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UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program : handbook for volunteer coordinator 2008-2009 Adams, Tegan; Allain, Venessa; Farmer, David; Gosset, Laura; Halloran, Afton; Hilchey, Colin; Cheng, Jian Hui; Russell, Heather; Straka, Adrian 2008-04-28

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report         UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program: Handbook for Volunteer Coordinator 2008-2009 Tegan Adams, Venessa Allain, David Farmer, Laura Gosset, Afton Halloran, Colin Hilchey, Jian Hui Cheng, Heather Russell, Adrian Straka  University of British Columbia AGRO 497 April 28, 2008           Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   1   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook for Volunteer Coordinator 2008-2009                          Compiled by: The Students of AGRO 497, UBC Winter 2007 Tegan Adams, Venessa Allain, David Farmer, Laura Gosset, Afton Halloran, Colin Hilchey, Jian Hui Cheng, Heather Russell, & Adrian Straka  With Special Thanks to: Gavin Wright-Curriculum Connections, UBC Farm/CSFS   Shannon Cowan- Agroecology Professor, UBC Shona Ellis-Botany Professor, UBC  Mark Bomford- UBC Farm/CSFS Program Director  UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   2 TABLE OF CONTENTS  A. PROGRAM INFORMATION 1. Program Description  1.1 Vision  1.2 Mission  1.3. Goal  1.4 Program History 1.5 Projected Annual Budget of Program 1.6 Projected Timeline of Program Activities  1.7 Volunteer Coordinator Position Description   2. UBC Farm and TREK 2010 2.1 Research at UBC 2.2 Learning 2.3 Community  2.4 Student Directed Learning at the UBC Farm 3. Theoretical Framework 3.1 Pedagogy of Transformative Learning  B. VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT RESOURCES  4. Recruitment  4.1 Interview Guideline 5. Orientation & Training   5.1 Group Facilitation Skills  6. Volunteer Incentives 7. Templates  7.1Volunteer Feedback Form  7.2 Farm Ambassador Pledge 7.3 Sample Emails  C. PROGRAM RESOURCES 8. Presentation ideas for Future Research Opportunities at the UBC Farm for Specific Faculties and Programs  8.1 Faculty of Land and Food Systems a. Agroecology   b. Food, nutrition and health  8.2 Faculty of Forestry  8.3 Faculty of Applied Science   a. School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture  8.4 Faculty of Science   8.5 Faculty of Education 8.6 Sauder School of Business  8.7 Faculty of Arts a. Geography  b. School of Journalism  8.8 School of Community and Regional Planning (UBC College for Interdisciplinary Studies) 9. Workshop Ideas  9.1 Presentation skills  9.2 Grant writing  10. Potential Funding Sources 11. Survey 12. UBC Farm FAQs 13. Contact and Resource List 14. Online Resources   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   3 A. PROGRAM INFORMATION   1. Farm Ambassador Program Description   1.1 Vision “We, the Farm Ambassadors, wish to increase the awareness, interest, and engagement of the greater UBC community in academic opportunities (research and credit based learning) at the Center for Sustainable Food Systems (CSFS) at the UBC Farm.”   1.2 Mission  This program is open to students who are passionate about and interested in increasing the number of students and university courses at the UBC Farm.  This in turn may act as a catalyst, enhancing educational experience at UBC.     To ensure the continuation of the farmlands into our future we must ensure our farm resources are readily available. The farm has capacity and desire to accommodate students, courses, projects and any creative ideas.   1.3. Goal of Program To promote learning opportunities and increase the population of UBC community members engaged in credit-based learning activities at the CSFS/UBC Farm.    This could take shape in the form of Student Directed Learning independent or group projects, student directed seminars, undergraduate and graduate theses, and university courses that engage in credit-earning learning activities at the UBC Farm.  1.4 Program History The development of the UBC Farm Ambassador Program began in Term 1 of the 2006/2007 academic year and has been continued into the 2007/2008 year by a Student Directed Study devoted to implementing the Program. The Directed Study component included students from the Faculties of Land and Food Systems and Engineering.  Their goal was to create resource materials and establish a strong foundation for the Program towards achievement of future goals.                -PROGRAM INFORMATION-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   4  1.5 Projected Annual Budget of Program     Estimated Costs Volunteer Coordinator Salary 10 hrs/week 30 weeks $12.00/hr $3,600.00 Orientation Training Resources (handbook etc.)  10 people $5.00/person $50.00 Food for Orientation Weekend Retreat (Breakfast x 2, lunch, dinner) 4 meals + snacks 15 people $65.00/person $975.00 Outreach Materials (brochures, overhead slides, posters)    $150.00 Volunteer Incentives (certificates, t-shirts)  10 people  $25.00/person $250.00 Bursary Program for Research at Farm    $500.00 Total Estimated Cost    $5,525.00   1.6 Projected Timeline of Program Activities Recruitment/Selection of Volunteer Coordinator  Feb/March 2008  Volunteer Coordinator Planning/Project Development  March-April 2008  Volunteer Recruitment  April/September 2008  Orientation and Training  Late August/Early September 2008  General Meetings for Volunteers  Monthly/Biweekly Basis 2008/2009  Class Presentations  Ongoing 2008/2009  Other Presentations (to Faculty, community meetings)  Ongoing 2008/2009    -PROGRAM INFORMATION-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   5  1.7 Position Description UBC Farm Ambassadors Program Coordinator Qualifications:  Knowledge about the UBC Farm  Previous volunteer experience at the Farm  Facilitation skills  Group/volunteer management skills  Public speaking skills  Good writing skills  Good organizational skills  Knowledge of grant writing  Less than a full course load (i.e. time to spare!)  Responsibilities:  Conduct initial interviews and select ambassadors   Organize and facilitate meetings with ambassadors (on a bi-weekly or monthly basis)  Organize/plan workshops  Act as a support person for ambassadors  Provide adequate materials, information and training to ambassadors  Apply for grants/external funding  Communicate with Farm Staff  Attend Friends of the Farm meetings regularly, connect with Students Associations, Undergraduate Societies, AMS and other student groups  Connect with faculty and staff  Organize social events for Ambassadors (e.g. potlucks)  Hours required: 10-12 hours/week Work Term: 30 weeks, Late August to May                   -PROGRAM INFORMATION-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   6 2. UBC Farm/CSFS and the TREK 2010 Vision*  The University of British Columbia, in its definition of the TREK 2010 vision, lists the five pillars through which UBC will achieve the goals of this vision as people, learning, research, community and internationalization. It is our belief that the work that is being done and can be done in the future at the UBC Farm will directly help the University achieve to these goals.  (*For more information please see the TREK 2010 website at http://www.trek2000.ubc.ca/index.html)  2.1 Research  Research contributes to understanding of the world and seeks to address its problems. Consequentially, UBC recognizes the value and importance of pure research in all areas. This research may not have any immediate applications, yet it ultimately contributes to the body of human knowledge.   2.2 Learning UBC strives to have students become leaders and contribute effectively to the well being of society. Through the educational experience provided, UBC aims to help students understand their responsibilities as members of a global society with respect for the natural environment and all human beings. Learning at UBC pushes boundaries and takes risks in search of new knowledge and unconventional ideas, and aims to drive students towards life-long learning.  2.3 Community Through the CSFS at the UBC Farm, the University is expanding community presence by developing Community Service Learning courses and programs.  UBC will also develop more opportunities for local community groups to make use of University facilities and contribute actively to learning and research.   2.4 Student Directed Learning at the UBC Farm How does the CSFS at UBC Farm contribute to the goals of the TREK 2010 Vision? The CSFS at the UBC Farm accommodates the research goals of the TREK 2010 Vision. With an accessible 40-acre field site, the Farm helps to build and strengthen a sense of community through activities and programs that link UBC students with the broader community. The Farm promotes the values of a sustainable society - increasing understanding of local food security and knowledge of the local food system. We believe that the UBC community as a whole is not aware of many programs and research and other opportunities available at the farm.  The UBC Farm contributes to unconventional ways of learning through community service learning, experiential learning and transformative sustainable learning and provides an opportunity for hands-on application of traditional knowledge.   The UBC Farm provides the UBC community with a source of local food and an opportunity for volunteering and learning about sustainable agriculture, fostering a connection to the land.  Undergraduate learning and research opportunities at UBC Farm may include:  directed studies, student-directed seminars, community service learning opportunities in classes, and papers or projects built into class curricula.      -PROGRAM INFORMATION-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   7 How will the Farm Ambassador Program contribute to the realization of these goals at the CSFS/UBC Farm? The UBC Farm Ambassadors will act as facilitators and liaisons; connecting the research goals of the TREK 2010 Vision to students and faculty engaged with the CSFS at UBC Farm. Bringing the Farm to the attention of the UBC Community, the Ambassadors will create a link between the resources available at the UBC Farm and the students who may benefit from them while enhancing their education and experiential learning opportunities. The CSFS at UBC Farm offers the resources for any student to engage in multidisciplinary and integrated learning opportunities. To date, 41 credit-based courses from 7 faculties have used the Farm. However, the UBC Farm Ambassador Program and the CSFS at UBC Farm would like to increase this number substantially in the future, helping to achieve the goals of the TREK 2010 vision.                                        -PROGRAM INFORMATION-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   8 3. Theoretical Framework  3.1 Pedagogy of Transformative Learning* a. Transformative Learning One of the main educational goals for individuals at the UBC Farm is to engage in Transformative Learning. This adult education theory seeks to change the way that adults view and learn about the world around them by surpassing previously held assumptions and perspectives that may lead to distorted viewpoints.  These include meaning perspectives such as:  Epistemic:  The way we relate to knowledge and use it, including ways of knowing and educational disciplines that might constrain us towards viewing a situation or problem in only one way.  Sociolinguistic:  Embedded cultural and social norms, expectations, and ways of communication based on our cultural backgrounds that may confine us to ethnocentric views in learning and action.  Psychological:   Perspectives on our own views of ourselves as individuals, including self-concepts, inhibitions, and personality based preferences that could limit our own willingness and beliefs to achieve certain means.  Transformative Sustainability Theory acknowledges these perspectives and caters to vastly varying individual personality types in attempting to give them tools to learn beyond their embedded paradigms.      b. Transformative Sustainability Learning The UBC Farm strives to follow a type of Transformative Learning to educate others about sustainability and food system awareness with educational methods and practices that must expound the interlinking of social justice and ecological justice of local communities and ecosystems. In order to achieve this, education at the farm must follow a three-tier system of Transformative Sustainability Learning:  Head:  Theory, critical thinking through lecture and research based information with an emphasis on process-decision making and problem solving.   Hands:  Practical field skills that focus on technical abilities and skill sharing.  Heart:  Engaging in values and passion for motivating, inspiring, and experiencing in participants.  These methods include combining theories of place-based educations, Experiential Enactment or learning by participation, interdisciplinary learning, and community service to help students become leaders in helping strengthen ecological and social sustainability in our greater Vancouver area.   The UBC Farm ambassadors will cater to participants’ individual learning styles and help them surpass previously held assumptions and viewpoints by presenting students with directed studies based on this three-tier system.  Transformative Sustainability Learning works towards self re-evaluation and expansion through projects that assist the expanded community as a whole.    (*For more information: Expanding the Landscape of Social Justice: A Critical Ecological Analysis by Gale C. Furman and David A. Gruenewald, Transformative Sustainability Learning: A United Pedagogy of Head, Hands and Heart by Yona Sipos Randor, Understanding and Promoting Transformative Learning: A Guide for Educators of Adults by Patricia Cranton ) -PROGRAM INFORMATION-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   9 B. VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT RESOURCES  4. Recruitment   4.1 Interview Guideline Interviewing Process:   Conduct a group interview (up to 5 per session) in an informal setting- try to make interviewees feel relaxed and comfortable enough to speak freely   Begin with introductions and background on the UBC Farm Ambassador Program (description of program and how it came to be)  Find out volunteers’ expectations: o Through participation in the program, what do they expect from the volunteer coordinator, from other volunteers, and from themselves?  Find out volunteers’ motivations: o Why are they interested in becoming Farm Ambassadors?  Listen carefully to their expectations  Be sure to go over what our expectations are for volunteers!!!  End with the signing of a ‘volunteer pledge’ sheet  Sample Questions:  Have you heard of the CSFS at UBC Farm? Have you participated in any activities/events involving the UBC Farm? (If yes, what were they?)   What is your impression/perception of the UBC Farm?  Discuss some of the recent challenges that the Farm has had to face (from your perspective).  Why are you interested in volunteering for the UBC Farm Ambassadors Program?  What are you looking forward to the most in being a part of the UBC Farm Ambassadors Program?  What do you hope to gain from volunteering in this program?   What are your expectations of me/our program?  Describe a situation that gave you great satisfaction or a sense of accomplishment (personally or professionally)  What type of work situations do you find most frustrating?  Do you prefer working alone or in a team?  What type of supervision do you prefer?  What relevant skills, interests and experiences do you have?  Do you have any past volunteer experiences? If so, please name a few examples.  What is your time availability?  Do you have any questions or concerns?  References?        -VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT RESOURCES-    UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   10 5. Orientation & Training   5.1 Group facilitation skills  Often, the most difficult part of facilitating a group can be finding a time when everyone can meet. An easy way to do this is to find two times that work for you, send an e-mail to all group members and see which time slot more are available for. Once you’ve picked your time, send out a group e-mail to let them know what time, what day, and where. To ensure attendance and a thoughtful group discussion, it is often beneficial to add an agenda to the e-mail so the group knows (somewhat) what to expect.  Once you have the group all together, an easy way to begin might go something like this:  1. Start with Introductions and maybe an icebreaker. For example, a common icebreaker used might be to go around the group and ask them to state ‘their name and their favourite food that starts with the same letter as their name, a quick backgrounder or something else about themselves never hurts. This helps the group to understand where their members are coming from.  2. Check to see if someone would like to take minutes, otherwise do them yourself afterwards.  3. Have an agenda in plain view of all group members as well as possible outcomes of the meeting.  4. Flip charts are excellent to write down points made by the group so everyone stays involved.  5. At the end of the Agenda, recap and see how many of your outcomes have been accomplished.  6. Schedule the next meeting to include an update on what has been accomplished, and if possible designate the outcomes not finished to group members to bring back to this meeting.    6. Volunteer Incentives  How to keep the ball rolling…   Appreciation gifts and reward ideas to look into -UBC farm merchandise -gift certificates to Agora, Capers, Sprouts  -overnight accommodation at a near-by eco-resort  -UBC Farm Market Gift Certificates   What should the dispersal of these rewards be based on? Hours put in to the program (presentations and other events) e.g. Participation in 20 hours of presentations= a UBC Farm T-Shirt or Canvas Bag  40 hours= Gift Certificate to Agora/UBC Farm  100 hours of presentations = overnight accommodation? Also, other discounts from the Farm Market (e.g. 15% off?)  Keep a tally of ambassador hours as hours contributed to Farm programs (i.e. record this also within the Farm volunteer program).       -VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT RESOURCES-    UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   11 7. Templates  7.1 Volunteer Feedback Form* Farm Ambassador Program   1. How long have you been in this program?   2. What are the main reasons you joined up as a volunteer?     3. What has been most satisfying about this volunteer work?    4. What are some of your biggest frustrations?      5. What do you see as some of the good things about this volunteer program now?      6. What do you see as some of the things that could be improved?      7. Do you have any suggestions about useful new jobs that volunteers might fill in this program?     8. Do you plan to apply again as a Farm Ambassador or continue for another term? If no, why not?     9. Additional comments/ suggestions (greatly appreciated!)    (* for more information: http://academic.regis.edu/volunteer/Ivan/sect15/sect15d4.htm)  -VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT RESOURCES-    UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   12 7.2 Farm Ambassador Pledge  Farm Ambassador Pledge  2008/2009 Academic Year  As a UBC Farm Ambassador, I _______________________ will work to increase the awareness, interest, and engagement of the greater UBC community in academic opportunities (community service learning, research and credit-based learning) at the Center for Sustainable Food Systems (CSFS) at the UBC Farm.  I will achieve this through:  Establishing faculty connections  Promoting CSFS/UBC Farm as component of course curriculum  Encouraging supervision for students doing SDL Organizing class presentations  Promoting use of CSFS/UBC Farm for SDL projects  Giving examples of research ideas  Increasing awareness of Farm programming/opportunities  Outlining the process by which to apply for SDL activities  Providing general information about the Farm Creating outreach materials  Developing PowerPoint presentations, on-line resources, promotional brochures Connecting to individual students  Acting as a resource for students interested in the CSFS/UBC Farm  In return, the UBC Farm Ambassador Program will provide me with opportunities for public speaking, leadership development, exploring my own learning options, and sharing my passion, knowledge and experiences of the Farm with others.  As a Farm Ambassador, I understand that I am part of a team, and my responsibilities to that team include attending an orientation/ training session and attending general meetings.  I pledge to fulfill these responsibilities to the best of my ability throughout the 2008/2009 academic year.      __________________________   _______________________ Signature       Date       -VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT RESOURCES-    UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   13 7.3 Sample Emails  a. Welcome Email Dear [Name],  Welcome to the UBC Farm Ambassador Team! We are delighted that you are joining us as a UBC Farm Ambassador. Your role is critical in fulfilling and facilitating the goals of our program; increasing the awareness, interest, and engagement of the greater UBC community in academic opportunities (research and credit based learning) at the CSFS at the UBC Farm.   There will be a program orientation on [Date] followed by a UBC Farm urban farmer volunteer work shift on [Date].  My role as the UBC Farm Ambassador Coordinator is to support your transition so please let me know if I can be of assistance to you in any way. We are looking forward to you joining our team and taking on your role as a UBC Farm Ambassador.  Sincerely,    [Name]  UBC Farm Ambassador Program Coordinator   b. Thank You Email Dear [Name],  I am writing this letter in appreciation for the valuable work you have done for the UBC Farm Ambassador Program.    [Add personal anecdote] Example  I really appreciated your commitment and persistence in meeting with Dr. Soandso and his students in the faculty of Science facilitating the establishments of each of the students’ directed studies on the UBC Farm. Your flexibility and accommodating nature was mentioned to me by Dr. Soandso.   Once again, I truly appreciated your passion and dedication to the UBC Farm Ambassador Program. You were an integral member of our team and I look forward to working with you again in the future.  Sincerely,   [Name] UBC Farm Ambassador Program Coordinator    -VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT RESOURCES-    UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   14 c. Recruitment Email Hi there!  Are you passionate about the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC Farm? Do you care about undergraduate research and student directed learning? Think the two can go together? If you answered yes, then we are looking for you. We are looking for articulate, confident people who can volunteer as UBC Farm Ambassadors and who can commit up to 5 hours a week for the duration of the winter term. Training and support will be provided. For more information please contact [E-mail].  Best Regards,   [Name]  UBC Farm Ambassador Program Coordinator                       -VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT RESOURCES-     UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   15 C. PROGRAM RESOURCES  8. Presentation Ideas for Future Research Opportunities at the UBC Farm for Specific Faculties and Programs  8.1 Faculty of Land and Food Systems  AGROECOLOGY Agroecology students are encouraged to use the CSFS/UBC Farm through volunteering/community service learning, directed studies courses (AGRO 497 Directed Studies), graduating essays (AGRO 498 Undergraduate Essay), graduating thesis projects (AGRO 499 Undergraduate Thesis) or by using UBC Farm issues as topics for papers and other projects necessary to meet the requirements of other credit courses. Collaborative group projects may be mounted through the 4th year seminar, AGRO 490 Topics in Agroecology.  Other related directed studies include PLNT 530, Directed Studies in Plant Science.Farm Management   Business planning   Farm design   Environmental farm planning   Organic management or certification   Marketing   Enterprise & synergies e.g. Poultry   Small lot, mixed farming  Cropping System   Perennial crops (grapes, strawberry, raspberry, kiwi, apples etc.)   Vegetable Crops management   Crop protection e.g. Wireworm, blight, weed control   Medicinal plants and properties   Season Extension   New crops  Livestock Management  Poultry   Breeding   Behaviour   Welfare   Nutrition   Product quality   Bird Health   Predation prevention Ruminants   Sheep   Other stock   Pasture improvement/management   Animal Health/reproduction  Bee-keeping   Hive set-up   Pollen counts   Monitoring of different types of bees   Landscape survey for nectar sources  Soils   Soil inventory and characterization   Management of soil organic matter and other fertility indicators   Water management   Development of teaching exhibits and interpretative materials  Ecology   Bio-diversity mapping   Wildlife inventory (birds etc.)   Understanding climate & weather (interpretations for agriculture)   Microclimate characterization and exploitation   Water storage and management   Survey of and roles of plants in south campus landscape   Hedgerow planning/development  Agroforestry   Wood lot management   Non-timber forest products   Shitake mushrooms   Management of historic tree plantings  Advocacy & Social Science Research   Establishment of a "Friends of the Farm" Advocacy group   Advocacy strategies and campaigns   Agricultural literacy and awareness   Local and global food security issues   Food systems and links to social well-being   Bio-diversity and social implications  Community Connection   School programs   UBC community (interface with planning development OCP)  Small lot agriculture development  -PROGRAM RESOURCES-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   16 FOOD, NUTRITION AND HEALTH  Projects that look into the health and nutrition aspects of local food systems are subjects that have been commonly studied at the UBC farm; however with the increasing need and demand for information and research concerning health and its relation to the food system, there are limitless possibilities for research. FNH students are encouraged to use the Farm through community service learning/volunteering, directed studies courses (FNH 497), graduating essays, (FNH 498), graduating thesis projects (FNH 499) or by using UBC Farm issues as topics for papers and other projects required to meet the requirements of various credit courses. Specific FNH related project topics include but are not limited to those on the following list. 8.2 Faculty of Forestry Much of the farm landscape is forested and is representative of a common combination of agricultural and forestry resources and activities. Forestry students are encouraged to use the Farm through, community service learning/volunteering, directed studies courses, graduating essays (FRST 497 Graduating Essay or Technical Report), graduating thesis projects (FRST 498 BSF Thesis, or FRST 499 B.Sc. Thesis in Forestry), Directed Studies in Natural Resources Conservation (CONS 449) or by using UBC Farm issues as topics for papers and other projects needed to meet the requirements of various credit courses. Specific forestry related project topics include but are not limited to those on the following list.  Agroforestry  Wood lot management   Non-timber food products   Shitake mushrooms   Management of historic tree plantings   Wood Science, farm structures   Effects of urbanization of neighbouring forests Community Connections  School programs   UBC community (interface with planning development OCP)   Wood-lot development and management   Maintenance of aesthetic values in working landscape   Soils  Soil inventory and characterization   Forest soils   Development of teaching exhibits and interpretative materials  Ecology  Bio-diversity mapping   Wildlife inventory (birds etc.)   Understanding climate & weather (interpretations for agriculture and forestry)   Microclimate characterization and exploitation   Survey of and roles of plants in south campus landscape   Hedgerow planning/development   Effects of urbanization on wildlife -PROGRAM RESOURCES- Food Safety  HAACP assessment of Market Garden operation   HAACP assessment of Poultry operation, eggs and meat   Use of compost as a fertilizer for food crops   Environmental Farm Planning  Food Processing  Appropriate technology for small scale agriculture    Design, build and evaluate equipment for production, handling and storage of horticultural products      Food processing system design and food safety   Value-added food products that the Market Garden could pursue Human Health  Medicinal Plants in human health and disease prevention   Nutritional assessment of Market Garden crops  Community Connection  School programs   "Grow an extra row": Local food production, preparation and nutrition for low income consumers   UBC community (The Farm as a laboratory for inclusion of food in institutional food systems)   UBC community (interface with planning development and OCP)   Small scale, value added, food processing and rural development     UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   17 8.3 Faculty of Applied Science The Faculty of Applied Science has many opportunities for directed studies, such as APSC 430, Advanced Engineering Design Projects, APSC 498B, Directed Studies on Assessment for Sustainability, APSC 498H, Directed Studies on Energy and Climate Change, MECH 451, ATMS 448A, Directed Studies in Atmospheric Science, CPSC 448, Directed Studies in Computer Science, ENDS 482C, Directed Studies in Environmental Design.   Specific applied science related project topics include but are not limited to those on the following list. Equipment Design/Evaluation  Appropriate technology for small scale agriculture   Design, build and evaluate equipment for production, handling and storage of horticultural products   Design, build and evaluate equipment for livestock (poultry, sheep and possibly swine) production   Food processing system design and food safety  Structures  Monitoring of physical environment and crop response in plastic greenhouses and other land covers.   Design, construction and evaluation of housing for livestock   Wood Science and construction of farm structures  Land Management  Irrigation/drainage system design, management and monitoring   Water storage and conservation   Microclimate characterization and exploitation   Soil management   Feasibility and design of aqua-culture system   Effects of urban development on surrounding rural areas  Waste Management and Recycling  Composting technology   Manure management   Energy Conservation and alternative energy sources   Environmental farm planning   SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE The School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture offers a Directed Studies in Landscape Planning and Sustainability (LARC 581).  This is a student-initiated independent study of topics related to landscape planning and sustainability, under the guidance of a faculty member. Specific landscape architecture projects include but are not limited to the following.   Incorporation of landscape design with food production (edible landscapes).  Sustainable landscape planning                 -PROGRAM RESOURCES-  UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   18 8.4 Faculty of Science  Science students are encouraged to use the Farm through volunteering, directed studies courses, graduating essays, and graduating thesis projects or by using UBC Farm issues as topics for papers and other projects required to meet the requirements of various credit courses. The faculty of science offers many options for directed studies in many departments such as: BOTA 546, Directed Studies in Botany, ZOOL 500, Directed Studies in Zoology, GEOG 507, Directed Studies in Physical Geography, ANSC 530, Directed Studies in Animal Science, PLNT 530, Directed Studies in Plant Science.  Specific applied science project topics include but are not limited to those on the following list.         Botany  Survey of and roles of plants in south campus landscape   Hedgerow planning/development   Economic botany: role of current and potential crops for the Market Garden   Medicinal plants and human health   Perennial crops (grapes, strawberry, raspberry, kiwi, apples etc.)   Vegetable Crops management   Crop protection e.g. Wireworm, blight, weed control   Season Extension of vegetable production        Zoology (Livestock Management)  Poultry   Breeding   Behaviour   Welfare   Nutrition   Product quality   Bird Health   Predation prevention   Ruminants   Sheep   Other stock   Pasture improvement/management   Animal Health/reproduction   Bee-keeping   Hive set-up   Pollen counts   Monitoring of different types of bees   Landscape survey for nectar sources  Ecology  Bio-diversity mapping   Wildlife inventory (birds, mammals, insects, etc.)   Understanding climate & weather (interpretations for agriculture and forestry)   Ecology  Microclimate characterization and exploitation   Survey of and roles of plants in south campus landscape   Hedgerow planning/development   Plant ecology in a managed landscape   Influence of land use and soil management on microbial ecology   Preparation of interpretive materials, signage for courses and public education   Economic roles of native plants,   Connection to First Nations traditional knowledge  Agroforestry  Non-timber forest products, food and medicinal plants   Shitake mushrooms   Management of historic tree plantings  Land Management  Water storage and conservation   Microclimate characterization and exploitation   Feasibility and design of aqua-culture system  Waste Management and Recycling  Composting technology   Manure management   Energy Conservation and alternative energy sources   Environmental farm planning  Community Connection  Identification of community needs and interests   Community workshop series development   Land, Food and Community Garden education program development   School programs and summer workshops for youths   UBC community (The Farm as a laboratory for inclusion of food in institutional food systems)   UBC community (interface with planning development and OCP)  Maintenance of aesthetic values in working landscape      -PROGRAM RESOURCES-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   19  8.5. Faculty of Education  COMMUNITY EDUCATION AND OUTREACH One of the primary goals of the Farm is to integrate practical educational elements into all program offerings. Students interested in the community education and outreach aspect are encouraged to use the Farm through volunteering, directed studies courses, graduating essays, graduating thesis projects or by using UBC Farm issues as topics for papers and other projects necessary to meet the requirements of various credit courses. Specific education and outreach related project topics include but are not limited to those on the following list.   Schools Program  Curriculum development for elementary programs   Curriculum development for high school programs   Classroom to Farm work projects   Summer camp workshops  Teacher Training  Development of agricultural curriculum components for teachers in training   Agriculture/gardening workshops for Professional Development Days  Community Connection  Identification of community needs and interests   Community organic farming and food systems workshop series development   Land, Food and Community Garden education program development   UBC community (interface with planning development OCP)  Advocacy & Social Science Research  Establishment of a "Friends of the Farm" Advocacy group   Advocacy strategies and campaigns   Agricultural literacy and awareness   Local and global food security issues   Food systems and links to social well-being   Bio-diversity and social implications    8.6 Sauder School of Business The Sauder School of Business offers a directed studies course in Entrepreneurship (BAEN 590), as well as a directed study in commerce (COMM 490).    Budget planning for non-lucrative organizations  Feasibility of marketing to restaurants  Feasibility of primary product transformation  Feasibility of primary product vs. secondary product                -PROGRAM RESOURCES-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   20 8.7 Faculty of Arts The faculty of arts offers opportunities for directed studies such as; PSYC 340, Directed Studies in Psychology, THTR 448, and Directed Studies in Theatre, Theatre and Practice.     Theatre production at the UBC farm  Art exposition at the UBC farm  Volunteer behaviours and the effects of volunteer management   Transformative learning   Municipality conflicts (Farm development vs. residential development).  Effects of the farm and farms in general on families' development.  Gender differences applied to different vocations (farming industry).    Anthropology/Sociology/First Nations Studies – develop projects with the Aboriginal Community Kitchen Garden   Latin American Studies/Anthropology/First Nations Studies – develop projects for the Maya in Exile Garden  GEOGRAPHY  Landscape/community mapping   Topographic surveys   Atmospheric data collection   Effects of urban development on surrounding rural municipalities   SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM Journalism is an important tool in the creation of change.  With its many opportunities to expose and highlight key issues that would otherwise go unnoticed, the school of Journalism has the opportunity to help promote the UBC farm to the UBC community as well as its surrounding communities.  (JRNL 539, Directed Studies in Journalism).      UBC farm related column in the UBC paper.  Promotion of Farm ambassadors program through Journalism  Urbanization surrounding rural areas (development surrounding UBC farm)  Politics involved in decision making on campus (residential development surrounding UBC farm, TREK park, etc.).  8.8 School of Community and Regional Planning (UBC College for Interdisciplinary Studies) The school of regional planning offers a directed studies course (PLAN 550). This directed study could be utilized in order to study or plan the future of the UBC farm with its ever-expanding surrounding community.  Study on the farm community and planning for its future         -PROGRAM RESOURCES-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   21 9. Workshop Ideas Here are some resources that you can incorporate into workshops for volunteers OR open to general public, YOU decide!  9.1 Presentation Tips and Skills* In order to easily communicate ideas, information, and research, the material of your presentation must be concise, to the point and tell an interesting story to keep the audience entertained and involved.  a. Making the presentation  Greet the audience (for example, 'Good morning, ladies and gentlemen'), and tell them who you are.  Good presentations often may follow this formula:   First, tell the audience what you are going to tell them (introduce the topic).   Then tell them.....   At the end, restate what you have told them in order to secure your main points and arguments.   Unless explicitly told not to, leave time for discussion. This will vary on the group, but normally 5 to 10 minutes should suffice depending on the material presented. If questions are slow in coming, you might like to start things off by asking a question of the audience – having one prepared is a good idea.  b. Delivery  Speak clearly. Shouting or whispering can confuse the audience.   Don't rush, or talk deliberately slowly. Try to be natural (although not conversational or you’ll find you have many interruptions that are not always appropriate).   By deliberately pausing at key points you can help to emphasize the point that you are making.   Look at the audience as much as possible, but don't fix on one individual - it can be intimidating. Pitch your presentation towards the back of the audience, especially in larger rooms.  c. Visual Aids  Keep it simple.   10 words per slide are adequate.   Pictures and Photos easily catch the audience’s eye, but make sure they are relevant towards what you are saying.   Here are some more tips and pointers to think about while presenting:   Your voice - How you say it is as important as what you say. Make sure you yourself believe what you say, and others will too.   Body language - Your body movements can help express what your attitudes and thoughts really are. Stand up straight, keep your shoulders down, and relax. If you’re feeling nervous before hand, try taking a couple deep breaths and make sure you have a water bottle for anything over five minutes.   Appearance - first impressions influence the audience's attitudes to you. Dress appropriately for the occasion. Remember what you are promoting when you give your presentation, colours can be important to help you feel a certain way, and can be important factors to consider when creating power point presentations.   Motivation – When having question and answer periods, it can be useful to have a prize or other motivational factor for audience interaction. If it is the afternoon or the audience/or yourself look or feel tired, try having a fun or stretching break!   Practice is essential, both to improve your skills generally and also to make the best of each individual presentation you make. If you’re going to do it, do it right the first time.    -PROGRAM RESOURCES- Preparation Tips:   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   22  Prepare the structure of the talk carefully and logically, just as you would for a written report. Before you are in front of the audience, make sure you know and understand:   the objectives of the talk   the main points you want to make  Making a list of these two things as your starting point can help you kickstart your presentation in an effective manner. It can be helpful to write out the presentation in rough, just like a first draft of a written report. Review the draft. Once you feel the structure is present to ensure the proper flow of the material to the audience, you’re almost done. If there are things you cannot easily express, possibly because of doubt about your understanding, it is better to leave them unsaid than create an uncomfortable situation for yourself.   Never read from a script. The audience will not take you as seriously. It is good to know what you are going to say in advance so that you don’t need to continually refer to a note sheet (consequentially coming across as unprofessional). You never know what questions people might ask, so it is good to be prepared. It can be helpful to create numbered (in case dropped) cue cards with key words, phrases and ideas on them in case you need a reminder or help asking a question.   If you have visual aids, be sure you are matching up what you say with what you are showing on the slideshow.   And, finally, enjoy yourself. The audience will be on your side and want to hear what you have to say!  (*For more information: http://lorien.ncl.ac.uk/ming/dept/Tips/present/comms.htm)    9.2 Grant writing skills* *** $$$SHOW ME THE MONEY! ***   When deciding who might like to be involved in grant writing and proposals, remember that the following skills are an asset for the proposal process:  Excellent writing skills. Communication is a very valuable skill these days, especially if you are convincing someone to donate their hard-earned money to you.  A clear understanding of the project process. The goal of the grant writer is to convert your ideas and concepts into workable programs. A clear understanding of what you are supporting must be communicated. The grant-writer must be able to effectively communicate to the funding provider how their funds will be put to the best possible use.  Research Skills. Yep, Key. You’re going to need to figure out who you are applying to, and chances are, they’re not just going to pop up out of the blue. You also need to know why the institution/funds you are applying to might be willing to donate funds to you.  Details....Details....Details....Analytical....Analytical....Analytical  Discipline and Organization. Keep Track of your work!   Now on to the fun part, finding money. But have no fear; there are lots out there, especially for students working for a good cause like the UBC Farm! Your task is to communicate your needs in any manner, while demonstrating how you are going to benefit everyone else involved. Get it? So, as long as you can show you are really helping someone out (which most things happening at the farm are doing...directly or not) you’re half way down the road to success.   A TENTATIVE OUTLINE FOR GRANT WRITING PROCESSES:  Identify the needs and a focus of the project from an honest standpoint.   Find prospective grants  -PROGRAM RESOURCES-  Develop a general proposal and budget (submit letter of inquiry)    UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   23  Receive request for formal application   Prepare specific proposal.   Submit proposal before deadline.   Agency/Institution reviews proposal and awards letter/funding.   Carry out project!   Some things to keep in mind....  Your Audience. In the case of grant writing, generally it may be assumed that you are addressing a colleague who is knowledgeable in the general area of your program, but does not necessarily know the details of what you are doing. The key to writing effectively, is to write something your colleague will enjoy reading. If possible, do a bit of research about who will be reading your grant proposal. Final funding decisions are often made based on organization and feasibility of the project in question.  A couple questions you may want to answer in your proposal are:   What are our goals, aims and outcomes?   What are we going to learn as a result of this project?   How will we know that our conclusions are valid?   Tentative Format:   Table of Contents   Title Page: brief title of project, principle people involved, department and University. Don’t forget your name, address, project dates, amount of funding requested, and the signatures of the authoritative University personnel involved. Some funding agencies have specific requirements for their applicants.   Abstract: first impression of project. You may like to include: a) The general purpose b) Specific Goals c) Research Design d) Methods e) Significance of the project to the agency/institution.  Introduction: Key elements of your proposal. Problem statement, Purpose of study/research, goals and objectives of project, significance of the project.   Literature Review   Project Narrative: Methods, Procedures, Objectives, Outcomes or Deliverables, Evaluation. By making connections between your research objectives, research questions, hypotheses, methodologies, and outcomes, you are strengthening your argument with a discipline-specific goal in mind.   Personnel involved: describe staffing requirements in detail. The purpose and goals of each staff member and how they will contribute to the project. Quite often, it is useful to include a C.V. of each member in order to ensure their credibility and relevant skill sets to the project.   Budget and Justification: a spreadsheet or table is normally quite useful to explain various expenses. Be sure to make it clear you are seeking additional funding from other sources also.   Tentative Time Frame: How and when will you complete each step of your project? Make sure you are assertive in your justifications and time-line goals in order to complete them on time.  *For more information:  1. http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/grant_proposals.html  2. http://npfunds.com/downloads/State%20Grant%20-Youth%20Drug%20Prevention%20-%20#360%20000.pdf  3. Research at Carolina. http://research.unc.edu  4. The Odum Institute for Research in the Social Sciences. http://www.irss.unc.edu/odum/jsp/home.jsp  5. The GrantSource Library. http://research.unc.edu/grantsource/  6. Grantwriting Tips from theDonors Forum of Wisconsin. http://www.dfwonline.org/page9123.cfm  7. Proposal Writing OnlineSHort Course form the Foundation Center. http://fdncenter.org/learn/shortcourse/prop1.html   -PROGRAM RESOURCES-    UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   24 10. Potential Funding Sources  The thing about funding is to pitch what you are doing in a slant that matches the fund exactly. For example, for the COABC funding, downplay the "educational" component entirely and play up "organic agriculture research" to access those funds. 10.1 UBC Alma Mater Society The Student Initiatives Fund  available for all UBC students (undergraduate and graduate)   up to $250, but no more than half the cost of a project   Innovative Projects Fund The Innovative Projects Fund (IPF) is an annual donation made by the Alma Mater Society (AMS) to the University in an effort to aid in the enrichment and progressive development of the campus community. The IPF was designed to provide funding for projects that are innovative, provide benefit to a significant number of students, and are visible to the campus community. Eligibility: UBC students, staff, and faculty  Range: $3,000.00 to $5,000.00 Deadline: November For more information: www.ams.ubc.ca/ipf    10.2 Vice-President, Students  Walter H. Gage Memorial Fund The Walter H. Gage Memorial Fund provides financial support for non-curricular student projects and activities that enhance the University's reputation, have broad interest to students at UBC, and are not part of an academic curriculum. To receive funding, projects must meet the funding criteria so please review these on the website.  Eligibility: UBC students or student groups and clubs on campus. Applications received from faculty members or from off-campus organizations will not be considered. Range: Up to $2,000.00 per project Deadline: Applications should be received a minimum of four weeks in advance of an event and a month before the Committee meeting. The Committee will meet monthly from September to May, with the exception of December. Contact person: Megan Hill, Office of the Vice-President Students  Contact email:   For more information: www.vpstudents.ubc.ca/memorial  Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund The Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (TLEF) was created to enrich student learning by supporting innovative and effective educational enhancements. Eligibility: UBC faculty, staff, and students. Note that UBC student submissions will only be eligible if submission is in conjunction with UBC faculty or staff. Range: Up to $50,000.00 Deadline: Early December 2005 For more information: www.vpacademic.ubc.ca  -PROGRAM RESOURCES- 10.3 UBC Student Services   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   25  UBC BASC Professional Activities Fund (PAF) The UBC BASc Professional Activities Fund (PAF) helps fund activities that enhance the educational experiences and/or professional development of undergraduate engineering students at UBC. The activities funded should fall outside the activities, facilities and equipment normally provided and funded by the University. Proposals will be considered for one-time expenditures, single-year projects, multi-year projects, and annual funding of ongoing projects. The type of proposals that might be funded from the Professional Activities Fund include a speaker's series, workshops, career fairs, field trips, student competitions, space for projects, and tutorial services. Eligibility: UBC BASc Engineering students Range: Previous grants have ranged up to $5,000.00 Conferences and field trips: Every month Projects: Beginning of October  For more information: www.apsc.ubc.ca  Fisher Scientific Fund The Fisher Scientific Fund sponsors proposals that strengthen the implementation of UBC's Policy #5: Sustainable Development. Proposals should strengthen sustainability at UBC and benefit the UBC scientific community (the main users of Fisher Scientific products).  Eligibility: UBC students, staff, and faculty Range: $5,000.00 to $15,000.00 Deadline: February Contact Person: Brigid MacAulay, UBC Sustainability Office Contact email:   For more information: www.sustain.ubc.ca   10.4 Certified Organic Association of British Columbia  Organic Sector Development Program Funding is available for projects that address the following key activity areas, as identified in the initiative’s strategic plan:  Expand the production capacity of organic agriculture  Develop marketplace opportunities and promote BC certified organic products  Improve organic environmental stewardship  On-farm research projects are eligible. Use of your farm and farm equipment may be used of part of your contribution to the project. You may receive payment for administration of your own research project, or you may choose to hire someone to administrate it. If you receive payment for your time, you may not also use your time as part of an 'in kind' contribution (see guide for full details). You may wish to download the On Farm Research Guide by Jane Sooby of the Organic Farming Research Foundation.   Eligibility: Any person or organization with an interest in the organic sector may apply. Sector participants may include primary producers, processors, handlers, members of the educational community and government and private regulators.  Range: Varies Deadline: November (approx.) Contact Person: Paddy Doherty  Contact Number:   -PROGRAM RESOURCES-    UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   26 Contact E-mail:    For more information: http://www.certifiedorganic.bc.ca/programs/osdp.htm  10.5 Investment Agriculture Foundation  BC Agri-Tourism Initiative BC Agri-Tourism is an initiative of the Agri-Food Futures Fund. $650,000 have been allocated to serve the diverse range of operators offering agriculture-oriented tourism experiences to people exploring BC. Agri-tourism encompasses a wide range of activities, from accommodations and retail sales to recreational activities and farm tours.   Funding is available for projects that match one or more of the following strategic priorities:   Develop strategic partnerships for the agri-tourism industry  Develop a code of standards for agri-tourism products and services  Produce a provincial product development and marketing strategy  Establish agri-tourism training programs for farmers and operators and a strategy for implementation  Range: Varies Deadline: Contact for information. Contact Person: Jessica Ng Contact Number:   Contact E-mail:  For More Information:  http://www.iafbc.ca/funding_available/programs/agri-tourism/Agri_tourism.htm  Aboriginal Agriculture Initiative Aboriginal Agriculture is an initiative of the Agri-Food Futures Fund. $500,000 have been allocated to fulfill the vision of Aboriginal people achieving self-sufficiency through participation in viable, diverse agri-food opportunities.   Funding is available for projects that match one or more of the following strategic priorities:   Increase Aboriginal awareness and involvement in agriculture  Develop underutilized agriculture land  Increase the participation of Aboriginal youth and women in agriculture  Range: Varies Deadlines: March 1st, May 1st, August 1st , October 1st  & December 1st Contact Person: Jessica Ng Contact Number:   Contact E-mail:  For More Information: http://www.iafbc.ca/funding_available/programs/AAI/aai.htm  Small Projects Funding: Funding Requests up to $10,000 Small projects are as diverse as BC’s agriculture industry. They can include, but are not limited to, demonstration projects, applied research projects, speaker costs, education projects and marketing plan development. Projects must be completed within one year. Project funding is not intended for sub-components of larger projects.  -PROGRAM RESOURCES-    UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   27 Eligibility: Eligible applicants consist of industry associations, co-operatives, marketing boards and commissions, corporations, partnerships, and sole proprietorships. In the case of private firms or individuals, a syndicate or group cooperating on a project is preferred over a single private applicant.  Range: Up to $10,000 Deadline: Applications accepted at any time Contact Person: Emily MacNair Contact Number:  Contact E-mail:  For More Information: http://www.iafbc.ca/apply_for_funding/upto10.htm  Health Product and Functional Food Initiative This initiative is designed to foster growth of the health product and functional food industry in BC. It serves a broad collection of industries and economic activities that includes growers, wildcrafters, harvesters, processors and service providers active in the farm, marine and rangeland sectors. Collectively they produce raw, intermediate and final use plant and animal products such as botanicals, natural health products, nutraceuticals, functional foods and related products and services. Funds for this initiative are nearing an end. If you are interested in accessing funding under this initiative, contact the administrator soon to develop your proposal or letter of intent.   Funding is available for projects that address the following key activity areas, as identified in the initiative’s strategic plan:  Enhance communication and coordination  Increase industry marketing and promotion  Target research and development  Encourage growth of the BC industry  Range: Funding is available for projects that address the following key activity areas, as identified in the initiative’s strategic plan: Enhance communication and coordination Increase industry marketing and promotion Target research and development Encourage growth of the BC industry  Deadline: Contact administrator Contact Person: Dawn Wood Contact Number:   Contact E-mail:   For More Information: http://www.iafbc.ca/funding_available/programs/HPFF/HPFF.htm  Beekeeping Industry Development Initiative Funding is available for projects that address the following key activity areas, as identified in the initiative’s strategic plan:  Increase the number of bee colonies available for production and pollination  Support research essential for a viable, healthy industry  Increase awareness of the importance of the beekeeping industry  Expand marketing avenues to increase consumption of hive products  Provide beekeepers with training and education  -PROGRAM RESOURCES-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   28   Range: Varies Deadline: Contact administrator Contact Person: Amy Neely Contact Number:  Contact E-mail:  For More Information: http://www.iafbc.ca/funding_available/programs/beekeeping/beekeeping.htm  Agriculture Environment Initiatives Agriculture Environment Initiatives include the Agriculture Environment Partnership Initiative (AEPI) and the Agricultural Environment Stewardship Initiative (AESI). AEPI is an Agri-Food Futures Fund program created to help the BC agri-food industry contribute positively towards resolving wildlife and environmental issues. Created by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, AESI encourages sustainable production practices. AESI funds are delivered through the structure set up for the AEPI.   Funding is available for projects that address the following key activity areas, as identified in the Agriculture Environment Initiatives Strategic Plan:  Ensure programs contribute to the health of the industry as well as to environmental goals  Assist industry in complying with environmental regulations and standards  Expedite voluntary actions on the part of industry to enhance environmental values  Implement measure to minimize the impacts of wildlife on agricultural programs  Establish mechanisms for sustainable funding of agriculture/environment programs  Encourage effective communication Support development of a policy framework that contributes to enhancement of agricultural and environmental resources  Implement monitoring systems that evaluate environmental health  Range: Funding is available for projects that address the following key activity areas, as identified in the Agriculture Environment Initiatives Strategic Plan:  Ensure programs contribute to the health of the industry as well as to environmental goals  Assist industry in complying with environmental regulations and standards  Expedite voluntary actions on the part of industry to enhance environmental values  Implement measure to minimize the impacts of wildlife on agricultural programs  Establish mechanisms for sustainable funding of agriculture/environment programs  Encourage effective communication  Support development of a policy framework that contributes to enhancement of agricultural and environmental resources  Implement monitoring systems that evaluate environmental health  Deadline: Contact administrator Contact Person: Brian Baehr Contact Number:  Contact E-mail:  For More Information:  http://www.iafbc.ca/funding_available/programs/agriculture-environment/environment.htm   -PROGRAM RESOURCES-    UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   29  Cultivated Mushroom Industry Initiatives Cultivated Mushroom is an initiative of the Agri-Food Futures Fund. $500,000 has been allocated to strengthen the viability and development of the cultivated mushroom industry in BC through industry research and development and sector education and promotion.   Funding is available for projects that address the following key activity areas, as identified in the initiative’s strategic plan:  Foster and support research and industry development activities  Enhance industry standards of food quality and safety  Increase industry, agri-food sector stakeholder and end-user communications  Enhance market development and diversification  Range: Varies Deadline: Contact Administrator Contact Person: Jessica Ng Contact Number:   Contact E-mail:  For More Information:  http://www.iafbc.ca/funding_available/programs/cultivated-mushrooms/mushrooms.htm  BC Agroforestry Initiative This initiative works with farmers, ranchers, woodlot owners, agroforestry product buyers and producers to achieve a dynamic, self-sustaining agroforestry industry.   Funding is available for projects that address the following key activity areas, as identified in the initiative’s strategic plan:  Develop partnerships among practitioners and stakeholder organizations  Increase awareness of agroforestry benefits through development of technology transfer materials, training programs and workshops  Establish the means to link agroforestry practitioners and products with buyers and consumers  Develop a BC agroforestry value-added marketing strategy  Range: Varies Deadline: Contact Administrator Contact Person: April Anderson Contact Number:  Contact E-mail:  For More Information:  http://www.iafbc.ca/funding_available/programs/agroforestry/Agroforestry.htm       -PROGRAM RESOURCES-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   30 11. Survey   UBC FARM AMBASSADORS SURVEY 2007  1. GENERAL 1.1. Faculty: 1.2. Program: 1.3. Year of Degree:   2. UBC FARM/CENTER FOR SUSTAINABILITY 2.1. Have you heard of the UBC Farm? (Circle one) YES  /   NO  2.2. If YES, how did you hear of the UBC Farm? (Check all that apply) o AMS o Farm Ade o Posters/advertising o Faculty member o Website o Friend o Course o Other (explain):___________________________________________  2.3. The UBC Farm has 3 Core Programs: Community, Research and Learning. Please indicate your level of familiarity with the following specific programs offered at the farm:  I have heard about it  I am familiar with the objectives of the program I have participated in this program I have never heard of it! Community Programs:   1) Volunteer Programs: e.g. Market Crew, School Programs, Friends of the Farm 2) Community Learning Gardens: Maya Garden, Urban Aboriginal Kitchen Garden, Institute for Aboriginal Health     Research Programs: Graduate Studies, Undergraduate Essay/Thesis, Directed Studies, ‘Topics in’ courses, Student directed seminars     Learning Programs: Community Service Learning, Agroecology Internship       -PROGRAM RESOURCES-    UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   31 2.4. The farm has both the capacity and desire to have more courses and students involved through different methods of learning. What do you think influences students’ involvement in research opportunities at the UBC farm? (Rank the level of importance of the following factors) Factor 1  (Not important at all) 2 3  (Neutral) 4 5  (Extremely important) Distance (too far)      Information not easily available/ out of date      The UBC farm does not have relevant research opportunities for specific area of study       Hard to find a faculty sponsor      Course schedule is not flexible enough       3. PERSONAL 3.1. Have you done or do you intend to do a directed study or independent research project before you graduate? YES /  NO  3.2. If YES, is it a requirement of your academic program? YES /  NO   3.3. Would you be interested in doing one at the UBC farm? Why / why not? (Please explain)     3.4. If YES, what ideas do you have for a project at the UBC farm? (this can just be a brief description)     3.5. Do you see any possibilities for incorporating courses from your faculty/ area of study into credit-based learning activities at the UBC Farm? If so, please elaborate…. If not, why not?    4. Additional Comments        -PROGRAM RESOURCES-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   32 12.   UBC Farm FAQS  a. What is the UBC Farm? The UBC Farm is a 24 hectare teaching, research, and community farm located on the University of British Columbia Campus in Vancouver, Canada. The ultimate goal of the farm is to retain and re-create existing farm and forest lands at the University of British Columbia into an internationally significant centre for sustainable agriculture, forestry and food systems.  b. Where is the UBC Farm? It is located on South Campus, according to the map below: c. Who is a Farm Ambassador? The UBC Farm Ambassadors are a group of students with a common goal of making it easier for students to engage in Student-Directed Learning at the UBC Farm. They work directly with students and faculty to facilitate project development.  d. I'm a student in the faculty of _______. What sorts of projects are available for me at the farm? You're free to propose any project ideas! Whether you're in Land and Food Systems, Engineering, Arts, Sciences, Commerce, or something else, there are plenty of opportunities available for you. Based on your personal interests and studies, the Farm Ambassadors can help you pick a topic of research to benefit your future and the UBC Farm.  e. Is there a list of ongoing and completed projects at the UBC Farm? Yes! There is a convenient database of all past and ongoing projects. By consulting this list, you can view common activities at the farm.  f. Are there current projects in which I can take an active role? Yes, the farm provides many current activities, assistance is always appreciated. By consulting a Farm Ambassador and/or looking through the project database, you can find a project coordinator to collaborate with. -PROGRAM RESOURCES-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   33 g. What do I need to begin a project at the farm? You need the following:   A Project proposal form.  Designs for a project layout.  Faculty member sponsor/support.  h. Do I need faculty support? If so, how can I get it? If you would like to receive academic credit for your work at the farm, you will need faculty support. The Farm Ambassadors can help your search for a faculty sponsor by contacting professors who have been cooperative in the past. You can also find your own faculty sponsor based on the type of research you would like to do at the farm.  Often, faculty members have their own ideas for research to be successful within the boundaries of the UBC Farm.  i. What does faculty support entail for the faculty members? A faculty sponsor will evaluate your research. They are there for guidance and support throughout the project. The student and the faculty member work together in developing an appropriate evaluation scheme.  j. Where might I find funding? Most funding for projects at the farm comes from grants, issued by the University, faculties, government, or private businesses. Securing funding may take time, and may be difficult to guarantee. Planning ahead is advised.  Start by talking to faculty members, as they may direct you towards University funding; they likely know other options appropriate for your research.   k. What equipment is available for my project's use at the farm? There is an assortment of agricultural and shop tools available. The odds are good that it has whatever you need for the agricultural aspect of your project, but you may need to provide materials. Consult the equipment list for specifics.                      -PROGRAM RESOURCES-   UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   34 13. Contact and Resource List  TAG (Teaching and Academic Growth) University of British Columbia Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth (TAG) 6326 Agricultural Road Vancouver , B.C., V6T 1Z2 Note: Explore options for writing something for TAG newsletter Gary Poole, Director   Alice Cassidy, Associate Director    UBC Sustainability Office Land and Building Services 2329 West Mall Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 Phone:  Fax:  Charlene Easton - c  Director of Sustainability Ruth Abramson -  Manager, Marketing/Communications  Heather Scholefield -  Manager, UBC Sustainability Strategy   Brenda Sawada -  Manager, UBC SEEDS Program  Social, Ecological, Economic, Development Studies (SEEDS) A program that brings together students, faculty, and staff in projects that address sustainability issues. Students may do a Directed Study that is also a SEEDS project, the project is then documented on the website, http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/seeds.html Projects that have been done before for the Farm include a COMM 465 Marketing Plan for UBC Farm as well as a number of MBA projects.  Brigid MacAulay -  Coordinator, Programs and Administration   Alison Aloisio -  Advisor, Sustainable Buildings   Liz Ferris -  Student Development Coordinator, Sustainability   UBC Career Services (has good resources for presentation skills and report writing)  http://www.landfood.ubc.ca/careers/student_ambassador.htm   UBC Farm  2357 Main Mall UBC Campus Vancouver V61 1Z4  http://www.landfood.ubc.ca/ubcfarm/ Friends of the UBC Farm Club      UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   35 Simon Fraser University For general information email:  For information on volunteer opportunities email:     City Farm Vancouver      Environmental Youth Alliance Vancouver  phone  mail p.o. box 34097 Station d Vancouver B.C. V6J 4M1 office 517 - 119 West Pender Street Vancouver, B.C. V6B 1S5  Multi-disciplinary Undergraduate Research Program (MURP) Sonja Embree  Multi-disciplinary Undergraduate Research Conference (MURC) A conference in the spring that brings together the participants of MURP and other undergraduate researchers to present their findings.    Research Opportunities and Directory (ROAD)  A database that introduces undergraduate students to centralized resources and services to help them become involved in research. - http://road.ubc.ca Email:   UBC Learning Enhancement Academic Partnership (LEAP) “An innovative collaboration between students, faculty and administration developed to strategically coordinate the use of resources to better meet the learning and research needs of UBC students.” http://leap.ubc.ca/         UBC Farm/CSFS Ambassador Program Handbook 2008-09   36 14. Online Resources  Farm Ambassador Program Wiki Site  http://wiki.elearning.ubc.ca/UbcFarm    This site was created as a portal for UBC students, towards taking on directed studies at the UBC farm. The goals of this site are to equip students with the resources necessary for planning a directed study. The site includes links for previous research done at the farm, a list of professors at UBC that have been involved with directed studies in the past, possible funding options, available resources at the UBC Farm, Frequently asked Farm Questions, future research opportunities at the UBC Farm according to specific faculties and programs, and an online version of the Farm Ambassador Handbook.                                     -PROGRAM RESOURCES- 

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