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SEEDS Marketing Plan Proposal Mcburny, Jason; Barrios, Andrea; Sanders, Florian; Li, Jimmy; Esquivel, Flor Christina Borda; Dyck, Chris 2009

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SEEDS Student Reports  1  UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Reports  SEEDS Marketing Plan Proposal Jason Mcburny Andrea Barrios Florian Sanders Jimmy Li Flor Christina Borda Esquivel Chris Dyck University of British Columbia COMM 468 December 2009  Disclaimer: “UBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report.”  UBC SEEDS: MARKETING PLAN Jason Mcburny Andrea Barrios Florian Sanders Jimmy Li Flor Christina Borda Esquivel Chris Dyck  1  TABLE OF CONTENTS I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  4  II. SITUATION ANALYSIS  4 4 5 5 6 8  A.OVERVIEW OF SUSTAINABILITY AT UBC B.INDUSTRY ANALYSIS PORTER’S FIVE FORCES CREST ANALYSIS  D. CHANNEL ANALYSIS: EVALUATION OF COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGY SUCCESSFUL METHODS OF COMMUNICATION TO DATE  E. CUSTOMER ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY OF INTERVIEWS PURPOSE OF INTERVIEWS OVERVIEW OF UBC STAFF MOTIVATIONS OVERVIEW OF UBC FACULTY STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF SEEDS: FACULTY PERSPECTIVE MOTIVATIONS  F. COMPETITION ANALYSIS COMPETITIVE OVERVIEW COMPETITORS STRATEGIES COMPETITION MATRIX: BENCHMARK BASED ON THE COMPETITION MATRIX  8 9 9 9 9 10 11 11 12 12 12 12 13 15  III. SWOT ANALYSIS  17  IV. CORE STRATEGY  18 18 19 20 20 20 21 22 24  A. TARGET MARKET B. RECOMMENDED POSITIONING V. MARKETING STRATEGIES A. OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES OBJECTIVE 1 OBJECTIVE 2 OBJECTIVE 3 OBJECTIVE 4  2  VI. MONITORS & CONTROLS A. DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM B. PARTICIPANT SATISFACTION  25 25 26  VII. CONTINGENCY PLANS  26  VIII. WORKS CONSULTED  28  IX. APPENDICES  30  APPENDIX A APPENDIX B APPENDIX C APPENDIX D APPENDIX E APPENDIX F APPENDIX G APPENDIX H  30 32 33 35 36 37 37 38  3  I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Since 2001, UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) has been a leader in promoting sustainability on campus at the University of British Columbia. SEEDS has been successful bringing together students, faculty, and staff to work together and to resolve many sustainability issues. SEEDS’ potential and opportunities for sustainability at UBC appear to be endless, however, due to constrained funding and resources, unapparent promotions, limited execution of communication strategy and lack of brand awareness at UBC, there are some challenging issues that need to be resolved in order for SEEDS to maintain or increase its current level of projects and further increase awareness. In order to strengthen SEEDS brand image and increase awareness, there are 4 objectives which need to be accomplished. We suggest that SEEDS:  1. Have at least one SEEDS project in every faculty by September 2011  2. Increase staff participation by at least five staff units per academic school year  3. Increase student and general awareness  4. Increase financial, human and data management resources There are three primary groups which we believe communications strategies should be targeting: Department heads, high ranking staff members, and those who are somehow involved in sustainability. The following is a non-exhaustive list of several key communications strategies we suggest: Lead Generation, Contact by Email, Contact by Phone •	 The key to any business with a small budget is determining key contacts, and contacting them directly SEEDS Information Session/Mixer •	 Bring together staff, faculty, and students for a night on sustainability. The event will also show how SEEDS can break the barriers between groups and build community at UBC. Inspirational Stories and Testimonies Video on Website CRM Data Management System •	 A data management system which will help SEEDS management keep in touch with clients and potential clients To increase awareness, it is critical that SEEDS develops a wider audience among the UBC community, even if this means fewer projects with established clients. A sustainable campus is far from a reality, but the SEEDS program can pave the way for the future and grow this campus into a sustainable one.  4  II. SITUATION ANALYSIS A.OVERVIEW OF SUSTAINABILITY AT UBC The University of British Columbia’s current mission as outlined by Trek 2010: “The University of British Columbia, aspiring to be one of the world’s best universities, will prepare students to become exceptional global citizens, promote the values of a civil and sustainable society, and conduct outstanding research to serve the people of British Columbia, Canada, and the world.” UBC has been a leader in sustainability and set a standard for other institutions across Canada. UBC has demonstrated a continuing commitment to achieving sustainability by engaging the community and constantly reviewing and revising their progress. The following is a brief description of key moments in UBC’s sustainability commitment.  History of Sustainability at UBC 2006: UBC Sustainability Strategy 1998:UBC Sustainability Office Opens  1991: Halifax Declaration 1990: Tailloires declaration  2000: UBC Trek 2010  1997: UBC Policy on Sustainable Development  Tailloires Declaration 1990: It is a 10 point action plan for incorporating sustainability in teaching, research, operations and outreach. The plan includes: raising awareness, developing energy conservation projects, and working with the UN Conference on Environment and Development Halifax Declaration 1991 Framework for “university action on sustainable development” UBC Policy on Sustainable Development 1997 Code of business, environmental and social practice stating that accountability for sustainability comes from the top and VPs are responsible for continuous development of sustainability in their portfolios. It is a formal sustainability policy and “provides leadership by demonstrating the means to a sustainable community on campus.”  5  Sustainability Office Opens 1998 UBC was the first university in Canada to open a sustainability office and it started out with two main focuses: “greening of the campus” (now known as SEEDS) and ECOtrek program. Now it has expanded its campus reach trying to incorporate sustainability in every aspect of campus life. Trek 2010 2000 Sustainability is integrated into highest level vision document – Trek 2010: A global Journey, stating that it is the responsibility of the university to prepare students to be global citizens and it will promote a sustainable society. Sustainability Strategy 2006 University campus-wide sustainability strategy: Inspirations & Aspirations: The Vancouver Campus Sustainability Strategy 2006-2010. It was developed by consulting a variety of groups on campus – the result was a strategy organized around nine goals.  B.INDUSTRY ANALYSIS PORTER’S FIVE FORCES THREAT OF NEW ENTRANTS The threat of new entrants is quite high. New entrants could be anything from new sustainability groups in different faculties to student led groups in the Alma Mater Society. Sustainability has become a mind set at UBC, so there is potential that there will be an increase in the amount of groups trying to solve this issue. BARGAINING POWER OF STAFF, FACULTY, AND STUDENTS The bargaining power of customers is quite high. In the case of SEEDS, the customers are the UBC staff, faculty, and students. SEEDS management has put an emphasis on UBC staff and faculty members. Without cooperation and involvement from staff and faculty members, it would be very difficult for the SEEDS program to exist. Therefore, the bargaining power of customers is very high as SEEDS depends heavily on their involvement. The service that SEEDS offers helps not only the entire UBC community, but also the entire city of Vancouver and the province of British Columbia. UBC is a large institution that uses a large amount of resources and SEEDS is working to lower the levels of resources and to lower the environmental foot print that UBC is creating. THREAT OF SUBSTITUTE GROUPS The threat of substitutes is also high. In the case of substitute groups, the potential threats are not only limited to sustainability groups, but also any group on campus that captures the attention of staff, faculty and students. Anything group participation which involves a commitment of time can be seen as a substitute group.  6  RIVALRY WITHIN THE INDUSTRY Currently, the rivalry within the industry is not very high. However, in the future, rivalry is expected to increase. Faculties are beginning to incorporate their own sustainability concentration. For instance, The Sauder School of Business recently added a sustainability concentration for students (Sauder School of Business, 2009). Consequently, these new additions of concentration programs could result in faculties and staff pulling away from SEEDS’s service.  CREST ANALYSIS REGULATORY/POLITICAL: The current environmental regulations could change as there is always the risk that the political party in power may not favor research into sustainability and could potentially cut funding. The University may decide that SEEDS is too costly and time consuming to run and decide to cut it. Also, the university view on applied learning could shift and the university may decide to discontinue funding. For example, the university allows students to take only one student directed seminar in their university career. ECONOMIC: There is a very high risk that the economy will continue to spiral downwards. If this happens, SEEDS and other sustainability initiatives may receive budgetary cuts. It is also possible that changes in employee wages make it too costly to have more workers in the sustainability office. They are an integral part of SEEDS as they help facilitate projects between faculty, students and UBC staff. There is also a high human capital cost involved with organizing a SEEDS project. This cost is associated with the time that is spent by SEEDS management, faculty, and staff organizing each SEEDS poject. SOCIO-CULTURAL: Sustainability is a choice of lifestyle, and if people are not interested, it will be difficult to get them involved in the SEEDS program. There has been a movement to increase sustainability related education, and future UBC students are becoming more aware of the issue and are more likely to be involved. Overall, there is an increasingly favorable public opinion towards sustainability. TECHNOLOGICAL: The amount of money that the government grants to research sustainability on campus limits the type of projects that can be implemented. There is always a risk that a SEEDS project is developed to solve a problem, and then a technology which solves the problem faster, cheaper and better emerges. If that were to happen, some may perceive the SEEDS project as a waste of resources and time. While technology is a major factor in terms of sustainability, it is not a major factor within the industry that SEEDS is serving.  7  C. COMPANY ANALYSIS: OVERVIEW OF SEEDS PROGRAM According to SEEDS management, the program pursues the goal of bringing faculty, staff and students together in order to establish sustainability-related projects on campus. SEEDS acts as a contact to initiate a new project and coordinates the involved participants throughout the project. RESOURCES The SEEDS program is led by two coordinators, who share a 6-day position. They are supported by administrative support of five hours per week and an associative director, who also works five hours per week and is responsible for strategic planning. Furthermore, there is a coordinator in Land and Food Systems; in the past, SEEDS has sometimes had paid student assistance. The budget amounts to $2,000. It is difficult to determine how many projects SEEDS can support at once or within one year, as each project is unique and differs in size. PROCESS OF A PROJECT In general, SEEDS coordinates faculties, students and staff throughout the project, which can be initiated either by staff members or by students. If staff members have a particular problem or request, they can ask SEEDS for assistance. SEEDS then finds a faculty in order to launch the project. However, projects can also be initiated by students who are interested in a particular topic and want to do research on it. Once the project is finished,the potential implementation of the findings and recommendations are discussed (UBC Sustainability SEEDS, 2009). So far, 52-92% of the projects have been implemented (UBC Sustainability SEEDS, 2009). It has to be mentioned that neither follow-up on the success of project implementation nor other detailed statistics on projects exist. There are three different types of projects: individual research projects in which one student or a group of students do research on a particular topic, class projects (i.e. all students have to do research), and projects which are part of a faculty program (multi-year degree program). VISION OF SEEDS The long term goal of SEEDS is to increase awareness of the program (UBC Sustainability SEEDS, 2009). All involved people are convinced that the program offers benefits for all groups, but it is simply not known well enough on campus. Therefore, SEEDS wants to have a project in every faculty by September 2011. This is to be realized by marketing and communicating the program and its benefits to non-participants. CURRENT COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGIES To date, SEEDS has approached faculty personally, by phone or by email. However, there are no real strategies as far as the communication to non-participants. This will be discussed in greater detail in the Channel Analysis. STRENGTHS OF SEEDS (OVERVIEW OF PROGRAM) SEEDS increases the general awareness of sustainability on campus and contributes to a more sustainable use of resources. In addition, it brings staff, faculties and students together to work towards one common goal. Moreover, the program offers advantages to all participating groups: Students are given the opportunity to apply the concepts they have learned to real-life projects  8  and gain academic credit, staff members receive free human resources who work towards sustainability-related solutions, and faculty members improve the quality of learning for their students and are able to attempt new learning strategies (Interviews with SEEDS management October 2009; UBC Sustainability SEEDS, 2009).  D. CHANNEL ANALYSIS: EVALUATION OF COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGY Successful Methods of Communication to Date PERSONAL SELLING To date, SEEDS’ primary communication strategy has been the use of personal selling. Instead of using a mass advertising approach, SEEDS has targeted specific staff members and contacted them by phone, email, or in person. Personal selling has been done primarily for the purpose of educating potential clients about the SEEDS program, and determining how the SEEDS program could benefit the potential client. Often times, a presentation that promotes a live and interactive relationship is displayed. By engaging in this format of a presentation, SEEDS is able to educate and promote its program to its most important prospects without ambiguity. Questions concerning the program can also be answered without any delay. When conducting interviews, staff members who had gone through this process in the past stated they were very satisfied with this form of communication. PUSH MARKETING SEEDS has been relatively successful in utilizing push marketing as a promotional strategy to create awareness among staff and faculty members. SEEDS management has educated high ranking staff and faculty members who have shared information with staff and faculty members of lower ranking. They “push” SEEDS to all other faculty and staff members who they do not directly contact. Eventually, this can turn into word of mouth marketing. PARTNERSHIP CONNECTION IN THE SUSTAINABILITY FIELD SEEDS has also borrowed the help of other sustainability departments to act as a method of promotion. Partners such as the UBC health, safety, and environment, UBC waste management, and UBC Trek Program Centre are just some examples of whom SEEDS have worked with. By having a close bond and tie with these partners, other staff members are often informed of the SEEDS program by members of these partner programs and departments. WORD OF MOUTH SEEDS has relied on existing users of the program to promote and communicate the advantageous aspects of the program. When conducting interviews, several staff members acknowledged that they were initially informed about SEEDS through their boss or colleagues. SEEDS WEBSITE The SEEDS website serves as an additional resource to inform potential clients. The website is currently being updated, and should be a key method of communication going forward.  9  E. CUSTOMER ANALYSIS Methodology of Interviews Interviews were conducted and customers were divided four groups: UBC Staff who have used SEEDS, UBC Staff who have not used SEEDS, UBC Faculty who have used SEEDS, and UBC Faculty who have not used SEEDS. The research began by searching the internet (primarily the UBC website) for UBC Staff and Faculty who would be of interest to speak to. The UBC Staff who have not used SEEDS were chosen primarily based on staff units which the SEEDS management mentioned they would be interested in expanding into. The UBC Staff who have used SEEDS were chosen from a list given directly to us from SEEDS management. The UBC Faculty who have not used SEEDS were selected based on their faculty and interest in sustainability. An overall attempt was made to ensure that many faculties were represented in the studies. Lastly, the UBC Faculty who have used SEEDS were selected from a list of UBC SEEDS participants over the past two years. We initially contacted the interviewees by email. Only those who responded were interviewed, so a large portion of those people who we wanted to interview to ensure a representative sample were not willing to participate. Each of the four groups interviewed were given a different set of questions. The interview questions can be found in Appendix A. We began with a quick explanation of the SEEDS program with those who have never participated in a SEEDS project. We were very flexible in the delivery of the interviews, asking additional questions when wanting to extract more information.  Purpose of Interviews The primary purpose of the interviews was to determine customer motivations. We wanted to determine why UBC Staff and Faculty use UBC SEEDS, and why other UBC Staff and Faculty do not. We also tried to determine the main concerns Staff and Faculty have with doing a SEEDS project. Lastly, we tried to determine the characteristics of people who are interested in SEEDS, and the best method to communicate information to these people.  Overview of UBC Staff As of 2008, there were 8,557 staff members at UBC Vancouver (UBC PAIR, 2009) across over 100 different Staff units. There are approximately 99 staff members listed on the SEEDS website who have participated in SEEDS projects since its inception in 2000, across 29 different staff units. Through interviews with UBC Staff members as well as opinions from SEEDS management, it is evident that UBC Staff members have not been made aware of the SEEDS program. Although they are not aware of the program, this does not mean they are not interested. On a 10 point scale, every staff member interviewed stated that they would score at least an 8 when it comes to interest in incorporating a sustainability project into their department. Because  10  each SEEDS project is unique, staff members had trouble visualizing how a SEEDS project would fit into their department. This is why an initial meeting between a member of the SEEDS team and the potential client is vital. Most staff members interviewed admitted that it took them quite a while before they understand how the SEEDS process works. A couple of staff members who had never heard of SEEDS researched the program on the internet prior to the interview, and were still unsure of how the program worked. It is evident that any information communicated about the SEEDS program must be carefully worded. SUCCESS OF CURRENT COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGIES In the 2008-2009 academic school year, SEEDS expanded into five new staff units: Infrastructure and Services Planning, Facilities Management, School of Nursing, Sprouts, and Plant Operations (UBC Sustainability SEEDS, 2009). Considering that most SEEDS projects have involved the same staff members year after year, this should be considered a success. Current communications strategies with UBC staff are consistent with communications strategies of companies with minimal budgets. Staff members are contacted by phone or email, an initial meeting occurs, and projects are potentially created. To date, it is evident that many of the same UBC staff members participate in SEEDS each year. Although it is good that customers are returning, the only way for the awareness of SEEDS to grow is to expand projects into as many staff units as possible. Individual staff members who participate in SEEDS projects discuss the program with other members within their staff unit, and this increases awareness. Staff members are unlikely to discuss the program with members in other staff units.  Motivations BUILDING COMMUNITY When interviewing UBC staff members about SEEDS, many common motivations arose. The predominant motivation for staff members who have already used SEEDS is building community at UBC. The almost hidden social aspect of SEEDS motivates staff members to be involved in SEEDS projects so that they can interact with students, and help them. STUDENT LEARNING Many staff members stated that they did SEEDS projects primarily for the students. The best example of this was stated by Andrew Parr who said that he was involved in one SEEDS project which he stated prior to its start that he would almost surely not implement. The only reason he participated was to give students a chance to participate in a real life project. INSPIRATIONAL STORIES Two UBC staff members who have been involved with SEEDS in the past stated that they think SEEDS should be marketed using inspirational stories which evolved from SEEDS projects. These could include staff, faculty, or student experiences.  11  LACK OF SELF-MOTIVATION Several staff members interviewed who have been involved with SEEDS projects in the past stated that if they were contacted by Brenda or Liska, they would be thrilled to participate in another SEEDS project. SEEDS management must stay in touch with past customers because most are not self-motivated enough to contact management if they have a potential project in their mind.  Overview of UBC Faculty UBC employs 3,298 faculty members in 20 faculties on the UBC Vancouver Campus (UBC PAIR, 2009). SEEDS management has already established several faculty contacts, but it is evident that these contacts are all from the same few faculties. We conducted a series of interviews with faculty members who have and have not been involved with SEEDS in the past. The primary goal of our research was to identify what motivates or deters faculty members from participating in SEEDS projects, what are the best ways to communicate information to faculty, and what are the strengths and weaknesses of the program in the eyes of faculty. Using the results, SEEDS can be made more appealing to faculty members at UBC. CURRENT COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES The current communication strategy primarily used by SEEDS is direct contact by email and telephone. Either the faculty member is contacted directly, or in the case that SEEDS does not know a specific person in the faculty, the dean’s office is approached. Throughout the interviews conducted, this method of communication was considered to be the best solution. However, it was mentioned that faculty members receive a significant amount of emails which are deleted because of a lack of time, so SEEDS would be well advised to be very specific about the project details in each email sent out. This way, the contacted person has all the relevant information and does have to spend the time asking further questions.  Strengths and Weaknesses of SEEDS: Faculty Perspective All interviews showed clearly that SEEDS’ biggest strength is the fact that the program can make a difference on campus and promote sustainability. The interviews showed that faculty members have an interest in this area, and publicizing the results of SEEDS projects could increase the awareness of sustainability on several levels. Students also have the opportunity to do real life research, apply the concepts they have learned and consult a professor in order to solve possible problems. From the faculty perspective, this is very valuable for the students learning. As for the weaknesses of SEEDS, many faculty members have the opinion that SEEDS lacks sufficient resources, primarily as far as the budget is concerned. As some projects, e.g. in the science area, require laboratory tests or other expensive tasks, they cannot always be realized because SEEDS is not able to provide faculties with a budget. Moreover, SEEDS requires a significant amount of time from professors who are already working lengthy hours. Therefore,  12  some might not be willing to accept SEEDS projects. A few faculty members mentioned that the name “SEEDS” is misleading. Furthermore, many faculty members thought it would be beneficial to hold periodic academic meetings with interested faculty members in order to talk about the SEEDS program and related issues.  Motivations The factor which was common among every faculty member who had already used SEEDS along with those interested in using SEEDS was personal interest in sustainability. Many faculty members stated that if this factor is not present, faculty members will not sacrifice their time for SEEDS. In addition, it was agreed upon that academic interest in the research topic can also be a strong motivation. Professors are more likely to be motivated to do a SEEDS project if they know the students themselves are motivated to be involved in a sustainability project. If professors know that students are interested in a research project or have initiated it themselves, they will be more willing to support it. Moreover, some professors simply like to work together with students. It is also interesting to take a closer look at what deters faculty members from using SEEDS. The most important factor, as already mentioned, is the fact that it is very time consuming and faculty members already work a lot. Therefore, they have to be motivated by one of the factors explained above. One suggested solution was to implement SEEDS projects in classes where there are already student research projects. This way, the projects contribute to sustainability on campus and the teacher has only minimal additional work. Finally, an important point is the fact that some faculty members are motivated to do SEEDS projects, but they have simply never been contacted about SEEDS. SEEDS management needs to take the initiative and make the first step, as faculty members are unlikely to contact SEEDS out of self-initiative.  F. COMPETITION ANALYSIS Competitive Overview There are many initiatives similar to SEEDS which involve sustainability related research and compete for student, staff, and faculty time and attention. Some of these direct key competitors include IRES (Institute for Resources, Environment & Sustainability), MDUR (Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research) URO (Undergraduate Research Opportunities) and CSL (Community Service Learning). There are also several indirect competitors which range from student associations and clubs to non-sustainability related student research projects. Indirect competitors compete against SEEDS on the basis of time.  Competitors Strategies  The following is a list of key competitors. Please note that although they are competitors, many of them could collaborate with SEEDS to help expand the program:  13  IRES (INSTITUTE FOR RESOURCES, ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY) The mission of IRES is to foster a sustainable future through integrated research and learning about the links between human and natural systems, and also to support decision making for local to global scales. (UBC IRES, 2009). They are trying to bring community together to address many environmental problems within UBC. This makes them a key competitor even though SEEDS is more structured and has more resources. IRES conducts interdisciplinary research for a wide variety of environment and sustainability related issues. They also provide support for graduate education programs. IRES obtains resources through collaboration with stake-holders, local enterprises, NGOs and international businesses. Their major goal is to produce high quality research in areas of societal interest; to accomplish that they have the RMES (Resource Management and Environmental Studies) program in which students and faculty members are work together to develop a specific research project through the means of a specific UBC course. IRES has the support of 12 core faculty members and approximately 40 associate faculty members. URO (UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES) URO is a UBC initiative for students, faculty and staff interested in engaging undergraduate students of all disciplines in the research process. URO’s can be extra-curricular or can be embedded directly into course content. URO’s philosophy has three major aspects (UBC URO, 2009) 1. Exposure (exposure to research-based thinking) 2. Apprenticeship (hands-on research skills with supervision) 3. Immersion (independent research with limited guidance) URO attracts students, faculty, and staff in different ways: Undergraduate Students: URO provides the necessary tools for students to find a research position through Peer Mentorship Programs. URO offers many opportunities to share student work in the Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Conference, one of URO’s bi-weekly Student Seminars, eJournal, or cIRcle. Faculty and Staff: Faculty and staff members who want to hire undergraduate students to assist them with a research project are encouraged to create a job posting. It is in this way that URO attracts all levels of the campus to work together, share ideas and make a changes in the society.  14  COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING Community Service-Learning (CSL) is a form of experiential education that integrates service in the community with academic courses and/or extra-curricular programs. CSL strives to encourage global citizenship, and act as a catalyst for social innovation (UBC Learning Exchange, 2009). CSL requires support from educational institutions and community organizations in order to achieve clear objectives for participants. Community organizations provide their expertise helping to connect the students’ experiences in the community with their academic learning. Since acceptance in 2002, the Learning Exchange has been working with instructors across campus to integrate student volunteer work into academic course work. The number of students and faculty members engaged in CSL continues to grow. In 2008, almost 1200 students participated in CSL programs or projects in public schools and non-profit organizations and 57% of those students did CSL as part of an academic course (UBC Learning Exchange, 2009). Because of the powerful learning experiences that students have and the important contributions they make in the community, UBC has made it a priority to increase the number of students, course instructors, and community organizations involved in CSL. AMS The Alma Mater Society houses many alternatives, and one that could be considered a competitor for SEEDS is “The Innovative Projects Fund” (IPF). The IPF is a program in which students, faculty or staff can submit a proposal regarding any issue within campus, and if they are selected, the project receives funding. The main goal of IPF is to provide funding for a broad range of projects that can directly benefit the UBC community. Traditionally, each successful application receives funding ranging from $3,000 to $5,000, and all UBC students, staff, and faculty members who have a vision for a new project that does not duplicate existing resources are encouraged to apply. In order to be eligible, all the projects must be innovative, provide benefit to a significant number of students, and be visible to the campus community (UBC Alma Mater Society, 2009) MDUR Is a voluntary 0-credit course designed to support undergraduate students in the research experience. The course is open to all students in any faculty and any year level. All students who work on a research project should be under the guidance of a supervisor during the regularly scheduled academic year. Usually, projects consist of an honours thesis, work study/learn, directed studies, co-op or volunteer study. There are 21 students and 12 faculty members, and the incentive for participation for students is a letter of participation from the VP of Research and a certificate of completion.  15  Competition Matrix:  SEEDS MDUR CSL IRES URO AMS  Sustainable Approach HIGH LOW LOW HIGH LOW LOW  Real/Applied Experience HIGH HIGH MEDIUM HIGH HIGH HIGH  Level of Involvement HIGH HIGH MEDIUM HIGH HIGH HIGH  Structure of Process LOW MEDIUM MEDIUM HIGH HIGH HIGH  Reward Perception MEDIUM MEDIUM LOW MEDIUM MEDIUM MEDIUM  Definition of Each Attribute in Table Sustainable Approach: The extent to which the program or initiative is sustainably relevant Real/Applied Experience: The extent to which the project is a real life applied research experience Level of Involvement: The amount of time that students, faculty and staff spend on the project Structure of Process: The level of simplicity involved in beginning the project Reward Perception: The perceived value of the reward received for doing a project  Benchmark Based on the Competition Matrix STRENGTHS OF SEEDS VS. COMPETITION SEEDS is perceived as a sustainablity related initiative, which differs from competitors who provide applied research opportunities on non-sustainability related issues. SEEDS also builds community much more than competition. The main competition for SEEDS is IRES; however, the main focus of IRES is research experience as they have no limit on the topics students choose. SEEDS has an advantage because they have one main focus. In terms of real life experience, SEEDS is very similar to competition. As can be seen in the competition matrix, IRES may be the most dangerous competitor. WEAKNESSES OF SEEDS VS. COMPETITION SEEDS biggest weakness is the lack of structure involved in creating a SEEDS project. Not only do many people not know about SEEDS compared to competition, but to begin a project, three different members of the UBC community must oblige. Also, SEEDS has a smaller budget than many competitors. This limits the amount of advertising SEEDS can do, and also limits the amount of employees available.  16  III. SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths SEEDS is one of the best kept secrets at the University of British Columbia. One of the major strengths of the SEEDS program is that it builds community and brings together people who would not otherwise come into contact with each other. Through interviews, we also found that most faculty and staff who have worked with SEEDS have come out with positive experiences. Students can benefit greatly from the SEEDS program as they get the opportunity to be involved in a real life experience in a sustainability related field that they are interested in, and in addition they receive academic credit for their efforts. Lastly, Brenda Sawada has already built many relationships with members of different staff units and faculties across campus. These relationships have helped build a solid customer base for SEEDS.  Weaknesses SEEDS is lacking in many things including funding and resources, communication to the UBC community, brand awareness, and a database. The lack of communications and promotions efforts can be attributed to the lack of funding and human resources. The only people who know about SEEDS are those who have been directly in contact with the SEEDS office. During interviews with UBC staff and faculty, it was also determined that the name “SEEDS” is misleading to some. Along with a lack of awareness of SEEDS at UBC, there is a lack of awareness of SEEDS on the internet. When one types “UBC Sustainability” into the Google search engine, the SEEDS website is no where to be found. One reason for there being a lack of a communications strategy can be attributed to there being a lack of a database. SEEDS management has not established a set process to establish new members of the UBC community. With a database, this would be simplified.  Opportunities The opportunities for SEEDS are almost unlimited as the campus is so large that there are always opportunities to make the campus more sustainable. To help expand the program, SEEDS could apply for government grants to help supplement their organization. UBC has a mandate of sustainability which empowers SEEDS as they are carrying that mandate forward for the betterment of UBC. There are many opportunities with both UBC faculty and staff as nearly all of the interviews conducted showed that faculty and staff are extremely interested in SEEDS; however, they have either never heard of SEEDS or they do not know how a SEEDS project could be integrated into their department. If SEEDS were to partner with other programs on campus, this would give SEEDS access to additional resources. Faculties, such as the Faculty of Commerce, are starting their own sustainability concentrations. SEEDS has the opportunity to work within these concentrations. They could also look into sponsoring or partnering with conferences that have faculty and or  17  staff attending. The opportunities for SEEDS are almost endless at UBC, it is just a matter of contacting key staff and faculty members.  Threats It is always difficult to run an organization that has limited funding, as another program with more funding can enter the market and take away clients. Although we previously stated that faculties introducing sustainability concentrations can be seen as an opportunity, they can also be seen as a threat. These concentrations may begin to implement sustainability projects within their classes on their own. Lastly, without a database, SEEDS could be in danger if any of their employees leave. The relationships which SEEDS employees have already built will be put to waste.  IV. CORE STRATEGY A. TARGET MARKET Staff High Ranking Staff While doing interviews, a couple of the UBC Staff members of higher business ranking stated that if they did not have time to do a SEEDS project, they would pass the project along to someone below them in ranking. If this happens, those who are lower in rank will feel compelled to oblige to impress those who are above them in rank. This will help increase awareness of SEEDS to a wider audience, and increase the willingness to work with SEEDS. For this reason, we believe it is most efficient to target high ranking UBC Staff members. We have compiled a list of UBC Staff who are key contacts. Please refer to Appendix B.  Faculty DEPARTMENT HEADS A major barrier in expanding SEEDS into different faculties is getting the attention of faculty members. Most faculty members are not motivated to learn about the SEEDS program or how it could benefit them. There are two benefits of contacting department heads: Department heads know which faculty members may be interested in the SEEDS program, and faculty members will be motivated to participate in projects consented by department heads. For instance, a faculty member may not be motivated to open an email given directly from SEEDS management, but they will be motivated to open an email forwarded from their department head. They will also feel compelled to oblige to any requests given by their department head since department heads monitor the success of faculty members.  18  SUSTAINABILITY RELEVANT FACULTY MEMBERS Sustainability Relevant Faculty Members include faculty members who teach courses involving sustainability, faculty members with an interest in sustainability, and faculty members with a background in sustainability. These faculty members are most likely to directly participate in SEEDS projects. We have compiled a list of UBC Department Heads and Sustainability Relevant Faculty Members who are key contacts. Please refer to Appendix C.  B. RECOMMENDED POSITIONING SEEDS is an initiative that brings together faculty, staff and students in an attempt to develop sustainability oriented projects that contribute to a sustainable campus. Faculty provide their students with a real life learning experience, students earn academic credit, and staff are provided with a way to make their business processes more sustainable. This is the main advantage and differentiating factor of SEEDS. The following is a position map which shows SEEDS relative to competition:  Positioning Map  SEEDS Positioning Statement An initiative that provides UBC students with an opportunity to apply their learning and knowledge in an effort to create a sustainable environment at UBC. Staff members are given the opportunity to connect with students in an effort to make their business units more sustainable, and faculty members are given the opportunity to enhance student learning.  19  As previously stated, SEEDS needs to focus its strategies on the main advantage of the program: faculty, students and staff can work together to make the UBC campus more sustainable. As you can see from the positioning map, there are many other initiatives, but SEEDS is the only one with a sustainable approach that requires a high level of involvement from all the parties. Most importantly, SEEDS will differentiate itself by having a good communications plan.  V. MARKETING STRATEGIES Goal: To increase awareness of the SEEDS program among the UBC community  A. OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES OBJECTIVE 1: To have at least one SEEDS project in every faculty by September 2011 Faculty members are a part of SEEDS’ target market and are an important link to students. By seeking this goal, it is necessary to measure the level of response by contacting the heads of departments and then inputting the projects completed by that faculty. Key Message: To communicate the complex SEEDS process succinctly and to emphasize the impact SEEDS has on students STRATEGY 1.1: TARGET HEAD OF FACULTY DEPARTMENTS AND MEMBERS INVOLVED IN SUSTAINABILITY Sending a periodical email with concise and relevant information about the SEEDS program will help achieve this objective. This email should be very brief because faculty members generally have limited time and they need information that is easy to process. One of the most important elements of the email will be the subject line, as it will determine whether or not the email will actually be opened. In the email, there should be a direct link to the SEEDS website and contact information to answer any doubts or comments. The email should be promotional and inviting since we want to broaden the number of faculties and increase the awareness of SEEDS. A sample email can be found in Appendix D. To reinforce and make sure that the email was read, a follow up call will be made to the faculty members in order to gauge interest and potentially find other people to contact. STRATEGY 1.2: CREATE A SEEDS INFO SESSION/MIXER This strategy will increase awareness of the program and bring faculty, students, and staff together with people who have been involved in SEEDS projects. The first portion should be a networking event with appetizers, and the second portion should be an information session where people share their experiences with SEEDS and invite others to try it. The event can be  20  something small, but very attractive. During the event, many talks and round table discussions about sustainability will take place. If the speakers are video taped, the footage can be used as promotional/informational material on the website. The event can be free, but with the aim to invite guests to give a donation to a sustainable cause. The main issue with this strategy is that it may be difficult to get people involved because of different schedules and the level of involvement in sustainability problems. Preparing an event such as this may also take substantial time, and financial funds, which are limited.  OBJECTIVE 2 Increase staff participation by at least five staff units per academic school year Last year, SEEDS was introduced into five new Staff units. Since there are fewer units to expand into each year, we want to maintain or increase this number on a year over year basis. Although we know that SEEDS management would prefer to increase the awareness among UBC staff rather than the numbers, increasing awareness will result in larger numbers unless SEEDS declines projects. Key Message: To emphasize the impact SEEDS has on students and building community at UBC STRATEGY 2.1: DIRECT CONTACT BY EMAIL AND PHONE The most common and useful method of communication for a company with a minimal budget is direct contact by email and phone. Although we are aware that SEEDS currently uses this method to an extent, we have a few suggestions for improvement. Through interviews, we have learned that there are many staff members who are interested in working with SEEDS, but have not been made aware of the program, and they do not know exactly how the program could fit their specific situation. To increase the awareness of SEEDS among staff, the primary work that must be done is lead generation research by determining the staff units in which they wish to expand into and finding the head contacts within those staff units. We have started this process in the attached excel file entitled “Staff Leads”. The second step suggested is to email staff members, asking for a casual appointment to introduce the SEEDS program. We realize that SEEDS management does not have the time to email and respond to every staff member on campus, and this is why we suggest emailing only department heads. The email must be clear that there is no commitment to participate in SEEDS, the meeting is only for information sake. While conducting interviews, it was made evident that the title of the email is more important than the content itself, and the content must be clear and concise. For a suggested email template, please see Appendix E. Lastly, staff members should be contacted by phone within a week of receiving the email. We emphasize that the point of sending emails and making phone calls is not just to increase the numbers of staff members using SEEDS, but to increase awareness of the program among those members.  21  STRATEGY 2.2: INSPIRATIONAL STORIES AND TESTIMONIALS As SEEDS has a very limited budget, it is difficult to attract new staff members to participate. A low cost solution to this is marketing the product through inspirational stories told by people who have participated in SEEDS projects. These stories could show the impact a SEEDS project had on the UBC Campus or the UBC Students participating in the project, and they would ideally affect the viewer on an emotional level. During our interviews, many staff members indicated that they were involved in SEEDS projects mainly for the benefit of the students. If we can convey the positive effects SEEDS has on students, staff members will be more motivated to use SEEDS. We suggest placing these stories on the SEEDS website, not more than one click away from the front page. Ideally, a short video with student, staff, and faculty testimonials would be placed on the homepage of the SEEDS website (See Strategy 2.3). Inspirational stories and testimonials can also be used during introductory meetings with potential clients to create enthusiasm. STRATEGY 2.3: VIDEO ON SEEDS WEBSITE A brief video on the homepage of the new SEEDS website could serve two purposes: educate potential clients and inspire potential clients. When staff members read the initial email sent by SEEDS management, they will likely visit the SEEDS website. One of the first things we want them to see is this video. The video would have to be short to keep the attention of the viewer, ideally under 1.5 minutes. The video would contain the testimonies of a staff member, faculty member, and student. The testimonies will validate the effects of SEEDS on the UBC community, and the strengths of the SEEDS program.  OBJECTIVE 3 Increase student and general awareness Although the main objectives of the marketing plan target staff and faculty, we also want to increase the awareness of SEEDS among students and other members of the UBC community. In order to measure the success of the following strategies, one would have to conduct a survey at this time as well as at a certain time in the future and compare the results. However, we think that this would require a significant amount of time which SEEDS management does not have, so we do not give specific expectations for this objective. Key Message: To communicate the complex SEEDS process succinctly STRATEGY 3.1: IMPLEMENTATION OF SEEDS SLOGAN The primary research shows that SEEDS does not have high recognition value and that the name may be misleading. For this reason, a slogan which underlines the SEEDS mission has to be created. We suggest the slogan “Building sustainable minds”, as it relates to UBC’s new slogan “a place of mind” and reveals SEEDS’s efforts to promote a more sustainable campus. For alternate slogan suggestions, see Appendix F.  22  STRATEGY 3.2: SPONSORING OF UBC EVENTS At UBC, there are many events and conferences which SEEDS can sponsor in an effort to increase awareness of the program. Many of these events and conferences are likely being held by individuals who have participated in SEEDS. This does not mean that SEEDS should pay for advertising, but rather management should talk to staff and faculty contacts who they have built relationships with, and see if any of them will do SEEDS a favor. Moreover, those who run sustainability-related events may be willing to mention or inform their audience about the program. STRATEGY 3.3: BRANDING ON CAMPUS Few people are aware of the fact that many SEEDS projects have already been implemented on campus. For this reason, SEEDS needs to brand itself through projects and their implementation, using for example the new slogan in order to increase the recognition value. As an example, if a SEEDS project results in stickers being put on waste bins which indicate the usage of the bin, the stickers could also include the SEEDS slogan. The UBC community would then associate the positive image of recycling with SEEDS. This would help increase awareness and promote a positive image. STRATEGY 3.4: CONSTANT IMPROVEMENT OF THE WEBSITE The SEEDS website is being updated as this marketing plan is being written. However, we have some general suggestions to improve the website: We suggest having three main headings on the homepage of the SEEDS website: Faculty, Staff, and Students. Each heading would be a link to a sub-section of the website relevant for the targeted audience. If SEEDS management can find someone with expertise, it would be good if Search Engine Optimization could be performed. This would ensure that the website can be found easily if someone searches “Sustainability at UBC” in a search engine. As previously mentioned, a video on the website could provide testimonials. An alternate option would be to provide a video which briefly describes the SEEDS program. Include the website address wherever possible: business cards, emails, presentations, etc. STRATEGY 3.5: ADVERTISING ON CAMPUS An inexpensive alternative to advertising is self-created posters or banners. They can be hung all over campus in an effort to increase awareness among staff, students, and to a lesser extent faculty. We are aware that placing posters all over campus is not a very sustainable act in itself, so environmentally friendly materials must be used.  23  STRATEGY 3.6: THE UBYSSEY NEWSPAPER ARTICLE SEEDS management must convince someone at The Ubyssey Newspaper to write an article on the SEEDS program. Without an established contact at The Ubyssey, this task would be very hard. The first step which must be taken is to approach a staff member at the UBC, and convince them to participate in a SEEDS project. Since The Ubyssey is a newspaper, there are likely many ways in which they can run their processes more sustainably. Once relationships are established and a project is completed, it should be much easier to convince The Ubyssey to run an article about SEEDS. An alternative motive for The Ubyssey may be to write an article themselves about how their processes are more sustainable thanks to the help of SEEDS. The brand image of The Ubyssey will be improved, and SEEDS will receive free advertising. To help start this process, we have attached several leads from The Ubyssey in the MS Excel file entitled “Staff Leads”.  OBJECTIVE 4 Increase financial, human and data management resources available to SEEDS The SEEDS program lacks sufficient financial resources to either support projects financially or to hire additional staff in order to create a reasonable follow-up and customer/project data base. STRATEGY 4.1: APPLY FOR INCREASED BUDGET AND THIRD-PARTY FUNDING As projects can sometimes not be realized due to a lack of financial support, it is important to the success of the SEEDS program that some financial resources are available. Third-party funding would be a great way for SEEDS to solve this problem. Governmental funding as well as NGOs might be able to support SEEDS financially (e.g. as sponsors). In addition, SEEDS may be able to receive further funding from UBC once awareness of the program increases. With increased awareness and support for the SEEDS program, UBC will feel pressured to contribute funds to a positive cause. SEEDS management could use this budget to sponsor SEEDS projects, or increase staff numbers. STRATEGY 4.2: INCREASE THE OVERALL NUMBER OF SEEDS STAFF, PREFERABLY BE VOLUNTEERS SEEDS will only be able to cope with one or more projects in each faculty and the respective follow-up with additional human resources. Student volunteers offer a great possibility to do so, and some of the work might even be incorporated into a student research project. If volunteers take on less complicated work at SEEDS, such as lead generation and initial contact with staff and faculty members, management will be able to focus on important strategic decisions. We are convinced that if SEEDS is well promoted it will be easy to find students who are willing to allocate a certain amount of their free time to sustainability on campus. The UBC career website offers a volunteer section which might helpful be in order to find volunteers.  24  STRATEGY 4.3: IMPLEMENTATION OF A DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (CRM) SEEDS has a 9 year history on campus, yet does not have a database of clients with past interactions recorded. As we understand, an access database has been developed, but is not yet in use. We suggest that SEEDS implements a CRM (Customer Relationship Management System). A CRM is a database system that helps management know their customers, and stay in contact with their customers. It can also help evaluate the success of SEEDS by compiling statistical information about customers. In the CRM, SEEDS management should include: • • • • •  Duration of the project Persons and faculties/departments involved Success of the project Feedback from the participants (follow-up) Who initiated the project (staff, faculty, student, SEEDS)  Most of this information can be collected through a phone call after the completion of the project, or by a survey sent by email. Furthermore, the CRM should include a method of scheduling future tasks to keep in contact with customers. For instance, once a project is completed, SEEDS management will schedule a future task in the system so that in a few months time, they are reminded to contact the customer. This contact could be a simple email (similar to the one shown in Appendix E), reminding the customer about SEEDS, and asking if they have any new projects in which SEEDS could participate. The system would also include any leads who have not yet worked with SEEDS (such as the one’s we have generated), and the input of any contact with them, such as introduction emails. We realize that this may be slightly more time consuming, but down the road it will help SEEDS management stay organized. For a list of prioritized strategies, please see Appendix G. For an suggested implementation schedule, please see Appendix H  VI. MONITORS & CONTROLS A. DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM With the implementation of a data management system, SEEDS management will be able to view the progress of their organization. The database will be able to generate reports which will show how many projects each faculty has participated in, as well as what staff units have been involved in SEEDS projects. Since SEEDS management wants to have one project in every faculty by September 2011, the progress of this goal should be reviewed at the beginning of each academic term. SEEDS should be expanding into atleast one new faculty unit each term, as well as five new staff units each year. If this is not occuring, the contingency plan will take effect.  25  B. PARTICIPANT SATISFACTION After each project, it is important to collect information from participants about their experience with SEEDS. An electronic survey can be created that can be emailed to participants. There is always the risk that not everyone will fill out the online survey; however, if it is kept short and under five minutes it should mitigate this problem. By storing and analyzing this data, SEEDS can continually improve the experience of participants increasing the probability that they will return or spread the word about the program.  VII. CONTINGENCY PLANS At each point of review, there is a chance that SEEDS management may not be attracting one new faculty per academic term, and 5 new staff units per academic year. If this is the case, management must put more effort into generating leads in different faculties and staff units, and building relationships with these people who have not yet participated in SEEDS. Since management has a time constraint, effort which was previously being put towards staff members who have already used SEEDS should shift slightly towards those who have not used SEEDS. As for the website, should there be no resources or expertise for search engine optimization, it might be possible to realize this through a student project. In the case that SEEDS does not have the resources to promote the program with a video containing testimonies on the website, the video could be substituted by success stories or inspirational quotes from program participants. Lastly, there is the possibility that SEEDS is not granted additional funding. In this case, management should gather detailed information on why SEEDS was rejected and on what is required in order to get funding. In accordance with these requirements, SEEDS should reapply as soon as possible. In addition, applications with further organizations should be considered. If UBC rejects additional financial support for the program, it is important to gather information on what SEEDS needs to change in order to get additional funding. In this case, increased general awareness of the program may become helpful.  Logo/ Slogan:  We have already come up with different suggestions for a logo and a slogan. However, the SEEDS team might not be satisfied with those, in which case they have to develop alternatives. A problem here could be a lack of human resources. To overcome this problem, the logo and the slogan could be created in a student research project, which could also involve research on the opinion of different groups on several suggestions. Should it not be possible to create both a logo and a slogan, it is of great importance that either a logo or a slogan be created which captures the mission of SEEDS and overcomes the possibly misleading name.  Sponsoring of UBC events:  In case the sponsoring of UBC events and conferences is not possible without paying for it, we suggest trying harder on other strategies, as there is no real alternative way than approaching responsible people among students and faculty.  26  Branding:  In general, SEEDS should use any possibility to show their logo/ slogan in public. However, it might be possible that there are not many opportunities for this, such as when projects are implemented. In this case, SEEDS should actively try to promote the program, e.g. through publication of project outcomes or advertising (as mentioned as another strategy).  Website:  The new website with the database of sustainability-related classes might not be accepted or used frequently. In this case again, SEEDS needs to actively promote it by such means as already mentioned under branding. Should there be no resources or expertise for search engine optimization, it might be possible to realize this in a student research project. In the case that SEEDS does not have the resources to promote the program with a video containing testimonies, the video could be substituted by success stories or inspirational quotes from program participants.  3rd-party funding:  There is the possibility that SEEDS is not granted additional funding. In this case, management should gather detailed information on why SEEDS was rejected and on what is required in order to get funding. In accordance with those requirements, SEEDS should reapply as soon as possible. In addition, applications with further organizations should be considered. If UBC rejects additional financial support for the program, it is important to gather information on what SEEDS needs to change in order to get additional funding and work towards this. In this case increased general awareness of the program might come in helpful.  Additional staff:  In case it is difficult to find volunteers for the program, the advertisement on the UBC career website should be reviewed. Moreover, increased awareness of SEEDS might help find volunteers after a certain period of time.  Customer relationship management tool:  In our opinion, this tool is absolutely vital for the future success of the program. Thus, there are no alternatives to the implementation. However, problems might arise in the continuous management and updating of the system. In case data is missing or not updated, SEEDS management should delegate tasks to single persons, so that there is always one responsible staff member. Moreover, checklists for each project could ensure the CRM tool is always updated.  27  VIII. WORKS CONSULTED Sauder School of Business. (2009). Sustainability Concentration. Retrieved October 19, 2009 from http://www1.sauder.ubc.ca/en/Programs/Bachelor%20of%20Commerce/Program%20 Overview/Options%20Specializations/Sustainability%20Concentration.aspx UBC Alma Mater Society. (2009). AMS Sustainability. Retrieved October 15, 2009, from http:// www2.ams.ubc.ca/index.php/student_government/subpage/category/resources_and_links/ UBC Alma Mater Society. (2009). AMS Lighter Footprint Strategy. Retrieved October 15, 2009, from http://www2.ams.ubc.ca/index.php/student_government/subpage/category/ams_lighter_ footprint_strategy/ UBC Alma Mater Society. (2009). Innovative Projects Fund. Retrieved October 15, 2009, from http://www2.ams.ubc.ca/index.php/ams/blog/innovative_projects_fund/ UBC Directories. (2009). Faculties and Schools. Retrieved October 19, 2009 from http://www. ubc.ca/directories/facultiesschools.html UBC Faculty and Administrative Directory. (2009). Search the Directory. Retrieved October 19, 2009 from https://www.directory.ubc.ca/index.cfm UBC Faculty of Arts. (2009). Well-being, Happiness, Sustainability. Retrieved October 20, 2009 from http://www.arts.ubc.ca/nc/faculty-amp-staff/single-page-news/browse/4/article/97/wellbeing-happiness-and-sustainability.html UBC Human Resources. (2009). Agreement on Conditions of Appointment for Faculty. Retrieved October 19, 2009, from http://www.hr.ubc.ca/faculty_relations/agreements/ appointmentfaculty.html UBC IRES. (2009). Institute for Resources, Environment & Sustainability. Retrieved October 13, 2009 from http://www.ires.ubc.ca/about/index.html UBC Learning Exchange. (2009). Community Service Learning (CSL). Retrieved October 13, 2009 from http://www.learningexchange.ubc.ca/about.html UBC PAIR. (2009). Faculty and Staff. Retrieved October 19, 2009 from http://webservices.publicaffairs.ubc.ca/clients/pa/apps/experts/public/index.php UBC Public Affairs. (2009). Find UBC Experts. Retrieved October 19, 2009 from http://webservices.publicaffairs.ubc.ca/clients/pa/apps/experts/public/index.php UBC SALA. (2009). Sustainability. Retrieved October 14, 2009 from http://www.sala.ubc.ca/category/tags/sustainability  28  UBC Scarp. (2009). School of Community and Regional Planning. Retrieved October 16, 2009 from http://www.scarp.ubc.ca/content/welcome-scarp UBC Sustainability Office. (2008). Case Study “Social, Ecological, Economic Development Studies (SEEDS).” UBC Sustainability Office. (2006/07). The UBC Sustainability Report 2006-2007. Retrieved October 30, 2009 from http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/pdfs/ar/UBC-Sustainability_Report_20062007-final.pdf UBC Sustainability Office. (2008/09). The UBC Sustainability Report 2008-2009. Retrieved October 30, 2009 from http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/pdfs/ubcsustainabilityreport_0809.pdf UBC Sustainability SEEDS (2009). UBC Social, Ecological, Economic Development Studies. Retrieved October 11, 2009 from http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/seeds.html UBC VPRO. (2009). Vice President Research Office. Retrieved October 10, 2009 from http://www.research.ubc.ca/UGConf.aspx UBC URO. (2009). Undergraduate Research Opportunities. Retrieved 10, 2009 from http://uro.ubc.ca/2009/06/29/hello-world/  29  IX. APPENDICES APPENDIX A Interview Questions FACULTY WHO’VE USED SEEDS - What is your official UBC faculty position? ie. fulltime prof, assistant prof, associate prof? - Where/how did you first hear about SEEDS, if you remember? - Can you think of a better approach for SEEDS to communicate the program to other faculty members? - How long have you been involved with SEEDS? How many projects have you completed during that time? How many were implemented? - What was your motivation for using SEEDS? - Do you think this is only motivating in your case or for all faculty members in your division? - What do you think motivates others to use SEEDS? - What do you think are the strengths and weaknesses of SEEDS? - What benefits did you have? How did you benefit? or What did you gain? - Did you encounter any problems during your SEEDS project? If yes, what were they, and how could they be prevented in the future? - Could you have achieved the project with the same level of success without SEEDS’ support? - Are you planning to continue to work with SEEDS in the future? Why? Why not? - Did you ever consider a sustainability program or a method other than SEEDS? - Are you involved in other sustainability initiatives at UBC (personal, professional, or academic?), other than SEEDS? - Last question: Anything else you want to tell us about SEEDS? FACULTY WHO HAVEN’T USED SEEDS - Prior to us emailing you, had you heard of SEEDS? If no, what did you think SEEDS was? - If you had heard of SEEDS, where/how did you hear about it? - Interviewer: Come up with brief description of SEEDS that remains constant across interviews - How interested would you be in incorporating a for-credit sustainability project into any of your classes? Scale of 1-10? - How could a SEEDS project fit into your faculty? - What would motivate you to use SEEDS? or What would it take for you to consider sponsoring a SEEDS project? - What do you think is the best way to be contacted about on-campus programs such as SEEDS and sustainability issues? - Would you be willing to allocate your time to a SEEDS project? If no, what would SEEDS have to offer for you to be willing to do a SEEDS project? - Are you at all involved with sustainability at UBC? (Personally, professionally, or academically? Be clear about what you mean) - What deters you from using SEEDS? -If this were changed would you use SEEDS? - Interviewer: For those who haven’t heard of SEEDS, leave a post card  30  STAFF WHO’VE USED SEEDS - What was the SEEDS project you did/ what was your role? - What is your UBC Staff position? - Where/how did you hear about SEEDS? - Can you think of a better approach for SEEDS to communicate the program to other staff members/departments? (Either in their staff unit or anywhere on UBC) - How long have you been involved with SEEDS? How many projects have you completed during that time? How many were implemented? - What was your motivation for using SEEDS? - What do you think motivates others to use SEEDS? - From your perspective, what do you think are the strengths of SEEDS? - What benefits did you have? - From your perspective, what do you think are the weaknesses of SEEDS? - Did you encounter any problems during your SEEDS project? If yes, what were they, and how could they be prevented in the future? - Are you going to continue to work with SEEDS in the future? Why? - Did you ever debate using another program or another method other than SEEDS? - Other than through SEEDS, are you at all involved with sustainability at UBC? - Last question: Anything else you want to tell us about SEEDS? STAFF WHO HAVEN’T USED SEEDS - Prior to us emailing you, had you heard of SEEDS? If no, what did you think SEEDS was? - If you had heard of SEEDS, where/how did you hear about it? - Interviewer: Come up with brief description of SEEDS that remains constant across interviews - How interested would you be in incorporating a sustainability project into your department? Scale of 1-10? - How could a SEEDS project fit into your department? - What would motivate you to use SEEDS? Or What would it take for you to consider doing a SEEDS project? - What do you think is the best way to be contacted about on-campus programs such as SEEDS and sustainability issues? - Would you be willing to allocate your time to a SEEDS project? If no, what would SEEDS have to offer for you to be willing to do a SEEDS project? - Are you at all involved with sustainability at UBC? - What deters you from using SEEDS? -If this were changed would you use SEED?  31  APPENDIX B STAFF CONTACTS Department  Name  Position  Email  Telephone  Athletics and Recreation  Lloyd Campbell  lloydc@interchange.ubc.ca  604 822-4704    Bookstore  Anna Li  Manager - UBC Aquatic Centre  annali@interchange.ubc.ca  604-822-6699  Bookstore  Debbie Harvie  Associate Director Operations Managing Director  Sustainable Purchasing  dharvie@interchange.ubc.ca  sustainable.purchasing@ubc.ca  604-822-5814  Building Operations  David Woodson  Managing Director  david.woodson@ubc.ca  Building Operations  Lori Takenaka  lori.takenaka@ubc.ca  Building Operations  Tariq Din  Health, Safety and Environment Coordinator  604 822-0971; 604 802-1707 [Cell]    Building Operations  “Sustainable Purchasing”  *Centre for Health Services and Dr. Morris Barer Policy Research *Classroom Services/ Enrolment Services  Scott Cameron  Enrolement Services  Rella Ng  Enrolement Services  Cindy Nahm  External, Legal, and Community Relations  Ms. Ashley Castellan  Financial Services  Ray McNichol  Health Services  External, Legal, and Community Relations  Michelle Aucoin  HR/Pay Systems  Media Group Pulp and Paper Centre Student Development Services Student Health Services Supply Management Treasury Treasury Treasury  Manager, Health Safety and Environment  tariq.din@ubc.ca  Director, CHSPR Professor  mbarer@chspr.ubc.ca  Research Communication Manager  scott.cameron@ubc.ca  604 822-9425  Manager, Registration Services  cindy.nahm@ubc.ca rella.ng@ubc.ca  604 822-8802  Associate Director  604-822-1885; 604-209-7854 [Cell] 604 822-5992  604 822-3730  Manager, UBC 2010 Olympic ashley.castellan@ubc.ca and Paralympic Secretariat  604 827-3969  Director, UBC 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Secretariat  michelle.aucoin@ubc.ca  604 822-8548  Director  Associate Director  mcnichol@finance.ubc.ca  madeleine.macivor@ubc.ca  604 827-5018  Dr Patricia Mirwaldt  Director  patricia.mirwaldt@ubc.ca  604 822-7011  Greg Lakowski  Director  Manager  sharon.rowse@ubc.ca  604.822.6630  tvoon@interchange.ubc.ca kenwong@ece.ubc.ca janet.teasdale@ubc.ca  604 822-8566 604 822-6049  First Nations House of Learning Madeleine MacIvor  HR for Alumni Engagement  604 822-6732; 604 838-4004 [Cell]    Sharon Rowse  Tony Voon Director Ken Wong Janet Teasdale Senior Director Kathy Brand Manager Allan Blighton Mail Disribution Coordinator Arlene Chan Marketing Manager Jenny Lum Director, Decision Support Peter Smailes Treasurer  glakowsk@finance.ubc.ca  604-822-8942  604 822-6739  kathy.brand@ubc.ca  604 822-7758   604 822-9495    arlene.chan@ubc.ca jenny.lum@ubc.ca  604 822-6555 604 822-8305    peter.smailes@ubc.ca  604 822-9625    32  APPENDIX C Faculty Contact List Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Department  Biomolecular and Pharmaceutical Chemistry  Name  Dr. David Grierson  Clinical Pharmacy Dr. James McCormack Clinical Pharmacy Dr. Mary Ensom Clinical Pharmacy Dr. Marc Levine Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics  Dr. Helen M. Burt  Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics  Kishor M. Wasan  Pharmacy Practice  Dr. David W. Fielding  Position  Email  Telephone  Professor & Acting CoChair  jmccorma@interchange.ubc.ca  604-822-1710  Professor; Director, Doctor of Pharmacy Program  ensom@interchange.ubc.ca  604-875-2886  levine@interchange.ubc.ca  604-822-5027  Angiotech Professor of Drug Delivery, Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Studies  burt@interchange.ubc.ca  604-822-2440  Professor, Chair of Pharma- kwasan@interchange.ubc.ca ceutics  (604) 822-4889  Professor & Acting Chair, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs  dwfield@interchange.ubc.ca  604-822-5447  Professor and Chair  Professor & Acting Co-Chair  dgrierso@interchange.ubc. ca or dgrierson@interchange. ubc.ca  604-827-3353  Faculty of Science Department  Name  Position  Email  Telephone  Botany  Dr. Paul Harrison  harrison@science.ubc.ca  604 822-3659  Chemistry  Dr. Edward Grant  Associate Dean/ Associate Professor Professor and Head  edgrant@chem.ubc.ca  Computer Science  Dr. William Aiello  Head Professor  head@cs.ubc.ca  Microbiology and Immunology  Michael Gold  Professor and Head  michael.gold@ubc.ca  Physics and Astronomy  Dr. Douglas Bonn  Statistics  Dr. Nancy Heckman  Professor/ Head Physics  Zoology  Dr. William Milsom  Botany  Earth and Ocean Sciences  Dr. Fred Sack  Dr. Gregory Dipple  Head/Professor  Professor and Head  Professor and Department Head  fsack@interchange.ubc.ca  head@eos.ubc.ca or gdipple@eos.ubc.ca  bonn@phas.ubc.ca; head@phas.ubc.ca  nancy@stat.ubc.ca or head@stat.ubc.ca  milsom@zoology.ubc.ca or head@zoology.ubc.ca  604 822-3554; 604 827-4510; 604 827-4564  604 822-2471; 604 827-3475; 604 827-4562   604 822-6056   604 822-4107   604 822-4070; 604 822-3401 [Lab]    604 822-3150; 604 822-2535; 604 822-1997 604 822-0570    604 822-2310; 604 822-5799 [Lab]; 604 822-3168  33  Sauder School of Business - New Sustainability Concentration (REQUIRED COURSES) Course  Name  Comm 495: Business and Sustainable Development  Peter Nemetz  Comm 486C: Corporate Social Angela Kelleher Responsibility and Business Ethics  Position  Email  Telephone  Sessional Instructor  angela.kelleher@sauder.ubc. ca  604 822-3607  Comm 486E – Environmental Management Comm 486F – Sustainability Marketing  Poli 351 – Environmental Politics and Policy  Econ 370 – Benefit-Cost Analysis and the Economics of Project Evaluation  Clive Chapple  Professor  cchapple@interchange.ubc.ca  604 822-9367  Cons 425 - Sustainable Energy: Policy and Governance  George Hoberg  Professor  george.hoberg@ubc.ca  604 822-3728  Hist 396 – Environmental History of North America  EOSC 312 - Planet, People, and Sustainability  34  APPENDIX D SAMPLE FACULTY EMAIL Subject: Sustainability in the (Faculty name) Faculty Dear _________, Just as an introduction, I am from a branch of the sustainability office at UBC entitled UBC SEEDS, and we would like to help the (Insert Faculty Name) become more sustainable. UBC SEEDS is a program that combines the knowledge of UBC Staff, Faculty, and Students. When a UBC Staff member has a concern regarding sustainability in their department, they contact the SEEDS office. The SEEDS office then finds a UBC Faculty member who is willing guide students in actively researching the sustainability issue and coming up with solutions to the problem. No financial costs are involved. For a closer look at UBC SEEDS, feel free to look around our website: http://sustain.ubc.ca/seeds.html If you’re available, I would love to come by for a quick (Insert time frame) to give you an idea of how we you can be part of this program. Let me know if any of the following times work for you: MON, JAN 4 @ 10AM or 2PM TUE, JAN 5 @ 11AM or 3PM If there is a better date/time, feel free to suggest one and I’ll do my best to make it work. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact me at (Phone number) or by response email. Regards, (Insert Name) (Insert Contact Information) Notes - Title has to be relevant to recipient. Recipient is unlikely to open if the title includes something they are unfamiliar with, such as the name “SEEDS” - If referred or share a mutual connection with faculty member, state in first paragraph. - Suggest multiple dates and times so that they feel more compelled to meet.  35  APPENDIX E SAMPLE STAFF EMAIL Subject: Sustainability in the (Department name) Department Dear _________, Just as an introduction, I am from a branch of the sustainability office at UBC entitled UBC SEEDS, and we would like to help the (Insert Department Name) become more sustainable. UBC SEEDS is a program that combines the knowledge of UBC Staff, Faculty, and Students. When a UBC Staff member has a concern regarding sustainability in their department, they contact the SEEDS office. The SEEDS office then finds a UBC Faculty member who is willing to teach a course in which students are involved in actively researching the sustainability issue and coming up with solutions to the problem. No financial costs are involved. For a closer look at UBC SEEDS, feel free to look around our website: http://sustain.ubc.ca/seeds.html If you’re available, I would love to come by for a quick (Insert time frame) to give you an idea of how we could help your department. Let me know if any of the following times work for you: MON, JAN 4 @ 10AM or 2PM TUE, JAN 5 @ 11AM or 3PM If there is a better date/time, feel free to suggest one and I’ll do my best to make it work. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact me at (Phone number) or by response email. Regards, (Insert Name) (Insert Contact Information) Notes - Title has to be relevant to recipient. Recipient is unlikely to open if the title includes something they are unfamiliar with, such as the name “SEEDS”. - If referred or share a mutual connection with staff member, state in first paragraph. - Suggest multiple dates and times so that they feel more compelled to meet.  36  APPENDIX F ALTERNATIVE SLOGANS “The Path to Sustainability” “Creating a Sustainable Campus”  APPENDIX G PRIORITIZED STRATEGIES • Strategy 1.1: Target Head of Faculty DEPARTMENTS and Members Involved in Sustainability • Strategy 1.2: Create a SEEDS INFO SESSION/MIXER • Strategy 2.1: Inspirational Stories and Testimonials • Strategy 2.2: Direct Contact by Email and Phone • Strategy 2.3: Video on SEEDS Website • Strategy 3.4: Constant improvement of the website • Strategy 3.6: The Ubyssey Newspaper Article • Strategy 4.1: Apply for increased budget and third-party funding •Strategy 4.3: Implementation of a data management system (CRM)  NON-PRIORITIZED STRATEGIES • Strategy 3.1: Implementation of SEEDS slogan • Strategy 3.2: Sponsoring of UBC events • Strategy 3.3: Branding on campus • Strategy 3.5: Advertising on campus • Strategy 4.2: Increase the overall number of SEEDS staff, preferably be volunteers  37  APPENDIX H IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE IMMEDIATELY • Strategy 1.1: Target Head of Faculty DEPARTMENTS and Members Involved in Sustainability • Strategy 2.1: Gather Inspirational Stories and Testimonials • Strategy 2.2: Direct Contact by Email and Phone • Strategy 3.4: Constant improvement of the website • Strategy 3.6: The Ubyssey Newspaper Article  o Contact Ubyssey key contacts and try to set up SEEDS project • Strategy 3.1: Implementation of SEEDS slogan • Strategy 3.3: Branding on campus • Strategy 4.2: Increase the overall number of SEEDS staff, preferably be volunteers JANUARY 2010 • Strategy 3.2: Sponsoring of UBC events • Strategy 3.5: Advertising on campus • Strategy 4.3: Implementation of a data management system (CRM) FEBRUARY 2010 • Strategy 2.3: Video on SEEDS Website AUGUST 2010 • Strategy 1.2: Create a SEEDS INFO SESSION/MIXER • Strategy 4.1: Apply for increased budget and third-party funding DECEMBER 2010 • Strategy 3.6: The Ubyssey Newspaper Article  38  

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