UBC Undergraduate Research

Developing food system outreach at Sprouts Canavan, Melissa; Leung, Anita; Ng, Karen; Weiler, Anelyse M. Apr 30, 2010

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SEEDS Student Reports  1  UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Reports  Developing food system outreach at Sprouts Melissa Canavan Anita Leung Karen Ng Anelyse M. Weiler University of British Columbia LFS 450 April 2010  Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report.”  [Type text]  The University of British Columbia Food System Project (UBCFSP)  Developing food system outreach at  Connecting communities through practical learning  Prepared by:  LFS 450 Group 10 Melissa Canavan Anita Leung Karen Ng Anelyse M. Weiler  For review by:  Dr. Andrew Riseman Principle Investigator Agroecology Program Faculty of Land and Food Systems 04 /16 /2010  Table of Contents Abstract .......................................................................................................................................... 3 Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 4 Introduction to the UBC Food System Project ......................................................................................... 4 Problem definition .................................................................................................................................... 5 Vision Statement for a Sustainable UBC Food System and identification of value assumptions ............. 6  Methodology .................................................................................................................................. 6 Findings.......................................................................................................................................... 9 Challenges encountered in Sprouts outreach and previous Sprouts workshops ...................................... 9 Results from surveys of SUB visitors ........................................................................................................ 9 Questionnaire responses from experienced workshop facilitators ......................................................... 10  Discussion..................................................................................................................................... 11 Targeting specific outreach audiences ................................................................................................... 11 Evaluating our workshop outlines: providing teachings that are relevant to people’s lives .................. 12  Recommendations ....................................................................................................................... 13 To Sprouts board members ..................................................................................................................... 14 To future LFS 450 teams ......................................................................................................................... 15  Conclusion ................................................................................................................................... 16 References .................................................................................................................................... 17 Appendices ................................................................................................................................... 19 Appendix A: Apartment-Sized Vegetable Garden ................................................................................... 19 Appendix B: Local Pumpkin Pie ............................................................................................................. 20 Appendix C: Edible Flowers Class ......................................................................................................... 21 Appendix D: Drying Your Own Fruit ..................................................................................................... 22 Appendix E: Soil and the body: Connecting Human and Ecological Well-Being .................................. 23 Appendix F: Wild Campus Foraging ...................................................................................................... 24 Appendix G: Children and Healthy Eating ............................................................................................. 25 Appendix H: Ethnic Foods Using Local Ingredients .............................................................................. 26 Appendix I: Survey Questions ................................................................................................................. 27 Appendix J: Questionnaire for Experienced Workshop Facilitators ...................................................... 28 Appendix K: Promotional Posters for Select Workshop Outlines .......................................................... 29 Appendix L: Additional Workshop Ideas ................................................................................................ 30 2  Abstract The University of British Columbia Food System Project is an ongoing initiative that connects campus stakeholders with teams of students from the Land, Food and Community III (LFS 450) course to collaboratively transition the UBC food system toward sustainability. Employing a community-based action research approach, our transdisciplinary team partnered with Sprouts, a student-run cafe and grocery store on campus. Our project involved developing outlines of food system sustainability-related workshops in order to diversify Sprouts’ workshop topics, which have thus far been limited to cooking. We also explored ways in which Sprouts could use its workshops as educational outreach venues to engage people who are not involved with Sprouts. From surveying people within the building where Sprouts is located, we determined that lecture-based workshops should be less than 1.5 hours. This workshop length was also advised by experienced workshop facilitators who we contacted by e-mail. Additionally, we found that there was great interest in workshops on indoor gardening and those with a cooking component, which supported the workshop outlines that we developed. We recommend that Sprouts target specific organizations on campus and in the greater Vancouver community whose members are underrepresented at Sprouts and its workshops. For future LFS 450 teams, we propose acting as a liaison between Sprouts and a target organization to collaboratively design, schedule, and deliver a workshop on a food system sustainability-related topic.  3  Introduction Introduction to the UBC Food System Project Our team of undergraduate students in the Land, Food and Community III keystone course at the University of British Columbia (UBC) has partnered with board members from Sprouts, a student-run cafe and grocery store on campus, to partake in the UBC Food System Project (UBCFSP). Our transdisciplinary team’s academic backgrounds comprise sustainable agriculture, global trade, and nutrition. Involving collaboration between numerous food system stakeholders on campus and student researchers, one of the UBCFSP’s main goals is to provide students with the opportunity to apply their discipline-specific knowledge in a real-world setting by making practical recommendations to project partners on how they can transition the UBC food system toward sustainability. Since its initiation in 2001, this year’s UBCFSP has grown to include twenty-four student groups working on eight scenarios that explore diverse facets of sustainability in the UBC food system (Baker-French & Richer, 2009). After providing some context for our project focus with Sprouts, the following report includes an examination of how our team’s environmental ethics influence our view of the Vision Statement for a Sustainable UBC Food System, which was collaboratively developed by UBCFSP project partners (Vision Statement, n.d.). Outlining our methods and community-based action research (CBAR) approach, we describe and discuss our findings in relation to Sprouts outreach goals and food system sustainability at large. Finally, we offer recommendations to Sprouts board members and future LFS 450 teams, and we conclude with considerations for our project as a whole.  4  Problem definition Sprouts’ cafe and services are supported by a dedicated community of volunteers and patrons. Sprouts’ free cooking workshops contribute an important educational function to the UBC food system by providing workshop participants with skills to prepare healthy foods using local, organic and fair trade ingredients. However, Sprouts would like to diversify its workshop topics to include engaging sessions on food-related topics besides cooking. Sprouts board members also recognize the importance of fostering an understanding of food system concerns among populations on campus that may not be familiar with concepts such as fair trade or even aware of the existence of Sprouts itself (UBCFSP Scenarios, 2010). Indeed, food security initiatives in Canada and globally are often met by unawareness or apathy from the majority of the population, and those who are deeply committed to sustainability concerns in general often find themselves “preaching to the converted” (Sheehan, 2008). Such issues of apathy and inertia often involve more than just a lack of awareness. Complex factors such as cultural norms and the “value-action gap” (Blake, 1999) between a person’s environmental values and their actual behaviour are also implicated in many people’s disengagement from the unsustainability that pervades much of the global food system (Kollmuss & Agyeman, 2002). Adopting a CBAR approach, we have collaborated with several Sprouts board members to establish a project direction and methodologies that support Sprouts’ goals (Stringer, 1996). Our project has focused on developing outlines for food system sustainability-related workshops, which are based on findings from our surveys and questionnaires and consultations with Sprouts (Appendix A-H). We have also highlighted ways to enhance Sprouts food-related workshops and opportunities to connect Sprouts with communities on campus and in greater Vancouver.  5  Vision Statement for a Sustainable UBC Food System and identification of value assumptions Our team members identify with a biocentric or ecocentric environmental ethic (Bhardwaj, Maekawa, Niimura & Macer, 2003). Although we vary in our degrees of active involvement in food system sustainability, we all perceive that human animals have a profound debt to the land that endows us with the exquisite gift of life (Jensen & McBay, 2009). Each of us fully supports the Vision Statement for a Sustainable UBC Food System, and its emphasis on local recycling of waste and enhancing ecosystems particularly concurs with our earth-centered view of humanity’s role in the world. Furthermore, the Statement’s reference to raising food system awareness among consumers relates closely to our project with Sprouts (Vision Statement, n.d.). Upon reflecting on the current Vision Statement, we suggest the addition of the two following points to ensure the UBC community’s agency in overseeing the continuance of its food system. First: “Food marketing is honest and transparent, which includes strict regulations on food labelling and advertising methodologies.” In addition, we suggest adding: “Ownership of the means of production is decentralized and maintained by local stakeholders.”  Methodology In order to gain a clear understanding of Sprouts’ philosophy and previous workshop offerings, we reviewed Sprouts’ constitution and history and the workshop archives on Vista and Sprouts’ website. We corresponded by e-mail with Jing Cheng, the Sprouts Workshop Coordinator, to learn about challenges that Sprouts encountered in past workshops and inform our proposals for future workshop offerings. One of our group members attended part of a Sprouts workshop as a participant observer for the purpose of gaining firsthand knowledge of the workshops. Throughout our project, a representative from our group met in person and 6  communicated regularly by e-mail with several Sprouts board members to ensure that our team’s direction was consistent with Sprouts’ goals for this CBAR project. This included modifying our proposed workshop topics based on board members’ feedback. In developing workshop outlines that Sprouts could eventually implement, we selected workshop topics that met the following criteria: a) focused on aspects of food system sustainability besides cooking; b) contained both a lecture and an appealing experiential learning component; c) were consistent with Sprouts’ vision and goals, as outlined in its constitution, and, for some of our workshop outlines; d) would appeal to populations on campus who may not be engaged in food system sustainability issues and do not already frequent Sprouts.  After standardizing our workshop outlines using a common, legible format, we evaluated them based on our literature review of sustainability education theory. Our workshop outline revisions and recommendations for future workshops were also based on primary research regarding how to make workshops effective. Specifically, we conducted a short survey in the Student Union Building (SUB) to gain a very general understanding of SUB visitors’ awareness of Sprouts, their preferences for food security workshops, and whether their academic field was related to their choices (Appendix I). All participants in our project provided their informed consent in accordance with the consent form and letter of advertisement prepared by our instructor, Dr. Andrew Riseman. Our population consisted of all people visiting the SUB, and we sampled from those people present in the SUB during our single 3-hour surveying period from 1-4pm on a Wednesday. Surveying on all floors of the SUB, we chose to conduct face-toface surveys because this was the most practical means of contacting people who were physically located in the SUB. Survey respondents were not selected randomly. We approached people 7  who were nearest us and were not visibly occupied, including several Sprouts board members (n = 38). Data analysis consisted of tallying results and taking note of questions that received a particularly high or low score. Due to the limited number of respondents, the survey was only intended to complement our other research rather than offer conclusive, representative results.  To gain insight on the challenges and successes of hosting food system educational sessions, we e-mailed questionnaires to experienced facilitators of related workshops (Appendix J). These facilitators were selected from personal networks and internet research (n = 11, response rate = 55%). Given the inherently place-based nature of much knowledge about food systems, we selected more than half of the respondents based on their experience with facilitating workshops in B.C., and we contacted several facilitators in the United States to gain a broader perspective on geographically cross-cutting themes in participants’ responses. We analyzed the completed questionnaires by highlighting themes between responses and ideas that we deemed to be particularly relevant to Sprouts workshops.  With the objective of providing Sprouts with an implementable series of workshops, we designed modifiable promotional material to correspond with our workshop topics (Appendix K). We also drew from our personal networks in suggesting potential organizers of our workshops. Finally, we initiated e-mail contact with an educational outreach initiative at UBC called Humanities 101 with the intent of connecting Sprouts' workshops to members of the broader campus and Vancouver community. At the time of completing this report, we had not received a response, but we will forward any correspondence to Sprouts board members.  8  Findings Challenges encountered in Sprouts outreach and previous Sprouts workshops Among the difficulties encountered in past Sprouts workshops, the two most prominent have been a lack of participants and registrants not showing up. These issues have decreased during the increase in Sprouts membership associated with the 2009/2010 academic term. While one UBC graduate student and one UBC Food Services staff member have attended workshops, the vast majority of workshop participants have been UBC undergraduate students. Board members observed that most people involved with Sprouts belong to a nationality in which English is the primary language. Through participant observation at a workshop, a team member also noted that many of the attendees were Sprouts volunteers. Held in the AMS Food and Beverage Department’s kitchen, Sprouts’ 2-3 hour cooking workshops have all been hosted by UBC students. The size of the AMS kitchen has limited the number of participants to 10, and the absence of stovetops has meant that recipes must be practicable with an oven or the large boiling pot. If a non-student were invited to host a workshop, a small honorarium may be available for the speaker (Sprouts board members, personal communication, February-March, 2010).  Results from surveys of SUB visitors More than half of our 38 survey participants did not know where Sprouts was located, and of the 18 who were aware of its location, only half had actually been to Sprouts. No respondents selected 3 hours as their ideal workshop length, and nearly 70% preferred workshops of 1 hour less. While none of the four categories of workshop topics was highly unpopular, the “gardening and foraging” category was the least favoured, while “food, nutrition and health” received the most interest. Paradoxically, five participants suggested offering a 9  workshop on gardening or indoor gardening. Despite the survey’s request for suggestions of topics besides cooking, there was considerable interest in healthy cuisine workshops such as single-person cooking and cooking on a budget. Our sample size was not large enough to draw meaningful correlations between survey participants’ responses and their faculty.  Questionnaire responses from experienced workshop facilitators In relation to expanding the audience of Sprouts workshops, it was suggested that the schedules of target populations at UBC for Sprouts outreach might be different from those of Sprouts’ regular audience. Also, extending outreach to “the general population” might be less successful than targeting specific interests. One seasoned facilitator suggested that it could be more effective to target specific audiences such as AMS staff or students living in high-rises on campus instead of the general public. The issue of conflicting timetables was a common challenge for facilitators, and one respondent advised that a workshop series could be made more successful by offering a variety of times throughout the series that would accommodate several target populations’ specific schedules. For lecture-based workshops, the general consensus for an ideal length was 45 to 90 minutes, and any workshop should allow for post-session discussions and socializing. Effective publicity was a perennial hurdle among questionnaire participants. They stressed the importance marketing and naming workshops to excite and intrigue potential attendees without being misleading. It was recommended to approach elders for assistance with wording advertisements targeted toward older generations. One respondent also proposed promoting workshops by word of mouth and flyers in community outreach tabling events.  10  To engage workshop participants, the facilitators warned against proselytizing and discounting the importance of humour and fun. Julie Rawson of the Many Hands Sustainability Center in Massachusetts advised being sensitive to participants’ levels of awareness and life experience: “Don’t harass them with sustainability if they are not ready” (personal communication, March 14, 2010). To help participants literally internalize theoretical concepts, one respondent provided delicious, home-grown food for audience members during a lecture about soil fertility and pest management. If Sprouts workshops were focused on outreach, one workshop facilitator advocated direct participation from the target audience in organizing the workshop or even forming an advisory board with members from the intended audience. Moreover, the facilitators who we contacted counselled that workshops should offer practical skills or teachings that would have immediate applicability to participants’ lives.  Discussion Targeting specific outreach audiences In relation to the small pool of people involved with Sprouts and the lack of diversity in age and nationality within this pool, our survey results support the remarks of Sprouts board members and our team’s participant observer. While we cannot claim statistical significance for our results, we suggest that the large number of survey participants who had never visited Sprouts or were unaware of its existence has important implications for Sprouts outreach goals and our proposed workshops. Like the workshop on community-based social marketing recently hosted by the UBC Alma Mater Society, there is strong potential for our proposed workshops to attract the same group of students who are already engaged in sustainability initiatives and miss the opportunity to reach other audiences (N. Toogood, LFS 450 lecture, March 10, 2010). This 11  result also echoes people’s widespread disengagement from urgent environmental and social issues such as climate change in the manner that Hawken (2007) describes: “...the general public is, at best, only dimly aware of the extent to which problems are rapidly multiplying.”  Evaluating our workshop outlines: providing teachings that are relevant to people’s lives Instead of attempting to connect with the indeterminate “general public,” community outreach through workshops may be made more effective by targeting specific groups with a particular need, as suggested by one of our questionnaire respondents (D. Lewis, personal communication, April 6, 2010). From our own knowledge of the campus and local community, apt target groups could include the University Neighbourhoods Association, the Musqueam Indian Band, and student graduate societies and cultural clubs. For example, our “Children and Healthy Eating” workshop could be marketed toward parents, who would largely fall within an underrepresented age demographic for Sprouts workshops (Appendix G). Based on our respondents’ advice, this workshop would likely have greater success if parents were consulted in workshop scheduling, content, and advertising (D. Lewis, personal communication, April 6, 2010; R. Wheeler, personal communication, April 8, 2010). A limitation of our workshops is that few opportunities for peer-to-peer learning are explicitly included in the outlines, and thus allocating time for casual, post-workshop discussions would be particularly important. However, the “Children and Healthy Eating” workshop designates time for both consultation with a dietitian and parent-to-parent support. This would provide a venue for the problem-solving that is deemed vital to deep learning for sustainability and would welcome the knowledge of all participants (Warburton, 2003).  12  Such an egalitarian learning approach is embodied in the philosophy of UBC’s Humanities 101 Programme, which provides free classes for residents of Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside who might not normally have access to university education (Faculty of Arts, n.d.). As a means of fulfilling Sprouts’ goal to expand its sustainability education outreach to the broader community, there exists untapped potential for workshop coordinators to collaborate with organizers of Humanities 101 in offering classes that would interest programme students. As Fien (1995) declares, any environmental education must identify with those that it claims to benefit. The low score for gardening-related workshop topics in our survey could be attributable to many student respondents’ lack of access to gardening space, and thus they would not identify gardening skills as being of immediate use to them. Conversely, the popularity of indoor gardening among survey respondents would likely provide this same demographic with highly practical skills. Acknowledging survey respondents’ interest in cooking, workshops could hybridize hands-on cooking with food system-related teachings in a similar vein as those workshops that we have outlined. In this manner, Sprouts workshops would provide an antidote to the problematic abstraction and passivity that often typify university learning (Orr, 1991; Rushmere, 2007). Moreover, by providing members of the UBC and greater community with practical knowledge and a diverse set of food-related skills, Sprouts’ workshops can act as a subtle but powerful form of resistance against the influence of food corporations whose profits depend on uninformed, deskilled consumers (Jaffe & Gertler, 2006; Rushmere, 2009).  Recommendations  13  To Sprouts board members We recommend the Sprouts Workshop Coordinator, Promotions and Outreach coordinator and other interested board members target Sprouts workshops toward specific communities at UBC and in greater Vancouver who are unaware of Sprouts and have a limited awareness of food system sustainability issues. Specifically, Sprouts board members should: •  Limit lecture-based workshops to 1.5 hours or less. Target audiences should be consulted when scheduling workshop dates and times.  •  Consider using the Food Teaching Laboratory in Room 130 of the Food, Nutrition and Health (FNH) building for workshops with a cooking component. This fully equipped kitchen would accommodate a greater number of workshop participants than the AMS kitchen, and the stovetop space would allow for more flexibility in workshop recipes. For lecture sessions, rooms FNH 220 and 300 would provide a large seating capacity. 1  •  Explore the possibility of designing a workshop on food system sustainability with organizations at UBC and Vancouver whose members are over 30 years old or include members for whom English is not a mother tongue. Examples of such groups include the University Neighbourhoods Association, UBC graduate student societies, local elementary school classes, the Humanities 101 programme, the Musqueam Indian Band, and the numerous AMS student cultural clubs. 2  •  Coordinate workshop scheduling with other organizations at UBC and in the local community, particularly the UBC Farm and UBC Botanical Gardens, that offer food  1  For room booking details, please see the link below. A Land and Food Systems faculty member may be able to act as a sponsor to offset the cost of renting rooms in the FNH building: http://www.landfood.ubc.ca/mylandfood/bookings/room-fns 2  Although the current online listing for AMS student clubs is at http://www2.ams.ubc.ca/index.php/campus_life/category/clubs, the clubs database will soon be located at http://www.amsclubs.ca/  14  system-related workshops (M. Bomford, personal communication, April 14, 2010). This would prevent competition between the respective organizations and optimize opportunities for mutual promotion and organizational support. •  Translate promotional material for Sprouts workshops into non-English languages to acknowledge the ethnic diversity at UBC. The main non-English languages spoken at UBC should be researched beforehand.  •  Prioritize, among our workshop outlines, the implementation of the “Apartment-Sized Vegetable Garden” workshop (Appendix A).  •  Promote Sprouts workshops through booths hosted at community events. Sprouts could initiate an outreach sub-committee to coordinate volunteers for such events.  To future LFS 450 teams For LFS 450 groups in future years, we recommend supporting Sprouts promotions, outreach and workshop development by: •  Attending a Sprouts workshop as a participant observer as early as possible in the term to gain firsthand insight on workshop strengths and areas for improvement. Likewise, all team members should visit Sprouts cafe and store at least once during the term.  •  Preparing and administering any surveys near the beginning of the project in order to gain a larger sample size and possibly allow for statistically significant results.  •  Approaching specific organizations at UBC and in the greater Vancouver community, such as those mentioned in the third bullet point above, to ascertain whether  15  organizations are interested in collaborating on a Sprouts workshop. We particularly recommend exploring possible connections with the Humanities 101 programme. •  Liaising between Sprouts and one of the aforementioned organizations to design and host a workshop. Students should collaborate with the organization to determine a food system sustainability-related topic and format that would attract its members.  •  Building educational facilitation skills for all involved in the workshops: workshops could be co-hosted by members of the organization and the LFS 450 team  •  Expanding in detail upon our team’s additional workshop ideas (Appendix L)  Conclusion By targeting its proposed food system workshops toward specific organizations on campus and in Vancouver at-large, Sprouts could fulfill its goals of extending its community of followers, promoting awareness of food system issues and providing people with food-related skills besides cooking. Effective outreach and education for sustainability will entail consulting with target groups on workshop topics, formats, scheduling and marketing. These target groups will likely include elders, multicultural organizations and members of the community who do not normally have access to university education. Through its workshops, Sprouts can impart practical knowledge and skills for people to use immediately in their own lives and thus to recognize their roles as members of a food system that is currently riddled with ecological destructiveness and social injustice, but that is also within humanity’s means to change.  16  References Baker-French, S., & Richer, L. (2009). The UBC Food System Project (UBCFSP): Summary report 2009 [Class resource material]. Retrieved from https://www.elearning.ubc.ca Bhardwaj, M., Maekawa, F., Niimura, Y., & Macer, D. R. (2003). Ethics in food and agriculture: Views from FAO. International Journal of Food Science & Technology, 38(5), 565-577. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2621.2003.00693.x Blake, J. (1999). Overcoming the ‘value-action gap’ in environmental policy: Tensions between national policy and local experience. Local Environment, 4(3), 257-278. doi:10.1080/13549839908725599 Faculty of Arts. (n.d.). Humanities 101: A Faculty of Arts programme. Retrieved from http://humanities101.arts.ubc.ca/ Fien, J. (1995). Teaching for a sustainable world: The environmental and development education project for teacher education. Environmental Education Research, 1(1), 21-34. Retrieved from http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13504622.asp Jaffe, J., & Gertler, M. (2006). Victual vicissitudes: Consumer deskilling and the (gendered) transformation of food systems. Agriculture and Human Values, 23(2), 143-162. doi: 10.1007/s10460-005-6098-1 Jensen, D., & McBay, A. (2009). What we leave behind. New York: Seven Stories Press. Hawken, P. (2007). Blessed unrest: How the largest movement in the world came into being and why no one saw it coming. Retrieved from https://www.elearning.ubc.ca  17  Kollmuss, A., & Agyeman, J. (2002). Mind the gap: Why do people act environmentally and what are the barriers to pro-environmental behaviour? Environmental Education Research, 8(3), 239-260. doi:10.1080/13504620220145401 Orr, D. (1991). What is education for? In Context, 27, 52. Retrieved from http://www.context.org/ICLIB/icintro.htm Rushmere, A. (2007). ‘Placing’ caring relationships in education: Addressing abstraction and domination. Paideusis, 16(2), 81-88. Retrieved from http://journals.sfu.ca/paideusis/index.php/paideusis/index Rushmere, A. (2009). Fermenting the Free Folk School: Tending a culture of place-based ecological learning and living (Unpublished master’s thesis). Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Sheehan, J. M. (2008). Book Review [Review of the book Blessed unrest: How the largest movement in the world came into being and why no one saw it coming]. The Electronic Journal of Sustainable Development, 1(2), 55-57. Retrieved from http://www.ejsd.org/ Stringer E. (1996). Action Research: A Handbook for Practitioners. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Vision Statement. (n.d.). Vision statement for a sustainable UBC food system: Plain language version [Class handout]. Retrieved from https://www.elearning.ubc.ca Warburton, K. (2003). Deep learning and education for sustainability. International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 4(1), 44-56. doi:10.1108/14676370310455332  18  Appendices Appendix A: Apartment-Sized Vegetable Garden Materials Needed: Well-drained planter box, seeds (recommended: carrot, radish, and lettuce), gardening tools Description: This workshop enables participants to grow their own vegetables regardless of the size of their home. Following a lecture discussing the benefits and details of vegetable gardening, participants will create their own vegetable planters. This workshop supports Sprouts philosophy by providing opportunities for participants to access affordable, nutritious, healthy and locally produced food. Workshop Breakdown: Lecture Section (1 hour) a) Discuss on the benefits of an indoor vegetable garden, the most appropriate vegetables to grow, and garden maintenance. (40 minutes) b) Q&A period with experts from the Faculty of LFS and UBC Farm staff. (20 min.) Make your own indoor vegetable garden (1 hour) a) Instructions for the activity (20 minutes) b) Packing vegetable containers with soil and planting the seeds (40 minutes) Reference Material: •  Guide to vegetables that are suited to indoor-growing: http://ucce-plumas-sierra.ucdavis.edu/files/42667.PDF  •  Container-growing chart: http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/garden/mg/vegetable/container.html  Possible Facilitators: 3 1) James Richardson, Masters of Advanced Studies in Landscape Architecture Candidate, Permaculture instructor 2) Robin Wheeler, Owner of Edible Landscapes, author of Food Security for the Faint of Heart, founder of The One Straw Society, instructor of gardening and food security skills Additional Comments: •  Plants need between 5-10 hours of daylight, depending on the vegetables grown  •  Planter can be placed either indoors or outdoors  3  In order to maintain the privacy of suggested workshop facilitators, we have not included their e-mail addresses in this document. Please e-mail Anelyse Weiler (anelyse.m.weiler@gmail.com) for their contact information.  19  Appendix B: Local Pumpkin Pie Materials Needed: Sprouts will provide all materials, but attendees should bring a container to carry home their pie.  Description: This workshop provides participants the opportunity to make a pumpkin pie with 100% locally produced ingredients. The first hour of the workshop will consist of lectures regarding local food production and ecological “foodprints.” Through its strong focus on locally, sustainable grown foods and supporting local farmers, the workshop is consistent with Sprouts’ goals. Workshop Breakdown: Lecture Section (1 hour) a) Discuss food transportation and your personal “foodprint.” This discussion will take place will Land and Food Systems faculty and students. (20 min.) b) A discussion with local food producers on seasonal food availability and the social, environmental and economic basis for supporting local food and farmers, (20 min.) c) Questions, all experts above will be available for questions. (20 minutes) Baking: Local Pumpkin Pie (1-1.5 hours) a) Baking instructions (20 min.)  Recipe: 100-Mile Pumpkin Pie (by Kelly Kuryk, based on the Moosewood Cookbook recipe): http://100milediet.org/desserts#more-147. Possible Facilitators: This workshop would be well-suited to co-facilitation by students and UBC Farm staff.  Additional Comments: This would be a good workshop to offer before Thanksgiving.  20  Appendix C: Edible Flowers Class Materials Needed: Sprouts will provide oven, bowls, mixers, rolling pin, stovetop, pots, and ingredients. Description: Participants learn about which flowers are edible, their effects on the human body, and how to make shortbreads and tea with edible flowers. By preferentially using flowers grown at the UBC Farm and Land and Food Systems Orchard Garden, this workshop can raise people’s awareness of produce grown and sold on campus. They can also learn that flowers are more than just looks! Workshop Breakdown (90 min.): Activity 1: Description of edible flowers and those that will be used in the class (10 min.) •  Rosemary: treatment for gastrointestinal disorders, improve digestion, clear congestions  •  Lavender: treatment for restlessness, insomnia, abdominal complaints, rheumatism, loss of appetite  •  Chamomile: boost immunity, relieves muscle spasms and menstrual cramps in women, relaxes the nerves, reduces inflammation, and soothes the stomach  Activity 2: Making Rosemary-Lavender Shortbread (1 hour) •  Recipe for shortbread is from: http://undercovercook.blogspot.com/2008/04/new-rosemary.html  Activity 3: Be creative! Making your own chamomile drink: (20 minutes)  •  Provide small amounts of cinnamon, orange peel, apple slices, peppermint, honey, lemon juice, vanilla extract, for people to add to create their own chamomile tea. Source as many ingredients as possible from the UBC Farm.  Possible Facilitators: Anyone who has tried the recipes would be qualified to host this workshop.  Additional Comments: This workshop requires the use of a stovetop. We recommend holding this workshop in Room 130 in the Food, Nutrition and Health building.  21  Appendix D: Drying Your Own Fruit Materials Needed: Sprouts will provide bowls, mixers, fruit steamers, baking dishes, spatulas, knives, cutting boards, baking sheets, and ingredients. Participants should bring their own containers. Description: Participants will learn how to make their own cereal out of simple ingredients and gain skills in drying local fruit, which can be eaten as a snack on its own or added to the cereal. By incorporating locally grown fruit and grains, the workshop will raise awareness about the importance of supporting local food producers. The food-preserving component will also serve to educate participants about the seasonal availability of produce and how easy practices such as drying fruit can contribute to local food security. Workshop Breakdown (approx. 2 hours and 10 min.) Activity 1: Making your own healthy cereal (90 min.) •  Cereal Recipe: http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Your-Own-Homemade-Cereal  Activity 2: Drying Your Own Fruit (30 min.) •  Fruit-drying procedure: http://planetgreen.discovery.com/food-health/homemade-driedfruit.html  Possible Facilitators: Anyone who has tried the recipes would be qualified to host this workshop.  Additional Comments: Because drying fruits in an oven can takes a few hours, it is suggested that Sprouts volunteers to pack the fruit in participants’ individual containers after the fruit has finished drying. The fruit could then be available for pickup at Sprouts the next day. Sprouts volunteers should complete Step 5 of the recipe after the fruits have been dried. In addition, facilitators should advise participants to complete step 6 of the recipe when they get home.  22  Appendix E: Soil and the body: Connecting Human and Ecological Well-Being Materials Needed: Sprouts will provide cutting boards, an apple, knives, soil samples, and seed ball-making materials. 4 Description: Explore the relationship between human well-being and soil health through an integrative, handson workshop that will leave you with a new way of looking at the ground beneath your feet. Workshop participants will gain a very basic understanding of soil science principles, the effects of conventional agricultural practices on both ecosystems and crop nutrition, and an awareness of how their own food choices can support healthy people and healthy land. We’ll also be making seed balls that you can bring home to satisfy your guerrilla gardening impulse! Workshop Breakdown (90 min.) Lecture section (45 min.): - Basics of soil science, interesting factoids - Harmful effects of conventional industrial agriculture on soil sustainability o Tillage and climate change o Soil nutrient deficiencies and the impact on plant foods and malnutrition - “The earth as an apple:” Demonstrating the preciousness of topsoil by having workshop participants cut an apple symbolizing the amount of world’s topsoil. o Participants can subsequently eat the apple during a brief mention about the soil management practices that were used in growing the fruit. - Poetic, cultural and scientific interpretations of relationships between soil and human health - Sustainable soil management practices, and how food choices can support soil health Hands-On (30 min.) - Observing samples of healthy and poorly managed soil (touch, listen, smell, see) - Making seed balls out of clay and compost for guerrilla gardening Possible Facilitators: 1) James Richardson, Masters of Advanced Studies in Landscape Architecture Candidate, Permaculture instructor 2) Dr. Maja Krzic, Program Director, Applied Biology; Associate Professor, Agroecology/Forest Sciences, Faculty of Land and Food Systems 3) Chris Thoreau, BSc. Student, Agroecology, Faculty of Land and Food Systems: 4) Anelyse Weiler, BSc. Student, Global Resource Systems, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, Permaculture Design Certified: anelyse.m.weiler@gmail.com  4  http://heavypetal.ca/archives/2007/03/how-to-make-seedballs/  23  Appendix F: Wild Campus Foraging Materials Needed: Sprouts will provide bowls and scissors for harvesting. Description: What would you do in the event of an emergency food shortage if grocery stores were emptied? Begin seeing the campus around you as a place of abundance, and find food beneath your feet! We will learn about the importance and traditional use of indigenous food plants by local First Nations, the health benefits of edible weeds, and how to harvest forage safely and ethically. We’ll finish off by identifying and harvesting wild plants from the campus area and enjoying a locally foraged salad together. Workshop Breakdown: Lecture section (45 min.): -  Learning about indigenous plants that are traditional foods of local First Nations (possibly lectured by Cease Wyss, from Vancouver Native Health) o Destruction of traditional harvesting grounds by development projects Wild weeds as progenitors of modern crop plants; benefits of “neutraceutical” weeds Ethics and safety of wild plant harvesting: Not harvesting in sensitive ecological areas; avoiding areas sprayed by pesticides or high-traffic places  Hands-On (45-60 min.) -  Identifying and harvesting wild greens and weeds from around the campus area Combining all workshop participants’ weeds in a giant salad o Either eating the salad as a group or giving workshop participants the option to take salad home  Possible Facilitators: • • • •  Cease Wyss, Vancouver Native Health, Dr. Felice Wyndham, Assistant Professor, UBC Faculty of Anthropology Holgar Lealand, Natural Builder and herbalist Anelyse Weiler, BSc. Student, Global Resource Systems, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, Permaculture Design Certified: anelyse.m.weiler@gmail.com  24  Appendix G: Children and Healthy Eating Materials Needed: Sprouts will provide fresh fruits, yogurt and all equipments for the participants; the only thing the participants need to bring is a container for taking the healthy snacks away. Description: Through an exploration of children’s nutritional requirements and eating behaviours, this workshop will provide participants with knowledge and tools for supporting children’s nutritional health. Along with a hands-on preparation of a healthy, kid-friendly snack, participants will have the opportunity to share their thoughts and concerns with a registered dietitian. This workshop relates closely to Sprouts’ goal to “provide an outlet and knowledge resource for community members interested in ethical, environmental, economic and health issues surrounding food” as outlined in the Sprouts Constitution. Workshop Breakdown (Total time: 65 min.) Lecture Section: (30 min. Lecture, followed by 20 min. discussion) - Familiarize participants with Canada’s Food Guide as it relates to children’s nutritional needs Provide participants with tips in preparing and choosing healthy food for children. This could include understanding nutritional labels, how to incorporate variety in children’s diets, and the importance of whole, unprocessed foods - Introducing the vitamins and minerals that are most important in children’s diets, including a description of their sources (e.g. vitamin C and D, iron and calcium). - Provide suggestions of healthy, appealing snacks for kids and discuss children’s major foodrelated health issues (e.g. obesity). - Give suggestions to participants on how to empower kids to make healthy choices for themselves. - A registered dietitian will address participants’ questions about children’s health and facilitate fun, practical activities. These will include problem-solving activities wherein parents can share their experiences and solutions to common issues with other parents. Activities -  Making healthy snack [Vanilla-yogurt Fruit Dip] (5 min. at the beginning of the workshop, and 10 min. at the end) o Recipe: http://recipes.kaboose.com/vanilla-yogurt-fruit-dip.html  Possible Facilitators: A registered dietitian would be required. This workshop would also provide an excellent opportunity for nutrition or dietetics students at UBC to gain experience in public speaking and workshop facilitation. Additional Comments: Since it takes an hour to prepare the yogurt dip, participants can make the yogurt dip at the beginning of the workshop. The lecture component and dialogue with the dietitian can take place while the yogurt is in the refrigerator.  25  Appendix H: Ethnic Foods Using Local Ingredients Materials Needed: Participants should bring their own containers to taking home the food prepared. All other ingredients and cooking supplies will be provided by Sprouts. Description: This workshop will describe how cuisines from around the globe can be harmonized with locally grown ingredients. Participants will learn which common ingredients in several ethnic cuisines can be grown locally as well as substitutes for those that cannot. This workshop would support Sprouts’ aim to “Foster discussion around the complexities of global trade and impacts of personal food choices,” as outlined in the Sprouts Constitution.  Workshop Breakdown: Lecture Section (30 min.) -  Compare the effects on local and international communities of supporting locally grown or imported foods, particularly on the basis of their ecological, social and economic impacts. Introduce a popular ethnic dish that can be made using mostly locally grown ingredients. Discuss locally available alternatives for exotic ingredients  Activities (1 hour) -  Prepare an ethnic dish that showcases locally grown ingredients. Possible dishes include a bean burrito with tomatillo salsa from the UBC Farm, vegetable curry using local fennel, curry, cumin and coriander, and fresh Italian pesto pasta using B.C. triticale wheat and basil from the UBC Farm.  Possible Facilitators: We suggest that it would be an excellent opportunity to connect Sprouts with other communities of students on campus by inviting a member of a UBC cultural club or the UBC Food Society to facilitate this workshop. Additional Comments: This workshop format is very flexible, and dishes prepared in the workshop can be catered to members of a specific cultural group or a general audience. The underlying messages remain the same: using local ingredients does not necessarily entail excluding ethnic dishes, and global cuisine does not need to have a colossal “foodprint”. 26  Appendix I: Survey Questions  1) Do you know where Sprouts Cafe is? (Y/N) 2) Have you ever been to Sprouts Cafe? (Y/N) 3) Sprouts offers regular workshops related to cooking and health. They are planning to diversify their workshop offerings and include topics on aspects of food system sustainability besides cooking. Of the following, which workshops would be of interest to you? (Check as many as apply) a) Food nutrition and health b) Gardening and foraging c) Food and environmental well-being d) Cultural aspects of food and social justice 4) What would be the ideal workshop length, in your opinion? (Circle one) a) 1 hour or less b) 2 hours c) 3 hours 5) Do you have any suggestions for food-related workshop topics that you would like to see offered by Sprouts? 6) If you are a UBC student/faculty/staff member, which faculty or school do you belong to?  27  Appendix J: Questionnaire for Experienced Workshop Facilitators  1. What have been the main obstacles you have encountered in coordinating workshops, and how have you addressed these challenges? 2. What is the ideal length for short, single-topic workshops? 3. Many workshops tend to attract the same people or people with very similar interests and backgrounds. For example, Sprouts workshops tend to attract the same small group of environmentally conscious, social activist undergraduate students, and Sprouts would like to reach out to the general public. What are some ways to interest people who are not already engaged in sustainability and food security issues? 4. What have been your most successful workshops and workshop formats (e.g. examples of experiential learning techniques), and what made them effective? 5. Do you have anything else that you would like to share based on your experience in organizing and facilitating workshops?  Questionnaire participants • • • • • •  John Kallas, Ph.D., Director, Wild Food Adventures, Institute for the Study of Edible Wild Plants and Other Foragables Julie Rawson, Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA) Massachusetts Chapter, ED/NOFA Summer Conference Coordinator, Many Hands Organic Farm and Sustainability Center Jack Kittredge, Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA) Massachusetts Chapter; Many Hands Organic Farm and Sustainability Center Robin Wheeler, Owner of Edible Landscapes, author of Food Security for the Faint of Heart and Gardening for the Faint of Heart, founder of The One Straw Society, instructor of gardening and food security skills DeLisa Lewis, PhD Candidate, Faculty of Land and Food Systems/Integrated Studies program, University of British Columbia; Workshop facilitator and speaker on soils and other agriculture-related topics Lori Weidenhammer, food security educator on native plant identification, local eating, gardening for pollinators, and guerrilla gardening; Vancouver performance-based interdisciplinary artist  28  Appendix K: Promotional Posters for Select Workshop Outlines  29  Appendix L: Additional Workshop Ideas  1) Trade and development (interactive activity: groups of people act as countries and play a game in trading a resource and satisfying their country’s unmet needs) 2) A closer look at Sprouts’ ingredients: A nutritional workshop on incorporating delicious new foods in one’s diet that support ecological and social well-being 3) Introduction to permaculture 4) Backyard chicken-raising workshop 5) The cost of caffeination: Environmental and social justice issues in tea & coffee + painting one’s own travel mug 6) Pet nutrition: Making doggie biscotti using whole, organic foods 5 7) Filtering water naturally: Building a biofilter 8) Health benefits of yeast-free breads + sourdough bread-baking 9) The disappearance of bees + honey-tasting workshop  5  We acknowledge that this workshop idea was not favoured by Sprouts board members during our consultations with them.  30  

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