BBQ due to lack of advertising. In addition, even if they are aware and are attendees of the BBQ, they often do not know what the menus are, what their nutritional values are, and where the food came from. A bulletin board should be designated for the BBQ so to provide information such as the menu of the week and its nutritional value, the farms that the produce came from, as well as a volunteer signup sheet so to attract volunteers to help with the BBQ.  If possible, the Imagine Day BBQ for first year could be used to test the acceptability of the meat as well as the local produce. The response could be collected via a questionnaire given out to first year students to ask their opinion on the meal. Alternatively, the first four week’s menu could be implemented to test the acceptability of the menus as well as the meat and produce from the general BBQ audience. Similarly, a questionnaire would be available to collect their response in regards to the new products used at the BBQ. There were some concerns raised by the survey towards the food safety of the BBQ’s preparation process. To create peace of mind in the BBQ goers, the AgUS members should all have Food Safe I where AgUS would supplement the cost. If the AgUS members already have Food Safe I, food safety practice should be implemented more strictly. Though a position of BBQ planner already exists, the position is currently unfilled. The position should be advertised to the FNH and the dietetics department to recruit individuals with that particular field of interest. Finally, in order for the BBQ to be more efficient and be able to provide a larger variety of food, the equipments would need to be enhanced. To do so, the AgUS would need more funding. If possible, the AgUS should undergo fundraising events to attempt to raise funds so to improve the food processing facilities. For Subsequent AGSC 450 Groups: UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 26  Future groups should contact the AgUS and monitor if the menus developed are being utilized. The menus should also be evaluated to determine the improvements that could be made. If the changes we proposed to the AgUS are being incorporated, the ecological footprint of the BBQs should also be evaluated to determine the progress of the BBQ in terms of sustainability. If the menus have not been utilized, the AgUS of the following year should be interviewed prior to the creation of the menus in order to learn more of their capabilities as well as their willingness to participate in the particular project. The scenario group could also plan a fundraising event so to increase awareness of the BBQ as well as to raise funds to enhance the BBQ’s food processing facilities. One aspect worth exploring is the possibility of preservation of foods during the summer months. If the fresh produce could be preserved during the summer months, they could be utilized throughout the year and therefore allowing more local produce to be used at the BBQ. Finally, if/when the BBQ have improved dramatically, the possibility of helping other faculties start their own BBQ should be explored. If each faculty was able to host a BBQ each day of the week, there would always be a food source that is available, accessible, acceptable, appropriate, safe, and sustainable for the community of UBC (Rojas et al. 2007). Conclusions The current AgUS Wednesday BBQ is not really based on local products and utilizes lots of imported pre-packaged. The change that we want to see through this scenario is to make BBQ more sustainable by moving to more locally and seasonal produce and meats. Some of the barriers that we faced in this scenario include the time constraints, availability of produce from the farm, lack of response from farms contacted, difficulties in designing the menus due to lack of AgUS kitchen equipment and difficulties in incorporating the vegan and vegetarians options and also menu options for people with allergic. Overall, we believe our findings and recommendations  will help AgUS to make a step toward sustainable food systems in terms of social, economic and environmental aspects. Furthermore, we hope that this project can serve as a guide for future implementations of sustainable food servcices within other faculties to further improve food security at the UBC campus UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 27  References Act Now BC. (2008). Buy local, in season fruits and vegetables. Retrieved April 4, 2008,  from http://www.actnowbc.ca/EN/everyone/buy_local,_in_season_fruits_and_  vegetables/    BC fresh Vegetables Inc. (2007). Why eat local? Retrieved April 3, 2008 from http://www.bcfreshinc.com/local.htm Bomford, M. and Frye, A. (March 12, 2008).  UBC Farm Marketing Coordinator. Class presentation. City of Vancouver. (2006). Multiculturalism. Retrieved April 5, 2008, from  http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/multiculturalism/ 1Faculty of Land and Food Systems. (2005). About Us. Retrieved March 20, 2008, from http://www.landfood.ubc.ca/aboutus.htm 2Faculty of Land and Food Systems. (2005). Vision & Mission. Retrieved March 20, 2008, from http://www.landfood.ubc.ca/aboutus/vision_mission.htm Google map. Retrieved April 4, 2008, from  http://maps.google.com/ Group 3. (2006). UBC Food System Collaborative Project V. Group 6. (2006). The University of British Columbia Food System Project (UBCFSP) - Scenario 2: Incorporating Seasonal BC Food Items into Campus Food Provider Menus. Group 13. (2006). AGSC. 450 - UBC Food System Project - Scenario 2 Group 23. (2006). The Sustainability of the UBC Food System Collaborative Project - To Grow, to Cook, to Eat in (U)BC. Group 4. (2007). Extending BC Local Food Purchasing on Campus: Connecting SPUD with Sage Bistro. Group 6. (2007). Bring Local Food to UBC Campus 2007 UBC Food System Project (UBCFSP), Scenario 4 Report. Group 9. (2007). Extending BC Local Food Purchasing on Campus, Scenario 4.  Group 29. (2007). Strengthening the AgUS-Farm Partnership Final Report. Halweil, B. (September/October 2000). “Where Have All the Farmers Gone?” Worldwatch. Retrieved April 2, 2008, from http://www.worldwatch.org/node/490   Lang, T., & Heasman, M. (2004). Food Wars: The Global Battle for Mouths, Minds and Markets.  London: Earthscan.  Rojas, A., Richer, L., Wagner, J. (2007). University of British Columbia Food System Project:  Towards Sustainable and Secure Campus Food Systems. EcoHealth 4, 86-94. Retrieved April 2, 2008 from http://www.springerlink.com/content/q06p509022332767/fulltext.pdf  Stringer, E.T. (1999). Action Research. London, United Kingdom: Sage Publications. UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 28  University of Toronto. (2006). U of T local producers Campus food services will serve seasonal, fresh items that have been produced in environmentally and socially responsible ways. Retrieved March 31, 2008, from http://www.news.utoronto.ca/bin6/060919-2573.asp University of British Columbia Food System Project (UBCFSP). (2008). The University of British Columbia Food System Project (p.3). Retrieved March 31, 2008 from http://www.webct.ubc.ca/SCRIPT/agsc_450/scripts/student/serve_bulletin UBCFSS. (2002-2006). UBCFSP Model. Retrieved April 2, 2008, from http://www.webct.ubc.ca/SCRIPT/agsc_450/scripts/serve_home Yale University.(2008). Yale Sustainable Food Project. Retrieved March 31, 2008, http://www.yale.edu/sustainablefood/ Appendix A: Email Template of Email to Farm Dear…., We are UBC students working on UBC Food Security Project. In this project that we are involved in investigating the feasibility of incorporating more local, seasonal and sustainability produced food products in to Agricultural Student’s Undergraduate Society (AGUS) weekly BBQ menus. The project will be implemented starting from September 2008 to April 2009. Shown below is the proximate amount of produce and fruits that we require per week. We would like to know what type of produce that you could grow from the farm and whether it can meet the amount we need. If possible, could you also provide us with the price lists? We are also wondering if you provide any delivery services to Vancouver area or even to UBC?  As part of this project, for any information that we will get from you, we need to have consent in order for us to use and release the information.  Attached is the consent form. In responding to email you agree with the form. Thank you for your kind attention. We are looking forward for your reply.  Appendix B: Survey & Survey Results Community Member Survey  We, group 26 and 16 of Agsc 450 are involved in the 2008 UBC Food System Project and are attempting to improve the food security of the Wednesday night BBQ by incorporating more local and seasonal produce.  We need your help!!! As part of the Agsc community, we would like you to raise critical issues, give advice, lend recipe ideas and potentially commit to attending and helping out at future Wednesday night BBQs.  Please fill out this survey thoughtfully, apply your knowledge and help shape the foodservice of your faculty. 1) By continuing on with this survey, I am agreeing to collaborate in the study on The UBC Food System Study.  2) Are you a UBC : graduate student;  undergraduate student;  staff, faculty member  3) Age: 18 and under; 19-24; 25-31; 32-55; 56+ UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 29  4) Gender:Male; Female 5) Year of study : First; second; third; fourth; graduate; other; does not apply 6) Program Agroecology; Food, Nutrition & Health; Global Resources, Does not apply,   Other (please specify) _____________ 7) Faculty/Department ______________________________  8) Have you been to a Wednesday Night BBQ? Yes, No  9) If ‘no’, why not? I’ve been too busy; It does not fit my schedule; I have no one to go with; I do not know what it is about; I answered ‘yes’; other (please specify) ____________ 10) If ‘yes’, how often? All the time; Frequently; Occasionally; I answered ‘no’  11) If ‘yes’, how did you first hear about it? Friend; Email; AgUS rep. (during class); other (please specify)_____________  12) Do/would you have any preference for food choices were offered at the BBQ? (please check all that apply) : ethnic (examples such as Chinese, Italian, Mexican, Greek, etc.); vegan; raw;  other (please specify) ___________  13) Would you be more inclined to come to the Wed. Night BBQ if it was… Local; Organic; Seasonal; Local, organic & seasonal; Had a vegan option  Other (please specify) ____________ 14) Are you a: Vegan; vegetarian; meat eater; selective meat eater; other (please specify) ___________ 15) If you have been to a BBQ, what do you think of the quality for the price (currently at $5)? Expensive; Affordable; Needs improvement (please specify)__________; Question does not apply  16) Would you be willing to pay more if the food was local/seasonal (current price at $5)?  Yes, No 17) If ‘yes’, how much more?  10% ($5.50); 20% ($6.00); 30% ($6.50); 40% ($7.00); 50% ($7.50); Even more 18) Do you know where the food supply of for the Wednesday night BBQ is from?  Yes, No 19) If you answered ‘yes’, do you think this is sustainable according to the definition of food security (check all that you feel apply) Affordable; Available; Appropriateness; Accessibility; Safety; Sustainability; I answered no UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 30  20) If any, what aspects of the Wednesday Night BBQ do you think are not sustainable (please elaborate)? _______________________________ 21) What do you think of the nutritional value of the Wednesday Night BBQ? Sufficient; Balanced; Lacking (please elaborate) _____________;Question does not apply 22) In general, do you think that the Wednesday Night BBQ can be improved?  Yes (please elaborate) ______________; No; I don’t know 23) Have you volunteered for the Wednesday Night BBQ? Yes, No  23) If ‘no’, would you be interested?  Yes, No  24) If you were interested, what would you prefer to do?  Preparation; Shop for food supplies; Grill; Clean up; Question does not apply Survey Results      Figure 1. Demographics on survey respondents                                          Figure 2. Program       Figure 3. Distribution of respondent’s year of study.                Figure 4. Gender distribution    Figure 5. Age distr  Figure 5.Age distribution of respondents.                           Figure 6. Wednesday Night BBQ attendance. Response to Survey (out of 133 individuals)86%5%6%0%3%UndergraduatestudentGraduate studentStaffFaculty memberOtherSurvey Respondent's Specialties17%65%12%2%4%AgroecologyFood Nutrition andHealthGlobal ResourcesDoes not ApplyOtherYear of Study7.7%19.2%30.0%33.1%0.0%4.6%5.4%firstsecondthirdfourthothergraduate leveldoes not applyGender 16.7%83.3%0.0%20.0%40.0%60.0%80.0%100.0%male femaleGenderPercent Age3.8%72.0%16.7%4.5%3.0%under 1819-2425-3133-5556+Past Attendance57.3%42.7%0.0%10.0%20.0%30.0%40.0%50.0%60. %70. %Yes NoHave you been to a Wed. Night BBQ?Percent of RespondnetsUBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 31  If you have never been, why not?       been too busy does not fit schedule  no one to go with do not know what it is about  other 28.0%   38.0%   22.0%   2.0%     10% Table 1. Reasons why respondents have not attended the Wednesday Night BBQ. Past attendance    all the time frequently   occasionally 16.9%   16.9%   66.2% Table 2. Respondents frequency of past attendance    Table 4. Respondent’s food preferences  to the Wednesday Night BBQ.  How individuals first found out about the BBQ  a friend  E-mail AgUS rep during class Agsc 100 other 31.6% 13.2% 43.4%   3.9% 7.9% Table 3. How the Wednesday Night BBQ was first advertised to respondents. Reasons people would be more inclined to come   local organic seasonal local, organic & seasonal vegan  gluten free 36.7% 19.3% 27.5% 64.2% 7.3% 3.7% Table 5. Reasons Respondents who have not attended a Wednesday Night BBQ would be more inclined to attend.     Figure 7. Respondent’s diet limitations.                             Figure 8. Respond on the current  price         Figure 9. Respondents opinion on price increase              Figure 10. Volunteering  Preference and food choices   ethnic food vegan raw other 89.8% 13.9% 9.3% 16.7% Food Limitations1.7%12.9%44.8%35.3%5.2%veganvegitarianmeat eaterselective meat eaterotherOpinions on Current Price1.2%95.3%3.5%expensiveaffordablen eds improvementPrice Increase21.016.0%44.4%12.3%3.7% 2.5%0.0%10.0%20.0%30.0%40.0%50.0%5.50 6.00 6.50 7.00 7.50 evenmoreNew Price ($)PercentWould people who have not volunteered be interested in volunteering?58.4%41.6%0.0%10.0%20.0%30.0%40.0%50.0%60.0%70.0Y s NoResponsePercentageUBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 32        Figure 11. Knowledge on food location                 Figure 12. Respondent’s opinions nutrition             Figure 13. Respondent’s knowledge on the source of Wednesday Night BBQs.        Figure 14. General improvement                                 Figure 15. Past volunteer experience           Do respondents know where the food for the BBQ comes from?27.4%72.6%0.0%20.0%40.0%60.0%80.0%Yes No AnswerPercentageRespondents oppini ns on nutritional value of BBQ47.3%2.7%25.0%0.0%10.0%20.0%30.0%40.0%50.0%sufficient balanced lackingNutritional ValuePercent Opinion on the Source of Food Used31.9%19.4% 19.4%41.7%36.1%33.3%0.0%10.0%20.0%30.0%40.0%5 .0%affordable available appropriate accessible safe sustainableFood Security CategoriesPercentageIn general, can the Wed. Night BBQ be improved?11.5%35.4%53.1%0.0%10.0%20.0%30.0%40.0%50.0%60.0%Yes No don't knowResponsePercentageH ve you volunteered for the Wed. Night BBQ?27.7%72.3%0.0%10.0%20.0%30.0%40.0%50.0%60.0%70.0%80.0%Yes NoResponsePercentageUBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 33        AgUS Wednesday BBQ Recipe Book  (September 2008-April 2009)   By Group 26         UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 34  September: Strawberry spinach salad, BBQ Jerk Chicken/Tofu, Blueberry Crisp Strawberry Spinach Salad Instructions Balsamic Raspberry Vinegarette Garlic 2 heads (~120g) 1. Slice strawberries. 2. Mix Greens ingredients together. 3. Mix Balsamic Raspberry Vinegarette together. 4. Dress salad and serve. Honey Dijon Mustard 1 cup  Raspberry Vinegar 4 cups Balsamic Vinegar 2 cups Brown Sugar 2 cup Vegetable Oil 1 cup Salt and Pepper To taste Greens Lettuce 3 kg (500g each) Spinach 3 kg (230g/bunch) Feta 2 kg Almonds, slivered 1 kg Strawberries, sliced 1.5 kg (28g each) BBQ Jerk Chicken/Tofu Instructions Marinade Onion 5 kg (450g each) 1. Chop onions into thin strips 2. Chop Chicken and tofu into cubes. 3. Blend all ingredients in rub together in a blender except for the onions.  4. Mix half the onions in with the chicken and half with the tofu. 5. Coat chicken and tofu in puree and let stand for 30 minutes 6. Grill! 7. Serve alone or with rice.  Garlic 4 heads (~240g) Allspice ½ cup Thyme ½ cup Cayenne ½ cup Nutmeg ½ cup Sugar 1 cup Vinegar 1/8 cup Oil 6 cup Black Pepper ¼ cup Salt ¾ cup Chicken/Tofu Chicken 8 kg Tofu 6 kg (16 pkg of 340g) Blueberry Apple Crisp Instructions  Apples 10 kg (200 g/apple) 1. Preheat oven to 350°F 2. Combine apples (sliced), blueberries and sugar. 3. Combine flour, brown sugar, oats, baking powder, cinnamon, and salt. 4. Blend butter into flour mixture to form coarse crumbs. Sprinkle over fruit. 5. Bake for 45-60 minutes. 6. Serve alone or with ice cream. Blueberries 2.5 kg Sugar 5 cups All-Purposed Flour 10 cups Brown Sugar 20 cups Quick-Cooking Oats 20  cups Baking Powder ½ cup Ground Cinnamon ½ cup Salt 1/8 cup Butter at room temp. 10 cups  UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 35  Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 2.5 8 Grain Products 1.5 7 Milk and Alternatives 1 2 Meat and Alternatives 1.25 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation Foods and Beverages 3 limit  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 756 kcal based on the foods selected for today.  Vegetarian option with 85g tofu provides:  Calories- 746kcal Protein- 22g Fat- 38g          (Superior Tofu, 2008) Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  33 17% 10-35% Fat (g)  34 40% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates (g)  82 43% 45-65% UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 36   Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 7.4 25 Vitamin A (μg) 261 700 Vitamin C (mg) 26 75 Vitamin D (μg) 0.3 5 Vitamin E (mg) 4.1 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.6 1.1 Riboflavin (mg) 0.7 1.1 Niacin (NE) 5.3 14 Folate (μg) 110.4 400 Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.5 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 0.9 2.4 Calcium (mg) 341.9 1000 Iron (mg) 5 18 Sodium (mg) 754.4 1500 Potassium (mg) 569.4 4700      UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 37   September: Greek salad, chicken souvlaki/veggie kabobs, tzatziki, ice cream Greek Salad Instructions Dressing Olive Oil 2 cup 1. Combine all dressing ingredients 2. Cut vegetables 3. Pour dressing over, set aside to marinate Lemon Juice 1 cup  Salt 1/4 cup Oregano ½ cup Garlic 2 heads (~240 g) Greens Lettuce 3 kg (500g each) Cucumber 6 kg (400g each) Red Onion 6 kg Peppers 3 kg (300g each) Chicken/Tofu Souvlaki Instructions Marinade Extra virgin olive oil 4 cups 1. Chop onion and garlic in to fine strips 2.  Combine olive oil, red wine vinegar, garlic, onion, oregano, parsley, mint, salt and black pepper in a bowl & mix well 3. Add meat/ tofu , toss to coat, cover and refrigerate; marinate for a min of 2 hours 4.  Barbecue. 8.      Serve alone or with rice  Red wine vinegar 6 cups Garlic  4 heads (~240 g) Onion 5 kg (500 g each) Dried oregano 1/2 cup Parsley 1 cup (250 g) Mint 1/2 cup (125 g) Salt and black pepper To taste Chicken/Tofu Chicken 8 kg Tofu 6 kg (16 pkg of 340g) Tzatziki Instructions  Cucumber 3 kg (400g each)  1.  Peel cucumber thinly, grate and place in a strainer to drain off excess liquid 2. Blend grated cucumber and garlic into yogurt, add vinegar Garlic, crushed 2 heads (~120g) Plain Yogurt  10 containers (650 g each) Vinegar or lemon 1 cup UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 38  juice or lemon juice 3. Season to taste with salt Salt  To taste Lemon Vegetable Kebabs Instructions Paste Lemon juice 8 Cups 1. Combine all lemon baste ingredients in a bowl and mix 2. Chop red pepper and cut onion in to half 3. Barbeque vegetables, brush with lemon paste, until onions are just soft 4. Sprinkle with combined parsley and chives before serving    Vegetable oil 2 cups  Garlic 2 heads (~120g) Vegetables Red pepper, cubed  6 kg (300 g each) Onions, cubed 5 kg (500g each) Button mushrooms 2.5 kg (15g each) Parsley 1.5 cup (375 g) Fresh chives 1 cup (250 g)   Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 2.35 8 Grain Products 1 7 Milk and Alternatives 0.5 2 Meat and Alternatives 1 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation Foods and Beverages 0.7 limit  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 421 kcal based on the foods selected for today.  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 39  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  31 29% 10-35% Fat (g)  14 30% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates (g)  42 40% 45-65%  Vegetarian option with 85g tofu provides:  Calories- 411kcal Protein- 20g Fat- 18g          (Superior Tofu, 2008)  Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 3.4 25 Vitamin A (μg) 89.6 700 Vitamin C (mg) 91.3 75 Vitamin D (μg) 0.5 5 Vitamin E (mg) 2.2 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.2 1.1 Riboflavin (mg) 0.4 1.1 Niacin (NE) 15.3 14 Folate (μg) 41.6 400 UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 40  Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.7 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 0.7 2.4 Calcium (mg) 178.6 1000 Iron (mg) 1.9 18 Sodium (mg) 2480.5 1500 Potassium (mg) 707.1 4700                 UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 41    October- Green Beans & Cauliflower, Beef Satay/ Tofu with Peanut Sauce, Rice, Fresh Fruit Salad  Crunchy Green Bean Salad with Asian Dressing Instructions Dressing Soy sauce 3 cups 1. Remove stem end of green beans. Leave whole or cut into 1 ½-inch (4cm) pieces. Cut cauliflower into small florets and chop onion and garlic.   2. In sauce pan, bring water to boil; add onion, garlic, beans and cauliflower.  Reduce heat, cover and simmer until vegetables are tender-crisp  3. Drain and refresh under cold running water, drain well and discard garlic. 4. Combine soy sauce, water and oil 5.  Pour over vegetables. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour 6. Sprinkle toasted sesame seeds Water 3 cups Olive or sesame oil ¾ cup Greens Green Beans 5 kg Cauliflower 4 kg (450 g) Onion 4 kg (500 g)  Garlic 2 heads (~120 g) Sesame seeds ¾ cup Beef Satay/Tofu with Peanut Sauce Instructions Peanut sauce Soy sauce 1 cup 1. Chop ginger to fine bits 2. Add the first six ingredients into a blender and process on high until they mix well 3. Add ground peanut and mix well again 4. In a cup, combine oils and drizzle into blender mixture while blending at low speed  Unseasoned rice vinegar 2 cups Cold water 3 cups Sugar 1.5 cups Salt ¼ cups Ginger ½ cup (~50 g)  Ground roasted peanut 1 cup Peanut oil 1.5 cups Sesame oil 1.5 cups Hot chilli oil or paste 1.5 cup Salt ¾ cup Satay Beef 8 kg 1. Arrange meat in a shallow pan 2. Combine all ingredients and pour over meat 3. Marinate in refrigerator  4. Grill 5. Serve with the peanut sauce Tofu 6 kg (16 pkg of 340g) Soy sauce 5 cups Sugar 1.5 cups Cornstarch 1.5 cups UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 42  Hoisin sauce 1 cup  Garlic 2 heads (~120g) Fresh Fruit Salad (Seasonal Fruits: Apples, Pears)   Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 0.6 8 Grain Products 1 7 Milk and Alternatives 0 2 Meat and Alternatives 1.2 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation Foods and Beverages 1.2 Limit  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 410 kcal based on the foods selected for today.  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  28 27% 10-35% Fat (g)  16 35% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates (g)  37 36% 45-65%  Vegetarian option with 85g tofu provides:  UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 43  Calories- 353kcal Protein- 16g Fat- 15g          (Superior Tofu, 2008) Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 3.4 25 Vitamin A (μg) 12.6 700 Vitamin C (mg) 10.1 75 Vitamin D (μg) 0.5 5 Vitamin E (mg) 1.3 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.2 1.1 Riboflavin (mg) 0.3 1.1 Niacin (NE) 9.7 14 Folate (μg) 32.7 400 Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.5 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 2.2 2.4 Calcium (mg) 63.8 1000 Iron (mg) 3.2 18 Sodium (mg) 500.8 1500 Potassium (mg) 464.1 4700    UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 44     October- Caesar Salad, Grilled Thai Chile Chicken Chocolate Chip Cookies Caesar Salad with Light & Delicious Caesar Dressing Instructions Caesar Dressing Garlic 4 heads (~240 g) 1. Crush the garlic in the blender 2. Place all the ingredients in a large bowl and whisk well to combine 3. Serve with lettuce. Dijon mustard 1 cups  2% Plain Yogurt 2 L Red wine vinegar 1 cup Wostershire sauce 1 cup Salt and Pepper To taste Greens Lettuce 7 kg Grilled Thai Chile Chicken Instructions Marinade Cilantro  1.5 cups (~250g) 1. Mince cilantro to paste 2. Chop garlic to tiny bits 3. Place chicken in large bag or dish  4. Combine remaining ingredients and pour into bag/ dish 5. Toss well to coat 6. Refrigerate at least 2 hours 7. Cook on grill   Garlic 4 heads (~240 g) Vegetable oil 1 cup Soy sauce ½  cup Sugar 1/3 cup Pepper flakes 1/8 cup Chicken/Tofu Chicken 8 kg Tofu 6 kg (6 pkg of 340 g) Chocolate Chip Cookies Instructions  Sugar 3 cups 1. Preheat oven to 375oF 2. Combine sugars, butter, eggs and vanilla and beat at medium speed until well blended 3. Add flour, cocoa, baking soda and salt and beat at low speed until soft dough forms Brown sugar 3 cups Butter, softened 3 cups Eggs 12 Vanilla 3 tsp All –purpose flour 11 cups Baking soda 6 tsp Salt 1.5 tsp Semisweet chocolate chips 6 cups UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 45  Unsweetened cocoa 1.5 cups 4. Stir in chips 5. Drop dough by heaping tablespoons 3 inches apart onto ungreased cookie sheets 6. Bake for 8-10 min    Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 1 8 Grain Products 3 7 Milk and Alternatives 0.75 2 Meat and Alternatives 0.25 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation Foods and Beverages 0 limit  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 428 kcal based on the foods selected for today.  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  19 18% 10-35% Fat (g)  21 44% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates (g)  40 37% 45-65%  UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 46  Vegetarian option with 85g tofu provides:  Calories- 418kcal Protein- 11g Fat- 25g          (Superior Tofu, 2008) Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 3.8 25 Vitamin A (μg) 91.7 700 Vitamin C (mg) 13.1 75 Vitamin D (μg) 0 5 Vitamin E (mg) 0.1 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.4 1.1 Riboflavin (mg) 0.4 1.1 Niacin (NE) 6.8 14 Folate (μg) 93.4 400 Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.3 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 1.1 2.4 Calcium (mg) 310.4 1000 Iron (mg) 2.3 18 Sodium (mg) 1311.9 1500 Potassium (mg) 482.8 4700  UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 47       November- Ginger Vegetable & Beef/Tofu Stir-Fry, Rice, Chinese Almond Cookies  Gingered Vegetable Stir-Fry Instructions Sauce Oil 6 cups  1. Chop onion and garlic to fine slices 2. Mix all the sauce ingredients together Sesame oil 1 cup  Onions 4 kg (500 g each)  Garlic 2 heads (~240 g) Ginger 0.5 kg Soy sauce 2 cups Water 10 cups Beef/Tofu Beef 8 kg 1. Cut all the vegetables 2. Heat oils in a wok 3. Add vegetables & (chicken/ tofu), stir-fry until onions are soft 4. Add sauce ingredients 5. Stir-fry until vegetables are tender & (meat is cooked) 6. Serve with rice Tofu 6 kg Vegetables Broccoli 3 kg (400g each) Brussel Sprouts 1.5 kg Cabbage 10 kg (2kg each) Carrots 2 kg (100g each) Onions 2.5 kg (500g each) Chinese Almond Cookies Instructions  Vegetable shortening 4 cups 1. Beat shortening and sugar until light and fluffy in a large bowl with electric mixer 2. Beat eggs in a bowl with a fork until thoroughly blended; remove 2 Tbsp of egg into a cup; add 1 Tbsp water; set aside. 3. Add beaten eggs and almond extract to shortening-sugar mixture, blending thoroughly 4. Sift flour, baking soda and salt onto wax paper.  Beat into the shortening-sugar mixture.  5. Shape into 1 1/2-inch balls using a tablespoon. Place 2 Sugar 4 cups Eggs 8 eggs Water ½ cup Almond extract 12 tsp All-purpose flour 12 cups Baking soda 6 tsp Salt 1.5 tsp UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 48  inches apart on lightly greased cookie sheets. 6. Flatten cookie into 2-inch rounds. Brush top of each cookie with reserved egg and water. 7. Bake in moderate oven (350oF) for 15 min, or until firm   Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 1.55 8 Grain Products 0.5 7 Milk and Alternatives 0 2 Meat and Alternatives 1 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation Foods and Beverages 0.4 limit  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 291 kcal based on the foods selected for today.  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  26 36% 10-35% Fat (g)  11 34% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates  22 30% 45-65% UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 49  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) (g)  Vegetarian option with 85g tofu provides:  Calories- 234kcal Protein- 14g Fat- 10g        (Superior Tofu, 2008)  Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 3.9 25 Vitamin A (μg) 219.4 700 Vitamin C (mg) 48.8 75 Vitamin D (μg) 0.5 5 Vitamin E (mg) 1.3 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.2 1.1 Riboflavin (mg) 0.3 1.1 Niacin (NE) 9 14 Folate (μg) 82.7 400 Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.5 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 2.2 2.4 UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 50  Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Calcium (mg) 61.2 1000 Iron (mg) 3.8 18 Sodium (mg) 268.5 1500 Potassium (mg) 694 4700      November- Tossed Salad, Grilled Citrus Chicken/ Tofu, Polenta, Carrot Cake Tossed Salad Instructions Lemon Honey dressing Lemon zest 1 cup 1.   In saucepan, lemon zest, lemon juice, garlic, ginger and brown sugar. Bring to a boil then simmer over medium heat until the mixture is reduce by half 2.   Remove from the heat and mix in honey to the desired sweetness. Allow to cool to room temp 3.   Puree the lemon mixture in a blender. With the blender running, slowly add both oils until the dressing has a creamy texture 4.   Dress lettuce and serve Lemon juice 5 cups  Garlic 1 head (~60 g) Ginger ½ cup (~50 g) Brown Sugar ¼ cup Honey To taste Canola oil 4 cups Olive oil 4 cups Greens Lettuce 7 kg Grilled Citrus Chicken Instructions Marinade Honey 3 cups 1.   In a ziplock plastic bag or shallow pan, combine honey, juice, salt, pepper, garlic and oil.  2. Add chicken, seal bag and turn Orange juice 3 cups Lemon juice 2 cups Salt ¼ cup Pepper 1/8 cup UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 51  Garlic 2 heads (120 g) to coat chicken  3.   Marinate in refrigerator for 2-3 hours  4.   Grill! Oil 1/3 cup Chicken/Tofu Chicken 8 kg Tofu 6 kg (16 pkg of 340g) Polenta Instructions  Water 80 Cups 1. Bring 1 cup water, milk, salt and garlic to a simmer 2. Mix polenta with ½ a cup of cold water (this prevents clumping in step 3) 3. Stir polenta and cold water in with simmering ingredients in step 1 4. Continuously stir mixture as it heats until it thicken (spoon should be able to stand up by itself) 5. Serve along with chicken/tofu.  Milk 60 cups Salt 1 cup Polenta 30 cups Garlic 2 heads (~120 g) Chicken/Tofu Chicken 8 kg Tofu 6 kg (16 pkg of 340g) Carrot Cake Instructions Cream cheese frosting Cream cheese 3 cups (24 oz) 1. Mix all ingredients together Butter 1.5 cups Icing sugar 10 cups Vanilla ¼ cup Cake Brown Sugar 6 cups  1. Peel carrot, grate and place in a strainer to drain off excess liquid 2. Combine sugar and oil in bowl, add eggs one at time and beat well.  Sift dry ingredients and add to the egg mixture.  3. Beat until well blended. Fold in the grated carrots and nuts  4. Pour into greased pan and bake at 350oF for about 35 to 45 min or toothpick comes out clean 5. Serve with the cream cheese frosting  Salad oil 6 cups Eggs 18 All-purpose flour 8  cups Baking powder ½  cup Baking soda ½ cup Salt  1/8  cup Nutmeg 1/8 cup Cinnamon 1/8 cup Carrots 1 kg (100g each) Chopped nuts 3 cups  Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 52  Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 0.75 8 Grain Products 2 7 Milk and Alternatives 0 2 Meat and Alternatives 1 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation Foods and Beverages 1.7 limit  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 393 kcal based on the foods selected for today.  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  26 26% 10-35% Fat (g)  9 21% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates (g)  52 53% 45-65%  Vegetarian option with 85g tofu provides:  Calories- 383kcal Protein- 15g Fat- 13g          (Superior Tofu, 2008) UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 53   Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 1.9 25 Vitamin A (μg) 14.8 700 Vitamin C (mg) 13.9 75 Vitamin D (μg) 0.2 5 Vitamin E (mg) 1.2 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.1 1.1 Riboflavin (mg) 0.1 1.1 Niacin (NE) 13.3 14 Folate (μg) 19.2 400 Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.5 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 0.2 2.4 Calcium (mg) 26.5 1000 Iron (mg) 1.4 18 Sodium (mg) 287.8 1500 Potassium (mg) 323.2 4700      UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 54              December- Hazelnut Chicken, Chickpeas, Rice, Rayta, Mango Ice Cream Hazelnut Chicken Instructions Rub Hazelnut (toasted) 10 cups (1.5 kg) 1. Chop garlic, ginger and onions in to small bits 2. Mix 1 tsp 1 cup of hazelnuts in blender  3. Remove skin from chicken; trim off any excess fat.  In skillet, heat oil over medium high heat; brown chicken and transfer to a plate  4. Add onions, garlic and ginger to pan; cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until softened. About 5 mins.  5. Add “spice blend” (cinnamon, cayenne pepper, salt and turmeric); stir until combined.  Add stock 6. Return chicken and any accumulated juices to pan; bring to boil.  Reduce heat, cover and simmer until juices Vegetable oil ½ cup Onions 2.5 kg (500 g each) Garlic 2 heads (~120 g) Ginger ½ cup (~50 g) Cinnamon 1/8 cup Cayenne pepper 1/8 cup Salt 1/8 cup Turmeric 1/8 cup Vegetable stock 8 cups Garam Masala 1 cup Chicken/Tofu Chicken 8 kg Tofu 6 kg (16 pkg of 340g)   UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 55  run clear when chicken is pierced (~ 40 min) 7. Blend in cream and 1 tsp garam masala; heat through 8. Serve with rice Chana Dal Curried Chick Peas Instructions  Chickpeas 12 cans 1. Chop onions and ginger to fine slices 2. Heat butter over high heat 3. Add cumin seeds and stir for 30 sec, then add onions and ginger (careful splashing may occur) 4. Lower heat to moderate and stir constantly, fry for 7-8 min until onions are soft and golden brown 5. Stir in turmeric, cumin, ground coriander, garam masala, red pepper, and I tablespoon water; fry for 1 min  6. Add chick-peas and water; stir constantly 7. Put a lid on put and bring to a boil over high heat  8. Reduce heat to low and simmer for ~ 25 min or until chick-peas are tender but still intact Salt ½ cup Water 5 litres Butter 1.5 cup Cumin Seeds 1/3 cup Onions 2 kg (500g each) Ginger ½ cup Turmeric ¼  cup Cumin ¼  cup Coriander ¼  cup Garam Masala ¼  cup Ground hot red pepper 1/8 cup Rayta Instructions  Cucumber 4 kg  (400 g each) 1. Chop onions to tiny bits 2. Grate cucumber and squeeze out excess water  3. Combined all ingredients in bowl   Onion 2.5 kg (500 g each) Salt ½  cup Plain Yogurt 6 containers (650 g each) Ground Cumin ½ cup Chilli powder 1/8 cup  Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 0.55 8 UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 56  Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Grain Products 1 7 Milk and Alternatives 1 2 Meat and Alternatives 2.25 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation Foods and Beverages 1.35 limit  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 799 kcal based on the foods selected for today.   Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  37 19% 10-35% Fat (g)  35 39% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates (g)  86 42% 45-65%  Vegetarian option with 85g tofu provides:  Calories- 789kcal Protein- 26g UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 57  Fat- 39g          (Superior Tofu, 2008)  Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 9.6 25 Vitamin A (μg) 164.3 700 Vitamin C (mg) 8.8 75 Vitamin D (μg) 0.8 5 Vitamin E (mg) 3.2 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.2 1.1 Riboflavin (mg) 0.5 1.1 Niacin (NE) 4.2 14 Folate (μg) 123.2 400 Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.9 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 0.8 2.4 Calcium (mg) 312.1 1000 Iron (mg) 2.9 18 Sodium (mg) 926.2 1500 Potassium (mg) 769.2 4700     UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 58             January- Cabbage Salad, Sesame Chicken/ Tofu, Rice, Cabbage and Sesame, Chocolate Coffee Cake Cabbage Salad Instructions Dressing Sesame oil 1.5 cups 1. Whisk together the sesame oil, rice, vinegar, soy sauce and chilli sauce 2. In another large bowl, combine cabbage, onion and almonds 3. Toss dressing to coat Rice vinegar ¾  cup  Soy sauce ¾  cup Chilli sauce ½  cup Greens Cabbage 10 kg (2kg each) Onions, chopped 5 kg (500g each)  Almonds, sliced 3 cups Sesame Chicken/Tofu Cutlets Instructions Sauce Garlic 4 heads (~240 g) 1. Crush garlic using the blender 2. Peel and grate ginger to thin slices 3. Combine garlic, ginger, sauces and oil in bowl 4. Stir in cutlets 5. Marinate for several hours 6. Barbecue cutlets until tender, basting occasionally with marinade  7. Sprinkle with sesame seeds just before serving  Ginger 1 cup (~100 g) Soy sauce 2 cups  Barbeque sauce 6 cups Sesame oil 1 cup Sesame seeds ½ cup Chicken/Tofu Chicken 8 kg Tofu 6 kg (16 pkg of 340g) Cabbage and Sesame Seed Instructions  Cabbage 6.5 10 kg (2kg each)  1. Shred the cabbage with a knife 2. Boil 10 cups of water in pot Sesame seeds 1.5 cups UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 59  Sugar 4 cups 3. Add cabbage and cook for ~ 5 min, just until tender 4. Drain and squeeze out water when cabbage has cooled enough to handle 5. Return cabbage to pot and add all ingredients, toss and heat until hated through  Salt To taste Chocolate Coffee Cake Instructions  All-purpose flour 20 cups 1. In a large bowl, combine flour and sugar 2. Cut in butter until crumbly; set aside 1-1/4 cup for topping 3. To the remaining mixture add cocoa, cinnamon, baking soda, baking powder, nutmeg, salt and cloves 4. Mix well 5. Stir in raisins and nuts 6. Make a well in the center and pour in buttermilk  7. Stir until moistened 8. Transfer to a greased 13x9x2 inch pan 9. Sprinkle reserved crumb mixture 10. Bake at 350oF for 35-40min  Sugar 12 cups Butter or margarine 6 cups Baking cocoa 1 cups Grown cinnamon  ¾ cup Baking powder ½  cup Nutmeg (ground) ¼  cup Baking soda ¼  cup Salt 1/8 cup Cloves (ground) 1/8 cup Raisins 5 cups Nuts (chopped) 2.5 cups Milk 12 cups  Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 1.54 8 Grain Products 2.8 7 Milk and Alternatives 0.2 2 Meat and Alternatives 1.83 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation Foods and Beverages 11.98 Limit  UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 60  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 1120 kcal based on the foods selected for today.  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  44 16% 10-35% Fat (g)  42 34% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates (g)  148 50% 45-65%  Vegetarian option (with 85g tofu instead of chicken) provides: Calories- 1096kcal Protein- 37g Fat- 43g    (Superior Tofu, 2008)  Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 8.3 25 Vitamin A (μg) 222.8 700 Vitamin C (mg) 42.4 75 Vitamin D (μg) 1 5 Vitamin E (mg) 2 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.8 1.1 UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 61  Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Riboflavin (mg) 0.7 1.1 Niacin (NE) 22.7 14 Folate (μg) 210.5 400 Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.8 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 0.5 2.4 Calcium (mg) 348.1 1000 Iron (mg) 7.7 18 Sodium (mg) 1184.1 1500 Potassium (mg) 1136.7 4700  January- Green Salad, Marla’s Maple Chicken/ Tofu, Garlic Mashed Potatoes, Oatmeal Gingersnaps  Green Salad Instructions Red Onion Vinaigrette Greens Red onion 3 kg  1.   Whisk all the ingredients together 2.  Serve with the seasonal vegetables of the month (Lettuce)  Olive oil 8 cups  Red wine vinegar 4 cups Brown sugar ¾ cup Garlic  4 heads (~240 g) Ground cumin ½ cup  Oregano ½ cup Salt  To taste Greens Lettuce 7  kg Marla’s Maple Chicken/Tofu Instructions Sauce Maple syrup 5 cups 1. Chop garlic into tiny bits 2. Place chicken in heavy-duty, re-sealable plastic bag  3. Whisk together all remaining ingredients in bowl and pour most over chicken in bag.  Seal bag and allow to marinate in Reduced salt-soy sauce 1.5 cups  Ketchup 1.5 cups  Dijon mustard ¾  cup Orange Zest ¾  cup Curry powder ½  cup UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 62  Ground coriander ½  cup refrigerator for 1 hour 4. Use remaining ingredients to brush over meat while grilling    Worcesteshire sauce ¼  cup Garlic 3 heads (~180 g) Chicken/Tofu Chicken 8 kg Tofu 6 kg (16 pkg of 340g) Garlic Mashed Potatoes Instructions  Potatoes 12 kg (425 g each) 1. Chop garlic into tiny bits 2. Peel and cube potatoes 3. Place potatoes in pot and add water so that 1/3 of the potatoes are covered 4. Heat and stir occasionally until potatoes are soft  5. Mash and mix in remaining ingredients Garlic 4 heads (~240 g) Butter 1 cup Salt and pepper To taste Oatmeal Ginger Snaps Instructions  All-purpose flour 7.5 cups 1. Stir together first 7 ingredients 2. Blend in shortening, molasses and egg 3. Beat well with electric mixer for 2mins 4. Form into 1-inch balls and roll in sugar 5. Place 2-inches apart on greased cookie sheet 6. Bake at 375oF for 8-10mins  Sugar 5 cups Quick-cooking rolled oats 3.5 cups Baking soda 5 tsp Ginger (ground) 5 tsp Cloves (ground) 1.5 tsp Shortening 2.5  cup Salt 3 tsp Molasses 1 cup Eggs 5  Sugar To garnish  Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 3.36 8 Grain Products 0.78 7 Milk and Alternatives 0 2 Meat and Alternatives 1.01 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 63  Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Foods and Beverages 3.48 Limit  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 552 kcal based on the foods selected for today.  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  30 22% 10-35% Fat (g)  16 26% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates (g)  75 52% 45-65%   Vegetarian option (with 85g tofu instead of chicken) provides: Calories- 528kcal Protein- 23g Fat- 17g    (Superior Tofu, 2008)  Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 5.8 25 UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 64  Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Vitamin A (μg) 432.8 700 Vitamin C (mg) 46.8 75 Vitamin D (μg) 0.4 5 Vitamin E (mg) 1.4 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.4 1.1 Riboflavin (mg) 0.3 1.1 Niacin (NE) 17.1 14 Folate (μg) 202.5 400 Vitamin B6 (mg) 1 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 0.4 2.4 Calcium (mg) 132.4 1000 Iron (mg) 4.7 18 Sodium (mg) 1027 1500 Potassium (mg) 1176 4700  February- Winter Vegetable Stew/ Beef Winter Vegetable Stew, Buns, Hazelnut Brownies     Winter Vegetable Stew (w/ beef or tofu) Instructions   Butter 4 cups 1. Melt 3 cups of butter into large heavy pot 2. wash and slice the leeks; peel onions; scrape and thinly slice  3. Sauté the (beef), leeks, onions in butter, together with the garlic, thyme, bay leaves and Leeks 10 kg (2kg each)  Onions 4 kg (500 g each) Garlic 4 heads (~240 g) Thyme 1/8 cup Bay leaves 20 leaves  Rosemary To taste UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 65  Mushroom 2.5 kg rosemary until the leeks begin to turn golden 4. Wash the mushrooms and cut to size; peel turnips and cut to ½ inch diced pieces; add both to pot  5. Add wine and Worcestershire sauce; stir and cover 6. In microwavable bowl melt 1 cup butter then stir in flour; in large microwave bowl microwave broth so hot and whisk in butter-flour mixture; add vinegar, molasses, paprika and a little Tabasco; whisk till smooth and pour into stew pot  7. Add in beef and tofu (optional). Simmer stew gently, covered for ~ 1 hour or until vegetables are tender (and meat cooked), season to taste with salt and pepper.  8. Serve with buns Turnip 4 kg (~500 g each) Dry white wine 20 cups Worcestershire sauce 1.5 cups Brussel sprouts 4 kg Flour 1.5 cups Vegetable broth 15 cups Wine vinegar  1 cup Molasses 1.5 cups Paprika ¾  cup Salt and pepper To taste Beef/Tofu  (Optional) Beef ~3 kg Tofu  ~2 kg (6 pkg of 340 g) Hazelnut Brownies Instructions  Hazelnuts 1 kg  1. Preheat oven to 180oC; line base and sides of baking pan with baking paper  2. Chop butter and put in a microwavable bowl; roughly chop chocolate and add to bowl. Microwave for a short period of time, frequently remove and mix; continue to do so until both chocolate and butter melted; allow mixture to cool 3. Put eggs, sugar and vanilla into small bowl of an electric mixer and beat until mixture is thick and pale. Sift in cocoa and flour into egg mixture; add chopped & roasted hazelnuts and cooled chocolate mixture to egg mixture, fold ingredients together 4. Gently spoon mixture into Butter 1.5 kg Dark chocolate 2 kg Eggs 24  Sugar 12 cups Vanilla extract 1/3 cup Plain flour 8 cups Cocoa powder 4  cups UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 66  pan, spread evenly to all edges 5. Bake 30-35min  6. Allow it to cool and dust with cocoa just before serving   Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 2.29 8 Grain Products 0.51 7 Milk and Alternatives 0 2 Meat and Alternatives 0.73 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation Foods and Beverages 9.07 Limit  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 678 kcal based on the foods selected for today.  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  18 11% 10-35% Fat (g)  31 41% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates (g)  76 45% 45-65%  Vegetarian option (with 85g tofu instead of chicken) provides: UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 67  Calories- 589kcal Protein- 6g Fat- 27g          (Superior Tofu, 2008)  Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 4.9 25 Vitamin A (μg) 196.9 700 Vitamin C (mg) 11.5 75 Vitamin D (μg) 1.1 5 Vitamin E (mg) 1.3 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.2 1.1 Riboflavin (mg) 0.4 1.1 Niacin (NE) 6.8 14 Folate (μg) 64.3 400 Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.4 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 1.1 2.4 Calcium (mg) 146.9 1000 Iron (mg) 6.6 18 Sodium (mg) 976.1 1500 Potassium (mg) 851.4 4700   UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 68                  February- Green Salad, Chicken/tofu Dijon, Leek and Potato Soup, Vanilla Ice Cream  Green Salad Instructions Oil and Vinegar Dressing Cider vinegar ½ cup 1. Chop garlic in to tiny bits 2. Blend together vinegar, Dijon mustard, garlic, salt and pepper 3.  Slowly blend in oil and water 4. Dress salad and serve  Dijon mustard ¼ cup  Garlic 2 heads (~120 g) Canola or olive oil 2  cups Water 2 cups Salt and pepper To taste Lettuce 7 kg Chicken Dijon Instructions Sauce Plain yogurt 2L 1. Combine yogurt and mustard 2. In another bowl combine bread crumbs, thyme, salt and pepper 3. Spread each piece of chicken/ Dijon mustard 1.5 cups  Whole-wheat bread crumbs 15 cups  Dried thyme leaves ½ cup UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 69  Salt 1/8  cup tofu with mustard mixture, then roll in bread-crumb mixture.  4. Grill!  Pepper 1/8  cup Chicken/Tofu Chicken 8 kg Tofu 6 kg (16 pkg of 340g) Leek and Potato Soup Instructions  Leeks 10 kg  1. Chop garlic in to tiny bits 2. Trim all dark green parts from leeks, cut lengthwise and spread apart; wash under cold running water; slice thinly 3. In pan combine leeks, potatoes, garlic and stock; simmer, partially covered for 30min or until vegetables are tender 4. Add salt and pepper  5. Heat until hot  Potatoes 10 kg Garlic 2 heads (~120 g) vegetable stock 30 chicken stocks or vegetable stocks Salt and pepper To taste Vanilla Ice Cream   Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 2 8 Grain Products 1 7 Milk and Alternatives 0.58 2 Meat and Alternatives 1 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation Foods and Beverages 0.97 limit  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 568 kcal based on the foods selected for today  UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 70  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  35 25% 10-35% Fat (g)  21 33% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates (g)  62 42% 45-65%  Vegetarian option (with 85g tofu instead of chicken) provides: Calories- 558kcal Protein- 24g Fat- 25g          (Superior Tofu, 2008)       nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 4.6 25 Vitamin A (μg) 93 700 Vitamin C (mg) 11.9 75 Vitamin D (μg) 0.8 5 Vitamin E (mg) 1.7 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.4 1.1 Riboflavin (mg) 0.5 1.1 Niacin (NE) 19.3 14 UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 71  nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Folate (μg) 77 400 Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.8 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 0.8 2.4 Calcium (mg) 233.6 1000 Iron (mg) 4.9 18 Sodium (mg) 1080.5 1500 Potassium (mg) 1030 4700      March- Red Cabbage and Apple Salad, Burger (Beef & Ground Round), Potatoes with Parmesan and Herbs, Yogurt Frozen Blueberry Smoothy     Red Cabbage and Apple Salad Instructions   Red wine vinegar or balsamic vinegar 2 cups 1) Chop red cabbage, peel and cut apples 2) Whisk vinegars and mustard in a bowl  3) Gradually whisk in honey and olive oil 4) Toss apples with lemon juice in another bowl then add shredded cabbage and dried cranberries 5) Toss dressing in and add salt and pepper, to taste Apple cider vinegar 1 cup Honey 1 cup Mustard 1 cup Extra virgin olive oil 4 cups Apples 3 kg Fresh lemon juice 2 cups Cabbage 12 kg (2 kg each) Dried cranberries 10 cups Salt and pepper To taste Burgers Instructions  Ground beef 8 kg 1. Combine ingredients and UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 72  Yves ground round 4 kg shape into patties  2. Grill  Onion 5 kg (500 g each) Bread crumbs 10 cups Garlic 3 heads (~180 g)  Salt and Pepper 12 cups Potatoes with Parmesan and Herbs Instructions  Potatoes 12 kg 1. Chop chives 2. Grate parmesan cheese 3. Scrub unpeeled potatoes 4. Cut potatoes into thick cross sectioned slices 5. Cook on hot well greased BBQ until tender 6. Combine cheese, parsley, chives and paprika in a bowl 7. Sprinkle over potatoes while still on grill Parmesan cheese 10 cups Parsley 1 cup Chives 1 cup Paprika ¼  cup Yogurt Frozen Blueberries Smoothy Instructions  Vanilla yogurt 4 L 1. Combine all ingredients in the blender  Frozen blueberries 15 cups Apple juice 8 cups    Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 4.38 8 Grain Products 1.25 7 Milk and Alternatives 1.38 2 Meat and Alternatives 1 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation Foods and Beverages 1.59 limit  UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 73  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 788 kcal based on the foods selected for today.  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  41 21% 10-35% Fat (g)  25 29% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates (g)  105 50% 45-65%  Vegetarian option (with 1/3cup Yves Ground Round instead of Beef) provides: Calories- 683kcal Protein- 38g     Fat- 17.5g           (Yves, 2008) Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 7.7 25 Vitamin A (μg) 84.7 700 Vitamin C (mg) 68.1 75 Vitamin D (μg) 0.4 5 Vitamin E (mg) 2.1 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.5 1.1 Riboflavin (mg) 1 1.1 UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 74  Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Niacin (NE) 16 14 Folate (μg) 102.9 400 Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.9 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 3.2 2.4 Calcium (mg) 461.8 1000 Iron (mg) 6.1 18 Sodium (mg) 1342.2 1500 Potassium (mg) 1529 4700       March- Green Salad, Tex-Mex Chilli, Buns, Hazelnut Blondies  Green Salad Instructions Roasted Garlic Dressing  Garlic 6 heads (~360 g) 1. Toss garlic cloves in canola oil 2. Place in a piece of foil and seal 3. Roast in oven @ 350˚F for 20-25 minutes on grill until garlic has softened 4. Allow garlic to cool 5. Blend garlic, balsamic vinegar and Dijon mustard 6. Slowly blend in olive oil 7. Dress on salad and serve  Canola oil 2 cups Balsamic vinegar 2 cups  Dijon mustard ½  cup Olive oil 6 cups Greens Lettuce 7 kg UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 75  Tex-Mex Chilli Instructions  Ground beef 8 kg 1. Chop onion and garlic 2. In large heavy saucepan cook beef/ ground leans over medium heat until no longer pink 3. Pour off any fat 4. Add onions, garlic, chilli powder, cumin, oregano and hot red pepper flakes.  Cook, stirring over medium-low heat for ~ 5 min/ until onions are tender 5. Stir in tomatoes, breaking them up with the back of a spoon 6. Stir in kidney beans and salt 7. Bring to a boil  8. Reduce heat and simmer over medium-low heat, stirring often, for 20 min 9. Add corn  10. Cook until corn is heated through Yves ground round 4 kg Garlic 4 heads (~240 g) Chilli powder 1.5 cups Cumin ½ cup Dried oregano leaves ¼ cup Hot red pepper flakes ¼ cup Tomatoes 12 cans (28 oz each) Red kidney beans (drained) 20 cans (19 oz each) Salt ¼ cup Corn kernels 15 cups Hazelnut Blondies Instructions Cake Hazelnuts (chopped) 3 cups 1. Chop hazelnut 2. Preheat oven to 350˚F 3. Place hazelnuts in a pan and bake for 7-9 minutes or until nuts begin to brown 4. In large mixing bowl, combine granulated sugar, brown sugar and butter; mix with an electric beater until light and fluffy 5. Add eggs; beat at low seed until well blended 6. Add flour, baking powder and salt; beat at low speed until well blended 7. Stir in hazelnuts 8. Spread mixture evenly in greased 9 by 13 inch pan 9. Bake for 20-25min   10. In microwave melt frosting butter, add remaining frosting ingredients and stir until Granulated sugar 6  cups Brown sugar 3 cups Margarine 3 cups Eggs 12  All-purpose flour 9 cups Baking powder 6 tsp  Salt 3 tsp  Frosting Butter or margarine ¾  cup Powdered sugar 12  cups Milk 1.5 Margarine 3 cups Eggs 12  All-purpose flour 9 cups Baking powder 6 tsp  Salt 3 tsp  UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 76  smooth 11. Spread frosting evenly over cooled squares   Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 3.6 8 Grain Products 1.27 7 Milk and Alternatives 0.01 2 Meat and Alternatives 1.32 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation Foods and Beverages 2.86 limit  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 633 kcal based on the foods selected for today.  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  25 16% 10-35% Fat (g)  27 38% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates (g)  78 46% 45-65%  Vegetarian option (with 1/3cup of Yves Ground Rounds instead of ground beef) provides: Calories- 613kcal UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 77  Protein- 24g Fat- 23.5g     (Yves, 2008)  Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 13.9 25 Vitamin A (μg) 345.2 700 Vitamin C (mg) 43.1 75 Vitamin D (μg) 0.3 5 Vitamin E (mg) 4.6 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.5 1.1 Riboflavin (mg) 0.5 1.1 Niacin (NE) 11.2 14 Folate (μg) 244.5 400 Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.6 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 1.1 2.4 Calcium (mg) 192.7 1000 Iron (mg) 7.5 18 Sodium (mg) 1216 1500 Potassium (mg) 1220.4 4700    UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 78                April- Spinach Salad, Grilled Tandoori Chicken/ Tofu, Rice, Rhubarb Apple Crisp Spinach Salad Instructions Asian Salad Dressing  Garlic 4 heads (~240 g) 1. Chop garlic to tiny bits 2. Blend all the dressing ingredients 3. Dress the salad and serve Rice vinegar 5 cups Canola oil 2.5 cups Soy sauce 2.5 cups Sesame oil (toasted) 1.5 cups Honey 2 cups Greens Spinach ~3 kg Lettuce ~3 kg Grilled Tandoori Chicken/ Tofu Instructions Marinade Lemon juice Cups 1. Chop garlic and ginger to tiny bits 2. In large dish combine lemon juice, water, salt and turmeric 3. Use a sharp knife to cut shallow incisions ½-inch apart into skin-less chicken   Water 1 cup Salt ½ cup Ground Turmeric 4 tsp Plain yogurt 2 L  Garlic 4 heads (~240 g) Ginger 1/2 cup (~50 g)  UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 79  Ground coriander 12 tsp 4. Add pieces of chicken and turn to coat 5. Marinate chicken for at least 5 min 6. In a bowl combine yogurt, garlic, ginger, coriander, cumin and cayenne; add to chicken and lemon mixture and turn to coat; let marinate for at least 10 min  7. Grill chicken over moderately high heat, basting with cooking oil 8. Serve with rice Ground cumin 8 tsp Cayenne 1.5 tsp Cooking oil  2 cups Chicken/Tofu Chicken 8 kg Tofu 6 kg (16 pkg of 340 g) Rhubarb Apple Crisp Instructions  Apple 15 kg 1. Chop apples and rhubarbs 2. Preheat oven to 350oF (180oC) 3. Combine apples, rhubarb, and sugar in backing dish 4. Combine flour, brown sugar, oats, baking powder, cinnamon and salt 5. With a fork, blend butter into flour mixture to form coarse crumbs. Sprinkle over fruit 6. Bake for 45 to 60 minutes Rhubarb 1.5 kg Sugar 4 cups All-purpose flour 8 cups  Brown sugar 15 cups Quick-cooking oats 15 cups Baking powder ½ cup Ground cinnamon ½ cup Salt 1/8 cup Butter 7 cups  Food Group My intake (Number of Food Guide Servings) Recommended* Number of Food Guide Servings Vegetables and Fruit 2.75 8 Grain Products 2.26 7 Milk and Alternatives 0.08 2 Meat and Alternatives 1 2 Total number of choices that are not from a food group My intake Recommendation Foods and Beverages 9.44 limit  UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 80  Your Calorie Feedback My energy (calorie) intake: 940 kcal based on the foods selected for today.  Nutrients Rating My Intake (grams) My Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Recommended Intake (Percent of Energy/Calories) Protein (g)  35 15% 10-35% Fat (g)  42 40% 20-35% for adults 25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds Carbohydrates (g)  116 45% 45-65%  Vegetarian option (with 85g tofu instead of chicken) provides: Calories- 930kcal Protein- 24g Fat- 46g          (Superior Tofu, 2008) Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Fibre (g)* 6.7 25 Vitamin A (μg) 472.7 700 Vitamin C (mg) 33.2 75 Vitamin D (μg) 0.5 5 Vitamin E (mg) 4.5 15 Thiamin (mg) 0.5 1.1 Riboflavin (mg) 0.4 1.1 UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 81  Nutrients* Intake from my food choices Recommended Daily Intake** Niacin (NE) 21.5 14 Folate (μg) 193 400 Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.8 1.3 Vitamin B12 (μg) 0.4 2.4 Calcium (mg) 230.5 1000 Iron (mg) 5.7 18 Sodium (mg) 2109.1 1500 Potassium (mg) 1114.6 4700       Work Cited for Recipes- The Best of Bridge Series. (2002). Strawberry and Chèvre Salad. The Best of The Best and More. (pp 80). Regina: The Best of Bridge Publishing Ltd.  Hill, J., Lantzius, S., Russell, L.B., Mauro, T., Mateer, B.A., & Maret, R. (Eds.). (1997).  Jerk Chicken. Quick From Scratch Chicken and Other Birds. (pp 71). New York: American Express Publishing Corporation.  Samson, C., Leong, A. (Eds.). (1995). Blueberry Apple Crisp. Treats To Remember (pp  62). Vancouver: UBC Food Group. CountryLady. (2007). Greek Souvlaki. RecipeZaar. Retrieved March 13, 2008, from  http://www.recipezaar.com/110939 UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 82  Mallos, T. (1979). Yoghurt and Tzatziki Cucumber Sauce. Greek Cooking for Pleasure.  (pp 36). Secaucus, New Jersay: Chartwell Books Inc. Funnell, S., Blacker, M., & Clark, P. (1990). Lemony Vegetable Kebabs. The Great Barbecue Cookbook. (pp 98). Sydney: The Australian Women’s Weekly.  Lindsay, A. (2002). Crunchy Green Bean Salad with Asian Dressing. Smart Cooking. (pp 75). Toronto: Anne Lindsay and Associates Inc.  Parkinson, R. (2008). Beef Satay. About.com:Chinese Food. Retrieved March 14, 2008,  from http://chinesefood.about.com/od/beef/r/beefsatay.htm Arnold, A. (2008). Spicy Asian Peanut Sauce Recipe. Retrieved March 14, 2008, form http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/11/Spicy_Asian_Peanut_Sauce51905.shtml Hyam, N. (2004). Light & Delicious Caesar Dressing. Salad Dressing 101. (pp 102). Vancouver: Whitecap Books. Cy DeCosse Inc. (1994). Chocolate Chocolate Chip Cookies. Cookies! A Cookie Lover’s  Collection. (pp 94). Montreal: Tormont Publications Inc.  Funnell, S., Blacker, M., & Clark, P. (1990). Ginger Vegetable Stir-Fry. The Great Barbecue Cookbook. (pp 97). Sydney: The Australian Women’s Weekly.  Fitzpatrick, N. (Ed.). (1974). Chinese Almond Cookies. Great Desserts. (pp 35). New York: The Family Circle Inc.   Hyam, N. (2004).Lemon Honey Dressing. Salad Dressing 101. (pp 22). Vancouver: Whitecap Books.  Larsen, L. (2008). Citrus Grilled Chicken. Retrieved March 14, 2008, from  http://busycooks.about.com/od/chickenbreastrecipes/r/GFcitruschicken.htm Lacto, K. (1998).Polenta-7 Recipe. Retrieved March 14, 2008, from http://www.fat free.com /recipes/polenta/polenta-7 Clement, D. (1982). Carrot Cake from Devine. Chef on the Run. (pp 100). Vancouver: Sunflower Publications Ltd.  Empey, C. (Ed.). (2002). Chicken with Cashews. Canadian Living. (pp125). Toronto: Canadian Living   Foods of the World. (1969). Chana Dal. Recipes: the Cooking of India. (pp 29). New York: Time Inc.  Foods of the World. (1969). Kheera ka Rayta. Recipes: the Cooking of India. (pp 94). New York: Time Inc.  UBCFSP-Group 26 (Scenario 8) Page 83  Chan, R. (2008). Edamame Salad. Retrieved March 14, 2008, from http://find.myrecipes.  com/recipes/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=1694240 Funnell, S., Blacker, M., & Clark, P. (1990). Sesame Chicken Cutlets. The Great  Barbecue Cookbook. (pp 52). Sydney: The Australian Women’s Weekly.  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