UBC Undergraduate Research

Fair Trade UBC Bains, Sanjeet 2012

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
Bains_S_et_al_SEEDS_2011.pdf [ 2.21MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 1.0108375.json
JSON-LD: 1.0108375+ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 1.0108375.xml
RDF/JSON: 1.0108375+rdf.json
Turtle: 1.0108375+rdf-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 1.0108375+rdf-ntriples.txt
Citation
1.0108375.ris

Full Text

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report       Fair Trade UBC Sanjeet Bains Beyonca Alemzadeh Yooji Cummings Puneet Deo Andrey Kolesnikov Natasha Lallany University of British Columbia DEC 2011 COMM 468         Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”. 	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   Sanjeet	
  Bains,	
  Beyonca	
  Alemzadeh,	
  Yooji	
  Cummings,	
  Puneet	
  Deo,	
   Andrey	
  Kolesnikov,	
  Natasha	
  Lallany	
   	
   2	
   Table	
  of	
  Contents	
  	
  1.	
  Executive	
  Summary	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   3	
  2.	
  Background	
  	
   2.1	
  Mission	
  and	
  Corporate	
  Values	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   4	
  	
   2.2	
  Industry	
  Analysis	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   4	
  	
   2.3	
  Company	
  Analysis	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   5	
  3.	
  SWOT	
  Analysis	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   3.1	
  Strengths	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   7	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  3.2	
  Weakness	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   7	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   3.3	
  Opportunities	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   7	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   3.4	
  Threats	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   8	
  4.	
  Competitive	
  Analysis	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   9	
  5.	
  Recommendations	
  	
  	
  	
  5.1	
  Market	
  Outlook	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   11	
  	
  	
  	
  5.2	
  Target	
  Segments	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   11	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  5.2.1	
  The	
  Amount	
  of	
  Years	
  One	
  Has	
  Spent	
  at	
  UBC	
  	
   	
   12	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  5.2.2	
  The	
  Faculty	
  That	
  One	
  Is	
  In	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   13	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  5.2.3	
  Whether	
  Or	
  Not	
  One	
  Lives	
  On	
  Campus	
  	
   	
   	
   14	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  5.2.4	
  How	
  Many	
  Days	
  One	
  Spends	
  On	
  Campus	
  	
   	
   	
   15	
  	
  	
  	
  5.3	
  Messaging	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   15	
  	
  	
  	
  5.4	
  Communication	
  Channels	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   19	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  5.4.1	
  Social	
  Media	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   19	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  5.4.2	
  Student	
  Groups	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   22	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  5.4.3	
  Public	
  Relations	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   22	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  5.4.4	
  Other	
  examples	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   24	
  6.	
  Recommendations	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   29	
  7.	
  Metrics	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   31	
  8.	
  Contingency	
  Plan	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   32	
  9.	
  Appendix	
  	
   9.1	
  Sources	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   33	
  	
   9.2	
  Sample	
  Advertisements	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   34	
  	
   9.3	
  Survey	
  Results	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   37	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   3	
   1	
  Executive	
  Summary	
   	
  	
   The	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia’s	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  initiative	
  has	
  been	
  an	
  important	
  aspect	
  in	
  their	
  community.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  four	
  primary	
  divisions	
  under	
  UBC	
  who	
  serve	
  as	
  the	
  ambassadors	
  of	
  this	
  initiative:	
  UBC	
  Social	
  Ecological	
  Economic	
  Development	
  Studies	
  (SEEDS),	
  the	
  UBC	
  Bookstore,	
  Student	
  Housing	
  and	
  Hospitality	
  Services	
  and	
  the	
  Alma	
  Mater	
  Society	
  (AMS).	
  Currently,	
  these	
  four	
  divisions	
  offer	
  an	
  array	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  across	
  various	
  outlets	
  on	
  their	
  campus,	
  while	
  educating	
  the	
  local	
  community	
  through	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  media	
  outlets.	
  	
  	
   Our	
  main	
  objective	
  is	
  to	
  increase	
  exposure,	
  awareness,	
  purchasing	
  habits	
  and	
  knowledge	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  within	
  the	
  UBC	
  community.	
  This	
  could	
  be	
  achieved	
  through	
  analyzing	
  UBC’s	
  current	
  practices	
  and	
  marketing	
  techniques,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  conducting	
  primary	
  research	
  that	
  would	
  provide	
  key	
  information	
  to	
  the	
  target	
  market.	
  	
  	
  	
   Our	
  recommendations	
  are	
  heavily	
  reliant	
  on	
  our	
  primary	
  research	
  data,	
  which	
  indicates	
  that	
  the	
  target	
  market	
  has	
  misconceptions	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  along	
  with	
  a	
  low	
  exposure,	
  awareness	
  and	
  purchasing	
  habits	
  towards	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  available	
  at	
  UBC.	
  We	
  have	
  provided	
  key	
  messaging	
  techniques	
  through	
  various	
  communication	
  channels	
  that	
  will	
  provide	
  an	
  increase	
  in	
  awareness,	
  support	
  and	
  sales	
  towards	
  UBC	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  and	
  practices	
  within	
  a	
  limited	
  budget.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   4	
   2	
  Background	
  	
   2.1	
  Mission	
  and	
  Corporate	
  Values	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   The	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia’s	
  mission	
  as	
  a	
  single	
  institution	
  is	
  to	
  offer	
  “an	
  exceptional	
  learning	
  environment	
  that	
  fosters	
  global	
  citizenship,	
  advances	
  a	
  civil	
  and	
  sustainable	
  society,	
  and	
  supports	
  outstanding	
  research	
  to	
  serve	
  the	
  people	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  Canada,	
  and	
  the	
  world”.	
  This	
  is	
  evident	
  through	
  the	
  institution’s	
  approach	
  to	
  promote	
  and	
  take	
  initiative	
  towards	
  sustainable	
  and	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  practices.	
  Their	
  values	
  that	
  encompass	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  practices	
  are:	
  advancing	
  and	
  sharing	
  knowledge	
  within	
  and	
  across	
  disciplines,	
  integrity,	
  striving	
  for	
  excellence,	
  mutual	
  respect	
  and	
  equity	
  with	
  all	
  members	
  of	
  its	
  communities,	
  and	
  enhancing	
  societal	
  good.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   The	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  has	
  branches	
  that	
  focus	
  on	
  a	
  particular	
  field	
  within	
  the	
  organization.	
  The	
  three	
  branches	
  that	
  are	
  primarily	
  pursuing	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  practices	
  and	
  increasing	
  awareness	
  are:	
  Student	
  Housing	
  and	
  Hospitality	
  Services	
  (entails	
  UBC	
  Food	
  Services),	
  the	
  AMS	
  Student	
  Society	
  of	
  UBC	
  Vancouver	
  and	
  the	
  UBC	
  Bookstore.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   The	
  Student	
  Housing	
  and	
  Hospitality	
  Services’	
  mission	
  is	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  “preferred	
  food	
  service	
  provider	
  and	
  the	
  employer	
  of	
  choice	
  for	
  their	
  community”.	
  Their	
  values	
  are:	
  sustainability,	
  placing	
  people	
  first,	
  innovation,	
  care,	
  and	
  excellence.	
  Their	
  most	
  recent	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  initiatives	
  that	
  exemplify	
  their	
  vision	
  and	
  values	
  are	
  adopting	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee	
  at	
  all	
  non-­‐franchise	
  outlets,	
  as	
  well	
  as,	
  implementing	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  teas,	
  cold	
  beverages,	
  bananas,	
  chocolate	
  and	
  donuts	
  to	
  more	
  than	
  20	
  outlets	
  and	
  catering.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   The	
  AMS	
  Student	
  Society	
  of	
  UBC’s	
  mission	
  is	
  to	
  “improve	
  the	
  quality	
  of	
  the	
  educational,	
  social,	
  and	
  personal	
  lives	
  of	
  the	
  students	
  of	
  UBC”,	
  which	
  is	
  over	
  48,000	
  people.	
  A	
  few	
  of	
  their	
  values	
  are:	
  resources,	
  stewardship,	
  and	
  community.	
  UBC’s	
  Alma	
  Mater	
  Society	
  also	
  supports	
  student	
  projects	
  through	
  funding,	
  which	
  includes	
  efforts	
  to	
  increase	
  awareness	
  of	
  sustainable	
  and	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  practices.	
  	
   The	
  UBC	
  Bookstore’s	
  mission	
  is	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  primarily	
  retailer	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  and	
  a	
  socially	
  responsible	
  employer.	
  The	
  UBC	
  Bookstore	
  currently	
  provides	
  students	
  with	
  an	
  array	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  that	
  range	
  from	
  jewellery,	
  accessories,	
  clothing,	
  and	
  sweets.	
   	
   2.2	
  Industry	
  Analysis	
  	
   Fair	
  Trade	
  is	
  an	
  economic	
  model	
  designed	
  to	
  provide	
  socially	
  responsible	
  trade	
  and	
  equity	
  among	
  producers	
  in	
  developing	
  countries.	
  	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  work	
  to	
  promote	
  sustainability	
  and	
  alleviate	
  global	
  poverty	
  by	
  giving	
  producers	
  fair	
  prices.	
  	
  The	
  only	
  independent,	
  third	
  party	
  certification	
  group	
  for	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  in	
  Canada	
  is	
  TransFair	
   Canada.	
  	
  This	
  group	
  works	
  with	
  and	
  through	
  the	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Labeling	
  Organizations	
  (FLO)	
  International.	
  	
  The	
  Canadian	
  Industry	
  is	
  growing	
  at	
  a	
  rate	
  of	
  approximately	
  47%	
  every	
  year.	
  	
  The	
  industry	
  has	
  a	
  retail	
  value	
  of	
  around	
  $50	
  million	
  with	
  over	
  250	
  participating	
  companies.	
  	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  is	
  receiving	
  increasing	
  interest	
  in	
  the	
  public	
  sphere	
  and	
  world	
  governments.	
  	
  	
   	
   5	
   In	
  Canada	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  companies	
  offering	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  is	
  growing	
  and	
  this	
  trend	
  is	
  expected	
  to	
  continue.	
  A	
  greater	
  number	
  of	
  consumers	
  are	
  actively	
  seeking	
  out	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  and	
  the	
  awareness	
  and	
  familiarity	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  certification	
  labels	
  is	
  rising.	
  	
  On	
  average,	
  61%	
  of	
  consumers	
  who	
  recognize	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  certified	
  labels	
  purchase	
  these	
  products	
  at	
  least	
  once	
  per	
  month	
  among	
  those	
  who	
  do	
  not	
  cite	
  the	
  price	
  and	
  availability	
  as	
  the	
  major	
  hurdles	
  to	
  purchasing	
  these	
  products.	
  The	
  main	
  consumers	
  groups	
  purchasing	
  these	
  products	
  are	
  Enthusiasts	
  and	
  Mainstreamers.	
  Overall	
  national	
  consumer	
  demand	
  has	
  more	
  than	
  tripled	
  since	
  2001.	
  	
  	
   Over	
  1000	
  products	
  coming	
  into	
  Canada	
  are	
  recognized	
  as	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  and	
  are	
  organized	
  into	
  13	
  categories.	
  These	
  include	
  cocoa,	
  coffee,	
  fruit,	
  herbs	
  and	
  spices,	
  grains,	
  sugar,	
  tea,	
  nuts,	
  oils,	
  fruit	
  juice,	
  cotton,	
  sports	
  balls,	
  wine	
  and	
  flowers.	
  In	
  2010	
  Canadian	
  sales	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  reached	
  nearly	
  13	
  million	
  kg,	
  with	
  flowers,	
  cocoa,	
  coffee	
  and	
  fruit	
  selling	
  over	
  a	
  million	
  kilograms	
  each.	
  Coffee	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  and	
  most	
  popular	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product.	
  Most	
  coffee	
  shops	
  advertise	
  and	
  sell	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  blends,	
  with	
  Starbucks	
  being	
  the	
  largest	
  customer	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee,	
  purchasing	
  over	
  40	
  million	
  pounds	
  of	
  coffee	
  in	
  2009	
  alone.	
  McDonald's,	
  Dunkin'	
  Donuts	
  and	
  Wal-­‐Mart	
  also	
  sell	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee.	
  	
  In	
  Canada,	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee	
  holds	
  1%	
  of	
  the	
  market	
  share	
  while	
  globally,	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  represent	
  approximately	
  3%	
  of	
  the	
  market	
  share	
  in	
  the	
  food	
  and	
  beverage	
  industry.	
  	
   2.3	
  Company	
  Analysis	
  	
   The	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  has	
  over	
  54,000	
  students	
  each	
  year	
  from	
  140	
  countries	
  around	
  the	
  world.	
  It	
  is	
  considered	
  one	
  of	
  Canada's	
  best	
  research	
  universities	
  and	
  is	
  among	
  the	
  top	
  30	
  schools	
  in	
  North	
  America.	
  	
   UBC	
  is	
  an	
  integral	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  local	
  Vancouver	
  economy,	
  supplying	
  $10	
  billion	
  in	
  local	
  income	
  and	
  providing	
  over	
  39,000	
  jobs.	
  Research	
  and	
  new	
  innovations	
  from	
  UBC	
  has	
  injected	
  over	
  $5	
  billion	
  in	
  2	
  years	
  into	
  the	
  BC	
  economy.	
  Non-­‐research	
  initiatives	
  directly	
  provide	
  $1.9	
  billion	
  to	
  the	
  local	
  economy	
  and	
  students	
  and	
  visitors	
  generate	
  a	
  further	
  $600	
  million	
  in	
  local	
  spending.	
  	
  	
   UBC	
  has	
  a	
  long	
  history	
  of	
  dedication	
  to	
  sustainability	
  and	
  environmental	
  issues.	
  	
  One	
  of	
  the	
  original	
  adopter	
  of	
  green	
  campus	
  programs,	
  UBC	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  University	
  in	
  Canada	
  to	
  achieve	
  the	
  Kyoto	
  Protocols.	
  	
  The	
  school	
  also	
  offers	
  its	
  students	
  over	
  300	
  sustainability-­‐related	
  courses.	
  	
   Earlier	
  this	
  year,	
  UBC	
  was	
  designated	
  Canada's	
  first	
  “Fair	
  Trade	
  Campus”	
  for	
  their	
  efforts	
  in	
  supporting	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products.	
  	
  As	
  a	
  result	
  of	
  pressure	
  from	
  students,	
  the	
  university	
  began	
  adopting	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  in	
  their	
  Student	
  Services	
  and	
  Student	
  Union	
  eateries	
  as	
  early	
  as	
  2004.	
  	
  	
  In	
  the	
  last	
  year,	
  the	
  school	
  has	
  purchased	
  nearly	
  1.5	
  million	
  cups	
  of	
  coffee,	
  429,000	
  tea	
  bags,	
  2300	
  chocolate	
  bars	
  and	
  1885kg	
  of	
  bananas,	
  all	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products.	
  	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Canada	
  has	
  called	
  UBC	
  “an	
  example	
  to	
  all	
  universities	
  and	
  the	
  epitome	
  of	
  Canadian	
  dedication	
  to	
  fairness	
  and	
  respect	
  for	
  the	
  farmers	
  who	
  produce	
  these	
  products.”	
  	
   The	
  UBC	
  Bookstore	
  	
   The	
  UBC	
  Bookstore	
  consists	
  of	
  three	
  stores	
  at	
  the	
  Vancouver	
  campus,	
  Okanagan,	
  and	
  Robson	
  Square.	
  	
  These	
  stores	
  provide	
  not	
  only	
  books	
  but	
  also	
  a	
  wide	
  variety	
  of	
  products	
  and	
  services	
  including	
  clothing,	
  furniture,	
  IT	
  assistance,	
  gifts	
  and	
  more.	
  	
  In	
  the	
   	
   6	
   previous	
  school	
  year	
  the	
  Bookstore	
  provided	
  over	
  $1.6	
  million	
  to	
  UBC.	
  	
  The	
  store	
  is	
  highly	
  involved	
  in	
  sustainability	
  issues	
  including	
  a	
  no	
  sweat	
  shop	
  policy,	
  green	
  operations	
  and	
  selling	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee.	
  	
   Alma	
  Mater	
  Society	
  	
   The	
  UBC	
  Alma	
  Mater	
  Society	
  seeks	
  to	
  improve	
  the	
  quality	
  of	
  education,	
  social	
  and	
  personal	
  lives	
  of	
  students.	
  	
  The	
  student	
  society	
  operates	
  and	
  oversees	
  AMS	
  owned	
  businesses,	
  resource	
  groups,	
  clubs	
  and	
  other	
  student	
  services	
  on	
  campus.	
  	
  The	
  group	
  also	
  acts	
  as	
  an	
  advocate	
  for	
  student	
  issues	
  and	
  represents	
  all	
  UBC	
  students	
  to	
  the	
  university	
  administration	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  federal,	
  provincial	
  and	
  municipal	
  governments.	
  	
   UBC	
  Sustainability	
  	
   This	
  group	
  operates	
  out	
  from	
  the	
  Centre	
  for	
  Interactive	
  Research	
  on	
  Sustainability	
  and	
  focuses	
  on	
  finding	
  and	
  implementing	
  sustainable	
  solutions	
  for	
  the	
  university.	
  	
  University	
  Sustainability	
  Initiative	
  works	
  on	
  Bio-­‐energy,	
  smart	
  energy	
  systems,	
  energy	
  storage	
  systems,	
  regenerative	
  building,	
  social	
  license,	
  behavior	
  change	
  and	
  public	
  policy.	
  	
  This	
  group	
  is	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  driving	
  forces	
  behind	
  the	
  shift	
  towards	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   7	
   3	
  SWOT	
  Analysis	
  	
   3.1	
  Strengths	
  	
   Alma	
  Mater	
  Society	
  	
   • Many	
  channels	
  to	
  communicate	
  with	
  students	
  (its	
  customers)	
   • Holds	
  a	
  favorable	
  view	
  among	
  students	
   • More	
  freedom	
  to	
  take	
  risks	
  for	
  sake	
  of	
  students	
  (product	
  introductions)	
   • Control	
  over	
  many	
  popular	
  food	
  outlets:	
  product	
  +	
  ingredient	
  changes	
  visible	
  to	
  large	
  student	
  body	
  	
   Student	
  Housing	
  and	
  Hospitality	
  Services	
  	
   • Consistent	
  sales	
  in	
  many	
  locations	
  –	
  owner	
  of	
  almost	
  all	
  food	
  dispensaries	
  near	
  classes/libraries	
  • High	
  visibility	
  of	
  products	
  available	
  –	
  customers	
  know	
  exactly	
  what’s	
  for	
  sale	
  	
   UBC	
  Bookstore	
   	
   • Exclusive	
  for	
  UBC	
  apparel	
  • Every	
  student	
  must	
  enter	
  the	
  store	
  for	
  U-­‐Passes	
  	
   3.2	
  Weaknesses	
  	
   • Few	
  powerful	
  brands	
  to	
  help	
  pull	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  off	
  the	
  shelf	
   • Fair	
  Trade	
  brands	
  that	
  are	
  available	
  aren’t	
  automatically	
  associated	
  with	
  the	
  concept	
  (i.e.	
  Kit	
  Kat)	
  	
   Alma	
  Mater	
  Society	
  	
   • Limited	
  shelf	
  space	
  for	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  items	
  	
   Student	
  Housing	
  and	
  Hospitality	
  Services	
   	
   • Vanier	
  +	
  Totem	
  Dining	
  Hall	
  sales	
  based	
  on	
  population	
  of	
  residences.	
  Zero-­‐sum	
  game	
  for	
  student	
  dollars	
  	
   UBC	
  Bookstore	
   	
   • Seasonal	
  patronage/shopping	
  –	
  primarily	
  at	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  each	
  term	
  	
   3.3	
  Opportunities	
  	
   • Further	
  expansion	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  can	
  generate	
  international	
  attention,	
  drum	
  up	
  interest	
  and	
  attract	
  interested	
  parties	
  to	
  UBC	
  and	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  purchases	
  • Growing	
  awareness	
  and	
  demand	
  for	
  ‘ethical’	
  products	
  thanks	
  to	
  changing	
  consumption	
  patterns	
  means	
  more	
  sales	
  for	
  organizations	
  that	
  sell	
  them	
  	
   	
   8	
   	
   Alma	
  Mater	
  Society	
   	
   • Fair	
  Trade	
  sourcing	
  of	
  common	
  ingredients	
  at	
  AMS	
  outlets	
  would	
  be	
  highly	
  visible	
  to	
  consumers	
  	
   Student	
  Housing	
  and	
  Hospitality	
  Services	
  	
   • Opportunity	
  to	
  engage	
  first	
  year	
  students	
  in	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  practices	
  during	
  their	
  orientation	
  • Using	
  Residence	
  Advisors	
  as	
  a	
  communication	
  tool	
  	
   UBC	
  Bookstore	
  	
   • Using	
  the	
  staff	
  to	
  communicate	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  to	
  consumers	
  within	
  the	
  store	
  • Showcasing	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  in	
  prominent	
  positions	
  throughout	
  the	
  bookstore	
  	
   3.4	
  Threats	
  	
   • Student	
  apathy,	
  lack	
  of	
  knowledge	
  about	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products.	
  Unwillingness	
  to	
  learn/pay	
  attention	
   • Perception	
  that	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  is	
  too	
  expensive	
  	
   Alma	
  Mater	
  Society	
  	
   • Critics	
  always	
  watching	
  the	
  AMS,	
  vocal	
  about	
  what	
  they	
  perceive	
  to	
  be	
  wasted	
  resources	
  	
   Student	
  Housing	
  and	
  Hospitality	
  Services	
  	
   • Fair	
  Trade	
  sales	
  replace	
  normal	
  products	
  –	
  must	
  provide	
  similar	
  or	
  identical	
  margins	
  	
   UBC	
  Bookstore	
  	
   • Decreased	
  book	
  sales	
  show	
  that	
  students	
  are	
  using	
  the	
  store	
  less	
  for	
  books,	
  likely	
  meaning	
  less	
  visits	
  and	
  purchases	
  of	
  other	
  items	
  too	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   9	
   4	
  Competitive	
  Analysis	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Worldwide	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  describes	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  system	
  of	
  exchange,	
  involving	
  the	
  purchasers	
  of	
  the	
  products	
  agreeing	
  to	
  pay	
  a	
  slightly	
  higher	
  cost	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  ensure	
  that	
  providers	
  are	
  able	
  to	
  maintain	
  a	
  decent	
  standard	
  of	
  living.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  can	
  be	
  applied	
  to	
  all	
  kinds	
  of	
  goods,	
  so	
  for	
  the	
  purpose	
  of	
  competitive	
  analysis	
  in	
  this	
  report,	
  we	
  have	
  segmented	
  its	
  products	
  into	
  three	
  categories;	
  	
   •	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Food	
  •	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Beverages	
  •	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Clothing	
  and	
  Accessories	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  We	
  can	
  better	
  observe	
  the	
  levels	
  of	
  competition	
  facing	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  on	
  the	
  basis	
  of	
  the	
  categories	
  mentioned	
  above.	
  	
   Food	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   In	
  the	
  food	
  category,	
  the	
  main	
  competitors	
  for	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  include	
  non	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  foods	
  in	
  addition	
  to	
  Organic,	
  Sustainable	
  and	
  Locally	
  produced	
  foods	
  (although	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  try	
  to	
  encompass	
  at	
  least	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  last	
  three	
  elements).	
  41%	
  of	
  respondents	
  answered	
  “no”	
  to	
  the	
  question	
  “Does	
  the	
  term	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  stick	
  out	
  to	
  you	
  from	
   Organic	
  or	
  sustainable?”	
  which	
  could	
  explain	
  why	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  people	
  who	
  are	
  aware	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  are	
  not	
  buying	
  the	
  products.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  The	
  UBC	
  Student	
  Housing	
  and	
  Hospitality	
  Services	
  includes	
  the	
  UBC	
  Food	
  Services	
  department,	
  which	
  has	
  been	
  serving	
  the	
  campus	
  and	
  surrounding	
  communities	
  for	
  over	
  80	
  years	
  now.	
  Venues	
  on	
  campus	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  a	
  few	
  just	
  off	
  (that	
  are	
  close	
  enough	
  in	
  proximity	
  to	
  be	
  considered	
  in	
  the	
  minds	
  of	
  UBC	
  students	
  and	
  staff)	
  that	
  are	
  not	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  UBC	
  Food	
  Services,	
  are	
  also	
  in	
  competition	
  with	
  them.	
  These	
  include:	
  Save	
  On	
  Foods,	
  The	
  Point	
  Grill,	
  McDonalds,	
  Mega	
  Bite,	
  Vera’s	
  Burgers,	
  Omio,	
  The	
  Pendulum	
  and	
  other	
  AMS	
  restaurants	
  (A&W,	
  Honor	
  Roll,	
  Pit	
  Pub,	
  Subway),	
  The	
  Deli	
  and	
  the	
  Hospital	
  café.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Due	
  to	
  46%	
  of	
  respondents	
  from	
  our	
  survey	
  saying	
  that	
  they	
  never	
  see	
  products	
  marked	
  “Fair	
  Trade”	
  at	
  UBC,	
  and	
  only	
  24%	
  saying	
  that	
  they	
  see	
  it	
  daily,	
  we	
  can	
  conclude	
  that	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  the	
  potential	
  customers	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  are	
  turning	
  to	
  other	
  options.	
  It	
  is	
  also	
  important	
  to	
  note	
  here	
  that	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  foods	
  mostly	
  include	
  items	
  such	
  as	
  chocolates,	
  fruits,	
  donuts	
  and	
  the	
  like,	
  therefore	
  not	
  offering	
  a	
  wide	
  enough	
  range	
  of	
  products	
  for	
  the	
  students.	
  	
   Beverages	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Taking	
  into	
  account	
  the	
  beverage	
  category,	
  our	
  survey	
  results	
  convey	
  that	
  coffee	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  recognizable	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  at	
  UBC.	
  This	
  result	
  was	
  not	
  very	
  surprising	
  to	
  us,	
  especially	
  since	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  advertising	
  done	
  about	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  in	
  general	
  at	
  UBC	
  is	
  centered	
  on	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee.	
  Another	
  contributing	
  factor	
  could	
  involve	
  the	
  AMS	
  locations	
  now	
  serving	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee,	
  enabling	
  a	
  wider	
  audience	
  to	
  be	
  excessively	
  aware	
  of	
  the	
  category	
  of	
  products.	
  Survey	
  results	
  show	
  that	
  because	
  most	
  consumers	
  believe	
  that	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee	
  is	
  more	
  expensive	
  than	
  regular	
  coffee,	
  they	
  are	
  not	
  willing	
  to	
  choose	
  the	
  Fair	
   	
   10	
   Trade	
  alternative	
  if	
  given	
  a	
  choice.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  The	
  competitors	
  to	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  beverages	
  include	
  regular,	
  non-­‐Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee,	
  tea,	
  juices,	
  wines,	
  and	
  pop	
  which	
  are	
  available	
  at	
  these	
  locations:	
  McDonalds,	
  Starbucks,	
  Tim	
  Hortons,	
  The	
  Hospital	
  Café,	
  Triple	
  O’s	
  and	
  The	
  Point	
  Grill.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Because	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  people	
  associate	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  with	
  “expensive”,	
  they	
  are	
  not	
  willing	
  to	
  spend	
  extra	
  money	
  on	
  these	
  products.	
  This	
  is	
  surprising	
  because	
  73%	
  of	
  our	
  respondents	
  are	
  aware	
  of	
  the	
  term	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  and	
  what	
  it	
  entails,	
  yet	
  are	
  not	
  willing	
  to	
  shift	
  their	
  buying	
  habits	
  to	
  support	
  the	
  cause.	
  	
   Clothing	
  and	
  Accessories	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Clothing	
  and	
  Accessories	
  can	
  be	
  grouped	
  as	
  one	
  category	
  because	
  there	
  are	
  only	
  few	
  products	
  available	
  at	
  UBC.	
  These	
  are	
  mostly	
  available	
  at	
  the	
  SUB,	
  the	
  UBC	
  Bookstore,	
  the	
  Outpost	
  and	
  the	
  UBC	
  Recreational	
  Centre.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  The	
  primary	
  competition	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  clothing	
  and	
  accessories	
  on	
  the	
  UBC	
  campus	
  comes	
  from	
  non-­‐Fair	
  Trade	
  brands	
  sold	
  at	
  the	
  UBC	
  Rec	
  Center	
  and	
  ‘handcrafted’	
  items	
  sold	
  by	
  vendors	
  in	
  the	
  Student	
  Union	
  Building.	
  These	
  two	
  locations	
  see	
  relatively	
  high	
  foot	
  traffic,	
  and	
  impulse	
  purchases.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Unlike	
  food	
  and	
  beverages,	
  UBC	
  consumers	
  do	
  not	
  spend	
  very	
  much	
  money	
  shopping	
  for	
  clothes	
  on	
  campus.	
  Sources	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  clothing	
  at	
  UBC	
  face	
  competition	
  from	
  major	
  clothing	
  retailers	
  who,	
  for	
  the	
  most	
  part,	
  do	
  not	
  use	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  practices.	
  Consumers’	
  choice	
  in	
  clothing	
  is	
  heavily	
  brand-­‐driven	
  and	
  thanks	
  to	
  this,	
  money	
  is	
  spent	
  much	
  more	
  conservatively	
  on	
  clothing	
  than	
  on	
  food	
  and	
  beverages.	
  This	
  means	
  that	
  purchases	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  clothing	
  at	
  UBC	
  are	
  primarily	
  to	
  satisfy	
  the	
  desire	
  to	
  own	
  UBC	
  branded	
  clothing.	
  Competition	
  for	
  consumers’	
  dollars	
  on	
  clothing	
  is	
  fierce,	
  but	
  can	
  be	
  overcome	
  through	
  the	
  introduction	
  of	
  clothing	
  product	
  categories	
  that	
  are	
  currently	
  unavailable	
  and	
  through	
  proper	
  communication.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   11	
   5	
  Recommendations	
  	
   5.1	
  Market	
  Outlook	
   	
  	
   It	
  seems	
  that	
  the	
  market	
  for	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  at	
  UBC	
  is	
  growing.	
  Although	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  people	
  are	
  aware	
  that	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  are	
  available	
  on	
  campus,	
  they	
  claim	
  to	
  not	
  be	
  exposed	
  to	
  it	
  enough	
  as	
  made	
  apparent	
  by	
  the	
  46%	
  of	
  respondents	
  who	
  said	
  they	
  never	
  see	
  products	
  market	
  “Fair	
  Trade”.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  In	
  addition,	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  people	
  associate	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  with	
  “expensive”	
  hence	
  moving	
  forward,	
  tailoring	
  advertisements	
  or	
  information	
  sessions	
  to	
  educate	
  consumers	
  as	
  to	
  why	
  this	
  is	
  and	
  where	
  the	
  proceeds	
  go	
  to	
  is	
  important.	
  As	
  well,	
  noting	
  that	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee	
  is	
  cheaper	
  than	
  Starbucks,	
  could	
  allow	
  people	
  to	
  consider	
  buying	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee	
  habitually	
  thus	
  spending	
  a	
  few	
  cents	
  less	
  each	
  time	
  while	
  contributing	
  to	
  a	
  good	
  cause.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Aiming	
  advertisements	
  to	
  try	
  to	
  change	
  peoples	
  associations	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  to	
  things	
  like	
  fair,	
  tasty,	
  healthy	
  and	
  so	
  on,	
  instead	
  of	
  associating	
  it	
  with	
  products	
  could	
  also	
  be	
  an	
  improvement	
  tactic.	
  This	
  would	
  help	
  with	
  consumers	
  not	
  only	
  linking	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  to	
  coffee	
  but	
  also	
  to	
  clothing	
  and	
  accessories,	
  considering	
  that	
  when	
  respondents	
  were	
  asked	
  what	
  they	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  see	
  more	
  of	
  regarding	
  Fair	
  Trade,	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  them	
  mentioned	
  products	
  that	
  were	
  already	
  available	
  to	
  making	
  it	
  more	
  seen.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Survey	
  results	
  show	
  that	
  not	
  many	
  people	
  are	
  aware	
  of	
  clothing	
  or	
  accessories	
  as	
  being	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products.	
  When	
  asked	
  what	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  they	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  see	
  being	
  introduced,	
  a	
  few	
  mentioned	
  clothing	
  and	
  noted	
  their	
  dislike	
  for	
  seeing	
  UBC	
  Bookstore	
  clothing	
  labeled	
  as	
  made	
  in	
  China,	
  India	
  etc.	
  This	
  is	
  a	
  great	
  opportunity	
  for	
  expansion	
  and	
  promotion	
  for	
  clothing	
  with	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  logos	
  at	
  the	
  UBC	
  bookstore.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Convenience	
  plays	
  a	
  powerful	
  role	
  for	
  consumers	
  in	
  determining	
  where	
  they	
  decide	
  to	
  purchase	
  from.	
  AMS-­‐run	
  businesses	
  at	
  the	
  SUB	
  have	
  a	
  great	
  advantage	
  in	
  this	
  respect,	
  especially	
  since	
  they	
  serve	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee	
  now.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Customers	
  enjoy	
  variety.	
  Presenting	
  more	
  choices	
  could	
  help	
  to	
  attract	
  a	
  wider	
  consumer	
  base	
  or	
  merely	
  create	
  awareness	
  for	
  those	
  less	
  educated	
  on	
  the	
  subject	
  matter.	
  For	
  those	
  consumers	
  who	
  are	
  unaware	
  of	
  the	
  benefits	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  or	
  what	
  it	
  is,	
  increasing	
  awareness	
  and	
  communicating	
  positive	
  associations	
  could	
  be	
  key	
  to	
  attracting	
  them	
  as	
  potential	
  long-­‐term	
  customers.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Finally,	
  as	
  students	
  resent	
  having	
  to	
  pay	
  anything	
  more	
  than	
  they	
  have	
  to	
  for	
  habitual	
  purchases,	
  increased	
  awareness	
  and	
  positive	
  associations	
  with	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  could	
  definitely	
  help	
  in	
  this	
  area,	
  better	
  educating	
  consumers	
  on	
  how	
  their	
  business	
  is	
  benefiting	
  other	
  people,	
  less	
  fortunate	
  than	
  themselves.	
   	
   5.2	
  Target	
  Segments	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   This	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  action	
  plan	
  will	
  analyze	
  customers	
  in	
  regards	
  to	
  various	
  aspects	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  at	
  UBC.	
  After	
  thorough	
  observation	
  and	
  cross	
  tabulation	
  of	
  our	
  survey	
  results,	
  we	
  found	
  it	
  most	
  useful	
  to	
  compare	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  familiarity,	
  awareness	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  at	
  UBC	
  and	
  resulting	
  purchase	
  habits/intentions	
  against	
  4	
  key	
  groupings	
  of	
  students:	
   	
   12	
   • The	
  amount	
  of	
  years	
  one	
  has	
  spent	
  at	
  UBC	
  • The	
  faculty	
  that	
  one	
  is	
  in	
  • Whether	
  or	
  not,	
  one	
  lives	
  on	
  campus	
  • How	
  many	
  days	
  one	
  spends	
  on	
  campus	
  	
   5.2.1	
  The	
  Amount	
  of	
  Years	
  One	
  Has	
  Spent	
  at	
  UBC	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   What	
  immediately	
  became	
  apparent	
  was	
  that	
  a	
  large	
  number	
  of	
  respondents	
  were	
  those	
  who	
  had	
  spent	
  less	
  than	
  1	
  year	
  at	
  UBC.	
  This	
  led	
  us	
  to	
  assume	
  that	
  our	
  initial	
  advertisements	
  of	
  our	
  survey	
  on	
  the	
  UBC	
  public	
  affairs	
  newsletter	
  and	
  PowerPoint	
  advertisements	
  in	
  high	
  traffic	
  areas	
  of	
  the	
  school,	
  were	
  effective	
  in	
  garnering	
  attention	
  of	
  this	
  group,	
  who	
  we	
  believe	
  is	
  seeking	
  to	
  be	
  actively	
  engaged	
  with	
  and	
  aware	
  of	
  on-­‐going	
  UBC	
  events.	
  	
  This	
  is	
  a	
  very	
  useful	
  finding	
  as	
  educating	
  and	
  informing	
  an	
  audience	
  who	
  is	
  actively	
  willing	
  to	
  listen	
  in	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  their	
  tenure	
  at	
  UBC,	
  could	
  carry	
  on	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  philosophy	
  throughout	
  their	
  time	
  at	
  the	
  UBC.	
  What	
  also	
  became	
  evident	
  was	
  the	
  lull	
  in	
  respondents	
  who’ve	
  spent	
  1-­‐2	
  years	
  at	
  UBC	
  and	
  how	
  there	
  seemed	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  disconnect	
  with	
  this	
  group	
  and	
  Fair	
  Trade.	
  More	
  specifically,	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  figures:	
  	
   Awareness	
  	
  	
   68%	
  of	
  respondents	
  had	
  spent	
  less	
  than	
  one	
  year	
  at	
  UBC	
  and	
  were	
  aware	
  of	
  and	
  familiar	
  with	
  Fair	
  Trade.	
  This	
  number,	
  with	
  the	
  exception	
  of	
  those	
  who’ve	
  spent	
  2	
  years	
  at	
  UBC,	
  increased	
  gradually,	
  ending	
  with	
  those	
  who’ve	
  spent	
  5+	
  years	
  at	
  UBC	
  having	
  85%	
  being	
  familiar	
  with	
  Fair	
  Trade.	
  What	
  was	
  unusual,	
  was	
  the	
  dip	
  in	
  awareness/familiarity	
  among	
  those	
  who	
  have	
  spent	
  2	
  years,	
  with	
  48%	
  being	
  unfamiliar	
  with	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  	
   How	
  often	
  does	
  one	
  encounter	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  on	
  a	
  monthly	
  basis?	
  	
   • 35%	
  of	
  respondents	
  who’ve	
  been	
  on	
  campus	
  for	
  less	
  than	
  a	
  year	
  have	
  never	
  encountered	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  and	
  just	
  over	
  30%	
  of	
  them	
  had	
  encountered	
  them	
  at	
  least	
  once	
  a	
  week.	
  This	
  is	
  a	
  key	
  group	
  that	
  could	
  UBC	
  could	
  benefit	
  from	
  by	
  educating	
  them	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  at	
  UBC,	
  because	
  of	
  their	
  willingness	
  to	
  listen	
  and	
  participate	
  • For	
  those	
  who’ve	
  spent	
  1	
  to	
  2	
  years	
  at	
  UBC	
  they	
  encountered	
  such	
  products	
  even	
  less	
  than	
  the	
  previous	
  group	
  • However,	
  those	
  who’ve	
  spent	
  3	
  or	
  more	
  years,	
  the	
  percentage	
  of	
  those	
  who	
  rarely	
  or	
  never	
  encounter	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  begins	
  to	
  shrink	
  significantly	
  as	
  more	
  years	
  pass	
  	
   Do	
  you	
  choose	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  over	
  non-­Fair	
  Trade	
  products,	
  if	
  given	
  the	
  choice?	
  	
   • Those	
  who’ve	
  spent	
  less	
  than	
  1	
  year	
  had	
  over	
  50%	
  of	
  the	
  respondents	
  choose	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  over	
  non-­‐Fair	
  Trade	
  if	
  given	
  the	
  option.	
  This	
  number	
  was	
  the	
  highest	
  among	
  all	
  groups	
  in	
  this	
  category	
  • Those	
  who’ve	
  spent	
  1	
  to	
  2	
  years	
  on	
  campus	
  again	
  reported	
  low	
  figures	
  with	
  only	
  30%	
  of	
  respondents	
  choosing	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  over	
  non-­‐Fair	
  Trade	
  • Of	
  those	
  who’ve	
  spent	
  3	
  or	
  more	
  years,	
  on	
  average	
  40%	
  of	
  them	
  would	
  choose	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  over	
  non-­‐Fair	
  Trade	
  	
   How	
  would	
  one	
  rank	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  affordability	
  and	
  availability	
  at	
  UBC?	
   	
   13	
   	
   • Across	
  all	
  groups	
  of	
  years,	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  clear	
  central	
  tendency	
  with	
  60%	
  or	
  more	
  respondents	
  choosing	
  between	
  somewhat	
  low	
  and	
  somewhat	
  high,	
  almost	
  at	
  a	
  neutral	
  standpoint,	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  affordability	
  and	
  availability	
  	
   5.2.2	
  The	
  Faculty	
  That	
  One	
  Is	
  In	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   The	
  largest	
  amount	
  of	
  respondents	
  came	
  from	
  the	
  Science	
  faculty,	
  followed	
  closely	
  by	
  Arts,	
  Commerce	
  and	
  Land	
  and	
  Food	
  systems	
  respectively.	
  What	
  was	
  most	
  evident	
  when	
  examining	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  by	
  Faculty	
  was	
  that,	
  Land	
  and	
  Food	
  systems	
  was	
  by	
  far	
  the	
  most	
  familiar	
  with/aware	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  leading	
  us	
  to	
  believe	
  that	
  their	
  thorough	
  knowledge	
  of	
  food	
  practices	
  is	
  what	
  produced	
  optimal	
  results	
  on	
  the	
  survey.	
  Furthermore,	
  because	
  the	
  Arts	
  and	
  Science	
  faculties	
  make	
  up	
  a	
  large	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  UBC	
  population	
  and	
  both	
  have	
  very	
  high	
  awareness	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade,	
  we	
  feel	
  that	
  properly	
  educating	
  the	
  UBC	
  population	
  on	
  Fair	
  Trade,	
  as	
  Land	
  and	
  Food	
  systems	
  has	
  been,	
  could	
  yield	
  tremendous	
  results	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  consumption	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  and	
  the	
  adopting	
  of	
  its	
  philosophy.	
  	
  Currently,	
  of	
  the	
  three	
  largest	
  faculties	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  respondents,	
  each	
  have	
  significantly	
  less	
  than	
  50%	
  picking	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  over	
  one	
  that	
  wasn’t,	
  this	
  is	
  something	
  that	
  requires	
  attention.	
  	
  Finally,	
  there	
  was	
  an	
  extremely	
  low	
  response	
  rate	
  from	
  Medicine,	
  Pharmacy,	
  Nursing,	
  Human	
  Kinetics	
  and	
  Forestry	
  and	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  incorrect	
  to	
  infer	
  trends	
  from	
  such	
  a	
  small	
  number.	
  	
   Arts	
  	
   • 72%	
  awareness/familiarity	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  • Even	
  with	
  significant	
  awareness	
  only	
  36%	
  of	
  students	
  encounter	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  at	
  least	
  once	
  a	
  week	
  and	
  21%	
  have	
  never	
  encountered	
  these	
  products	
  • If	
  given	
  the	
  option	
  to	
  choose	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product,	
  only	
  42%	
  would	
  choose	
  the	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  over	
  the	
  one	
  that	
  wasn’t	
  • In	
  terms	
  of	
  availability	
  and	
  affordability,	
  the	
  same	
  central	
  tendency	
  that	
  was	
  apparent	
  when	
  examining	
  by	
  years	
  @	
  UBC,	
  was	
  apparent	
  when	
  measuring	
  against	
  faculties	
  with	
  over	
  60%	
  giving	
  neutral	
  responses	
  	
   Science	
  	
   • 74%	
  awareness/familiarity	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  • Despite	
  high	
  awareness,	
  only	
  27%	
  of	
  these	
  students	
  encounter	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  at	
  least	
  once	
  a	
  week	
  and	
  another	
  27%	
  have	
  never	
  encountered	
  these	
  products	
  • If	
  given	
  the	
  option	
  of	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  over	
  with	
  a	
  product	
  that	
  wasn’t,	
  48%	
  would	
  choose	
  the	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  option	
  • In	
  terms	
  of	
  availability	
  and	
  affordability,	
  the	
  same	
  central	
  tendency	
  that	
  was	
  apparent	
  when	
  examining	
  by	
  years	
  @	
  UBC,	
  was	
  apparent	
  when	
  measuring	
  against	
  faculties	
  with	
  over	
  60%	
  giving	
  neutral	
  responses	
  	
   Commerce	
  	
   • Has	
  a	
  significantly	
  high	
  awareness	
  at	
  88%,	
  possibly	
  due	
  to	
  that	
  Sustainability	
  is	
  a	
  focal	
  point	
  in	
  the	
  faculty	
  • 37%	
  of	
  Commerce	
  students	
  encounter	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  at	
  least	
  once	
  a	
  week,	
  however	
  30%	
  have	
  never	
  encountered	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  as	
  well	
   	
   14	
   • If	
  given	
  the	
  option	
  of	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  with	
  a	
  product	
  that	
  was	
  not,	
  only	
  33%	
  would	
  choose	
  the	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  option	
  	
  	
  • In	
  terms	
  of	
  availability	
  and	
  affordability,	
  the	
  same	
  central	
  tendency	
  that	
  was	
  apparent	
  when	
  examining	
  by	
  years	
  @	
  UBC,	
  was	
  apparent	
  when	
  measuring	
  against	
  faculties	
  with	
  over	
  60%	
  giving	
  neutral	
  responses	
  	
   Land	
  and	
  Food	
  Systems	
  	
   • By	
  far	
  the	
  highest	
  awareness	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  at	
  93.2%	
  • 53.3%	
  of	
  these	
  respondents	
  have	
  encountered	
  these	
  products	
  at	
  least	
  once	
  a	
  week,	
  if	
  including	
  the	
  2-­‐3	
  times	
  a	
  month,	
  then	
  number	
  the	
  statistic	
  shifts	
  to	
  80%.This	
  may	
  have	
  to	
  do	
  with	
  the	
  fact	
  the	
  Land	
  and	
  Food	
  systems	
  has	
  high	
  awareness	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  knows	
  where	
  to	
  find	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  and	
  is	
  easily	
  able	
  to	
  identify	
  a	
  larger	
  variety	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  • 73.3%	
  would	
  choose	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  over	
  one	
  that	
  wasn’t,	
  if	
  there	
  was	
  an	
  option,	
  showing	
  that	
  this	
  faculty	
  seems	
  to	
  more	
  in	
  tune	
  with	
  the	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  philosophy	
  than	
  others	
  • Strangely	
  with	
  Land	
  and	
  Food	
  Systems,	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  availability	
  and	
  affordability,	
  the	
  same	
  central	
  tendency	
  that	
  was	
  apparent	
  when	
  examining	
  by	
  years	
  @	
  UBC,	
  was	
  apparent	
  when	
  measuring	
  against	
  faculties	
  with	
  over	
  60%	
  giving	
  neutral	
  responses.	
  	
   5.2.3	
  Whether	
  or	
  Not	
  One	
  Lives	
  on	
  Campus	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   There	
  wasn’t	
  a	
  large	
  enough	
  difference	
  between	
  the	
  group	
  that	
  lived	
  on	
  campus	
  and	
  the	
  one	
  that	
  did	
  not	
  for	
  it	
  considered	
  to	
  significant,	
  though	
  ironically	
  the	
  group	
  that	
  didn’t	
  live	
  on	
  campus	
  reported	
  somewhat	
  higher	
  awareness,	
  higher	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  encounter	
  and	
  higher	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  purchase	
  intentions.	
  This	
  is	
  odd	
  considering	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  time	
  those	
  that	
  live	
  on	
  campus,	
  spend	
  at	
  UBC	
  and	
  have	
  more	
  opportunities	
  to	
  be	
  exposed	
  to	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products.	
  	
   Those	
  that	
  lived	
  on	
  campus	
  	
   • Reported	
  68%	
  awareness	
  • There	
  seem	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  level	
  distribution	
  with	
  an	
  average	
  number	
  of	
  12	
  respondents	
  in	
  each	
  category	
  of	
  encountering	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products,	
  with	
  the	
  exception	
  of	
  those	
  who	
  have	
  never	
  encountered	
  being	
  lopsidedly	
  high	
  • Only	
  37%	
  would	
  choose	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  over	
  a	
  non-­‐Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  if	
  given	
  the	
  choice	
  • There	
  is	
  another	
  central	
  tendency	
  for	
  availability	
  with	
  50%	
  of	
  respondents	
  choosing	
  an	
  almost	
  neutral	
  position	
  of	
  somewhat	
  low	
  or	
  high.	
  Also,	
  because	
  of	
  the	
  low	
  amount	
  of	
  purchase	
  intentions	
  from	
  this	
  group,	
  we	
  thought	
  it	
  was	
  because	
  these	
  students	
  were	
  on	
  a	
  limited	
  budget	
  and	
  would	
  consider	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  expensive;	
  however	
  the	
  results	
  delivered	
  yet	
  another	
  central	
  tendency.	
  59%	
  of	
  this	
  group	
  retained	
  a	
  neutral	
  position	
   	
   Those	
  that	
  do	
  not	
  live	
  on	
  campus	
  	
   • Reported	
  77.4%	
  awareness	
  • Level	
  distribution	
  with	
  similar	
  number	
  of	
  people	
  in	
  each	
  level	
  of	
  encounters	
  • 45%	
  of	
  this	
  group	
  would	
  purchase	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  over	
  a	
  non-­‐Fair	
  Trade	
   	
   15	
   product	
  if	
  given	
  the	
  option	
  • There	
  was	
  a	
  large	
  central	
  tendency	
  with	
  73%	
  of	
  respondents	
  choosing	
  a	
  middle	
  stance,	
  with	
  somewhat	
  high	
  or	
  somewhat	
  low	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  affordability	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products.	
  And	
  again	
  for	
  availability,	
  68%	
  of	
  respondents	
  chose	
  somewhat	
  high	
  and	
  somewhat	
  low	
  	
   5.2.4	
  How	
  Many	
  Days	
  in	
  a	
  Week	
  does	
  One	
  Spend	
  on	
  Campus	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   For	
  this	
  grouping,	
  there	
  were	
  only	
  6	
  respondents	
  who	
  are	
  campus	
  1	
  to	
  2	
  days	
  a	
  week,	
  so	
  we	
  were	
  unable	
  to	
  infer	
  any	
  trends	
  from	
  that	
  segment.	
  	
  Those	
  who	
  spend	
  3	
  to	
  5	
  days	
  and	
  those	
  who	
  spend	
  6	
  to	
  7	
  days	
  produced	
  very	
  similar	
  responses	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  awareness,	
  however	
  strangely	
  those	
  who	
  spent	
  3	
  to	
  5	
  days	
  on	
  campus,	
  encountered	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  much	
  more	
  often	
  than	
  those	
  who	
  spent	
  6	
  to	
  7	
  days,	
  who	
  were	
  also	
  less	
  likely	
  to	
  choose	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products.	
  Also,	
  a	
  significant	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  6	
  to	
  7	
  days	
  group	
  considered	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  affordability	
  to	
  be	
  somewhat	
  low;	
  this	
  attitude	
  mixed	
  with	
  greater	
  budgetary	
  constraints	
  than	
  a	
  group	
  who	
  spends	
  3	
  to	
  5	
  days,	
  may	
  have	
  resulted	
  in	
  lower	
  purchase	
  intentions.	
  	
   3	
  to	
  5	
  days	
  on	
  campus	
  	
   • Of	
  107	
  respondents,	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  74%	
  awareness	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  • Only	
  38%	
  of	
  this	
  group	
  encounters	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  at	
  least	
  once	
  a	
  week	
  • 46%	
  of	
  this	
  group	
  would	
  choose	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  over	
  a	
  non-­‐Fair	
  Trade	
  product,	
  if	
  given	
  the	
  option	
  • Another	
  central	
  tendency	
  is	
  apparent	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  affordability,	
  with	
  74%	
  of	
  respondents	
  choosing	
  either	
  a	
  neutral	
  response,	
  however	
  43%	
  of	
  respondents	
  choose	
  somewhat	
  high	
  affordability	
  • Central	
  tendency,	
  with	
  40%	
  of	
  respondents	
  choosing	
  somewhat	
  low	
  and	
  30%	
  of	
  respondents	
  choosing	
  somewhat	
  high	
  	
   6	
  to	
  7	
  days	
  	
   • 105	
  respondents,	
  with	
  74%	
  awareness	
  • 25	
  %	
  of	
  this	
  group	
  has	
  never	
  encountered	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product,	
  otherwise	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  even	
  distribution	
  of	
  respondents	
  in	
  each	
  category	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  encounters	
  • Central	
  Tendency:	
  60%	
  of	
  respondents	
  chose	
  a	
  neutral	
  position	
  on	
  affordability	
  • Central	
  Tendency:	
  28%	
  of	
  respondents	
  chose	
  somewhat	
  low	
  and	
  32%	
  somewhat	
  high	
   	
   5.3	
  Messaging	
  	
  	
   Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  face	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  fundamental	
  marketing	
  challenges	
  in	
  the	
  UBC	
  market.	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  increase	
  volume	
  of	
  sales	
  and	
  market	
  share	
  of	
  the	
  food	
  and	
  beverage,	
  challenge	
  in	
  awareness	
  and	
  perception	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  in	
  consumer	
  minds	
  must	
  be	
  changed.	
  Given	
  the	
  recommended	
  communication	
  channels,	
  this	
  report	
  puts	
  forth	
  strategic	
  communications	
  to	
  improve	
  the	
  position	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  in	
  consumer	
  minds.	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   16	
   Challenges	
  	
   The	
  primary	
  challenge	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  face	
  at	
  UBC	
  is	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  awareness	
  of	
  the	
  concept	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  (FT).	
  This	
  includes	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  understanding	
  of	
  the	
  concept	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade,	
  the	
  range	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products,	
  the	
  availability	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products,	
  where	
  to	
  purchase	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  and	
  how	
  to	
  identify	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products.	
  Over	
  25%	
  of	
  students	
  at	
  UBC	
  do	
  not	
  understand	
  the	
  concept	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  and	
  this	
  lack	
  of	
  understanding	
  detrimentally	
  affects	
  other	
  purchasing	
  incentives.	
  It	
  is	
  clear	
  that	
  consumers	
  must	
  first	
  be	
  aware	
  of	
  a	
  product	
  to	
  even	
  come	
  to	
  a	
  point	
  of	
  considering	
  purchasing	
  it.	
  Therefore,	
  raising	
  consumer	
  awareness	
  of	
  the	
  different	
  facets	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  at	
  UBC	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  important	
  aspect	
  of	
  messaging	
  in	
  the	
  short	
  term.	
  	
   Secondary	
  challenges	
  in	
  promoting	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  and	
  increasing	
  sales	
  is	
  the	
  perception	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  in	
  consumer	
  minds.	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  are	
  perceived	
  to	
  be	
  expensive	
  by	
  the	
  student	
  population,	
  despite	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  most	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  are	
  cheaper.	
  Furthermore,	
  most	
  students	
  do	
  not	
  believe	
  that	
  paying	
  more	
  for	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  is	
  worthwhile	
  over	
  cheaper	
  alternatives.	
  This	
  challenge	
  must	
  be	
  addresses	
  from	
  a	
  economic	
  and	
  ethical	
  approach.	
  	
  Medium	
  term	
  challenges	
  should	
  be	
  approached	
  once	
  primary	
  challenges	
  have	
  been	
  sufficiently	
  addressed	
  and	
  solved.	
  Medium	
  term	
  challenges	
  include	
  leveraging	
  the	
  pre-­‐existent	
  positive	
  images	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  and	
  improving	
  on	
  them	
  to	
  increase	
  the	
  likelihood	
  of	
  purchase.	
  	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  enjoy	
  a	
  positive	
  image	
  of	
  quality	
  and	
  taste.	
  Other	
  challenges	
  to	
  be	
  faced	
  are	
  cross-­‐promotional	
  leveraging	
  such	
  as	
  using	
  print	
  advertisement	
  to	
  assist	
  social	
  media	
  to	
  push	
  sales	
  (and	
  vice-­‐versa)	
  or	
  applying	
  sampling	
  promotions	
  with	
  print	
  media	
  in	
  connection	
  with	
  social	
  media.	
  This	
  form	
  of	
  messaging	
  can	
  be	
  done	
  throughout	
  all	
  stages	
  of	
  messaging	
  however	
  should	
  be	
  increased	
  in	
  presence	
  over	
  the	
  campaign	
  duration	
  after	
  primary	
  challenges	
  are	
  solved.	
  	
   Brand	
  Personality	
  	
   All	
  messaging	
  in	
  different	
  communication	
  channels	
  should	
  follow	
  a	
  set	
  guideline.	
  This	
  guideline	
  can	
  be	
  referred	
  to	
  the	
  brand	
  personality,	
  which	
  refers	
  to	
  the	
  image	
  and	
  feeling	
  the	
  promotion	
  should	
  attempt	
  to	
  convey	
  and	
  the	
  image	
  and	
  feeling	
  that	
  should	
  be	
  present	
  in	
  the	
  consumer’s	
  mind.	
  	
  Brand	
  personality	
  includes,	
  but	
  is	
  not	
  limited	
  to,	
  the	
  theme,	
  style,	
  tone,	
  and	
  key	
  values	
  of	
  your	
  promotional	
  communications	
  and	
  channels.	
  It	
  is	
  important	
  that	
  all	
  messaging	
  is	
  consistent	
  among	
  all	
  communications	
  to	
  ensure	
  a	
  focused,	
  strategic	
  marketing	
  campaign	
  that	
  leverages	
  synergy	
  of	
  a	
  collaborative	
  effort.	
   	
   Key	
  values	
  are	
  the	
  product’s	
  principles	
  that	
  your	
  product	
  operates	
  under	
  and	
  the	
  image	
  that	
  must	
  be	
  conveyed	
  to	
  consumers.	
  	
  All	
  communications	
  to	
  consumers	
  for	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  should	
  convey	
  these	
  specific	
  values	
  that	
  are	
  held	
  in	
  mutual	
  respect	
  by	
  both	
  the	
  organization	
  and	
  consumers:	
  	
   • Ethical	
   • Informative	
   • Quality	
   • Inexpensive	
   • Tasty	
   • Honest	
   • Change	
   • The	
  Individual	
  and	
  Society	
   	
   17	
   	
   Tone,	
  as	
  the	
  name	
  suggests,	
  is	
  the	
  fashion	
  in	
  which	
  the	
  message	
  is	
  communicated.	
  	
  All	
  communication	
  from	
  UBC	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  (et	
  al)	
  should	
  have	
  the	
  following	
  tone:	
  	
   • Friendly	
   • Informative	
   • Intelligent	
   • Clear	
   • Ethical	
   • Down-­‐to-­‐Earth	
   • Instructive	
  	
   Style	
  refers	
  to	
  the	
  graphic	
  imagery	
  of	
  the	
  text,	
  images,	
  general	
  outlay	
  of	
  the	
  promotions.	
  The	
  style	
  should	
  reflect	
  the	
  key	
  values	
  and	
  tone	
  of	
  the	
  promotional	
  campaign.	
  The	
  style	
  of	
  the	
  campaign	
  should	
  follow	
  the	
  following	
  guidelines:	
  	
   • Sustainable	
  Green	
   • Light	
  Color	
  Scheme	
   • Modern	
   • Sharp	
   • Preference	
  for	
  Larger	
  Presence	
  	
   Short	
  Term	
  Solutions	
  	
   One	
  of	
  the	
  primary	
  challenges	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  is	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  understanding	
  of	
  the	
  concept	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade.	
  To	
  address	
  this	
  issue,	
  the	
  team	
  has	
  developed	
  creative	
  concepts	
  for	
  making	
  more	
  aware	
  and	
  teaching	
  the	
  general	
  student	
  population	
  the	
  concept	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  in	
  an	
  interesting	
  and	
  captive	
  fashion.	
   	
   “What	
  is…”	
  Campaign	
  	
   The	
  “what	
  is…”	
  campaign	
  is	
  an	
  easily	
  customizable	
  and	
  interesting	
  communication	
  method	
  that	
  captures	
  consumer	
  attention	
  by	
  directly	
  asking	
  consumers	
  an	
  ambiguous/uncertain	
  open	
  ended	
  question	
  about	
  the	
  definition	
  of	
  a	
  value	
  that	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  supports.	
  This	
  ad	
  can	
  be	
  customized	
  to	
  increase	
  variety	
  and	
  thereby	
  interest,	
  attention	
  and	
  mind	
  space	
  of	
  consumers.	
   	
  	
  	
   Header: “What	
  is……?”	
  <Empowerment,	
  Community,	
  Ethical,	
  Sustainable,	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  etc>	
  Text	
  Size:	
  1/3	
  page	
  cover.	
   Channel:	
  Any.	
  Page	
  Size:	
  Any.	
  	
  Colour:	
  White. Sub-­‐Text: Word	
  Cloud:	
  	
  [words	
  associated	
  with	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  with	
  some	
  misconceptions] Body: Ex.	
  Empowerment	
  is	
  giving	
  third	
  world	
  producers	
  a	
  chance	
  to	
  rise	
  above	
  poverty	
  and	
  have	
  an	
  opportunity	
  to	
   create	
  something	
  more	
  through	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Products.	
  UBC	
  HHC	
  only	
  purchases	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee	
  and	
  chocolate	
   to	
  help	
  support	
  third	
  world	
  producers	
  earn	
  a	
  fair	
  wage	
  for	
  their	
  labor.	
  Be	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  change	
  and	
  buy	
  fair. Footer: Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  can	
  be	
  found	
  at	
  all	
  Housing	
  and	
  Conference	
  locations	
  and	
  at	
  select	
  AMS	
  outlets.	
  Follow	
  us	
   on	
  Twitter	
  @UBCFairTrade	
  and	
  Join	
  us	
  on	
  Facebook	
  www.facebook.com/ubcfairtrade	
  	
  for	
  more	
  information. Background: Light	
  Green,	
  Abstract	
  art,	
  Light	
  leafy	
  design. 	
   18	
   Product	
  Range:“What’s	
  so	
  special	
  about	
  this	
  …?”	
  Campaign	
  	
  	
   The	
  “What’s	
  so	
  special	
  about	
  this	
  …?”	
  	
  campaign	
  is	
  similar	
  to	
  the	
  “What	
  is…”	
  campaign	
  in	
  customizability	
  but	
  keeps	
  simplicity	
  for	
  easy	
  variation	
  and	
  duplication.	
  This	
  campaign	
  revolves	
  around	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  that	
  is	
  not	
  known	
  for	
  being	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  certified	
  and	
  asks	
  consumers	
  “What	
  is	
  so	
  special	
  about	
  this	
  Banana?”	
  The	
  following	
  sub-­‐text	
  explains	
  that	
  it	
  is	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  and	
  the	
  body	
  brings	
  awareness	
  of	
  the	
  concept	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  and	
  its	
  significance	
  while	
  bringing	
  to	
  light	
  the	
  wide	
  variety	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  in	
  various	
  ads.	
  	
  Header:	
   “What’s	
  so	
  special	
  about	
  this……?”	
  <Banana,	
  Muffin,	
  Chocolate,	
  Sweater,	
  etc>	
  Text	
  Size:	
  1/3	
  page	
  cover.	
  Channel:	
  Any.	
  Page	
  Size:	
  Any.	
  	
  Colour:	
  White.	
  Sub-­‐Text:	
   It’s	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Product!	
  Body:	
   Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  help	
  third	
  world	
  producers	
  become	
  economically	
  independent	
  in	
  a	
  sustainable	
  fashion	
  by	
  providing	
  producers	
  a	
  fair	
  wage	
  for	
  their	
  labour.	
  UBC	
  HHC	
  only	
  purchases	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Bananas	
  from	
  the	
  DRC	
  and	
  ensures	
  workers	
  are	
  paid	
  a	
  fair	
  wage.	
  Be	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  change	
  and	
  buy	
  fair!	
  Footer:	
   Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  can	
  be	
  found	
  at	
  all	
  Housing	
  and	
  Conference	
  locations	
  and	
  at	
  select	
  AMS	
  outlets.	
  Follow	
  us	
  on	
  Twitter	
  @UBCFairTrade	
  and	
  Join	
  us	
  on	
  Facebook	
  www.facebook.com/ubcfairtrade	
  	
  for	
  more	
  information	
  and	
  free	
  coupons.	
  Background:	
   Light	
  Green,	
  Abstract	
  art,	
  Light	
  leafy	
  design.	
  	
  	
   The	
  past	
  two	
  campaigns	
  have	
  addressed	
  the	
  location	
  of	
  where	
  to	
  purchase	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  but	
  can	
  also	
  be	
  placed	
  close	
  to	
  or	
  beside	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  placements.	
  	
   Product	
  Price	
  Savings	
  and	
  Ethics	
  Comparison	
  	
  	
   This	
  page	
  will	
  cover	
  two	
  intertwined	
  parts:	
  One	
  part	
  will	
  compare	
  the	
  average	
  price	
  of	
  the	
  commercial	
  product	
  to	
  the	
  price	
  of	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Product	
  (preferably	
  a	
  FT	
  product	
  that	
  is	
  cheaper	
  than	
  the	
  commercial	
  version).	
  The	
  second	
  part	
  will	
  cover	
  the	
  price	
  of	
  an	
  average	
  commercial	
  coffee	
  is	
  and	
  compare	
  it	
  to	
  the	
  producer	
  wage.	
  This	
  promotion	
  will	
  accomplish	
  two	
  objectives,	
  diminish	
  the	
  perception	
  of	
  the	
  expensiveness	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  and	
  guilt	
  consumers	
  into	
  buying	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  by	
  demonstrating	
  how	
  little	
  producers	
  make	
  relative	
  to	
  the	
  selling	
  price	
  (despite	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  they	
  made	
  the	
  product).	
  	
   	
   	
   Header:	
   “This	
  is	
  how	
  much	
  an	
  average	
  coffee	
  costs	
  at	
  a	
  chain	
  …$X	
  This	
  is	
  how	
  much	
  the	
  producer	
  makes	
  $X	
  <SPACE>	
  This	
  is	
  how	
  much	
  UBC	
  FT	
  coffee	
  costs	
  $X	
  This	
  is	
  how	
  much	
  the	
  producer	
  makes	
  $X”	
  Text	
  Size:	
  ¼	
  	
  page	
  cover	
  each	
  line.	
  Channel:	
  Any.	
  Page	
  Size:	
  Any.	
  	
  Color:	
  White.	
  Sub-­‐Text:	
   None	
  Body:	
   Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  help	
  third	
  world	
  producers	
  become	
  economically	
  independent	
  in	
  a	
  sustainable	
  fashion	
  by	
  providing	
  producers	
  a	
  fair	
  wage	
  for	
  their	
  labor.	
  UBC	
  HHC	
  only	
  purchases	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Bananas	
  from	
  the	
  DRC	
  and	
  ensures	
  workers	
  are	
  paid	
  a	
  fair	
  wage.	
  Be	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  change	
  and	
  buy	
  fair!	
  Footer:	
   Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  can	
  be	
  found	
  at	
  all	
  Housing	
  and	
  Conference	
  locations	
  and	
  at	
  select	
  AMS	
  outlets.	
  Follow	
  us	
  on	
  Twitter	
  @UBCFairTrade	
  and	
  Join	
  us	
  on	
  Facebook	
  www.facebook.com/ubcfairtrade	
  for	
  more	
  information	
  and	
  free	
  coupons.	
  Background:	
   Starbucks	
  Green	
  and	
  White,	
  Clear	
  Half	
  Page	
  divide	
  in	
  color	
  contrast,	
  clear	
   	
   19	
   Medium	
  Term	
  Solutions	
  	
  	
   Medium	
  term	
  solutions	
  should	
  be	
  designed	
  based	
  on	
  feedback	
  and	
  results	
  from	
  the	
  first	
  round	
  of	
  promotions.	
  Once	
  primary	
  objectives	
  of	
  raising	
  awareness	
  of	
  FT	
  goods	
  to	
  a	
  sufficient	
  and	
  reasonable	
  level,	
  promotions	
  should	
  begin	
  to	
  focus	
  on	
  qualities	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  such	
  as	
  taste,	
  portion,	
  quality	
  and	
  purchasing	
  habits.	
  Promotions	
  through	
  specific	
  channels	
  should	
  also	
  be	
  designed	
  to	
  strategically	
  focus	
  on	
  supporting	
  and	
  developing	
  other	
  high	
  potential	
  promotional	
  activities	
  such	
  as	
  sampling,	
  contests	
  and	
  social	
  media.	
  	
   Long	
  Term	
  Solution	
  	
  	
   Long	
  term	
  messaging	
  should	
  only	
  begin	
  once	
  the	
  target	
  market	
  is	
  sufficiently	
  aware	
  of	
  the	
  presence	
  and	
  positive	
  qualities	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products.	
  Once	
  this	
  is	
  accomplished,	
  consumers	
  should	
  be	
  reminded	
  of	
  the	
  aforementioned	
  qualities	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  on	
  a	
  regular	
  basis	
  while	
  keeping	
  in	
  touch	
  with	
  consumer	
  perceptions	
  and	
  modify	
  according	
  to	
  changing	
  attitudes.	
   	
  	
   5.4	
  Communication	
  Channels	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
   The	
  large	
  percentage	
  of	
  UBC	
  students	
  who	
  are	
  unaware	
  of	
  the	
  availability	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products,	
  let	
  alone	
  the	
  understanding	
  of	
  the	
  concept	
  of	
  what	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  is,	
  is	
  a	
  large	
  problem	
  that	
  requires	
  effective	
  communication	
  to	
  ameliorate.	
  There	
  are	
  a	
  multitude	
  of	
  different	
  communication	
  tactics	
  that	
  are	
  available	
  to	
  marketers	
  to	
  achieve	
  their	
  communication	
  goals,	
  however	
  with	
  every	
  organization	
  and	
  target	
  market,	
  the	
  most	
  effective	
  technique(s)	
  can	
  vary	
  drastically	
  depending	
  on	
  the	
  individual	
  needs	
  and	
  circumstances	
  of	
  an	
  organization	
  and	
  the	
  unique	
  characteristics	
  of	
  its	
  target	
  market.	
  That	
  is	
  why	
  a	
  careful	
  analysis	
  of	
  viable	
  communication	
  channels	
  is	
  necessary	
  to	
  make	
  an	
  informed	
  and	
  strategic	
  decision	
  on	
  the	
  method	
  you	
  will	
  communicate	
  key	
  messaging	
  to	
  your	
  target	
  in	
  the	
  most	
  effective	
  and	
  efficient	
  way	
  possible.	
  This	
  recommendation	
  will	
  provide	
  a	
  detailed	
  analysis	
  of	
  viable	
  communication	
  options	
  for	
  the	
  client	
  and	
  further	
  supply	
  a	
  recommended	
  combination	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  effective	
  communication	
  channels.	
  	
   5.4.1	
  Social	
  Media	
   	
   	
   This	
  marketing	
  plan	
  recommends	
  the	
  creation	
  and	
  utilization	
  of	
  an	
  effective	
  360	
  degree	
  social	
  media	
  marketing	
  platform	
  to	
  be	
  used	
  in	
  conjunction	
  with	
  other	
  promotional	
  campaigns	
  in	
  a	
  supporting	
  role.	
  	
  The	
  key	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  UBC	
  Fair	
  Trade’s	
  marketing	
  plan	
  should	
  include	
  Facebook,	
  Twitter	
  and	
  a	
  corresponding	
  website	
  with	
  an	
  RSS	
  feed	
  and	
  optional	
  Blog	
  and	
  connection	
  to	
  YouTube	
  multimedia	
  communications.	
  Key	
  values	
  of	
  authenticity,	
  honesty,	
  freedom,	
  cooperation,	
  personalization,	
  simplicity	
  and	
  intimacy	
  should	
  always	
  be	
  strived	
  for	
  in	
  the	
  design	
  and	
  use	
  of	
  social	
  media.	
  	
  Other	
  possible	
  but	
  less	
  popular	
  yet	
  effective	
  options	
  in	
  niche	
  markets	
  environments	
  include	
  SMS	
  advertising,	
  Foursquare,	
  Google	
  Plus,	
  ad	
  MySpace.	
  	
   Facebook	
  	
  	
   In	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  there	
  are	
  over	
  one	
  million	
  users,	
  in	
  other	
  words	
  1	
  in	
  3	
  British	
  Columbians	
  are	
  Facebook	
  users.	
  Facebook	
  can	
  provide	
  real	
  results	
  with	
  studies	
  finding	
  that	
  40%	
  of	
  Facebook	
  users	
  follow	
  a	
  brand	
  and	
  51%	
  of	
  brand	
  followers	
  will	
  purchase	
  the	
  specific	
  product.	
  	
  In	
  keeping	
  with	
  current	
  trends,	
  it	
  is	
  also	
  important	
  to	
  note	
  the	
  strategic	
   	
   20	
   vision	
  of	
  Facebook	
  and	
  the	
  general	
  direction	
  of	
  the	
  internet	
  community	
  using	
  Facebook	
  as	
  the	
  new	
  “Google”	
  to	
  search	
  everything	
  from	
  places	
  to	
  business	
  and	
  of	
  course	
  people	
  with	
  a	
  large	
  majority	
  of	
  businesses	
  establishing	
  fan	
  pages	
  and	
  to	
  use	
  Facebook	
  as	
  a	
  medium	
  to	
  communicate	
  and	
  engage	
  customers	
  to	
  ultimately	
  create	
  sales.	
  	
  When	
  creating	
  a	
  Facebook	
  page	
  be	
  sure	
  to	
  do	
  the	
  following:	
  	
   • Add	
  fun	
  and	
  engaging	
  pictures	
  to	
  your	
  profile	
  • Fill	
  out	
  the	
  information	
  completely	
  with	
  website,	
  twitter	
  feed,	
  locations	
  and	
  other	
  relevant	
  information	
  • Add	
  a	
  profile	
  picture	
  that	
  is	
  interesting,	
  eye-­‐catching	
  and	
  relevant.	
  • Keep	
  up-­‐to-­‐date	
  events	
  posted	
  as	
  soon	
  as	
  they	
  are	
  confirmed	
  • Use	
  a	
  wide	
  variety	
  of	
  media	
  when	
  updating	
  your	
  facebook	
  page,	
  including	
  links,	
  photos,	
  videos,	
  polls,	
  etc	
  • Connect	
  to	
  other	
  promotional	
  material	
  in	
  your	
  real	
  world	
  campaign	
  	
   Twitter	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Many	
  users	
  on	
  twitter	
  interact	
  with	
  organizations	
  on	
  a	
  personal	
  level	
  and	
  accordingly,	
  organizations	
  can	
  respond	
  to	
  customers	
  on	
  a	
  personal	
  level	
  and	
  build	
  effective	
  customer	
  service.	
  This	
  can	
  be	
  utilized	
  to	
  form	
  exceptional	
  customer	
  service	
  and	
  improve	
  organizational	
  services.	
  Twitter	
  is	
  also	
  a	
  great	
  forum	
  where	
  organizations	
  can	
  provide	
  thought	
  leadership.	
  In	
  the	
  case	
  of	
  UBC	
  Fair	
  Trade,	
  the	
  thoughts	
  and	
  opinions	
  of	
  student	
  perspective	
  on	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  can	
  have	
  a	
  large	
  impact	
  on	
  purchasing	
  habits,	
  if	
  UBC	
  Fair	
  Trade’s	
  tweets	
  are	
  effective	
  in	
  reaching	
  consumers	
  and	
  leading	
  them	
  to	
  form	
  positive	
  perspectives	
  towards	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products.	
  	
  More	
  concretely,	
  twitter	
  has	
  a	
  great	
  potential	
  for	
  gaining	
  new	
  customers	
  though	
  interaction	
  with	
  users.	
  Lastly,	
  the	
  benefits	
  of	
  twitter	
  are	
  not	
  all	
  in	
  one	
  communication;	
  twitter	
  is	
  a	
  great	
  way	
  to	
  follow	
  the	
  trends,	
  opinions	
  and	
  thoughts	
  of	
  your	
  customer	
  base	
  in	
  real	
  time.	
  Asking	
  questions,	
  following	
  key	
  connected	
  tweeters	
  and	
  important	
  hash-­‐tags	
  can	
  give	
  great	
  insight	
  into	
  market	
  data.	
  When	
  creating	
  a	
  twitter	
  account,	
  be	
  sure	
  to	
  do	
  the	
  following:	
  	
   • Add	
  a	
  relevant	
  avatar	
  picture	
  for	
  your	
  account	
  • Link	
  to	
  your	
  website	
  • Add	
  a	
  relevant	
  and	
  interesting	
  self	
  description	
  and	
  describe	
  yourself	
  as	
  the	
  “official”	
  twitter	
  account	
  holder	
  • Add	
  interesting	
  and	
  relevant	
  pictures	
  to	
  your	
  account	
  and	
  be	
  sure	
  to	
  update	
  them	
  with	
  current	
  events	
  • Follow	
  relevant	
  people	
  (they	
  will	
  follow	
  you	
  back)	
  and	
  groups	
  that	
  are	
  in	
  line	
  with	
  the	
  values	
  of	
  the	
  organization,	
  but	
  be	
  sure	
  to	
  keep	
  a	
  good	
  ratio	
  between	
  followers	
  and	
  following	
  • Customize	
  your	
  background	
  for	
  a	
  more	
  professional	
  and	
  inviting	
  look.	
  • Tweet	
  about	
  topics	
  relevant	
  to	
  your	
  area	
  and	
  interact	
  with	
  other	
  users	
  • Use	
  hash-­‐tags.	
  Hash	
  tags	
  are	
  a	
  community	
  driven	
  practise	
  of	
  tagging	
  an	
  individual	
  tweet	
  by	
  using	
  an	
  individual	
  hash	
  (#)	
  before	
  a	
  tag.	
  Ex.	
  #OccupyVancouver	
  is	
  a	
  tweet	
  referring	
  to	
  an	
  occupy	
  movement	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  and	
  allows	
  the	
  community	
  to	
  easily	
  stream	
  a	
  particular	
  subject.	
  Popular	
  hash	
  tags	
  in	
  Vancouver	
  include	
  #ubc,	
  #vancouver,	
  #	
  • ReTweet	
  (RT).	
  A	
  retweet,	
  as	
  the	
  name	
  suggests,	
  is	
  a	
  repeated	
  tweet.	
  It	
  is	
  used	
  in	
  a	
  reply	
  to	
  allow	
  everyone	
  to	
  see	
  the	
  original	
  tweeter,	
  it	
  is	
  also	
  used	
  to	
  forward	
  a	
  message	
  to	
  one’s	
  own	
  followers	
   	
   21	
   • Follow	
  trends	
  and	
  comment	
  on	
  them	
  using	
  a	
  hash.	
  Trends	
  can	
  be	
  found	
  on	
  the	
  home	
  bar	
  or	
  on	
  www.trendsmap.com	
  and	
  can	
  be	
  effective	
  in	
  gaining	
  new	
  followers	
  or	
  finding	
  popular	
  topics	
  in	
  a	
  select	
  geographical	
  area	
  	
   The	
  Seven	
  C’s	
  of	
  Communication	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   In	
  social	
  media	
  marketing	
  there	
  are	
  important	
  features	
  which	
  every	
  campaign	
  should	
  follow	
  for	
  successful	
  execution	
  of	
  any	
  campaign	
  know	
  as	
  the	
  Seven	
  C’s.	
  The	
  Seven	
  C’s	
  are	
  as	
  follows:	
  Context,	
  Commerce,	
  Connection,	
  Communication,	
  Content,	
  Community	
  and	
  Customization.	
  	
   • Context:	
  A	
  website's	
  layout	
  and	
  overall	
  visual	
  design	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  uncluttered,	
  easy	
  to	
  read	
  and	
  navigate,	
  the	
  color	
  scheme	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  appropriate	
  for	
  the	
  marketing	
  design.	
  Having	
  some	
  white	
  space	
  will	
  also	
  aid	
  in	
  the	
  overall	
  design	
  and	
  readability.	
  	
   • Commerce:	
  If	
  the	
  website	
  is	
  converted	
  commercial	
  transactions,	
  then	
  it	
  must	
  be	
  safe	
  and	
  communicated	
  to	
  the	
  customer	
  that	
  it	
  is	
  so,	
  most	
  websites	
  use	
  a	
  "lock"	
  symbol	
  in	
  the	
  corner	
  to	
  indicate	
  that	
  it	
  has	
  been	
  encrypted.	
  Furthermore,	
  the	
  commercial	
  activities	
  should	
  be	
  organized	
  in	
  an	
  easy	
  to	
  use	
  and	
  simple	
  format	
  with	
  the	
  least	
  amount	
  of	
  clicks	
  to	
  reach	
  a	
  sale.	
  UBC	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  should	
  look	
  into	
  commercializing	
  their	
  web	
  page	
  with	
  various	
  product	
  offers,	
  price	
  promotions,	
  and	
  product	
  information	
  and	
  offers.	
  	
   • Connection:	
  Website	
  should	
  be	
  connected	
  to	
  all	
  aspects	
  of	
  your	
  social	
  media	
  campaign.	
  There	
  should	
  not	
  only	
  be	
  little	
  twitter	
  and	
  facebook	
  logo	
  attached	
  to	
  every	
  page	
  but	
  your	
  twitter	
  feed	
  should	
  be	
  shown	
  on	
  your	
  website	
  and	
  active	
  interaction	
  between	
  the	
  website	
  and	
  your	
  Facebook	
  page	
  and	
  a	
  Twitter	
  feed	
  should	
  be	
  a	
  regular	
  behavior.	
  Additionally,	
  any	
  other	
  co-­‐sponsors	
  and	
  interesting	
  news	
  should	
  be	
  linked	
  in	
  with	
  your	
  website	
  to	
  act	
  as	
  a	
  resource	
  for	
  your	
  organization.	
  Be	
  sure	
  to	
  add	
  an	
  RRS	
  feed	
  on	
  your	
  website	
  so	
  users	
  can	
  follow	
  updates	
  easily.	
  	
   • Communication:	
  How	
  the	
  company	
  talks	
  to	
  its	
  customers;	
  this	
  can	
  be	
  done	
  through	
  signing	
  up	
  for	
  special	
  offers,	
  email	
  newsletters,	
  contests,	
  surveys,	
  live	
  chat	
  with	
  company	
  representatives,	
  and	
  company	
  contact	
  information	
  and	
  last	
  but	
  not	
  least,	
  your	
  social	
  media	
  pages	
  	
   • Content:	
  The	
  text,	
  graphics,	
  sound,	
  music,	
  and/or	
  videos	
  that	
  are	
  presented	
  must	
  be	
  relevant	
  and	
  interesting	
  for	
  your	
  consumers.	
  Information	
  that	
  is	
  common	
  knowledge	
  is	
  not	
  enough.	
  The	
  website	
  must	
  strive	
  to	
  provide	
  meaningful	
  information	
  that	
  stands	
  out	
  as	
  primary	
  resource	
  for	
  your	
  relevant	
  area.	
  	
  A	
  blog	
  is	
  also	
  a	
  very	
  good	
  way	
  of	
  providing	
  up-­‐to-­‐date	
  information	
  that	
  is	
  relevant	
  and	
  improves	
  the	
  Page	
  Rank	
  of	
  your	
  website	
  in	
  searches.	
  	
   • Community:	
  The	
  website	
  should	
  allow	
  interaction	
  between	
  customers	
  through	
  message	
  boards	
  and	
  possibly	
  live	
  chat.	
  Fostering	
  a	
  healthy	
  community	
  and	
  engaging	
  customers	
  get	
  users	
  excited	
  about	
  products	
  and	
  increase	
  awareness	
  and	
  sales	
  of	
  products.	
  	
   • Customization:	
  Companies	
  can	
  allow	
  customers	
  to	
  personalize	
  aspects	
  of	
  the	
  website	
  or	
  it	
  may	
  tailor	
  itself	
  to	
  different	
  users,	
  for	
  example	
  having	
  different	
  colors	
   	
   22	
   and	
  graphics	
  for	
  people	
  who	
  speak	
  different	
  languages.	
   Print	
  Advertising	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Print	
  advertising	
  is	
  the	
  backbone	
  of	
  most	
  promotional	
  campaigns.	
  Coming	
  in	
  a	
  wide	
  variety	
  of	
  forms	
  print	
  adverting	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  in	
  anything	
  from	
  newspapers	
  to	
  billboards	
  to	
  websites.	
  	
  An	
  effective	
  print	
  campaign	
  requires	
  the	
  careful	
  designed	
  strategic	
  goals	
  outlined	
  for	
  messaging,	
  a	
  creative	
  ideas	
  to	
  form	
  attention	
  grabbing	
  concepts,	
  the	
  production	
  of	
  the	
  creative	
  material	
  and	
  the	
  eventual	
  of	
  distribution	
  of	
  the	
  ad	
  with	
  purchasing	
  of	
  ad	
  space	
  which	
  can	
  greatly	
  vary	
  in	
  price	
  and	
  change	
  in	
  CPM	
  (cost	
  per	
  thousands	
  impressions).	
  	
  Appropriate	
  theme,	
  messaging	
  and	
  concept	
  for	
  print	
  is	
  discussed	
  in	
  the	
  Messaging	
  section	
  of	
  this	
  report.	
  	
   5.4.2	
  Student	
  Groups	
  	
   Student	
  Newspapers	
  and	
  Publications	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Student	
  Newspapers	
  and	
  Publications	
  offer	
  a	
  direct	
  forum	
  to	
  reach	
  our	
  exact	
  target	
  market	
  without	
  wasting	
  resources	
  on	
  non-­‐relevant	
  populations.	
  UBC	
  offers	
  7	
  different	
  newspapers	
  and	
  magazines	
  (Discorder,	
  The	
  Graduate,	
  Perspectives,	
  The	
  Point,	
  The	
   Thunderbird,	
  The	
  Ubyssey,	
  and	
  The	
  Arts	
  Underground)	
  and	
  publications	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  10	
  different	
  academic	
  journals	
  13	
  official	
  publications	
  that	
  specialize	
  in	
  specific	
  areas	
  of	
  student,	
  graduate	
  and	
  staff	
  life.	
  To	
  get	
  to	
  the	
  widest	
  of	
  our	
  core	
  target	
  audience,	
  we	
  recommend	
  The	
  Ubyssey	
  as	
  an	
  appropriate	
  resource	
  to	
  reach	
  students	
  with	
  print	
  material.	
  The	
  Ubyssey	
  targets	
  the	
  18-­‐25	
  campus	
  market	
  and	
  20%	
  of	
  all	
  students	
  read	
  the	
  Newspaper,	
  more	
  than	
  any	
  other	
  publication	
  on	
  campus.	
  In	
  addition	
  to	
  the	
  printed	
  version,	
  the	
  Ubyssey	
  boasts	
  a	
  unique	
  visitor	
  rate	
  on	
  their	
  website	
  (where	
  print	
  ads	
  are	
  also	
  feature)	
  of	
  23,362	
  with	
  an	
  average	
  200	
  views	
  for	
  each	
  visitor	
  creating	
  a	
  total	
  potential	
  of	
  4,672,	
  400	
  impressions	
  over	
  a	
  year.	
  The	
  paper	
  distributes	
  to	
  72	
  different	
  locations	
  around	
  campus	
  with	
  a	
  distribution	
  point	
  in	
  every	
  major	
  faculty	
  building	
  on	
  campus,	
  publishes	
  twice	
  weekly	
  with	
  a	
  weekly	
  circulation	
  of	
  24,000	
  copies.	
  Pricing	
  ranges	
  from	
  $2,000	
  for	
  full	
  page	
  back	
  cover	
  to	
  $22.00	
  for	
  the	
  smallest	
  size.	
  Free	
  ad	
  design	
  is	
  also	
  available.	
  	
  For	
  further	
  information	
  the	
  media	
  kit	
  is	
  available	
  on	
  the	
  Ubyssey	
  website.	
  	
  	
  Print	
  advertising	
  should	
  focus	
  on	
  getting	
  fewer	
  but	
  larger	
  advertisements	
  in	
  either	
  black	
  and	
  white	
  or	
  color,	
  have	
  an	
  appropriate	
  call	
  to	
  action	
  or	
  incentive	
  to	
  act	
  and	
  always	
  link	
  back	
  to	
  social	
  media	
  by	
  either	
  using	
  the	
  Facebook	
  and	
  Twitter	
  logo	
  or	
  otherwise.	
  	
   5.4.3	
  Public	
  Relations	
  	
  	
   Public	
  Relations	
  is	
  an	
  effective	
  measure	
  for	
  an	
  organization	
  or	
  an	
  institution	
  to	
  obtain	
  free	
  advertising	
  through	
  various	
  media	
  outlets	
  (e.g.	
  television,	
  print,	
  radio,	
  etc…),	
  especially	
  with	
  a	
  limited	
  budget.	
  To	
  ensure	
  success,	
  the	
  promotional	
  piece	
  must	
  be	
  engaging	
  and	
  beneficial	
  to	
  the	
  targeted	
  audience,	
  the	
  publication/network	
  (e.g.	
  24	
  hours),	
  and	
  the	
  editor	
  who	
  is	
  contacted.	
  Two	
  effective	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  campaigns	
  that	
  will	
  receive	
  free	
  exposure	
  and	
  provide	
  awareness	
  in	
  regards	
  to	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  initiatives	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  are:	
  hosting	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Month	
  and	
  engaging	
  in	
  community	
  outreach.	
   	
   Fair	
  Trade	
  Month	
  	
  	
   Currently,	
  there	
  is	
  only	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Day	
  during	
  the	
  second	
  week	
  of	
  May	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  which,	
  is	
  aligned	
  with	
  the	
  World	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Day.	
   	
   23	
   The	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Day	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  gains	
  limited	
  exposure	
  and	
  interactions	
  with	
  students	
  and	
  staff	
  for	
  several	
  reasons:	
  	
   • Availability	
  	
   • Final	
  exams	
  for	
  students	
  during	
  Term	
  2	
  end	
  prior	
  to	
  May,	
  therefore,	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  students	
  are	
  not	
  on	
  campus	
  to	
  participate.	
  	
   • Lack	
  of	
  Awareness	
  	
   • Limited	
  messaging	
  to	
  students	
  in	
  regards	
  to	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Day	
  and	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  initiatives	
  in	
  general.	
  	
   • Low	
  Priority	
  	
   • Students	
  who	
  are	
  on	
  campus	
  have	
  begun	
  their	
  Summer	
  Session	
  (May	
  9th,	
  2011),	
  therefore,	
  their	
  focus	
  and	
  attention	
  is	
  primarily	
  towards	
  their	
  new	
  course(s).	
  	
   • Limited	
  Use	
  of	
  Knowledge	
  	
   • As	
  most	
  students	
  during	
  the	
  Summer	
  Session	
  are	
  on	
  campus	
  for	
  a	
  short	
  time	
  in	
  comparison	
  to	
  the	
  Winter	
  Session,	
  their	
  application	
  of	
  the	
  information	
  provided	
  by	
  the	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  day	
  is	
  limited	
  at	
  UBC	
  until	
  Term	
  One.	
  	
  	
   A	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Month	
  will	
  provide	
  more	
  opportunities	
  for	
  students	
  to	
  participate	
  in	
  this	
  initiative,	
  therefore,	
  creating	
  more	
  exposure	
  and	
  awareness	
  towards	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  and	
  the	
  community.	
  The	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Month	
  will	
  encompass	
  the	
  current	
  initiatives	
  and	
  promotions	
  in	
  place,	
  such	
  as:	
  sampling,	
  promotions	
  (e.g.	
  bring	
  your	
  own	
  mug	
  and	
  receive	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee	
  or	
  tea	
  for	
  99	
  cents),	
  informational	
  booths,	
  and	
  giveaways	
  (e.g.	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Basket).	
  We	
  also	
  encourage	
  the	
  implementation	
  of	
  the	
  following,	
  in	
  addition	
  to	
  the	
  Communication	
  and	
  Messaging	
  techniques	
  provided	
  in	
  our	
  marketing	
  plan:	
  	
   • Fair	
  Trade	
  Organization	
  of	
  the	
  Week	
  	
   • Providing	
  a	
  short	
  informational	
  piece	
  about	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  organization	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia	
  each	
  week.	
  	
   • Submission	
  Contests	
  	
   • Students	
  write	
  a	
  short	
  piece	
  (less	
  than	
  200	
  words)	
  in	
  regards	
  to	
  their	
  interpretation	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  and	
  how	
  it	
  has	
  impacted	
  their	
  life	
  or	
  choices.	
  The	
  top	
  three	
  submissions	
  receive	
  a	
  prize	
  and	
  are	
  showcased	
  through	
  various	
  UBC	
  outlets	
  (media	
  and	
  physical	
  space).	
  	
   • Interactive	
  Informational	
  Booths	
  	
   • Interactive	
  booths	
  provide	
  a	
  more	
  engaging	
  experience	
  for	
  students	
  to	
  learn	
  about	
  Fair	
  Trade,	
  causing	
  a	
  greater	
  retention	
  rate	
  on	
  the	
  information	
  they	
   	
   24	
   receive.	
  An	
  example	
  is	
  displaying	
  how	
  many	
  plucks	
  of	
  leaves	
  it	
  takes	
  to	
  produce	
  1	
  kilograms	
  of	
  tea	
  and	
  their	
  daily	
  quota	
  of	
  8	
  kilograms	
  (Reference:	
  http://www.gypsytea.com/sustainability/)	
  	
   Fair	
  Trade	
  Month	
  at	
  UBC	
  will	
  take	
  place	
  during	
  October	
  or	
  November	
  with	
  the	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Day	
  at	
  UBC	
  still	
  taking	
  place	
  during	
  the	
  second	
  week	
  of	
  May.	
  During	
  the	
  first	
  few	
  months	
  of	
  the	
  new	
  academic	
  year,	
  students	
  are	
  still	
  in	
  the	
  “information	
  –	
  gathering”	
  mode,	
  especially	
  first	
  year	
  students.	
  Students	
  are	
  still	
  seeking	
  out	
  greater	
  information	
  in	
  regards	
  to	
  clubs,	
  services,	
  events,	
  and	
  other	
  initiatives	
  that	
  take	
  place	
  at	
  UBC	
  in	
  comparison	
  with	
  the	
  second	
  term	
  of	
  the	
  academic	
  year.	
  Therefore,	
  they	
  their	
  willingness	
  to	
  partake	
  throughout	
  the	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Month	
  and	
  retain	
  information	
  regarding	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  is	
  greater.	
  The	
  second	
  reason	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Month	
  should	
  take	
  place	
  during	
  the	
  first	
  term	
  is	
  in	
  regards	
  to	
  the	
  application	
  of	
  information.	
  Students	
  will	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  apply	
  the	
  information	
  they	
  have	
  learned	
  throughout	
  their	
  entire	
  academic	
  year	
  instead	
  of	
  waiting	
  for	
  the	
  new	
  academic	
  year	
  to	
  arrive	
  (May	
  to	
  August),	
  especially	
  	
  if	
  they	
  are	
  not	
  on	
  campus	
  during	
  the	
  summer	
  session.	
  Finally,	
  placing	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Month	
  during	
  the	
  first	
  term	
  will	
  showcase	
  to	
  students	
  that	
  this	
  is	
  an	
  important	
  initiative,	
  as	
  they	
  are	
  exposed	
  to	
  this	
  information	
  in	
  their	
  first	
  months	
  at	
  UBC	
  rather	
  than	
  nine	
  months	
  later.	
  	
   Community	
  Outreach	
  	
  	
   The	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Month	
  will	
  receive	
  high	
  awareness	
  and	
  frequent	
  promotion	
  within	
  UBC’s	
  media	
  outlets	
  (e.g.	
  The	
  Ubyssey)	
  but	
  limited	
  exposure	
  outside	
  (e.g.	
  The	
  24,	
  The	
  Province),	
  which	
  is	
  the	
  reason	
  community	
  outreach	
  is	
  essential.	
  	
  	
   The	
  first	
  initiative	
  entails	
  UBC	
  students	
  educating	
  the	
  youth	
  (e.g.	
  elementary	
  school	
  children)	
  and/or	
  the	
  community	
  about	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  initiatives.	
  This	
  can	
  be	
  achieved	
  through	
  implementing	
  this	
  initiative	
  into	
  the	
  course	
  material	
  of	
  sustainable	
  and	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  related	
  courses	
  offered	
  at	
  UBC	
  or	
  through	
  offering	
  an	
  incentive.	
  The	
  ideal	
  faculty	
  that	
  would	
  participate	
  in	
  educating	
  the	
  public	
  would	
  be	
  the	
  Faculty	
  of	
  Land	
  and	
  Food	
  Systems	
  due	
  to	
  their	
  high	
  awareness	
  rate	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  according	
  to	
  our	
  primary	
  research.	
  Educational	
  materials	
  can	
  consist	
  of	
  the	
  same	
  methods	
  used	
  during	
  the	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Day	
  at	
  UBC	
  or	
  during	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Month.	
  Students	
  can	
  also	
  provide	
  further	
  recommendations	
  and	
  marketing	
  strategies	
  regarding	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  at	
  UBC	
  and	
  how	
  to	
  improve	
  current	
  practices.	
  	
  	
   The	
  second	
  initiative	
  entails	
  collaboration	
  with	
  other	
  academic	
  institutions	
  (e.g.	
  elementary	
  schools,	
  secondary	
  schools,	
  and	
  post	
  -­‐	
  secondary	
  schools)	
  in	
  British	
  Columbia	
  that	
  will	
  create	
  a	
  greater	
  exposure	
  within	
  the	
  community.	
  The	
  collaboration	
  would	
  simply	
  consist	
  of	
  sharing	
  resources	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  educate	
  the	
  students	
  and	
  public	
  about	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  practices	
  and	
  products.	
  This	
  will	
  benefit	
  both	
  academic	
  institutions	
  and	
  showcase	
  to	
  the	
  public	
  that	
  this	
  is	
  a	
  community	
  wide	
  effort	
  rather	
  than	
  just	
  a	
  single	
  institution,	
  therefore,	
  gaining	
  larger	
  exposure	
  across	
  media	
  outlets.	
  	
   5.4.4	
  Other	
  Examples	
  	
   Bus	
  Advertising	
  	
  	
   Bus	
  advertising	
  can	
  be	
  a	
  valuable	
  method	
  to	
  reach	
  the	
  UBC	
  off	
  campus	
  student	
  commuter	
  population	
  of	
  UBC.	
  Over	
  two-­‐thirds	
  of	
  UBC	
  students	
  live	
  off	
  campus	
  and	
  the	
  vast	
  majority	
  of	
  them	
  ride	
  the	
  bus	
  to	
  reach	
  campus.	
  Popular	
  lines	
  include	
  the	
  99	
  B-­‐line,	
  480	
   	
   25	
   Bridgeport,	
  41	
  Joyce	
  Station,	
  49	
  steet,	
  14	
  Hastings,	
  4th	
  Powell,	
  44	
  downtown	
  and	
  others.	
  	
   The	
  most	
  used	
  of	
  the	
  aforementioned	
  lines	
  is	
  the	
  99	
  B-­‐line,	
  with	
  over	
  50,000	
  passengers	
  daily	
  and	
  acts	
  as	
  service	
  to	
  get	
  students	
  from	
  all	
  over	
  the	
  lower	
  mainland	
  in	
  and	
  out	
  of	
  UBC.	
  	
  Print	
  bus	
  advertising	
  though	
  effective,	
  may	
  not	
  be	
  as	
  efficient	
  as	
  direct	
  on	
  campus	
  print	
  channels	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  usage	
  by	
  other	
  non-­‐UBC	
  students	
  however,	
  presents	
  a	
  great	
  opportunity	
  to	
  reach	
  a	
  great	
  proportion	
  of	
  students	
  of	
  commuter	
  students	
  at	
  a	
  reasonable	
  price.	
  This	
  report	
  recommends	
  the	
  inside	
  bus	
  banners	
  11’’x35’’	
  bus	
  banners	
  that	
  are	
  $25	
  each	
  with	
  a	
  minimum	
  order	
  of	
  50	
  for	
  four	
  weeks.	
  	
   Indoor	
  Advertising	
  “Faces”	
  	
  	
   Indoor	
  advertising	
  “faces”	
  are	
  miniature	
  billboards	
  are	
  strategically	
  placed	
  in	
  captive	
  locations	
  or	
  high	
  volume	
  traffic	
  areas	
  that	
  are	
  specific	
  to	
  the	
  target	
  market.	
  These	
  ads	
  will	
  be	
  specifically	
  placed	
  in	
  areas	
  around	
  campus	
  that	
  are	
  close	
  to	
  purchasing	
  areas	
  to	
  remind	
  consumers	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  purchase	
  choices.	
  Studies	
  show	
  that	
  80%	
  of	
  people	
  find	
  that	
  this	
  channel	
  of	
  communication	
  “generally	
  catch	
  their	
  attention”,	
  79%	
  says	
  that	
  “they	
  usually	
  read	
  their	
  content”	
  and	
  62%	
  say	
  that	
  “it	
  is	
  an	
  interesting	
  way	
  to	
  learn	
  more	
  about	
  products	
  and	
  services	
  available	
  on	
  the	
  market”.	
  These	
  adverting	
  products	
  come	
  in	
  a	
  wide	
  variety	
  of	
  forms	
  with	
  varying	
  effectiveness	
  ranging	
  in	
  size,	
  back	
  lit	
  features,	
  lenticular	
  multi	
  views,	
  luminescent	
  styling,	
  audio	
  additions,	
  post	
  card	
  takeaways	
  and	
  digital	
  boards.	
  Resources	
  for	
  this	
  advertising	
  product	
  is	
  provided	
  by	
  Calgary	
  based	
  advertising	
  agency	
  NewAd,	
  which	
  already	
  has	
  advertising	
  partnerships	
  with	
  UBC.	
  Weekly	
  rate	
  for	
  basic	
  indoor	
  advertising	
  “faces”	
  range	
  from	
  $75	
  per	
  week	
  to	
  $50	
  per	
  week	
  with	
  increasing	
  discounts	
  over	
  time.	
   	
   Mega	
  Banners	
  	
  	
   Mega	
  banners,	
  similar	
  to	
  ad	
  ‘faces’	
  is	
  an	
  effective	
  and	
  very	
  impactful	
  form	
  of	
  communication.	
  Mega	
  banners	
  can	
  be	
  successfully	
  utilized	
  in	
  areas	
  with	
  large	
  rooms	
  with	
  large	
  audiences,	
  ideal	
  for	
  areas	
  like	
  the	
  cafeteria	
  located	
  in	
  the	
  UBC	
  SUB	
  (where	
  there	
  currently	
  mega	
  banners	
  in	
  use)	
  and	
  other	
  areas	
  such	
  as	
  the	
  Totem	
  or	
  Vanier	
  cafeteria.	
  Other	
  areas	
  that	
  are	
  ideal	
  for	
  mega	
  banner	
  use	
  is	
  on	
  the	
  exterior	
  of	
  buildings	
  in	
  a	
  visible	
  area	
  with	
  high	
  traffic,	
  preferably	
  close	
  to	
  a	
  point	
  of	
  purchase.	
  	
   Online	
  Print	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Print	
  media	
  can	
  easily	
  be	
  transferred	
  to	
  banner	
  boards	
  and	
  pop	
  ads	
  in	
  online	
  media.	
  However,	
  due	
  to	
  high	
  costs	
  of	
  ad	
  placement,	
  lack	
  of	
  pinpoint	
  targeting	
  of	
  UBC	
  area,	
  by	
  services	
  such	
  as	
  Google	
  ads,	
  it	
  is	
  not	
  recommended	
  to	
  follow	
  through	
  with	
  a	
  general	
  media	
  campaign.	
  However,	
  if	
  possible,	
  banner	
  ads	
  linking	
  to	
  a	
  splash	
  page	
  for	
  a	
  new	
  UBC	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  page	
  on	
  partner	
  websites	
  such	
  as	
  UBC	
  Sustainability	
  and	
  Student	
  Housing	
  websites	
  could	
  be	
  both	
  a	
  cost	
  and	
  reach	
  effective.	
  	
   Creative	
  Point-­of-­Purchase	
  (POP)	
  Assets	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Creative	
  assets	
  refer	
  to	
  any	
  physical	
  object	
  (not	
  including	
  print	
  media)	
  that	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  to	
  communicate	
  and	
  promote	
  your	
  product.	
  	
  Creative	
  assets	
  have	
  a	
  near	
  infinite	
  range	
  of	
  possibilities	
  for	
  promoting	
  your	
  product	
  such	
  as	
  signs,	
  outdoor	
  stand-­‐up	
  displays,	
  product	
  display	
  booths	
  with	
  video	
  games	
  or	
  more	
  creatively	
  giant	
  blow	
  up	
  coffee	
  cups	
  to	
  promote	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  coffee;	
  the	
  possibilities	
  are	
  endless.	
   	
   26	
   	
  This	
  report	
  will	
  recommend	
  only	
  a	
  few	
  basic	
  creative	
  assets	
  that	
  will	
  be	
  utilized	
  close	
  to	
  or	
  near	
  the	
  point	
  of	
  purchase	
  however,	
  it	
  is	
  encouraged	
  to	
  think	
  of	
  more	
  ideas	
  that	
  will	
  be	
  a	
  good	
  fit	
  for	
  the	
  campaign.	
  	
   POP	
  Asset	
  Food	
  Item	
  Signs	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  should	
  be	
  grouped	
  together	
  when	
  possible	
  and	
  clearly	
  designated	
  as	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  with	
  a	
  large	
  sign	
  accompanied	
  by	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  logo	
  that	
  with	
  ‘trademark’	
  colors.	
  The	
  sign	
  should	
  be	
  large	
  enough	
  to	
  be	
  visible	
  but	
  not	
  over	
  bearing,	
  approximately	
  12’’X	
  4’	
  placed	
  directly	
  at	
  eye	
  level	
  in	
  a	
  visible	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  store.	
  If	
  the	
  products	
  cannot	
  be	
  grouped	
  together,	
  another	
  effective	
  option	
  is	
  designing	
  a	
  miniature	
  billboard	
  style	
  sign	
  (propped	
  by	
  metal	
  or	
  possibly	
  a	
  spring)	
  that	
  will	
  clearly	
  designate	
  the	
  product	
  as	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  with	
  all	
  aforementioned	
  style	
  guidelines	
  followed	
  with	
  exception	
  of	
  size.	
  	
  This	
  measure	
  will	
  assist	
  in	
  reducing	
  the	
  reported	
  lack	
  of	
  seeing	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods	
  on	
  campus	
  and	
  increase	
  the	
  perceived	
  availability	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  on	
  campus.	
  	
   POP	
  Asset	
  Checkout	
  Signs	
  	
  	
   Miniature	
  billboard	
  signs	
  similar	
  to	
  food	
  item	
  signs	
  can	
  be	
  placed	
  at	
  cashier	
  to	
  remind	
  or	
  make	
  consumers	
  aware	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  goods.	
  These	
  signs	
  are	
  strategically	
  placed	
  where	
  consumers	
  make	
  their	
  decision	
  to	
  purchase	
  goods	
  and	
  impulse	
  purchases	
  are	
  stronger.	
  Reminding	
  consumers	
  at	
  this	
  point	
  raises	
  the	
  likelihood	
  of	
  a	
  purchase.	
  	
  	
   POP	
  Asset	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Food	
  Booth	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   A	
  well-­‐placed	
  booth	
  branded	
  with	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  logos,	
  colors	
  and	
  products	
  is	
  an	
  ideal	
  tool	
  for	
  winning	
  customer	
  attention	
  time	
  and	
  increasing	
  the	
  likelihood	
  of	
  a	
  purchase.	
  A	
  booth	
  can	
  be	
  placed	
  by	
  or	
  in	
  the	
  middle	
  of	
  a	
  walking	
  route	
  within	
  a	
  cafeteria	
  or	
  close	
  to	
  the	
  check	
  out	
  with	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  for	
  a	
  quick	
  and	
  easy	
  method	
  of	
  picking	
  up	
  a	
  product.	
  	
   Multimedia	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Multimedia	
  promotions	
  can	
  be	
  notoriously	
  difficult	
  to	
  produce	
  or	
  extremely	
  costly.	
  Therefore,	
  it	
  is	
  clear	
  that	
  TV	
  promotions	
  are	
  not	
  recommended	
  for	
  this	
  campaign.	
  However,	
  there	
  are	
  some	
  cost	
  effective	
  methods	
  of	
  multimedia	
  that	
  can	
  be	
  both	
  easily	
  produced	
  and	
  disseminated.	
  	
   Faculty	
  Televisions	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   With	
  the	
  increasing	
  presence	
  of	
  LED	
  TV’s	
  on	
  campus	
  used	
  as	
  a	
  messaging	
  board,	
  a	
  quick	
  power	
  point	
  or	
  video	
  presentation	
  with	
  interesting	
  and	
  relevant	
  information	
  can	
  reach	
  thousands	
  of	
  target	
  consumers	
  at	
  absolutely	
  no	
  cost.	
  A	
  15	
  second	
  clip	
  shown	
  60	
  times	
  an	
  hour	
  can	
  gather	
  a	
  large	
  number	
  of	
  impressions	
  over	
  a	
  short	
  period	
  of	
  time.	
  However,	
  this	
  method	
  is	
  effective	
  at	
  raising	
  awareness	
  of	
  the	
  product;	
  it	
  is	
  not	
  necessarily	
  effective	
  at	
  driving	
  sales	
  of	
  product.	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   27	
   Event	
  and	
  Experiential	
  Marketing	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Event	
  and	
  experiential	
  marketing	
  is	
  a	
  form	
  of	
  relationship	
  marketing	
  with	
  direct	
  face-­‐to-­‐face	
  consumer	
  contact.	
  People	
  are	
  more	
  inclined	
  to	
  buy	
  a	
  product	
  once	
  they	
  have	
  tried	
  it,	
  touched	
  it,	
  tasted	
  it,	
  or	
  had	
  an	
  overall	
  positive	
  brand	
  experience.	
  According	
  to	
  a	
  study	
  by	
  Target,	
  80%	
  of	
  young	
  buyers	
  stated	
  they	
  were	
  more	
  likely	
  to	
  buy	
  a	
  product	
  if	
  they	
  tried	
  it	
  first.	
  46%	
  of	
  the	
  younger	
  target	
  market	
  also	
  stated	
  that	
  face-­‐to-­‐face	
  interactions	
  during	
  a	
  promotional	
  event	
  	
  helps	
  them	
  develop	
  a	
  more	
  positive	
  image	
  of	
  the	
  brand,	
  which	
  makes	
  consumer’s	
  much	
  more	
  likely	
  to	
  talk	
  about	
  it	
  and	
  create	
  a	
  buzz	
  about	
  the	
  product.	
  	
  This	
  is	
  substantiated	
  by	
  a	
  study	
  by	
  the	
  Event	
  Marketing	
  Institute,	
  which	
  states	
  that	
  78%	
  of	
  people	
  “that	
  engaged	
  in	
  a	
  brand	
  experience’s	
  “impact	
  zone”	
  during	
  a	
  promotional	
  event	
  spoke	
  about	
  the	
  event	
  to	
  4	
  people,	
  on	
  average”.	
  	
   Speaking	
  to	
  friends	
  about	
  the	
  product	
  results	
  in	
  recommendations,	
  which	
  influence	
  buying	
  decisions	
  enormously	
  with	
  “almost	
  all	
  consumers	
  (98%)	
  recommending	
  a	
  brand	
  if	
  they	
  have	
  had	
  a	
  positive	
  brand	
  experience	
  during	
  an	
  experiential	
  marketing	
  campaign.”	
  	
   Sampling	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Sampling	
  is	
  a	
  great	
  way	
  to	
  raise	
  awareness,	
  promote	
  and	
  create	
  a	
  positive	
  brand	
  image	
  of	
  a	
  product.	
  As	
  mentioned	
  above,	
  when	
  consumers	
  are	
  able	
  to	
  try	
  a	
  product	
  they	
  are	
  much	
  more	
  likely	
  to	
  purchase	
  the	
  item.	
  Moreover,	
  if	
  they	
  like	
  the	
  product	
  and	
  they	
  recommend	
  it,	
  you	
  receive	
  word-­‐of-­‐mouth	
  advertising,	
  which	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  effective	
  form	
  of	
  promotional	
  communication	
  for	
  affecting	
  consumer	
  purchasing	
  habits.	
  Sampling	
  can	
  be	
  a	
  low	
  cost	
  effective	
  method	
  for	
  promoting	
  and	
  driving	
  sales	
  of	
  a	
  product.	
  When	
  sampling	
  always	
  be	
  sure	
  to	
  tie	
  in	
  social	
  media	
  and	
  send	
  out	
  update	
  through	
  Twitter,	
  Facebook	
  and	
  other	
  relevant	
  social	
  media	
  outlets	
   	
   Free	
  Giveaway	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Free	
  giveaways	
  can	
  be	
  a	
  form	
  of	
  sampling	
  and/or	
  a	
  great	
  way	
  to	
  draw	
  consumer	
  attention	
  to	
  raise	
  awareness	
  of	
  your	
  product	
  and	
  promote	
  the	
  goods.	
  This	
  method	
  relies	
  heavily	
  on	
  the	
  giveaway	
  and	
  can	
  be	
  modified	
  with	
  different	
  products	
  that	
  are	
  not	
  associated	
  with	
  the	
  good	
  in	
  question,	
  purchase	
  incentives,	
  coupons,	
  contests	
  and	
  many	
  other	
  methods.	
  	
   Contest	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Contests	
  are	
  another	
  cost	
  effective	
  solution	
  to	
  raising	
  awareness	
  and	
  spreading	
  buzz	
  about	
  your	
  product.	
  Used	
  in	
  conjunction	
  with	
  social	
  media,	
  even	
  after	
  the	
  contest	
  is	
  over	
  the	
  residual	
  follow	
  effect	
  of	
  a	
  contest	
  can	
  live	
  on	
  long	
  after	
  the	
  contest.	
  Contests	
  should	
  be	
  worked	
  in	
  conjunction	
  with	
  other	
  promotional	
  strategies	
  and	
  be	
  promoting	
  a	
  specific	
  message	
  for	
  maximum	
  effectiveness.	
  	
  	
  	
   Campaigning	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Campaigning	
  is	
  performed	
  by	
  stationing	
  brand	
  representative	
  in	
  key	
  high	
  traffic	
  locations	
  to	
  solicit	
  information	
  to	
  passersby.	
  This	
  form	
  of	
  experiential	
  marketing	
  is	
  not	
  as	
  effective	
  as	
  the	
  other	
  forms	
  of	
  marketing	
  for	
  turning	
  sales	
  over	
  but	
  can	
  be	
  effective	
  imparting	
  more	
  impactful	
  messages	
  to	
  potential	
  consumers	
  about	
  more	
  complex	
  subjects	
   	
   28	
   such	
  as	
  the	
  economic	
  effects	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade.	
  This	
  method	
  may	
  be	
  useful	
  for	
  improving	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  knowledge	
  on	
  the	
  concept	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade.	
  	
   Guerrilla	
  Marketing	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Guerrilla	
  marketing	
  is	
  a	
  form	
  of	
  unconventional	
  marketing	
  that	
  does	
  not	
  rely	
  on	
  the	
  traditional	
  channels	
  of	
  communication.	
  They	
  are	
  characteristically	
  marked	
  by	
  their	
  unexpectedness,	
  potential	
  interactivity,	
  and	
  in	
  unexpected	
  places	
  for	
  provoking	
  thought	
  to	
  create	
  a	
  buzz,	
  This	
  form	
  of	
  marketing	
  is	
  geared	
  more	
  towards	
  small	
  businesses	
  and	
  utilizes	
  the	
  factor	
  that	
  smaller	
  budget	
  companies	
  are	
  strong	
  in	
  such	
  as	
  time,	
  energy	
  and	
  imagination.	
  The	
  following	
  are	
  some	
  easy	
  recommended	
  examples	
  of	
  Guerrilla	
  marketing,	
  however	
  it	
  is	
  encouraged	
  that	
  other	
  creative	
  ideas	
  are	
  formed	
  within	
  team:	
  	
   Chalking	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Chalking	
  is	
  a	
  cheap	
  and	
  easy	
  solution	
  for	
  communicating	
  your	
  message	
  is	
  more	
  readily	
  accepted	
  on	
  campus	
  relative	
  to	
  other	
  areas	
  in	
  the	
  city.	
  Due	
  to	
  chalk`s	
  ability	
  to	
  be	
  easily	
  washed	
  off,	
  there	
  are	
  no	
  problems	
  with	
  chalking	
  any	
  area	
  around	
  campus.	
  To	
  be	
  most	
  effective,	
  chalk	
  in	
  areas	
  that	
  are	
  high	
  visibility,	
  use	
  large	
  designs,	
  	
  draw	
  in	
  an	
  area	
  that	
  cannot	
  be	
  reached	
  by	
  rain,	
  create	
  intriguing	
  messaging	
  with	
  a	
  call	
  to	
  action,	
  and	
  most	
  importantly,	
  in	
  an	
  area	
  with	
  high	
  traffic	
  volume.	
  	
   Stickers	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Stickers	
  in	
  keeping	
  with	
  the	
  Guerrilla	
  marketing	
  mantra,	
  is	
  cost	
  effective	
  and	
  useful	
  in	
  spreading	
  a	
  message	
  over	
  an	
  area.	
  Stickers	
  with	
  printed	
  messages	
  left	
  in	
  public	
  as	
  a	
  free	
  giveaway	
  is	
  a	
  great	
  way	
  to	
  spread	
  your	
  message	
  organically	
  through	
  your	
  target	
  market.	
  The	
  relative	
  permanency	
  of	
  stickers	
  are	
  also	
  great	
  for	
  long	
  lasting	
  messaging	
  however,	
  this	
  has	
  the	
  potential	
  to	
  cause	
  problems	
  with	
  unintentional	
  stickering	
  by	
  consumers	
  of	
  sensitive	
  areas.	
  	
   Reverse	
  Graffiti	
  	
  	
   Reverse	
  graffiti	
  is	
  an	
  effective	
  method	
  for	
  creating	
  a	
  near	
  permanent	
  out-­‐of-­‐home	
  street	
  advertisement	
  for	
  your	
  product.	
  By	
  creating	
  a	
  simple	
  decal	
  and	
  spraying	
  a	
  pressure	
  washer	
  to	
  ‘clean’	
  the	
  portion	
  of	
  the	
  street,	
  the	
  result	
  is	
  the	
  image	
  of	
  your	
  logo/message	
  ‘cleaned’	
  onto	
  the	
  pavement.	
  	
  	
  	
   Mini	
  Posters	
  along	
  University	
  Boulevard	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
   Mini-­‐posters	
  are	
  a	
  common	
  communication	
  method	
  used	
  in	
  civil	
  elections	
  and	
  UBC	
  club	
  advertising.	
  With	
  2/3	
  of	
  the	
  school	
  population	
  driving	
  into	
  and	
  out	
  of	
  UBC	
  from	
  three	
  main	
  arteries	
  on	
  campus	
  (Marine	
  Drive,	
  University	
  Boulevard,	
  and	
  16th	
  avenue),	
  a	
  poster	
  campaign	
  along	
  these	
  three	
  boulevards	
  with	
  messaging	
  is	
  an	
  effective	
  way	
  to	
  make	
  72,156	
  impressions	
  daily	
  for	
  close	
  to	
  no	
  cost	
  (54,125	
  students	
  x	
  .666	
  x	
  2).	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   29	
   6	
  Recommendations	
  	
  	
   Based	
  on	
  our	
  findings	
  from	
  the	
  survey	
  results	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  additional	
  research,	
  we	
  have	
  come	
  up	
  with	
  a	
  few	
  final	
  recommendations	
  that	
  we	
  think	
  will	
  enable	
  you	
  to	
  increase	
  awareness	
  and	
  purchases	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  at	
  UBC.	
  	
  	
  	
   Student	
  Housing	
  and	
  Hospitality	
  Services	
  	
  	
  	
   Our	
  primary	
  recommendation	
  for	
  the	
  Student	
  Housing	
  and	
  Hospitality	
  Services	
  is	
  to	
  target	
  first	
  year	
  students	
  at	
  UBC	
  with	
  their	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  education	
  and	
  product	
  introductions.	
  First	
  years,	
  of	
  all	
  the	
  market	
  segments	
  that	
  we	
  could	
  find,	
  are	
  the	
  easiest	
  group	
  to	
  communicate	
  with.	
  In	
  addition	
  to	
  that,	
  they	
  have	
  greater	
  motivation	
  to	
  be	
  engaged	
  on	
  campus	
  and	
  will	
  be	
  at	
  UBC	
  for	
  the	
  longest	
  time	
  thus	
  can	
  spend	
  more	
  of	
  their	
  dollars	
  on	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  items	
  offered	
  on	
  campus.	
  Based	
  on	
  this	
  group’s	
  disproportionately	
  large	
  response	
  rates	
  to	
  our	
  primarily	
  newsletter-­‐based	
  survey	
  distribution,	
  we	
  determined	
  that	
  they	
  absorb	
  more	
  information	
  given	
  to	
  them	
  on	
  campus	
  because	
  of	
  their	
  newly	
  arrived	
  status.	
  They	
  can	
  be	
  targeted	
  through	
  communication	
  channels	
  in	
  first	
  year	
  residences	
  where	
  they	
  spend	
  a	
  great	
  deal	
  of	
  their	
  time	
  interacting	
  with	
  others	
  in	
  common	
  areas.	
  Booths	
  and	
  advertising	
  materials	
  for	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  can	
  also	
  be	
  placed	
  in	
  these	
  common	
  areas	
  to	
  reach	
  students	
  that	
  frequent	
  them.	
  Another	
  resource	
  that	
  could	
  be	
  used	
  is	
  residence	
  advisors	
  and	
  residence	
  coordinators.	
  This	
  can	
  be	
  done	
  by	
  putting	
  up	
  advertisements	
  in	
  first	
  years’	
  houses,	
  educating	
  students	
  about	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  and	
  promoting	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  month.	
  Also	
  we	
  found	
  that	
  using	
  newsletters/publications	
  can	
  be	
  advantageous,	
  as	
  we	
  determined	
  that	
  this	
  segment	
  is	
  more	
  likely	
  to	
  read	
  them	
  thoroughly,	
  as	
  seen	
  from	
  the	
  surge	
  of	
  first	
  year	
  respondents	
  from	
  our	
  newsletter	
  distribution.	
  	
  	
   By	
  targeting	
  first	
  years,	
  SHHS	
  will	
  be	
  taking	
  advantage	
  of	
  3-­‐4	
  more	
  years	
  of	
  purchases	
  from	
  these	
  students.	
  Older	
  students	
  at	
  UBC	
  might	
  have	
  slightly	
  higher	
  awareness	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade,	
  but	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  they	
  have	
  much	
  fewer	
  time	
  left	
  to	
  spend	
  at	
  UBC	
  means	
  that	
  they	
  will	
  take	
  their	
  dollars	
  elsewhere	
  shortly.	
  Although	
  growing	
  the	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  market	
  as	
  a	
  whole	
  is	
  one	
  of	
  our	
  objectives,	
  targeting	
  older	
  students	
  will	
  do	
  little	
  to	
  grow	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  on	
  campus.	
  	
  	
   Alma	
  Mater	
  Society	
  	
  	
   Since	
  the	
  AMS	
  owns	
  partial	
  space	
  of	
  the	
  Student	
  Union	
  Building,	
  which	
  we	
  found	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  highest	
  trafficked	
  building	
  at	
  UBC,	
  we	
  suggest	
  using	
  it	
  as	
  the	
  primary	
  resource	
  for	
  attracting	
  customers.	
  	
  Various	
  communication	
  methods	
  can	
  be	
  utilized	
  to	
  promote	
  and	
  increase	
  awareness	
  about	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  available	
  at	
  UBC,	
  such	
  as:	
  mega	
  banners	
  in	
  the	
  SUB,	
  advertising	
  faces,	
  point-­‐of-­‐purchase	
  displays	
  in	
  the	
  Outpost,	
  chalk	
  outside	
  the	
  SUB,	
  and	
  promotional	
  booths	
  in	
  the	
  main	
  concourse	
  of	
  the	
  Student	
  Union	
  Building	
  space.	
  	
  	
  	
   During	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Month,	
  a	
  display	
  booth	
  can	
  be	
  set	
  up	
  in	
  the	
  SUB	
  with	
  information	
  about	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  as	
  a	
  practice,	
  product	
  offerings	
  at	
  UBC,	
  and	
  interactive	
  displays	
  (e.g.	
  discussion	
  board)	
  at	
  the	
  SUB	
  where	
  students	
  can	
  post	
  their	
  thoughts	
  on	
  Fair	
  Trade.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   30	
   UBC	
  Bookstore	
  	
  	
   In	
  the	
  case	
  of	
  the	
  UBC	
  Bookstore,	
  we	
  suggest	
  making	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  displays	
  more	
  prominent	
  by	
  using	
  POP	
  items	
  near	
  registers	
  or	
  on	
  the	
  path	
  to	
  the	
  U-­‐Pass	
  distribution	
  area/carding	
  office.	
  We	
  also	
  believe	
  that	
  by	
  further	
  emphasizing	
  that	
  UBC	
  branded	
  clothing	
  is	
  Fair	
  Labor	
  and	
  by	
  having	
  more	
  prominent	
  signage,	
  will	
  help	
  better	
  respondents’	
  low	
  awareness	
  of	
  clothing	
  at	
  UBC	
  being	
  Fair	
  Trade.	
  In	
  addition,	
  having	
  promotional	
  discounts	
  associated	
  with	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  e.g.	
  buy	
  $50	
  worth	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  and	
  receiving	
  $5	
  off	
  a	
  textbook,	
  could	
  be	
  enforced	
  to	
  further	
  attract	
  students	
  to	
  buying	
  these	
  products.	
  Since	
  profit	
  margins	
  may	
  be	
  smaller	
  on	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products,	
  the	
  discount	
  should	
  be	
  taken	
  off	
  a	
  high	
  profit	
  margin	
  item.	
  	
  	
  	
   We	
  also	
  propose	
  collaborating	
  with	
  the	
  Land	
  and	
  Food	
  Systems	
  faculty,	
  who	
  have	
  the	
  highest	
  awareness,	
  purchase	
  intentions	
  and	
  encounters	
  with	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products.	
  One	
  suggestion	
  is	
  developing	
  a	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Ambassador	
  Program	
  organized	
  by	
  the	
  AMS	
  or	
  Sustainability	
  department.	
  This	
  program	
  will	
  consist	
  of	
  UBC	
  students,	
  and	
  will	
  be	
  aimed	
  at	
  increasing	
  awareness,	
  education	
  and	
  purchase	
  intentions	
  towards	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  throughout	
  UBC	
  and	
  the	
  community.	
  In	
  addition,	
  focusing	
  on	
  the	
  Science	
  and	
  Arts	
  faculties,	
  which	
  had	
  a	
  significantly	
  high	
  awareness	
  yet	
  subsequently	
  low	
  purchase	
  intentions	
  and	
  encounters,	
  could	
  also	
  be	
  targeted.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   31	
   7	
  Metrics	
  	
   In	
  order	
  to	
  continuously	
  measure	
  the	
  success	
  and	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  our	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  recommendations,	
  we	
  have	
  provided	
  various	
  metric	
  methods.	
  	
  	
   The	
  first	
  method	
  involves	
  direct	
  interaction	
  with	
  students	
  at	
  promotional	
  and	
  information	
  booths	
  located	
  around	
  campus,	
  which	
  will	
  provide	
  a	
  qualitative	
  analysis.	
  This	
  is	
  a	
  low	
  cost	
  and	
  quick	
  method	
  with	
  potential	
  for	
  in-­‐depth	
  analysis	
  but	
  with	
  possibility	
  of	
  limited	
  participation,	
  as	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  incentive	
  to	
  participate.	
  This	
  method	
  will	
  provide	
  direct	
  feedback	
  and	
  possible	
  recommendation	
  in	
  regards	
  to	
  the	
  current	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  practices	
  at	
  UBC	
  and	
  the	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  the	
  campaigns.	
  	
  	
   The	
  second	
  method	
  involves	
  a	
  quantitative	
  analysis	
  of	
  sales	
  figures	
  for	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  items	
  throughout	
  the	
  academic	
  year.	
  One	
  use	
  of	
  this	
  analysis	
  is	
  determining	
  if	
  the	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Month	
  provides	
  an	
  increase	
  in	
  sales	
  for	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  using	
  a	
  ‘before	
  and	
  after’	
  bench	
  marking	
  system.	
  	
  	
   The	
  third	
  method	
  involves	
  a	
  quantitative	
  analysis	
  of	
  Facebook,	
  Twitter,	
  and	
  various	
  websites	
  at	
  UBC	
  that	
  has	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  materials.	
  Various	
  tools	
  such	
  as	
  HootSuite,	
  in-­‐house	
  Facebook	
  performance	
  dashboard	
  and	
  Google	
  analytics	
  can	
  provide	
  in-­‐depth	
  and	
  detailed	
  analysis	
  of	
  performance	
  trends.	
  	
  This	
  should	
  measure	
  the	
  effectiveness	
  of	
  our	
  messaging	
  and	
  communication	
  channels	
  throughout	
  the	
  academic	
  year.	
  	
  	
   The	
  final	
  method	
  entails	
  a	
  survey	
  and	
  a	
  focus	
  group	
  study	
  near	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  academic	
  year,	
  which,	
  is	
  similar,	
  if	
  not	
  same	
  survey	
  conducted	
  for	
  this	
  marketing	
  plan.	
  	
  This	
  will	
  determine	
  whether	
  there	
  was	
  an	
  increase	
  in	
  awareness,	
  exposure,	
  correct	
  information	
  in	
  regards	
  to	
  Fair	
  Trade,	
  and	
  willingness	
  to	
  purchase.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   32	
   8	
  Contingency	
  Plan	
  	
   Intense	
  Short-­Term	
  Promotion	
  With	
  Long	
  Term	
  Outlook	
  	
  	
   If	
  our	
  initial	
  efforts	
  do	
  not	
  meet	
  expectations	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  sales,	
  awareness	
  and	
  purchase	
  intentions,	
  we	
  suggest	
  holding	
  more	
  intensive	
  promotions	
  that	
  include	
  discounts/sales	
  on	
  certain	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  products	
  or	
  simply	
  spotlighting	
  a	
  certain	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  around	
  campus.	
  The	
  goal	
  here	
  is	
  to	
  significantly	
  boost	
  short-­‐term	
  sales	
  and	
  subsequently	
  increase	
  long-­‐term	
  awareness	
  and	
  make	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  a	
  serious	
  option	
  in	
  a	
  student’s	
  consideration	
  set	
  when	
  deciding	
  upon	
  a	
  product	
  in	
  a	
  certain	
  category.	
  	
  	
   Increase	
  The	
  Amount	
  of	
  Information	
  Heavy	
  Advertisements	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   If	
  exposure	
  based	
  advertisements	
  such	
  chalking,	
  stickers,	
  reverse	
  graffiti	
  etc,	
  have	
  not	
  been	
  effective	
  in	
  garnering	
  attention	
  and	
  awareness	
  and	
  increasing	
  sales,	
  SHHS,	
  AMS,	
  UBC	
  Sustainability	
  and	
  the	
  UBC	
  Bookstore	
  should	
  opt	
  for	
  more	
  information	
  heavy	
  forms	
  of	
  advertisements.	
  	
  Rather	
  than	
  focusing	
  on	
  eye-­‐catching	
  advertising	
  materials	
  to	
  garner	
  attention,	
  use	
  forms	
  of	
  communication	
  such	
  as:	
  information	
  seminars	
  and	
  guest	
  speakers	
  (e.g.	
  prominent	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  UBC	
  community),	
  that	
  provide	
  a	
  great	
  deal	
  of	
  depth	
  and	
  seek	
  to	
  heavily	
  educate	
  the	
  UBC	
  population	
  	
  	
   Experiment	
  With	
  Placement	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Displays	
  and	
  Information	
  Materials	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   If	
  current	
  placement	
  of	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  product	
  displays	
  and	
  information	
  materials	
  does	
  not	
  translate	
  into	
  the	
  success	
  metrics	
  of	
  awareness	
  and	
  sales,	
  experiment	
  with	
  their	
  placement	
  in	
  other	
  high	
  traffic,	
  high	
  visibility	
  areas	
  of	
  the	
  campus.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   33	
   9	
  Appendix	
   	
   9.1	
  Sources	
   	
  [1]	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Federation.	
  (2008).	
  	
  Interim	
  Report	
  on	
  Fair	
  Trade	
  Trends;	
  FairTrade	
  Canada	
  (2011).	
  	
  Canadian	
  Sales	
  of	
  (Labelled)	
  Fairtrade	
  Certified	
  Products.	
  	
  [2]	
  Renard,	
  M.	
  (2003).	
  	
  Fair	
  Trade:	
  Quality,	
  market	
  and	
  conventions.	
  Journal	
  of	
  Rural	
  Studies,	
   19:87-­‐96.	
  [3]	
  http://www.publicaffairs.ubc.ca/2011/05/05/ubc-­‐named-­‐canada’s-­‐first-­‐fair-­‐trade-­‐campus/	
  [4]	
  UBC	
  Bookstore	
  Website	
  (2011):	
  http://www.bookstore.ubc.ca/home	
  [5]	
  UBC	
  AMS	
  Website	
  (2011):	
  http://www.ams.ubc.ca/	
  [6]	
  UBC	
  Sustainability	
  Website,	
  (2011):	
  http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   34	
   9.2	
  Sample	
  Advertisements	
   	
   	
   35	
   	
   	
   36	
   	
   	
   37	
   9.3	
  Survey	
  Results	
   https://qtrial.qualtrics.com/CP/Report.php?RP=RP_816elHQ3chbu7Uo 	
  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

    

Usage Statistics

Country Views Downloads
United States 4 2
China 2 0
Mexico 1 0
City Views Downloads
Unknown 2 7
Beijing 2 0
Buffalo 1 0
Monterrey 1 0
Ashburn 1 0

{[{ mDataHeader[type] }]} {[{ month[type] }]} {[{ tData[type] }]}

Share

Share to:

Comment

Related Items