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AMS sustainability fund marketing plan Chan, Stephanie; Kazi, Ashar; Kim, Sarah; Ko, Ivy; Lee, Mandy; Salimoff, Salim 2011-12-31

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UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report AMS Sustainability Fund Marketing Plan Stephanie Chan Ashar Kazi Sarah Kim Ivy Ko Mandy Lee Salim Salimoff University of British Columbia COMM 468 2011 Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report”.            AMS SUSTAINABILITY FUND MARKETING PLAN Stephanie Chan Ashar Kazi Sarah Kim Ivy Ko Mandy Lee Salim Salimoff   COMM 468 – SEC 202  1  Table of Contents  Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Situation Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5  Category Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5  Category and Initiative Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5   Providers of Funds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5   The Users of Funds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5   Threat of New Funds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6   Alternative Funding Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6  The World at Large. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6   The Global Economies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6   Social Influences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7   Technological Factors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7  Student Society Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8   Alma Mater Society. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8   AMS Sustainability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8   Competitive Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8  Target Audience Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9   The General Student Population at UBC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9    Primary Target Audience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9    Uninvolved. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10     Academics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10      Coursework. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10      Academic Based Interest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10     Personal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10      Social. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10     Employment. . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11     Athletics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11      Varsity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11       Recreational. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11     Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11      School Wide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11      Interest Specific. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12     Clubs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12      Academics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12      Non-Academics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12   Secondary Target Audiences: The Niche Market. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12     In-Depth Interviews. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13      Fragmented Sustainability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13      Word of Mouth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13      Competition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13      Need for an Advisor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14      Intellectual Property Concern. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14      Corporate Involvement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .14  Goals and Objectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14 2   Core Strategy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15   Recommended Positioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15    Recommended Segmentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16 Recommendations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   16  Get the Ball Rolling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16   Horticulture and Landscaping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   17   “What Will You Think of Next?” Campaign. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17   Handouts during Exam Season. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18   “You are What you Eat” Campaign. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18   Launch Party. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .19  Drip Marketing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19   Email.  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20   Digital Screens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20   Social Media. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20    Facebook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20    Twitter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21  Affiliate Marketing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21   Orientation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21    Imagine UBC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21    First Day of 100-Level Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22   Student Clubs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22    Club Week. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22    Inter-Club Competition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22    Green Dash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23   Faculties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23  Forward Looking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23   Work Study Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  24   Centralized Website. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24   Sustainability Week. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Limitations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24  Survey Findings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24  Benchmarking and Objectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25  Financials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Work Cited. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Appendices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29           3  Executive Summary The Alma Mater Society (AMS) of the University of British Columbia (UBC) prides itself upon being one of the largest student unions in Canada. The AMS distinctly recognizes itself as a separate entity from UBC Administration and proudly presents itself as an independent decision maker in regards to student-related issues. With sincere efforts to establish UBC as a leader in sustainable practices, both entities take measures in their own separate capacities to increase awareness, develop sustainability-oriented programs, and implement sustainability initiatives. Confining our discussion to the AMS as an organization, it should be noted that the AMS has ownership of several operational businesses and the AMS finances a number of initiatives that deal with specific causes. The specific initiative being considered for this marketing plan falls under the responsibility of the AMS Sustainability Office and has been logically referred to as the AMS Sustainability Fund.  This marketing plan is geared towards increasing awareness of this Fund and eventually giving rise to a student movement that revolves around creative thinking and innovative student engagement in regards to sustainability on campus. This document will first outline the general classification of this Fund while defining the category under which it falls. Then, a comprehensive analysis of the environmental factors affecting the Fund will follow. It should be noted that since this Fund is not a conventional consumption product, the situation analysis and discussion of environmental factors will comprise of a specific framework which is carefully designed to mention only the most relevant external factors. The situation analysis will seek to briefly describe fund providers and fund users before discussing the environmental factors at play in the “World at Large.” A “Student Society Analysis” will be provided to better understand the AMS and its different functions. Next, a key deliverable of this project will present itself in the form of target market identification. This section is systematically divided into several parts that elaborate on each identified segment of our primary target audience. In the same section, a brief description of our secondary target audience is also provided along with explanations of how the secondary audience is fundamentally different from the primary audience. Having executed in-depth interviews with students who are keen on instigating sustainability initiatives, there are several suggestions brought forward through these interviews for the purposes of enhancing the quality and completeness of this marketing report.  The main recommendations of the Marketing Team will be listed alongside descriptions of specific strategies and the underlying tactics. The three strategies mentioned in the final section include: “Get-the-ball-rolling,” “Drip Marketing,” and “Affiliate Marketing‟” Each of these strategies have distinct purposes: The first strategy, given its name, focuses on the ways in which the AMS Sustainability Fund can be advertised through primarily unconventional methods that initiate an immediate increase in awareness of the Fund. The strategy of “Drip Marketing” elaborates on how this Fund can provide information to its audience on periodic intervals through different channels. The third strategy of “Affiliate Marketing” relates to the opportunities available to the Fund for cross-promotions and collaboration with different initiatives on campus. The recommendations conclude with a brief discussion of long term goals for the AMS Sustainability Fund. 4  Lastly, this document will outline the limitations of the project. The Marketing Team had to work with several obstacles and the findings were subject to certain restrictions. These matters are brought to the attention of the reader before the closure of this report. All financial aspects of the recommendations are considered and provided along with the specific tactics. This document has pursued the incorporation of many visual and graphical elements that are demonstrated in the appendices; the references used in this document may consist of previous research, in-class lectures, and scholarly articles.     5  Situation Analysis Category Definition Student Initiative Funds (SIFs) are becoming a commonplace on university campuses in Canada. Many prominent universities across the country such as Queen‟s University and the University of Toronto provide SIFs to their student bodies to encourage student participation in competitions, conferences, festivals, and community development projects. Most of these funds share a common goal of providing financial support to promote and enhance student involvement. Currently, a variety of SIFs are made available to UBC students. Some of these funds include the Science Undergraduate Society Student Initiative Fund, Dean Emeritus George F. Curtis Student Endowment Fund, John “Blue” Evans Student Enrichment Fund, and the UBC Global Fund. More specifically, the Alma Mater Society, also known as AMS, is responsible for funds such as the AMS Student Initiative Fund, the Walter Gage Memorial Fund, and the Innovative Projects Fund. Some of these funds encourage applications from the general student body while some are more faculty and cause specific.  Category and Initiative Analysis  Providers of Funds On several occasions, student initiative funds are supported and approved by students through the passing of campus referendums. Fees are then collected from students every year to raise money for these funds. In addition, many SIFs are permanently endowed through gifts from alumni, students, faculty members, and other prominent members of society. In most cases, the providers of funds are either a part of the university or are individuals who are very closely linked to the academic community. With such close ties to the University or the AMS, those individuals have little reason to support another school in funding. The financial contribution remains relatively stable despite the possible fluctuation in the fund amounts due to decreased rates of return, reduced student enrolment, as well as policy changes. According to one account, fewer students may mean more funding: the newspaper article stated that over the next five years, enrolment is expected to decrease by 14,000 students and consequently the average per-pupil funding is expected to increase (Rooney).  The Users of Funds Although projects created with SIFs benefit communities surrounding the school, the main users of SIFs are student themselves. Incentives to apply for SIFs are high because of obvious positive effects through their usage. These incentives may include the satisfaction of applying original ideas into action, giving back to the community, and simply adding to the list of experiences on students‟ resumes. On the other hand, some students may be reluctant to apply for SIFs due to other activities that occur on campus, such as other initiatives and student clubs. This means that students may not be willing to dedicate their time and effort on one activity alone. In our attempts to get a clearer picture of the users of funds, our survey provided some useful insights. According to our survey findings, 32 percent of the respondents stated that they are interested in obtaining funds for a student initiated project. This clearly shows that there is a 6  significantly large level of interest in SIFs. Although certain students have specific interests and are likely to apply for related funds, the majority of the student population has multiple interests. The survey indicates that there is a direct correlation between strong involvement in clubs and events that are not sustainability related and strong interest in initiating a sustainability related project. This leads us to believe that many of these potential applicants for the AMS Sustainability Fund are also interested in initiating and applying for project funds in other disciplines.  Threat of New Funds The establishment of a new SIF poses a threat to existing funds in that they are competing for popularity and the allocation of money and other resources.  However, in order to introduce a new fund, student societies must first determine whether it is financially possible to have this fund, and whether it can meet all the policies and requirements of the school. They must seek donors or endowments to finance the fund. If it is funded by students, then this may require them to cut down on budgets in other operations and increase student fees. They then would have to raise awareness on campus to seek approval from the majority of students. Because establishing a new SIF would require a considerable amount of time, manpower and financial backing, a new SIF being initiated in the university presents a minimal threat. Alternative Funding Sources There are several other alternative sources for funding outside of UBC. The most readily available sustainability-related funds include: The Green Municipal Enabling Fund through the Federation of Canada Municipalities, The Water Sustainability Endowment Fund through the Real Estate Foundation - Vancouver, TD Global Sustainability Fund through TD Canada Trust, Sustainable Food Research Fund from Loblaws Canada, and a large portfolio of annual sustainability-related funds administered by Tides Canada. This is only a short list of the numerous funds available for sustainability-related projects outside of UBC. The number of fund providers is ever-increasing due to the booming relevance of sustainable actions and corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the business community. Other substitutes for SIFs may include grants, bursaries, and loans amongst other means of funding. The monetary amount of these alternative funding sources will largely depend on the nature of the project undertaken, the level of determination to acquire funds and the applicant‟s income level in society.  The World at Large The Global Economies In manufacturing industries all around the world, there is a general trend of moving towards pollution abatement practices (Chapple). Academic relevance of sustainability concepts is ever-increasing and in recent years there has been a great development of economic models relating to environmental sustainability for renewable resources. These concepts include the identification of maximum sustainable yields in forestry and fisheries with the application of the Gordon-Schaefer Model (Munro). Contemporary economics also emphasize the Environmental Kuznets Curve which deals with the concept of marginal damage in a specific environment corresponding to the varying levels of income of a nation (Chapple). 7  There is growing importance of collaboration between nations for successful sustainability attempts, such as the partnership between USA and Canada in regards to sustaining the existence of the Pacific Salmon (Munro). Government authorities are being established to enforce emission standards and taxes in attempts to control pollution damage. Businesses are realizing the value of CSR in relation to sustainable practices: sustainability in business can provide a form of competitive advantage, the role of social networks in CSR projects, and the „triple-bottom-line‟ of sustainable actions where companies consider their impacts on the people, the planet and the profit. In a nutshell, the global economic situation is strongly in favour of a funding system within a campus society that promotes sustainable actions (Javornik and Kaldekerken).  Social Influences With the younger population embedded in such an environmentally conscious society, student societies are actively playing their part in sustainability initiatives. Youth feel a relatively strong affinity to the environmental movement and regard environmental problems as important (Helferty and Clark). For this reason, student fees to promote climate action on campuses have been passed in Quebec at Bishop‟s University, Concordia University, and many others. Similarly, the AMS Sustainability Fund came into place after the Alma Mater Society from UBC was able to get a referendum approval for a fee increase to fund sustainable projects. According to our survey, 91 percent of the respondents answered “agreed” or “strongly agreed” to the statement “I am concerned about the environment.” Although the youth have limited access to decision-making, their social movement towards sustainability is known to work outside the decision-making systems to both critique the status quo and to create their own solutions. Helferty and Clark‟s research has identified five principles of youth involvement in social issues: analyzing power in social relationships, making identity central, promoting systematic change, encouraging collective action, and embracing the youth culture. Some of the common examples of student-led initiatives include: awareness- raising, sustainability assessments and GHG (greenhouse gas) inventories, residence challenges, on-campus retrofits or renewable energy production on campuses, multi-sectored collaborations, faculty-focused programs, policy development and most importantly, in the present case, sustainability funds. (Helferty and Clark). Technological Factors Technologies for pollution abatement, air quality conservation, and minimization of environmental damage can greatly alter the sustainability landscape. New ideas and innovations to existing technologies can motivate current students to apply those ideas and innovations in a realistic project. For example, a common theme among engineering technology addresses carbon dioxide as being one of the main contributors to human-induced global warming - warming that is accelerated by the burning of fossil fuels and deforestation. Monitoring carbon emissions in the atmosphere through modern technology is something that is wide-spread in many Western nations. The significant impacts of new and sustainable technology are being felt throughout several industries. The design and architecture industry can be taken as an example. For this industry, “green building” and “sustainable projects” have been catchphrases for several years; however, sustainability has recently moved from mere talk to real action. Even developers are requesting for the prestigious Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) rating 8  because the certification is recognized and valued in many markets (Tulacz). Because of the importance of sustainable technologies in practice, many educational institutes are competing to excel in this field. The AMS Sustainability Fund can enable current students to apply those technologies that are highly regarded across the world.  Student Society Analysis Alma Mater Society The Alma Mater Society of UBC represents over 44,000 UBC students as well as students at affiliated colleges. Its mission is “to improve the quality of the educational, social, and personal lives of the students of UBC (AMS).” AMS operations include student services, student owned businesses, resource groups, and student clubs. The student union positions itself to be separate from the university administration with regards to decision making. This means that AMS is not legally bound to follow UBC`s administrative decisions. The organization has a proven record of bringing like-minded students together for specific purposes. Student movements in areas such as politics, charities, and sustainability are often instigated under AMS.  AMS Sustainability AMS Sustainability, a division within AMS, commits itself to become a community leader in sustainability, ensuring the ability to serve generations of students to come. The division aims to research environmental best practices to set performance targets for an ever smaller ecological footprint. For example, AMS Sustainability alongside with the Faculty of Land and Food Systems just launched the worm compost project at the Pendulum located in the Student Union Building (SUB). This method of compost has proven to be more efficient than the current waste compost system and to be a source of revenue if the worms were sold. AMS Sustainability partners up with various organizations both on and off campus to initiate various programs aimed to enrich the campus community. Through its initiatives, the division aims to enrich the lives of students through sustainable means and to encourage constant consideration in regards to how one‟s actions impact the environment.      Competitive Analysis Student initiative funds seek the time and effort of students, similar to other activities like academics, employment, varsity athletics, or student clubs. As a result, the competitive landscape for the AMS Sustainability Fund is very large and diversified. It is very easy for these numerous involvement opportunities to steer students away from participating in the AMS Sustainability Fund. The AMS Sustainability Fund is in direct competition with other student initiative funds. If a student has a project idea that is very simple by nature and requires minimal financing, the student may invest his own money. However, if the project is a large undertaking which is beyond the scope of an individual student‟s finances, then the student has to search beyond the means available to him directly. UBC and AMS offers numerous different student initiative funds, which were previously mentioned in the Category Definition section of the report. 9  An example of a direct competitor for the AMS Sustainability Fund is the Shell Engineering Student Fund. This fund targets UBC students in the Faculty of Engineering who form a vital part of our target market for the AMS Sustainability Fund. The AMS Sustainability Fund must compete with the Shell Engineering Student Fund in order to gain more project submissions and commitment from the students. Indirect competitors are all other functions that compete with the AMS Sustainability Fund for students‟ involvement and all alternative funding sources. There are many different ways to get involve within UBC. The AMS alone supports about 300 student clubs that provide opportunities for student involvement, such as the UBC Salsa Club. In addition, other student involvement opportunities may include faculty based clubs and societies, UBC REC, student residences, and the community in general.  Target Audience Analysis The General Student Population at UBC UBC is one of the world's highest ranked public universities. It has continuously been ranked among the top 40 institutes in the world.  Currently, there are a total of 37,944 part time and full time undergraduate students and 9,638 part time and full time graduate students enrolled in its 11 faculties. The four biggest faculties in terms of student enrolment are Arts, Science, Commerce, and Applied Sciences. Within the student population, 88 percent of the student population are from within Canada while the remaining 12 percent come from 155 different countries around the world. This makes UBC one of the most culturally diverse universities in North America. Primary Target Audience The primary target audience, the general student population of UBC, is the focal point of our marketing plan. The large and culturally diverse student population at UBC is comprised of many separate groups; thus, the primary segment is divided into different segments based on behavioural, psychographic, and demographic aspects.   Our survey results indicate that student involvement in UBC affiliated activities such as clubs, events, and athletic activities is lowest among first and second year students. Over 91 percent of first year students and 81 percent of second year students have never or only sporadically participated in AMS events and clubs. These students are relatively new to the school and have yet to form a strong association with any particular club or group. In comparison, upper year students appear to be more fragmented in their academic and social pursuits. Since first and second year students also  have a longer time commitment on campus, our segmentation and marketing initiatives would chiefly focus on freshmen and sophomores. The biggest distinction that segregates UBC students into different segments is their involvement or lack of involvement in clubs, events, and activities within the UBC community.  According to our survey findings, approximately 70 percent of the student population have never attended or only sporadically participated in clubs, events, and activities within the UBC community. The remaining 30 percent of the student population claim to regularly attend or even take a leadership role in extracurricular activities in the UBC community. 10  The goal of segmentation is to identify the different groups of similar students on campus, to prioritize the groups to address, and to create the best marketing initiatives to penetrate the different segments. In the sections that follow, we have identified several segments and sub- segments AMS Sustainability Fund should focus its marketing efforts on. Uninvolved  Those that are not involved in extracurricular activities in the UBC community are generally less aware of campus initiatives such as Speakeasy, AMS Safety, Sexual Harassment Fund, and Ubyssey. We can assume that these students are drawn to other things other than extracurricular activities and are less susceptible to the traditional print based marketing methods that other UBC related events or initiatives often use. Our team identified that academics and other personal reasons are likely the driving forces behind the lack of involvement Academics Coursework As one of the highest ranked universities in the world, UBC is known for its challenging coursework and gruelling grading schemes. Many students find little time for involvement in extracurricular activities while juggling a full course load. This is especially true for first and second year students that are still trying to adjust to the rigorous requirements of post-secondary courses. According to the UBC Engineering website, first year students take as many seven courses and its subsequent lab sessions in a single semester. These academically focused students are usually extremely concerned about their grade point average and often spend long hours in the school‟s libraries. Academic Based Interest Some students are extremely passionate about their chosen field of study. As a result, they have very little time remaining for extracurricular activities. They often spend long hours trying to refine and increase their knowledge in the subject area. Although these students often perform extremely well academically in their chosen field of study, their motivation for spending long hours refining their knowledge is often not motivated by grades alone. Their dedication to the subject area is often motivated by passion and personal interest. These students often connect with their professors and other students that are interested in their chosen field of studies. Some of these students even participate in self-directed coursework relating to their studies. Many of these students are also interested in interdisciplinary research and are likely to pursue additional education in their field. Personal Social There are various personal reasons that would prevent a student from participating in extracurricular activities. From our observations, spontaneous social activities seem to be a driver which prevents participation in more organized social activities. Many students are well connected to the campus through more personal relationships. These students often engage in private social gatherings and enjoy socializing with their peers. Although these students do not have any formal ties to organized social outlets on campus, their broad social networks often allow them to stay connected regardless. These students tend to be social media savvy and use websites such as Facebook to stay connected with those in their network. 11  Employment Many UBC students engage in employment on or off campus. Many of these students work part-time during the school year to finance their education and gain experience to build their careers in the future. UBC also offers many on-campus jobs and career development opportunities for its students. Some of these programs include Work Study and CO-OP programs. Some students work as little as four hours a week while others work almost full time. As a result, many students are time stricken and have minimal leisure time to engage in other activities on campus. They often only come to campus for academic purposes and leave as soon as classes are over. Involved According to our survey, students that are involved in extracurricular activities within UBC are more likely to stay current with campus related information. We also found a strong relationship between students who are interested in, or participated in, volunteering, unpaid internships, leadership, or started a student club and their awareness of AMS Sustainability. However, awareness or interest for the program often does not equate to usage or participation. Although it is unrealistic to expect those that are already involved in school activities to abandon their previous commitments and transfer their interest solely to the AMS Sustainability Fund, it is important to reach out and market the AMS Sustainability Fund as another way to get involved. Our team identified that athletics, clubs, and events are the three major sources of student participation in the UBC community. Athletics  Varsity UBC currently has 23 varsity sports teams. Due to the competitive nature of these teams, the athletes often have to go through rigorous training throughout the year. Some students in extremely competitive sports, such as basketball, train as many as three or four times a week. Although many of these students have little time left for other involvement, they are well connected to the school and frequent the school‟s athletic facilities, such as the Student Recreational Centre (SRC). Recreational UBC REC provides generous subsidies to students participating in leisure sports. There are approximately 11 recreational sports leagues in UBC. Moreover, UBC REC also offers a variety of classes ranging from salsa dancing to taekwondo to students at discounted prices. Students that are involved in recreational athletic activities are often more likely to participate in other school wide events. Events  School Wide A variety of events occur throughout the UBC campus on a daily basis. Most of the smaller scale events are created by student clubs to raise awareness of their particular interest to the general UBC population. Large scale events are usually hosted by AMS, UBC REC, or a certain branch of UBC. Some well-known large scale events that can be found on campus include Storm the Wall, First Week, and Imagine Day. As many as 6,000 students participate in these large scale events. 12  Interest Specific There is a wide range of interest specific events available to UBC students. These events include seminars, conferences, and special speaker series. They are often smaller in scale than school wide events. The student participants of these interest specific events are also more likely to share an interest in the specific knowledge presented in the event. These events are often hosted by individual faculties and student clubs. Regardless of their specific interest, the students that participate in these events are more likely to be involved in student clubs. These students are also more likely to pay attention to school related information and printed material on campus. Clubs  Academics Student associations of each faculty often provide support to clubs that focus on its subject area. Some examples of academic-related clubs include the UBC Marketing Association and the Mechanical Engineering Club. Each of these clubs attract a niche following and often host information sessions and invite speakers for its members. The students that participate in these clubs are often looking to enhance their understanding in their field of study and gain insight to career options in the future. Non-Academics There are currently about 300 clubs that are registered under AMS. The majority of these clubs are non-academic and interest based. Some of these clubs include the UBC Dance Horizons and the UBC Anime Club.  They often act as an outlet for students with the same interests to gather and exchange ideas. Many of these groups are also socially focused such as the sororities and fraternities on campus. However, those that are involve in these clubs are often participants of other events on campus as these clubs often participate in school wide events as a team. Secondary Target Audience: The Niche Market The secondary target audience generally consists of students from the Faculty of Land and Food Systems, Forestry or Engineering. They are mostly senior students in their third or fourth year, with a more established vision about their career interest in the field of sustainability. They are academically involved in sustainability. There is also a non-academic group of students who pursue sustainability due to their passion towards sustainable causes and genuine wish to make a difference in the community. They are involved through sustainable club memberships across campus in various faculties and by providing their support in different capacities. Revealed through our interviews with selected sustainability-oriented students, a majority of them are passionate about the future of our environment and humanity. Since the students interviewed are appropriately classified as our secondary target audience, some commonalities amongst these individuals allow us to provide a more focused description of this audience. These students have the belief that their education, time and effort are making a difference in the world. Their efforts are aimed directly at contributing towards the betterment of the entire community and brightening the future of our planet. Their studies and constant conversations regarding sustainability concerns lead them to believe that they need to take immediate action. These students believe that through their sustainable initiatives, they are providing a solution for the sustainability problems at hand. These individuals look at their sustainable ideas and efforts as a 13  direct launching pad for their future endeavours and rely on their efforts to provide them with a career path in the field of sustainability. It should be noted that this target audience is fundamentally a subset of the primary target audience which encompasses all students attending UBC. Our analysis identifies these environmentally concerned, entrepreneurial and “keen” students as a separate group because they are more likely to be active in project creations and submissions for the AMS Sustainability Fund. To reiterate our survey findings, there is a strong relationship between whether students have an interest and/or participate in various extracurricular activities and their awareness of AMS Sustainability. This proves our theory that sustainability „keeners‟ would automatically be attracted when a general/awareness generation campaign is launched.  In regards to their overall feeling towards the sustainability movement at UBC, the students believe sustainability needs to be at the forefront and be talked about more. They look at sustainability as an integrated problem that encompasses and affects many other problems and not a stand-alone problem. It has been frequently stated by the interviewees that they view sustainability as having far more economical, social, political and environmental impact than what the general public is aware off. To answer this problem, they believe UBC and AMS need to integrate all these concerns under one umbrella and demonstrate how sustainability is an integrated problem that encompasses other fields. Some suggestions from selected members of the secondary target audience are given below In-Depth Interviews and Suggestions  Fragmented Sustainability The students indicated that the UBC administration is far more complex than they anticipated. This level of complexity, along with the fragmented sustainability initiatives at UBC, results in roadblocks in the social movement when it comes to the execution of their ideas, or simply seeking funding for their ideas. As one interviewee brilliantly puts it, “how can you effect change, if change cannot take place with firm bureaucracy?” (Interview with A. Willock, February 11th, 2011).  Frustration towards the decentralized sustainability effort on campus was obvious throughout the interviews. Many showed interest in a single centralized website which lists all of the funds available for sustainable initiatives, and their respective requirements.  Word of Mouth Word of mouth is the key avenue to seeking funds for project. Most students rely on their interactions with fellow peers and instructors to explore funding avenues  Competition The key take away from our in person interviews with students involved in sustainable initiatives is the fact that the level of competition is very high for funding. In essence, there are too many initiative and ideas looking for financial support. Many are rejected, translating to the fact that the AMS Sustainability Fund should not be concerned with the amount of project submissions. The major concern would potentially emerge in the selection and allocation process of projects, rather than not having enough submissions. 14  Need for an Advisor  The general feedback was that the application and selection process should have an advisor that provides recommendations on how to improve one‟s application while applying to seek funding. An interviewee stated that “an advisor can make you feel stronger about your application and increase your chances of getting the funding.” The main concern was that in some cases (i.e. Global Lounge Fund), the applications are very strict (maximum of 50 words per answer), which proves to be a challenge for the individual or group seeking funding.  Intellectual Property Concern Students raised concern over the possibility of AMS or UBC having intellectual property rights to their ideas and initiatives. They strictly expressed that under the condition that their intellectual property is taken away from them, they would rather explore other alternative avenues for funding, even if it meant more effort to secure the funds. The reasoning was such that these ideas and initiatives could become their future career and their success rests on their ability to take their ideas and apply it beyond their years of education at UBC. “I am doing what I do for the better good of everyone, however at the end of the day this is my future and lively hood will come from my ideas” (interview with K. McMahen, February 10th, 2011). Corporate Involvement If UBC or AMS was to ever seek funding for the AMS Sustainability Fund from corporations such as Home Depot, Rona, or other companies, students believe that all the decision making processes should lie with the student body. Corporation should not be allowed to direct their own future interests in student initiatives and education (interview with J. Baker- French, February 11th, 2011).   Goals and Objectives Our main objective is to raise awareness of the AMS Sustainability Fund amongst the general student population in UBC. This includes all undergraduate and graduate students. In the first year of launching the fund, we estimate 50 percent of the UBC student population to have general awareness about the AMS Sustainability Fund. General awareness is achieved when students have heard about and has become aware of the AMS Sustainability Fund. Assuming that the current level of awareness for the AMS Sustainability Fund is less than 5 percent, since the fund has yet to be officially launched, 50 percent awareness may seem daunting. However, according to our survey data, we found that the current awareness level of AMS Sustainability is at 56 percent (Appendix C). Therefore, an awareness level of 50 percent for the fund by the end of the first year is reasonable and achievable.  Another key measure of success would be to have 25 percent of the student population to have in-depth awareness about the fund. In-depth awareness is achieved when students know important details about the fund. This may include knowledge such as what the fund entails, who provides the funds, and how to submit project ideas. In terms of project submissions, our goal is to have at least one hundred quality applications by the end of the first year. A quality application implies that the project idea meets 15  the basic criteria for submissions set by AMS Sustainability. During our in-person interviews, an interviewee stated that they often receive up to 30 sustainability-related project submissions a month. As a result, we deemed that the goal of 100 quality applications is a good starting point for the new AMS Sustainability Fund. Any number above 100 submissions during the first year would be a clear mark of success for the fund. A survey should be conducted at the end of the first year in order to measure the awareness level and to pinpoint successes and opportunities. Although we expect the bulk of the project submissions to come from the secondary target audience, it is important to embed the concept of the AMS Sustainability Fund in the earlier stages of UBC students‟ undergraduate journey. Our goal is to eventually transform initial brand awareness and interest of the AMS Sustainability Fund to participation and submission of sustainability-related projects around campus.  Core Strategy Recommended Positioning With over 300 clubs on the UBC campus, there are plenty of opportunities for student involvement. Although 91 percent of the students surveyed claimed to care about the environment, interest often does not translate into action. It is unrealistic to convert a student that has only a mild or a regular interest in sustainability to become an enthusiast in sustainability who eventually submits a project. However, general brand awareness and knowledge of the AMS Sustainability Fund would establish the Fund as an outlet for participation or funding for projects in the future. Unlike other initiatives on campus, we recommend that the AMS Sustainability Fund should take a proactive approach to encourage student involvement.  Most of the sustainability initiatives on campus often only market or encourage participation from a niche group of students. As a result, only students that already have a keen interest in sustainability related topics would participate. Since the AMS Sustainability Fund is financed by the students, it is very important that every student on campus to have equal access to the Fund. Moreover, our survey findings show that there is a strong relationship between awareness of AMS Sustainability and how concerned someone is about the environment. The group that seems to be most concerned about the environment (agree and strongly agree) is most likely to be aware of AMS Sustainability. This shows that „keeners‟, the group that is most concerned about sustainability, will likely seek out opportunities to participate in sustainability related projects without being specifically marketed to.  Our team is confident that by focusing our main marketing effort on creating brand awareness for the general UBC population, it will be the best way to differentiate the UBC Sustainability Fund from other sustainability related initiatives on campus. Unlike the marketing effort of other student initiative funds and sustainability initiatives on campus, the AMS Sustainability Fund should position itself as an action packed and energetic initiative created by the students for the students. Since the Fund is financed by the student population, they should be proud that they are contributing to the sustainable future of UBC. As a result, they should take initiative and their participation to the next level. The Fund should be regarded as an initiative that encourages all levels of participation from different groups around campus. It should also empower students to take the challenge and get involved in whatever way possible. Our team believes that involvement in the Fund does not necessary mean project submissions but rather 16  awareness. The AMS Sustainability Fund should help create a culture of involvement and awareness for sustainability on campus.  Recommended Segmentation The AMS Sustainability Fund is open to UBC students in any year level including graduate students. However, it is most financially feasible to focus our marketing effort towards first and second year students that are currently not involved in the UBC community. This group of students is by far the biggest segment in the UBC community. These students are relatively new to the school and have yet to form strong associations with any particular club or group. Therefore, these students often are more willing to explore new opportunities and have a longer time frame to do so. Our survey also indicates that freshmen and sophomores are more susceptible toward UBC related information and messages as this group is more likely to stay current with UBC related news and information with more than one source.  Large, common classes such as ECON 101 and orientation activities such as Imagine also makes reaching this group easier than upper years and graduate students which are more fragmented. The longer time frame first and second year students have in the school also helps make this group of students more attractive in a marketing perspective. Although our team further classified students in this segment into smaller sub segments based on their reasons for not getting involved, our analysis shows that students in these sub segments behaved in a similar manner. Moreover, since the factors we are using to categorize the student population are not mutually exclusive, it is almost impossible to pinpoint and categorize a student into a single segment. Although we do have marketing strategies that focus specifically to those that are involved, we feel our marketing strategies that focus on those that are uninvolved should be a priority. It is important to embed the idea of the AMS Sustainability Fund early on in a students‟ academic career. Creating strategies to focus on uninvolved freshmen and sophomores will likely expose the entire UBC student population to multiple AMS Sustainability Fund marketing initiatives and increase the likelihood of embedding the idea of the Fund in the student population.  Recommendations As the AMS Sustainability Fund aims to encourage student participation in campus sustainability-related initiatives, we recommend the AMS Sustainability Fund to change its name to AMS Sustainability Challenge. The word “challenge” will inherently encourage active student involvement. By including a verb in the name itself, it subconsciously induces action, energy, and enthusiasm – all of which is the objective of the fund. Although the clients have informally agreed to this recommendation, we will continue to refer to the AMS Sustainability Fund with its original name for the sake of consistency in this report. Please refer to Appendix I for the financial breakdown off the initiatives listed below. Get the Ball Rolling  This marketing strategy is primarily concerned with ensuring that the AMS Sustainability Fund creates some immediate movement in the community. The tactics that fall under this 17  strategy are geared towards instigating a momentum relating to the sustainable movement. With the measures being recommended in this section, the students that have very recently become a part of UBC will be exposed to the sustainability emphasis on campus; those students who are returning to school in the new academic year will experience AMS Sustainability‟s initiatives in a new light. The main material discussed here will include experiential and guerrilla marketing tactics. Horticulture and Landscaping In order to refrain from using conventional advertising methods involving highly unsustainable practices, we recommend the application of ornamental horticulture on a patch of grass outside the SUB. Instead of plastering the campus bulletin boards with posters that hypocritically encourage students to be sustainable, such an approach to non-conventional advertising will likely appeal to many amongst the student population who do not pay much attention to bulletin boards. Our survey indicated that only 35% of students pay attention to bulletin boards on campus. This horticulture campaign can become a source of word-of-mouth advertising for the Fund, and the survey research indicates that 73% of students obtain new information through word-of-mouth informational transfer. Creative designs on the grass outside the SUB will immediately grab the attention of onlookers. We propose a simple depiction of our recommended AMS Sustainability Fund logo (Appendix E). An ideal location for such a creative and environmentally sound advert would be the „grassy knoll‟ outside the SUB. With the uniqueness of the advertising idea and the perfect location, this specific tactic could become the focal point of several campus conversations as students walk past that area in large numbers. This campaign can be an attractive method to target the entire student population in a non-conventional way. Application of horticulture and landscaping techniques to depict messages has been historically applied in few cases. Their size can greatly depend on their purpose: sometimes such activities are undertaken on massive scales, possibly involving a large plot of farmland crafted in a giant advertisement meant to be seen by airline passengers; other times, such adverts may be applied to only a single square foot of land for a very selective audience. The general size of the AMS Sustainability Fund advert will eventually determine the cost of this venture. After inquiries from representatives at the BC Landscaping and Nursery Association, it has been verified that this tactic is a definite possibility and it may be executable at a cost ranging between $200-$500, depending on the size and complexity of the work (BCLNA). “What Will You Think of Next?” Campaign The objective of the “What Will You Think of Next?” campaign is to instigate students to brainstorm new sustainable ideas and apply for the fund to make it a reality. We recommend that the slogan be put on all current and future AMS Sustainability tangible projects such as the AMS Lighter Footprint Strategy water system located in the SUB. The slogan will simply read “What Will You Think of Next?” and under it, in smaller print, “Apply for the AMS Sustainability Fund.” An example can be seen in Appendix F. In addition, to increase the exposure of this campaign, recycling bins or other tangible sustainable instruments should be strategically placed around the campus with the “What Will You Think of Next?” slogan. This campaign can also be integrated online once AMS Sustainability establishes a Facebook and Twitter account. For instance, on Twitter, AMS Sustainability can tweet about a 18  sustainable project and end the post with the “What Will You Think of Next?” slogan. By having these short posts on Facebook and Twitter, students will be better informed of the different sustainability initiatives occurring around campus and they will also be able to interact with AMS Sustainability by posting comments and “@” tweets. Although the campaign itself is fairly simple, it has the potential to be very effective. Not only will it increase awareness of the fund, but it will get the students who read the words “What Will You Think of Next?” to stop and think of the possibilities the fund could provide them and how they could impact the community with their sustainable ideas. Handouts during Exam Season In order to target those students who are uninvolved with school activities due to academic reasons, we recommend handing out cookies, candy, or pens in campus libraries during exam seasons. The item that is being handed out will have the AMS Sustainability Fund logo on it as well as its website address. Many students tend to have their laptops when studying in the library. Curious students will be able to easily access the AMS Sustainability Fund website for more information while they take a break and enjoy their candy.  These free handouts can reach hundreds of students at a very low cost and effort. For cookies and candy, they would have to be wrapped with the AMS Sustainability Fund label on it. The actual cost of cookies ranges depending on what ingredients are used (Cho et al. 15). Given the sticker label pricing found on Juke Box Online Print Shop website, 250 coloured labels would cost approximately 88 dollars. With the given information, we recommend AMS Sustainability Fund to hand out 250 labeled cookies. On the other hand, engraved promotional bamboo click pen prices range from 1.37 to 1.73 dollars each (including processing fee) depending on the amount ordered. We recommend AMS Sustainability Fund to order 2500 or more bamboo click pens because of the piece discount and high likelihood of using these low- cost items for prizes and promotional initiatives. Overall, the handouts can successfully reach about 300 students with a budget of 470 to 650 dollars. In terms of effort, the AMS Sustainability representative will simply have to go around the library and give students these handouts while saying good luck on their exams. “You are What You Eat” Campaign  Our team proposes to leverage the line of local, organic, and vegan (LOV) food items at the SUB to cross promote the AMS Sustainability Fund.  An AMS Sustainability Fund food item of the month should be created, featured, and aggressively promoted each month. The general student body, even those that are uninvolved in the UBC community because of their busy academic or personal agenda, visit the SUB for food consumption. This makes associating the AMS Sustainability Fund with food items the ideal way to market to people in this segment. A total of eight in-season food items would be created, one for each month of the academic year. The food item should appeal to the palate of the general student population and shy away from overly innovative creations. Some possible food items are vegetarian pizzas at Pie R Square and a UBC apple pie at Blue Chip Cookies.   The food item should be placed in a prominent location in the food outlet and have special signage to attract consumers. In order to be consistent with the brand image of the AMS Sustainability Fund, the sign should be in the line of “Challenge Yourself to Be Sustainable, Buy 19  the AMS Sustainability Fund Special”.  A small sticker with information on the Fund would also be placed on the food item to differentiate it from the other food items and to promote the AMS Sustainability Fund. Another method to encourage the purchase of the special item and sustainable behaviour is to give generous discounts to those that bring their own containers to purchase the item. The cost to implement this marketing initiative would be minimal. The majority of the cost would be associated with creating signage and stickers to highlight the food item. We estimate sticker logos will cost about 312 dollars for branding 2500 food items. With all the printing expense included, we estimate that the eight month campaign would cost about 500 dollars.  Launch Party Our team proposes to generate campus wide awareness of the AMS Sustainability Fund by hosting a launch party on campus. The purpose of the launch party is to introduce and reinforce the idea of the AMS Sustainability Fund to the student population that would otherwise not learn about the Fund in a fun and casual way. The party is expected to generate publicity for the Fund and create buzz among the general student population around campus. We propose that the launch party take place in the spring to celebrate the selection and accomplishments of the project submissions. The launch party should take place in the Pit Pub and be advertised as a great night of music, dancing, and affordable alcohol. Discretion is to be taken when designing the advertisements as some students believe that parties that relate to seemingly academic initiatives are boring and thus do not participate. We do not want this negative social stigma to turn students away, therefore, design and execution of advertisements is crucial. The advertisement materials have the challenge of simultaneously informing the student population about the Fund and promising a night of partying and fun. The party will take after the format of a normal Pit Night. A great way to differentiate the launch from normal Pit nights is to offer discounts on beverages to students who wears something green. Moreover, a specialty drink, such as an AMS Sustainability Fund green shot, should be made available at discount prices. A casual launch party that is open to the student population will be consistent with the AMS Sustainability Fund‟s brand image as something that encourages student participation and involvement Since the Pit Pub is owned by the AMS, the financial burden of the launch party will be greatly reduced. The event should be advertised around the Student Union Building (SUB), on Twitter, Facebook, and possibly digital screens around the school. Hosting an event can be very costly; however, if the launch party is to happen at the Pit Pub the cost of the event would be estimated at $500 to cover the cost of advertising, giveaways, and party operations.    Drip Marketing  With drip marketing, we intend to provide useful and relevant information to selected audiences on a consistent periodic fashion. Some of the ways in which information can be sent out with different time intervals may include emails to a list of subscribed individuals, Facebook and Twitter updates for an informed presence on social media, and periodic advertisements on digital screens installed in numerous buildings across the UBC campus. 20  Email With 91 percent of survey respondents indicating that they are concerned about sustainability, and 86 percent indicating email as their main avenue of communication with UBC and AMS, we believe that a periodic email with regards to sustainability initiatives in UBC will capture the attention of the students. These emails will not only serve as a reminder of sustainability initiatives on campus but they can also include a description of new projects that have recently been approved for funding. Additionally, the periodic emails can include information about the progress of currently sponsored projects, how exactly AMS Sustainability is making a difference, as well as information for students regarding news related to the AMS Sustainability Fund.  Digital Screens Digital screens used for advertisements can be found in many buildings across the campus, such as in the SUB, the UBC Bookstore, and the Henry Angus building. Although this form of drip marketing will not allow for a detailed exposure of the AMS Sustainability Fund, it may serve as a lucrative platform to advertise the brand of the Fund. In the adverts, the words “AMS Sustainability Fund” with an accompanying logo and a conveniently locatable website will serve as a mechanism to increase awareness levels of this initiative. Such continuous reinforcements through digital mediums across campus are sure to have a positive impact on brand awareness levels. These small contests are intended to integrate the four different channels of communication and help increase the AMS Sustainability Fund‟s presence online. It is a great way to increase the attention of students and raise awareness of the fund for a small price. Possible list of prizes for the contests can be found in Appendix G. Social Media According to our survey, 63 percent of those surveyed use social media to obtain up to date information regarding programs, activities, and opportunities within the UBC community.  The relatively low cost, interactivity and accessibility of Twitter and Facebook makes them excellent vehicles to promote and communicate information to both the primary and secondary target audience. Facebook The AMS Sustainability Fund should create a Facebook group to deliver information and encourage interaction between users. This can be done through periodic status updates and by posting news relating to the Fund on the wall. The secondary target audience, those that are interested in applying for the Fund would likely join the Facebook group to stay current with the communication. However, it is unlikely that someone with limited knowledge or interest of the Fund would become a member of the Facebook group. In order to increase its reach and harness the full potential of the Facebook group, we recommend the creation of an AMS Sustainability Fund Facebook photo contest. The contest should be advertised on the AMS Sustainability Fund Facebook page as well as other popular UBC specific Facebook pages. The contest requires participants to take a photo of themselves doing something sustainable around campus and use it as their display picture in addition to posting it on the AMS Sustainability Fund Facebook page. The participant that gets the most amount of “likes” for his picture would win a prize. This 21  would likely create buzz and make more people on campus aware of the AMS Sustainability Fund.  A Facebook contest is an excellent way to reach those that are uninvolved due to social reasons as people in this segment are often social media savvy. Twitter Twitter is another form of social media that is popular among UBC students. Currently, there are more than 1,800 followers for UBC Sustainability. From this information, we can interpret that many sustainability orientated students in UBC are interested in obtaining sustainability related information from Twitter. AMS Sustainability should create a Twitter account and try to attract as many followers as possible. News relating to the AMS Sustainability Fund would be uploaded and tweeted from the account. Logically, AMS Sustainability should start by following other UBC sustainability related groups and offer value to those in specific Twitter communities. This should increase awareness of the AMS Sustainability Fund and attract those that are sustainability minded to follow its feeds. In order to increase the awareness level for the AMS Sustainability Fund and expand its number of followers, we recommend the AMS Sustainability Fund to host a Twitter contest. The AMS Sustainability Fund should offer a chance for followers to win a prize by advertising the Twitter contest on digital screen ads, its Twitter feeds, and Facebook. A possible Twitter contest could be to have secret codes or key words on the digital screen ads. In order to win a prize, students must be a follower on Twitter and they must tweet the key word to AMS Sustainability to be entered into the draw. The participant must also tweet about the contest to his followers. Ideally the key word would contain some information regarding the AMS Sustainability Fund. This way, all the followers of the person retweeting the contest message would be able to learn about the Challenge and possibly even become a follower and spread the message further. A twitter contest is an ideal way to reach those that are otherwise uninvolved in extracurricular activities and would not otherwise learn about the AMS Sustainability Fund.     Affiliate Marketing  Since establishing and increasing awareness of the AMS Sustainability Fund will likely provide some interesting opportunities of cross-promotions with other movements on campus, several tactics that utilize various unique affiliations and partnerships are grouped together in this strategy.  Orientation Orientation provides the perfect platform for mass communication with the student population. A majority of the students who attend orientation are new students with little to no awareness of various campus initiatives. These individuals are thus the most susceptible to marketing efforts. Imagine UBC A vast majority of first year student attends Imagine UBC and/or their faculty Frosh at the beginning of each school year. Free promotional items, such as mugs and tote bags, has been handed out in previous years by UBC Sustainability to conserve the use of plastic bottles and plastic bags. We suggest AMS Sustainability to partner up with UBC Sustainability and add the AMS Sustainability Fund logo on the free merchandise. These items are likely to be utilized by 22  the students and with the AMS Sustainability Fund logo on it, the items can act as tools for reinforcing and reminding students about the initiative. The additional cost of incorporating the logo onto the UBC merchandise is unavailable as we do not have access to UBC financial information. However, we assume that adding the additional graphic to the logo print process should have minimal impact on budgeted UBC merchandising costs. First Day of 100-Level Courses We recommend the AMS Sustainability Fund to utilize the first day of classes as an avenue of communication. First day of classes usually have full student attendance and thus increase the probability of message awareness. Representatives of the AMS Sustainability Fund should attend various first-level, faculty required courses to inform the students about the Fund. These representatives should be passionate about sustainability and knowledgeable about the Fund. The AMS Sustainability Fund committee must partner up with faculty staff to schedule these in-class presentations. The visits do not require any financial expenses but require sufficient planning and timely execution.  A non-exhaustive list of first year mandatory courses in selected faculties is outlined in Appendix H Based on these faculties, we recommend AMS Sustainability Fund to assign representatives to Math 100, English 112, and Econ 101 classes – given time constraints, these courses are top priority because they are the most common across the faculties and thus increase audience reach. Student Clubs The advantage of affiliating with students clubs is that there is a higher chance of attracting the attention of groups as opposed to single individuals due to social psychology such as group think. It is important to establish and maintain contact with student clubs‟ presidents so as to increase effectiveness of various marketing initiatives aimed at club members. The liaison between the AMS Sustainability Fund committee and the student clubs should be a member that is passionate about sustainability and eager to promote the initiatives set forth by the organization. Various joint-events can be designed with the student clubs such as hosting conferences and workshops tailored specifically to the club members‟ interests and bundling sustainability- oriented speakers into the program. Club Week AMS Sustainability Fund is a brand new and therefore must present itself officially not only to the student population, but in the student club community as well. It is thus essential that the AMS Sustainability Fund committee participate in Club Week to promote itself. By setting up a booth, not only can the AMS Sustainability Fund representatives interact directly with the student population to provide information, but also screen and recruit volunteers that are readily available and interested in the organization. These volunteers are essential to ensure that the operations of the committee run smoothly and effectively through the year. Inter-Club Competition Members of the student clubs are also our target audience, so to appeal to their sense of club pride and provide incentive for club involvement in sustainability awareness, a club versus club contest can be hosted. 23  Clubs are to form their own representative teams and introduce an innovative sustainability-related project idea to a panel of judges. Based on a set of evaluation criteria, each submission is scored by the judges and the team that produced the highest ranked idea is declared the winner. Clubs can enter into the contest by submitting a fee. The collected fees from all participants are pooled together and the club that wins first place in the contest receives all the cash in the pool. This event not only serves as public relations for the AMS Sustainability Fund, but it also allows the organization to get access to new and free ideas. This is a low-cost event; the submission fees collected is the prize. AMS Sustainability Fund may want to consider giving contestants supplementary prizes to acknowledge their participation - cost of these additional prizes can be found in Appendices G. Clubs not only benefit from the prizes, but they are also given the opportunity to market themselves as sustainable organizations to the student population. Winners of the contest also have the possibility to get their project funded by the AMS Sustainability Fund. Although inter-club contests are designed to appeal to student clubs, other group such as fraternities, sororities, and residence houses are welcome to join. Green Dash Green Dash is a fun, interactive event that is similar to a photo scavenger hunt. Clubs and major campus groups (fraternities and residences) form their own teams to take part in a day of roaming on campus to take digital pictures related to a topic. For instance, teams may be required to use their digital camera to take pictures of a campus initiative designed to promote sustainable practices, such as the CIRS building. This is meant to be a sustainable and environmentally friendly event in itself because people are not removing anything from the environment nor creating waste. This is also a great opportunity for students to be involved in the community and raise awareness about the AMS Sustainability Fund. The teams that submit their entries in the fastest time win a prize.  The financial costs associated with this event depend on what prizes are offered. Please refer to Appendix G for prize suggestions. Faculties There are courses addressing different aspects of sustainability in every field of every faculty. We recommend AMS Sustainability Fund to partner up with professors who teach sustainability-related courses to help promote the fund. Because sustainable projects are most likely mandatory in these courses, professors can encourage students to integrate sustainability into their academics by informing them about the opportunity to apply for the fund. This is a great way to tie the AMS Sustainability Fund with academic programs on campus, and a valuable opportunity for students to see their project ideas shape into reality.  Forward Looking The strategies proposed in this report aims to promote initial awareness of the AMS Sustainability Fund; the tactics are designed to capture the attention of the general UBC student population and promote the utilization of a new avenue where students are given the option to actively participate in a social movement gaining enormous momentum in society. With the implementation of the recommended short-run strategies to increase awareness, the benefits of accessible student funding for sustainability-related projects will quickly manifest among excited students into an epidemic campus movement towards sustainable practices.  24  We see the AMS Sustainability Fund as an influential leader who will propel UBC to the forefront of campus sustainability. With inevitable success, even though it may be beyond the scope of our report, we propose three marketing recommendations for the AMS Sustainability Fund committee to consider. These future long-run strategies aim to reinforce the strong sustainability-oriented student culture and to ensure the overall social movement is amplified throughout the campus. Work Study Program We assume that the success of the AMS Sustainability Fund initiative would result in more funds being directed to the program. With an increase in funds, it may be worthwhile for the committee to offer work study programs to students. Employed students would then be able to get first-hand experience in sustainability-related jobs. This program not only encourages students to consider careers in sustainability, but also gives the opportunity for students who are not involved in campus initiatives due to employment to be involved while still receiving an income. The actual financial costs of offering a work study program depends on the amount of funds available,  the number of students hired, and the future cost of living. Centralized Website A centralized website listing all the sustainability-oriented initiatives available in UBC should also be launched. As mentioned in our secondary target market analysis, some students feel that the overall sustainability efforts on campus are saturated. By creating a centralized website with all sustainability-related information readily available - much like other Eastern Canadian universities - students can access information that would otherwise be scattered or non- existent.  The AMS Sustainability Fund would technically be accessible by members of all the listed clubs and initiatives on the website; therefore, the Fund committee would benefit from cross-promoting itself to and with these organizations.  Not only would the website update and inform students about the various sustainability initiatives, but also it will portray UBC as a united entity in its quest in developing a sustainable campus community.  Sustainability Week To further unite the collective efforts of various campus sustainable initiatives and clubs, we propose Sustainability Week to be hosted. Sustainable clubs and initiatives can market themselves to the general student population. By hosting this event and associating with other sustainability clubs, the AMS Sustainability Fund may be perceived by the student population as an authority among the sustainable student clubs. This perception validates the fund as the go-to for financing sustainability projects, which in turn translates into higher volumes of quality submissions. As AMS already has access to facilities and props necessary to host club showcases, little to no financial expense would be incurred. However, a lot of prior planning and inter-club communications and logistics must be done in advance to ensure smooth execution.   Limitations  Survey Findings Due to limited resources and the relatively short timeline, our team was not able to survey enough students on campus to make our survey statistically significant. However, we obtained a secondary source of survey findings. The survey we obtained our information from was done by 25  a professional marketing firm for the UBC Sustainability Office. The findings in that survey supported our own findings. As a result, we are confident that our recommendations base on the survey is accurate. Benchmarking and Objectives The AMS Sustainability Fund is a brand new initiative with no past data. As a result, the goal and objectives set forth by our team is solely based on the data from survey and interview findings. Financials Most of our team‟s recommendations have to do with partnering with other clubs, faculties, or existing events. Moreover, some of our recommendations require the use of AMS owned facilities, resources, or venues. Since it is a possibility that the fund would have access to some of AMS‟s resources such as the use of an in-house graphic designer, it is difficult to determine the exact cost of the different recommendations. However, we were aware of the financial constraints and based our recommendations on what would be feasible for a 3,000 to 5,000 dollars marketing project. In Appendix J, we included a timeline that prioritize the different recommendations we are putting forth. The priority of the recommendations is based on financial commitment and the number of people the initiative would most likely reach.   26     Work Cited  “About the BCLNA.” BC Landscape and Nursery Association. Web. 11 Apr 2011.  <http://www.bclna.com>.  "AMS Lighter Footprint Strategy." UBC Alma Mater Society. Web. 11 Feb. 2011.   <http://www.ams.ubc.ca/campus-life/ams-sustainability/ams-lighter-footprint-strategy/>.  “AMS/UBC Innovative Projects Fund Policy.” AMS UBC, Feb. 2007. Web. 2 Apr. 2011.              <http://www.ams.ubc.ca/wpcontent/uploads/2010/08/IPF_Revised_Policy_-                  _Feb_07_KK.pdf>.  Anjali Helferty, Amelia Clarke, (2009) "Student-led campus climate change initiatives in     Canada", International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Vol. 10 Iss: 3, p.287 – 300. Retrieved 29 Mar. 2011.            <http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=1800784&show=abstract>.  "Annual Reports." Sustainability Office. University of Toronto. Web. 27 Mar. 2011. <http://sustainability.utoronto.ca/reports/annual.htm>.  Chapple, Clive. Class Lecture. Economics of the Environment. University of British  Columbia, Vancouver, BC  Cho, Hyun Nho., Choi, Shirley, Choi, Tony, Chondro, Yulietta, Chua, Janelle, Chuang,  Eric, Chui, Michelle, and Ng, Ho Yee. (2009). “Exploring ways to lighten the ecological footprint of Blue Chip Cookies.” UBC. 2009. Web. 11 Apr. 2011.  Christou, Costas & Haliasos, Michael, (2006) “How do students finance human capital   accumulation?:The choice between borrowing and work”, Journal of Policy  Modeling, Vol. 28, Iss: 1, p.39 –51. Retrieved 4 Apr. 2011 <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V82-  4H16KWT1&_user    =1022551&_coverDate=01%2F31%2F2006&_rdoc=1&_f  mt=high&_orig=gateway&_origin=gateway&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_  acct=C000050484&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1022551&md5=aa7d8e  bbebcedb617aef396e412fae7e&searchtype=a>.  "Clubs." UBC Alma Mater Society. Web. 5 Apr. 2011.   <http://www.ams.ubc.ca/campus-life/clubs/>.   “CopyRight."UBC Alma Mater Society. UBC AMS. Web. 5 Apr. 2011.  <http://www.ams.ubc.ca/businesses/copyright/>.  “Courses.” UBC Sustainability. UBC Sustainability. Web. 27 Mar. 2011.  <http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/teaching-learning/curriculum/courses>.  27  "Energy & Resource Management Fund." Sustainabilty Office. University of Toronto. Web. 27 Mar. 2011. <http://sustainability.utoronto.ca/projects/fund.htm>.  “Exploring and Exemplifying Sustainability.” UBC‟s Sustainability Academic Strategy.  Web.11 Apr. 2011.          <http://www.ams.ubc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/SAS-Final-Report-Oct-17- 2009.pdf>.  Fennerty, Herbert, (2006) “Standards, Technology and Sustainability”. Environmentalist,   26(2), p.95 – 101.  Retrieved 10 Apr. 2011. <http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?Ver=1&Exp=03- 302016&FMT=7&DID=  1049420421& RQT=309>.  "Financial Statements of The Alma Mater Society of Queen's University Incorporated." The Alma Mater Society of Queen's University. Queen's University, June 2009. Web. 27 Mar. 2011. <http://www.myams.org/images/2009-04-30%20alma%20mater%20society%20fs%20- %20audited%20statements.pdf>.  Food and Beverage. UBC Alma Mater Society. Web. 6 Apr. 2011.  <http://www.ams.ubc.ca/campus-life/ams-sustainability/what-we-are-doing/food-and- beverage/>.  Guimaraes, Carolina, and Liksa Richer. "Walking Veggies and Fruits in the SUB???"  Sustainability Television. 7 Oct. 2008. Web. 1 Apr. 2011.          <http://www.sustainabilitytelevision.com/news/327>.  "Impacts." UBC Food System Project. UBC Food Systems. Web. 6 Apr. 2011.  <http://blogs.landfood.ubc.ca/foodsystemproject/impacts/>.  “Information Package.” UBC Annual giving Phone Programs. Web. 10 Apr. 2011.   <http://www.supporting.ubc.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/Info-Packet-Jan-2011.pdf>.  Javornik, A., & van Kaldekerken, I., (2010) “LSF 2010 - Lugano Sustainability Forum  2010: Competitive advantage when going sustainable”, Zeitschrift für q Wirtschafts- und Unternehmensethik, 11(1), p.82 – 86. Retrieved 10 Apr. 2011. <http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=2185714831&sid=1&Fmt=6&clientId=6993&RQ T=3    09&VName=PQD&cfc=1>.  Munro, Gordon. Class Lecture. Economics of Renewable Resources. University of  British Columbia, Vancouver, BC  “Our Alma Mater: AMS Strategic Framework”, (2008) Feb. Retrieved 29 Mar. 2011 So http://www.ams.ubc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Strategic-Framework-  _updated-Feb-23-2008_-_2_.pdf>.  28  "Promotions Guidelines | Facebook." Welcome to Facebook - Promotion Guidelines. 1   Dec. 2010. Web. 16 Mar. 2011.   <http://www.facebook.com/promotions_guidelines.php>.  “Price List.” Juke Box Online Print Shop. Web. 11 Apr. 2011.  <http://www.jukeboxprint.com/colour_stickers.php>.  Rooney, Carole, (2009) “Fewer students, more funding”.100 Mile House Free Press,  A.11.  Russell, Tony, Allen Brizee, and Elizabeth Angeli. "MLA Formatting and Style Guide."  The Purdue OWL. Purdue U Writing Lab, 4 Apr. 2010. Web. 20 July 2010.  Students - Planning & Institutional Research (PAIR), UBC. Welcome - Planning & Institutional Research (PAIR), UBC. 2009. Web. 5 Apr. 2011.                 <http://www.pair.ubc.ca/statistics/students/students.htm>.  Sustainability Office. The Alma Mater Society of Queen's University. Queen's University.  Web. 27 Mar. 2011.   <http://www.myams.org/society/offices/sc>.  Tulacz, Gary J., (2007) Engineering News-Record: June 25th, Vol. 258 Iss: 23, p.9 – 9, 1.  Retrieved 3 Apr. 2011.          <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=96b12124-c9aa-490e-9f24- 899052c47bc8%40sessionmgr10&vid=1&hid=24&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ %3d%3d#db=bth&AN =25764160>.  "UBC Engineering : First-year Students." UBC Engineering : Welcome. Web. 6 Apr.  2011.   <http://www.engineering.ubc.ca/current_students/undergraduate/first_year/index.php>.  UBC REC Leagues. UBC REC. Web. 11 Apr. 2011.  <http://www.rec.ubc.ca/leagues.cfm>.  UBC SEEDS Program. UBC Sustainability. Web. 10 Apr. 2011.     <http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/seeds>.  “Writing Instruments.” Imagen. Web. 11 Apr. 2011.  <http://www.imagengreen.com/>.  Yeun, Vinnie. "“Refresh, Rethink, Renew” Event Raises Awareness for Sustainability."  Sustainability Television. 29 Jan. 2010. Web. 1 Apr. 2011.  <http://www.sustainabilitytelevision.com/news/1385>.   29  Appendix A AMS Sustainability Fund Survey  This short survey will give the AMS a better understanding of how the student body feels about sustainability and sustainability related projects around campus. The AMS is proposing to start a student initiative fund on campus as an outlet for student engagement in sustainability projects. The fund is intended to help develop a culture of sustainability at UBC. This survey will provide crucial information to help make the sustainability fund a reality. Please complete this survey to help us create an environment where students can convert ideas for sustainability into reality.   The survey should take less than five minutes to complete.    What is your gender? Male  Female   Are you a current UBC student? Yes No   Do you reside within a 10 km radius of campus? Yes No   Which faculties are you currently enrolled in? Commerce  Arts  Science  Engineering  Human Kinetics  Land and Food System  Others    Does your faculty offer the opportunity for students to participate in direct studies or student directed projects for credits? Yes  No  Not Sure     30  What year of your program are you currently in? 1st year  2nd year  3rd year  4th year  Others  Grad Student  PhD. Student   Where would you obtain up to date information regarding programs, activities, opportunities etc. within the UBC community?  [Please check all that apply] Student newspapers  Bulletin boards around campus  Posters around campus  UBC radio  E-mails  Social Media [Facebook, Twitter, Blogs etc.]  Word of mouth   Others    How do you stay current with UBC news and information? [Please check all that apply] SSC  E-mails from UBC  E-mails from your faculty  Word of mouth  Student newspapers  Others    31  My Involvement    Never Sporadic Attendance Regular Attendance Leadership Role I participate in AMS sponsored clubs/events       I participate in clubs/events sponsored by my faculty       I participate in clubs/events/activities within the UBC community [excluding the above]        Activities   I have no interest I have an interest I have an interest and participated Volunteering    Unpaid internship     Leader of a student club     Start a club/event     Which of the following campus initiatives are you aware of?    Not Aware Aware Participation Speakeasy      Sexual Assault Support Center      AMS Safety Coordinator Office      Innovative Project Fund     Ubyssey Publication      Student Legal Fund       Have you ever worked on or completed a student-initiated project? Ex. community initiatives, entrepreneurship etc. Yes No  What kind of student-initiated project did you worked on or completed?  32   Are you interested in obtaining funds for a student-initiated project? Yes No   Where and how would you attempt to seek funding for a student-initiated project?   I am concern about the environment. Strongly disagree  Disagree  Neither Agree nor Disagree  Agree  Strongly Agree   Is sustainability a popular concept/integrated part of your field of study? Yes No   Have you heard of AMS Sustainability? No Yes   Environment    Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree/ Done So in the Past I support those that participate in sustainability related projects       I am willing to participate in a sustainability related project       I am interested in initiating a sustainability related project within UBC       I am interested in initiating a sustainability related project outside of UBC         33    Are you aware of any channels [club, courses, projects etc.] that you can participate in sustainability-related activities?  Yes No   Please name all the channels that you are aware of.   Have you taken part in a sustainability-related project in the past? Yes No   Through which organization did you participate in a sustainability-related project?   Thank you for doing the survey.                 34  Appendix B Survey method We used a combination approach to obtain results for our survey. Our team conducted a total of 200 surveys in all. 120 of those surveys were conducted in person while the remainder of the surveys was distributed on-line through e-mails and Facebook. All of the survey findings were entered in to Qualtrics, a market research program, for analysis purposes. In order to control the survey findings for consistency and, surveys that were not 100% completed and surveys completed by non-UBC students were excluded from our analysis. A total of 182 surveys were included in our analysis.  Face to face interviews Our team conducted the face to face interview in various locations around campus. These locations include the SUB, and the Irving K Barbra Learning Center. These locations were selected to ensure the sample size contained students in various year levels and faculties.  On-line Survey In order to obtain a realistic representation of the student population, our team focused on distributing the surveys to people outside our normal circle of friends. Team members enlisted the help of his or her contacts in faculties outside of Sauder to distribute the surveys to students in their faculty. As a result we were able to obtain a more accurate portrayal of the student populations.            35  Appendix C Survey Findings “I am concern about the environment.”   “Are you interested in obtaining funds for a student-initiated project?”   0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Strongly Agree Agree Neither Agree or Disagree Disagree Strongly Disagree 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Yes No36  “My Participation”   # Answer  Response % 1 Student newspapers  37 28% 2 Bulletin boards around campus  46 35% 3 Posters around campus  74 56% 4 UBC radio  4 3% 5 E-mails  113 86% 6 Social Media [Facebook, Twitter, Blogs etc.]  82 63% 7 Word of mouth  96 73% 8 Others  8 6%        0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Never Sporadic Attendance Regualr Attendance Leadership Role I participate in clubs/events/activities within the UBC community (excluding above) I participate in clubs/events sponsor by my faculty I participate in AMS sponsored clubs/events37  Appendix D Target Audience Segmentation  Secondary Target Audience     Primary Involved Clubs Academics Non Academics Events School  Wide Interest Athletics Recreational Varsity Not Involved Academics Course Work Interest Personal Social Employment 38  Appendix E Logo Suggestions               39  Appendix F “What Will You Think of Next?” Campaign                40  Appendix G Prize Suggestions    Estimated Cost   Prize per Unit Comments Gift card to food places $15.00    Gift card to UBC Bookstore $30.00    Free 1 year U-Pass $95.00    Cookies $0.61  average cost ($0.76 and $0.46) AMS UBC Bamboo Pens $1.37  min order of 2500, not including processing fee AMS UBC Reusable Water Bottles $4.00  min order of 500 with logo                  41  Appendix H Mandatory First Year Courses Science CHEM 121, 123, 113 PHYS 101, 102, 107, 108 BIOL 111 (for students without credit for high school biology) or one lecture course in ASTR, BIOL, EOSC, or GEOB (for students with credit for high school biology) MATH 100 (or equivalent) Engineering APSC 122 APSC 150 APSC 160 CHEM 154 ENGL 112 MATH 100 MATH 101 MATH 152 PHYS 153 PHYS 170 Commerce COMM 292 COMM 293 COMM 299 ECON 101 ECON 102 MATH 104¹ MATH 184 ENGL 112² ENGL 120² ENGL 121²  Forestry               Forest Science ENGL 100-level BIOL 111*1, 121, and 140 CHEM 111 and 113 or 121 and 123 MATH 100 and 101 or MATH 102 and 103*2 FRST 100 (3) or CONS 101 (1) APBI 200               Natural Resource Conservation BIOL 111*1, 121 CONS 101 ECON 101 and 102 ENGL 100-level MATH 100, 102, 104, 110, 180, 184, or 190*2 42  GEOB 102 and GEOB 103 APBI 200 Forest Resources Management Major (Specialization in integrated resource management)             APBI 200 ENGL 100 BIOL 111 and 1211 CHEM 121 (111) or PHYS 101 (100)2 ECON 101 FRST 100                         FRST 2323 MATH 100 or 102 or 104 or 1904 FOPR 162 immediately preceding second year 2 Forest Resources Management Major (specialization in community and aboriginal forestry) ENGL 100 BIOL 111 and 1211 CHEM 121 (111) or PHYS 101 (100)2 ECON 101 FRST 100 MATH 100 or 102 or 104 or 1904 FOPR 162 immediately preceding second year 2               Forest Resources Management Major (specialization in international forestry) ENGL 100 BIOL 1111 and 121 CHEM 111 or 121 or PHYS 100 or 1012 ECON 101 MATH 100 or 102 or 104 or 1903 FRST 100 FRST 2324 3 APBI 200 3 Total Credits 33/34 FOPR 162                   Forest Operations Major APBI 200 ENGL 100 BIOL 111, 1212 ECON 101 MATH 1003 MATH 101 FRST 100 FRST 231 FRST 232 PHYS 170 FOPR 162 immediately preceding second year 2  Land and Food Systems Undergraduate Degree Requirements               Dietetics major ENGL 112 43  BIOL 112, 121, 140, 200, and 201 CHEM 111/113 or 121/123, and CHEM 205/233 or 203/204 AGSC 2501; AGSC 2522 FNH 2001 and 250 Social Science1 (6 credits; e.g., PSYC 100, SOCI 100).           Food market analysis major             LFS 100 ENGL 112 BIOL 112/121 BIOL 140 CHEM 121/123 (111/113)1 MATH 102/103 ECON 101/102               Food science major                         LFS 100 ENGL 112 BIOL 112/121 BIOL 140 CHEM 121/123 (111/113)1 MATH 102/103 ECON 101 PHYS 101               Food, Nutrition, and Health major                          LFS 100                         ENGL 112 BIOL 112/121 BIOL 140 CHEM 121/123 (111/113)1 MATH 102/103               Nutritional sciences major                         LFS 100 ENGL 112 BIOL 112 BIOL 121 BIOL 140 CHEM 121/123 (111/113)1 MATH 102 MATH 103 ECON 101             Agroecology AGSC 100 ENGL 112 BIOL 112/121 BIOL 140 CHEM 121/123 (111/113)1 MATH 102/103 or equivalent2 44  Bachelor of Science in Global Resource Systems LFS 100 BIOL 111/112 or 121 CHEM 121 (111)1 ECON 101 ENGL 100-level2 MATH 100, 102, 104, 110, 180, or 1844                                   45  Appendix I  Budget Breakdown  Strategies Tactics Budgeted Cost Get the Ball Rolling Launch Party $500    Horticulture and Landscaping $200 - $500   "You Are What You Eat" Campaign $500    "What Will You Think of Next?" Campaign $400    Handouts during Exam Season $470 - $650       Drip Marketing Email -   Social Media                   Facebook $50                  Twitter $50                  Digital Screens -       Affiliate Marketing Orientation                   IMAGINE UBC -                 First day of 100-Level Core Classes -   Student Clubs                   Inter-Club Competition $100                  Green Dash $100                  Clubs Week $150    Faculties -         Total $2520 - $3000              Appendix J 46   Implementation Timeline               

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