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Construction & demolition (C&D) waste practices Hosseiniteshnizi, Zahrasadat (Zahra) Oct 23, 2013

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 UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student ReportZahrasadat (Zahra) HosseiniteshniziConstruction & Demolition (C&D) Waste PracticesVOL 500October 23, 2013University of British Columbia Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.        SEEDS PROJECT FINAL REPORT Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices  Information Collection Phase  Zahra Hosseini 10/23/2013     SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 1 of 67     Contents  1. Executive summary ............................................................................................................................................. 2  2. Introduction ......................................................................................................................................................... 4  3. Methodology ....................................................................................................................................................... 5  4. General Contractors Interview Summary .............................................................................................................. 5  4.1. Waste Tracking .................................................................................................................................................. 5  4.2. Waste Diversion: ............................................................................................................................................... 7  5. Demolition Sub-contractors Interview Summary .................................................................................................. 9  5.1. Waste Tracking: ................................................................................................................................................ 9  5.2. Waste Diversion: ............................................................................................................................................. 10  6. Quantity Sheets Analyzes .................................................................................................................................. 12  6.1. Demolition Waste ............................................................................................................................................ 12  6.2. Construction Waste ......................................................................................................................................... 12  7. Discussion ......................................................................................................................................................... 13  8. Recommendations ............................................................................................................................................. 14  8.1. Campus Sustainability: .................................................................................................................................... 14  8.2. Building Operations: ....................................................................................................................................... 14  8.3. Project Services/Properties Trust: ................................................................................................................... 14  8.3.1. Preferred Demolition Subcontractors List ........................................................................................... 15  Appendix 2: Demolition Sub-contractors Interviews .................................................................................................. 31  Appendix 3: List of Interviewees ............................................................................................................................... 40  Appendix 4: Projects Pictures .................................................................................................................................... 41  Appendix 5: Quantity Sheets ..................................................................................................................................... 58        SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 2 of 67   1. Executive summary C&D waste reduction and diversion is an integral part of UBC’s Zero Waste Action Plan, which in turn is a high priority for Campus Sustainability.  It is estimated that UBC Project Services manages about 60-80 “special” projects per year. These are typically renovation projects that fall between large construction projects, and small projects. Large projects generally have good waste tracking due to the requirements in LEED and REAP green building rating systems to which most large projects must conform. Waste from small projects is tracked because it is managed by UBC Building Operations. However, waste diversion is not tracked for the “special” projects. The small size of the projects and private contractors involved makes detailed waste tracking more cumbersome.  In support of UBC’s Zero Waste Action Plan, to decrease C&D waste disposal and increase waste diversion for medium sized renovation project with smaller contractors, the purpose of this initiative was to develop a practical waste tracking and reporting method; and promote C&D waste reduction and diversion for contractors. The study is consisting of two separate parts:  1. Information Collection from contractors  2. Research and identify solutions for waste tracking/reduction and diversion for this type of projects.  This report reflects the results of the first part of the study. In this part general contractors and demolition/waste management subcontractors working on-campus were interviewed regarding their waste management and waste tracking practices and their methods and strategies for waste reduction and waste diversion. The key findings in this study are as follow: - General contractors are not very aware or concerned about waste management as they assign demolition/waste management sub-contractors to take care of demolition waste. - Tracking waste is easy by analyzing the waybills from landfills/transfer stations/recycling facilities, yet contractors do not consider it to be necessary in “special” projects - There is usually not enough space on-site to set up separate bins, but waste can be categorized in different piles, cans, plastic bags - Waste is not categorized by their quality - Reusing is rare due to the following reasons: Owners/architects prefer new materials; salvage materials might not meet required quality or quantity; in some cases, it is against BC construction codes; lack of storage area; lack of market; time constraints. - Materials which are not usually diverted are: Small amounts of waste, plastic, mixed small pieces of waste, bonded systems, food waste.  The following recommendations are proposed as a result of this study: - Mandate waste tracking and a  minimum waste diversion in the general contract, proved by waybills - Provide standard and easy form to fill in both electronic/online and hardcopy formats. - Educate Contractors and workers  through some courses - Provide small size bins, which clearly shows the type of waste  that should put in them - Expand organic composting for large construction sites  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 3 of 67   - Conduct studies on un-recyclable waste, e.g. plastic, mixed small pieces of waste, bonded systems - Hire one demolition sub-contractor for multiple projects on-campus o Carry waste from various site together o Reduces dump fees by reduced cost for larger quantities and also separated loads o Less space is needed on campus for setting up bins - Expand the transfer station on-campus to accept C&D waste of “Special” project o Promote waste separation on site o Promote waste categorization based on the quality o Keep small quantities until they reach an acceptable amount - Provide a list of preferred sub-contractor list to general contractors.  Preferred sub-contractors should: o Have high waste diversion records  o Report waste generation and diversion rates, supported by waybills o Train workers, preferably through UBC courses o Work with preferred transfer station and recycling facilities It is recommended that preferred sub-contractors: o Use pick-ups for small loads rather than trucks o Use, sell or donate reusable materials o Categorize waste based on quality o Use innovative methods for unrecyclable materials  o Separate waste on-site  o Take each type of material to designated recycling facilities/transfer stations  o For small quantities of waste: - Take them as mixed load to transfer stations with high diversion rate - Store them until it reaches to an amount that fills a truck/pick-up    potentially in campus transfer station               SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 4 of 67   2. Introduction UBC is striving to be a zero waste campus by 2030. C&D waste constitutes a considerable amount of UBC’s waste; hence, it is crucial to understand current amount of C&D waste generation and diversion rates. Such study provides required data for Campus Sustainability to be able to plan for next steps toward Zero C&D Waste. It is estimated that UBC Project Services manages about 60-80 “special” projects per year. These are typically renovation projects that fall between large construction projects (e.g., construction of a new building), and small projects (less than $50k, whose waste is managed by Building Operations). Large projects generally have good waste tracking due to the requirements in LEED and REAP green building rating systems to which most large projects must conform. Waste from small projects is tracked because it is managed by UBC Building Operations. However, waste diversion is not tracked for the special projects because: - The waste is managed by small, private contractors – not by UBC - The projects are typically not required to conform to LEED or REAP The small size of the projects and contractors involved makes detailed waste tracking more cumbersome for the contractors. In the past several years, a tracking sheet was developed to help contractors track waste on a voluntary basis – however it was not successful. There are concerns about increasing the burden on contractors, and increasing their costs that could get passed along to faculty clients who are funding the renovation projects.  In support of UBC’s Zero Waste Action Plan, to decrease C&D waste disposal and increase waste diversion for projects that fall outside of LEED and REAP green building systems. The purpose of this initiative was to develop a practical waste tracking and reporting method; and promote C&D waste reduction and diversion for contractors. This project is divided into two main themes: 1. Collect information from construction contractors and waste management companies, on “special” projects  regarding their current. 2. Research and identify solutions for waste reduction and diversion, specifically for this type of medium sized renovation project with smaller contractors.  This report contains the first part of the study i.e. data collection. The focus of this part of the study was on gathering the following information from general contractors and demolition/waste management sub-contractors: a. Waste management and waste tracking practices - Collect data that will assist UBC in estimating the total waste generation and typical waste diversion rates from special projects - Identify the most prevalent types of waste materials for different project types - Determine how waste is typically collected on site, and where do the different materials go for processing or disposal. - Identify current waste generation and diversion tracking methods (if any) used by contractors and other service providers - Recognizing tracking methods that can be practical and have minimal cost impact to contractors - The way in which UBC can help contractors to track and report waste  b. Waste reduction and diversion practices - Collect data on typical waste diversion rates and methods from special projects  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 13 of 67   7. Discussion  Except for the projects in which there are very little amounts of waste, demolition sub-contractors are responsible for demolition waste, while general contractors mainly take responsibility of construction waste. They may rent bins and hire a hauler from waste management companies.  Demolition subcontractors/waste management companies would gain the potential economic benefits of selling old materials. Hence, they are more concerned about separating and diverting waste in the most efficient way. By contrast, many of general contractors are not fully aware of or concerned about different scenarios and costs/benefits of end of life of different types of waste. Some general contractors believe that separating waste does not worth their time.  Due to the higher quantity of demolition waste and also because demolition companies are more concerned about the benefits of separating waste, demolition waste is usually separated more carefully onsite. As opposed to construction waste which usually carried to landfill as commingle waste.  Some of the demolition subcontractors stated that they separate small quantities of waste in one truck/pick-up, by plastic bags/garbage cans or simply by putting them in separate piles. However, unloading the waste one by one and weighing the truck each time is time consuming and costly. In this case delivering waste as a mixed load and pay the extra money to transfer stations to separate the mixed waste might be a better option.  Many contractors stated that they can track waste easily by requesting waybills from demolition sub-contractors/waste management companies. However, they usually do not have enough motivation/requirement to do so, except for LEED projects. Most of subcontractors stated that they keep waybills for their own purposes, but contractors generally do not request for them, unless it is a LEED project.  Waste is not usually categorized by its quality.  Contractors/subcontractors stated the following points as major obstacles for waste diversion: - Small pieces of mixed waste  - Materials which are difficult to separate (e.g. because of adhesives, nails, etc.) - Unrecyclable materials (Styrofoam, plastics and wrappers in packaging) - There is not much money in recycling  - Lack of space on site to set up separate bins. - Educating the workers  - Non-transparent garbage bags, used for small amounts of waste, can result in mistakes in waste categorization - Finding proper recycling facilities for each type of waste with decent price - Separating food waste (In large projects) - Competitive bidding fees among demolition sub-contractors  Materials are not usually reused in the projects, unless it is requested by the owners/architects.   Major obstacles stated by contractors for material reuse are: - Old materials in renovation projects are mainly not in a good condition to be reused - Owners usually prefer new materials - Storage area is expensive/inaccessible - Sometimes it is against codes to use old materials (e.g. structures)  - Old materials might be outdated and not efficient enough in terms of energy consumption  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 14 of 67   - Salvaged materials might not fit in new design (size, length, color, etc.)  - Processing materials for reusing in the same project may be time consuming and may result in delays in project schedule. - Finding customer for salvaged materials  - Materials might be damaged through demolition/deconstruction  8. Recommendations 8.1.  Campus Sustainability:  Campus Sustainability can support, promote, and conduct studies on innovative method for diverting unrecyclable materials (e.g. plastics, bonded systems, small size mixed waste, etc.) and best practices for waste management, i.e. waste tracking/diversion strategies. These studies can be done in collaboration with other active organization in the region such as Metro Vancouver.  Campus Sustainability can offer courses to educate contractors/workers on waste management. Attending these courses can be considered as an asset for preferred contractors list. The courses can contain materials such as best practices of waste management, preferred recycling facilities or transfer station, how to fill the waste tracking form, etc. 8.2. Building Operations:  Small projects on campus can have shared bins and same demolition sub-contractor. In this case demolition sub-contractor can benefit from reduced dump fees for higher waste quantities and consequently decrease the bidding fee.   Building Operations can extend organic compost collection programs to large construction sites.  Building Operations can have a transfer station close to the campus that has high preference on separated waste. The transfer station stores different types of waste separately, until they reach an acceptable quantity. Then each type of material should be carried to the designated recycling facility. This transfer station can also promote separating waste based on different qualities.  8.3. Project Services/Properties Trust:  Project Services/Properties Trust should mandate tracking waste and a minimum recycling percentage, based on the project type, early in the general contract and demand providing waybill receipts as a proof.   In order to increase diversion rate, Project Services/Properties Trust should mandate contractors to submit their demolition/deconstruction plan before starting demolition stage.  Project Services/Properties Trust can provide contractors with an easy waste tracking form to fill out, in both electronic/online and hardcopy format would help them to track waste more easily. A possible option for that is incorporating Green Halo1                                                1 Green Halo Systems is a user-friendly and intuitive; web based waste management software solution. Green Halo provides real time, and historical data, charts, graphs and reports. The software is marketed by Light House, a sustainable consultant company.   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 15 of 67    Project Services/Properties Trust can demand small separate cans/bins to collect small quantities waste. The cans/bins can also be used to carry waste separately in one truck/pick-up. Materials inside cans/bins should be easily identifiable for workers. Building Operations can provide cans/bins.  Project Services/Properties Trust should request material reuse, whenever it is possible   Project Services/Properties Trust should make sure that contractors work with dumps/transfer stations that have high recycling rate; weigh waste; and issue bills.  Project Services/Properties Trust can provide a list of preferred demolition sub-contractors for general contractors and a list of preferred transfer stations/recycling facilities for general contractors and demolition sub-contractors. 8.3.1. Preferred Demolition Subcontractors List  Required practices: - Prove a high waste diversion records in their previous practices. - Reports the waste generation rates and recycling percentage, supported by waybills at the end of project. - Train workers on best practices of deconstruction/demolition and also separating waste. - Work with preferred transfer station and recycling facilities  Preferred practices: - Separate waste on-site and take each type of material to designated recycling facilities/transfer stations - For small quantities of waste: o Using pick-ups rather than trucks o carry them as mixed load to transfer stations with high diversion rate record o Store them until it reaches to an amount that fills a truck/pick-up - Use, sell or donate reusable materials - Categorize waste based on their quality - Provide innovative methods for dealing with unrecyclable materials               SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 16 of 67   Appendix 1: General Contractors Interviews  Contractor: Mike Fisher                        Project: University Centre                                                 Date: 06/18/2013  (Seismic improvement)  Waste Tracking: 1. How waste is typically collected on site, and where do different materials go for processing or disposal?   Demolition has been done by Pacific Blasting & demolition   Construction waste management is done by Econ Pro (Recycling Contractor): 6048822733   The goal of this project is to reuse materials as much as possible. Waste Materials are separated onsite.  2. Is the amount of waste that is generated and recovered measured in your project? (How much waste is generated? How much of it is recycled? What metrics do you use to assess the amount of waste generation (LSB per Sq.ft or dollar value of project))  Who is responsible for gathering that data? (Is waste diversion measured by you (contractor), waste haulers, processors or waste transfer stations?)   Econ Pro   Follow up with Ed Cepka  UBC project services has asked for the quantity of materials  3. How many separate bins you have on site to collect different types of waste? Do you differentiate Construction and Demolition waste? Yes   Do you separate Reusable and recyclable materials? Yes  Do you separate different qualities of same material (eg. Wood, steel)? No The only bin is for steel, the rest is separated in designated area on site (not enough space for bins) Isolation Drywall Mixed garbage (dirt, excavated soil Cardboard  no charge Conc  no charge for recycling Asbestos (Bagged) Plaster/cement Wood (chipped and used as fuel) Steel  money back Copper  4. What types and how much of waste will be reused (in the same or different function), recycled, or sent to landfill?  Will be Reused: Wood, door/window frames, door handles (UBC like this type of door handles!), locks, Doors, Carpet tiles, Ceiling Tiles, bathroom tops, Insolation, Lighting fixtures (give out for free), soil (if be good for compacting), roller blinds, baseboards, white boards, ceiling steel T-bars (90% roughly), lights, pipes, electronic transformer, cable trays   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 17 of 67   5. Is there any building code, requirements from transfer station or UBC Campus that you have to follow in regard to waste management?  The owner has asked the contractor to reuse materials as much as they can 6. What are the major obstacles to waste tracking for your company? (e.g. it costs, time requirement, or other factors) Easy, just should be asked from recycling company (Econ Pro)  Usually do it for no charge to please the client (Mike has done another LEED project in Buchanan building with more than 90% recycling – 5 different bin) 7. How do you think UBC can help you in tracking and reporting the amount of waste (e.g., a web based tool)? Clarify the requirement of tracking the waste in the contract  Waste Diversion: 8. Do you use the recovered waste in your own projects or sell them? What is the reason for your preference? (Costs, Quality or quantity of materials, customers, code requirements, storage requirement, time, etc.) Yes. Owner’s wanted to reuse Demolition contractor is the owner of materials and can sell them to used building supply store 9. Does sending the waste to landfills or recovering it have different time/financial requirements or benefits for you? (Do you see any economic value in C&D waste recovery?   No economic benefit for the contractor, more ethical value for the society  Reduces the cost and the bid as a result (beneficial for recycling and demolition contractors not for the construction contractor), less charge from transfer station  No extra time or cost just motivation is needed. reuse is the requirement of the project 10. Who are your major customers for the recovered materials? (Get their contact if it is possible)  Econ Pro takes care of it.  Steel: AMIX (Ph: 1800-recycle)  Rich Van: concrete 11. What are the key barriers to waste reduction and diverting in your projects? (e.g. lack of knowledge, cost, lack of infrastructure, time, storage space, customer, or other factors)  Time consuming (Separating mixed materials: Taking off the nails from wood)  not worth it  Not fit with new design  Control the workers to throw the waste in the right bin   Plastic and Styrofoam is difficult to recycle  Enough room to setup bins 12. What are some opportunities to increase waste recovery? (What would need to happen for help you to achieve 75% or higher waste diversion?)  He claimed that they are already good 13. How could UBC help encourage reduction and diversion of waste? (e.g. on campus transfer station: not really necessary) No idea!   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 18 of 67   Contractor: Paul Davis                                                                               Project: IK Barber Library Date: 06/18/2013  Waste Tracking: 1. How waste is typically collected on site, and where do different materials go for processing or disposal?  Designated employee for picking up garbage daily with a truck Separate Bags, bring bins in, send them down, get to transfer station 2. Is the amount of waste that is generated and recovered measured in your project? (How much waste is generated? How much of it is recycled? What metrics do you use to assess the amount of waste generation (LSB per Sq.ft or dollar value of project))  Who is responsible for gathering that data? (Is waste diversion measured by you (contractor), waste haulers, processors or waste transfer stations?)  Not generally. They only have rough idea about the amount. Get weigh bills from transfer station of regional district  3. How many separate bins you have on site to collect different types of waste?  Do you differentiate Construction and Demolition waste?   No, they are treated in a same way. Do you separate Reusable and recyclable materials?  Yes, metal ceiling, extra carpet tiles, lights, door hardware, electrical, light fixture, plumbing fixture, sinks: UBC takes it to reuse in future project  for other project outside UBC he mentioned that he tries to give good quality but not useful materials/products (door, glass, furniture: have economic value (each glass 400$)) to anybody who wants them for free. Otherwise they will go to aggregate or chopped off.  Do you separate different qualities of same material (eg. Wood, steel)? No Transfer station weigh truck each time it drops off a specific type of material  Dry wall  Steel: frame, elec conduit (Deconstructed not demolished)  Sometimes Reused  Garbage  Acoustical ceiling tiles (If not reusable should be bagged separately to be accepted at Transfer Stations) Generally not reusable as it is soft and will be recycled  Large amount will be sent to specific points recycling companies (Name?)  Carpet tile  Recycled in specific transfer station locations, worn out  not reused, Sometimes is mixed with general waste and be buried in station, or sent to companies that clean good shape but dirty tiles (If clients be interested, generally customers want new) (Name?)  Conc (Small amount to regional district transfer stations, big amount which are in good shape and clean will be recycled by specific companies in north shore accept it with no cost  Cardboard  Plastic (regular garbage)  Mixed garbage: waste, flooring, dust, etc  Wood (not always separate)  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 19 of 67    Block/Brick  Florescent tubes  Light fixture (mixed garbage unless they have ballast)  Glass 4. What types and how much of waste will be reused (in the same or different function), recycled, or sent to landfill?  Reused: door, glass, carpet tiles, ceiling tile  Recycled: steel, drywall, wood (On Campus less work with wood, mainly MDF, lumber  few amounts go into mixed garbage), carpet tiles, ceiling tile, brass and copper (get back money: electricians not renovation contractor), aluminum,   Landfill: mixed garbage 5. Is there any building code, requirements from transfer station or UBC Campus that you have to follow in regard to waste management?  Transfer station regulation regarding separating the trash, Protocols regarding Asbestos (They test acoustic ceiling and if have asbestos should be bagged properly in specific bags and send to specific recyclers (closest is in Ontario)  separate contractor take care of it (Asbestos Abatement), take each type and standard amount to designated transfer stations 6. What are the major obstacles to waste tracking for your company? (e.g. it costs, time requirement, or other factors) - Not difficult, but no need to do that, when it is not a LEED Project. They should just make sure that it does not exceed the max allowed amount, but they do not need to track the exact amount. - Some of them are not separated in small projects (wood goes into garbage, elect conduit goes into steel bin 7. How do you think UBC can help you in tracking and reporting the amount of waste (e.g., a web based tool)? - Contractors would just guess it except for the one that can be counted (e.g. lights), because it is too much work for nothing. - UBC should make it mandatory otherwise contactors just guess the amount.  - (UBC can ask for weigh bills)  Waste Diversion: 8. Do you use the recovered waste in your own projects or sell them? What is the reason for your preference? (Costs, Quality or quantity of materials, customers, code requirements, storage requirement, time, etc.) Rarely - Whatever is taken apart from building belongs to UBC - There is no money in recycling - Storage area is expensive - Sometimes it is against codes (old round door handles) 9. Does sending the waste to landfills or recovering it have different time/financial requirements or benefits for you? (Do you see any economic value in C&D waste recovery?) No, All the materials go to regional transfer station 10. Who are your major customers for the recovered materials? (Get their contact if it is possible) Follow-up to receive a list of them.  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 20 of 67   11. What are the key barriers to waste reduction and diverting in your projects? (e.g. lack of knowledge, cost, lack of infrastructure, time, storage space, customer, or other factors) - Separating everything is time consuming but it’s more efficient - Renovation projects generally happen when building and consequently materials (Specially carpet tiles) are old or worn out, outdated technology, does not meet the needs or expected efficiency - For carpet tile if some be cleaned for reused but some be worn out, it is costly to order same style and they never match. - Finding customer or someone who wants it - Monitoring the workers to separate waste 12. What are some opportunities to increase waste recovery? (What would need to happen for help you to achieve 75% or higher waste diversion?)  People think that they don’t have time for it: education, policing, charging and rules Benefits: - Reduce the amount of waste and consequently the cost - Slow down filling of landfills - Better to learn how to do it now than being forced in future 13. How could UBC help encourage reduction and diversion of waste? (e.g. on campus transfer station) Not always possible  Define clear rules that contractors have to follow: people try to find shortcut  Contractor: Ledcore – Richard Arestad                                                     Project: Ponderosa Commons Date: 06/24/2013  Waste Tracking: 1. How waste is typically collected on site, and where do different materials go for processing or disposal?  - Waste is collected in disposal bins.  - The waste is then sent to the disposal facility for sorting. 2. Is the amount of waste that is generated and recovered measured in your project? (How much waste is generated? How much of it is recycled? What metrics do you use to assess the amount of waste generation (LSB per Sq.ft or dollar value of project))  Who is responsible for gathering that data? (Is waste diversion measured by you (contractor), waste haulers, processors or waste transfer stations?)  - Waste is measured in KG. - We are targeting 97% diversion from landfill - The waste haulers provide the data. They in turn receive this data from the recycling facilities. 3. How many separate bins you have on site to collect different types of waste? (Do you differentiate Construction and Demolition waste? Do you separate Reusable and recyclable materials?) - 2 - 40 yard co-mingle waste bins - 2 - 25/30 yard drywall bins - 1 - 40 yard wood bin - 1 - 30 yard cardboard bin - 2 - 4 yard front tipper cardboard bins - 1 - 20 yard metal bin  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 21 of 67   - 1 - 10 yard concrete bin - 2 - 4 yard front tipper general waste bins 4. What types and how much of waste will be reused (in the same or different function), recycled, or sent to landfill? - Recycled: Wood, drywall, cardboard, metal, concrete - Landfill: organics, plastics 5. Is there any building code, requirements from transfer station or UBC Campus that you have to follow in regard to waste management?  - n/a, other than LEED requirements. 6. What are the major obstacles to waste tracking for your company? (e.g. it costs, time requirement, or other factors) - No major obstacles 7. How do you think UBC can help you in tracking and reporting the amount of waste (e.g., a web based tool)? No need for the UBC support  Waste Diversion: 8. Do you use the recovered waste in your own projects or sell them? What is the reason for your preference? (Costs, Quality or quantity of materials, customers, code requirements, storage requirement, time, etc.) Other than some instances of re-purposing existing materials from demolished buildings (eg. Old Ponderosa building) for the new building, the waste is typically not re-used in the same project. 9. Does sending the waste to landfills or recovering it have different time/financial requirements or benefits for you? (Do you see any economic value in C&D waste recovery?) Yes, there is economic value in waste recovery through reduced disposal fees. 10. Who are your major customers for the recovered materials? (Get their contact if it is possible)  Ecowaste  Urban Wood Waste Waste haulers take the materials to these transfer stations and they distribute materials to the processing companies that buy recycled materials. 11. What are the key barriers to waste reduction and diverting in your projects? (e.g. lack of knowledge, cost, lack of infrastructure, time, storage space, customer, or other factors)  Site space constraints  Education of workers to ensure waste is placed in the correct bins  Packaging (no use for plastic, foam, and ropes used in packaging) 12. What are some opportunities to increase waste recovery? (What would need to happen for help you to achieve 75% or higher waste diversion?)   It shouldn’t be difficult to achieve 90% or higher waste diversion.  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 22 of 67    Opportunities for the remaining 10% include: o UBC extending organic compost collection to construction sites. o Companies to reduce plastic content, and packaging. 13. How could UBC help encourage reduction and diversion of waste? (e.g. on campus transfer station)  UBC extending organic compost collection to construction sites.  Facility to address items that typically are not recycled on a construction site (i.e. plastics, etc.)  Connecting the contractors with recycling companies that have high diversion rates  Providing an online list of recycling companies that contractors can work with  Contractor: El Shaddai – Mike Briant                                                     Project: Geography Building Date: 06/25/2013                                                                                                                (Seismic exterior renovation)   Waste Tracking: 1. How waste is typically collected on site, and where do different materials go for processing or disposal?  - Gathered in separate piles, load on trucks (everyday) and sent to transfer station 2. Is the amount of waste that is generated and recovered measured in your project? (How much waste is generated? How much of it is recycled? What metrics do you use to assess the amount of waste generation (LSB per Sq.ft or dollar value of project))  Who is responsible for gathering that data? (Is waste diversion measured by you (contractor), waste haulers, processors or waste transfer stations?)  80 % is roughly recycled (his guess) 3. How many separate bins you have on site to collect different types of waste? (Do you differentiate Construction and Demolition waste? No. Do you separate Reusable and recyclable materials? No.) Only one bin can come at a time. Piles of separate materials  Wood: recyclable (mainly for compost: he guess) (30 yard bin/ qfeet)  Shrubbery/trees: compost  Insulation (no insulation in this project)  Drywall (more than half tone: abatement crew)  Asbestos: abatement crew (anything might have asbestos can’t be recycled: e.g.: Library floor tiles)  Soil  steel (steam pipe, plumbing / pipe: around half tone)  scrap  aluminum/copper (not that much)  Plumbing piping  (1/4 tone)  Elect conduit (less than 50 ponds  in scrap steel pile)  Flooring (3 half tone loads)  Mixed garbage 4. What types and how much of waste will be reused (in the same or different function), recycled, or sent to landfill?  Recycled: Wood, drywall, cardboard, metal, concrete  Landfill: organics, plastics 5. Is there any building code, requirements from transfer station or UBC Campus that you have to follow in regard to waste management?   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 23 of 67    Not mixing all waste  waste is a green space and construction practice and transfer station requirement  6. What are the major obstacles to waste tracking for your company? (e.g. it costs, time requirement, or other factors)  No major obstacles  counting the bins and size  pick-up truck 7. How do you think UBC can help you in tracking and reporting the amount of waste (e.g., a web based tool)? Garbage bags make it difficult to know what’s in it and can result in wrong classification or separating materials that are mixed by mistake ( myself: maybe transparent containers!) - Sometimes garbage cans are used and then will be emptied in bins (garbage can be seen in it)  no requirement for cleaning afterward  Waste Diversion: 8. Do you use the recovered waste in your own projects or sell them? What is the reason for your preference? (Costs, Quality or quantity of materials, customers, code requirements, storage requirement, time, etc.)  Floor joist (high quality as it is old)  Structural members  wood  Piping  Electrical 9. Does sending the waste to landfills or recovering it have different time/financial requirements or benefits for you? (Do you see any economic value in C&D waste recovery?)  Contributing to environment  Composting worth money, but we don’t get much money  If you bring mixed waste they make you sort it, only metal is free 10. Who are your major customers for the recovered materials? (Get their contact if it is possible)  No specific reclamation company that we work with 11. What are the key barriers to waste reduction and diverting in your projects? (e.g. lack of knowledge, cost, lack of infrastructure, time, storage space, customer, or other factors)  Site space constraints (separate bins can’t be set up: only 2 at a time)  Waste bags (can’t be seen)  Small mixed materials 12. What are some opportunities to increase waste recovery? (What would need to happen for help you to achieve 75% or higher waste diversion?)   Don’t waste the remaining of material that is utilized in construction (e.g. beam: utilize the extra remaining part) 13. How could UBC help encourage reduction and diversion of waste? (e.g. on campus transfer station)  UBC keep require contractors to think green    SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 24 of 67   Contractor: turn-Key – Brian Adamson                                                     Project: FNH Labs Date: 06/26/2013                                                                                                                   Waste Tracking: 1. How waste is typically collected on site, and where do different materials go for processing or disposal?   Gathered in separate piles, load on one bin that is downstairs in entrances (not enough space for separate bins), demo company take care of waste: 3R Demo 2. Is the amount of waste that is generated and recovered measured in your project? (How much waste is generated? How much of it is recycled? What metrics do you use to assess the amount of waste generation (LSB per Sq.ft or dollar value of project))  Who is responsible for gathering that data? (Is waste diversion measured by you (contractor), waste haulers, processors or waste transfer stations?)   demo company take care of waste: 3R Demo  they get receipt of amount of waste and diversion rates 3. How many separate bins you have on site to collect different types of waste? (Do you differentiate Construction and Demolition waste? No. Do you separate Reusable and recyclable materials? No.) Only one bin can come at a time.   Wood  Drywall   Cardboard  steel   Mixed garbage 4. What types and how much of waste will be reused (in the same or different function), recycled, or sent to landfill?  No reused rate  Separated waste goes to transfer station and they take care of it  Mixed garbage, mixed products (countertop: takes long to separate it) 5. Is there any building code, requirements from transfer station or UBC Campus that you have to follow in regard to waste management?   UBC encourage to recycle  Project services ask us waste/recycling quantities  Hazardous, Asbestos  abatement company 6. What are the major obstacles to waste tracking for your company? (e.g. it costs, time requirement, or other factors)  Money (recycling cost money) No body buys used material we should give them for free to others  Time  7. How do you think UBC can help you in tracking and reporting the amount of waste (e.g., a web based tool)?  Easier access and machines to site      SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 25 of 67   Waste Diversion: 8. Do you use the recovered waste in your own projects or sell them? What is the reason for your preference? (Costs, Quality or quantity of materials, customers, code requirements, storage requirement, time, etc.) No  9. Does sending the waste to landfills or recovering it have different time/financial requirements or benefits for you? (Do you see any economic value in C&D waste recovery?) The money that comes out of recycling goes to recycling company. In smaller projects that they take care of waste they might get few money for scrap metal 10. Who are your major customers for the recovered materials? (Get their contact if it is possible) No specific customer  New west 11. What are the key barriers to waste reduction and diverting in your projects? (e.g. lack of knowledge, cost, lack of infrastructure, time, storage space, customer, or other factors)  Time consuming to take apart components, take out screws and nails, have them in exact required size and length 12. What are some opportunities to increase waste recovery? (What would need to happen for help you to achieve 75% or higher waste diversion?)   Allocate money to recycling. Make it required 13. How could UBC help encourage reduction and diversion of waste? (e.g. on campus transfer station)  Monetary incentives  Easy access  Contractor: Division 15 – Patrick Osada                                           Project: Place Vanier Residence – Pipes Date: 07/02/2013                                                                                                                   Waste Tracking: 1. How waste is typically collected on site, and where do different materials go for processing or disposal?   Not so much waste to deal with. All collected in garbage bags and go to one commingle bin located in south campus and when it’s full they call the disposal company to pick up the bin. Super Save (the disposal company) sort out the mixed waste to some extent. 2. Is the amount of waste that is generated and recovered measured in your project? (How much waste is generated? How much of it is recycled? What metrics do you use to assess the amount of waste generation (LSB per Sq.ft or dollar value of project))  Who is responsible for gathering that data? (Is waste diversion measured by you (contractor), waste haulers, processors or waste transfer stations?)   Not mandated to assess the amount of waste in the contract, but is very minimal (in 3 month that they have been here they have not filled one bin (8 cubic yard: 5ft*5ft*8ft) yet.    SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 26 of 67   3. How many separate bins you have on site to collect different types of waste? (Do you differentiate Construction and Demolition waste? No. Do you separate Reusable and recyclable materials? No. Only one commingle waste bin  short pieces of pipe 4. What types and how much of waste will be reused (in the same or different function), recycled, or sent to landfill? - Small pieces of pipe would be reused if it can fit in the  needed place 5. Is there any building code, requirements from transfer station or UBC Campus that you have to follow in regard to waste management?  No  Disposal company is responsible with transfer station requirements 6. What are the major obstacles to waste tracking for your company? (e.g. it costs, time requirement, or other factors) No obstacles  easy to track: the number of dumping the bin and its size makes it possible to track waste 7. How do you think UBC can help you in tracking and reporting the amount of waste (e.g., a web based tool)? No need for help  Waste Diversion: 8. Do you use the recovered waste in your own projects or sell them? What is the reason for your preference? (Costs, Quality or quantity of materials, customers, code requirements, storage requirement, time, etc.)  Yes. Every piece of pipe over 3 feet long is kept to be reused in other place in project to make a corner, etc.  They have 2 huge sorting sites on campus, so it is lots of room to keep remaining pipe pieces 9. Does sending the waste to landfills or recovering it have different time/financial requirements or benefits for you? (Do you see any economic value in C&D waste recovery?)  No 10. Who are your major customers for the recovered materials? (Get their contact if it is possible)  All the pipes (steel pre insulated pipe) and fittings used in the project, which come from Denmark, are owned by UBC project services. Crop pipes go back to UBC storage site. 11. What are the key barriers to waste reduction and diverting in your projects? (e.g. lack of knowledge, cost, lack of infrastructure, time, storage space, customer, or other factors)  Bonded piping system makes separating the materials difficult  expensive and time consuming  Food waste  Waste is minimal (the amount of required materials in each phase is assessed by engineers so there is not many excess) and does not worth separating 12. What are some opportunities to increase waste recovery? (What would need to happen for help you to achieve 75% or higher waste diversion?)   We are mechanical contractor and do not have much waste  finding a way to separate bonded materials 13. How could UBC help encourage reduction and diversion of waste? (e.g. on campus transfer station)  If they can come with an idea of separating polyurethane insulation from steel pipe  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 27 of 67   Contractor: Flynn Roofing – Blane Braun                                   Project: Re-roofing of MacMillan Building Date: 07/09/2013                                                                                                                   Waste Tracking: 1. How waste is typically collected on site, and where do different materials go for processing or disposal?  (Replacing the old mopped on system will be replaced with torch on system  New insulation, skylight, metal roof cladding over skylight)  Huge vacuum for ballast (rock and dust) on top of old roof into the truck and be taken for disposal   Bins on site  materials will be craned from the roof into bins  Demo contractor (Quantum Murray) for demolition and getting rid of demo materials  Hazardous materials and asbestos  Construction excess will be handled by themselves in another bin  Mini Load (subcontractor for waste disposal) supply bin and also dispose it will take it to landfill or recycling locations to be disposed properly 2. Is the amount of waste that is generated and recovered measured in your project? (How much waste is generated? How much of it is recycled? What metrics do you use to assess the amount of waste generation (LSB per Sq.ft or dollar value of project))  Who is responsible for gathering that data? (Is waste diversion measured by you (contractor), waste haulers, processors or waste transfer stations?)   Not measured. They pay per bin load. Around 11 bins for roof demo and 1-2 bins for construction (40 yrds bin)  At the end they know how many bins are filled but they don’t keep track of it. (they get waybills) James from project management will give them the form to fill 3. How many separate bins you have on site to collect different types of waste? (Do you differentiate Construction and Demolition waste? Yes. Do you separate Reusable and recyclable materials? No.)  Only two bins (Demo and construction) Concrete will be loaded separately.   - Demolition: Pollyiso, Roofing membrane, scrap metal (all mixed)  - Construction: adhesive primer, empty buckets, foam container adhesive, used rollers, cut strips of membrane and pollyiso and wood 4. What types and how much of waste will be reused (in the same or different function), recycled, or sent to landfill?  All go to waste management places and landfill 5. Is there any building code, requirements from transfer station or UBC Campus that you have to follow in regard to waste management?   Only gypsum and drywall is mandated to be separate   Asbestos should be treated separated But anything else can be mixed 6. What are the major obstacles to waste tracking for your company? (e.g. it costs, time requirement, or other factors)  As we are not separating waste right now, there is no benefit in changing this practice and follow waste unless it is required  Time and cost (charge more to follow waste) 7. How do you think UBC can help you in tracking and reporting the amount of waste (e.g., a web based tool)? Providing the form and requiring filling it  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 28 of 67    Waste Diversion: 8. Do you use the recovered waste in your own projects or sell them? What is the reason for your preference? (Costs, Quality or quantity of materials, customers, code requirements, storage requirement, time, etc.) No. Old roof materials can’t be reused. They are already failed  Rock may be reused 9. Does sending the waste to landfills or recovering it have different time/financial requirements or benefits for you? (Do you see any economic value in C&D waste recovery?)  Metal has benefit  Other materials have no benefit  Waste of time and money separating materials  separate shoots and bins for each type 10. Who are your major customers for the recovered materials? (Get their contact if it is possible)  Not aware of. 11. What are the key barriers to waste reduction and diverting in your projects? (e.g. lack of knowledge, cost, lack of infrastructure, time, storage space, customer, or other factors) Time and cost of time 12. What are some opportunities to increase waste recovery? (What would need to happen for help you to achieve 75% or higher waste diversion?)   Not in roofing product  old products are contaminated  Maybe in future current materials can be diverted more easily but he is not sure (Myself: UBC should make sure of reusability and recyclability of new materials) 13. How could UBC help encourage reduction and diversion of waste? (e.g. on campus transfer station)  As we are concerned about cost of excess waste we are already trying to minimize it  Contractor: VPAC Construction – Padraig Lyng                      Project: Buchanan B Rms 202,  204, 206 Date: 08/07/2013                                                        Merging 3 rooms                                                            Waste Tracking: 1. How waste is typically collected on site, and where do different materials go for processing or disposal?   In demo stage: Everything is separated in piles: Drywall, insulation, steel stud, concrete  taken to separate recycling places  In Construction stage: Bits of waste all over the room  after finishing put them in separate piles taken to separate recycling Try to separate even the small amounts: Drywall is not accepted and has to be separated, metal (prefer separated)  Only pure waste is remained One truck carries them all in bags or in different piles: waste, drywall (limited to one 4*4 sheet in the City dump so they take drywalls to Recycling places), metal (conduit, steel stud) They have a demo contractor but they haul the construction waste themselves 2. Is the amount of waste that is generated and recovered measured in your project? (How much waste is generated? How much of it is recycled? What metrics do you use to assess the amount of waste generation (LSB per Sq.ft or dollar value of project))   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 29 of 67   Who is responsible for gathering that data? (Is waste diversion measured by you (contractor), waste haulers, processors or waste transfer stations?)  Only in demo stage as they have to pay Demo Company based on weight They assess the amount beforehand and receive the waybills with invoce 3. How many separate bins you have on site to collect different types of waste? (Do you differentiate Construction and Demolition waste? Yes they will happen in diff stages. Do you separate Reusable and recyclable materials? Rarely, If they can find a use for it in their project (e.g. steel stud)) In small projects only three-four bins:  Metal, drywall, insulation, garbage 4. What types and how much of waste will be reused (in the same or different function), recycled, or sent to landfill?  Depend on: how old the material is (e.g. insulation), how the material comes out (e.g. steel stud)  In a bigger projects there are more possibilities (e.g. Crushing conc) 5. Is there any building code, requirements from transfer station or UBC Campus that you have to follow in regard to waste management?   No real limitation from the City apart from hazardous materials  The dump limitation: metal and drywall limitation  UBC preferred us to achieve 100% recycling rate (not mandatory) 6. What are the major obstacles to waste tracking for your company? (e.g. it costs, time requirement, or other factors) - Not difficult specially in small project: easy to assess and track 7. How do you think UBC can help you in tracking and reporting the amount of waste (e.g., a web based tool)? Not that I can think of.  Waste Diversion: 8. Do you use the recovered waste in your own projects or sell them? What is the reason for your preference? (Costs, Quality or quantity of materials, customers, code requirements, storage requirement, time, etc.) Steel stud, new and good quality insulation 9. Does sending the waste to landfills or recovering it have different time/financial requirements or benefits for you? (Do you see any economic value in C&D waste recovery?) Economically beneficial in reuse: prevent from buying new A little time constrained to separate and clean them, but this extra time usually does not cost more than buying new Small amounts doesn’t make much economic differences, in big project recycling is beneficial Not even very beneficial for demo companies as they will pay for most of waste except for metal, steel, copper 10. Who are your major customers for the recovered materials? (Get their contact if it is possible)  Take each type of waste to its specific recycling factory and pay to take it from them 11. What are the key barriers to waste reduction and diverting in your projects? (e.g. lack of knowledge, cost, lack of infrastructure, time, storage space, customer, or other factors)  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 30 of 67    Keeping waste separate  In larger projects during construction stage get workers to use the separate bins (wood, metal, cardboard)  Find a recycling company for each type  Time to separate specially in larger demo  Storage area 12. What are some opportunities to increase waste recovery? (What would need to happen for help you to achieve 75% or higher waste diversion?)   During construction: make sure separate bins are set up and make sure all people are aware of them and use them correctly. 13. How could UBC help encourage reduction and diversion of waste? (e.g. on campus transfer station)  Having online program to input data into  Setting requirement to manage waste and recycle. After some time of forcing the best practice, contractors see it work out this way, they will start doing that off-campus.   Normal practice in Europe is much better that North America, because ppl are more used to it.                           SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 31 of 67   Appendix 2: Demolition Sub-contractors Interviews  Contractor: Lorn Penton - East to West Demo                Project: Food and Nutrition Building Lecture theater – Room 60 Date: 19/07/13  Waste Tracking: 1. How waste is typically collected on site, and where do different materials go for processing or disposal?   Separate waste as we go since 4-5 years ago –   Even for they mixed waste (small projects), they try to keep them separate so that it can be separated in yards easily.   If take mixed waste in inner city recycling at Richmond yard (private yards) they sort it (hand picking) and it result in a small amount of extra charge (separate around 60$ / ton. Mixed 90$ / ton vs. adding a separate bin and truck about 300$)  Even small amount of mixed waste, which does not worth separating, will be separated and recycled.   Governmental facilities don’t separate (Wastec). They only charge more for mixed waste.  In long run separating waste will cost more  increases the number of trucks 2. Is the amount of waste that is generated and recovered measured in your projects? (How much waste is generated? How much of it is recycled? What metrics do you use to assess the amount of waste generation (LSB per Sq.ft or dollar value of project))  Who is responsible for gathering that data? (Is waste diversion measured by you (contractor), waste haulers, processors or waste transfer stations?)  Their company keeps the waybills (amount of waste and recycling percent) that they receive from yards, to track waste in case the contractor requires it. They worked with UBC contractors, and offered them to give them the receipts, but they said it’s not required for them. 3. How many separate bins you have on site to collect different types of waste? Do you differentiate Construction and Demolition waste? They don’t deal with construction waste yet.  Do you separate Reusable and recyclable materials? No, they don’t find someone who wants it quickly. Sometime give them for free) Depend on size of project.  Wood (cheaper dump)  laminated wood only can be used as fuel  Metal (paid back)  Drywall (won’t be accepted mixed)  expensive to dump both separate and mixed  Garbage (non-recyclable)  Cardboard is not accepted in mixed waste but they don’t have a separate bin for it. Just keep separated 4. What are the major obstacles to waste tracking for your company? (e.g. it costs, time requirement, or other factors)  Tracking waste has no considerable extra cost  Not enough room to set up bins and park on campus so they have to carry out each type of material separately with truck and trailer (one day metal, next day cardboard, so on)  although separate bins cost less that separate trucking they are not allowed to have bins on campus  Mixed waste cannot be recycled  take time    SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 32 of 67   5. Is there any building code, requirements from transfer station or UBC Campus that you have to follow in regard to waste management?  (For separating, recovering, etc.) What types of mixed waste materials won’t be accepted in transfer stations and landfills?   Many companies require separating and diverting waste.  Cardboard and drywall  drywall requires asbestos check  Unless customers require to divert waste. 6. How do you think UBC can help you in tracking and reporting the amount of waste (e.g., a web based tool)? Ask for the receipt  Waste Diversion: 7. What types and how much of waste will be reused (in the same or different function), recycled, or sent to landfill?  In normal project at least 80% can be recycled  Maybe 10% of materials are reusable (doors, counters, etc) 8. Do you gain money recovering waste? Does it worth your time?  Who are your major customers for the recovered materials?   Only metal, cardboard (not worth the time and energy)  Allied salvage for metal  They will charge the contractors about 5% more for separating waste because of more bins and trucking 9. Where do you separate the waste (on-site, in transfer stations, in landfills, etc)?  Separate waste in piles carried with separate trucks 10. Do you have any system for separating small quantities of waste? (Special bins, transferring waste of more than one project to landfills, etc.) Small blue bins, keep them at garage (home) until there is enough of a type to fill a truck There is no truck that can carry small amount of waste in separate piles 11. Can packaging and plastic be recycled? Only hard plastic can be recycled Plastic and Styrofoam is not recycled 12. What are the key barriers to waste reduction and diverting in your projects? (e.g. lack of knowledge, cost, lack of infrastructure, time, storage space, customer, or other factors) Unrecyclable materials (glass, plastic, isolation, flooring) Governmental yards don’t care about separating waste. Small mixed waste is better to be separated by yard workers    SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 33 of 67   13. What are some opportunities to increase waste recovery in small projects? (What would need to happen for help you to achieve 75% or higher waste diversion?)   People are more concerned and conscious about waste  Anything that is recyclable material is recycled, the problem is not recyclables  Some contractors are not interested in increasing the price (even small amount) for separating waste 14. How could UBC help encourage reduction and diversion of waste? (e.g. on campus transfer station)  Make delivering the forms and receipt mandatory  Provide space  Educate workers to know what can be recycled   Contractor: Kaj Brisko - Devastate/Div 2 contracting                   Project: UBC Sauder School of Business  Date: 31/07/13  Waste Tracking: 1. How waste is typically collected on site, and where do different materials go for processing or disposal?  In Sauder school:  Shoot from different levels of the building, two bins at the site which were swap of 2-4 times a day    2-3 bins a day would be carried to the transfer stage  Depending on the size of the project and the site  2. Is the amount of waste that is generated and recovered measured in your projects? (How much waste is generated? How much of it is recycled? What metrics do you use to assess the amount of waste generation (LSB per Sq.ft or dollar value of project))  Who is responsible for gathering that data? (Is waste diversion measured by you (contractor), waste haulers, processors or waste transfer stations?)   They have dedicated employee to track waste and keep the records (Kaj Brisko) 3. How many separate bins you have on site to collect different types of waste? Do you differentiate Construction and Demolition waste? Only responsible for the demo stage.  Do you separate Reusable and recyclable materials? No materials were not reused on site. Unless they were asked to keep any of materials for reuse (very small items like doors). Metal and wood could be recycled, but 100% recycled) 40 yards bins: wood, metal, concrete, drywall, garbage (sometime wood, cardboard, and drywall will be mixed in garbage but at the end the will be separated and then are taken to the dumps) 4. What are the major obstacles to waste tracking for your company? (e.g. it costs, time requirement, or other factors)  Easy if the company dedicates an employee to track.  Has not gotten enough foothold in our industry yet  Pure garbage loads are difficult to break out to recyclable and non recyclable  If the dump don’t weigh scale and way tickets (They place that they dump concrete does not have scale and they assess just by experience and eyeballing)  Weigh scale at dumps will let you know the exact amount of waste and recycling percentage   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 34 of 67   (Zahra: we should make sure that contractors work with dumps that have scale and issue bills) 5. Is there any building code, requirements from transfer station or UBC Campus that you have to follow in regard to waste management?  (For separating, recovering, etc.) No requirements LEED: Maximum the recyclable amount, but they are more concerned about accounting the amount of waste 6. What types of mixed waste materials won’t be accepted in transfer stations and landfills?  --- 7. How do you think UBC can help you in tracking and reporting the amount of waste (e.g., a web based tool)? UBC should demand tracking and submitting the reports as a part of the project (have a general requirement in the contract for general contractor or subcontractor) and fine them. And ask for receipt in a monthly base. Waste Diversion: 8. What types and how much of waste will be reused (in the same or different function), recycled, or sent to landfill? Reuse happens but it is very minimalistic and the contractor might request keeping some materials if possible but will not force it.  Pavers (stone) are reusable 9. Do you gain money recovering waste?  Metal can be profitable. Recycling concrete reduce the dump load (100% recyclable). Garbage that has drywall or wood (it is cheaper to dump it as wood than garbage) has to separated (extra time& cost  Does it worth your time?   It does not cost much more for contractors as the demolition company save money by reducing the amount of waste that has to take to dump as a replacement for extra time for deconstructing  Who are your major customers for the recovered materials?  Mitchel Island Material (Concrete), Richmod Steel, shnitzer steel   Are chosen based on the offering price and the ease of the process   The City and Metro Van dump are a lot more stringent in policy (mixed waste and accounting) and also more expensive  Having separate bins is more profitable in the longrun. 10. Where do you separate the waste (on-site, in transfer stations, in landfills, etc)?  The small amounts will be mixed and transfer station employees separate them, but the number of employees are not enough for the massive loads of mixed waste. Big amounts will be separated on-site. 11. Do you have any system for separating small quantities of waste? (Special bins, transferring waste of more than one project to landfills, etc.)  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 35 of 67   Every transfer station has employees who sift through waste and separate as much as possible for recycling 12. Can packaging and plastic be recycled? No, they go to garbage 13. What are the key barriers to waste reduction and diverting in your projects? (e.g. lack of knowledge, cost, lack of infrastructure, time, storage space, customer, or other factors)  Money (its more economical to dump all the waste rather than separate waste)  Space limitations  Time constraints   Ease of the process  Because of the bidding process they cannot increase the cost to recycle more 14. What are some opportunities to increase waste recovery in small projects? (What would need to happen for help you to achieve 75% or higher waste diversion?)   Account for waste  Knowing the proper place to deal with each type of material 15. How could UBC help encourage reduction and diversion of waste? (e.g. on campus transfer station)  Enforce waste management and recycling in contract for not LEED projects  Working with one sub-contractor to deal with waste in a number of small projects  Contractor: Ray Grendus - Fraser Trucking & Tractor Ltd.                   Project: --  Date: 01/08/13  Waste Tracking: 1. How waste is typically collected on site, and where do different materials go for processing or disposal?  It is collected and separated by hand onsite and depending on the type of materials they will be sent to the related recycling facility (metal, dry wall, concrete, wood: urban wood waste: they sort the wood based on the quality (clean wood, etc)  so that they get better price on recycling end) 2. Is the amount of waste that is generated and recovered measured in your projects? (How much waste is generated? How much of it is recycled? What metrics do you use to assess the amount of waste generation (LSB per Sq.ft or dollar value of project))  Who is responsible for gathering that data? (Is waste diversion measured by you (contractor), waste haulers, processors or waste transfer stations?)  They estimate the amount of waste by seeing the place. Then it will be confirmed with scale ticket (They only collect it for their own use for having more accurate bidding), but the customer don’t ask for it except for LEED jobs.  3. How many separate bins you have on site to collect different types of waste? Do you differentiate Construction and Demolition waste? They only deal with demolition  Do you separate Reusable and recyclable materials?  Depending on the project, the steps and the order are different.   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 36 of 67   As there is not usually enough room for separate bins, and they usually have one bin. So they usually follow the following steps (minimize the cost and maximize the amount of material that goes into a load in each hauling): 1. Pull out ceiling tiles  keep in the bin. If they are wooden, will be sent to Urban Waste Wood 2. Ceiling T-bars If they are enough for a bin will be kept in bin otherwise will be stacked on-site until the load is enough to fill a bin 3. Drywall 4. Framing for the T-bars and walls The bin will be loaded by each type of material that they are dealing with at the moment; it will be hauled and then in will be loaded with something else.  4. What are the major obstacles to waste tracking for your company? (e.g. it costs, time requirement, or other factors)  No obstacle (They know the exact amount and cost)  5. Is there any building code, requirements from transfer station or UBC Campus that you have to follow in regard to waste management?  (For separating, recovering, etc.)  Legal disposal in licensed fascility 6. What types of mixed waste materials won’t be accepted in transfer stations and landfills?  --- 7. How do you think UBC can help you in tracking and reporting the amount of waste (e.g., a web based tool)?  Make sure that contractors are licensed   Make sure that contractors hire a subcontractor that does a better job in recycling if it increases the bidding cost  Mandate submitting waybills   Waste Diversion: 8. What types and how much of waste will be reused (in the same or different function), recycled, or sent to landfill?  Reuse: Cabinet (if it is in good shape), doors (if it is stated in drawings notes – labor cost for removing a door 35$ vs. 10$ new door), plumbing fixtures  Recycle: steel  Recycling rate is generally 90% 9. Do you gain money recovering waste?  It offsets the costs. They do not mixed any type of waste for the cost (Clean wood: 25$/ton vs. mixed load wood 95$/ton) Most of the time sorting the waste as it comes down cost the same a mixing them.   Does it worth your time?  It worth saving the environment  Who are your major customers for the recovered materials? --- The higher volume of haul each month the charge become less (VIP price) They will send each type of waste to the related recycling facility   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 37 of 67   10. Where do you separate the waste (on-site, in transfer stations, in landfills, etc)?  90% On site. Small amounts will go to transfer station.  11. Do you have any system for separating small quantities of waste? (Special bins, transferring waste of more than one project to landfills, etc.) Sort onsite in smaller containers or will be sent mixed to transfer station to be separated: Hauling cost vs. mixed load cost 12. Can packaging and plastic be recycled? Paper and cardboard are recycled but not plastic 13. What are the key barriers to waste reduction and diverting in your projects? (e.g. lack of knowledge, cost, lack of infrastructure, time, storage space, customer, or other factors) No barriers, we know how to approach the projects - BC Building code does not allow reusing lumber as structural material  Salvaging in BC has become worst since 15-20 years  market has a high interest in new - There is no market for reusable materials even if they are not old 14. What are some opportunities to increase waste recovery in small projects? (What would need to happen for help you to achieve 75% or higher waste diversion?)   The loads of small pieces and swiping waste (10%)  if be sent to transfer station, they will try a secondary sort  They are involved with Metro Vancouver in changing the criteria of Vancouver landfills. They will go down from 5% allowed wood waste to 3%, which will affect the demolition method.  raise the cost considerably (e.g. two bedroom demo costs 10000$, but it will be 30000$)  Change the BC codes to reuse lumber as structure instead of recycle (Currently they are shipped outside of Canada)  Recycling create job opportunity and improve local economy 15. How could UBC help encourage reduction and diversion of waste? (e.g. on campus transfer station) Mandate specific recycling percentage, separating onsite On-campus transfer station does not work as it increases the cost Zahra: Work with private transfer stations as they are in the business and care about earning money (Make sure they recycle the amount that they state)       SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 38 of 67   Contractor: Dano Debney - Aerostars Contracting Ltd                   Project: Geography Building Date: 15/08/13  Waste Tracking: 1. How waste is typically collected on site, and where do different materials go for processing or disposal?  Separate everything: try to sell them as much as possible to the public or specific recycling stations  2. Is the amount of waste that is generated and recovered measured in your projects? (How much waste is generated? How much of it is recycled? What metrics do you use to assess the amount of waste generation (LSB per Sq.ft or dollar value of project))  Who is responsible for gathering that data? (Is waste diversion measured by you (contractor), waste haulers, processors or waste transfer stations?)   Only for LEED jobs  70% waste diversion except for drywall 3. How many separate bins you have on site to collect different types of waste? Do you differentiate Construction and Demolition waste?  They only deal with demolition  Do you separate Reusable and recyclable materials?  Drywall, wood, precious metals, glass (not necessarily bins, they are separated in piles) 4. What are the major obstacles to waste tracking for your company? (e.g. it costs, time requirement, or other factors) Tracking is Not required  Pricing is tight (They will not win the bidding if they raise the price for tracking or recycling) 5. Is there any building code, requirements from transfer station or UBC Campus that you have to follow in regard to waste management?  (For separating, recovering, etc.) Transfer station demand separating materials, less for wood 6. What types of mixed waste materials won’t be accepted in transfer stations and landfills?  --- 7. How do you think UBC can help you in tracking and reporting the amount of waste (e.g., a web based tool)? Restriction (And checking the accuracy so that they cannot manipulate the information)  having the transfer station to make sure the data is correct for not LEEDs  Waste Diversion: 8. What types and how much of waste will be reused (in the same or different function), recycled, or sent to landfill?  Recycle: Valuable metal (e.g. copper, tin), clean non-reusable wood (personal use as fuel), concrete  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 39 of 67    Reuse: Tin cladding and roofing sold for shed, lumber (to be reused as furniture as antique wood): 2*4, 2*6, joist, plywood, doors, windows, mirror toilets, insulation (is sold for garage and sheds: more request than supply)  reduce the dump cost, one of the double bags to pack it (it is mandated by transfer station, time, etc.  Drywall (Is used to kill algae in the ocean) 9. Do you gain money recovering waste?  It offsets the costs of dismantling or dumping. Does it worth your time?  Not very profitable that worth the time  Who are your major customers for the recovered materials?   Craigslist, Depending on the quality: sell or give for free 10. Where do you separate the waste (on-site, in transfer stations, in landfills, etc)?   Separate onsite by planning the demolition steps: 1. Ceiling, 2. Walls 3. floors 11. Do you have any system for separating small quantities of waste? (Special bins, transferring waste of more than one project to landfills, etc.)  Layering the stacks of different types of materials (big pieces) in one truck load or use garbage can for small pieces (The material can be seen in the can)  Not really using bins as it is difficult to separate waste in it. Separating different types in trailer truck  Separating screws with magnet, keeping them in their shop until it reaches enough quantity to sell 12. Can packaging and plastic be recycled?  Some recycling places take plastic 13. What are the key barriers to waste reduction and diverting in your projects? (e.g. lack of knowledge, cost, lack of infrastructure, time, storage space, customer, or other factors)  Some companies send the whole load to the US so that they don’t have to separate waste  Time  Space for keeping waste until it fills a load 14. What are some opportunities to increase waste recovery in small projects? (What would need to happen for help you to achieve 75% or higher waste diversion?)   Have a storage area for waste until it reaches enough quantity to fill a truck (transfer station)  More strict regulations 15. How could UBC help encourage reduction and diversion of waste? (e.g. on campus transfer station)  Having a close transfer station or provide the bins and check the proper use of it.  Force recycling         SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 41 of 67   Appendix 4: Projects Pictures  Figure 1 Door knob and door handle stored onsite for reuse in other UBC projects, The contractor mentioned that UBC favors keeping these door handles, Project:  University Centre - Contractor: Scott Special Projects   Figure 2 Ceiling tiles stored on-site to be reused in the same project, Project:  University Centre - Contractor: Scott Special Projects  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 42 of 67                    Figure 3 Carpet tiles stored on-site to be reused in the same project, Project:  University Centre - Contractor: Scott Special Projects  Figure 4  Pipes and air ducts stored on-site to be reused in the same project, Project:  University Centre - Contractor: Scott Special Projects   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 45 of 67    Figure 10 Lightings, stored on-site to be reused in the same project, Project:  University Centre - Contractor: Scott Special Projects Figure 9  Lightings, stored on-site to be reused in the same project, Project:  University Centre - Contractor: Scott Special Projects  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 46 of 67     Figure 11 Drywalls, separated for recycling, Project:  University Centre - Contractor: Scott Special Projects Figure 12 Project:  University Centre - Contractor: Scott Special Projects  Figure 13 Old decorative lightings, kept outside of building to be given to anyone who want them for free, Project:  University Centre - Contractor: Scott Special Projects  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 47 of 67                       Figure 15  Mixed waste, outside of building on project¶V VLWH, Project:  University Centre - Contractor: Scott Special Projects  Figure 14   0L[HG ZDVWH RXWVLGH RI EXLOGLQJ RQ SURMHFW¶V VLWH, Project:  University Centre - Contractor: Scott Special Projects   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 48 of 67                       Figure 16   0L[HG ZDVWH RXWVLGH RI EXLOGLQJ RQ SURMHFW¶V VLWH, Project:  University Centre - Contractor: Scott Special Projects Figure 17   6FUDS PHWDO ELQ RXWVLGH RI EXLOGLQJ RQ SURMHFW¶V VLWH ZLWK D GLVWLQJXLVKHG VLJQ RQ LW, Project:  University Centre - Contractor: Scott Special Projects  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 49 of 67                       Figure 18  Project:  Irving K. Barber Library, Room 310 - Contractor: Aberdane Construction   Figure 19   Project:  Irving K. Barber Library, Room 310 - Contractor: Aberdane Construction   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 51 of 67                       Figure 22 0L[HG FRQFUHWH DQG VKUXEEHULHV FROOHFWHG RXWVLGH RI EXLOGLQJ RQ SURMHFW¶V VLWH, Project:  Geography Building - Contractor: EL Shaddai Construction Figure 23 :RRG ZDVWH ELQ RXWVLGH RI EXLOGLQJ RQ SURMHFW¶V VLWH RQH ELQ FDQ FRPH LQ DW D WLPH, Project:  Geography Building - Contractor: EL Shaddai Construction   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 52 of 67                       Figure 24   :RRG ZDVWH SLOH FROOHFWHG RXWVLGH RI EXLOGLQJ RQ SURMHFW¶V VLWH, Project:  Geography Building - Contractor: EL Shaddai Constructio Figure 25 'XVW SLOH FROOHFWHG RXWVLGH RI EXLOGLQJ RQ SURMHFW¶V VLWH, Project:  Geography Building - Contractor: EL Shaddai Construction   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 53 of 67                       Figure 26  'XVW SLOH FROOHFWHG RXWVLGH RI EXLOGLQJ RQ SURMHFW¶V VLWH, Project:  Geography Building - Contractor: EL Shaddai Construction  Figure 27  ConcrHWH DQG ZRRG ZDVWH SLOHV FROOHFWHG RXWVLGH RI EXLOGLQJ RQ SURMHFW¶V VLWH, Project:  Geography Building - Contractor: EL Shaddai Construction   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 54 of 67                             Figure 28  Small drywall bin, inside the building, Project:  CEME Lab - Contractor: Holaco Construction Figure 29  Old wooden shelves, some of the wood may be used for backing during the construction, Project:  CEME Lab - Contractor: Holaco Construction   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 55 of 67                      Figure 30 Mixed sweeping waste  Project:  CEME Lab - Contractor: Holaco Construction Figure 31 Mixed sweeping waste  Project:  CEME Lab - Contractor: Holaco Construction   SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 56 of 67     Figure 32 Project:  FNH - Contractor: Turn-Key Construction Figure 33 Wood waste in outside of building (one bin can come in at a time), Project:  Geography Building - Contractor: EL Shaddai Construction  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 57 of 67                       Figure 34  Bonded system piping Project:  Place Vanier Residence -  Contractor: Division 15 Figure 35  3URMHFW¶V VLWH   Project:  Place Vanier Residence -  Contractor: Division 15  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 58 of 67    Appendix 5: Quantity Sheets             Table 1 Quantity Sheets Project:  FNH Labs, Contractor: turn-Key – Brian Adamson  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 59 of 67    Table 2 Quantity Sheets Contractor: EL SHADDAI – Mike Briant,  Project:  Geography Exterior       SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 60 of 67   Table 3  Quantity Sheets Contractor:  Scott Special Projects - Project:  University Centre   LEE D NC  version 1.0  Waste T racki ng  Fo rm   Proj ect Na me:  UBC Seis mic Up g rade   Rec yclable  Waybill or Bin Re ference  Date Load Hauled Rec ycling  F acility (contact info at bottom of table) Tot al Ma terial (K g s) G arbage  (non-  recyclable)  Wood  Me tal  Concrete  G yp sum %  K g  %  K g  %  K %  K g  %  K g  8 4 8341  18-Jan-13 New West Gypsum 4,970         100% 4,970 1096 90  23-Jan-13 Richvan Holdings 5,895       100% 5,895   2035771  25-Jan-13 Urban Wood Waste 3,540 15% 531 85% 3,009       61021  25-Jan-13 Allied Salvage 2,497     100% 2,4     1150589  28-Jan-13 Ecowaste 8,914       100% 8,914   113080  1-Feb-13 Richvan Holdings 5,895       100% 5,895   8 4 98 4 9  6-Feb-13 New West Gypsum 6,240         100% 6,240 235916  8-Feb-13 Inner City Recycling 3,520 100% 3,520         163246  12-Feb-13 Richvan Holdings 5,895       100% 5,895   61862  13-Feb-13 Allied Salvage 1,825     100% 1,8     1153754  15-Feb-13 Ecowaste 9,280       100% 9,280   1164 9 4  18-Feb-13 Richvan Holdings 5,895       100% 5,895   1164 93  18-Feb-13 Richvan Holdings 5,895       100% 5,895   117005  20-Feb-13 Richvan Holdings 5,895       100% 5,895   6258  23-Feb-13 Fast Trac Excava ing 5,895       100% 5,895   1317  25-Feb-13 Richvan Holdings 5,053       100% 5,053   62780  4-Mar-13 Allied Salvage 2,965     100% 2,9     1157020  5-Mar-13 Ecowaste 4,060 100% 4,060         241569  5-Mar-13 Pan Pacific Metals 309     100% 3     117802  7-Mar-13 Richvan Holdings 5,895       100% 5,895   1158932  13-Mar-13 Ecowaste 10,472       100% 10,472   165524  21-Mar-13 Richvan Holdings 5,895       100% 5,895   8 63520  21-Mar-13 New West Gypsum 8,160         100% 8,160 63716  21-Mar-13 Allied Salvage 1,589     100% 1,5     118305  22-Mar-13 Richvan Holdings 5,895       100% 5,895   Tot als 132,344  8,111  3,009  9,1  92,669  19,370   Tot als by Waste Type    T yp e of Waste A mount of Waste (K g )  Garbage 8,111 Wood 3,009 Metal 9,185 Concrete 92,669 Gypsum 19,370 Cardboard 0 Dirt/Rubble 0 Clean Fill 0 Other 0  Tot al Waste 132,344 Tot al Waste Rec ycled 124,233 Waste Diverted 93.9%       SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 61 of 67   Owner:  UBC Properties Inv estments Ltd. as a trustee for UBC Properties Tru st Contractor:  Scott Construction Group  Project:  UBC Sauder School of Business Phase III Renovations  Document:  LEED Materials Tracking   Scope of Work:  Demolition Coordinator:   Kaj Briscoe     Date of Bin  09-Apr-11 11-Apr-11 12-Apr-11 19-Apr-11 20-Apr-11 22-Apr-11 26-Apr-11 28-Apr-11 29-Apr-11 03-May-11 04-May-11 06-May-11 06-May-11 11-May-11 13-May-11 17-May-11 27-May-11 02-Jun-11 03-Jun-11 07-Jun-11 09-Jun-11 13-Jun-11 14-Jun-11 15-Jun-11 30-Jun-11 30-Jun-11 Invoice   7206 45251 7206 7206 7206 7206 45302 7206 7206 45315 7206 7206 45335 7264 45361 7264 7264 7305 45378 7305 7305 7305 45409 7305 7305 45439 Location  Mitchel Island Material Waste-Away Disposal Mitchel Island Material Waste-Away Disposal New West Gypsum Richmod Steel Waste-Away Disposal Richmond Steel Mitchel Island Material Waste-Away Disposal Mitchel Island Material Richmond Steel Waste-Away Disposal Mitchel Island Material Waste-Away Disposal Mitchel Island Material Mitchel Island Material Mitchel Island Material Waste-Away Disposal Richmond Steel Mitchel Island Material Mitchel Island Material Waste-Away Disposal Richmond Steel Mitchel Island Material Waste-Away Disposal Weight   12000kg 5500kg 12000kg 5800kg 9100kg 3450kg 7870kg 4300kg 12000kg 6100kg 12000kg 3800kg 6580kg 12000kg 8200kg 12000kg 12000kg 12000kg 7500kg 4100kg 12000kg 12000kg 7200kg 5000kg 12000kg 5800kg Material   concrete 30% wood, 70% garbage concrete 25% wood, 75% garbage gypsum wall board metal (dirty steel) 25% wood, 75% garbage metal (dirty steel) concrete 20% wood, 80% garbage concrete metal (dirty steel) 30% wood, 70% garbage concrete 15% wood, 85% garbage concrete concrete concrete 30% wood, 70% garbage metal (dirty steel) concrete concrete 10% wood, 90% garbage metal (dirty steel) concrete 20% wood, 80% garbage % Recycled   100%(12000kg) 30%  (1650kg) 100% (12000kg) 25% (1450kg) 100% (9100kg) 100% (3450kg) 25% (1967.5kg) 100% (4300kg) 100% (12000kg) 20% (1220kg) 100% (12000kg) 100% (3800kg) 30% (1974kg) 100% (12000kg) 15% (1230kg) 100% (12000kg) 100% (12000kg) 100% (12000kg) 30% (2250kg) 100% (4100kg) 100% (12000kg) 100% (12000kg) 10% (720kg) 100% (5000kg) 100% (12000kg) 20% (1160kg)   Total Weight:     Total Recycled:   % Recycled:   222,300 175,371.5kg   79%  Table 4  Quantity Sheets Contractor:  Scott Construction Group - Project:  Sauder School of Business Phase III Renovations                                                    SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 62 of 67    Table 5  Quantity Sheets Contractor:  Ledcor Construction  -  Project:  Ponderosa Commons  Date of Haul [ M onth DD, YYY Y]  T yp e of Waste A mount of Waste Diversion R ate A mount Diverted [w ood, steel, landfill, etc. ]  R eceiving F acility  [ K G ]  [ % ]  [ K G]  March 30, 2012 Mr Bin (wood, cb, metal) Mitchell Island 2390 100% 2390 March 30, 2012 Mr Bin, various Mitchell Island 5920 100% 5920 April 12, 2012 Mr Bin, various Mitchell Island 2220 97% 2153.4 April 19, 2012 Mr Bin, various Mitchell Island 6320 85% 5372 April 4, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100% 9500 April 14, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100% 9500 April 21, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 95% 9025 April 24, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100% 9500 May 3, 2012 Mr Bin, various Mitchell Island 3980 97% 3860.6 May 18, 2012 Mr Bin, various Mitchell Island 3990 97% 3870.3 May 30, 2012 Mr Bin, various Mitchell Island 4540 95% 4313 May 3, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100% 9500 May 3, 2012 Metal, Wood, Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 4815 90% 4333.5 May 4, 2012 Metal Davis Trading 2270 100% 2270 May 8, 2012 Wood Fraser Richmond 10240 100% 10240 May 22, 2012 Wood, Concrete, Plastic AWST New West 9500 94% 8930 May 29, 2012 Concrete Ecowaste 4444 100% 4444 May 30, 2012 Metal, Concrete AWST New West 9500 100% 9500 May 18, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100% 9500 May 23, 2012 Metal, Wood, Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 3985 95% 3785.75 May 29, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 90% 8550 June 5, 2012 Mr Bin, various Mitchell Island 3170 94% 2979.8 June 11, 2012 Mr Bin, various Mitchell Island 5610 96% 5385.6 June 22, 2012 Mr Bin, various Mitchell Island 4010 93% 3729.3 June 27, 2012 Mr Bin, various Mitchell Island 3680 96% 3532.8 June 12, 2012 Metal, Concrete Ecowaste 7660 100% 7660 June 19, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100% 9500 June 12, 2012 Wood, Concrete Urban Wood Waste 6155 95% 5847.25 June 20, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 95% 9025 July 6, 2012 Mr Bin, various Mitchell Island 3640 95% 3458 July 18, 2012 Mr Bin, various Mitchell Island 2870 94% 2697.8 July 20, 2012 Mr Bin, various Mitchell Island 3530 98% 3459.4 July 3, 2012 Wood Urban Wood Waste 860 100% 860 July 3, 2012 Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 215 100% 215 July 13, 2012 Metal Urban Wood Waste 628.5 90% 565.65 July 13, 2012 Wood Urban Wood Waste 3142.5 90% 2828.25 July 16, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100% 9500 July 24, 2012 Metal Urban Wood Waste 412 95% 391.4 July 24, 2012 Wood Urban Wood Waste 3296 95% 3131.2 July 24, 2012 Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 206 95% 195.7 July 30, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100% 9500 July 31, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100% 9500 July 9, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100% 9500 July 17, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100% 9500  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 63 of 67   July 26, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100% 9500 July 31, 2012 Wood Innercity 3120 80% 2496 August 1, 2012 Metal & Wood Ecowaste 4278 70% 2994. August 9, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 3760 100 3760 August 15, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 2795 90% 2515. August 16, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100 9500 August 20, 2012 Metal & Wood Ecowaste 5292 80% 4233. August 24, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 4925 95% 4678. August 30, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 August 8, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100 9500 August 9, 2012 Metal & Wood Urban Wood Waste 5285 90% 4756. August 14, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 August 20, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 August 24, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 August 28, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 4610 90% 4149 September 6, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100 9500 September 6, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 4275 90% 3847. September 14, 2012 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 3395 95% 3225. September 17, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 September 19, 2012 Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 3325 90% 2992. September 24, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 September 27, 2012 Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 4795 80% 3836 September 6, 2012 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 3750 90% 3375 September 12, 2012 Metal, Wood Richvan 4360 95% 4142 September 12, 2012 Concrete Urban Wood Waste 9500 100 9500 September 17, 2012 Wood Urban Wood Waste 5380 95% 5111 September 24, 2012 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 4645 90% 4180. September 25, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 October 2, 2012 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 5325 80% 4260 October 15, 2012 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 6305 75% 4728. October 26, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 6670 80% 5336 October 29, 2012 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 5020 95% 4769 October 2, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 October 23, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 October 29, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 October 2, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 3200 85% 2720 October 11, 2012 Waste Urban Wood Waste 4395 95% 4175. October 20, 2012 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 6760 70% 4732 October 25, 2012 Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 3220 65% 2093 October 31, 2012 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 5920 90% 5328 October 1, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 October 11, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 October 18, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 October 25, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 November 6, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 November 13, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 5495 95% 5220. November 14, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 7435 90% 6691. November 16, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 November 19, 2012 Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 4945 90% 4450.  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 64 of 67   November 21, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 November 28, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 November 28, 2012 Wood Urban Wood Waste 5040 90% 4536 November 6, 2012 Concrete Ecowaste 5942 100 5942 November 7, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 6650 80% 5320 November 13, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 6220 85% 5287 November 21, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 November 21, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Ecowaste 5236 50% 2618 November 24, 2012 Wood Urban Wood Waste 7310 85% 6213. November 28, 2012 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 5465 90% 4918. November 30, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 4125 80% 3300 December 3, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 December 3, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 December 4, 2012 Metal Davis Trading 2070 100 2070 December 5, 2012 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 6040 85% 5134 December 10, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 December 17, 2012 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 7040 75% 5280 December 5, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 5765 80% 4612 December 10, 2012 Concrete Richvan 9500 100 9500 December 11, 2012 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 5640 85% 4794 December 13, 2012 Concrete AWST New West 9500 100 9500 December 20, 2012 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 6835 65% 4442. December 20, 2012 Metal, OCC Urban Wood Waste 3840 85% 3264 December 27, 2012 Concrete Ecowaste 6262 100 6262 January 4, 2013 Wood, Concrete Ecowaste 4194 60% 2516. January 10, 2013 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 5640 85% 4794 January 14, 2013 Wood Urban Wood Waste 7545 70% 5281. January 14, 2013 Metal, Wood,OCC Urban Wood Waste 6275 65% 4078. January 16, 2013 Wood, Concrete Urban Wood Waste 4775 95% 4536. January 16, 2013 Concrete Ecowaste 9410 100 9410 January 22, 2013 Concrete Ecowaste 1012 100 1012 January 25, 2013 Metal, Concrete Ecowaste 7114 100 7114 January 25, 2013 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 5710 85% 4853. January 30, 2013 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 5525 100 5525 January 31, 2013 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 4680 65% 3042 January 2, 2013 OCC Urban Impact-NW 80 100 80 January 3, 2013 Concrete Ecowaste 1002 100 1002 January 9, 2013 OCC Urban Impact-NW 40 100 40 January 11, 2013 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 8705 65% 5658. January 14, 2013 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 4080 60% 2448 January 16, 2013 OCC Urban Impact-NW 40 100 40 January 17, 2013 Concrete Ecowaste 1122 100 1122 January 22, 2013 Wood Urban Wood Waste 6690 85% 5686. January 23, 2013 OCC Urban Impact-NW 60 100 60 January 25, 2013 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 5855 85% 4976. January 30, 2013 Concrete Ecowaste 1195 100 1195 January 30, 2013 OCC Urban Impact-NW 40 100 40 February 1, 2013 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 5340 80% 4272 February 5, 2013 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 2910 95% 2764.  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 65 of 67   February 7, 2013 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 4360 40% 1744 February 8, 2013 Wood Urban Wood Waste 2830 95% 2688. February 8, 2013 Concrete Urban Wood Waste 7846 100 7846 February 12, 2013 Metal, Wood Ecowaste 4895 95% 4650. February 12, 2013 Wood Urban Wood Waste 3040 75% 2280 February 13, 2013 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 3295 55% 1812. February 14, 2013 Wood Urban Wood Waste 3030 85% 2575. February 18, 2013 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 4365 85% 3710. February 18, 2013 Wood Urban Wood Waste 1145 85% 973.2 February 20, 2013 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 6415 50% 3207. February 22, 2013 Wood Urban Wood Waste 3785 90% 3406. February 25, 2013 Metal, Concrete Ecowaste 7346 95% 6978. February 27, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 1550 100 1550 February 27, 2013 Wood Ecowaste 2854 25% 713.5 February 28, 2013 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 4160 75% 3120 February 1, 2013 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 3840 90% 3456 February 4, 2013 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 3540 75% 2655 February 7, 2013 OCC Urban Impact 80 100 80 February 7, 2013 Wood Urban Wood Waste 5940 90% 5346 February 13, 2013 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 5530 95% 5253. February 13, 2013 Metal, Wood, OCC Urban Wood Waste 1165 30% 349.5 February 13, 2013 OCC Urban Impact 60 100 60 February 14, 2013 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 4920 100 4920 February 20, 2013 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 5315 95% 5049. February 20, 2013 OCC Urban Impact 60 100 60 February 21, 2013 Wood Urban Wood Waste 4565 90% 4108. February 22, 2013 Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste 5035 70% 3524. March 7, 2013 Metal, Wood Ecowaste 3510 70% 2457  March 8, 2013  Metal, Wood Urban Wood Waste - SPRUCE  4230  80%  3384  March 8, 2013  Metal, Wood, Cardboard  Urban Wood Waste - MAIN  2880  95%  2736 March 11, 2013 Concrete Ecowaste 6140 100 6140 March 12, 2013 Metal, Wood Ecowaste 3670 45% 1651. March 21, 2013 Metal, Wood Ecowaste 4250 30% 1275 March 21, 2013 Metal, Wood Ecowaste 2910 0% 0 March 27, 2013 Concrete Ecowaste 5840 100 5840 March 28, 2013 Metal, Wood, Cardboard Ecowaste 2580 35% 903  March 28, 2013  Metal, Wood, Cardboard  Urban Wood Waste - MAIN  1985  80%  1588 March 6, 2013 Wood Ecowaste 5512 45% 2480. March 7, 2013 Cardboard Urban Impact-NW 60 100 60 March 14, 2013 Cardboard Urban Impact-NW 20 100 20 March 21, 2013 Cardboard Urban Impact-NW 40 100 40  March 21, 2013  Metal, Wood, Cardboard  Urban Wood Waste - MAIN  2820  85%  2397  March 25, 2013  Metal, Wood, Cardboard  Urban Wood Waste - MAIN  4355  80%  3484 March 25, 2013 Metal Davis Trading 1730 100 1730 March 28, 2013 Cardboard Urban Impact-NW 80 100% 80  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 66 of 67    March 6, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 5920 100 5920 March 25, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 5950 100 5950 April 3, 2013 Cardboard Urban Impace 40 100 40 April 4, 2013 Wood Urban Wood Waste 3790 90% 3411 April 8, 2013 Metal Davis Trading 1060 100 1060 April 10, 2013 Cardboard Urban Impact 40 100 40 April 16, 2013 Metal Davis Trading 1100 100 1100 April 17, 2013 Cardboard Emterra 80 100 80 April 24, 2013 Cardboard Urban Impact 80 100 80 April 25, 2013 Metal, Wod, Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 4440 70% 3108 April 25, 2013 Metal Davis Trading 920 100 920 April 29, 2013 Cardboard Urban Impact 80 100 80 April 30, 2013 Metal Davis Trading 1070 100 1070 April 1, 2013 Cardboard Urban Impact 60 100 60 April 8, 2013 Wood Ecowaste 2510 30% 753 April 12, 2013 Metal, Wood, Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 3690 80% 2952 April 16, 2013 Wood, Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 2660 75% 1995 April 19, 2013 Metal, Wood Ecowaste 2470 55% 1358. April 23, 2013 Metal, Wood, Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 2665 80% 2132 April 24, 2013 Concrete Ecowaste 7116 100 7116 April 26, 2013 Wood, Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 2775 60% 1665 April 29, 2013 Cardboard Emterra 80 100 80 April 30, 2013 Wood, Cardboard Ecowaste 3060 63% 1927. April 9, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 6010 100 6010 April 12, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 6020 100 6020 April 17, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 5980 100 5980 April 25, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 4710 100 4710 April 26, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 6320 100 6320 May 1, 2013 Cardboard Emterra 80 100 80 May 3, 2013 Metal Davis Trading 1350 100 1350 May 8, 2013 Cardboard Emterra 80 100 80 May 9, 2013 Metal Davis Trading 1160 100 1160 May 13, 2013 Metal, Wood, Cardboard Ecowaste 2810 65% 1826. May 15, 2013 Metal Davis Trading 970 100 970 May 15, 2013 Cardboard Urban Impact 240 100 240 May 22, 2013 Cardboard Urban Impact 160 100 160 May 24, 2013 Metal Davis Trading 1750 100 1750 May 29, 2013 Cardboard Urban Impact 140 100 140 May 31, 2013 Metal, Wood Ecowaste 3080 65% 2002 May 2, 2013 Cardboard Urban Impact 80 100 80 May 2, 2013 Metal, Wood, Cardboard Ecowaste 2040 70% 1428 May 7, 2013 Metal, Wood, Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 3895 40% 1558 May 9, 2013 Metal, Wood, Cardboard Ecowaste 2710 75% 2032. May 14, 2013 Concrete Ecowaste 6286 100 6286 May 15, 2013 Wood, Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 2325 60% 1395 May 15, 2013 Metal, Wood, Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 2965 60% 1779 May 21, 2013 Metal, Wood, Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 2525 70% 1767.5 May 22, 2013 Metal, Wood Ecowaste 2290 78% 1786.2  SEEDS Project Report                      Zahra Hosseini Construction & Demolition (C&D) Waste Practices                        10/23/2013 Page 67 of 67    May 27, 2013 Wood Urban Wood Waste 2350 65% 1527. May 28, 2013 Wood Ecowaste 5210 90% 4689 May 30, 2013 Wood, Cardboard Urban Wood Waste 2280 90% 2052 May 30, 2013 Metal Davis Trading 1500 100 1500 May 3, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 5870 100 5870 May 6, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 5170 100 5170 May 8, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 5620 100 5620 May 13, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 6000 100 6000 May 17, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 6220 100 6220 May 29, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 5300 100 5300 May 30, 2013 Gypsum New West Gypsum 3780 100 3780  To tal quanti ty of waste di verted from landfill: 1100182.65 KG To tal quanti ty of waste taken offsite: 1212409 KG  Percentage of waste di verted: 90.7%     Table 6  Quantity Sheets  Contractor:  VPAC Construction -  Project:  Buchanan B Rooms 202, 204, 206  

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