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Sustainability Mapping Project Cullum, Alissa; Gunther, Bianca; Ristaniemi, Emilia 2006

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Sustainability Mapping Geography 472 Sally Hermansen  Bianca Gunther Alissa Cullum Emilia Ristaniemi  INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................ 3 Vision.............................................................................................................................. 4 SPECIFICATIONS........................................................................................................... 4 Client............................................................................................................................... 4 Audience.......................................................................................................................... 5 THE GREEN MAP SYSTEM ......................................................................................... 5 Employing Green Map Symbols...................................................................................... 5 Community Mapping Exercise........................................................................................ 7 DESIGN AND RESEARCH ............................................................................................ 8 UBC Maps....................................................................................................................... 8 Gathering Information .................................................................................................. 10 Map Design................................................................................................................... 11 Map Construction ......................................................................................................... 12 Tour Design .................................................................................................................. 13 Brochure Design ........................................................................................................... 14 ISSUES ENCOUNTERED............................................................................................. 14 Data............................................................................................................................... 14 Generalization/Simplification ....................................................................................... 15 Colour ........................................................................................................................... 15 Communication ............................................................................................................ 15 CONCLUSION ............................................................................................................... 16 APPENDICES..................................................................................................................18 Appendix I ................................................................................................................. 18 Appendix II................................................................................................................ 19 Appendix III .............................................................................................................. 21 Appendix IV............................................................................................................... 23 Appendix V ................................................................................................................ 25 CITATIONS.....................................................................................................................28 RESOURCES AND DRAFTS........................................................................................29  -2-  INTRODUCTION  A culture of sustainability is arising at UBC. In 1997 UBC adopted a sustainability development policy becoming the first university in Canada to do so, and subsequently, in 1998 the Campus Sustainability Office was launched. UBC is now fully engaged in bringing sustainability issues to the forefront of everyday campus life, and has been transforming the face of the campus reflecting these advancing sustainability principles. During the last eight years UBC has introduced a wide variety of sustainability initiatives and practices throughout campus life, and UBC is now the only Canadian university to receive Green Campus recognition from the US-based National Wildlife Federation (Sustainability Office).  In April 2004 Alice Miro and Nick Mason undertook the initiative to map the various sites that represented sustainable practices on the UBC campus. Their work resulted in the published map “Discover UBC - A Self Propelled Tour of Canada’s Leader in Campus Sustainability.” This map has since been circulated and used by a broad audience, however, earlier this year it was brought to our attention that this map is now outdated. The rapidly changing campus coupled with ever-evolving sustainability initiatives has rendered the existing map obsolete. Thus, we have proposed to update and redesign the Discover UBC map with the support of the SEEDS program and the Sustainability Office.  -3-  Vision Our vision was to create an all-inclusive map and brochure package that is an easy to read, visually intuitive summary of UBC initiatives and achievements. The Brochure is designed to promote awareness of the UBC Sustainability Office, its programs and partners to students and visitors alike, as well as to provide a gateway for the audience to further pursue knowledge of sustainable practices. The map is designed so that the audience may explore and familiarize themselves with the UBC campus and its various facets of sustainability. Overall, the map/brochure package attempts to encompass all aspects of UBC sustainability under one umbrella.  The map/brochure specifications, the Green Map system, and the design process will be described herein, followed by a discussion of the issues encountered.  SPECIFICATIONS  Client Publications by the Sustainability Office (SO) now have a new ‘look and feel’ in order to establish a visual identity for UBC Sustainability. Consistency with the SO style was of utmost importance; therefore, it was necessary to follow these constraints. For instance, we were confined to using precise fonts, headings, subheadings, and body text, as well as particular colours (Appendix I). Both pros and cons arose out of these specifications namely revolving around decision-making processes.  -4-  Audience The SO wanted the sustainability map to reach a wide audience including first year students, faculty, community members, tourists, and World Urban Forum visitors. To ensure that the guide could be effectively utilized by such a diverse audience, we would have to produce an aesthetically captivating map that was age and value neutral. Granted, we would have to balance audience needs with the client specifications.  THE GREEN MAP SYSTEM  Employing Green Map Symbols From the beginning of this project, we identified several reasons for using the Green Map symbol system. Firstly, our map was to be delivered to the SEEDS program at UBC SEEDS stands for social, ecological and economic development studies. Green Map symbols represent both ecological and cultural ideas. Secondly, if the map is to have an international audience during the World Urban Forum and beyond, people may be familiar with the system and may have seen other Green Maps. A third reason to use the symbols is that the first two UBC sustainability maps used them. Maintaining the symbol system allowed continuity across the reinvention of this map, however we felt it necessary to go back to the source, the complete Green Map legend, to make our symbol choices. The Green Map legend can be found in Appendix II.  There are many benefits in using the Green Map template. The symbols are meant to be an adaptable ‘shared visual language.’(Green Map) There is flexibility in the  -5-  symbols, as local mapmakers are given freedom to assign precise definitions. In our case, for example, the ‘Eco-building’ symbol was renamed as ‘Green building” to associate with UBC’s ‘green building’ projects.  One disadvantage we encountered is that the Green Map system does not include a symbol for libraries, nor a symbol with a definition that could be ‘stretched’ for the purpose. We felt it was necessary to identify all campus libraries to increase the usefulness of the map for students. The symbol we created approximates the Green Map style, a white letter within a black square; however we made it smaller to distinguish it from an official symbol.  We studied how the first two campus sustainability maps used the Green Map system to see what worked well, and what we needed to change to have the new map meet our vision. The first map, produced in 2004, had 26 symbols in the legend. The second map, the Discover UBC map, used 29 symbols. Several of these symbols were vital to showing how UBC is one of the most sustainable campuses in North America, such as Green Building, Organic Groceries, Farmer’s Market, Cultural Site, Special Garden and Social/Political Resources. Other symbols such as Star Gazing Site, Scenic View, Historical Feature and World Music, we viewed as auxiliary to the main sustainability message and were left off our map. We found the overall use of symbols distracted from the utility of the previous maps. Therefore, in an effort to employ cartographic principles such as KISS, we significantly reduced the number of symbols on our map.  -6-  Community Mapping Exercise In an effort to include a larger group of students in the decision making process around social sustainability (a somewhat fluid concept), we conducted a seminar exercise in a 4th year Cartography class. Having evaluated all Green Map symbols we chose 23 that we felt best encompassed ‘social sustainability.’ From these the students could choose from and place on a campus map.  By providing symbols, our intention was not to limit students in their definition of social sustainability, but to encourage the thought process. Many of the symbols had very broad, open-ended definitions such as ‘significant building.’ In hindsight, the process of thinking about social sustainability may have been better served by a simple campus map and free reign over design and symbolism. With or without symbols, however, the students involved in this exercise had limited knowledge about sustainable campus resources and sites. On average the groups placed 26 symbols on each map, many of which were common across every map. The students recognized the most celebrated green buildings, composting at residences, the Museum of Anthropology, many features at the Student Union Building, gardens and Pacific Spirit Park, among other things. Interestingly, all three groups placed a blight site symbol at the Buchanan towers.  The main point we gathered from the seminar exercise was that students could readily identify sustainability in areas and buildings that they are familiar with. Having thoroughly researched sustainability on campus however, we discovered many more buildings and initiatives that are not so well known and advertised. The fact that our  -7-  seminar students were not aware of these gave us all the more incentive for our map to be captivating, informative and widely distributed on campus.  DESIGN AND RESEARCH  UBC Maps To research our map and to find design ideas we looked at many campus maps in existence. We found five campus maps online, one in a brochure and the two previous Campus Sustainability maps. The purpose and audience for these maps were quite varied: from first-year students, to library users, to tourists and visitors. Our map needed to cater to a wide audience so we viewed and considered them all.  UBC’s online, interactive ‘Wayfinding’ service was one of our most heavily used resources for locating buildings and project sites quickly (our knowledge of campus was tested and found inadequate to the task of placing building names). The Wayfinding map is useful to students and campus visitors alike, and is easily accessible. Searching for some obscure buildings (e.g. the In-Vessel Composter) produced only addresses and not a map location; however, the search window allows the user to quickly find the location with Google maps. Interestingly, this map and the brochure version of this map are the only ones to represent South Campus. We had hoped to include South Campus on our map because there are several sustainability initiatives south of Thunderbird Road. UBC Farm in particular would have been wonderful to represent, as no UBC map officially  -8-  draws the farm’s boundaries. Unfortunately we were constrained by scale and the length of an 11x17” page so only North Campus was represented.  Though the Wayfinding map may be UBC’s most widely used reference map, it is not as up-to date as one might expect. Judging by building outlines, the base-line information appears to be drawn from a common PDF from Campus and Community Planning. Buildings erected before 2004 are drawn with detail that probably came from an AutoCAD file. Everything built after this, such as the Michael Smith Building, the Life Sciences Centre and Hawthorn Place, are represented as large rectangles with dashed outlines. Our data came from up-to-date AutoCAD files from Campus and Community Planning and included more detailed outlines for new buildings. For this reason we may have the claim to the most current campus map.  A map we must credit for inspiration is the printable Campus Map for new and first-year students from the student section of the UBC website (Appendix III, Fig.1) (http://students.ubc.ca/current/campus.cfm). The map uses colour effectively to distinguish classrooms, residences, libraries, services, sports facilities & gardens. Though over five hues are used, the map is visually pleasing and well organized. This use of colour demonstrates that many colours can be complementary if they are similar in value and saturation. The roads drawn in white on a green background also appealed to us and we followed this example. Our map maintains more detailed buildings and roads than this printable map. We tried hard to achieve a balance between accuracy, usefulness and visual appeal.  -9-  As mentioned before, the SO office wanted a map that would cater to a very wide audience. The first two sustainability maps were hugely influential in our map design choices but we believe that neither of these maps catered to all our map users. The first map, produced by Alice Miro and Nick Mason in 2004, was clearly targeted to a younger student audience, evidenced by the monkey graphic and use of the word ‘sex’ to draw attention. The second map maintained the same symbols and tour route but used base information from a standard campus PDF. The mapmaker did not adhere to many cartographic principles. Firstly, all base features are coloured in two shades of blue, neither of which are properly explained in the legend. Green Map symbols are not clearly placed or easily deciphered. The map also lacks a scale bar.  As cartographers we found the second map lacked the clarity and we felt that by using other types of symbolization the map information could be communicated much more effectively. The task of communicating all the sustainability initiatives at UBC was made somewhat easier by the brochure space on the back of the map. The next step was to decide what information could be symbolized on the map, and what information was better suited to be included as text.  Gathering Information We wanted the sustainability map to be as comprehensive as possible. Our main source of sustainability information was the Sustainability Office and its website. For further information on any project or program we were referred to more detailed reports,  - 10 -  websites and personal interviews. For detailed information on every project and program included in the brochure and map, refer to Appendix IV.  Spatial data was acquired from UBC Campus and Community Planning and from the Department of Geography spatial database. Below is a list of all the base information we gathered.  •  Roads and Walkways  •  Buildings  •  Building names  •  Parks and Recreational Areas  •  UBC outline  •  Parking lots- Above and Underground  For a complete list of the spatial data, data source location, data format type, date and the programs used refer to Appendix V.  Map Design After all the relevant information was gathered, we had to decide how to design our map and display all of the information. We discussed which projects and programs could be shown on the map and which couldn’t. This determined how many features we would have on the map and how they would be symbolized. Any features that did not have an address had to be excluded from the map and talked about in the brochure.  - 11 -  Important sustainability features were symbolized with green map symbols and Green Buildings were further highlighted in green, a colour associated with the environment. EcoTrek buildings, because so numerous, were coloured a pale yellow to distinguish them from other buildings without dominating the map. Any buildings that are not part of EcoTrek or any green program were shaded grey so as not to grab attention.  Roads were represented in white so that they would not dominate the visual hierarchy and to improve the aesthetic quality of the map. Pedestrian walkways are distinguished by a grayish purple. Feature outlines were kept as thin as possible and building shapes were simplified to maximize clarity. We included the inset in consideration of our wide audience who may not be familiar with Vancouver. Both the inset and legend were placed on the right hand side to balance the weight of buildings on the west side of campus. Legends were kept as simple as possible to avoid confusing the map reader. Font styles were specified by the client and we used these fonts to maintain the Sustainability Office ‘look and feel.’ We maximized the scale of the map to include as much of campus as possible. For a complete list of all the programs and projects included on the map refer to Appendix IV.  Map Construction Preparing the data involved many time-consuming steps. Below is a brief list of the steps required in transforming data into a useable format.  - 12 -  •  Imported AutoCAD files and generalized features due to jagged/irregular shapes  •  Roads were traced from the supplied AutoCAD File  •  Added all building names manually  •  Vancouver Inset was created from GVRD data on the Geography Server  •  Tour Locations were chosen and the Route digitized  •  Digitized missing buildings using Building websites/addresses and UBC maps  For a complete list of the spatial data, data source location, data format type, date and the programs used refer to Appendix V.  Tour Design In creating the tour we first consulted the previous sustainability maps. The first thing we noticed was that the tour descriptions were on the reverse side of the maps. We felt it was more user friendly to have the tour with the map. Our tour stops feature most Green Buildings, points of interest such as the Museum of Anthropology and important campus locations such as the SUB. The distance of the tour is approximately the same as the first tours, a reasonable 2 hours at a sustainable jaunt. The tour is coloured red on the map with the red provided by the SO colour palette. Tour descriptions provide information about why a building or location is considered sustainable.  - 13 -  Brochure Design In designing the brochure, we applied the same principles we used in making the map. That is, to appeal to a wide audience, maintain balance, utilize the sustainability office’s look and feel and to convey the sustainability message. Note: because the brochure was not the main focus of this Geography 472 project, we have not included all the design and construction description.  ISSUES ENCOUNTERED  Data We had originally hoped to create the map using GIS so that it would be easily updatable, and attribute tables such as Ecotrek information could be spatially joined (Appendix V Table 2). After spending some time on a wild goose chase for campus GIS data, we found that it did not exist, or was not available. Some data was found on the Geography Department server, however it had no metadata. We explored this data and found major flaws, such as building names being assigned to the wrong buildings, and building outlines overlapping each other. Campus and Community Planning provided us with a complete and updated set of AutoCAD files that we transformed for GIS. This produced relatively accurate data and very detailed building outlines (Appendix III, Fig.2). Because building labels were lost, or complicated in the transformation, and editing polygons in ArcGIS is more difficult, we chose to abandon the idea of creating the map in GIS, and continued using CorelDraw and Adobe Illustrator instead.  - 14 -  Generalization/Simplification The roads had to be hand digitized in order to simplify the original, very complicated GIS spatial files. For our purposes the use of the GIS roads would have caused clutter and confusion, since the roads were initially represented as lanes with dividers etc. For visual acuity it was absolutely necessary to eliminate this unnecessary data.  Colour We tried to work within the confines of the sustainability colour palette for the map; however, it was difficult to work with the limited choices available. As a compromise, we chose various hues as best we could for the most visually pleasing affects. That being said, minor choices such as selecting different values of green were complicated by the fact that we did not have access to a publishing printer. Using different computer screens and a printer that is not calibrated for CKMY colours made all our colour choices estimates.  Communication – Between Offices, Departments and People Gathering information about sustainability initiatives at UBC became time intensive when our search went beyond the Sustainability Office website. Obtaining responses from the right people was difficult and sometimes we didn’t receive a response at all. For instance, we were unable to include exact information about sustainability street because no one actually knows what features will be ready to showcase for the World Urban Forum this June. Stormwater management projects were also difficult to pin down.  - 15 -  Shortly before the completion of the map we received some information, which was hastily included. It should also be noted that we attempted to gather information about University Town sustainability initiatives, however, communication with the contact was unsuccessful.  We had hoped that this sustainability map might be incorporated with the GreenGuide project underway at the Design Centre for Sustainability at UBC. The GreenGuide has a similar mission to ours, to promote social, ecological and economic sustainability, but its scope is the entire Greater Vancouver Region. A meeting with GreenGuide organizers to facilitate this effort sharing was not fruitful, and our project continued on independently even though UBC will be featured on both maps.  What we found most surprising is the larger issue of spatial data sharing on campus. We found no GIS data available for UBC properties, and no indication that it is in use by Campus Planning or even the Engineering Department. We have discovered that a GIS data set for UBC is being built within the Geography department for a Graduate student project, however it is unknown what will become of the data afterwards.  CONCLUSION  Through all of our efforts, we have learned a great deal about what it is like to work under client specifications and audience requirements. We have experienced the  - 16 -  difficult decision making process that goes into information selection and generalization as well as specific design choices. The context of our choices being made under the possibility of this map being published renders our decisions all the more important. The reality of our project has made the experience of producing a product that effectively communicates a vision all the more valuable. In the end, we hope our map will successfully engage users in the growing culture of sustainability at UBC and spread the principles of sustainable living to other communities across the globe.  - 17 -  Appendix I  - 18 -  Appendix II  - 19 -  - 20 -  Appendix III Fig. 1  - 21 -  - 22 -  Appendix IV MAP FEATURES 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23  BUILDINGS GREEN MAP SYMBOL C.K. Choi Green Building Fred Kaiser Building Green Building Life Science Building Green Building The Liu Centre for the Study of Global Issues Green Building Micheal Smith Building Green Building Aquatic Ecosystem Resource Laboratory (AERL)Green Building ICICS/CS Expansion Green Building Swing Space Building Green Building Technology Enterprise Facility III Green Building First Nations House of Learning Cultural Site International House Cultural Site Museum of Anthropology Cultural Site Chan Centre for the Performing Arts Cultural Site Sustainability Street Ecodesign/planning feature The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre Library David Lam Library MacMillan Library Woodward Library Education Library Music Library Math Library Asian Library Library Koerner Library  24 EcoTrek  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10  1 2 3 4  Coloured to Distinguish  FEATURES Recycled materials, energy efficient Photovalactic cells LEED Gold Fly-ash concrete construction Energy efficient LEED Silver: energy efficient, natural materials Energy and water efficient Natural Ventilation, energy efficient LEED Silver, private research building Cultural Centre Cultural Centre Cultural Centre World Music Composting, eco-features Library Library Library Library Library Library Library Library Library  STREET ADDRESS 1855 West Mall 2332 Main Mall 2350 Health Sciences Mall 6476 North West Marine DR 2185 East Mall 2202 Mail Mall 2366 Main Mall 2175 West Mall 6190 Agronomy RD 1985 West Mall 1783 West Mall 6393 NW Marine Drive 6265 Crescent Road Stores Road 1961 East Mall 2033 Main Mall 2357 Main Mall 2198 Health Sciences Mall 2125 Main Mall 6361 Memorial Road 6357 Agricultural Road 1871 West Mall 1958 Main Mall  Infrastructure upgrades to reduce energy and water useMultiple locations: see Table 3  FEATURES WITHIN BUILDINGS AMS Resource Groups (5) Equity Office Bluechip cookies (only fairly traded) Sprouts Bernouli's Bagels(only fairly traded) Bike Co-op Campus Information Centre Place Vanier (some ftc) Totem Park(some ftc) Sage Bistro  SYMBOLS ON MAP FEATURES Social Political Resources Social Sustainability, equity Social Political Resources Social Sustainability, equity Fair trade Fairly Traded Products Organic Produce/Natural FoodOrganic food, Fairly Traded Products Fair trade Fairly Traded Products Included in map text box Campus Bike Program Information Centre General Campus Information Centre Fair trade, Fairly Traded Products Fair trade, Fairly Traded Products Organic Produce/Natural FoodOrganic food from UBC farm  6138 Student Union Boulevard. 6138 Student Union Boulevard. 6138 Student Union Boulevard. 6138 Student Union Boulevard. 6138 Student Union Boulevard. 6138 Student Union Boulevard. 1935 Lower Mall 2525 West Mall 6331 Crescent Road  PARK AND RECREATIONAL FEATURES Botanical Gardens Nitobe Garden Rose Garden Pacific Spirit Park  GREEN MAP SYMBOL Special Garden Special Garden Special Garden Parklands/recreation area  STREET ADDRESS 6068 South Campus Road 1903 Wesr Mall NW Marine and Main Mall SW to NW Marine Drive  FEATURES Open green space Open green space Open green space Open green space  - 23 -  STREET ADDRESS  CAMPUS SUSTAINABILITY TOUR 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11  TOUR STOP LOCATION NUMBER ON MAP Student Union Building Museum of Anthropology Sage Bistro The Liu Centre for the Study of Global Issues C.K. Choi Nitobe Garden First Nations House of Learning Sustainability Street Aquatic Ecosystem Resource Laboratory (AERL) Fred Kaiser Building Life Science Building  12 Micheal Smith Building  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11  FEATURES University Student Hub Cultural Centre Organic food from UBC farm Fly-ash concrete construction, Energy efficent Recycled materials, energy efficient Open green space Cultural Centre Composting, eco-features LEED Silver: energy efficient, natural materials Photovalactic cells LEED Gold  12 Energy efficient  STREET ADDRESS 6138 Student Union Boulevard. 6393 NW Marine Drive 6331 Crescent Road 6476 North West Marine DR 1855 West Mall 1903 Wesr Mall 1985 West Mall Stores Road 2202 Mail Mall 2332 Main Mall 2350 Health Sciences Mall 2185 East Mall  1 2 3 4 5  BROCHURE FEATURES SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVES SEEDS Renew program UBC Trek Program UBC Waste Management Ecotrek  TEXT ON BROCHURE "" "" "" "" ""  FEATURES STREET ADDRESS Academic programs for sustainability studies/initiatives 2329 W Mall (Sustainability Off Building restoration, recycle building materials 2329 W Mall (Sustainability Off Alternative transportation/reduce pollution and traffic 2329 W Mall (Sustainability Off Recycling and Wate Management 2329 W Mall (Sustaianbility Off Infrastructure upgrades to reduce energy and water2329 use W Mall (Sustaianbility Off  1 2 3 4 5 6  DID YOU KNOW? SECTION C.K. Choi Biodiesel Project In-vessel Composter UBC Farm Green Power Ecological Footprint  TEXT ON BROCHURE "" "" "" "" "" ""  FEATURES Recycled materials, energy efficient 1855 West Mall Alternative Fuel from Recycled Cooking Oil 2329 W Mall (Sustainability Off Composing of UBC Food Waste Unknown Organic and Sustaianble Farming Pracitces 6168 Soth Campus Road UBC purchase certificates 2329 W Mall (Sustaianbility Off Sustainabilty Concept from UBC Faculty William Rees N/a  Stormwater management at UBC  Ecodesign/planning feature Stormwater management  - 24 -  Na  Appendix V Table 1  SPATIAL DATA Data Name  Data Source Date  Source Location  Source Format  Software used  UBC Roads  2006  Campus and AutoCad Community Planning  Imported to GIS and then Manually generalized roads, exported to Corel Draw simplified road complexity to Version 11 show location of road but removed any further information since road locationwas the most important information  UBC Buildings  2006  Campus and AutoCad Community Planning  Imported to GIS and then Manually generalized buildings exported to Corel Draw into simplified building shapes to reduce complexity Version 11  Parks and Recreation 2006 Areas  Campus and AutoCad Community Planning & UBC Campus MapsPDF Version 2005  Imported to GIS and then Manually generalized park and exported to Corel Draw recreational area shapes Version 11  Building Names  2006  UBC Campus PDF Map PDF Version 2005 and variuos specific building websites  Corel Draw  Manually inserted text names onto Buildings  Road Names  2005  UBC Campus PDF Map PDF Version 2005  Corel Draw  Manually inserted text names onto roads  Vancouver Inset  2006  The Department GIS of Geography Spatial Data= GVRD Data  Imported from GIS into Inset created in GIS, only main Corel Draw roads were selected  - 25 -  Programs Transformations/ Processes  Table 2 ECOTREK BUILDINGS OLD ADMINISTRATION BUILDING  ASIAN CENTRE  GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION BUILDINGANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY BUILDING THE BRIMACOMBE BUILDING BIORESOURCE ENGINEERING ANNEX  FREDERIC LASSERRE BUILDING  HUT M-22 ANIMAL SCIENCE - BEEF CATTLE RESEARCH BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES BUILDING- WEST, NORTH SOUTH WING BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES BUILDING - WORKSHOP BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES - PAPER RECYCLING/FLAMMABLE STORAGE FACILITY BOTANY TRAILER UNIT  CAMPUS PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT II  BOTANICAL GARDENS SCHOLARS' RETREAT  NW MARINE DRIVE RESEARCH HENRY ANGUS BUILDING HENRY ANGUS BUILDING ADDITION  DAIRY CATTLE TEACHING AND RESEARCH UNIT BOTANICAL GARDENS - LUNCHROOM BOTANICAL GARDENS - GREENHOUSE AND AQUATIC CENTRE WORKSHOP BOTANICAL GARDENS - GREENHOUSE, ALPINE ARTS ONE BUILDING GARDEN HUT O-4  BOTANICAL GARDENS - WORKSHOP  BIORESOURCE ENGINEERING ANNEX 2  BOTANICAL GARDEN - GARDEN PAVILION  HUT B-5 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT RESEARCBOTANICAL GARDENS WORKSHOP (TRAILER) INSTITUTE  BOTANICAL GARDEN CENTRE - RECEPTION AN EDUCATION CENTRE BOTANICAL GARDEN CENTRE - LOOKOUT TOWER BROCK HALL - WEST WING BROCK HALL ANNEX BUCHANAN TOWER CHAN CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS CHEMISTRY BUILDING CHEMISTRY BUILDING NORTH WING ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES FACILITY SOLVENT & SILVER RECOVERY LAB ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES FACILITY - OFFICE CHEMISTRY STORAGE ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES FACILITY SOLVENT STORAGE AREA ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES FACILITY CHEMICAL WASTE PROCESSING & STORAGE BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES FACILITY - PCB EQUIPMENT STORAGE CONTAINERS CHEMISTRY BUILDING EAST WING  AUDITORIUM  BOTANICAL GARDEN CENTRE - GATE HOUSE AND CHEMISTRY BUILDING SOUTH WING SHOP-IN-THE-GARDEN  AUDITORIUM ANNEX OFFICES A CEME TRAILER  BOTANICAL GARDEN CENTRE - CAMPBELL BUILDING FOREST SCIENCES EQUIPMENT STORAGE B  CENTRE FOR INTEGRATED COMPUTER SYSTE RESEARCH (CICSR) CHEMISTRY PHYSICS BUILDING  LADNER CLOCK TOWER  FOREST SCIENCES CENTRE  SCHOOL OF FAMILY AND NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES BUILDING HAIDA HOUSE MORTUARY HOUSE MACMILLAN ANNEX A  COAL AND MINERAL PROCESSING LABORATORYFOREST SCIENCES EQUIPMENT STORAGE A PONDEROSA CENTRE FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE J. B. MACDONALD BUILDING FOOD SCIENCE BUILDING CENTRE FOR RESEARCH IN WOMEN'S STUDIES &OLD FIRE HALL GENDER RELATIONS SING TAO BUILDING FISH AND GAME BRANCH WORKSHOPS FISH AND GAME BRANCH WORKSHOPS - BOAT DUKE HALL STORAGE NEVILLE SCARFE BUILDING - LECTURE BLOCK FISHERIES CENTRE - HUT B-8 NEVILLE SCARFE BUILDING - TEACHER WOOD PRODUCTS LABORATORY EDUCATION OFFICE  MACMILLAN ANNEX B PARKING AND SECURITY SERVICES BUILDING HORTICULTURE BUILDING HORTICULTURE HUT BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE  ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES FACILITY INCINERATOR SOUTH STAFF OFFICE BLOCK (EDUCATION) FOREST SCIENCES GREENHOUSE INTERNATIONAL HOUSE MATH/STATS RESOURCE CENTRE FORESTRY FIELD HOUSE SOUTH CAMPUS INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCE CENTRE ANIMAL SCIENCE SMALL RUMINANT RESEARCH INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCE CENTRE LECTURE CHEMICAL ENGINEERING BUILDING UNIT THEATRE ADDITION CIVIL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING BUILDINGGAS GUN FACILITY JAPANESE TEA HOUSE - NITOBE GARDENS CIVIL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING C. K. CHOI BUILDING FOR THE INSTITUTE OF GEOGRAPHY BUILDING LABORATORIES ASIAN RESEARCH THE LEONARD S. KLINCK BUILDING GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES CENTRE GEORGE F. CURTIS BUILDING CIVIL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES CENTRE - OFFICE BLOCKGEORGE F. CURTIS BUILDING ADDITION STRUCTURES LAB MACLEOD BUILDING GEOPHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY BUILDING HUT M-21 HUT M-18 THEA KOERNER HOUSE DAVID LAM MANAGEMENT RESEARCH CENTRE HUT M-17 THEA KOERNER HOUSE ADDITION ROBERT F. OSBORNE CENTRE - UNIT I CECIL GREEN PARK HOUSE, COACH HOUSE,& ROBERT F. OSBORNE CENTRE - UNIT II FOREST SCIENCES TRAILER SQUASH COURT THE LEON AND THEA KOERNER UNIVERSITY EMPIRE POOL FIRST NATIONS LONGHOUSE CENTRE THE LEON AND THEA KOERNER UNIVERSITY UBC-IBM LAW AND COMPUTERS CENTRE/UBC LIU CENTRE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CENTRE ADDITION 2 LEGAL AID CLINIC INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR CRIMINAL LAW GEORGE CUNNINGHAM BUILDING ADDITION JACK BELL BUILDING FOR THE SCHOOL OF REFORM AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE POLICY SOCIAL WORK (PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES) GEORGE CUNNINGHAM BUILDING LIU CENTRE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES SOUTH CAMPUS TELECOMMUNICATION HUB S (PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES) NEVILLE SCARFE BUILDING - LIBRARY  H. R. MACMILLAN BUILDING  - 26 -  SOUTH CAMPUS SUBSTATION - SWITC STATION 12KV LIBRARY PROCESSING CENTRE SOUTH CAMPUS WAREHOUSE MAIN SUBSTATION SEDGEWICK LIBRARY UNIVERSITY SERVICES BUILDING STUDENT UNION BUILDING (SUB) MAIN LIBRARY CAMPUS PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT I MAIN SUBSTATION - SWITCHING STAT CHEEZE FACTORY ENGINEERING ANIMAL SCIENCE - AQUACULTURE TEA PLANT OPERATIONS NURSERY UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY RESEARCH CENTRE MATHEMATICS BUILDING B.C. BINNING M.F.A. STUDIOS TASK FORCE BUILDING MATHEMATICS ANNEX PLANT OPERATIONS EXTERIOR STORAGE TOTEM SHEDPOLE SHED JOHN OWEN PAVILION AND ALLAN MC AMS DOG BARN PLANT SCIENCE GREENHOUSE SPORTS MEDICINE CENTRE JAMES MATHER BUILDING HENNINGS BUILDING VIVARIUM D.H. COPP BUILDING ADDITION 2 HEBB BUILDING BERWICK MEMORIAL CENTRE SHERWOOD BUILDING - PHYSIOLOGY AUDIOLOGY AND SPEECH SCIENCES TRAILER PLANT SCIENCE FIELD STATION RESEARCH HUT MS-3 HEALTH SCIENCES PLANT SCIENCE GARAGE WESBROOK BUILDING HUT MS-4 HEALTH SCIENCES TOTEM FIELD STUDIOS HEADER HOUSE WESBROOK PLACE STORES ROAD ANNEX WESBROOK ANNEX - ANIMAL CARE UN WOODWARD BIOMEDICAL LIBRARY PLANT SCIENCE FIELD BUILDING PONDEROSA OFFICE ANNEX G ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY BU FRANK FORWARD BUILDING POULTRY SCIENCE - QUAIL UNIT MARY MURRIN HALL MORRIS AND HELEN BELKIN ART GALLERY POULTRY SCIENCE - BROILER/BREEDER HUT UNITB-6 - FISHERIES CENTRE & ZOOLO ANIMAL CARE CENTRE - LARGE WILD MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY POWER HOUSE ZOOLOGY ANIMAL CARE CENTRE - SMALL WILD M MUSIC BUILDING POWER HOUSE - METER STATION ZOOLOGY ANIMAL CARE CENTRE - ADMINISTRAT JOHN OWEN PAVILION ANNEX POWER HOUSE - OIL STORAGE FACILITY BUILDING NORMAN MACKENZIE HOUSE (PRESIDENANIMAL CARE CENTRE - MEDIUM LAB FORESTRY ANNEX 6 BUILDING RESIDENCE) ENGINEERING HIGH HEAD ROOM LABORATORY PLANT OPERATIONS ANNEX F  SOIL SCIENCE ANNEX 3  BOTANY ANNEX  ANIMAL CARE CENTRE - RODENT BRE  PONDEROSA ANNEX H ARTS ONE BUILDING ANNEX PLANT OPERATIONS NURSERY - GARDE GEOPHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY BUILDING ANIMAL - NORTH SCIENCE - MAIN SHEEP UNIT RESIDENCE AND LAB PLANT OPERATIONS NURSERY - SOIL SHED GEOPHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY BUILDING ANIMAL - SOUTH SCIENCE - SHEEP BREEDING PLANT OPERATIONS NURSERY - PROPA GEOPHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY BUILDING ANIMAL - WEST SCIENCE - SHEEP DIGESTIBIL HOUSE PLANT OPERATIONS NURSERY - GREENCONTINUING STUDIES IN DAVID LAM MA ANIMAL SCIENCE - SHEEP BREEDING NO. 1 RESEARCH CENTRE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES BUILDING - WOR JOHN OWEN PAVILION AND ALLAN MC WALTER C. KOERNER LIBRARY ADDITION 1 SPORTS MEDICINE CENTRE - ADDITIO DOUGLAS KENNY BUILDING D.H. COPP BUILDING WEST MALL OFFICES HUT B-3 - FISHERIES CENTRE FRIEDMAN BUILDING AUDITORIUM ANNEX OFFICES B PULP AND PAPER CENTRE MEDICAL SCIENCES BLOCK C PONDEROSA OFFICE ANNEX A BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES BUILDING - WOR D.H. COPP BUILDING ADDITION PONDEROSA OFFICE ANNEX B ADDITION 2 BOTANY GREENHOUSE 1, 2 FRIEDMAN BUILDING ADDITION PONDEROSA OFFICE ANNEX C BOTANICAL GARDENS - GREENHOUSE MEDICAL SCIENCES BLOCK C ADDITION PONDEROSA OFFICE ANNEX D BOTANICAL GARDENS - SHADE HOUSE WOODWARD BIOMEDICAL LIBRARY ADDITION PONDEROSA OFFICE ANNEX E OCEANOGRAPHY ANNEX KOERNER GALLERY PONDEROSA OFFICE ANNEX F ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY BU NETWORKS OF CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE HENNINGS BUILDING PENTHOUSE ADDITION ISABEL MACINNES HALL ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY BU BROCK HALL - EAST WING TOTEM FIELD STUDIOS ADDITION ANNE WESBROOK HALL POULTRY SCIENCE - ADMINISTRATION A BUCHANAN BUILDING (BLOCK's A, B, C, D, & E) LABORATORY NEVILLE SCARFE BUILDING - CLASSROOM POULTRY BLOCK SCIENCE - NUTRITION UNIT NEVILLE SCARFE BUILDING - OFFICE BLOCK POULTRY SCIENCE - PHYSIOLOGY UNIT THE LEONARD S. KLINCK BUILDING ADDITION POWER HOUSE - ADDITION 1 THE LEON AND THEA KOERNER UNIVER POWER HOUSE - ADDITION 2 CENTRE ADDITION 1 MACMILLAN ANNEX C, D, E, F POWER HOUSE - ADDITION 3 NORMAN MACKENZIE HOUSE (PRESIDEN FORESTRY CONTAINER NURSERY 1 RESIDENCE - GARAGE) FORESTRY CONTAINER NURSERY 2 MAIN SUBSTATION ADDITION DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO STUDENT UNION BUILDING (SUB) - ADDITION 1 OLD FIRE HALL - TRAILER 1, 2, 3 STUDENT UNION BUILDING (SUB) - ADDITION 2  - 27 -  Citations Abramson, Ruth. “A New Kind of Street Smart, UBC Sustainability Street.” 8 April 2006. <http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/sustainabilitystreet/>. “Annual Report – Progress Towards a Sustainable Campus.” University of British Columbia Sustainability Office: May 2006. “Building A Sustainable Community, UBC Waste Management Annual Report 2003/2004.” The University of British Columbia Department of Plant Operations. 25 March, 2006. <http://www.recycle.ubc.ca/aboutus.htm>. “C.K. Choi Building Tour Script.” University of British Columbia Sustainability Office: 2003. “Fred Kaiser Building Script.” University of British Columbia Sustainability Office: No Date. “Green Map.” Green Map Systems. 15 March, 2006 <http://www.greenmap.org/> “Green Building Case Studies – Fred Kaiser Building.” Omicron/Architects Alliance: May 2005. “Inspirations and Aspirations-The UBC Sustainability Strategy 2006-2010.” University of British Columbia Sustainability Office: Feb. 21, 2006. “Life Sciences Centre (LSC) Tour.” University of British Columbia Sustainability Office: No Date. “Liu Centre (for the study of global issues) Tour.” University of British Columbia Sustainability Office: 2003. “Sustainability Office, Canada’s Leader in Campus Sustainability.” University of British Columbia Sustainability Office Website. 15 March, 2006 <http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/>. “UBC Farm Program Summary, 2004.” UBC Farm. 25 March 2006. <http://www.landfood.ubc.ca/ubcfarm/documents/program_summary_2004.pdf>. “UBC and B.C. Government Partnership Injects $120 Million into Campus Facilities Renewal.” Media Release: Dec. 5, 2005, UBC Public Affairs. 20 March, 2006. <http://www.publicaffairs.ubc.ca/media/releases/2005/mr-05-141.html>. “Wayfinding at UBC.” University of British Columbia Campus and Community Planning: 21 Jul. 2004. 15 March 2006. <http://www.maps.ubc.ca/ PROD/index.php>.  - 28 -  Resources and Drafts  - 29 -  GREEN COLLEGE  TAKE A TOUR OF CAMPUS SUSTAINABILITY  CECIL GREEN PARK HOUSE  BUCHANAN TOWER MEMORIAL ROAD B  L  NO  RT  L  AUDITORIUM  FRASER PARKADE  UNIVERSITY BO ULEVARD  TO FOURTH AVE  LAM  L ANGUS  MAIN MALL  LOWER MALL  MARINE DR. RES IDENCE  1  WEST SWING PARKADE SPACE  FOOD SCIENCES  HEBB  CHEMISTRY  SCARFE  WESBROOK  BIOLOGICAL MICHAEL SMITH SCIENCES BLDG  L  9  COPP  AERL  Y S T RE E T  WOODWARD  CIVIL & MECHANICAL LABS  HEALTH SCIENCES PARKADE  CEME  UBC HOSPITAL  PURDY PAVILION  ARINE DRIVE  KAISER MACMILLAN  E ST M  L  ICICS/CS  12  N OR  THW  PULP AND PAPER CENTRE FOREST SCIENCES CENTRE TOTEM RESIDENCES  THUNDERBIRD RESIDENCE  Y BO  ULEV ARD  To 10  th Av  K in gs  wa y  e  GREEN BUILDING ECODESIGN FEATURE CULTURAL SITE PARKLANDS/RECREATION AREA  DETWEILLER PAVILION  CHEM. & BIOL. ENGINEERING  MACLEOD  11  ERSIT  UNIVERSITY VILLAGE (SHOPS, SERVICES, RESTAURANTS)  IRC  L  10  UNIV  FRIEDMAN  FORWARD BLDG  RITSUMEIKAN-UBC HOUSE  MACDONALD (DENTISTRY)  WESBROOK MALL  I LIT  Broadway  Student Union Building (SUB) The SUB is UBC’s University Hotspot. Stop at Blue Chip Cookies or Bernoulli’s Bagels for a fair trade coffee, or Sprouts for some organic fare from the UBC Farm. The SUB is also home to many student resources such as the AMS Resource Groups and the Equity Office. Don’t forget to stop by the Bike Co-op to take advantage of the UBC community Bike Program.  EMPIRE WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM POOL GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION  BOOKSTORE  TAINAB  4th Ave 16th Ave  Bus Bus Loop Loop  CUNNINGHAM  SUS  10th Ave  41st Ave  AQUATIC CENTRE  GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES & MUSEUM CAMPUS PLANNING UNIVERSITY SERVICES BLDG  SUB  Future Bus Loop  KENNY PSYCHOLOGY  UBC  S.E . M a rine Dr  HENNINGS  CENTRE FOR CONTINUING STUDIES  ST. JOHNS COLLEGE  Hastings  STUDENT REC CENTRE  KLINK BLDG COMPUTER SCIENCE  JACK BELL  PACIFIC SPIRIT PARK  L  2  L  8  PONDEROSA  Ave  IRVING K. BARBER LEARNING CENTRE  KOERNER  FIRST NATIONS MATH HOUSE OF LEARNING L GEOGRAPHY  PLACE VANIER RESIDENCES  BROCK HALL  RD  CAREY HALL  VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY (IONA) ST.ANDREW’S COLUMBIAN HOUSE RESIDENCE LEGAL CLINIC WALTER GAGE RESIDENCE CONFERENCES & NORTH ACCOMMODATION PARKADE  E  LEVA  Main  E RIV ED IN AR TM ES  7  C BUCHANAN (ARTS) A  BOU  G ranville Oa k C am bie  FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE BELKIN ART C. K. CHOI 6 SING TAOMUSIC GALLERY ASIAN BLDG LASSERRE CENTRE  5  LLOR  ST. MARK’S COLLEGE  ST. ANDREW’S HALL  L  D  LIU CENTRE  NITOBE MEMORIAL GARDENS  CURTIS (LAW)  NCE  To 4t h  VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY (CHANCELLOR)  CHAN CENTRE FOR SAGE/PETER WALL UNIVERSITY CENTRE ROSE THE PERFORMING ARTS THEA GARDEN KOERNER 4 HOUSE  INTERNATIONAL HOUSE  PACIFIC SPIRIT PARK  CHA  BOLLERT HALL  3  NORMAN MACKENZIE HOUSE  HW  ANTHROPOLOGY & SOCIOLOGY  MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY  PACIFIC SPIRIT PARK  SPECIAL GARDEN FAIR TRADE SHOP  LIFE SCIENCES  ORGANIC/NATURAL FOOD SOCIAL/POLITICAL RESOURCES  T.E.C.III  THUNDERBIRD RESIDENCE  L  BIRD THUNDER  ACADIA PARK UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS AND RESIDENCES  RD  BOULEVA  2  LIBRARY COMPOSTING GREEN BUILDING PARK/GARDEN  TENNIS CENTRE  WEST MALL  HAWTHORN PLACE  OSBORNE CENTRE  ECOTREK BUILDING THUNDERBIRD WINTER SPORTS CENTRE  PEDESTRIAN ZONE BUILDING BERWICK MEMORIAL CENTRE  FORNITEK  ➢  EAST MALL  HAWTHORN PLACE  BOTANICAL GARDENS CENTRE  STORMWATER MANAGEMENT PROJECTS  N  RCMP & FIREHALL CHILD CARE SERVICES BUILDINGS  E DRIVE  OLD MARIN  UBC BOTANICAL GARDENS UBC BOTANICAL GARDENS  J.OWEN PAVILION  2 TO SOUTH CAMPUS UBC FARM, NRC FUEL CELL RESEARCH & IN-VESSEL COMPOSTER  Student Union Building: The hub of student life on campus. See inset for details.  2  Irving K. Barber Learning Centre: Usually referred to as the Main Library. The heritage core of the library is being preserved, and the new portion of the building features an energy efficient radiant heating and cooling.  7  Museum of Anthropology: An iconic cultural site, promoting understanding and respect for world cultures.  8  3  4  Sage Bistro: One of UBC’s best kept secrets, serving fresh organic produce from the UBC Farm, in season.  5  Liu Centre for the Study of Global Issues: Constructed with green practices such as salvaging materials from the previous building on site and using environmentally friendly fly-ash concrete. Energy conserving features include natural air circulation and efficient heating and cooling.  6  250m  250m = 3 Min. Walking Time  THUNDERBIRD STADIUM  1  0  This map was created April 2006 as a SEEDS project by Alissa Cullum, Emilia Ristaniemi, and Bianca Gunther. Basemap data from UBC Campus and Community Planning. "Green Map® Icons and Logo Copyright (c) Green Map® System, Inc. 2003. All rights reserved".  HAMPTON PLACE  C.K. Choi Building: UBC’s first green structure, featuring recycled building materials, energy efficiency, reduced water consumption and composting toilets. It has attracted international attention including an award from the American Institute of Architects. The Nitobe Memorial Gardens: A beautiful green space for quiet walks and contemplation.  energy. This building also features passive solar lighting and heating, natural materials, and renewable wood sources. 10  Sustainability Street: Showcasing emerging concepts in sustainability research.  11  Fred Kaiser Building: Awarded LEED Silver rating. Features water conserving washrooms, non-toxic wood products, recycled building materials and natural ventilation. Photovoltaic panels on the rooftop generate electricity from daylight, helping reduce the building’s energy use to 45% of a regular building’s.  First Nations House of Learning (Long House): Based on the Coast Salish model out of respect for the Musqueum people who historically inhabited the Point Grey peninsula. Its four major components: a resource 12 Life Sciences Centre: Awarded LEED Gold centre, the Great Hall, the Longhouse and certification for its responsible construction the Spirit Renewal Hall. practices, use of recycled materials as well as 9 Aquatic Ecosystem Resource Laboratory energy and water efficiency. Over 50% of the (AERL): Awarded LEED Silver rating. Natural open area has been restored with planting, ventilation and less sheet metal ducting of which 87.5% is of native or adaptive reduced the use of both materials and species.  

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