UBC Undergraduate Research

SEEDS Streamlining Administration Yuen, Clara 2010

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
Comm436SEEDSStreamliningProject _4_.pdf [ 1005.6kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 1.0108061.json
JSON-LD: 1.0108061+ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 1.0108061.xml
RDF/JSON: 1.0108061+rdf.json
Turtle: 1.0108061+rdf-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 1.0108061+rdf-ntriples.txt
Citation
1.0108061.ris

Full Text

     Comm 436 Project  SEEDS Streamlining Administration  Final Report  Clara Yuen Rodge Uy Katherine Ng Edmond Shin      2 April 12, 2008  Dear Ms. Brenda Sawada:   We have greatly welcomed the opportunity to work on the SEEDS Streamlining process with  you. Having studied the materials you supplied, we have a better understanding of what needs  to be done to accomplish your goals. Enclosed within this report are both the analysis of your  current work systems and practices, and the details of our recommended solution.   You will find all our recommendations involve streamlining currently‐employed technology and  software, so the brunt of the cost will be borne by additional staff training, and the hiring  specialists to modify the more complicated aspects of the current work systems (i.e.~ modifying  the access database).  It has been a pleasure working for you, and look forward to working with you again in the  future. If you have any questions with the contents of this document, please feel free to email  us for clarification.  Respectfully,   Clara Yuen  Edmond Shin  Katherine Ng  Rodge Uy  Comm 436   3 Table of Contents  0.0 Executive Summary………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……………4  1.0 Purpose of Document……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………5  2.0 Background……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………5  3.0 Objectives and Scope of the Project……………………………………………………………………………………………………………...5  3.1 Objectives……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..5  3.2 Scope…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….5  4.0 Main Project Activities…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..5  4.1 Weekly Meetings with Brenda Sawada and her Staff…………………………………………………………………………………….5  4.2 Internal Student Conferences………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..5  4.3 Choice of systems development method……………………………………………………………………………………………………….6  5.0 Information Sources………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………6  5.1 Stakeholders…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………6  5.2 Internal Documents……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….6  5.3 External Information……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..6  6.0 Special Consideration…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...6  7.0 Findings…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………6  7.1. The Organizational Environment……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…6  a. The Organization:  UBC SEEDS…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………6  7.2 The Information System and Use of Information Technology…………..……………………………………………………….…10  7.3 Planning………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………12  8.0 Alternatives, Recommendations, Feasibility, Implementation……………………………………………………………………..13  8.1 Work Practices………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…………………13  8.1.1 Sending Thank You Cards, Recognition Letters, and Memos……………………………………………………..………………13  8.1.2 “Summary Project and Stats” Document…………………………………………………………………..………………………………14  8.1.3 Annual Summary Report…………………………………………………………..………………………………………………………………14  8.1.4 Project Identification…………………………………………………………………………..……………………………………………………15  8.2 Participants…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………15  8.2.1 Documentation and Training in Access………………………………………………..……………………………………………………15  8.3 Technology………………………………………………………………………………………………….………………………………………………15  8.3.1 Upload projects onto the MySQL database…………………………………………………………….…………………………………15  8.3.2 User Interface for Access Forms………………………………………………………………………..………………………………………16  8.3.3 Compiling feedback forms and feedback data entry…………………………………………………….……………………………19  Appendix…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..21   4 0.0 Executive Summary  Since its inception eight years ago, SEEDS has been using a non‐integrated administration system  composed of an Access database, Mail Merge templates, administrative task summaries, handwritten  documents, and other non‐automated processes. This legacy administration system has been rendered  obsolete by the increased number of projects, and our recommended solution involves streamlining the  current work systems through the following streamlined practices:   • Mail merging directly from Access to Word Documents    • generating reports from Access showing which projects still need their recognition materials to  be sent out and the deadline    • scheduling important milestones by Windows Works Calendar    • defining a unique primary key to identify projects, increased training and documentation with  the database    • Keeping the online and access databases separate, but redesigning the access database to  match the format of the online database    • Using input masks to standardize user input    • Including student numbers to uniquely identify students    • Gradually transition from paper feedback forms to excel spreadsheets           5  1.0  Purpose of Document  This document outlines the project objectives, scope, activities, constraints, analysis, and  recommendations. It presents the processes and work system that we studied along with problems with  the work system, alternative feasible solutions, and recommended solutions.  Ultimately, this document  is meant to provide useful guidance for SEEDS.  2.0 Background  Since its inception eight years ago, SEEDS has been using a non‐integrated administration system  composed of an Access database, Mail Merge templates, administrative task summaries, handwritten  documents, and other non‐automated processes. This legacy administration system can no longer keep  up with the increase in SEEDS projects and is obsolete. The staff at SEEDS using the non‐integrated  administrative system can no longer keep up with the increased workload.  Our group recommends  changes to the work practices, participants, and technology in SEEDS to streamline the administration  system so it can handle more projects.  3.0 Objectives and Scope of the Project  3.1 Objectives  Our objective is to analyze the current system and consider integrated and streamlined alternatives to  the legacy system.  3.2 Scope  This project involved using the work system method to analyze the administration system of SEEDS. This  involved identifying the system and problems, analyzing the system to identify possibilities, and making  and justifying recommendations.   4.0 Main Project Activities  4.1 Weekly Meetings with Brenda Sawada and her Staff  At each meeting we elicited requirements and validated our understanding of the SEEDS administration  system. We also reported our progress to update Ms. Sawada on our project status.  4.2 Internal Student Conferences  At each internal student conference we reviewed the topics discussed in the weekly meetings with  SEEDS. We discussed possible solutions to address the problems with the SEEDS administration system   6 and prepared the interim report, final report, and class presentation. We created models to better  understand the as‐is work system. These models served as good communication tools with SEEDS.  We  also created to‐be models to document our recommendations to resolve the identified problems in the  as‐is work system.  4.3 Choice of systems development method  We have chosen to use the waterfall model for developing the new system.  The only IT object that  needs to be developed is the database.  The waterfall model ensures a finished database in a timely  manner. It provides a structured framework that is easy to follow.  5.0 Information Sources  5.1 Stakeholders  The stakeholders of this work system include Ms. Brenda Sawada (manager, SEEDS program), Anke Sieb  (coordinator, SEEDS program), and the students and faculty members involved in SEEDS projects.  5.2 Internal Documents  Internal Documents we used include: Student Registration Form, Permission to Publish Form,  Recognition Letter, Feedback Forms, Administration Task Summary, Summary Project and Stats Word  Document, Contact Sheet, Policy Handbook, and Templates for labels and recognition letters.  5.3 External Information  Some external information came from the SEEDS library of past projects and previous UBC Sustainability  Reports.  6.0 Special Considerations  One consideration is that the SEEDS staff prefers technology that is easy to use.  Another is that the  SEEDS staff is only available three days a week.  Also, SEEDS is working with a small budget and  recommendations must be economical.  7.0 Findings  7.1. The Organizational Environment    a. The Organization:  UBC SEEDS    Products and services  SEEDS organizes projects that address sustainability issues. This involves finding project opportunities  (known as “dormant projects” and “seed projects”), registering staff, faculty and students into initiated   7 projects (known as “sprouting projects”), following the progress of each project, writing reports, and  analyzing feedback.  Short history  In 2000, UBC launched western Canada’s only academic program bringing together students, faculty,  and staff in projects that address sustainability issues. To date SEEDS has saved the university hundreds  of thousands of dollars and attracted thousands of participants. Some past projects include studying  storm water treatment alternatives, finding innovative ways to market Fair Trade coffee, finding new  ways to reduce pesticide use, and exploring a sustainable food system for the campus.  Important measures  • For the organization: number of projects (set a goal, say, of 80 projects in progress per year and  50 completed per year; the more money that SEEDS helps UBC save, the more funding SEEDS gets  from the Sustainability Office), number of participants  • For the administration system: time it takes to generate annual report, number of data entries  made in an hour, reliability of system, how close it is to SEEDS’ needs (ease of usage, quality of  output), completing tasks within two months of project completion  b. The Environment  SEEDS operates in a non‐profit, university environment focused on sustainable development. Its projects  focus on the sustainability of campus facilities. The customers of SEEDS are the faculty, staff and  students, who also supply each project’s manpower and knowledgebase.  SEEDS is one program  operating under the UBC Campus Sustainability Office (CSO).  The CSO provides the vision behind SEEDS.  c. The Functional Area under Study  Short description  The functional area under study is SEEDS’ administration system.  Among other objectives, the study is  to find ways to administrate more SEEDS projects under current constraints.  This involves finding ways  to monitor project statuses (active/ dormant/ finish) more easily and creating annual reports from the  database more easily.  The customers of this study are the SEEDS manager and coordinator. The  stakeholders of this study are the SEEDS manager, coordinator, and the students on the study team.   Principles of operation  The two users are SEEDS Manager Brenda Sawada (BS) and SEEDS coordinator Anke Sieb (AS).  Both  have full access to the SEEDS administration system.  One principle procedure in the administration   8 system is Anke entering data into the Access database. Procedures depend on Brenda and Brigid  (previous SEEDS coordinator).   There is a procedures handbook but it is not detailed enough with which to train someone.  Resources   Administration system resources include the human resources (SEEDS staff, students, faculty) and the  financial resources.   Observed Problems or Requirements  • SEEDS staff give projects one name while students give it another leading to multiple project  names  • administration system cannot keep up with increasing number of projects  • repetitive tasks that could be eliminated   • behind in schedule on recognition letters, thank you cards, and collecting feedback  • annual report of SEEDS projects hand‐calculated by manager (time‐consuming)  d. Important Relevant Business Processes  i) Project generation and project sponsor seeking  The objective is to come up with ideas for projects without initiating them (“dormant” projects) and to  find interested staff/faculty/students without committing them to the project yet (“seed” projects).  The  main activity is to respond to requests for projects by contacting staff/faculty/students about the  potential project.  The main procedure involves keeping track of “dormant” and “seed” projects using  the “contact sheet”, “project registration form”, “admin tasks” summary, “summary project and stats”,  and database.  The main resources are Brenda and Anke.  Related processes are in the Policy Handbook  and one related system is the communication system.  One performance measure that we perceive is  the goal of updating the following within the same week: “contact sheet”, “project registration form”,  “admin tasks” summary, “summary project and stats”, and database.  ii) Project Commitment Seeking and Project Initiation  The objective is to confirm the commitment of staff/faculty/students to the project, to clearly  communicate expectations, and to initiate the project (“sprouting” project).  Some activities include  registering the project (Student Registration Form, Permission to Publish Form, Project Registration  Form), meeting with staff, faculty and students, and reviewing with staff, faculty, and students their   9 commitment. For example, students are to “submit project and project summary to Campus  Sustainability Office electronically within two weeks of project completion.”  The procedures include  entering information from the Project Registration Form, the Student Registration Form, and the  Permission to Publish Form into the database and updating the database, the “admin tasks” summary,  the “summary project and stats” document, and the “contact sheet.”  The main resources are Brenda  and Anke.  Related processes are in the Policy Handbook and one related system is the communication  system.  One performance measure that we perceive is the goal of updating the following within the  same week: “contact sheet”, “admin tasks” summary, “summary projects and stats”, and database.  iii) Project Monitoring  The objective is to monitor the status of the project while it is underway and liaise between staff,  faculty, and students while they work on the project (“flowering” project). The main activities include  attending meetings, monitoring emails, and responding to requests.  The procedures include updating  the “admin tasks” summary, the “summary project and stats” document, the “contact sheet”, and the  database.  The main resources are Brenda and Anke.  One performance measure that we perceive is the  goal of updating the following within the same week: “contact sheet”, “admin tasks” summary,  “summary project and stats”, and database.  iv a) Project Wrap‐up  The objective is to provide recognition to staff/faculty/students, to catalogue project papers, and to  collect feedback from staff/faculty/students (“awaiting report” or “completed” stages of project).  The  main activities include attending final presentations, preparing each letter of recognition and mailing  labels, sending thank you cards to staff/faculty/students, letters of recognition to department heads,  instructors, and deans, memos to the Vice Provost and Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs, and  updating the SEEDs and online libraries.  (Cataloguing sub‐process shown below.)  The main procedures  include updating the database, “admin tasks” summary, “summary project and stats” document,  “contact sheet”, labels, and recognition letters.  The main resources are Brenda and Anke.  Related  processes are in the Policy Handbook.  One performance measure that we perceive is the goal of  updating the following within the same week: “contact sheet”, “admin tasks” summary, “summary  project and stats”, and database.  Another performance measure is that the labels ought to be updated  and recognition cards and letters ought to be sent within two months of project completion.     10 iv b) Project Cataloguing  The objective is to categorize each project and file each project in the SEEDs Library and on the SEEDs  website.  The main activity is categorizing each project.  One main procedure involves creating an index  and cover page which ought to include the following: Title of Publication, Year, Student Authors, Course  Number and Name, Faculty/Instructor.  See also “Library Cataloguing Checklist” and “Website  Cataloguing Checklist” in the Protocols Handbook for more details.  Another procedure is updating the  database, the “admin tasks” summary, the “summary project and stats” document, the “contact sheet”,  and the SEEDs and online libraries.  The main resources are Brenda and Anke.  Related processes are in  the Policy Handbook.  The performance measure is that projects ought to be catalogued and filed by  January and June of each year.  iv c) SEEDs Program Evaluation  The objective is to find out if SEEDs is contributing to sustainability at UBC.  The main activity is the  SEEDs manager sending out and collecting feedback forms from at least one of each: staff, faculty and  student from each project.  The SEEDs manager will use this data to “create an annual triple bottom line  report.”  The main procedures include updating the database, the “admin tasks” summary, the  “summary project and stats” document, the “contact sheet”, and feedback forms, and converting  feedback form responses into an electronic format.  The main resources are Brenda and Anke.  Related  processes are in the Policy Handbook.  One performance measure that we perceive is the goal of  updating the following within the same week: “contact sheet”, “admin tasks” summary, “summary  project and stats”, and database.  Also, the feedback forms ought to be sent, collected, and responses  converted into electronic format within two months of project completion.  Lastly, the feedback form  ought to be collected from at least one of each: staff, faculty, and student from each project.  7.2 The Information System and Use of Information Technology  a) Main IT applications  MS Word The objective is to keep track of “summary projects and stats”, the protocol handbook, the  process mapping document, administrative tasks, registration forms, recognition letters, labels and  feedback forms.  The main users are Brenda and Anke.  Inputs for label and recognition letters come  from a related Excel spreadsheet.  The main technologies are LAN (shared hard drive), PCs, and MS  Word.   11 MS Excel The objective is to keep track of “contact sheets”, admin tasks, recognition letter mail merge  details, labels mail merge details, and feedback form responses.  Brenda and Anke use this application.   The input for feedback form responses comes from completed feedback forms.  The main technologies  are LAN (shared hard drive), PCs, and MS Excel.  MS Access The objective is to keep a database about: students, instructors, staff, project status  description, category descriptions, and project attributes.  This data will be updated and retrieved  regularly.  Anke is the user.  Student information comes from the Student Registration Form. Instructor  and staff information comes from the Project Registration Form.  Project attribute information comes  from Student Registration Forms, Project Registration Forms, Permission to Publish Forms, and emails.   The main technologies are LAN (shared hard drive), PCs, and MS Access.  MS IE The objective is to liaise between staff, faculty and students.  Another objective is to catalogue  project papers.  The cataloguing website is new and involves MySQL.  Anke is the user of IE.  The  developer (now gone) used MySQL.  Anke posts completed projects to the website.  The main  technologies are LAN (shared hard drive), PCs, MS IE, and MySQL.  b) Evaluation of Existing System  The work system we have analyzed is the UBC SEEDS administration system.  On the one hand,  the current system does not involve implementation costs, Brenda and her coordinators are already  trained with the system, and this system is flexible enough to adjust.  On the other hand, there are  problems with the work practices, participants, and technology parts.   The problem with the work practices is that, though Brenda and her staff know and want to  follow the work practice, they cannot follow them due to limited time and resources. The current  system cannot handle all the projects this year.  Steps like updating the student information on the  database, collecting feedback, sending out thank you cards, and updating the SEEDS library have been  postponed.   Another problem is the repetition of information in digital and paper forms. This leads to  inconsistencies during the conversion of data from paper to digital forms.   The problem is that, though  Microsoft Access, Excel, and Word have integration capabilities, the three programs are not used to  their full extent.  Other easily automated tasks, like calculating the number of people involved in SEEDS  projects for the annual report, are done manually.  Reproducibility is also a problem as the current work system is not well documented and the  available documentation is outdated. Steps in the work system are remembered.  New staff cannot train   12 themselves based on the documentation.  This is a problem since SEEDS coordinators turn over  frequently.  Relating to the technology and work practice parts, there is no technology to integrate the  online MySQL database with the internal Access one. The two databases contain similar information.   Also, the Access database lacks input controls that would allow for easy integration.    The administration system requires flexibility (so it can handle changing projects), ease of  operation (as only two people operate it), efficiency (so the SEEDS staff can organize more projects  instead of administering them), and affordability (as SEEDS has a modest budget).  c) Constraints to Consider  Project confidentiality is determined by the participating students and faculty.  They are permitted to  request that their project be kept confidential so only the project abstract is revealed on the SEEDS  library. Additional constraints are in the Administrative Policy Handbook which is given to every SEEDS  staff member.  7.3 Planning  a. Some Possible Solutions to Explore  • Keep track of each project’s status in the database without using the Project Summary and Stats  document. This would mean creating a form for the manager to change/view the project status.  This eliminates the MS Word documentation that the SEEDS manager uses, which requires  copying and pasting.  • Use a scheduling system to keep recognition letters and thank you cards on schedule.  One idea  is to use an email system with a calendar or notification service.  • Database should track updated details about each project, including money spent, staff and  students involved, etc. An annual summary report of SEEDS projects can then be generated on  the fly. Note that someone or a systems procedure is needed to keep database up to date.  • Hire more staff whether for full time, part time, or voluntary. More staff means more  productivity, but also a higher cost and more training.  b. Planned activities and products  Planned Activities: Allow stakeholders to use electronic forms instead of paper forms (e.g. Student  Registration form).  This eliminates data entry for the SEEDS staff but requires forms with input controls.   13   8.0 Alternatives, Recommendations, Feasibility, Implementation The redesign of the Access database must occur, before following the steps below. The prototype of the  Access database and static queries have been created as an example.  8.1 Work Practices 8.1.1 Sending Thank You Cards, Recognition Letters, and Memos The preparation of thank you cards, recognition letters, and memos (recognition materials) require a lot  of labour for preparing labels and performing mail merge and there is no accompanying reminder  system.      Firstly, the staff sometimes copies data from Access into Excel before finally performing a mail merge  into address labels and Word documents.  (Apparently, the user already knows how to mail merge into  address labels.  There just is not any documentation for the next user to follow.)  One alternative is to  avoid preparing address labels by emailing recognition materials instead of mailing them.  However, this  is unacceptable as it is too impersonal.  The recommended alternative is to mail merge directly from  Access to address labels and Word documents.  This is feasible as our group has found ample  instructions that are easy to follow and learn, and free to download.    (For example, http://www.leeds.ac.uk/iss/training/mailmerge/MailMerge.pdf)  Implementation would  only take a few moments to review the instructions.  There are more sources of information for using  Access in the Appendix.    Secondly, although there is an “admin tasks” summary it does not perform well as a reminder system  that specifies which project needs its recognition materials sent out by which date.  Recognition  materials ought to be sent out within two months of project completion.  The recommended  alternative is to generate a report from the Access database showing which projects still need their  recognition materials to be sent out and the deadline.  This is feasible as it could be implemented  during the implementation of other functions of the database with little extra cost and effort.  The  person handling changes to the database need only set up a query and report and provide  documentation for the client to follow.  The coordinator could remember to generate the report  monthly by including the task in her “admin tasks” summary document.  We recommend using the  Windows Works Calendar program.  It is easy to use and comes with Microsoft Windows.     14 A startup tutorial is available at:   http://www.learnntc.com/tools/GettingStarted/returningStudent/returningAdultWorks.cfm  There is additional information from the Microsoft webpage: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/270861  The ‘Help’ function within the program will also be helpful.  8.1.2 “Summary Project and Stats” Document The “summary project and stats” document includes the manager’s notes about certain projects, the  phase of each project the manager would like to keep track of, and certain completed projects.  The  manager manipulates this document by copying and pasting notes from one cell in a table to another.   One alternative is to keep the status quo.  This is because the information stored in the “summary  project and stats” document is organic and fluid in nature so it may be difficult to generate computer  reports that truly replicate this.  Since SEEDS has expressed distaste with the unwieldy nature of this  document, our group recommends using reports generated from Access.  Since we will be  recommending changes to the Access database elsewhere as well, it would be convenient now for the  person handling changes to the database to also set up a query and report that resembles the “summary  project and stats” document as closely as possible.  8.1.3 Annual Summary Report The manager currently calculates this manually.  Our group recommends the following implementation  because it would be convenient to make this change along with the other changes that we discuss.    1. Create a form that accepts the academic year as a parameter. It should be a drop‐down list of  valid values.   2. Create a query that uses this input to generate the data for the summary report for that  particular academic year.  3. Click on the ‘Generate Report’ button on the form to get query results.  4. Click on “File” > “Export…” Then, save as an Excel document. The results of the query will be  stored in this Excel document.  5. Format this report in Excel as you please.  The report has the following fields:  Access Table  Access Field  Field Description   Project  PID  project identification number  Project  ProjectTitle  name of the project  Project  AcademicYear  Academic year project was finished   15 Project  STID  Status of project  N/A  NumberOfStaff  <generated dynamically>  N/A  NumberOfStudent  <generated dynamically>  N/A  NumberOfFaculty  <generated dynamically>    8.1.4 Project Identification SEEDS identifies projects by name, which tend to change.  The status quo is to simply change the title  across all records each time the title changes, leading to update inconsistencies.  The recommended  alternative is to use an unchanging project number with changing project titles.  Participants can refer  to the project number in their communications with SEEDS, and staff can change project titles via the  accompanying project number.  This is feasible as it is already a feature implemented in the database.   The client only needs to provide participants with their respective project numbers.      8.2 Participants 8.2.1 Documentation and Training in Access There is currently no documentation on the way users interact with Access to perform tasks that is  meant for the end‐user.  Those with working Access knowledge should document the way they use  Access.  When staffs leave SEEDS new staff will be able to perform tasks by referencing the  documentation instead of having to relearn the steps.  We also recommend that Access users seek out and receive training to increase familiarity.  UBC  provides Access online tutorials at: http://www.slais.ubc.ca/COURSES/libr500/07‐08‐wt1/t5.htm  Working through the tutorial will increase the participants’ knowledge and interest in Access.  8.3 Technology 8.3.1 Upload projects onto the MySQL database The status quo is not feasible as the client specifically requested this additional function.  One  alternative is to store all the information on the MySQL database.  This is not feasible because the client  is concerned with the security of personal information online.  The recommended alternative is to keep  the two databases.  This would take approximately six months and cost $31,250 to $44,750 for a  professional database developer and $18,000 for a graduate student database developer.  To implement  this, the data in Access must be cleaned up to fit into MySQL fields.  For example, whoever handles the  changes for the databases must remove the extra spaces in front of participant names and add fields   16 categorizing each project under multiple categories.  Once the Access database and its data are ready,  the developer needs to prepare queries in Access to retrieve the necessary project information and  store it in a comma‐delimited file before uploading the data to MySQL.  The designer must prepare  instructions for the end‐user to perform these tasks as well.  Although the client requested one button  that can perform these tasks transparently, we have not yet found a way to do this.  Perhaps the  developer would know how to implement this.  8.3.2 User Interface for Access Forms The client should include features in the database to ensure data entry integrity and consistency.   Otherwise, errors would propagate onto the MySQL database.  For example, input masks or data  format examples would ensure that data is consistent across all records.  There ought to be a way to  prevent multiple student records.  One alternative is to ask students whether they have worked with  SEEDS before.  If they have, then the data entry person would know not to add another record.  If they  have not, however, then the data entry person may still need to waste time looking for a possibly non‐ existent record (as she must currently do) in case the student actually has worked with SEEDS before.   Thus, we recommend the use of student numbers.  (The sample implementation below for searching  for existing students does not take into account this recommendation yet.)  The client expresses  concerns about security and privacy implications with this alternative.  Our group recommends that  SEEDS quell security and privacy concerns in students by making a statement of confidentiality during  registration.  It is imperative that there are no erroneous or multiple entries so errors do not propagate  to queries, reports, or the MySQL database.      Here are some points to consider when implementing the Access Forms:  1) All fields on the forms should have input controls whenever applicable. Examples include  entering the date and telephone number in a specific format.  2) In the case where it is found to be too much of a hassle to create input controls, a guide should  be shown as an example of how to fill out a field. For example, next to a ‘Date’ field, we would  have ‘(dd/mm/yy)’ so that all dates are entered in the same format for data consistency in the  database.  3) Some database fields consist of different parts. E.g. The address field. In the form, instead of  showing just an Address field, there should be an Address section with the following fields:  City, Province, Country, Unit #, Street #, Street Name, Postal Code  4) Easy to use search functions can be implemented easily on the form.   17 5) Queries should take input from form to generate dynamic data.    Here is a sample implementation of the forms:  1) Student Registration Form  Form Field  Access Table  Access Field  Field Type   Note  Project Name  Project  ProjectTitle  Chosen from drop‐ down list of project  names already in  Access.   Need to have  entered a  staff/faculty  involved in a  project first  (because  project cannot  exist in  database  unless it has at  least 1  participant in  the db)  Instructor (i.e.  Faculty)  Participant  FirstName + “ “ +  LastName  Chosen from drop‐ down list of faculty  members in Access.     This faculty is  already in the  database.  Otherwise,  must enter  information  about this  faculty.  Student Information  Student First  Name  Participant  FirstName  Textfield (up to 50  characters)  Student Last  Name  Participant  LastName  Textfield (up to 50  characters)  Before  entering a new  student,  should use the  search form to  ensure this  student does  not exist  already.  Team Leader  Project  StudentTeamLead er  Checkbox  This field  cannot be in  Student or  Participant  table because  it’s specific to  a project  Gender  Participant  Gender  Checkbox    Unit #,   Street #, Street  Participant  Address  Textfields: Unit #,  Street #, Street  Concatenate  the form fields   18 Name,  City, Province,   Postal Code  Country    Name,  City,  Postal Code (with  input control if  assuming Canada  only),  Country    Drop‐down list:  Province (if assuming  Canada only).  Otherwise, textfield.  with spaces in  between to  create  address.  Phone  Participant  PhoneNo  Textfield with input  control.    Fax  Participant  FaxNo  Textfield with input  control.    Email  Participant  Email  Textfield (possibly  with input control –  e.g. must have ‘@’  and ‘.’.      2) Search Student Form  When this form is opened, all students in the database appear in the drop‐down list. The student shows  up in the format ‘LastName, FirstName’ from the Participant table. Much like the previous system’s  “Project” form when adding a new student. Note that for this example, I’ve only typed in “Fan”. Please  see screenshot:   19   In this search form, if a student with the same name already appears in the database, then SEEDS staff  should choose this student. Then, click the “Show Student Information” button to see the student’s  information. Then, compare this student’s information with the student that you wish to enter.    Furthermore, if the Access GUI mapped more closely to the paper forms then the data entry person  would be less likely to enter data into the wrong fields (for example, course subject and course number  are often in the wrong fields).1  8.3.3 Compiling feedback forms and feedback data entry Data entry and analysis of feedback that the client does collect is also behind schedule.  This is because  the data entry of feedback is unwieldy and the analysis functions of Excel are difficult for the client to  use.    To speed up the process of data entry one alternative would be to email the actual Excel spreadsheet to  participants.  This may be awkward for participants to fill out, but it would reduce data entry.  The ideal  alternative is to use survey software.  This reduces data entry and provides a better user interface,   1 See Appendix for Recommendations for Changing Forms  20 which may increase feedback response.  SEEDS could send out email reminders to participants as well.   An online survey program may also provide analysis tools that are easier to use than Excel.  Both  SurveyMonkey and Zoomerang have analysis functions and allow exporting data into Excel or Access,  but cost $200 and $350 per year, respectively.  The best survey software is phpESP or LimeSurvey which  are open‐source and free.  However, installation and set up will incur a one‐time cost of approximately  $100 to $300 and take a week.2  SEEDS can set up the actual feedback forms on its own or with paid  help.  The makers of phpESP and LimeSurvey claim that non‐technical users can create feedback forms  on their own.      As it may not be feasible to implement the ideal alternative, we recommend that SEEDS continue with  the status quo and in the near future send out feedback forms in the Excel format it will eventually  use for analysis purposes.  This is the easiest and least expensive alternative to implement.  However, as  SEEDS grows beyond the 90 or so feedback forms it receives annually, it may want to install a system  (like phpESP or LimeSurvey) that is more scalable and automated.    A related issue is the amount of time SEEDS spends on entering data from the Project Registration  Forms, Student Registration Forms, and Permission to Publish Forms into the Access database.  If  participants could complete these forms electronically, SEEDS could reduce the time it spends on data  entry.  One alternative would be to have participants fill out the forms in Excel format.    SEEDS could ask  participants to provide one Excel file, leaving it to the participants to decide on how best to compile  such a spreadsheet.  The ideal alternative is to set up open‐source survey software to also collect  project, student and permissions to publish data.  The data entry person would only need to import the  data into Access.  However, this requires one‐time set up costs.  Furthermore, the client does not want  personal information stored online.  Our group recommends that SEEDS continue with the status quo  and in the near future use Excel to collect data instead of the paper forms.  For projects involving many  participants, paper forms make the logistics of collecting data much simpler.  Eventually, the client will  need to set up the Excel spreadsheets so data will import into Access properly and will need instruction  into the procedure.  The only issue that is still pending is the legal equivalency of electronic  acknowledgement to a physical signature.       2 http://www.getafreelancer.com/projects/PHP/Need-modify-enhance-phpSurveyor.html  21 Appendix Recommendations for Changing Forms The client must also redesign its forms (paper, Word documents, Excel or otherwise) so that participants  fill them out completely and correctly.  This will take little of the client’s time and will provide much  benefit.  Firstly, the forms must have the same fields as the Access database.  For example, the client  ought to replace “address” with address, city, province, postal code, and country.  Instead of “name” the  forms ought to request the participant’s proper or legal first name and last name.  Instead of “course  number” the forms ought to request the course subject and the course number.      Secondly, the forms also should provide masks and prompts.  For example, the postal code field could  have two sets of three boxes so participants do not use a hyphen.  This ensures the data entry person  enters all postal codes without hyphens.  To prompt participants to provide their course subject and  number, the forms could have a small note beneath the field: “e.g. COMM 436”.    Lastly, the student registration forms ought to ask students for their student numbers.  This prevents the  data entry person from entering multiple records for the same person by more easily checking the  database for a previous record.  This saves time and is more reliable than looking for records by name.  If  the name is spelt differently or is a different version of a name or if there was an extra space in the  name to account for a title, the search comes back with a false negative.  It is very important to ensure  that the data in the Access database is free of errors as the client wishes to transfer data to the MySQL  database and our recommendations involve generating queries and reports.  Errors in the Access  database will propagate to the MySQL database and may inhibit the transfer of data.  Tutorial Links Microsoft Works Calendar Get Started Guide: http://www.learnntc.com/tools/GettingStarted/returningStudent/returningAdultWorks.cfm Additional Information: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/270861 Microsoft Access http://www.slais.ubc.ca/COURSES/libr500/07-08-wt1/t5.htm  22 Level 3 Analysis: Possibilities Checklist Common types of work system changes Relevance (1, 2, or 3) Summary of specifics for this situation Customers Add or eliminate customer groups 1 Change customer expectations 1 Change the nature of the customer relationship 1 Change the customer experience 1 Products & Services Change information content 1 Change physical content 1 Change service content 1 Increase or decrease customization 2 Try to decrease customization when possible. Make products and services more controllable by the customer 2 Allow participants to enter their own data and allow manager to print reports. Make products and services more adaptable by the customer 2 Use dynamic instead of static fields. Provide better intangibles 1 Change by-products 1 Work Practices Change roles and division of labour 1 Improve business process by adding, combining, or eliminating steps, changing the sequence of steps, or changing methods used within steps 3 Mail merge, generate reports with deadlines, Windows Works Calendar, use project numbers Change business rules and policies that govern work practices 1 Eliminate built-in obstacles and delays 1 Add new functions that are not currently performed 2 Report generation from Access (annual report, recognition materials deadlines) Improve coordination between steps 1 Improve decision making practices 1 Improve communication practices 2 Refer to projects by project number and name. Improve the processing of information, including capture, transmission, retrieval, storage, manipulation, and display 2 Set up queries and reports in Access; reduce data entry with comma delimited files and Excel; Change practices related to physical things (creation, movement, storage, modification, usage, protection, etc.) 1 Participants Change the participants 1 Provide training on details of work 3 Direct participants to Access training. Assure that participants understand the meaning and significance of their work 1 Provide resources needed for doing work 2 Participants should create documentation before they leave. Change incentives 1 Change organizational structure 1 Change the social relations within the work systems 1 Change the degree of interdependence in doing work 1 Change the amount of pressure felt by participants 1  23 Information Provide different information 1 Codify currently uncodified information 3 Document the tasks. Eliminate some information 2 Review the forms and eliminate redundant fields. Organize information so it can be used more effectively 2 Refer to projects by number and to files by full file path.  Reorganize files. Improve information quality 2 Improve forms so participants fill them in correctly.  Add input masks and input samples. Make it easier to manipulate information 2 Prepare dynamic queries. Make it easier to display information effectively 2 Reorganize forms. Protect information more effectively 1 Provide different codified knowledge 3 Document tasks. Assure understanding of details of tasks and use of appropriate information and knowledge in doing work 2 Input masks and input samples.  Make documentation more practical. Provide access to knowledgeable people 1 Technologies Upgrade software and/or hardware to a newer version 1 Incorporate a new type of technology 2 Perhaps LimeSurvey. Reconfigure existing software and/or hardware 3 Match Access db to MySQL db. Make technology easier to use 3 Improve the forms.  Have documentation. Improve maintenance of software and/or hardware 1 Improve uptime of software and/or hardware 1 Reduce the cost of ownership of technology 1 Infrastructure Make better use of human infrastructure 1 Make better use of information infrastructure 1 Make better use of technical infrastructure 1 Environment Change the work system’s fit with organizational policies and procedures (related to confidentiality, privacy, working conditions, worker’s rights, use of company resources, etc.) 1 Change the work system’s fit with organizational culture 1 Respond to expectations and support form executives 1 Change the work system’s fit with organizational politics 1 Respond to competitive pressures 1 Improve conformance to regulatory requirements and industry standards 1 Strategy Improve alignment with the organization’s strategy 1 Change the work system’s overall strategy 1 Improve strategies related to specific work system elements 1    24    25    26    27    28 ORIGINAL ENTITY-RELATIONSHIP DIAGRAM OF ACCESS DATABASE    29 ENTITY-RELATIONSHIP DIAGRAM OF ACCESS DATABASE WITH RECOMMENDATIONS   30  31  32 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

    

Usage Statistics

Country Views Downloads
Japan 2 0
China 1 18
United States 1 0
City Views Downloads
Tokyo 2 0
Beijing 1 3
Ashburn 1 0

{[{ mDataHeader[type] }]} {[{ month[type] }]} {[{ tData[type] }]}

Share

Share to:

Comment

Related Items