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Baseline survey of the UBC food system : public opinion to inform food system targets Hatud, Daniel; Kwan, Jonathan; McLean, Sarah; Pai, Lisa; Tong, Jonathan Apr 30, 2012

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report        Baseline Survey of the UBC Food System: Public Opinion to Inform Food System Targets   Daniel Hatud  Jonathan Kwan  Sarah McLean  Lisa Pai  Jonathan Tong University of British Columbia LFS 450 April 2012          Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.       Scenario 5: Baseline Survey of the UBC Food System Public Opinion to Inform Food System Targets         Group 9  Daniel Hatud  J onathan Kwan  Sarah Mc Le an  Lisa Pai  J onathan Tong            LFS 450  Wil l Vall e y  April  2012   2 Table of Contents Abstract…………………………………………………………………………………... 2  Introduction……………………………………………………………………………… 2   Value Assumptions and Vision Statement………………………………………. ..5  Methodology…………………………………………………………………………… ...6  Findings………………………………………………………………………………….11 Discussion………………………………………………………………………………. 19  Recommendations……………………………………………………………………… 23  Scenario Evaluation…………………………………………………………….……… 24  Media Release……………………………………………………………………… ... … 25  References………………………………………………………………………………. 26  Appendices…………...…………………………………………………………………. 26  … Abstract  As part of the University of British Columbia’s Food Systems Project our group conducted a survey to determine baseline knowledge, attitudes and practices of the Campus community. For our methods we used convenience sampling to target the ideal 1000 participants in our survey.  Participants engaged in either web based surveys or hard copy surveys to measure their attitudes, behaviour and knowledge about the UBC food system.  413 individuals participated in our survey with 117 filling out hard copy surveys and 296 doing web-based surveys.  We found that there was a lot of opportunity to increase knowledge about food sustainability on campus as well as a definite need to improve student’s actual practices within the UBC food system.  But there is interest and demand for this information.  Introduction  The UBC Food S ystems Project (U BC FS P ) is a coll aborati ve, comm unit y based acti on rese arch (CBAR) project with the aim to improve  food s ystem sust ainabili t y and food securit y.  The Facul t y of Land and Food S yst ems joint l y ini ti ated this project wit h  3 UBC’s Sustainability Office’s “S ocial, Ecologi cal, Economi c and Dev elop ment Studi es ” (SEEDS ) program ( Bak e r - F rench, 2009). In  it’s aim to critically assess the environmental, social and economi c sust ainabili t y of the UBC campus food s ystem the UBCFS P  proposed a bas eli ne surv e y of the enti r e UBC foo d s ystem .  The UBC FS P has been working for the past ten ye a rs to improve the UBC f ood s ystem, and me as ure pro gr ess.  Our team has w o rked closel y with Sophia Baker - F rench, who is the Food Sys tem Coordinator, as well as Liska Richer, who works with Campus Sustainabilit y and Victoria  Wakefie ld, who is the purchasin g mana ge r for UBC Housing  and Hospit ali t y Services to develop and implement a surve y.  We also worked with UBC Food Services (UBC FS ) and the AMS Food and Bever a ge Depart ment (AMS FB D) to crea te our surve y.   A ke y component to crea ti ng thi s surve y was usi n g ke y indi c ators form the U BCFSP’s “Vision for a Sustainable Food System” which was developed by UBCFSP project partners and previous L a nd and F ood S ystem (LF S )  students (See Appendi x A).   Connecti ons can be mad e betwe en global, nati ona l, region al, and local foo d s ystems so b y looki ng at the knowled ge, att it udes and behavio u rs of partici pants in the UBC food s ystem we are able to make conn ecti on s to comm unit ies outsi de of UBC.  Food s yst ems can ex perience an ar ra y of vulne rab il it ies due to insecure and unsust ainable social, economi c and env ironmental practi c es.  Th e knowled ge gained b y t his surve y and the enti re UBCFS P will help to spread awar eness and educ ate consum e rs  about their food s yste ms.  The food eaten by most North Ame rican s has travell ed from eve r yw h ere around the globe (Kloppenbu r g, Hen d rickson and Stev ens on, 1996).  This lit eral distance from their food is also distance from their knowled ge .  Most North American co nsum ers onl y hav e a vague  ide a about where, ho w, and b y who m the food the y pu rch ase was  produc ed  4 and handled (Kloppenbu r g et. al. , 1996) .  Advanc e ments made in the field of agricult ure have revolut ioni z ed food producti on, howeve r this indust riali z ati on brings with it huge  loss es to biodi versit y, water and soil contami nati on and depletion, clim ate chan ge and more  (Mc La u ghli n and Mineau, 1995) .  Also, de spit e our abil it y to produ ce enormous amount s of food the worl d is sti ll ex periencing epidemics of malnutrit ion and fami ne.   The gap between North America’s overconsumption and many developing countries chronic hun ge r is growin g.  Throu gh th e UBCFS P the campus comm unit y i s taking responsi bil it y and makin g ch an ges on the loc al le vel, wit h the hope that it will inspi re chan ges i n a broade r cont ex t.  As long as consumer s remain igno rant about t heir food s ystem, agribusi nesses hold all the power.  When consum ers are unaware, they can’t make posi ti ve chan ges (Kloppenbur g et. al. , 199 6).  By inc reasin g awar e ness about the global food s ystem on a local level we hope to insti ll a sense of conne cti on to the land and inspire indi viduals to make behavio u r al chan ges to increas e the sustain abil it y of their local food s ystems.  This surve y  will be used to obtain baseline data about the campus community’s knowledge, opini ons and actual beh avio u rs in regards to sust ainable food s ys tems.  B y surve yin g a wide variet y of consum ers wit hin the UBC food s ystem we will be able to assess the environme ntal, economi c and soci al sus tainabil it y practi ces of th e campus comm unit y to determine where the campus food s ys tem is per formi ng well and wher e it can stil l be improved upo n.  This report begins b y bri efl y ex plaining the back ground of the UBCFS P an d ident if yin g our probl em statement and the importa nce of our rese arch. Foll owing thi s is our justi ficati ons on how our scena rio relat es to the UBC FS P Visi on Statement.  In cluded  5 in this secti on is a descriptio n on how indivi dual members of thi s group’s different  value assum pti ons have influen ced our pe rc epti ons of the scena rio. Nex t is a walkt hrough of our methodol og y fo r cr ea ti ng and distribut ing thi s surve y, foll owed b y a discussi on of our findings. Lastl y, alon g wit h our conclusi on, we pr ovide recomm end ati ons to ke y stakeholders, and future s tudents who wish to conti nue with this project.  Value Assumptions and the UBCFSP Vision Statement  Through ou r time her e at UBC the Facult y of Lan d and Food S ystem has h elped to insti ll a sense of comm unit y with its student s.  Concepts of sust ainabili ty in all its forms (economi c, so cial and environmental) have become deepl y ingrained in our value  s ystems throu gh our acad emi c course work and co mm unit y invol vement.   Outsi de of LFS most of us have encounte red classes wher e we are ex pected to sit silentl y an d be lectured, where we are of fed ve r y limi ted control over what and how we are ex pecte d to learn.  Through LFS we are giv en the  opportuni t y to inte ract wit h comm u nit y bas ed pr ojects and case studi es and us e  the tools we have acquired ov er the y e ars to work tow a rds solut ions.  Personal ex periences dict ate what values students hold and what ea ch finds most relevant.  By comi n g together in LFS and sharin g our ex perien ces we become priv y to perspecti ves other than our own.  Our project is enriched by the group’s differences.  Every cultural perspecti ve, ever y ac ade mi c discipl ine, ever y reli gion, ev er y ethi c al posi ti on and ever y personal ex perienc e, pro vides a new wa y of  looki ng at a problem.  Each pe els back a previous l y uns een la ye r and offers a bett er vie w of the solut ion.     As a group we come into thi s project wit h a ran ge of differ ent academi c discipl ines and cult ural b ack grounds ,  how ever we all agree on th e import an ce of the UBCFSP’s Vision Statement.  Each of the princi ples in the Visi on Statement is  working  6 towards pres ervin g and enhancin g both  human an d ecos ystem healt h , whic h is something that all of us beli eve to b e incredibl y important .   Our task of dev elopi ng a surve y for the UBC food s ystem is cons ist ent wit h the principles of the UBC FS P Visi on Statement and works especially well with number 6, “Fosters awareness, understanding, and personal responsi bil it y withi n the comm unit y of ev er y  com ponent from producti on t o disp osal .”  Our surve y will all ow us to give an ov erview of how members of our camp us comm unit y are pa rticipati ng in man y components of the s yste m.  Methodology For our project we decid ed to use convenien ce s a mpl ing for our su rve y.  Convenience sampli n g is when participants are s elected at the convenient accessi bil it y to the rese arch er (Yu & Co oper, 1983).  We classifi ed our sampli ng as conve nience sampl ing throu g h group discussi on and with the help of Sophia Bak er - Fr en ch.  We targeted pla ces such as the SUB, the UBC Bookst ore, Koe rner  Libr ar y , Ir v ing K. Barb er Le arnin g Centr e and Woodward Libra r y, as well as UBC Residen ces, whi ch include Walt er H. Gage, Plac e Vani er, Totem Park and M arine Driv e as the y are su bject to a lot of campus tra ffic.  By tar geti n g pla ces that were convenient for our rese arc h as opposed to surve yin g throu gh a random method, we all owe d potential bias into our sample.  A downside to convenienc e sampli ng, bec ause it is a non - random sampl e, is t hat there is a limi ted att empt to ensure accur ate repres entation of populati on.  There fore i t is poss ibl e that by onl y surve yin g ou r tar geted pl aces, bias es could pot enti all y arise.   We had two differ ent ways in which our su rve y could be compl eted.  We had both hard cop y ve rsions (See Appendix B) as well as an onli ne version, which we emailed out the link to (See Appendi x B).  We decided to carr y out bot h hard cop y vers ions and web  7 based versions fo r mult i ple reasons, whi ch will be mentioned a litt le further int o the methods.  For the web - ba sed  version, we wer e inst ructed to use the Ente rpri se Fe edback Mana gement  (E FM ) pro gr am to const ruct and an al yz e our surv e y.  We als o included a Quick Response (QR) co de  and post er wit h tabs t hat contained the link to the onli ne surve y, which could b e torn off to help adv ertise our surve y.  A QR cod e i s a type of bar code, which can be scanned by devices such as iPhones, Androids and Blackberry’s or other devices su ch as iPods and iP ads.  Once our QR code was s canned, it would lead directl y to ou r web surv e y or dir ectl y to our link to the web surve y dependi ng on wh at kind of device was used or what kind of appli c ati on was used.  In addit ion, the post er had tabs wit h the li nk to our surve y that can be torn of f (See Appendix B).  We used the website “TinyURL” to compress the original web link of our survey since it was too long.  W e did this because we felt that t ypin g in a long web link int o the UR L would discoura ge particip ants from pa rtaki ng in our surv e y.   Our tar get popul ati on inc luded facult y membe rs, students, staff members and others.  We felt that the facult y m embers, students and staff membe rs made up most of the UBC campus .  We included an others s ecti on to include  people who didn’t fall within the first three cate gori es.  Peo ple wit hin the others cate gor y  could include const ructi on workers, alum ni and/or even visi tors to UBC.  If the y pu rchas e and consu me food on UBC then the y sti ll participate in the UBC food s ys t em.  The refo re we felt it was important to include a se cti on for others in our sur ve y.  A limit ati on to our tar get population is that there was no gu arant ee that all of them would be reach ed.  Our ideal was to make our surv e y known to ever yon e in our tar ge t popul ati on; howe ver, this was  8 sim pl y not possi ble,  as we did not have access to t he email addr esses of ev e r yon e on campus .   We targeted residenti al areas such as Totem, Vani er, Ga ge and Ma rine Dri ve as indi viduals who live on campus are hu ge contribut or s to the UBC food s yst em.  We also targeted libra ries, which include Koern er, Ir vin g and Wood w ard as the y are central loc als for student s  to stud y.  Addit ionall y, we tar geted th e SUB, cl assrooms, socia l networks, and the UBC Bookst ore.  Specificall y for th e dist ri buti on and advertisement of our web -based  surve ys, we dist ributed to the UBC Residen ces throu gh the UBC Res idence Fac ebook pa ge.  A limit ati on here is that origin all y we thought we were ab le to get the RA’s of the residences to email everyone else who lived withi n their reside nces.  Howeve r, there wer e priv ac y iss ues we came acros s and thus we were not able to target each on e of them indivi duall y.  We also distribut e d and advertised ou r web surve y to all our classes throu gh our Vist a accounts .  A do wns ide to thi s is that we were onl y limi ted to sending our surv e y to our classes.  Most of our classes were LFS based and thus biases could be introduced on ce again.  In addit ion we ad vertised our surv e y throu gh pe rsonal social networkin g, which included a ll our Faceboo k pages and encour a ged friends to share the link on their Fa cebook pa ges (See App e ndix B).  A limi tation here is that there was a potential for someone who didn’t participate in the UBC food system to partake in our surve y, which  would affe ct  our result s.  We target ed other pa rticipants in UBC b y advertisi ng ou r surve y th rough UBC Blogs su ch as the LFS US Blo g as well advertisi ng to UBC facult y pa ges.  For our hard cop y surve ys, we tar get ed the UBC Bo okst ore, the SUB, classrooms, Ir ving, Koerne r and Woodward librar y, stud y areas and t he UBC Residence Comm ons Blo ck in an att empt to avoid the bias of Facult y buil dings.   9 S pecificall y in the SUB, we att empt ed to surve y during pe ak hours and busy da ys.  Peak hours included hours aro und 12pm when eve r yon e would go for lunch.  As well we att empt ed to surve y duri ng Tuesd a ys and Wednes da ys, which  were the da ys where most traffic go es throu gh the SUB accordin g to Liska R icher.  With the dist ribution of the QR code and Posters we tar geted the UBC Residences , the UBC Bookst ore, Ko erner and Ir ving libr ar y, the SRC (Student Recreati on Centr e), Brock Hall , the SUB bull eti n boards and fac e - t o - fac e  invi tation.  We decided to use web - b ased  surve ys b ecaus e of its high ef ficienc y in the sense that we can send the surv e y out to a lar ge numbe r of people in a matte r of seconds.  In addit ion, web based surv e ys are ver y eas y to anal yz e in comparison to ha r d cop y su rve ys, as the EFM  pro gram we used compi led all the dat a for us.  It is also low co st, both economi call y and env iro nmentall y, in the sens e that we do not have to print out a lar ge number of pap er cop y su rve ys.  The downside to our web - b ased surv e y is that there is ver y low int era cti on mea ning that we are not p res ent to be able to answ er questi ons that participants m a y hav e or clarif y an y awkw ardl y worded questi ons.  Anothe r downside is that basic comput er skill s are required for pa rticipa nts to fill out our surve y.  Finall y, web based surve ys are easil y disregarded and can be deleted easil y b y participa nts.   We also  included hard co p y surv e ys so that we can be present if the y had an y questi ons and thus have more int era cti on with par ti cipants and we also felt that there would be a lowe r re fusal rate for th e hard cop y sur ve ys when ask ed dire ctl y as opposed to by em ail . Compared to easil y disre gardin g an email people ar e less likel y t o refuse a personal invit ati on to par ti cipate in a surve y.  Som e downsides to our hard cop y su rve y is that approachin g indi vid uals and askin g if the y would like to participate in our surve y i s  10 ver y time consum ing.  Also, we can onl y ta r get a small popul ati on at a give n time.  With hard copies, it is also ver y tedious to anal yz e the data.  Havin g to look thro ugh all the hard copies indi viduall y and anal yz e the data is also tim e consum ing. Final l y, costs were higher bec ause we need e d to print out a lot of hard cop y su rve ys.   We also used QR codes and post ers wit h tabs than can be torn off containin g a web link to our surve y.  We found the QR codes t o be att racti ve and conv e nient.  People walki ng  b y with devi ces such as smart phones cou ld easil y sc an our cod e and participate in our surve y.  With that being said, the code woul d lead them directl y to o ur web bas ed surve y and thus the result s would be eas y to an al yz e.  We also felt that the tear off tabs were convenient be caus e if the y did not hav e a device that would be abl e to scan the bar code or if the y did not ha ve enou gh time to scan t he bar cod e, the y could t ear off the tab and fill in the surve y late r.  Again, this woul d lead to the web based su rve y and thus data would be eas y to an al yz e .  A downside to the QR code is that not ever yon e has a devic e that is able to scan the co de, alt hough hop efull y the rip off tab helped to me diate thi s limi tation.  In addit ion, our post er could easil y be bypass ed since it was letter - siz ed  paper.  With that being said, ano ther downside is that other post ers could easil y co ver our post er .  Finall y, ou r QR code and post er could also be tak e n down.  In order to att r act peopl e to parti cipate in our surv e y, we decided to include some incenti ves.  We advertise d that by participati ng in our surve y, the participan t would be entered in a draw with a chanc e to win a gift card to the UBC Bookst or e.  All the y would have to do is fill in their name and include th eir email addre ss and phone number to be included in the draw wit h a chan ce to win.    11 In tot al we had sampled 413 indi viduals on the UBC campus .  We had lau nched our surve y on the afterno on of Frida y M arch 16, 2012.  We had officiall y ceased acc ess to parti cipate in the surve y on the evenin g of Marc h 31, 2012.  There fore we had the surve y u p and runnin g fo r about two  weeks befor e we had an al yz ed th e dat a.  In tot al with respect to both hard cop y and web - based  su rv e ys, after th e quart er mar k of the two weeks, we had rou ghl y 90 surve ys completed.  After two weeks we had ro ughl y 210 surve ys com pleted.  Afte r the three qu arte r mark of the two - we ek  pe riod we had rou ghl y 300 surve ys done.  By the end of the two - we ek  pe riod we had compl eted a tot al of 413 surve ys.  Ther efor e the response rate tot al ed  to ab out 100 parti cipants biwe ekl y fo r the two we eks we had the su rve y runnin g.  The aim of our surve y was to tar get 1000 indi viduals on campus .  Another limit ati on we came across whi ch af fected our number of response was the two week period in which we co nducted our surv e y.  If th e surve y was acc essi ble  for more th an two weeks, ther e potentia ll y could hav e been mor e respondents.   Findings  Surve ys wer e handed out to a combi ned tot al of 413 participants. 117 of th ese were su rve yed via hard cop y surv e ys, whil e the re maining 296 were captur ed using our onl ine surve y. Questi ons were grouped int o 10 cat ego ries and sh all be pres ented as such here. See Appendix C  for gr aphical repres entation.   “Food purchasing” was our first category, and it contained two questions. Question 1, “Do you purchase food items for i mm ediate consum pti on on the UBC Campus?” 397 of the participants answered “Yes”, while 15 answered “No”. Question 2 asked, “How often do you purchase food on campus?” 10 answered “Almost never”, 20  12 answered “At least once a semester”, 63 answered “At least once a month”, a majority of 202 answered “At least once a week”, and finally 96 answered “At least once a day”  “Location of food purchase” contained 3 questions. Question 3 of our survey asked the participants “When purchasing food or drink for immediat e con sump ti on on the UBC campus , whi ch foo d establi shments do you purchase foods from mos t often? (Select your top 2)” The list contained 23 food outlet examples. 311 answered “UBC Sub (not including Pacific Spirit Place)”, 138 answered “Tim Hortons”, 131 answered “Starbucks”, 81 answered “Pacific Spirit Place”, 72 answered “Ike’s Café”, 9 answered “Café Perugia”, 1 answered “Café Moa”, 14 answered “IRC Snack bar”, 1 answered “Law Café at Allard Hall”, 24 answered “The Loop Café at CIRS”, 2 answered “Neville’s”, 12 answered “Niche Café”, 3 answered Pond Café, 13 answered Reboot Café, 8 answered “Sauder Exchange Café, 13 answered “Stir it Up”, 24 answered Triple O’s, 2 answered “Trek Express”, 1 answered “Sage Bistro” 15 answered “The Point Grill” 16 answered Tot em Park” 50 answered “UBC Village Food Outlets” and 24 answered “Vanier’s.”  Our next two questi ons focused on reasoni n g for choice of food establi shments. Questi on 4 asked, “What is your most important consideration when selecting the food establishme nt you just indicated?” 141 answered, “Price”, 127 answered “Location”, 9 answered “Speed of Service”, 43 answered “Nutrition”, 64 answered, “Taste”, and 14 answered “Other”. Question 5 asked, “What is your second most important consideration when selectin g th e food establishments you just indicated?” 98 answered “Location”, 125 answered, “Price”, 44 answered “Speed of Service”, 62 answered “Nutrition” 68 answered “Taste” and 3 answered Other”  13 “Packaging and reusable containers” had 9 questions. Question 6 asked, “Have yo u ev er brou ght you r own coff ee mu g inst ead of using a dispo sable paper cup when purchasing drinks on campus?” A majority of 204 answered, “Yes”, 156 participants answered “No”, and lastly 39 participants responded with “I do not purchase dri nks on campus.” Question 7 asked, “How often do you bring your own coffee mug when purchasing drinks on campus?” 22 participants answered “Almost never”, 25 participants answered “At least one a semester”, 53 participants answered “At least once a month”, 55 of participants answered “At least once a week” and finally 50 participants answered “At least once a day”. Question 8 asked, “Have you ever brought your own container instead of using a dispo sabl e tak e - away container when purchasing food on campus?” 11 7 of participants answered, “Yes”, while a majority 281 participants answered “No”. Question 9 asked “How often do you bring your own container for food when purchasing food on campus?” 33 of participants answered “Almost never”, 22 of participants answered “At least once a semester”, 23 of participants answered “At least once a month”, 35 of participants answered “At least once a week” and lastly 5 participants responded with “At least once a day. Question 10 asked “Do any campus food businesses offer disc ounts for bringing your own coffee mug on campus?” A majority of 284 participants answered “Yes” while 99 participants answered “No”. Question 11 asked “Do any businesses offer discounts for bringing your food container on campus?” 160 of responses were “Yes” while the remaining 214 were “No”. Question 12 asked, “Do you bring your own mug or containers to get discount?” 66 of responses were “Yes” while a majorit y 125 of responses was  “No”. Question 13 asked, “Have you ever heard of the Eco - t o - go program?” 100 of responses answered “Yes” while a majority 283 responses answered  14 “No”. Question 14 asked, “Are you a member of the Eco - t o - go program?” Only 19 of responses were “Yes” while 93 of responses were “No”.  In the next category of “Dietary choices and menu items”, 11 questions were asked. Question 15 of our survey asked “Do you know what a vegetarian diet is?” 374 of responses were “Yes”, while 24 were “No”. Question 16 asked, “Are you a vegetarian?” 32 of responses were “Yes”, while 345 answered “No”. Question 17 asked, “Do you purchase vegetarian foods when available?” 71 of responses were “Yes, almost always”, 119 of responses were “No, almost never”, while 118 of responses were “Sometimes”. Question 18 asked “Do you know what a vegan diet is?” 348 of responses were “Yes”, while 50 responses were “No”. Question 19 asked, “Are you vegan?” Only 8 responses were “Yes”, while 340 responses were “No”. Question 20 asked, “Do you purchase vegan foods when available?” 16 of responses were “Yes, almost always”, 203 responses were “No, almost never” and 131 responses were “Sometimes”. Question 21 asked, “Why do you choose vegan and/or vegetarian menu options? 48 of responses were “Ethical/Animal welfare reasons, 39 of responses were for “Environmental reasons”, 117 r esponses were for “Personal Health Reasons”, 77 of responses were for “Taste preference” and 76 of responses were for “Other reasons not mentioned here”. Question 22 asked, “Do you know what organic food is?” 388 of response answered “Yes”, while 11 answer ed “No”. Question 23 asked “Are you aware of any organic food or drink items on campus?” 249 of responses answered “Yes” while 142 of responses were “No”. Question 24 asked, “Have you ever purchased organic foods on campus?” 249 of responses were “Yes” while 142 responses were “No”. Question 25 asked, “How often do you buy organic food or drink on campus?” A majority of 218 answered “Almost  15 never”. 43 responses were “At least once a semester”, 69 responses were “At least once a month”, 50 responses were “At least once a week”, and 6 responses were “At least once a day”.   For the “Waste” section of the survey, 15 questions were asked. Question 26 of our survey asked, “How often do you use disposable products such as plastic or paper plates and cups?” 40 of responses were  “Almost never”, 33 of responses were “At least once a semester”, 80 of responses were “At least once a month”, 178 of responses were “At least once a week” and 66 of responses were “At least once a day”. Question 27 asked, “Do you know what recycling is?” A majority of 395 answered “Yes” while 2 answered “No”. Question 28 asked “Are you aware of any recycling bins that are located on campus?” A majority of 392 answered “Yes” while 7 answered “No”. Question 29 asked, “Do you use recycling bins on the UBC Campus?” A majority 381 answered “Yes” while 16 answered “No”. Question 30 asked “Do you find it convenient to recycle on the UBC Campus?” A majority 309 answered “Yes” while 73 answered “No”. Question 31 asked, “How often do you recycle plastic forks, spoons, or knives on the UBC Campus?” A majority 120 answered “Almost never”, 36 answered “At least once a semester”, 60 answered “At least once a month”, 108 answered “At least once a week”, and 56 answered “At least once a day”. Question 32 asked, “When you do not recycle plastic forks, spoons and knives, why not?” 161 answered, “They are not recyclable”, 159 answered I do not know where to recycle them”, 130 answered, “It is not convenient to recycle them” and 15 answered, “Recycling is not that important to me”. Question 33 asked, “How often do you recycle products, such as sushi containers, on the UBC Campus?” 177 answered “Almost never”, 41 answered “At least once a semester”, 64  16 answered “At least once a month”, 76 answered “At least once a week” and 35 answered “At least once a day”. Question 34 asked, “Do you know what composting is?” A majority 378 answered “Yes” while 21 answered “No”. Question 35 asked “Are you aware of any compost bins located on the UBC Campus?” A majority 294 answered “Yes”, while 83 answered “No”. Question 36 asked, “Do you use compost bins on the UBC Campus?” 247 answered “Yes” while 60 answered “No”. Question 37 asked “Do you find it convenient to compost on the UBC Campus?” 162 answered “Yes” while 99 answered “No”. Question 38 asked, “When you do not compost, why you not compost on campus do?” 92 answered, “I do not know where to put compostable items”, 96 answered “I’m not sure what items can be compostable”. 159 answered, “It is not compostable” and 10 answered, “Composting is not that important to me”. Question 39 asked, “Which of the following items can be placed in the green compost bins found on the UBC Campus?” 140 answered “Chopsticks”, 130 answered “Coffee Stir sticks”, 202 answered “Paper bag”, 242 answered “Napkins”, 195 answered “Bones from Meat products”, 238 answered “Teabags”, 23 answered “To Go Cups”, 7 answered “Metal flatware (forks, knives, spoons), and 106 answered “To Go hot beverage cups”. Question 40 asked “Please indicate if the following state ment is true or false: it does not matte r which bin (garba ge, re c ycli n g or co mpos t) I put an item in b ecause all the bins will be sorted anyway.” 19 answered “Yes” while 374 answered “No”. “Campus events” contained 7 questions. Question 41 asked “Are you a war e of food - relat ed events such as Meet Your M aker, th e Bluebe rr y Festi val, the Apple Festi val, FarmAde or other similar event on campus?” 219 answered “Yes” while 180 answered “No”. Question 42 asked, “Have you ever attended or participated in one of these events?”  17 113 answered “Yes”, while 280 answered “No”. Question 43 asked, “How did you hear about these events?” A majority 140 answered “Through friends”, 77 answered “In class”, 68 answered “Bulletin board”, 122 answered “Emails from UBC”, 34 answered U BC Events website”, 14 answered “AMS website”, and 68 answered “Other”. Question 44 asked “Have you ever purchased food from the UBC Farm?” 95 answered “Yes”, while 299 answered “No”. Question 45 asked “How often do you purchase food from the UBC Farm?” 8 answered “Once a week”, 19 answered “1 - 3 times a month”, 65 answered “A few times a year (less than once a month)”, 271 answered “Never” and 29 answered, “I don’t know”. Question 46 asked “Are you aware of the Saturday morning Markets at the UBC Farm?” 151 answered “Yes”, while 244 answered “No”. Question 47 asked “Are you aware of the UBC Farm market on Wednesdays at 12 pm by the bookstore?” 169 answered ‘Yes”, while 228 answered “No”. “Information Availability” contained 2 questions. Question 48 asked “A re yo u interested in having more information about the food you purchase on campus?” 232 answered “Yes”, while 165 answered “No”. Question 49 asked, “What type of information are you interested in?” 203 answered “Nutrition”, 171 answered “Location of where  product was grown or produced (food miles, food origin)”, 151 answered “Where product was prepared (i.e., campus made)”, 159 answered “Organic”, 69 ans wered “Cultural Information (Kosher, Halal, etc.)”, 137 answered “Fair - Trade”, 66 answered “Vegan”, and 83 answered “Vegetarian” and 13 answered “Other” “Sustainable food products” includes 4 questions. Question 50 asked, “How often do you purchase Fair Trade products on campus?” 124 answered “Almost never”, 29 answered “At least once a semester”, 46 answered “At least once a month”, 48 answered  18 “At least once week”, 14 answered “At least once a day” and 130 answered “I do not know”. Question 51 asked, “How often do you purchase certified organic food on campus?” 141 answered “Almost never”, 35 answered “At least once a semester”, 44 answered “At least once a month”, 47 answered “At least once week”, 9 answered “At least once a day” and 118 answered “I do not know”. Question 52 asked, “How often do you purchase locally produced food on campus?” 103 answered “Almost never”, 36 answered “At least once a semester”, 49 answered “At least once a month”, 38 answered “At least once week”, 13 answered “At least once a day” and 153 answered “I do not know”. Question 53 asked “Would you be more likely to purchase food fr o m an outlet that uses produce from UBC Farm” 261 answered “Yes”, and 125 answered “No”. “Information sharing” contained 4 questions. Question 54 asked, “Are you interested in knowing more about the foods you purchase on the UBC campus?” 250 answered “Yes”, while 143 answered “No”. Question 55 asked, “What would be the best way to learn more about the food you purchase at UBC?” 177 answered “Brochure, table tent, or display located where you purchase or eat your food”, 82 answered “Newspaper (i.e. Ubyssey)”, 78 answered “Campus event or presentation”, 95 answered “Classroom lecture/guest speaker”, 188 answered “Product labels”, 10 answered “Study groups”, 42 answered “Talking to seller/farmer”, 50 answered “Tour of farms”, 188 answered “Web pages/t he int erne t (UBCFSP blog, Food provider websites, QR codes)” and 12 answered “Other”. Question 56 asked, “Have you ever heard of the UBC Food Systems Project before?” 106 answered “Yes”, while 284 answered “No”. Question 57 asked ‘How did yo u he ar about the UBC Food  Systems Project?” 15 answered “UBC SEEDS Program”, 57 answered, “Land, Food, and community III course (LFS 450)”, 8 answered “Online  19 Blog”, 13 answered “UBC Farm/LFS Orchard Garden”, 8 answered “Presentations”, and 26 answered “Other”.  “Demographics” contained 3 questions. Question 58 asked “Whom do you represent in the UBC Food System?” 350 answered “Student”, 29 answered “UBC Staff”, 8 answered “UBC Faculty Staff”, and 4 answered “Other”. Question 59 asked, “Which faculty do you represent?” This was a w rite in que sti on in which the participants wrote their  own answe r. Most popul ar answe rs we re 124 from Land and Food S yst ems facult y, 71 from the Facult y of Science, and 59 from the Facult y of Arts. Lastl y, qu esti on 60 asked, “Do you live on Campus?” 86 answered “Yes”, and 307 answered “No”.  Discussion Food Purchasing & Location of Food Purchasing  Unsurprisi ngl y alm ost 10 0% of the people who ch ose to participate in our surve y have purch ased fo od withi n the UBC food s ystem .  The majorit y of respon dents said  the y purchased food or drinks  at least once a week or once a da y.  It is safe to sa y that the UBC food s ystem pla ys an important role in the co mm unit y at UBC. Also u nsurprisi ngl y the top two reasons fo r consum ers wer e  locati on and price .  Students are of t en on ex treme budgets with the cost of higher educ ati on so chea p food is alwa ys a hi gh priorit y and bus y da ys running all aro und campus for classes make locati on alm ost eq uall y as important.  Knowing thes e two thi ngs it s important that we make sur e sust a i nable food choices are of fer ed at rea sonable prices, and ar e widel y dist ributed across campus .  Packaging and Reusable Containers  Eco - t o - G o is a pro gram where consum ers  can ex chan ge a membership car d for a temporar y food container ( UBC Food Services, N/A ) . Onc e a membe r is done with the  20 container, the y need onl y drop the dirt y container off at a food outl et to get their card back ( U BC Food Se rvice s, N/A ). Membership is onl y $5 plus tax with no ex pir y dat e  or annual ren ewal, how ever the r e  is a replac ement f e e for a lost or dama ged card ( U BC Food Servic es, N/A ).  This program is available at Totem and Vanier’s Dining Rooms, and all participati n g UBC Food Services loc ati ons ( UBC Food Se rvices, N/A ). It  is a great food sust ainabl e ini ti ati ve for an yone who live s, works, or eats on campus .  Howeve r, wit h onl y 24% of participants knowin g about Eco - t o - G o , we can not properl y assess the impact it has on the UBC food s ystem. We also found that  onl y 5% of our participants wer e  membe rs of thi s program,  ther ef ore the pro gr am is not as effe cti ve as it c ould  be. Wit h increased awar eness we will hopef ull y be bett e r able to ass e ss the effe cti veness of the pro gr am.  Dietary Choices and Menu Items  Most participants stated the y kn ew wh at ve geta ria n and ve gan diets me ant  however most also said t he y wer e not ve geta rian or vegan. Ho weve r, the l ack of practi cin g vegetarians and vegans did not prevent people’s preference for wanting vegetarian choices. Th e t op reasons fo r indivi duals choosing ve getarian me al opt ions were for  pe rsonal healt h reasons and tast e prefer e nce.    Most of our participants knew what or ganic foods were, ho weve r, not eve r yo ne is willing to purchase it. As price is the second most important food factor in UBC’s food s ystem, it ma y be the  rea son for lower consum pti on of or ganic foods. As participants prefe r to purch ase ve geta rian or vegan food alt e rn ati ves becaus e of persona l healt h reasons, it can probabl y be said that participants would also like to purcha se or ganic  fo r those same re asons . How ever, the price of foods is more important than the healt h  21 benefits of organic foods.  Waste  From our result s we noti ced that the majorit y of the participants kno w wh at rec ycli n g is and rec ycl e  when the y can. Howev er, our data shows that not ever y par ti cipant re c ycles even though the y know wh at rec ycli n g is. Thi s puts int o questi on wh y the re are some parti cipants not rec ycli n g. Ou r foll ow - up questi on iden ti fies that the top two reasons ar e  that participants do not know which items can be rec yc led and t hat they sometimes can’t find a recycl ing  bin. Ho wev er, UBC does attempt to educate th e UBC food comm unit y b y providi ng information la bels on  rec ycli n g bins an d att empt s to provide man y re c ycli n g bins across campus to pr omot e rec ycli n g. How ev er the gap tha t we have found betw een knowledge and practi c es leads us to beli eve that th ere is sti ll room for improvement.   Like rec yc li ng, compos ti ng diff ers  in th e number of participants who kno w what compost ing is  to the number of participants who compos t. Howeve r with compos ti ng, less people said the y kn ew wh at com post ing was, and l ess peo ple said the y compos ted. Wit h thi s, we can identif y that ther e ne eds to be more improvem ent in educati n g people in the UBC food s ystem on wh at compost ing is. Particip ants had trou ble identif yin g which items were compos table at the UBC food s ystem. The UBC food s ystem has lab els identi fyi n g some produ cts that are rec ycl able, how ever, bett er labels ma y be requir ed based on the result s of the unc ert aint y of which items can be compos te d. Like rec yc li ng the top two reasons wh y participan ts did not compost were the lack of knowledge of wh at was compos table, and the conv enience of findi n g a com post bin.  Campus Events  22  Less than half  the partici pants were awa re of food - related events  aroun d ca mpus . Man y have ne ver att ende d an y of these events, nor have the y pur chased foo d from the UBC farm or know of the farm’s produce market events in front of the UBC Bookstore. This  lack of aw aren ess indi cates  that UBC food - c a mpus related ev ents are not b eing advertised well enou gh.  Information Availability  From the result s we can see that particip ants are in terested in knowin g more about the UBC food s ystem. M ore than half of the stude nts want to know more information on the food product itself. In terms  of obtaining mor e knowledge about foods on campus in gen eral, mor e than half of our participants also wa nt to learn more. Wit h the most popular method of learnin g about food knowled ge on cam pus being onli ne sour ces. We are uncertain wh y mor e parti cipants did not know information about foods whe n their prefe rred sou rce to find t his information is current l y av ail able.  Sustainable Food Products  For man y sust ainable foo d product s, the majorit y of participants  stated  the y “alm ost never ” purch ase d sust ainable f oods prod ucts, or “did not know ” whether the y were bu yin g sust ainable food products. F rom wha t parti cipants previous l y  said about information avail abil it y, there is interest in knowi ng about loc al, or ganic and fair trad e food products . The refo re food outl ets should emphasiz e sust ainable food op ti ons and provide signs so consum ers ar e aw are of what the y are pur chasin g.  Information Sharing  Participants provided  thr ee main methods for  whi ch the y prefer to find out more information  about the UBC food s yst em . Brochur es and information tables , food product  23 labels, and i nternet webp ages. Thou gh these are th e top three choi ces, som e of these methods are alr ead y curr entl y bein g used. Websit es and QR codes are curr entl y bein g used on campus  to off er coupons and de als near food outl ets, and on the UBC websit e  but the y shoul d also be utili z ed as a wa y to spre ad aw areness about the food s ystem .  Demographics  There were bi ases in the demogr aphics of ou r sur ve y. Our pa rticipants wer e mainl y students  and alt h ough the UBC food s yste m consist s of man y other people, such as staff, teache rs, and vis it ors , the y did not have hi gh repres entation in our surve y . Fo r students and facult y we also asked what facult y /d e partment the y rep resent e d, h owever, not ever y pa rticipant ans we red thi s  questi on. As discussed  in methods , participants were coll ected throu gh V ist a class mail and social netw ork s, which cr eated a b ia s towards certain facult ies. We wer e not able to massi vel y dist ribute the surve y link through UBC, and had to sea rch up  and indi viduall y post our su r ve y link to facult y blo gs. Howeve r, not ever y facult y all owed no n - members to post .   We encountered a lot of skipp ed response s  while looki ng throu gh our surv e ys, which we assum e is du e to the length of th e surve y.  The s e  skipp ed questi on s could have had an ef fe ct on our resul ts.   As the project improv es  over the ye ars and more data is coll ected, we will be able to gain a bett er unde rsta nding of the UBC food s ys tem.  Recommendations  B y 2022, we will have no cross contamination of  the garba ge/compost ing/ r ec ycli n g by havin g ex pli cit labels and signa ge and inc re asing the numbe r of rec ycli ng and compos t bins.  For UBC Waste Mana gement.   B y 2017, we will have increas ed knowled ge with respect to or ganic food, l ocal food, and fair - trad e fo od by ex pli cit l y label in g  wh ere food is gro wn, and ho w it is  24 gro wn and pr epar ed.  Fo r UBCFS and AMS FB D.   B y 2017, we will have increas ed the att end ance of food - relat ed campus eve nts through advertisement in lecture rooms , bro chures , guest spe ake rs, posters, and emails  from UBC and web page s / blogs on the i nte rnet.  For UBC and C ampus Sustainabil it y.   B y 2017, we will have increas ed the beh avio u r  wi th respect to brin g reusab le containers on the campus through advertisement o f food outl et discounts an d Eco -t o - go p ro gram. For UBC and Campus Sustainabil ity.   B y 2020, we will have increas ed the use of produc e from UBC Fa rm, as stu dents would more likely to purchase food from food outlets that utilize local farmer’s products.  For UBC Farm , UBCFS and AMS FB D.  Scenario Evaluation  We thought that this project was important to the UBCFS P as a whol e.  After working with the UBC fo od s ystem for so lon g, it i s important to step back and look at the system as a whole in order to see wher e ch an ges are sti ll need ed most . We spent a lot of time making sur e that our comm unit y pa rtners were able to comm ent on our surve y fo r ever y dr aft.  How ever, w e encounte red some conf usion with the comm unity pa rtners, as each gave sli ghtl y con flicting inst ructi ons.  Fo r a while we were tol d to foc u s onl y on actual beh avio u rs and pr acti ces with in the food s ystem, however a few vers ions into the surve y draft that chan ged and we had to factor in knowledge and att it udes.   We were ini ti all y disapp oint ed by onl y re achin g 413 participants when our goal was for 1000 responses, but we do feel that this w as a dec ent sampl e siz e given the short time we had the surv e y live (two weeks).   Hop eful l y workin g of f of our su r ve y and givi n g themselves more t im e, nex t years surv e y gr oup will be able to rea ch the 1000 participant obj ecti ve.   25  W e recomm end that that nex t years surv e y group s et up an adve rtised booth in the SUB or the UBC Bookst ore whe re the y can gath e r surve y pa rticipants.  If the y spend a few ho urs at the booth, a few tim es a wee k the y shoul d be able to garner a lot of responses .  o The busi est da ys for the SUB ar e Tuesda ys and Wednesda ys around 12:00pm   The surve y shoul d be sho rtened to encou ra ge parti cipation and eit her mad e more specific or split int o mul tipl e surve ys, each askin g about one component of the food s ystem.   Nex t years group shoul d tr y to get the surv e y live earlier so that the y have more time to coll ect data and anal yz e their result s.  Media Release UBC Food S ystem Proje ct  April 2012  P roject Titl e:  Baseline Survey of Behaviours and Attitudes of UBC Food System Community Members  Description: As part of the University of British Columbia’s Food Systems Project w e cr eated and implemented a gen er al surve y for th e enti re UBC campus comm unit y t o determi ne knowledge, att it udes and practi ces o f people who participate in the UBC fo od s ystem.  With this surve y we will be able to assess areas of the food s yst em that are c urrentl y       Quote : “If consumers are unaware of the problem how can that work to fix it. Help the UBC food system function in a sustainable way by participating and filling out our survey!”   26 working well , alon g with areas th at can stil l be improved upon. Fo r our me thods we used convenienc e sampli ng to target parti cipants for our surve y.  Participants en gaged in either web based su rve ys or har d cop y su rve ys to measu r e their att it udes, behavio u r and knowledge about the UBC food s ystem.  413 indivi duals parti cipated in ou r surve y with 117 fil li ng out hard cop y surve ys and 296 doin g web - based su rve ys.  We fo und that there was a lot of opportuni t y t o increas e knowled ge ab out food sust ainabi l it y on campus as  well as a definite need to improve student’s actual practices within the UBC food system.  But there is inter est and demand for thi s informat ion.   References  Bake r - F r en ch, S. (2009). The UBC Food Systems Project -UBCFSP- Summary Report  2009 . Retrieved  on April 6, 12 from htt p:/ /bl ogs.landfood.ubc .ca/foods ystemproje ct/ files/2010/08/ UBC FS P -S umm ar yR eport20091.p df  Kloppenbur g, J .J ., Hen drickson, J., and Stevenson, G.W. (1996). “Coming in to the  Foodshed.” Agriculture and Human Values, 13, 33 - 42.  McLaughlin, A. and Mineau, P. (1995). “The Impact of Agricultural Practices on  Biodiversity.” Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 55, 201 - 212.  UBC Food Se rvices. (N/A). Eco -  To Go: Container Ex chan ge Pro gr am. Retrieved Ap ril  8, 2012, from UBC Food Services: h tt p:/ /www.food.ubc.ca/sus tainabil it y/e co - t o -g o  Yu, J., &  Cooper, H. (19 83). “A Qu anti tative Review of Res ea rch Desi gn Effects on  Response Rates to Questi onnaires. ” Journal of Marketing Research , 20 (1), 36 - 44.   Appendices  Appendix A: Vision Statement for a Sustainable UBC Food System 1. Must prot ect and enhance the diver si t y and the integr i t y of the nat ur al ecosyst em and res our ces that support s it.  2. Rel ies on loca l input s when possi bl e, wher e input s and was te are recycl ed and/ or compost ed local l y.  3. Is a secur e syst em that provi des foo d that is aff or dabl e; avai lable; accessi ble; cul t ur al l y, et hi cal l y, and nutr it i onall y appr opr iate 
 and saf e; and can adapt to changes .  4. Nour ishe s the pres ent gener at i on to provi de for heal thy diet s that do not compr omi se the food secur it y of pres ent or 
 f ut ur e gene rati ons.  5. Nur t ur es feeli ngs of communi t y and pr omot es enj oyment of food ar ound the food tabl e.  6. Foster s awarene ss, underst andi ng, and per sonal responsi bi li t y withi n the commu ni t y of ever y component from 
 pr oduction to disposal .  7. Cont ai ns a bal ance of impor ted and loca l foods that come from soc i al l y and ecol ogi cal l y cons ci ous producer s to ensur e 
 l ong - t er m financi al viabil it y.   27 8. Consumer s, food wor kers, and educ at or s are made awar e of the recipr oca l impac t s that the UBC food syst em has on sur r oundi ng food syst ems.  Appendix B: Sample Survey-S ee att a ched Word Document   Sample QR Response Poster   Example of Email and Facebook Advertisement  EFM Survey Tools Account:  Password:    Gmail Account:   Password:   28 Appendix C: Results S ee a tt ach ed Ex cel Sprea dsheets  for raw dat a     1. Do you purchase food items for immediate consumption on Campus? YesNo050100150200250Almost Never At least once asemesterAt least once amonthAt least once aweekAt least once aday2. How Often do you purchase food on campus? 0501001502002503003503. When purchasing food or drink for immediate consumption on the UBC Campus, which food establishments do you purchase foods from most often?  29    050100150Location Price Speed ofServiceNutrition Taste Other4. What is your most important consideration when selecting the food establishments you just indicated? 050100150Location Price Speed ofServiceNutrition Taste Other5. What is your second most important consideration when selecting the food establishments you just indicated? 6. Have you ever brought your own coffee mug instead of using a disposable paper cup when purchasing drinks on campus? YesNoI do not purchase drinks on campus0204060Almost never At least once asemesterAt least once amonthAt least once aweekAt least once aday7. How often do you bring your own coffee mug when purchasing drinks on campus?  30 8. Have you ever brought your own container instead of using a disposable take-away container when purchasing food on campus? YesNo010203040Almost never At least once asemesterAt least once amonthAt leasat once aweekAt least once aday9. How often do you bring your own container for food when purchasing food on campus? 10. Do any campus food businessess offer discounts for bringing your own coffee mug on campus? YesNo11. Do any businessess offer discounts for bringing your food container on campus? YesNo12. Do you bring your own mug or containers to get discount? YesNo13. Have you ever heard of the Eco-to-go program? YesNo14. Are you a member of the Eco-to-go program? YesNo15. Do you know what a vegetarian diet is? YesNo 31 16. Are you a vegetarian? Yes, almostalwaysNo, almostneverSometimes17. Do you purchase vegetarian foods when available? Yes, almostalwaysNo, almostneverSometimes18. Do you know what a vegan diet is? YesNo19. Are you a vegan? YesNo20. Do you purchase vegan foods when available? Yes, almost alwaysNo, almost neverSometimes050100150Ethical/Animalwelfare reasonsEnvironmentalreasonsPersonal HealthreasonsTaste preference Other reasonsnot mentionedhere21. Why do you choose vegan and/or vegetarian menu options? 22. Do you know what organic food is? YesNo23. Are you aware of any organic food or drink items on campus? YesNo24. Have you ever purchased organic foods on campus? YesNo 32  050100150200250Almost never At least once asemesterAt least once amonthAt least once aweekAt least once aday25. How often do you buy organic food or drink on campus? 050100150200Almost never At least once asemesterAt least once amonthAt least once aweekAt least once aday26. How often do you use disposable products such as plastic or paper plates and cups? 27. Do you know what recycling is? YesNo28. Are you aware of any recycling bins that are located on campus? YesNo29. Do you use recycling bins on the UBC Campus? YesNo30. Do you find it convenient to recycle on the UBC Campus? YesNo050100150Almost never At least once asemesterAt least once amonthAt least once aweekAt least once aday31. How often do you recycle plastic forks, spoons or knives on the UBC Campus?  33 0100200They are notrecyclableI do not know whereto recycle themIt is not convenient torecycle themRecycling is not thatimportant to me32. When you do not recycle plastic forks, spoons and knives, why not? 050100150200Almost never At least once asemesterAt least once amonthAt least once aweekAt least once aday33. How often do you recycle plastic products, such as sushi containers, on the UBC Campus? 34. Do you know what composting is? YesNo35. Are you aware of any compost bins located on the UBC Campus? YesNo36. Do you use compost bins on the UBC Campus? YesNo37. Do you find it convenient to compost on the UBC Campus? YesNo050100150200I do not know where toput compostable itemsI'm not sure what itemscan be compostedIt is not convenient tocompostComposting is not thatimportant to me38. When you do not compost, why do you not compost on Campus?  34  05010015020025030039. Which of the following items can be placed in the green compost bins found on the UBC campus? 40. Please indicate if the following statement is true or false: It does not matter which bin (garbage, recycling, or compost) I put an item in because all the bins will be sorted later anyway 1 01 =Tru e,  0=F alse  41. Are you aware of food-related events such as Meet Your Maker, the Blueberry Festival, the Apple Festival, FarmAde or other similar event on campus? Yes No42. Have you ever attended or participated in one of the events? Yes No 35     050100150ThroughfriendsIn class BulletinboardEmails fromUBCUBC eventswebsiteAMS website Other43. How did you hear about these events? 44. Have you ever purchased food from the UBC Farm? Yes No45. How often do you purchase food from the UBC Farm? Once a week or more1-3 times a monthA few times a year (less than once a month)NeverI don't know46. Are you aware of the Saturday morning Markets at the UBC Farm? Yes No47. Are you aware of the UBC Farm Market on Wednesdays at 12 pm by the bookstore? Yes No48. Are you interested in having more information about the food you purcase on campus? Yes No 36     05010015020025049. What type of information are you interested in? 50. How often do you purchase Fair Trade products on campus? Almost neverAt least once a semesterAt least once a monthAt least once a weekAt least once a dayI do not know51. How often do you purchase certified organic food on campus? Almost neverAt least once a semesterAt least once a monthAt least once a weekAt least once a dayI do not know52. How often do you purchase locally produced food on campus? Almost neverAt least once a semesterAt least once a monthAt least once a weekat least once a dayI do not know 37  53. Would you be more likely to purchase food from an outlet that uses produce from UBC Farm? YesNo54. Are you interested in knowing more about the foods you purchased on the UBC Campus? YesNo02040608010012014016018020055. What would be the best way to learn more about the food you purchase at UBC?  56. Have you ever heard of the UBC Food Systems Project before? Yes No 38    010203040506057. How did you hear about the UBC Food Systems project? 0200400Student UBC Staff UBC Faculty Staff Other58. Whom do you represent in the UBC Food System? 02040608010012014059. Faculty  60. Do you live on Campus? Yes No

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