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Promoting education and awareness of local foods at UBC Cai, Wendy; Farrell, Krista; Hutchings, Kate; Maclennan, Simone; Noble, Emma; Reichenback, Caroline; Uribe, Moises Apr 12, 2006

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report       UBC Food System Project SCENARIO 4 Promoting Education and Awareness of Local Foods at UBC Wendy Cai, Krista Farrell, Kate Hutchings, Simone Maclennan, Emma Noble, Caroline Reichenback, Moises Uribe  University of British Columbia AGSC 450 April 12, 2006           Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.            AGSC 450 UBC Food System Project  SCENARIO 4    Promoting Education and Awareness of Local Foods at UBC                Submitted by Group 12: Wendy Cai Krista Farrell Kate Hutchings Simone Maclennan Emma Noble Caroline Reichenback Moises Uribe  Table of Contents PART 1 ............................................................................................................................................ 1 A. Abstract ................................................................................................................................... 1 B. Introduction ............................................................................................................................. 1 C. Problem Statement ................................................................................................................... 3 D. Group Reflections on the Vision Statement ............................................................................ 4 PART 2 ............................................................................................................................................ 6 E. The Campaign .......................................................................................................................... 6 Educational Pieces ................................................................................................................... 6 Local Food Day ...................................................................................................................... 12 Plans for Campaign Implementation ..................................................................................... 15 Timeline .................................................................................................................................. 16 F. Recommendations and Conclusion ........................................................................................ 16 REFERENCES ............................................................................................................................. 17 APPENDICES .............................................................................................................................. 19 Appendix 1: Itemized Budget .................................................................................................... 19 Appendix 2: Logos ..................................................................................................................... 20 Appendix 3: Educational Pamphlet ............................................................................................ 21 Appendix 4: Educational Posters ................................................................................................. 1 Appendix 5: Dry-erase poster .................................................................................................... 25 Appendix 6: Table tents ............................................................................................................. 26 Appendix 7: Mini-posters ........................................................................................................... 27 Appendix 8: Local Food Day Posters ........................................................................................ 28 Appendix 9: MUG Leader Information Sheet ............................................................................ 29 Appendix 10: Survey .................................................................................................................. 30   1 PART 1 A. Abstract    Globalization of our food system has led to many detrimental effects, including a decrease in its environmental, economic, and social sustainability. The problems faced by today’s global food system are mirrored in the University of British Columbia’s (UBC) food system. For this reason, the Faculty of Land and Food Systems has partnered with other campus organizations to implement the UBC Food System Project (UBCFSP), aimed at increasing the long term sustainability of the UBC food system through re-localization. There are many facets to this project, and creating an educational campaign to promote awareness on campus of the benefits of consuming local foods is just one. Our group defines “local” as products produced in British Columbia (BC).  Drawing on research, ideas, and proposals from our colleagues in previous years of AGSC 450, we have developed a campaign to educate the UBC population about the benefits of choosing to consume local foods. We propose a set of educational pieces, including logos, a pamphlet, posters, a laminated dry-erase poster, table tents, mini-posters, and a website as tools for our campaign.  The campaign also includes an interactive event, Local Food Day, to be held on October 16th, 2006, in the Student Union Building (SUB) concourse. This event will involve campus food providers and community organizations, and will promote local foods in a fun and interactive manner. In order to implement this campaign in the fall of 2006, we suggest that the Faculty of Land and Food Systems hire a work study student. This is a cost efficient strategy as wages are subsidized by the UBC Financial Assistance and Awards Office. A practical timeline for the implementation of the campaign is provided in this paper, along with recommendations to both the UBCFSP partners and our future AGSC 450 (2007) colleagues. B. Introduction  UBC provides food for thousands of people each day, and therefore it is essential to have a food system that is as economically, environmentally and socially sustainable as possible. UBC’s food  2 system is a microcosm of the global food system, and as a result faces many of the same problems such as increased food miles and a lack of consumer knowledge of the issues surrounding globalization (Bouris, 3). Food miles are defined as the distance that food travels to get from producer to consumer (Lang and Heasman 235).  Re-localization is important as it shortens the chain between production and consumption, resulting in reduced negative impacts of transportation and increased trust between producers and consumers (Pretty, 9).  The UBC Faculty of Land and Food Systems, along with partners such as the Alma Mater Society Food and Beverage (AMSFB), UBC Food Services (UBCFS), and the UBC Sustainability Office have acknowledged the detrimental long-term effects of globalization, and to address this, developed the UBCFSP for students in Land and Food Systems. As a part of the larger UBCFSP, the purpose of this scenario is to raise awareness among the UBC population about the benefits of choosing locally produced products whenever possible, and to draw attention to local foods that have already been incorporated into the menus on campus. It is our hope that consumers targeted by this scenario will demand more local foods, both on campus and in the greater Vancouver community. Through responsible consumption, consumers can participate in the transition towards a more sustainable food system. For this project, “local” will be defined as food grown and produced within the province of BC. We agree with the authors and partners of the UBCFSP that local foods should be defined according to political rather than geographical boundaries in order to support the local economy.  We believe that local foods can include those produced on small farms (such as the UBC Farm) and from larger agri-businesses. Supporting the local economy will provide the local food industry with the capacity to transition towards more sustainable means of production.   An interactive awareness campaign targeting students, staff, and faculty of UBC has been developed and will be explored within the bounds of this paper. According to social marketing theory,  3 convincing consumers to change their behavior involves not only an educational campaign to highlight the benefits of change, but also removal of barriers to change (McKenzie-Mohr, 1). We believe that barriers to purchasing local foods on campus may include the lack of knowledge and the lack of local products available. This scenario focuses on educating the UBC consumers about local food so that they may gain the knowledge to make informed choices, while other scenarios within the UBCFSP are working towards improving the availability of local foods on campus. It is only through this multi-faceted and collaborative approach that consumer behaviors will change.  C. Problem Statement  The need for an educational campaign to promote the importance of purchasing local foods has resulted from the recognition that increased food mileage and the globalization of the food system has detrimental social, economic, and environmental impacts that decrease the sustainability of our food system; this is a problem that must be addressed. Globalization of the food system has resulted in the average North American food item now traveling between 2500 and 4000 km to reach the consumer (Halweil, 23). This increased distance can be attributed to high consumer demand for a variety of food year round (Halweil, 23) and a general consumer unawareness of their role in the food system (Kloppenburg, Hendrickson, and Stevenson, 2). Food is controlled by a decreasing number of global companies, and advances in shipping and storage technologies are enabling food to travel further than ever, with a perceived lower cost to the consumer (Halweil, 23).  The increased distance between food producer and consumer decreases knowledge of food production by creating a disconnection between the consumers and their food sources (Kloppenburg, Hendrickson, and Stevenson, 2). This decreases the consumer’s sense of responsibility for their influence on the food system (Kloppenburg, Hendrickson, and Stevenson, 2). In addition, purchasing food that has traveled large distances is detrimental to the local economy since money spent on local products generates nearly twice the income for the local economy (Halweil, 25). Furthermore, many  4 international producers rely on monocultures and other intensive agricultural practices in order to meet consumer needs, resulting in the loss of biodiversity and an increased need for pesticides and fertilizers (Lang and Heasman 220). The transportation of food over large distances relies heavily on the use of fossil fuels, resulting in increased carbon dioxide production (Pretty 6). With such serious consequences arising from increased food miles and the globalization of the food system, there is a need for increasing consumer awareness around this issue. The goal of this educational campaign is to raise awareness of the importance of choosing locally produced foods whenever possible, whether on or off-campus, and increase demand for these products among the UBC population. By promoting awareness on campus about the importance of choosing local foods, we are taking a small step towards improving the sustainability of the UBC food system and in turn, addressing major issues surrounding consumer awareness of the global food system.  D. Group Reflections on the Vision Statement    Our group consists of Dietetics, Food Science, Food and Nutritional Sciences, and Agroecology students. Although we come from a variety of academic and cultural backgrounds we have agreed that a weak anthropocentric framework is the most suitable value base for developing initiatives that increase the sustainability of the UBC food system. While we greatly value human health, we also feel that it is in the best interest of humans to maximize environmental health in the creation of a food system that is socially and economically sustainable. In order to clearly articulate the values of our group with respect to this project, we have analyzed each of the seven guiding principles of a sustainable food system (confirmed in 2004) to determine how well they fit into our common value set:  1. Must protect and enhance the diversity of the natural ecosystem that supports it.  It must preserve the resources needed that can make it function indefinitely. We feel this is a critical principle due to the fact that agricultural practices cannot thrive without environmental health and diversity.  5 2. Relies on local inputs when possible, where inputs and waste are recycled and/or composted back into the system in which it originated. Although we believe strongly in the benefits of composting, we are not adamant that organic wastes must go directly back into the system from which they came. We feel that it is also sustainable to recycle those wastes in other local environments, should the benefit be greater elsewhere. 3. Is a secure system that provides food that is affordable, available, accessible, culturally, ethically and nutritionally appropriate, socially just, safe and resilient. We agree with this principle and feel it encompasses all facets of food consumption.  4. Provides for healthy diets that do not compromise the ability of people to feed themselves or others in the present or in the future. We feel that this principle could be improved as it is somewhat superfluous. It reads more like a definition of sustainability, rather than a guiding principle to achieve a sustainable food system. We prefer the alternative suggested by Group 7 (2005) that reads: “Nourishes the present generation to provide for healthy diets that do not compromise the food security of future generations”. 5. Entices pleasures, and nurtures feelings of commensality around the food table. This statement could be worded more outright by saying that a sustainable food system strengthens local food culture. However, we also feel that a strong food culture is not essential to achieve a sustainable food system on campus and in this context the principle may not be appropriate or necessary. 6. Enhances feelings of community belonging which requires a heightened awareness of every component, from the point of production to end disposal. We agree with this principle as it demonstrates the personal investment that each individual must acquire in order to fully support the goals of this project at UBC. 7. Is based on long-term financial viability; contains a mixture of imported and local foods whenever possible; on foods that come from socially and ecologically conscious producers who  6 receive fair prices for their products. We feel that this statement is too wordy and prefer the rendition of this principle proposed by group 7 (2005): “Contains a mixture of imported and local foods that come from socially and ecologically conscious producers to ensure long-term financial viability”.  PART 2 E. The Campaign  The target population for this educational campaign is UBC faculty, staff and students. The main goal of the campaign is to raise awareness among the entire UBC population surrounding the benefits of choosing local foods, both on and off campus. As mentioned previously, an increased consumer awareness of the benefits of food system re-localization will aid in the development of a more sustainable food system. This campaign draws heavily from the findings and proposals of our colleagues in previous years of AGSC 450, and incorporates some new ideas developed by our group. The aim of the campaign is to send clear and concise messages to our target population by implementing a variety of educational pieces and holding an interactive event that will increase demand for local foods by promoting awareness of the importance of choosing these products. Our colleagues from previous years worked with a budget of approximately $5000, which they claimed would be from the AMS (Groups 1 & 7, 2005). Upon further investigation, we discovered that only if AMSFB deems the campaign proposal as both valuable and cost-effective, will they consider putting money towards the implementation of the project (AMS Food and Beverage Manager, personal communication, April 5, 2006). It was also recommended that a funding application go directly to the AMS (AMS Food and Beverage Manager, personal communication, April 5, 2006).  For this reason, we have justified all costs associated with this campaign, aiming to keep the budget to a minimum (see Appendix 1). Educational Pieces  According to social marketing theory, a common internal barrier to change is lack of knowledge (McKenzie-Mohr, 1). We believe that educational messages targeted to a large population  7 are most effective when the message delivers key information in a very clear and concise manner. Therefore, our educational pieces aim to convey a simple, yet powerful message that illustrates the many benefits of supporting locally produced foods. These materials include both educational pieces that have been modified from previous AGSC 450 colleagues, as well as a new poster idea developed this year. The educational pieces of the campaign include logos, a pamphlet, a three part poster series, a large dry-erase poster, table tents, mini-posters, and a website. Each of these components will be explored in more detail below: i. Logos  After reviewing the logo suggestions from previous AGSC 450 campaigns, we decided that using the “Buy BC” logo and slogan would be the most effective way to promote recognition of local food (see Appendix 2). According to the BC Agricultural Council, consumer recognition of the Buy BC logo is over 75%, proving the campaigns’ success of raising awareness. In addition, using the Buy BC logo on campus will provide continuity with the community at large. By using the Buy BC logo in our campaign, students, faculty and staff will know to look for this symbol on and off campus, making it easier for them to choose local foods.  We acknowledge that the Buy BC campaign is currently struggling since losing its government funding in 2001 (Group 7, 2005). In order to keep the campaign running, costs are now incurred by the users of the Buy BC material, which has shown to be prohibitive for many businesses who have withdrawn from the program (Group 7, 2005). Despite these drawbacks, we believe that the concept of having continuity between UBC and the greater community is critical to the education and behavior change of our target population. The Buy BC campaign is the only existing logo and campaign that conveys our desired message of “made in BC”. We also feel that the logo is currently undergoing somewhat of a comeback. The logo is gaining familiarity among BC teachers, parents, and schoolchildren thanks to its association with the “School fruit and vegetable snack program” (BC  8 Agriculture in the Classroom Foundation). Due to this program, future UBC students from BC will already be familiar with the logo and its association with BC products.  In addition, with local food procurement as a recommendation for the 2010 Olympics (Barbolet 8, 42), it is hoped that the Buy BC logo will be widely promoted throughout this event (Group 7, 2005).    After speaking with a representative from the BC Agriculture Council, it was agreed that UBC would be able to use the Buy BC logo as part of this campaign, however a formal letter of intent from a faculty member addressing how the logo will be used is required (BC Agriculture Council Public Relations Coordinator, personal communication, March 13, 2006). The cost to use the Buy BC material may be waived if made clear that is it solely for use at an educational institution to generate awareness. Rather than depend on this, the proposed cost of using the Buy BC logo has been included in the budget (see Appendix 1).  Another logo associated with this campaign is that of the UBC Farm (see Appendix 2). With Scenario 2 of the UBCFSP working towards incorporating farm-grown products into campus menus, we feel that there is a need to differentiate between BC and UBC products. We chose to use the existing UBC Farm logo as it is simple and visually appealing. ii. Pamphlet We feel that a pamphlet would be an effective educational tool, and agree with previous AGSC 450 colleagues that it is a very important component of a successful educational campaign (Groups 8, 9, 13, 15, 2005; Group 3, 2004). We felt that the pamphlet designed by Group 7 (2005) was very effective as it was a simple idea without too much text, providing a clear, informative and concise message. For this reason, this pamphlet was only modified slightly for our educational campaign (see Appendix 3). The message is essentially the same, but with logos, resources, and a layout that reflects our unique campaign. The pamphlet provides easy to read information about the benefits of consuming local food, how to buy local food, tips for supporting local food production,  9 and a list of local food resources. The UBC Farm and Buy BC logos are clearly displayed, emphasizing the association between these visual cues and local food. The format and colours used are aligned with the educational posters (see Appendix 4), table tents (see Appendix 6), and mini-posters (see Appendix 7) to provide a sense of continuity. Although we liked the idea put forth by Group 7 (2005) to include the pamphlets in Frosh kits distributed to first year students, the UBC Sustainability Office’s concern for paper waste has resulted in the discontinuation of Frosh Kit production. In keeping with this initiative, we propose waiting until our main event, “Local Food Day” to distribute the pamphlets. By handing them out at Local Food Day, we are targeting all people in the UBC community, not just first year undergraduates. We have budgeted for 500 colour pamphlets (see Appendix 1). iii: Educational Posters Several proposed campaigns from past AGSC 450 groups have included posters (Groups 1,7,9, 2005; Group 17, 2004).  In addition, the successful American campaign, “Farm to College”, has relied heavily on posters to promote awareness of local foods (Community Food Service Coalition). For these reasons, we felt it necessary to use posters as a large component of our educational campaign. In developing the posters our intention was to keep them simple and concise while conveying a message that will impact readers. All posters have the same theme with regards to promoting awareness of the benefits of choosing local foods, but the benefits of three separate topics are addressed: nutrition, environment, and the economy (see Appendix 4). The posters give facts to the reader on product freshness, transportation issues, and economic issues, respectively. They are formatted with similar colours and style to the other educational materials to create continuity throughout the campaign. The posters will be placed strategically around campus in high traffic areas, such as the SUB, student residences, the bus loop, and in many of the buildings on campus. The AMS has also agreed  10 to allow the displaying of our posters inside 20 locked cases throughout campus at no cost (AMS Marketing and Promotions Manager, personal communication, March 15, 2006). A new idea for poster placement that has not been explored in past campaigns is on the inside of public bathroom stall doors, especially in the SUB, since these locations would give great poster exposure. We have not heard back from our contact on the AMS Executive Committee but the AMS Marketing and Promotions Manager has already agreed to allow the posters to be displayed above the urinals in the men’s washroom in 99 Chairs (personal communications, March 15, 2006). Overall, we have budgeted for a total of 100 colour posters (see Appendix 1). iv. Large dry-erase posters  After learning from Nancy Toogood and Andrew Parr that most food products served on campus which contain local foods are made from less than 100% local ingredients (AGSC 450 Lecture, March 15, 2006), we realized that there is a need to draw attention to individual ingredients.  Previous AGSC 450 colleagues have proposed labeling dishes with more than 50% local ingredients as “local” (Group 1, 2005), but we felt that this would exclude many dishes that contain less than this amount. In order to draw attention to more local foods served on campus, we developed a large poster that will highlight all the local ingredients used in the food service establishment where the poster is displayed (see Appendix 5).  The posters should be laminated so that they can be written on using dry-erase markers. Two columns for local ingredients are included; one column is for foods supplied by UBC Farm, and the other is for foods produced in BC. The poster should be erasable to account for the seasonality of many products, and the unpredictable availability of certain ingredients. It would not be sustainable to print a new poster each time the source of ingredients changed. It is expected that the manager of the food service establishment will ensure that the poster is updated as needed.  11  The cost of colour printing and laminating is quite high, so we propose that a small-scale pilot project be undertaken in order to gauge the effectiveness of the laminated poster before implementing it across campus. Since a column is included for UBC Farm ingredients, we recommend that the poster first be displayed in the four establishments targeted by Scenario 2 of this year’s UBCFSP as these food service establishments are working towards incorporating farm-grown products into their menus. These establishments are Café Perugia, The Barn, Pie R Squared, and Bernoulli’s Bagels. In communications with Group 13 of Scenario 2 (2006), Pie R Squared already sources all of its dairy products and many vegetables from BC, and is adding a new farm-grown squash pizza to its menu in September 2006. As none of the pizzas contain more than 50% BC grown ingredients, they would have been excluded from the labeling campaign proposed by Group 1 (2005). We believe that drawing attention to individual ingredients rather than whole products will be an effective way of raising awareness of local foods used on campus. If the poster is deemed effective and isn’t too labor intensive, it should be expanded to all UBC food service establishments.  v. Table tents  Table tents have been suggested by previous AGSC 450 colleagues (Group 15, 2005), and are used in the “Farm to College” educational campaign (Community Food Service Coalition). We believe that they are an effective tool for raising awareness of local foods as they are located on the tables where people eat (see Appendix 6). We recommend that the table tents be displayed throughout campus, although not on every table due to budgetary constraints. We have budgeted for 350 table tents (see Appendix 1) and believe that if they are carefully placed in residences and other food service establishments, they will still have a great impact.   vi. Mini-posters Group 7 (2005) proposed the distribution of informational pamphlets inside the Tupperware containers given to first-year students upon check-in to Totem and Vanier residences. We feel this  12 would be very effective, but we also feel that new undergraduates are inundated with information, and likely would not take the time to read a pamphlet. As a result, we have modified this idea to a mini-poster rather than a pamphlet. This small piece of paper will contain clear and concise information about choosing local foods and looking for the Buy BC and UBC Farm logos on campus (see Appendix 7). Paper will be saved as 4 mini-posters are printed per page and a quick glance is all that is needed to read the informative message displayed. In communications with the Marketing Manager for UBC Food Services, 2250 Tupperware containers are distributed each September (UBC Food Services Marketing Manager, personal communications, March 28, 2006), and we have budgeted appropriate printing costs for this number of black and white mini-posters (see Appendix 1). vii. Website We agree with Group 1 (2005) that a website is an important component of an educational campaign. A website allows those who are interested to seek further information about local foods. We propose that a simple website be developed to include links to local food providers and contain further information on the importance of buying locally produced products. The website address should be provided on all educational materials, and the AMS have indicated that they would allow a link to this website from their main website (Marketing and Promotions Manager, personal communication, March 15, 2006).  We suggest that this link be in the form of a banner reading “Where does your food come from?”  Local Food Day    To effectively promote awareness and educate people about local food we believe that it is necessary to include an interactive component in the campaign. To do this, our group recommends hosting a ‘Local Food Day’ built on the idea of ‘Food Week’ that was developed by Group 7 (2005). Upon evaluation of their proposal for Food Week, our group decided that a three-day event was not  13 feasible in regards to time and money. Therefore, we refined the idea and decided that it would be more practical to host a one-day event that involved local food providers from the campus and community, some of which will be able to offer samples of locally grown foods.  Like Group 7’s (2005) Food Week, Local Food Day should be held in the SUB concourse. We would like to link this event to a day when food is nationally celebrated, so we recommend that it be held on World Food Day, October 16th, 2006, from 10:00am to 4:00pm. A number of organizations have already been contacted via email and have confirmed that they are interested in hosting a booth at the event. These organizations include Farm Folk City Folk, UBC Sustainability Office, UBCFS, AMSFB, Sprouts and the UBC Farm. Most of the organizations that we contacted said that they would need reminding closer to the event, i.e. beginning of September, in order to determine the details of their booth.  Group 14 (2006) is also proposing a similar event. They are proposing a carnival-like atmosphere to attract passers-by to participate in the event. We think this is a great idea, and would recommend incorporating their ideas for games and music into this event. By creating a fun atmosphere, attention will be drawn to the event, and people who may not otherwise visit the booths may be enticed into learning about the benefits of local foods. In communicating with the AMS Marketing and Promotions Manager we discovered that the Agricultural Sciences Undergraduate Society (AGUS) can reserve the SUB concourse for this event for free (personal communication, March 15, 2006). Currently, the SUB concourse is not booked for the proposed event date, but should be booked as soon as possible to ensure the space is available. In order to promote Local Food Day, we recommend that promotional posters be displayed throughout campus beginning on October 2, 2006, for the two weeks leading up to the event. These posters have a simple message, and incorporate the colours and style of the educational posters that are also displayed around campus (see Appendix 8). We recommend that they be displayed in similar  14 high-traffic locations to the educational posters. In addition, a banner is provided by the BC Agriculture Council with the purchase of the rights to use the Buy BC logo on campus and should be displayed at the SUB during Local Food Day to increase familiarity with the logo and slogan of the Buy BC program. An additional promotional tool for Local Food Day that we recommend is a banner advertisement in the AMS Agenda, distributed free of charge to 24,000 students each September. The idea of using the agenda was based on the recommendation from Group 1 (2005). Due to cost restraints, we propose the purchase of a simple banner on the October calendar indicating that Local Food Day is to happen on the 16th at the SUB. The banner cost quoted by the AMS Marketing and Promotions Manager (personal communication, March 15, 2006) has been accounted for in the proposed budget (see Appendix 1). Group 7 (2005) proposed using the IMAGINE UBC orientation sessions for first-year students to promote their educational campaign. While we agree that IMAGINE UBC is a useful time for promotion, we would like to propose instead that the orientation sessions be used to promote the main interactive component of this campaign, Local Food Day. We believe that the My Undergraduate Group (MUG) leaders should receive information about Local Food Day to pass along to the students in their group (see Appendix 9 for an informational flyer). We also recommend that as the Local Food Day event draws closer, campus-wide emails be sent by the Community Partnerships Manager to all UBC students. We recommend that two emails be sent, one two weeks prior to the event, and another one week prior to the event. A final aspect of the overall campaign is to evaluate its effectiveness. This is a necessary step in any social marketing campaign (McKenzie Mohr, 1). In order to carry out the evaluation, we recommend that surveys be distributed to those visiting the SUB concourse during Local Food Day (see Appendix 10). The survey is designed to determine whether our educational campaign succeeded  15 in raising awareness for the benefits of consuming local foods. The results should be used to modify and improve the campaign for the future.   Plans for Campaign Implementation   In order to implement this campaign while being as cost-effective as possible, we propose that the AGSC 450 teaching team hire a student through the UBC work study program. The work study program is a wage subsidy program that allows UBC faculty and staff to hire an eligible student for a subsidized wage of $9/hour (UBC Faculty and Staff Wage Subsidy Program). The student is permitted to work a maximum of ten hours per week until they have received the total authorized earnings of $3000 (UBC Faculty and Staff Wage Subsidy Program). We recommend that the work study student be responsible for implementing all aspects of the campaign under the direction of the AGSC 450 teaching team. The work study student should also be responsible for recruiting and organizing volunteers as necessary to implement the campaign. A detailed timeline to guide the student through the implementation of the educational campaign can be found below.  We recommend that the work study student recruit thirty volunteers to assist with Local Food Day, as we predict ten volunteers will be needed per shift (there will be three shifts, each for two-three hours). We have contacted the AGSC 100 instructor and he has agreed to make Local Food Day one of the volunteer options for students to fulfil their four hours of volunteer work that form part of the course requirements (Andrew Riseman, personal communication, March 30, 2006). If thirty AGSC 100 volunteers are not available then our group suggests that the work study student send a faculty wide email through the faculty’s Community Partnerships Manager requesting volunteer help for Local Food Day. This has proved to be an effective method for getting volunteer support as fifty volunteers were recruited for the 2006 Career Fair through a faculty wide email (Cathleen Nichols, personal communication, March 28, 2006).  16  Timeline   Last week of August   Print all educational materials at Copy Right  Deliver the mini-posters to UBC Resident Services to be included in Tupperware  Develop website  Deliver Local Food Day information sheet to MUG leaders  First week of September   Put educational posters up around campus  Contact AGSC 100 instructor to ensure that Local Food Day is listed as a volunteer opportunity for students  Second week of September   Contact organizations to confirm attendance for Local Food Day  Third week of September   Send a faculty wide email to recruit volunteers for Local Food Day  Put up promotional posters   First week of October  Send a faculty wide email to advertise the event  Confirm volunteer participation (AGSC 100 students and other recruited volunteers)  Second week of October  Make class announcements to advertise the event  Send a second faculty wide email to advertise the event  Local Food Day - October 16, 2006  9:00 - 10:00am Event Set-up  10:00am – 4:00pm Event Activities  4:00pm – 5pm Clean-up  October 17, 2006 – April, 2007  Compile survey results  Maintain posters and table tents around campus  Ensure that dry-erase laminated posters are being updated  F. Recommendations and Conclusion   We recommend that the AGSC 450 Teaching Team oversee the implementation of this education and awareness campaign. Before hiring a work study student, the SUB concourse booking for October 16, 2006 should be confirmed through collaboration with the AGUS. We also  17 recommended that arrangements for a banner in the AMS agenda calendar be finalized as soon as possible. Other than these two aspects of the campaign, we feel that an appropriate work study student would be able to take ownership of the overall campaign implementation.   In the future, it is critical that the faculty of Land and Food Systems continue their valuable collaboration with their partners in the UBCFSP. Input, support, and involvement from these partners will ensure a successful transition towards a more sustainable UBC food system. We believe that we have laid the appropriate groundwork for a successful awareness campaign. In order to integrate this awareness with an increased availability of local foods on campus, the findings and recommendations from Scenarios 1 and 2 (2006) should be paired with the findings and recommendations from groups working on this scenario. Future students of AGSC 450 can use the survey results from this campaign to indicate whether awareness of local foods has been increased, and if not, suggest modifications to the campaign. We realize that awareness of local foods on campus will not change overnight. This campaign is a stepping stone towards a more economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable UBC food system, which in turn increases the sustainability of the global food system. REFERENCES  AMS Food and Beverage Manager. Personal Communication, 5 April, 2006.  AMS Marketing and Promotions Manager, Personal Communication, 15 March, 2006.  Barbolet, Herb, Vijay Cuddeford, Fern Jeffries, Holly Korstad, Susan Kurbis, Sandra Mark, Christiana Miewald, Frank Moreland. “Vancouver Food System Assessment.” 2005. Accessed 14 March, 2006 <http://vancouver.ca/commsvcs/socialplanning/initiatives/foodpolicy/pdf/vanfoodassessrpt.pdf>  BC Agriculture Council Public Relations Coordinator, Personal Communication, 13 March, 2006.  BC Agriculture in the Classroom Foundation. 2005. Accessed 7 April, 2006 <http://www.aitc.ca/bc/snacks/>  Bouris, K. “2003 UBC Food System Collaborative Project: Summary of Findings”. 2003. Accessed 10 March, 2006 <http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/pdfs/ubcfoodsum.pdf>  18  Buy BC.  Accessed 28 February, 2006 <http://www.bcac.bc.ca/buybc/index.html>  Community Food Security Coalition. “Farm to College Program.” Accessed 6 March, 2006 <http://www.foodsecurity.org/farm_to_college.html>  Halweil, B.  “The Argument for Local Food: At an Unimposing Diner in Vermont a Revolution is Taking Place”. Worldwatch 2003. Accessed 6 March, 2006 <http://www.worldwatch.org/pubs/pdf/>  Kloppenburg, J., J. Hendrickson, and G.W. Stevenson.  “Coming In to the Foodshed.”  Agriculture and Human Values 13.3 (1996):33-42.   Lang, Tim and Michael Heasman. Food Wars: The Global Battle for Mouths, Minds, and Markets. London UK, Virginia USA: Earthscan, 2004.  McKenzie-Mohr, Doug. “Quick Reference: Community based social marketing.” Accessed 21 March, 2006 <http://www.cbsm.com/members/newuser/CBSM.pdf>  Nichols, Cathleen. Personal Communication, 28 March 2006.  Pretty, Jules. “Some Benefits and Drawbacks of Local Food Systems”. Briefing Note for TVU/Sustain AgriFood Network, November 2, 2001. Accessed 31 March, 2006 <http://www.sustainweb.org/pdf/afn_m1_p2.pdf>  Riseman, Andrew. Personal Communication, 30 March, 2006.  UBC Faculty and Staff Wage Subsidy Program. Accessed 2 April, 2006 <http://students.ubc.ca/facultystaff/wagesubsidy.cfm?page=workstudy&view=overview>  UBC Food Services Marketing Manager. Personal communication. 28 March, 2006.    19 APPENDICES Appendix 1: Itemized Budget  Item Description Quantity Price ($) Educational Pieces       Awareness Posters (11x17) Color Copies 100             99.00  Food Week Posters (11x17) Color Copies 50             49.50  Laminated Posters (11x17) Color Copies 20             50.00  Color Pamphlets (8.5x11) Double Sided Color Copies 500            414.00  Mini Posters (8.5X11)Four per page, Black and White 563             39.41  Table Tents (8.5x11) Color Copies 350            326.07  Survey (8.5X11) Two per page. Black and White 100               7.00  Mug Leader Handouts (8.5X11) Black and White 450             31.50  Printing Fees             1,016.48  Tax 7% GST                 71.15  ED. PIECES TOTAL COST             1,087.63  Other Resources        Buy BC Logo Rights Visuals and Buy BC authorization              350.00  AMS Agenda Banner Calendar Ad promoting Food Day              341.00  Agenda Discount 20%                 68.20  Total Fees                622.80  Tax 7% GST                 43.60  OTHER RESOURCES TOTAL COST                666.40  GRAND TOTAL     $1,754.03   Budget Based on AMS Copyright prices, the printing fees of our educational promotion pieces will cost $980.46. The non-production cost for the use of the Buy BC logo will be approximately $350 as quoted by BC Agriculture Council via telephone communication on March 13, 2006. The purchase of a banner advertisement for World Food Day in the AMS student agenda with student discount is $291.90. This brings our total cost for promotional material to $1,754.03.  20 Appendix 2: Logos  1. The Buy BC Logo:  2.  The UBC Farm logo:      21 Appendix 3: Educational Pamphlet     25 Appendix 5: Dry-erase poster   30 Appendix 10: Survey  Local Food Campaign Evaluation  The following survey is to measure the effectiveness of our campaign and to evaluate if we successfully raised awareness about the benefits of purchasing local food. Your responses will help us to improve the sustainability of the UBC campus.  1-Agree, 2- Mildly agree, 3-Neutral, 4-Mildly disagree, 5- Strongly disagree  Or  circle Yes or No to answer the following questions:  1)  Do you know what local food means?        Y N 2) Can you name at least one? If yes, name it___________________________  Y N 3)  Did you see media promoting local food on campus?     Y N Where? __________________________________________________________ 4)  I know where to purchase local food.       1  2  3  4  5 5) I am aware of the benefits of purchasing local food items.     1  2  3  4  5 6) I currently purchase local food.         1  2  3  4  5  7) I will now buy local food now that I understand the benefits.    1  2  3  4  5 8) Were you aware of World Food Day (Oct 16th)?     Y N 9) Did you see the advertisement for Local Food Day?     Y N  Thanks for your time, and cooperation!!!   

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