UBC Undergraduate Research

Harvest Hut Waste Redirection Site Baysheva, Anastasia; Bragagnini, Daniel; Elliot, Thomas; Forrest, Chris; Nocos, Adrian; Yii, Elliot 2010

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
Harvest%20Hut%20Waste%20Redirection%20Site.pdf [ 2.76MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 1.0108289.json
JSON-LD: 1.0108289+ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 1.0108289.xml
RDF/JSON: 1.0108289+rdf.json
Turtle: 1.0108289+rdf-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 1.0108289+rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 1.0108289 +original-record.json
Full Text
1.0108289.txt
Citation
1.0108289.ris

Full Text

UBC Social, Ecological, Economic Development Studies (SEEDS)   Student Report  Harvest Hut Waste Redirection Site Anastasia Baysheva, Daniel Bragagnini, Thomas Elliot, Chris Forrest, Adrian Nocos, Elliot Yii University of British Columbia Civil Engineering I – CIVL 201 November 22nd, 2010  Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report.”  Page | i       TABLE OF CONTENTS  TABLE OF CONTENTS…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…..ii  LIST OF TABLES...............................................................................................................................iv  1.0 INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................................1  1.1 Purpose and Outline.....................................................................................................1  1.2 Plan of Action................................................................................................................1  1.3 Team Members.............................................................................................................1  2.0 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION BACKGROUND..........................................................................2  2.1 Structure.......................................................................................................................2  2.2 Vision and Mission........................................................................................................2  2.3 Organizational Contacts................................................................................................3  3.0 SCOPE STATEMENT FOR THE PROJECT.....................................................................................4  3.1 Goals and Objectives....................................................................................................4  3.2 Constrains.....................................................................................................................4  3.3 Assumptions.................................................................................................................5  4.0 THREE CONCEPTUAL DESIGNS..................................................................................................6  4.1 Design One....................................................................................................................6  4.2 Design Two....................................................................................................................7  4.3 Design Three.................................................................................................................7  5.0 DECISION MAKING PROCESS....................................................................................................8  Page | ii     6.0   7.0 DESIGN MODIFICATION..........................................................................................................10  8.0 DETAILED DESIGN…………………………………………........................................................................11  8.1 Final Design Description..............................................................................................11  8.2 Material Estimates......................................................................................................12  9.0 ACTIVITY SCHEDULE................................................................................................................13  9.1 Material Acquisition....................................................................................................13  9.2 Three Day Schedule....................................................................................................13  9.2.1 Day One.....................................................................................................13  9.2.2 Day Two....................................................................................................14  9.2.3 Day Three..................................................................................................14  10.0  11.0  ROLES AND  RESPONSIBILITIES.........................................................................................15  10.1  The Organization (UBC Farm)...............................................................................15   10.2  The Team..............................................................................................................16   10.3  The Members........................................................................................................16   RISK ASSESSMENT.............................................................................................................18  11.1  Safety Risks...........................................................................................................18   11.2  Odour Risks...........................................................................................................18   APPENDIX A: LIST OF FIGURES………………………………………………………………………………………………….20  APPENDIX B: HAND SKETCHES OF CONCEPTUAL DESIGNS……………………………………………………….22  APPENDIX C: FINAL DESIGN PLAN ………….……………………………………………….……………………………….24  APPENDIX D: FINAL DESIGN VIEWS………………………………………………………….………………………………25 Page | iii     LIST OF TABLES    Table 1. Criteria met by the three conceptual designs...................................................................6  Table 2. Decision‐Making Matrix....................................................................................................8  Table 3. Cost of Materials…………………………………………………………………………………………………………12  Table 4. Delegation of roles and responsibilities for term two construction...............................17                         Page | iv     1.0 INTRODUCTION  1.1 Purpose and Outline  This document presents a detailed description and plan for the construction of the Harvest Hut  Waste Redirection Site project. The report consists of background information on UBC Farm,  scope statement for the project, three conceptual designs developed by the team, description  of the decision making process, final design modifications, detailed design, construction  schedule, roles and responsibilities of the team members, and risk assessment.   1.2 Plan of Action  After approval and finalization of all details, construction of the new site will be undertaken by  second year UBC Civil Engineering students. The project will be completed in three days during  the second semester, while keeping costs within a pre‐estimated budget.  1.3 Team Members  The members of the group and their main roles are:   Anastasia Baysheva – Team Coordinator   Christopher Forrest – Designer and Formatter   Daniel Bragagnini – Record Keeper and Editor   Elliot Yii – Contact Person with the Organization   Rommel Adrian Nocos – Designer and Final Editor   Thomas Elliott – Designer and Construction Specialist   Page | 1         2.0 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION BACKGROUND  2.1 Structure  UBC Farm is 24 hectares big and is located on the South Campus of the University of British  Columbia in Vancouver. It is a student‐driven model farm and is mainly used for research and  learning purposes by different faculties in UBC, which include the departments of Botany,  Forest Sciences, the Botanical Gardens, and the Faculty of Land and Food Systems. The farm  site applies the research and innovation of the students to maintain the land and produce food  with sustainable methods.  UBC Farm is managed by the UBC Farm Advisory Committee, which includes faculty, staff and  students. However, countless volunteers and interns are what make UBC farm functional. UBC  Farm’s vision is to utilize its research and innovation on agro‐ecological design to create a  positive influence on the economics and ecology of urban communities.   2.2 Vision and Mission  UBC Farm Advisory Committee has a set of objectives and goals they want to accomplish. These  objectives include validating UBC Farm as a significant part of the university, promoting student  participation concerning the operation of the farm, and getting involved with the community by  promoting sustainability. Moreover, one of the main goals of UBC Farm is to transform itself  into a sustainable enterprise. This includes implementing a management system and  developing farm programs that allow the people in UBC Farm to practice sustainability. This  Page | 2      also means establishing the farm as a viable initiative. To help them get to this goal, two  Agriculture Science students came up with the idea of a market garden on the farm site in 2001.  UBC Farm approved this idea and the students were allowed to put the project into operation.  In its first five years, the Farm Market flourished, demonstrating an eightfold increase in  cultivation capacity. However, during those years, the Farm Market struggled financially. It had  to depend on grants, wage subsidies and help from volunteers to achieve a state of financial  sustainability. Now the Farm Market has improved financially and cultivates countless varieties  of vegetables, fruits and herbs. The UBC Farm Market operates every Saturday during the  growing season, which is from June to late October. The produce on sale is always organic and  fresh, meaning it is harvested the day of the market or the day before. Most of the market  produce is grown by the UBC Farm staff.   2.3 Organizational Contacts    Andrew Rushmere – Academic Coordinator   Brenda Sawada – UBC SEEDS Manager   Kayla McIntyre – Market Manager     Page | 3      3.0 SCOPE STATEMENT FOR THE PROJECT  3.1 Goals and Objectives  The goal of the project is to design and build a feasible and effective waste redirection site at  UBC Farm for main use during the Farm Market. Another goal is to increase public awareness of  recycling, composting, and other sustainable waste management practices at UBC Farm. The  idea is to construct an aesthetically pleasing, weather and rodent‐proof structure to manage  the waste sorting. The structure is to house garbage and compost cans as well as recycling bins  for paper and other recyclable material, that are located around the pole in the Harvest Hut  area (view APPENDIX A, Figures 1 and 2). It should allow UBC Waste Management staff and UBC  Farm staff to easily remove waste from the containers, at the same time preventing waste from  contamination, rain leakage and odour problems. The structure is ideally portable and cheap.  Thus, the main project objectives are functionality, low cost and visually appealing design. The  structure should clearly indicate the type of waste thrown in each container, making the sorting  process easier. It also serves to increase safety and hygiene of the Farm Market.  3.1 Constrains  The project constraints met during the design process consist of weather, rodents, material  selection, size of the containers and specific Waste Management design criteria, as discussed  below.  •  The weather factor implies the need for having an inclined roof, so that rain and   snow do not collect on top of the containers.  Page | 4      •  Squirrels, mice and other rodents often carry infections and may cause many   problems. They should be prevented from getting into containers. Therefore, a closed  structure is potentially more durable and safe than an open one.  •  Low price is one of the project objectives, and materials have to be selected   carefully. The team was given access to the UBC Farm Tool Shed and the South Campus  Warehouse. Materials available at the UBC Farm include lumber, hardware, metal  scraps, livestock panels, and other assorted materials.   •  Size of the containers is essential for the design and construction of the project, as   the structure has to fit in the containers and remain easily portable. Careful  measurements were taken before the team progressed to the design process.   •  The Waste Management criteria include easy access to the containers and simplicity   of the waste collection. Therefore, large containers are more preferable than the small  ones.  3.1 Assumptions  The project assumptions include the building schedule and the availability of materials. There is  a total of 10 Civil and Mechanical Engineering design projects at UBC Farm this year. Because of  the limited material, tools and space resources, the interests of student teams may intersect. In  order to avoid clash of interests, every team was asked to make a list of required materials and  submit it to the organization, as well as the possible dates for the building part of the projects.         Page | 5      4.0 THREE CONCEPTUAL DESIGNS  Following the design objectives and constraints, the team has come up with three conceptual  designs. Each design had to meet a different combination of the criteria, offering the  organization a variety of possible solutions to the problem.     Cost   Weather   Rodent   Portability   Resistant   Resistant      Accessibility   Large   Aesthetics   Container   Design                         One      √   √   √      √        Design         Two                  √   √      √   √               Design         Three   √                           √   √   √              Table 1. Criteria met by the three conceptual designs  4.1 Design One  Design One meets four criteria out of seven. It is resistant to weather and rodents, portable and  is capable to contain large containers. The four covered sides, roof and push hatch work to  keep its contents protected from precipitation and rodents (view APPENDIX B, Figure 3).  Page | 6      Constructing the four containers as separate structures serves portability. It also allows to build  each unit specifically for the required container size. The hinged doors are designed to make it  easy for the waste management personal to retrieve the container from inside. However, the  hinges and stoppers have to be purchased separately, which increases the structure cost.  4.2 Design Two  Design Two meets four of the seven criteria. It is similar to Design One, but it gives less  protection from rodents and is visually more appealing. Design Two has four walled sides and a  triangular roof to protect it from the rain and snow (view APPENDIX B, Figure 4). However, it  does not contain the push hatch, thus it is possible that the rodents can get inside. As the four  structures are separate they can be constructed to a specific size and easily relocated if needed.  Hinged doors protect the containers from the outside and increase the cost of the structure.  4.3 Design Three  Design Three meets four criteria, which are cost, accessibility, aesthetics and the ability to  contain large containers. This design is unique in that it does not have any walls, which gives it  an appealing look, but leaves it wide open to the weather and small animals (view APPENDIX B,  Figure 5). Having no walls and hinged doors makes it the most accessible and the cheapest of  the three designs. However, because it is one solid structure it is not portable.  Like the other  two designs, Design Three can be constructed with materials available at the farm, but in this  case there is no need to buy hinges and stoppers.     Page | 7      5.0 DECISION‐MAKING PROCESS  In coming to a decision of which design the team will recommend to the organization, several  factors were taken into account. The project constrains included cost, weather‐durability,  resistance to rodents, portability, the size of containers, and accessibility. The benefits and  drawbacks of each design were discussed in a Multi‐Criteria Decision Making form. It was  decided that Design Three was the best overall candidate. The benefits and drawbacks of each  design are as listed below:     Advantages   Design One   Disadvantages   o Simple  and  recognizable  o Necessary  to  purchase  design   hinges,   o Easy access to containers   handles (increased cost)   o Weather   o Requires  site  preparation   and   rodent‐  stoppers,   and   proof structure   (concrete  corner  footings,   o Requires  less  area  (only  2   metal platform)   sides around the pole)   o Site   maintenance      required  more  frequently      (roof  angled  towards  the  back, causing water‐log)   Design Two   o Simple  and  recognizable  o Requires  site  preparation  design   (perhaps  concrete  corner   o Easy access to containers   footings, metal platform)   Page | 8      o Weather‐proof structure   o Necessary  to  purchase   o More open than design 1   hinges,   stoppers,   and   handles (increased cost)  o No  flapping  door  (no  protection against rodents)  Design Three   o Best aesthetics overall   o Requires  site  preparation   o Open  structure  (rain  and   (concrete  corner  footings,   smell do not stagnate)   metal platform)   o Less material necessary   o Water  and  rodents  enter   o Easiest   in   terms   of   easily   garbage  bin  loading  and  o Structure is not portable  unloading   o Requires  less  area  (only  2  sides around the pole)  Table 2. Decision‐Making Matrix  After reviewing the above breakdown of each design, it was decided that Design Three would  be  the  best  candidate  for  recommendation.  The  table  shows  that  this  design  combines  the  most advantages with the least amount of disadvantages. Formulating the above list has greatly  helped in the process of choosing the best design. All designs are open to alteration depending  on the need and preference of the UBC Farm staff and the Waste Management personnel.     Page | 9      6.0 DESIGN MODIFICATION  The final design chosen by UBC Farm is a combination of Designs One and Three. This design  brings together the aesthetics of the initial Design Three and the closed structure of Design  One. The main modification was that the structure has to use three sides of the post instead of  the initial two (view APPENDIX C, Figure 6). The reason for this change was the overflow of  garbage at the Farm Market.   A following meeting with UBC Waste Management has been held in order to ensure proper  understanding of the project. Initially the team has concluded that design with smaller bins is  more effective, because it can store more waste and the containers are easier to transport.  However, after speaking to the Waste Management personnel it was learnt that one large bin is  preferable over two small bins. Doubling the number of bins requires more time for the waste  extraction, as well as more physical work. The bin will have to be pulled out of a tight space and  will not slip out easily. Also, the vehicles used by UBC Waste Management are not designed to  pick up the smaller bins. One side consideration is that more bins will mean less space in each  enclosure as two small bins will occupy the space that should be taken by one large bin. Taking  all of the above into consideration, it was decided to use one large container for each of the  garbage, paper and metal cans sections. Two smaller bins were assigned to the compost  section. Such distribution of containers would provide enough space to store one week’s worth  of waste and meet the requirements of the UBC Waste Management.      Page | 10      7.0 DETAILED DESIGN  7.1 Final Design Description  The final design consists of five separable units that come together to make one structure (view  APPENDIX D). When all five of the units are connected, the structure is roughly five feet tall,  eight feet long and six feet wide. Taking into consideration the materials available at UBC Farm,  it was decided to use cedar for the structure. Each container requires a door attached to the  unit by two latches. The roof of each container is slanted and covered in a sheet of tin. The roof  contains a slot, which will be the access point for the appropriate kind of trash to be deposited  into the container. The structure is built as five separate units so that the client has the option  to relocate the structure. The sides of each unit that are not directly exposed to the elements  do not contain a wall. Instead, in place of the wall is an extra brace to add structural support.  Because of this, the units in the present state cannot be separated from the structure and  placed in different locations. However, if it was required to separate the structure, all that  needs to be done would be to attach a piece of plywood to the un‐walled sides of each unit.             Page | 11      7.2 Material Estimates     Amount   This price estimate is based on available   Cost  Lumber  materials.   SPF/Cedar 2X4      410'   140$/0  450'   Available  onsite  2.5 sheets   Available  onsite  2.5 sheets   Available  onsite  20'   Available  onsite  Because the availability  of cedar 2X8’s is  Cedar 1X5    questioned, the prices for two cases are  provided:   ¾ @ 4'X8' Plywood   1)   100$ Case:  410’ of 2X4 may be   4X8 Sheets light gauge  tin   obtained from cedar 2X8’s  available at UBC Farm.   4X4          Hardware  2) 240$ Case: If the cedar 2X8’s are  assigned to another CSL project   Nails   there is an estimate provided for   Deck Screws  the cost of purchasing the   Cinderblock Supports       Box   60$  small box   40$  4   Available  onsite  10   Available  onsite  Total   100$/240$  required lumber as SPF which  would represent an economical   Hinges   compromise.          Table 3.  Cost of Materials.   Page | 12      8.0 ACTIVITY SCHEDULE  During the 3 day build of term two, each team member will be assigned a different task in  regards to construction, as discussed in the following section of this report. A description of the  material acquisition process during term two for the project is described below. In addition, a  list of tasks for each individual day of the 3 day construction is provided. However, it is  important to note that these tasks serve as guidelines only and are subject to change.  8.1 Material Acquisition  Many of the materials that will be used for the construction will be provided by UBC Farm.  Some of these materials include 4x4 inch and 2x4 inch pieces of lumber, metal sheets for the  base, tin for the shingles, and plywood for the outer walls and doors. However, the team will  need additional materials that cannot be provided by the Farm. It is necessary to buy metal  hinges for the doors of the containers. In addition, if there is a shortage in the 2x4 inch sizes of  lumber, more lumber will have to be purchased.  8.2 Three Day Schedule  The following is a tentative schedule for the three day construction process at UBC Farm.  8.2.1 Day One:    level the ground     cut wood for the supports     put the supports on the ground and make sure they are of proper height   Page | 13        nail the supports on the existing wooden posts     assemble the frame for the waste site   8.2.2 Day Two:    cut wood for the 2x4 platforms     assemble the platform, and add cedar toppings on them     cut wood for the walls for the sides of the waste site     assemble the walls, nailing them to the support and to the base   8.2.3 Day Three:    cut wood for doors; two different sizes are needed     cut plywood for the roof     cut tin to the right sizes for the roof     attach the tin to the plywood     assemble the roof by nailing  the tin covered plywood to the frame     label the containers with signs that indicate kind of waste             Page | 14         9.0 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES  This section outlines a comparison between the roles and responsibilities assigned in term one  and term two. The following is a description of these roles for the organization, the team, and  its members.  9.1 The Organization (UBC Farm)   Term One:  In term one, UBC Farm was responsible for providing the team with specifications and  suggestions regarding the completion of the design and project. In the first weeks, Kayla  McIntyre showed the project site to the team and gave a tour of the Tool Shed and the Harvest  Hut. She outlined the specifications for the project, namely: an aesthetical appeal, easy to use  system, organized environment, and a set of four containers for garbage, paper products,  recyclable materials such as metal cans and plastic bottles, and compost. In the following  weeks, Andrew Rushmere provided the team with feedback on the three conceptual designs.  He suggested that the design be portable, while having outer walls to prevent squirrels and  bees from entering the trash and recycling containers. In addition, he specified the need to  contact and receive approval from UBC Waste Management, as they are also the stakeholders  of the project.   Term Two:   Page | 15      In term two, UBC Farm will provide the team with access to the Tool Shed and the Harvest Hut,  where most of the building will take place. Andrew Rushmere will continue to provide feedback  for the team, and he will be available to answer any questions that may arouse during the  construction. UBC Farm will also provide the team with scrap materials, including metal sheets  for the base of the containers and plywood for the outer walls. Although some of the sheets are  larger than the base of the containers, the tools provided by UBC Farm can be used to make  them to the appropriate size. Finally, UBC Farm will notify team members of any  inconveniences and hazards related to the construction process.  9.2 The Team  During term one, the team was responsible for drafting the deliverables of the report and  creating the three designs (with approval of UBC Farm and UBC Waste Management). During  term two, the team will be responsible for constructing the structure that will house four  containers (garbage, paper products, cans, and compost) around the wooden post in front of  the Harvest Hut in a three day period.   9.3 The Members  Term One:  In term one, the members of the team assigned roles for the successful completion of the  project. All members attended regular meetings one to two times per week, contributed in the  design process, and wrote at least one section of this report. The following is a list of the roles  delegated to each member:    Mentor Contact and Team Leader (Anastasia)  Page | 16        Client Contact (Elliot)     Record Keeper (Daniel)     Google Sketch‐up 3D Models (Chris, Adrian, Thomas)     Technical Report Editors (Anastasia, Daniel, Adrian)     Technical Report Formatter (Chris)   Term Two:  Throughout term two, Anastasia and Elliot will continue to contact the mentor and the client,  respectively. It is the responsibility of each team member to arrive on time and wear the  appropriate wardrobe for construction. All team members will be following all safety  regulations given provided by UBC Farm with regards to the tools in both the Tool Shed and the  Harvest Hut. The following is a list showing the tasks of each member during the 3 day  construction period, as seen in Table 3.  Team Members   Task   Daniel, Adrian, and Chris   Levelling the foundation   Daniel, Thomas, and Elliot   Cutting the metal sheets for base   Adrian, Elliot, and Chris    Cutting the plywood for the outer walls   Chris, Thomas, Adrian, and Elliot   Assembling the outer walls / roof and  connecting to the base   Anastasia and Thomas   Assembling the trash dispenser on the roof of  containers   Daniel and Elliot   Assembling the doors with connecting hinges   Page | 17      Anastasia and Adrian   Labelling the containers with signs      Table 4. Delegation of roles and responsibilities for term two construction.   10.0 RISK ASSESMENT  10.1 Safety Risks  Because construction is a major part of the Harvest Hut Waste Redirection Site Project, there is  some concern about safety during its assembly. The design consists of metal, so metal cutting is  a possibility when constructing the waste site. Metal cutting can pose safety hazards when  performed improperly. Therefore, team members who are responsible for cutting metal sheets  will be required to learn the safety and basics of sheet metal cutting beforehand. In addition,  woodwork is going to be important in the building of the waste redirection site as well, since  the design will mostly be composed of wood. Similar to metal cutting, team members in charge  of the woodwork will be also be required to learn how to properly and safely use the desired  woodworking machine before he or she uses it. All team members involved in the construction  of the project will be expected to wear protective gear at all times. This includes wearing  protective coveralls, safety glasses or goggles, gloves, and dusts masks when required (will most  likely be used when working with wood). Team members will be advised not to wear loose  clothing and any jewellery or clothing accessories that can get tangled with the machines, such  as necklaces, bracelets, or neckties. Furthermore, group members will be made aware to  handle sharp tools carefully and to ensure that each equipment is turned off after use.   10.2 Odour Risks   Page | 18      One of the projects goals that the group had to consider when designing the models for the  organization was to make sure that the waste site is rodent proof. However, UBC Farm also  wanted the site to be breathable so that odours do not accumulate inside the structure.  Because the organization felt that it would be best to enclose the waste site with plywood to  keep rodents out, the final design focuses more on the structure’s ability to prevent rodents  from coming into it than its capability to let odour escape. This poses a possibility of odour  problems, especially with garbage and compost. Since the garbage can and compost bin are  going to be encased on all sides, it will be difficult for foul smells to escape.                        Page | 19             APPENDIX A: LIST OF FIGURES     Figure 1. Wooden post and project site at UBC Farm   Page | 20        Figure 2. Current recycling and compost containers with labelling at UBC Farm    APENDIX B: HAND SKETCHES OF CONCEPTUAL DESIGNS   Page | 21        Figure 3: Hand Sketch of Design 1          Page | 22        Figure 4. Hand Sketch of Design 2           Page | 23        Figure 5. Hand Sketch of Design 3         APPENDIX C: FINAL DESIGN PLAN   Page | 24        Figure 6. Planned layout of the waste redirection site                   APPENDIX D: FINAL DESIGN VIEWS  Page | 25      North‐West Elevation (side)                              Page | 26      Top View                               Page | 27      North East Elevation (Front)                               Page | 28      Plan View                       Page | 29      

Cite

Citation Scheme:

    

Usage Statistics

Country Views Downloads
China 21 0
Germany 12 1
United States 6 0
Japan 4 0
India 1 0
France 1 0
City Views Downloads
Beijing 19 0
Unknown 13 1
Tokyo 4 0
Ashburn 3 0
Shenzhen 2 0
Redmond 2 0
Roswell 1 0
New Delhi 1 0

{[{ mDataHeader[type] }]} {[{ month[type] }]} {[{ tData[type] }]}
Download Stats

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.18861.1-0108289/manifest

Comment

Related Items