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The incidence of boring and sessile organisms on wooden structures in British Columbia coastal waters Black, Edgar Clark 1935

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THE INCIDENCE OF BORING AND SESSILE ORGANISMS ON WOODEN STRUCTURES I N BRITISH COLUMBIA COASTAL WATERS  EDGAR CLARK BLACK  A T h e s i s s u b m i t t e d f o r t h e Degree o f MASTER OF ARTS i n t h e Department o f ZOOLOGY  The U n i v e r s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia August,  1935.  CONTENTS page  INTRODUCTION  IV  REVIEW OF LITERATURE  I  DISCUSSION OF SITES STUDIED  3  GENERAL METHODS METHODS OF OBTAINING INFESTATION DATA  10  METHODS OF OBTAINING PHYSICO-CHEMICAL DATA  12  METHODS AND RESULTS BANKIA INFESTATION RESULTS William Head . . Eequiraalt  -  Victoria Departure bay  VancouverCrescent  .Prince Rupert Buckley bay Shannon bay  '  13 131 16 16 19  S0L 21 24  26  LIMNORIA INFESTATION DATA William Head Esquinialt Victoria Beparture bay  Vancouver  \l/  Crescent Princ® Rupert Buc k l e y bay Shannon bay  28 28 29 30 31 31 32 33 33  INCIDENCE OF SESSILE ORGANISMS W i l l i a m Head Esquimalt Victoria Departure bay Vancouver Crescent P r i n c e Rupert Shannon bay  36 36  3?  38 41 42 43 44  TABLES OF RESULTS BANKIA AND LIMNORIA William Head Esquinalt Victoria Departure bay Vancouver  Crescent  Prince Rupert Buc kley bay Shannon bay 1931*1932 Shannon bay 1933-1934 HYDROGRAPHIC TABLES William Head Esquimalt Victoria Departure bay • Vancouver Crescent Prince Rupert-. Buciley bay Shannon bay 1931-1932 Shannon bay 1933-1934 SESSILE ORGANISMS William Head Esquimalt Victoria Departure bay Vancouver Crescent Princo Rupert Shannon bay VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION TABLES Bankia Limnoria Balanus Mytilus Bryozoa  Ill GENERAL DISCUSSION  page  BORING ORGANISMS Bankia Limnoria •.  96 100  .„  SESSILE ORGANISMS  .B.alaauB .  101  Mytilua B'ryosoa  103 103  COMPARISON OF INFESTATION BY BANKIA AND LIMNORIA  103  COMPARISON OF INCIDENCE OF BORING AND SESSILE ORGANISMS  104  SUMMARY  105  ACKNOWLEDGMENTS  169  CITATIONS  111  APPENDIX DETAILED HYDROGRAPHIC TABLES William Head Esquimalt Victoria Departure bay Vancouver Crescent Prince Rupert  ' L  114 125 127 136 156 175 180  PRODUCTION  Wooden test blocks have been exchanged a t i n t e r v a l s i n cert a i n coastal areas of B r i t i s h Columbia, with a view to determining the extent and nature of i n f e s t a t i o n of the marine wood borers, Bankia setaeea and Limnoria lignor.vrou  The investigation  overlapped to a certain extent that made on marine wood borers by Fraser (1923, 1925) and Vvhite (1929).  Hydrographic data were ob-  tained for as many areas as was p r a c t i c a b l e i n order that a r e lationship between the a c t i v i t y of the wood borers and the hydrographic conditions might be established. At the suggestion and with the kind encouragement of Dr. C. McLean Fraser, the problem was extended t o include a record of the incidence of certain o f the sessile organisms on the test blocks that were exposed i n the course of the investigation. The two most destructive species of wood borers i n the Canadian P a c i f i c coastal waters are Bankia (Xylotrya) setaeea Try on and Limnoria lignorum (Rathke). (Fraser, 1983)*  Bankia be-  longs to the mollusc family Ter-edinidae while Limnoria belongs to the arthropod family Limnoriidae.  (Clemens, 1933).  Two other  wood borers are l i s t e d , the mollusc borer Xylophaga washingtona Bartsch of the family Pholadidee and the arthropod borer Exosphaeroma oregensis (Dana) of the family Sphaeromidae.  (Fraser, 1923;  Clemens, 1933). Common names f o r Bankia setaeea are:  "giant or plumed p i l e -  worm" (Kbfoid, 1921); "Northwest shipworm" (Bartsch, 1922),"teredo"  V  or ^shipworm" (Fraser, 1923), ligaorum  The common names given to  are the " g r i b b l e " (Wallace, 1919;  Fraser, 1923)  Limnoria or the  "sea louse" (Fraser, 1923)« Bankia gouldi, the species studied by Sigerfoos Beaufort, N C., 0  (1908) at  d i f f e r s from Teredo n a v a l i s i n spawning habit.  The eggs and sperms of the former are extruded i n t o the water where subsequent development of the trochophore and the f r e e swimming v e l i g e r takes place*  The v e l i g e r larvae of Teredo de-  velop i n the g i l l cavity. (Sigerfoos, 1908),  Concerning the time  of development p r i o r to s e t t l i n g on wooden structures, Sigerfoos stated the following f o r 3ankia gouldls "The  rate of growth of.  larvae of marine lamellibranchs, however, i s slow, and I think that the larvae of ship-worms when they a t t a c h themselves must be at l e a s t • a month old©  They may be more, f o r a t t h i s time t h e i r  development i s quite advanced and t h e i r organization complexc" An i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of the length of the breeding  season should  be  dependent upon a knowledge of the time required f o r the new i n dividuals to develop and extrude mature gametes.  Again reference  must be made to the species which Sigerfoos studied,,  "Individua Is  (B, gouldi)become sexually mature i n a month a f t e r they have a t tached, and those which a t t a c h i n August must bear r i p e sexual products l a t e r i n the season, so that the breeding period would seem to extend throughout the warmer months*"(Sigerfoos, 1908)• Limnoria lignorum  (Rathke) i s dioecious, but the sexes do not  show very decided secondary sexual characters.  The most n o t i c e -  able difference i s i n size, the female being the l a r g e r of the  two,  (Ebfoid and M i l l e r , 1927), Henderson, (1924) r e f e r r i n g to the l i f e h i s t o r y of Limnoria ligaorum  at S t  c  Andrews, N.B.  states that the  period of incubation i s not less than 4-6 weeks but sets no f i n i t e limitationsc  de-  Her temperature range was from -1.5° to 12,5°C.  Coker (1923) gives two weeks as the period o f incubation at Beauf o r t , N.C.  with a temperature range of from 8° to 30° C.  Boring  i s commenced while the seventh thoracic appendages of the newlyhatched gribble are s t i l l lacking*  (Henderson, 1924).  S e s s i l e organisms found on r e g u l a r l y exchanged blocks were barnacles, mussels, encrusting Bryozoans and tubicolous annelids, Ascidians and hydroids occurred on blocks exposed f o r three to four months at William Head, while hydroids and algae were present during s i m i l a r periods i n Departure bay.  At Crescent,  oysters  (Ostrea l u r i d a ) were found on the bldbcks exposed three months. No detailed account i s made of the incidence of ascidians, oysters? hydroids or algae. The barnacles were of the Balanus type. his  (Tise'cher (1928), i n  study of the reactions of cyprid larvae of barnacles at the  time of attachment stated that a f t e r a free-swimming period of from three days to several weeks, the cyprids attach to some substratum and metamorphose into the adult type of barnacle. The mussels were of the species Mytilus edulis Linnaeus• With reference to t h i s species F i e l d (1922) states t h a t : "The sexes are separate and mature t h e i r products at the end of the f i r s t  year  ffi  VII  A c i l i a t e d Larva i s formed 4- 1/2 hours a f t e r f e r t i l i z a t i o n , and when. 10 weeks old possesses nearly a l l the organs of the adult,,  M  Encrusting Bryozoans of the Departure hay area are dealt with hy 0*Donoghue (1926).  He found Membranipora v i l l o s a (Hincks) to  be the most common species p a r t i c u l a r l y i n the neighbourhood of extensive kelp beds*  The- larva, generally known as the Cyphonautes,  i s free swimming, Tubicolous annelids were of the family 8erpulidae»  A l l the  Polychaet larvae studied by Gravely (1909) were pelagic trochophores.  REVIEW OF LIT3RAT0RE  Fraser (1925) gives the f i r s t account of the destruction and a c t i v i t y of marine wood borers i n Canadian P a c i f i c coastal waters  0  Bankia, Xylophaga and Limnoria. are l i s t e d by him as destructive agentSo  He states with regard to d i s t r i b u t i o n that! "Xylotfrya  (Bankia) and Limnoria were found almost everywhere where untreated p i l e s were exposed*" Xylophaga was found t o be a c t i v e only i n one area, namely Rivers inlet©  Included i n h i s investigation were a l -  most a l l the waters along the east coast of Vancouver i s l a n d from Nonoose bay to P o r l i e r pass with the various channels between, i s lands as well as the open s t r a i t ; Quathiaski cove i n Discovery passage; A l e r t bay on Cormorant i s l a n d ; Sointula on Malcolm i s l a n d ; the majority of the channels from Queen Charlotte sound to Prince Rupert* He records (1925) i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia and Limnoria of test blocks exposed i n 1923 and 1924 a t V i c t o r i a , Esquimalt, Quatsino sound, Barkley sound, Digby i s l a n d and Rivers inlet» Referring to the f a c t o r s a f f e c t i n g the d i s t r i b u t i o n of Bankia and Limnoria Fraser (1925) expresses the opinion that while the range of temperature and s p e c i f i c g r a v i t y are evidently suitable for growth, these factors are not the most potent ones a f f e c t i n g the r a p i d i t y and extent of i n f e c t i o n within the area investigated* This conclusion was supported by the fact that i n f e c t i o n i n areas of somewhat s i m i l a r s a l i n i t y and temperature range showed a wide variation*  According to Fraser's findings, i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia may be most intensive during the' spring and e a r l y summer months but must take place a t a l l times o f the year. (Fraser, 1925). was found by Fraser to t h r i v e throughout the year.  Limnoria also Although the  extent of the season i n which gribble larvae are hatched out was not  accurately determined by Fraser, there was evidence that i t  must include a large portion of the year. White (1929) dealing with the breeding season of Bankia i n Departure bay, summarizes h i s findings as follows: "A preliminary investigation of the breeding season of Bankia setaeea has i n dicated the occurrence of two breeding seasons: one of short duration i n the month of October, and another (probably the main one) commencing i n the month of March®  w  White found that October and March were the months of low temperature and high s a l i n i t y and that during the winter months when no Bgnkia breeding took place, very low s a l i n i t i e s were recorded?. He suggests that whereas low temperature i s a favourable condition the dominant f a c t o r i s a high s a l i n i t y .  (White, 1929),  There were indications from the r e s u l t s of Fraser (1925) o f an association between Limnoria and species of barnacles, mussels, ann e l i d s , other isopods, e t c . He thought that the tunneling of the wood by Limnoria might be b e n e f i c i a l to the other forms either because better surfaces f o r attachment were provided or because the tunnels themselves served f o r protection.  DISCUSSION Off SITES STUDIED  In the s e l e c t i o n of s i t e s f o r i n v e s t i g a t i o n an e f f o r t was made to choose locations d i f f e r i n g markedly i n ecological conditions*  At  the same time some attention was given to t h e i r importance as shipping centres and to t h e i r geographical position*  At the south end  of Vancouver island, William Head, Esquimalt harbour and V i c t o r i a inner harbour were selected as the most important harbours*  In a l l  of them temperatures and s a l i n i t i e s are r e l a t i v e l y uniform, owing to t h e i r d i r e c t connection with the open ocean water*  Vancouver har-  bour and Boundary bay on the southern mainland and Departure bay on the east coast of Vancouver i s l a n d were taken as representing bodies of water not d i r e c t l y communicating with the ocean.  Each of them i s  subject to considerable v a r i a t i o n both i n temperature and s a l i n i t y * According to Lucas and Hutchinson (1927) a l l of them are influenced by Fraser r i v e r discharge®  Boundary bay receives a d d i t i o n a l dischar-  ges from the Nicomekl and Serpentine r i v e r s * In northern waters, Prince Rupert harbour and Masset investigated*  The body of ocean water at Prince Rupert i s influenced  by fresh water from the Skeena r i v e r * Masset  i n l e t were  At Buckley bay and Shannon bay,  i n l e t , Queen Charlotte islands, low s a l i n i t i e s and a wide tem-  perature range have been recorded. This hydrographical condition i n Masset  i n l e t i s made poss i b l e by the heavy r a i n f a l l end by the r e s -  t r i c t i o n of the escapement of the d i l u t e d sea water by the shallow and narrow channel towards the entrance of the i n l e t .  Plat© I  5  i  Plats II  Plate  III  P l a t s IV  8  Plate VI  GENERAL METHODS METHOD OF OBTAINING INFESTATION  DATA  The method of procuring data of i n f e s t a t i o n was s i m i l a r to that used by Fraser (1925).  Douglas f i r test blocks 2"x4"x5", double  dressed, k i l n dried and free from knots and r e s i n , were bored and placed on a bar® block l " x l " x l / 2 " .  Each t e s t block was separated by means of a wooden A numbered c e l l u l o i d "chicken tag" was attached to  each block f o r i d e n t i f i c a t i o n .  YJhere a set of blocks was placed out  at one time, the bar supporting the blocks was placed h o r i z o n t a l l y , rather than v e r t i c a l l y as suggested by the Committee on Marine P i l ing  Investigations, National Research Council, Washington, D.C.  (Atwood and Johnson, 1924)  0  The v e r t i c a l d i s t r i b u t i o n of the i n c i d -  ence of the organisms was studied by employing two or more sets of test blocks. At William Head, Departure bay, Vancouver and Crescent, three series of test blocks were used f o r each l e v e l investigated.  Each  block of the f i r s t s e r i e s was exchanged f o r a new block at the end of the exposure i n t e r v a l , which i n t e r v a l varied from two weeks to two months.  The second series consisted of twelve blocks which were  placed on the horizontal bar.  One block of the second series was  taken out a t the end of the exposure i n t e r v a l used f o r the p a r t i c u l a r station and a block of the t h i r d series was set out.  When the test  blocks had been changed twelve times, the entire frame was taken i n and another set o f blocks exposed.  Only the data obtained from the  f i r s t series of blocks are presented.  At Esquimalt, V i c t o r i a , Prince Rupert, Buckley bay end Shannon bay, two sets of blocks were set out, one f o r exchange a t f o r t n i g h t l y or monthly intervals, the other a t i n t e r v a l s of 6 months© When, only one l e v e l was investigated and where conditions permitted the anchoring of the frame, the test blocks were placed at zero t i d e l e v e l , otherwise  the test blocks were suspended from a  f l o a t a t an appropriate distance below that reached by the f r e s h water portion of the epithalassa. At Departure bay the l e v e l s investigated were surface, zero t i d e l e v e l (8 feet from bottom) and bottom* The test blocks were suspended from a f l o a t f o r the f i r s t l e v e l and suspended from a dock f o r the two low l e v e l s * The counts of the Limnoria i n f e s t a t i o n and that o f the easily recognizable s e s s i l e organisms were made with the unaided eye*  Sub-  sequently each block was r u l e d o f f into sections and examined with the a i d of a binocular microscope^ using a 48 mm. objective*  The  area of the surface examined was determined and the i n f e s t a t i o n expressed i n terms o f a u n i t block area of 40.5 square inches (261 square centimeters)* The number of i n d i v i d u a l Limnoria furrows was taken to represent the number of Limnoria attacking a t e s t piece, regardless of the f a c t that the furrow might be empty or contain more than one animal at the time of examination* At Vancouver and Prince Rupert the exposed test blocks when r e moved, were sprayed with formaldehyde solution t o prevent damage by the "fish-meal weevil, Ptinus o c e l l u s Brown?  I am indebted to Professor G*J. Spencer f o r the i d e n t i f i c a t i o n of t h i s organism.  12 METHOD 0? OBTAINING PHYSICO-CHEMICAL DATA  Temperatures s a l i n i t y and the hydrogen-ion concentration were investigated with a view to'establishing a r e l a t i o n between the i n cidence of the organisms and the environment* In such places as was practicable, water samples and temperatures  were taken a t the l e v e l s at which the t e s t blocks were exposed*  The  temperatures f o r the most part were determined by the use of an ordinary laboratory thermometer*.  At Departure bay a thermograph and a  reversing thermometer were used when avallable*  The sea water samples  were stored i n two ounce "medicine" bottles and the t o t a l halide was determined within a year's time by means of Mahr•s s i l v e r nitrate method*  (Lucas and Hutchinson, 1927).  Hydrogen-ion  was determined by l a Mbtte's Cresol Red pH set* made f o r " s a l t error*"  concentration  No correction was  METHODS AND RESULTS  BANKIA INFESTATION RESULTS William Head (Quarantine Station) Table 1. Period investigated: September 20, 1932 t o J u l y 20, 1934, Depth investigated: S i x inches below surfaces Exposure i n t e r v a l : One month. Time: The i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia was sporadic.  No seasonal  p e r i o d i c i t y was demonstrated. Intensity: The i n f e s t a t i o n was l i g h t .  The heaviest incidence  was 5.2 per block f o r the month i n t e r v a l s January 20 t o February 20, 1933 and Ifey 20 to June SO,  1933®  Eydrographic condition: The average temperature and s a l i n i t y ranged from 7° to 11° 0. and from 30 to 31.5 parts per m i l l e respectively.  Tables 11 and 34.  Figure  1  .  Esquimalt harbour (Canadian P a c i f i c Railway Co. o i l wharf) Table 2. Period investigated: November 4, 1933 to June 11, 1934, Depth investigated:  S i x feet below surface.  Exposure i n t e r v a l : One month. Time: Every test block examined was attacked by Bankia. No seasonal p e r i o d i c i t y was demonstrated. Intensity: The i n f e s t a t i o n was l i g h t , the greatest, count being 7.2 f o r t h e i n t e r v a l November 4 to December 9, 1933. Bydrographlc conditions The average temperature and s a l i n i t y ranged from 8° to 15° C. and from 30 to 31 parts per m i l l e r e s pectively.  Tables 12 and 35.  Figure 2  .  Plate VII Figure 1  • Plate V I I I * Figures 2 and 3  V i c t o r i a inner harbour (Johnstone St* bridge) Table S» Period investigated: October 15, 1933 to J u l y 20, 1934* •9  Depth investigated: Six'feet below surface. Bxposure,JLn;teryal: Two weeks* Timet The i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia was sporadic*  No seasonal per-  i o d i c i t y was demonstrated* Intensity: The i n f e s t a t i o n was l i g h t * per  The count 4*8 per block  month f o r the i n t e r v a l A p r i l 6 to 13, 1934 was the greatest  recorded. Hydrographic condition: The  f o r t n i g h t l y average temperature and  s a l i n i t y varied from 7° to 15° C, and from 28*5 to 30*5 parts per  m i l l e respectively*  Tables 13 and 36*  Figure  3  *  Departure bay ( P a c i f i c B i o l o g i c a l Station) Tables 4 and 29* 1 Period investigated: October 4, 1931 to September 1, 1934, Depths investigated: (a) Surface ( f l o a t ) ; (b) Zero-tide l e v e l ; (c)  Bottom (eight feet below zero otide level*  Exposure i n t e r v a l : Usually one month* or  Occasionally two months  longer©  Time: Two p r i n c i p a l periods of i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia are evident from an examination of Table 4, a heavier f a l l i n f e s t a t i o n that extends from October (September) to December and a l i g h t e r spring i n f e s t a t i o n extending from March to May* the  These l i m i t s f o r  time of f a l l i n f e s t a t i o n are wider than those set by White  (1929) who r e s t r i c t e d i t to October. While no i n f e s t a t i o n took place from December 16, 1931 to  Plate IX Figure 4  Harch 24, 1932 there was i n f e s t a t i o n from December, 1932 to A p r i l 4, 1953 and i n a l l the winter months of the season 1933 1934*  '  Ho i n f e s t a t i o n took place i n mid-summer 1932 hut counts were recorded f o r blocks exposed i n both 1933 and 1934 from July to  the f a l l .  Departure bay Infestation may take place at a l l  times o f the year as contended  by Fraser (1925} although i n f e s t a t i o n may cease during mid summer and mid winter i n c e r t a i n years. Intensity; The r e s u l t s f o r the period investigated point to the fact that the greatest a c t i v i t y of Bankia  i s i n the f a l l .  variance with the nature of i n f e s t a t i o n of Bankia  This i s a t  i n Departure bay  as- reported by White (1929) who suggested that the main breeding season took place i n the spring. The i n f e s t a t i o n f o r the month i n t e r v a l October 7, 1933 to November 4, 1933 was 258.0 per block.  The heaviest spring attack  was on the block exposed from February 4 to March 4, 1934, 5.9 per unit block area. Hydrographic conditi on;  The f o r t n i g h t l y average temperature and .  s a l i n i t y ranged from 3° to 18°C. and from 18 to 29.3 parts per m i l l e r e s p e c t i v e l y f o r the period October 1, 1931 to August 13,  1932.  The average temperature at the four foot l e v e l varied from 5° to 20° 0, for the period August 14, 1952 to August 19, 1933 and from 4.3° to 19° C. f o r the period August 20, 1953 to June 6,  1934.  19 The average -temperature and s a l i n i t y at  the three foot  l e v e l ranged from 15° to 19° C, and from 21»3 to 26 parts per m i l l e respectively f o r the period June 12 to September 3, 1934. Tables 14 and 37*  Figure  Vertical distribution:  4  0  Table 29.  Infestation took place a t the three l e v e l s investigated. There was no s i g n i f i c a n t difference between the attack at the surface and at the zero tide l e v e l .  The attack at  the bottom  however, was markedly greater than that at the two higher l e v e l s . In c e r t a i n instances only the surface experimental block was attacked.  In one case, only the bottom block showed i n f e s t a t i o n .  Vancouver harbour (Gore avenue wharf)  Table 5. .  Period investigated: October 14, 1951 to May 19, 1934. Depth investigated: Zero t i d e l e v e l (ten f e e t from bottom) Exposure i n t e r v a l :  Two weeks.  Time: No i n f e s t a t i o n was recorded f o r the early summer months  0  Li  The i n f e s t a t i o n f o r the remainder of the year was i r r e g u l a r . Intensity: The attack by Bankia was very l i g h t .  The almost  complete absence of attack i s d i f f i c u l t to explain i n view of the f a c t noted by Mr. J.R, Townsend that a destructive attack occurred i n 1929 at the s i t e and l e v e l used f o r the present i n vestigation. Hydrographic condition:  Tables 15 and 38.  Figure  5  .  The average (fortnight) temperature and s a l i n i t y ranged o o from 4 tively.  to 15.5  C, and from 15 to 28 parts per m i l l e respec-  i  1  Salinity  \  s  f /  s'\ \  /  -  y  X  / \  \  /  \  .  \  \  \  i  -  / /  \ \  i  -  ? /  \  >  1 1  | 1  Temperature  -  1  <  Salinity  21 20  19  g  Pi  18  Temperature  Oot. 1  Hov. 9 3 3  Deo.  Jm.  Feb.  Sfaroh  V A H C O U V E R Gore Avenue Wharf  Plate X Figure 5  ^  J  .  m  ^  e  ^  —  is  S g  Crescent {Crescent Oyster Go* f l o a t )  Table 6.  Period investigated: September 1, 1952 to May 16,  1954®  Depth investigated* Zero tide l e v e l (one foot from bottom) Exposure i n t e r v a l : One month. Time: The Bankia attack was confined to the colder months o f the year. Intensity: The i n f e s t a t i o n was l i g h t .  Four. Bankia larvae per  month per u n i t block was the heaviest  count, the i n t e r v a l being  from October 1 to November 16, 1953. Hydrograuhie condition: The period f o r which liydrographic are given i s from May 18, 1955 to May 16, 1954. 59,  Figure  6  .  data  Tables 16 and  The average temperature and s a l i n i t y ranged  from 6° to 19° C. and from 21 to 28 parts per m i l l e respectively. The samples were taken s i x feet below the surface at the daylight high f l o o d t i d e .  Prince Rupert (Fisheries Experimental Station)  Table 7.  Periods investigated: June 29 to November 10, 1952. l&reh 1 to August 1, 1954. Depths investigated: 1952: Two feet from bottom, 1954:  Two feet  Exposure i n t e r v a l : 1952: Two weeks.  from surface. 1954: One month.  Time: The incidence was recorded f o r the i n t e r v a l October 25 to November 10, 1952, Intensity: The r e s u l t s are inconclusive  since the investigation  has not been run long enough at t h i s s t a t i o n .  22  Plats XI Figure 6  Plato XII • Figures 7and 8  24  Hydrograpalc condition:  February 1 to August 1, 1934. The  average temperature and s a l i n i t y taken at s i x feet from the surface ranged from 4.6° to 13° C. and from 22.7 to 29 parts per mille respectively.  Tables 17 and 40. Figure 7  ,  Buckley bay,. Ifesset' inlet, Q,ueen Charlotte islands. Table 8* Period investigated; Depth investigated:  October 1, 1931 to May 12, 1932. l i g h t feet from bottom* (Below zero tide  level). Exposure interval: Two weeks. Time: Every test block examined was attacked by Bankia. The investigation was not carried on long enough to show the seasonal characteristics of infestation. Intensity* The infestation by Bankia was never less than 5 per block per month. The most severe attack took place from October 1, 1931 to January 7, 1952. The number of Bankia l a r vae per unit area of 261 square centimeters f o r the month interv a l from October 29 to November 26, 1931 was 1,620. Hydrographic condition: The temperatures and s a l i n i t i e s taken at weekly intervals at -fee surface are presented i n table 18. The temperature and s a l i n i t y varied from 3.7° to 15.5° C. and from 9 to 20.7 parts per mille respectively.  The very low  s a l i n i t i e s (less than 16 parts per mille) were probably restricted to the epithalassa.  Figure  8  .  S H A N N O N 1! A 5 3 S T  B A Y I N L E T  ' 20  S H A. N H  0  H  B- A  Y  Plate XIII Figures 9 and 10  26  Shannon -bay I/asset i n l e t , Queen Charlotte islands. 9  Tables 9 and 10,  Periods investigated: September 17, 1931 to September 15,  1932,  November 3, 1933 to July 31, 1954, 1951-1932 Table 9. Depth investigated: l i g h t feet from bottom,  (Six feet below  zero tide l e v e l . Exposure i n t e r v a l : Two weeks. Time § As was the case at Buckley bay, every test block exposed was attacked by Bankia,  Intensity: The infestation by Bankia was never l e s s than 9 per block per month. The greatest a c t i v i t y was from September to November and during May and June, the f a l l infestation the heaviest*  being  The number of Bankia entries per unit area of  261 square centimeters f o r the month interval between October 15, 1931 to November 12, 1931 was 1,880, The infestation per u n i t area from May 26 to June 23, 1952 was 550, Hydrographic condition: Table 19,  Figure  9  .  The surface temperature and s a l i n i t y (taken at weekly i n tervals) varied from 3*5° to 14.5° C. and from 5,1 to 21.6 parts per mille respectively.  The very low s a l i n i t i e s (less  than 16 parts per mille) were probably r e s t r i c t e d to the epithalassa.  27  1955-1954 Table 10 Period investigated: November 3, 1955 to July 31, 19 54. Depth investigated: Fourteen feet from bottom (zero t i d e l e v e l ) . Exposure i n t e r v a l :  Two weeks.  Time: The second investigation a t Shannon bay again demonstrated a d e f i n i t e seasonal p e r i o d i c i t y with regard t o Bankia i n f e s t a t i o n . The f a l l i n f e s t a t i o n continued i n t o the early winter months. The spring attack extended from A p r i l to the middle o f June.  As  recorded f o r Buckley bay and f o r the f i r s t investigation at Shannon, every test block exposed was attacked by Banlcia. Intensity: The f i r s t t e s t block was not exposed u n t i l November, 1955 by which time the heavy f a l l i n f e s t a t i o n of 1951 was w e l l advanced.  The most a c t i v e attack during the spring of 19 54 was  - from May 21 to June 18 when the count per unit area of 261 square centimeters was 1,080.  The lowest count f o r the period inves-  t i g a t e d was 9 per month. Hydrographic condition: Table 20.  Figure  10  .  The temperatures and s a l i n i t y samples were taken every two weeks at the l e v e l a t which the test blocks were exposed; The temperature and s a l i n i t y varied from 5.5° to 16° 0. and from 17 to 21.6 parts per m i l l e respectively*  METHODS AMD RESULTS  LIMNORIA INFESTATION RESULTS William Head (Quarantine Station) Table 1, Period investigated: September 20, 1932 to July 20, 1934, Depth investigated: S i x inches below surface. Exposure i n t e r v a l : One month* Time: The i n f e s t a t i o n by Limnoria was continuous throughout the year.  In 1933 the greatest a c t i v i t y was from June to July.  During 1934 the increased a c t i v i t y began i n March and continued u n t i l July 20, when the l a s t test block was exposed. Intensity: The heavy attack by Limnoria took place from June 20 to J u l y 20, the count f o r the month being 106.  During the  winter of 1933-1934 the i n f e s t a t i o n dropped t o one or two i n dividuals per block per month.  The i n f e s t a t i o n from February  20 to June 20, 1934 ranged from 50 to 130 i n d i v i d u a l s per block per month. Hydrographic condition: The average temperature and s a l i n i t y ranged from 7® to 11° C. and from 30 to 31.5 parts per m i l l e respectively.  Tables 11 and 34.  Figure  1  .  Esquimalt harbour (Canadian P a c i f i c Railway Co. o i l wharf)  Table 2.  Period investigated: November 4, 1933 t o June 11, 1954. Depth investigated; S i x feet below surface. Exposure i n t e r v a l : One month. Time:  Every test block exposed was attacked by Limnoria.  Intensity: Although the time of i n f e s t a t i o n was s i m i l a r to  that at William Head, the attack was three times as severe at From March 11 to A p r i l 15, 1954 the count per block  Esquimalt. was 386  c  The extent of i n f e s t a t i o n at or near the surface was  the second greatest a t Esquimalt, the greatest having occurred at Departure bay,  Fraser (1925) reported that the greatest  amount of destruction wrought by Limnoria was a t Belmont wharf, Esquimalt and at Ogden point, V i c t o r i a (outer harbour), Hydrograuhic condition» The average temperature and s a l i n i t y ranged from 8° to 15° C, and from 30 to 51 parts per m i l l e respectively.  Tables 12 and 35.  Figure  2  c t o r i a inner harbour (Johnstone St, bridge) Period investigated:  ,  Table 5,  October 15, 1933 to July 20, 1934,  Depth investigated: S i x feet below surface. Exposure i n t e r v a l s :  Two weeks.  Time: No i n f e s t a t i o n occurred during the f a l l or e a r l y winter months of 1933. July,  Infestation was continuous from February to  1934.  Intensity: The greatest a c t i v i t y was recorded f o r the i n t e r v a l A p r i l 27 to May 25, 1934, the count being 17 per block. Hydrographic condition: The.average temperature and s a l i n i t y varied from 7° to 15° and from 28.5 to 30.5 parts per m i l l e respectively.  Tables 13 and 36,  Figure  3  ,  bay (Pacific Biological Station) Tables 4 and 30.  Departure  Period investigated; October 4, 1931 to September 1, 1954. Depths investigated; (a) Surface (float) (b) Zero tide l e v e l ; (c) Bottom (eight feet below zero tide level)* .Exposure  i n t e r v a l ; Usually one month. Occasionally two months  or longer. Timet  Limnoria infestation took place during 29 of the 36 months  investigated at Departure bay.  In  attack during the winter months at i n f e s t a t i o n occurred  contrast to the cessation of William Head and at Crescent,  during the winter a t Departure bay„  Hydrographic condition: The average temperature and s a l i n i t y ranged from 3° to 18° C. and from 18 to 29.3 parts per m i l l e  respectively f o r the period October 1, 1931 to August 13, 1932. The  average temperature a t the four foot l e v e l varied from  5°to 20° C. f o r the period August  14, 1952 to August 19,  1932.  and from 4,3° to 19° C, f o r the period August 20, 1933 to  June 6, 1934, The average temperature and s a l i n i t y at the three foot l e v e l ranged from 15° to 19° 0, and  from 21,3 to 26 parts per m i l l e  f o r the period June 12 to September 3, 1934,  Tables 14 and 37,  Figure 4 , Vertical Distribution.  Table 30.  Test blocks were exposed a t three d i f f e r e n t l e v e l s  con-  currently at Departure bay, namely at the surface ( f l o a t ) , zero t i d e (eight feet from the bottom) and at but the bottom. i n t a b l e 30.  The  not touching  counts per unit area per month are presented  The average i n f e s t a t i o n was much greater at the bottom than at the surface or at the zero t i d e levels  The average in-  f e s t a t i o n at the surface, however, was s l i g h t l y greater than that at the zero tide l e v e l .  Johnson and M i l l e r  (1935) found  that the settlement of Limnoria on blocks exposed at Friday harbour was heavier below than above the zero t i d e l e v e l , a l though i t extended upward to approximately mid-tide,, Vancouver harbour (Gore avenue wharf)- Table 5, Period investigated; October  14, 1931 to  19, 1934,,  May  Depth investigated: Zero tide l e v e l ( ten feet from bottom). Exposure interval:- Two weeks. Time: No seasonal p e r i o d i c i t y i n f e s t a t i o n was demonstrated* Intensity:The a c t i v i t y was not very great. 8,4  The greatest count,  per block was f o r the month i n t e r v a l J u l y 22 to August  19, 1933, Hydrographic condition: The average temperature and s a l i n i t y ranged from 4° to respectively.  15*5° C,  and from  Tables 15 and 38,  Crescent (Crescent Oyster Co, f l o a t ) .  15  to  Figure  28 parts 5 .  Table 6.  Period investigated; September 1, 1932 to May 16, Depth investigated.:  per m i l l e  1954,  Zero t i d e l e v e l (one foot from bottom).  Exposure i n t e r v a l : One month. Time: The i n f e s t a t i o n by Limnoria at Crescent i s characterized by a d e f i n i t e seasonal p e r i o d i c i t y .  There was a complete ces-  sation of g r i b b l e a c t i v i t y during the months o f December, January and February 1952-1935 and during December. January, Febr-uary and the f i r s t three weeks of March, 1955-1954, Intensity: The i n f e s t a t i o n from September 1 to October 1, .was 150 per blocks  1952  The following month only one i n d i v i d u a l  attacked the exposed t e s t block,,  The a c t i v i t y v a r i e d from  90 to 110 per block per month during the i n t e r v a l May 50 to September 50,  1935.  Hydro graphic condition: The period f o r which hydrographic are given i s from May 18, 59.  Figure  6  1933  to Kay 16, 1934.  data  Tables 16 and  .  The average temperature and s a l i n i t y ranged from 6° to o 19  C» and from 21 to 28 parts per m i l l e respectively®  The  • samples were taken at the s i x foot l e v e l below surface on the high daylight flood t i d e . Prince Rupert (Fisheries Experimental Station) Table 7. Periods investigated: June 29 to November 10, March 1 to August 1, Depths investigated: 1932; 1954; Exposure i n t e r v a l : 1952; Time:  1954©  Two f e e t from bottom» Two feet from surface.  Two weeks.  1934;  One month.  I n f e s t a t i o n occurred during the entire i n t e r v a l inves-  tigated i n 1932, i n 1934  1952,  J u l y to Ho verber 10,  Infestation w a s recorded  f o r the months March, A p r i l , May and June.  took place during July,  1954.  No attack  33  Intensity:  The infestation during the period investigated i n  1932 averaged 7 per block per month,, The average count per month during the period" investigated i n 1934 was 50 per block per month. Hydrographic condition:  February 1 to August 1, 1934®  The  average temperature and s a l i n i t y taken at s i x feet from the o o surface ranged from 4.5  to 13  per m i l l e respectively.  Tables 17 and 40.  Buckley bay,  Masset  C. and from 22.7 to 29 parts Figure  i n l e t , Queen Charlotte islands.  Period investigated: . October 1, 1932  to May  7  •  Table 8.  12, 1932®  Depth investigated: Sight feet from bottom (Below zero t i d e l e v e l ) . Exposure i n t e r v a l :  Two weeks.  Time: Infestation was  sporadic.  Intensity: Infestation was very l i g h t . The largest count was 2 6 per month. e  Hydrogranhic condition: Temperatures and s a l i n i t i e s taken at  the surface at weekly i n t e r v a l s are presented i n table 18. o  temperature and s a l i n i t y varied from 3.7 9 to 20.7  parts per m i l l e respectively.  The  o  to 15.5  C. and from  The very low  salinities  (less than 16 parts per m i l l e ) were probably r e s t r i c t e d to the epithalassa.  Figure  8  «,  Shannon bay, Masset' i n l e t , Queen Charlotte islands. Periods investigated: September 17, 1951 November 3, 1955  Tables 9 and  to September 15,  to July 31,  1954.  10.  1932.  1931 - 1932  Table 9.  Depth investigated: Eight feet from bottom  (Six feet below  zero tide l e v e l , Exposure i n t e r v a l : Two weeks* Time: From September 17, 1931 sporadic*  to March 31, 1932 the attack was  Every test block exposed during the period March 31  to September 15, 1932 was infested by Linmoria. Intensity: The attack was rather l i g h t .  The greatest  block per month, 19, occurred from May 12 to Hydrographic condition: Table 19*  Figure  9  count per  June 9, 1932* ,  The surface temperature and s a l i n i t y (taken at weekly i n tervals) varied from 3*5° to 14.5° C, and from 5*1 to 21*6 parts per m i l l e respectively*  The low s a l i n i t i e s  (less than 16  parts per m i l l e ) were probably r e s t r i c t e d to the epithalassa*  1933-1934  Table 10,  Period investigated: November 3, 1933 to J u l y 51, 1934, Depth investigated: Fourteen feet from bottom (zero t i d e  level)*  Exposure i n t e r v a l : Two weeks, Tims: The i n f e s t a t i o n from November 3, 1933 to February 9, 1954 was i r r e g u l a r .  From February 9 to July 31, 1934 the attack was  continuous.  Intensity: As was the case during the f i r s t investigation at Shannon bay, the attack generally was not very great» The highest count per block per to A p r i l 23, 1934*  month was 45 f o r the i n t e r v a l March 26  35  Hydrographic condition; Table 20, Sea-water samples which the t e s t blocks  Figure 10  .  were taken every two weeks at the l e v e l a t were exposed®  The temperature and s a l i n i t y  varied from 3,5 to 16° C. and from 17 to S l 6 parts per m i l l e 0  respectively.  METHODS AND RESULTS  INCIDENCE OF SESSILE ORGANISMS William Head (Quarantine Station) Table 21. Period investigated: October 20, 1935 to July 20, 19 34* Depth investigated: S i x inches below surface* Brpostire i n t e r v a l :  One month,  Balenus Times  Settlement took place from March 20 to June 20, 1954*  .Intensity: The incidence of Balanus was very;light, the greatest count being but 5 per block, Bryozoa Time and Intensity: A single encrusting bryozoan colony was found on the block exposed October 20 to November 20, 1933* Eydrographlc condition: The average temperature and s a l i n i t y ranged from 7° to 11° C, and from 30 to 31,5 parts per mille respectively.  Tables 11 and 34, Figure  1  „  Esquimalt harbour (Canadian Pacific Railway Co* o i l wharf5 Table 22* Period investigated: November 4, 1955 to June 11, 1934. Depth investigated: S i x feet below surface. Exposure interval: One month, Balanus Time and Intensity: Thirty organisms settled on the block that was exposed from A p r i l 15 to May 12, 1954. A l l other blocks  were free of i n f e s t a t i o n .  •»  Bryozoa .Times  Settlement of encrusting bryozoa commenced on Harch 11  and continued to June 11, 1934, the date on which the l a s t block was  removed©  Intensity; The count f o r the t e s t block exposed May 12 to June 11, 1954 was  15.  Esquimalt harbour Hydrographic condition:  The average temperature and s a l i n i t y  ranged from 8° to 15° C„ and from 50 to 51 parts per m i l l e respectively.  Tables 12 and 55.  2  Figure  .  V i c t o r i a inner harbour {Johnstone St. bridge) Table 25, Period investigated: October 15, 1955 t o J u l y 20,  1954.  Depth investigated: S i x feet below surface. Exposure intervals Two weeks.  Balanus Time and i n t e n s i t y ; Two organisms s e t t l e d on the experimental block exposed from May 25 to June 22, 1934.  A l l other blocks  were without barnacles. Hydrographic condition:  The average temperature and s a l i n i t y  varied from 7° to 15° C. and from 28.5 to 50.5 parts per m i l l e respectively.  Tables 15 and 56.  Figure  3  •  Departure bay (Pacific B i o l o g i c a l Station) Tables 24, 31, 32 and 3S„ Period investigated: October 4, 1931 t o September 1, 1954, Depth investigated: (a) Surface (float); (b) Zero tide l e v e l ; (c) Bottom (eight feet below zero t i d e level)*, Balanus  Time:  The main settlement o f Balanus i n Departure bay takes  place i n March, A p r i l , May and June.  Some settlement usually  occurs from August t o November, Intensity: Of the two incidence periods which are indicated at Departure bay the early spring period i s decidedly the heaviest,.  On the block exposed May 18 to June 18, 1932 150 barnacles were recorded* 670»  The count f o r the block exposed during A p r i l , 1935 was  The. incidence during June, 1955 was 800 and during May,  1954 the count was 450. The greatest count per block during the months of l a t e summer and f a l l was 5. V e r t i c a l d i s t r i b u t i o n : Table 31. From a comparison o f the counts f o r the f i v e months f o r which records are complete f o r the three depths, surface ( f l o a t ) , zero t i d e l e v e l and bottom, i t would seem that there i s a tendency for  the barnacle cyprids to s e t t l e at or near the surface. I t  i s apparent that test blocks must be placed a t more than one l e v e l and that the surface must be included i f an adequate p i c ture of seasonal settlement i s to ba obtained.  Mytilus Timet  The p r i n c i p a l period of incidence i s during J u l y and  August although attachment may Intensityt Settlement  begin as e a r l y as March®  from July 8 to September 8^ 1935  at iiie rate of 110 per block per month. the incidence was 8*  During March,  occurred 1954  The counts per block per month for trie i n -  t e r v a l s J u l y 6 to August 6, 1934 and from xiugust 9 to September 1, 1934 were 10 and 325 respectively.) V e r t i c a l d i s t r i b u t i o n : Table 32„ Demarcation of incidence at the d i f f e r e n t l e v e l s i s more decided than that found f o r Balanus© The counts f o r the levels, f l o a t , zero t i d e and bottom f o r the i n t e r v a l August 9 to September 1, 1934 were 525,  35 and 0 per block per month respectively*  From these r e s u l t s i t i s manifest that test biocks should be placed a t the f i r s t two levels at least, i f r e l i a b l e incidence f o r Hytilus  edulis are to be  obtained.  In connection with the attachment of Mytilus edulis and Hytilus caiifornianus on t e s t blocks placed at low water l e v e l at the p i e r of Scripps I n s t i t u t i o n of Oceanography, La J o l l a , California,Coe (1952) makes the following statement:  "Of the  several species of mussels occurring on the coast of C a l i f o r n i a , only two of the e d i b l e species, M. edulis and have been found on the experimental blocks.  caiifornianus Although these  species form thick growths on the neighbouring p i l e s , only a few i n d i v i d u a l s of the former and only tv/o of the l a t t e r were found attached to the blocks.  The smooth surface evidently does not  afford a suitable attachment f o r the byssus of the young molluscs, for the water i s often swarming with the free-swimming larvae of both species during the warmer summer months of the year*" At Orescent no mussels were found on the test blocks placed at zero tide level although a heavy set of mussels commonly occurs on f l o a t s adjacent to the s i t e where the test blocks are placed. Bryozoa Time' The incidence of Membranipora took place in 1952 and 1955 during the months of May and June*  During 1954 settlement began  in March and continued sporadically u n t i l the end of August, when the last block to be examined was removed. Intensity: The monthly count per block for May and June, 1935 was 155.  The. incidence during March, A p r i l and May, 1934 was 42,  110 and 0 respectively*  The heaviest settlement o f Bryozoa took  place at Departure bay. V e r t i c a l distribution: Table 55. Membranipora colonies a t the levels, surface, zero tide and bottom numbered 80, 40 and 0 respectively.  A tendency to  aggregate at the surface i s indicated. Sorpulids Time and in tensity: A single specimen attached to the block exposed August 9 to September 1, 1954. The organism was not suff i c i e n t l y developed to make possible i t s identification to genus. Hydrographic condition: Tables 14 and 37.  Figure  4 ;  The average temperature and s a l i n i t y at the surface ranged  41  o  o  t o 18  from S  C, and from 18 t o 29,3 parts per m i l l e respectively  f o r the period October 1, 1951 to August 13, 19 32, The average temperature a t the four foot l e v e l varied, from o  o 5  to 20  0, f o r the period August 14, 1952 to August 19, 1932 and  o from 4,3  o to 19  0, f o r the period August 20, 1953 to June 6, 1954,  The average temperature and s a l i n i t y at the three foot  level  ranged from 15° to 19° C, and from 21,5 to 26 parts per m i l l e r e s p e c t i v e l y f o r the period June 12 t o September 3, 1934, Vancouver harbour (Gore avenue wharf) Table 25, Period investigated: October 14, 1931 to May 19,  1954,  Depth investigated:Zero t i d e l e v e l (ten feet from bottom) Exposure i n t e r v a l : Two weeks, Balanus Time:  Attachment occurred i n the months A p r i l , May,  J u l y and  September,, Intensity: The settlement was very l i g h t , i n no instance exceeding 5 per block,  Mytilus Time:  Sporadic incidence took place from March to October,  Intensity: Incidence was comparatively  light.  The greatest number  21, was recorded f o r the i n t e r v a l August 5 to September 2, 1935.  Bryozoa Time and i n t e n s i t y : Only one colony was observed. on the block exposed from A p r i l 25 to May 19,  1954,  This occurred  42 Hydrographic condition'  Tables 15 and 58.  figure  5  .  The average temperature and s a l i n i t y ranged from 4° to 15.5° 0, and from 15 to 28 parts per m i l l e respectively. Orescent (Crescent Oyster Co. f l o a t )  Table 26.  Period investigated" September 1, 1952 t o May 16, Depth investigated? Zero t i d e l e v e l Exposure i n t e r v a l *  1954.  (one foot from bottom)  One month.  Balanus Time;  Two periods of settlement occur at Crescent. The spring  settlement of 1953 extended from A p r i l to began i n  June. That o f 1934  March. The p r i n c i p a l f a l l settlement of 1952 was con-  fined to September whereas  that o f 1935 began i n October and con-  tinued to December 16. Intensity: The counts f o r the blocks exposed from A p r i l to June, 1955 averaged 180 per month. 1 to December 16  During the f a l l of 1955 from October  settlement on blocks was a t the rate o f 160*per month.  Such counts are r e l a t i v e l y high.  Bryozoa Time and i n t e n s i t y : Incidence o f encrusting forms occurred only during ihe month o f  June, 1955 and amounted to 4 per block,  Hydrographic condition: Tables 16 and 59.  Figure  6  .  The period f o r which hydrographic data are given i s from May 18, 1955 t o May 16, 1954.  The  average temperature and s a l i n i t y  ranged from 6°to 19° C. and from 21 to 28 parts per m i l l e respec-  tively.  The samples were taken at the s i x foot l e v e l on the  daylight high flood tide* 'i  Prince Rupert (Fisheries Experimental Station) Table 27. Periods investigated: June 29 to November 10, March 1 to August 1,  1932.  1934,  Depths investigated: 1932: Two  feet from bottom.  1934: Two  feet from surface  Exposure i n t e r v a l :  1932:  Two weeks.  1934;  6  One month.  Balanus Time: Incidence occurred from July 20 to September 13, 1932 from A p r i l u n t i l August 1, 1934,  and  the date the l a s t biock examined  was removed, • Intensity: Intensity at the bottom during 1932 was l i g h t . cidence during the period A p r i l 2 to J u l y 3, 1954  In-  (two feet from  surface) was at the rate of 105 per block per month.  Mytilus Time: Settlement took place during July and August,  Serpulids Time and i n t e n s i t y : Six specimens s e t t l e d on the block exposed feom June 29 to July 20, 1932 and 1 on the block exposed from October 25, 1932 to November 10, 1952,  Settlement during  1954  occurred only i n July, during which time 5 serpulids attached.  Bryozoa Time and i n t e n s i t y ; A l i g h t settlement o f encrusting Bryozoans took place during the months  June, J u l y and August.  Hy drographic condition; February 1 to August 1, 1934, The average temperature and s a l i n i t y taken a t s i x feet from the surface ranged from 4,6° to 13° C. and from 22»7 to 29 parts per m i l l e .  Tables 17 and 40.  Figure  7  Shannon bay, Masset-.. i n l e t , Q,ueen Charlotte islands.  .  Table 28.  Period investigated; November 3, 19 35 to July 51, 1934. Depth Investigated: Fourteen feet from bottom (zero t i d e l e v e l ) Exposure i n t e r v a l : Two weeks.  Balanus Time: Sporadic settlement took place from A p r i l 23 to J u l y 31, 1954,  No settlement took place from November 5, 1933 to A p r i l 25,  1934. Intensity: Spring settlement per month d i d not exceed 17 to the blocks  Incidence on the l a s t block, which was exposed from  July 17 to 31, 1954 was 600, or at the rate o f 1,200 f o r a month interval.  Hytilus Time: Incidence was sporadic.  Settlement occurred during the  months of December, January, March, A p r i l , July and August. This i s the only record of winter attachment of H y t i l u s . (It i s of interest that i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia was continuous at this station.)  F i e l d (1922) found that My-tilus edulis spawned at the Atlantic coast from A p r i l to Septembers that Mytilus edulis  Fish (1925) reported  larvae appeared i n the plankton hauls taken  at Woods Hole i n June (1922) and continued to be taken as late as December. Hydro graph! c con d i t i o n T a b l e . 2 0 .  Figure  10 «  Temperatures and s a l i n i t i e s were taken every two weeks at the level at which the test blocks were exposed.  They varied  from 3.5° to 16° C. and from 17 to 21.6 parts per m i l l e respectively.  TABLE I BANKJA AND LIMNORIA • WILLIAM HEAD Depth ^ 1 foot from surface Date  .  Infestation*. Area 261 sq Bankia Limnoria  Sept* 20, 1932 t o Oct* 20, 1932  0  8*4  Oct*  20, 1932 to Nov, 20, 1932  0  1.9  Nov*  20, 1932 to Dec, 20, 1932  6.5  0.6  Dec*  20, 1932 to Jan* 20, 1933  1*5  4.6  Jan*  20, 1933 to Feb. 20, 1935  5*2  0.6  Feb.. 20, 1933 to Mar. 20, 1935  1*5  7,5  Mar*  20, 1933 to Apr* 20, 1955  0  5.9  Apr.  20, 1935 to May 20, 1953  1.5  5.9  May  20, 1935 to June 20, 1955  5.2  19.5  June  20, 1953 to July 20, 1935  0  July  20, 1955 to Aug* 20, 1955  1*5  10.5  Aug*  20, 1953 to Sep. 20, 1955  0  19.0  Sept. 20, 1955 to Oct. 20, 1955  0  1*0  Oct,  20, 1935 to Nov. 20, 19 53  0  3*0  Nov*  20, 1955 to Dec* 20, 1955  0  0  Dec,  20,. .1933 to Jan. 20, 1954  0  1*0  Jan*  20, 1934 to Feb. 20, 1934  5.7  4*5  Feb,  20, 1934 to Mar. 20, 1954  0  54*0  0  154.0  Mar, 20, 1934  to Apr, 20, 1934  106.0  Apr*  20, 1934 to May  May  20, 1954 to June 20, 1934  0  103.0  June  20, 1934 to July 20, 1954  0  21*4  20, 1954  0*8  61*0  TABLE  I I  B A N K I A A N D HmOBIk ' ESQUIMAU? HARBOUR Depth - 6 feet from surface Date  Infestation. Bankia  Area 261 sq* Limnoria  NOT*  4, 1933 to Dec.  9, 1933  7.2  10.0  Dec*  9, 1933 to Jan,  7* 1934  0*6  13.1  Jan.  7, 1934 to Feb. 11, 1934  2*0  58*8  1934 to Mar* 11, 1934  0,6  131.0  Mar* l l j . 1934 to Apr-, 15, 1934  1*2  386,0  Apr* 15, 1934 to May ::.12, 1934  0.7  279.0  May  2.9  10.5  Febi l i t  1934 to June 11, 1934  TABLE I I I VICTORIA, INNER HARBOUR Depth - 6 feet from surface "If  Date  Infestation. Bankia  Area 261 sq Limnoria  Oct, 15, 1933 to Oct. 29, 1933  0  0  Oct. E9, 1933 to Nov. 11, 1933  0  0  NOT. l l j 1933 to Nov. 25, 1933  0  0  Nov. 25^ 1933 to Dec.  0*8  0  9, 1933 to Dec. •27* 1933  0  0  Dec. 27, 1933 to Jan. 10, 1934  o  0  Jan. 10, 1934 to Jan. 24, 1934  0*8  o"  Jan. 24, 1934 to Feb. 10, 1934  0  0  Feb. 10j 1934 to Feb. 2*3j 1934  0  2,6  Feb. 23, 1934 to LSar.  9, 1934  0  0*6  9, 1934 to Mar. 24, 1934  0  6*5  0  5,2  2.4  0*6  Apr. 13, 1934 to Apr. 27, 1934  0  0*6  Apr. 27, 1934 to fey 11, 1934  1,8  16*3  May  25, 1934  1.4  1.9  8, 1934  0*6  1© 3  8, 1934 to June 22, 1934  1,4  6.5  0  1,9  0  0  Dec.  Sir.  Mar. 24, 1934 to Apr. Apr.  6, 1934  6, 1934 to Apr. 13, 1934  11, 1934 to May  toy 25, June  9, 1933  1934 to June  June 22, 1934 to J u l y  7, 1934 -j  July 7, 1934 to July 20, 1934  TABLE  IV  BANKIA AMD L M Q R I A DEPARTURE BAY Depth.  Infestation, Bankia  1931 to NOT. 4, 1931  bottom  14,2  1931 to NOT. 18, 1931  bottom  7.0  0  NOT. 18, 1931 to Dec. 2, 1931  bottom  5*6  6*5  Dec.  2, 1931 to Dec, 16, 1931  bottom  -1*4  7*9  Dee. 16, 1931 to Dec, 30, 1931  bottom  0  353.0  Jan.  1, 1932 to Jan,13, 1932  bottom  0  0  Jan. 13, 1932 to Jan,27, 1932  bottom  0  72.0  Jan. 27, 1932 to Feb,10, 1932  bottom  0  21,0  Feb. 10, 1932 to 'Mar.*  9, 1932  bottom  0  0  9, 1932 to Mar. 24j 1932  bottom  0  470*0  Kar. 24, 1932 to Apr. 6, 1932  bottom  1.4  190,0  Apr.  bottom  0  72.0  Oct. Nov.  Mar.  %  7, 1932 to Apr* 21, 1932  Area 261 sq* cm. Limnoria 59,5  Apr. 20* 1932 to May  4, 1932  bottom  0  285,0  May  4, 1952 to June  4, 1932  bottom  0  130*0  Jtme  4, 1932 to July  4, 1932  bottom  0  130*0  July  4, 1932 to Aug*  2, 1932  bottom  0  130*0  Aug.  2, 1932 to Sep. 2, 1932  bottom  16*0  25*0  Sep.  3* 1932 t o Oct, 4, 1932  bot torn  2,8  Oct,  7, 1932 to Dec*  7, 1932  bottom  96*0  19.5  Dec.  4, 1952 to Feb, 4, 1933  bottom  21*0  100*0  Feb.  2, 1933 to Apr. 4, 1933  0,8  165.0  Apr.  2, 1953 to May  6 feet o f f bottorn 6 feet o f f bot torn  2, 1935  0  0  0  TABLE •IV (Continued) BANKIA AND LIMNORIA DEPARTURE BAY Depth May- 4, 1935 to June 15, 1953 June  4,1953 to June 29, 1955  Infestation* Bankia  6 feet o f f bottom surface  Area 261 sq* Limnoria  0  41.0  0  0  June 29,1953 to July  8, 1933  -  - ••.  -  July  8,1935'to Aug*  8, 1953  surface  5.4  222*0  Aug*  8,1933 to Sep.  6, 1935  surface  5*4  0  Sep*  6, 1933 to Oct.7j 1955  Oct*  7,1935 t o Nov,  4* 1953  Nov*  4*1935 to Dec,  -  X  • - ..  -  bottom  258*0  57,0  4, 1955  bottom  51,5  54*0  Dec*  4>1955 to Jan, 4,' 1934  bottom  2*8  53*0  Jan;  4,1954 to Feb, 4, 1954  -  -  Feb„  4,1954 to Mar,  1934  surface  5*9  35.0  S  Mar*  4,1934 to Apr, 4> 1954  surface  0,8  95.0  s  Apr.  4,1954 to May  4, 1934  surface  5.4  12*0  May  4,1954 t o June  4i 1954  surface  1,7  85.0 ~  June  4,1954 to July  5, 1934  surface  0  July  7,1954 to Aug, 9, 1954  bottom  7.5  22.0  Aug.  9,1954 to Sep,  bottom  22.0  41.0  Bottom  1, 1954  -  S  5*0  TABLE  V  BANKIA AND LLWORIA VANCOUVER, GORE AVE. Depth - zero t i d e l e v e l (10 feet from bottom) •  Date  Infestation. Bankia  Area 261 sq> Limnoria  Oct. 14, 1931 to Nov. 4* 1951  0  0»6u  Nov.  4, 1931 to Nov. 18, 1931  0  0,6  Nov. 18, 1931 to Dec. 3, 1931  0  1,9  5, 1931 to Dec.17, 1931  0  0  Dee. 17, 1931 to Dec.31, 1931  0  0  Dec. 31, 1951 to Jan,13, 1932  0  0.6  Jan. 13, 1932 to Jan, 27, 1932  0  1.3  Jan. 27, 1932 to Feb.10, 1932  • 0  0  Feb. 10, 1932 to Feb.27, 1932  0  0  Feb. 27, 1932 to Mar. 9, 1932  0  present  Mar.  9, 1932 to Mar.19, 1932  0  0  Mar. 19, 1932 t o May . 10, 1932  0  present  May-  10, 1932 to May  21, 1932  0  present  May  21, 1932 to June  4, 1932  0  0.6  4, 1932 to June 18, 193 2  0  present  2, 1932  0  present  2, 1932 to July 16, 1932  0  0  July 16, 1932 to July 30, 1932  0  0  July 30, 1932 to Aug.13j 1932  0  present  Aug. 13, 1932 to Aug..27, 1932  0  0  27, 1932 to Sep.10 j 1932  0  0  Dec.  June  June 18, 1932 to July July  TABLE  V  BANZZLA AND  ( Continued) LIMNORIA  VANCOUVER, Gl RE AVE. Depth - zero tide l e v e l ( 10 feet from bottom) Date  Infestation. Bankia  Area 861 sq* onu Limnoria  Sep. 10* 1932 to Sep, 50, 1932 Oct.  1, 1932 to Oct, 15, 1932  0  0  Oct. 15 i 1932 to Oct* 29, 1932  0  0  Oct. 29, 1932 to Nov* 12, 1932  0  present  Nov. 12, 1952 to Nov* 26j 1932  0  0  Nov. 26, 1932 to Dec* 10, 1932  0  0  Dec. 10, 1952 to Dec* 26, 1932  0  0  Dec. 26, 1932 to Jan*  7, 1933  0  0  7, 1953 to Jan* 21, 1933  0  0  4, 1953  0  0  4, 1955 to Feb* 18, 1955  0  0  4, 1953  0  5*2  Mar.  1953 to Mar. 18, 1955  0  1*5  Ida** 18,  1935 to Apr* 10, 1955  0  0  Apr.  10, 1935 to Apr* 24, 1955  0  5*2  Apr.  24, 1955 to June 10, 1955  0  0  June 10, 1935 to June 24, 1953  0  0  June 24, 1935 to July  8, 1955  0  5*2  8, 1955 to July 22, 1955  0  0*6  0  5.2  Jan.  Jan* 21, 1935 to Feb* Feb.  Feb. 18, 1933 to Mar*  July-  J u l y 22, 1955 to Aug.  5, 1955  '  . TABLE V  (Continued)  , BANKIA AND LIMNORIA VANCOUVER, GORE AVE, Depth - zero tide l e v e l (10 feet from bottom) Date Aug,  Infestation, Bankia  5, 1955 to Aug* 19, 1955  Area 261 sq. cm, Limnoria  1.3  5.2  2, 1955  0  0  1955 to Sep* 16, 1955  0  0  Sep, 16, 1955 to Sep. 50, 1953  0  0  Sep. 30, 1955 to Oct* 14, 1953  0  0  Oct* 14, 1955 to Oct. 28, 1955  0i  0  Oct. 30, 1953 to Nov* 15, 1935  0  0  Nov, 15, 1933 to Dec.  2,6  0  0  0  2, 1954  5.9  0  2, 1954 to Jan* 15, 1934  1* 5  0  0  0  1.3  0  1*3  0  0  0  9, 1954  0  0  9, 1954 to Apr. 25, 1934  0  0  0  0  Augo 19, 1955 to Sep* Sep.  Dec.  1* 1955 to Dec* 16, 1953  Dec. 16, 1935 to Jan. Jan*  Jan. 15, 1952 to Feb* Feb,  6, 1954  6, 1954 to Mar* 24, 1934  Mar* 24, 1954 to Apr* Apr*  2, 1954 .  2, 1954 to Feb. 16, 1934  Feb* 16, 1934 to Mar. Mar*  1, 1955  Apr* 25, 1954 to May  19, 1954  TABLE  VI  BANKIA AND LMTORIA ORESCENT Depth - zero tide l e v e l ( 1 foot from bottom) Kate  Infestation. Bankia  Sep.  1, 1932 to Oct.  Oct.  1, 1932 to Oct, 31, 1952  1, 1952  0  Area 261 sq.. Limnoria  150.6  2.6  0.6  Oct, 51, 1932 to Nov. 30, 1932  0  1*3  Nov. 50, 1932 to Dec, 30, 1932  0  0  Dec. 30, 1932 to Jan. 30, 1935  2.6  0  Jan. 30, 1933 to Feb. 28, 1933  1.3  0  Feb. 28, 1933 to Wiser, 30, 1933  0  0*6  Mar-* 30, 1933 to Apr, 30, 1933  0  12*4  Apr.  30, 1953  0  41*2  1 % • 30, 1935 to June 30, 1935  0  94*5  June 30, 1933 to July 30> 1935  0  91*0  July 30, 1933 to Aug, 30, 1955  0  114*0  Aug. 30, 1935 to Sep, 50, 1953  0  103.0  Oct.  1, 1933 to Nov, 16, 1933  5,2  3*2  Nov  16 j 1933 to Dec, 16, 1933  0  0  Dec. 16, 1933 to Jan.. 16, 1934  2,6  0  Jan. 16, 1934 to Mar. 20, 1934  1.3  0  lifer. 20, 1934 to Apr* 16, 1934  0  2*6  Apr.  0  10.5  0  30, 1933 to May  16, 1934 to May  16, 1934  55 TABLE  VII  BAWKEA AND LII-1T0RIA PHBTCE RUPERT Depth - 2 feet from bottom Date  Infestation. Bankia  Area 261 sq. Limnoria  June 29, 1932 to J u l y 29j 1932  0  24.2  July 29, 1932 to Aug*  3, 1932  0  9.3  Aug. -3, 1932 to Aug. 17, 1932  0  5*9  Aug. 17, 1932 to Aug, 31, 1952  0  0*6  Aug. 31, 1932 to Sep* 13, 1932  0  9,3  Sep. 13, 1932 to Sep, 28, 1932  0  0.6  Sep. 28, 1932 to Oct.  1932  0  12.4  Oct, 12, 1932 to Oct. 25, 1932  0  0.6  Oct. 25,  0*7  3.2  1932  to  NOT*  JLSJ  10, 1932  Depth - 2 feet from surface Mar* l j 1934 to Apr.  2, 1954  0  53.5  Apr*  2, 1934 t o July  3, 1954  0  214*0  July  3, 1934 to Aug*  1, 1934  0  0  56 TABLE BANKIA  AND  VIII LIMORIA  BUCKLEY BAY, MASSETT INLET Depth - 8 feet from bottom Date Oct,  Infestation, Bankia  Area 861 sq,, em* Limnoria  1* 1951 to Oct. 15, 1951  607  0  Oct. 15, 1951 to Oct. 29, 1951  551  0.6  Oct, 29, 1951 to NOT. 12 j 1951  828  0  Nov. 12, 1951 to NOT. 26, 1951  796  0  NOT* 26, 1951 to Dec. 10, 1951  259  0  Dec. 10 j 1951 to Dec* 24* 1951  106  0  7* 1952  49  0  7, 1952 to Jan*  1952  15  1.3  Jan. 21, 1932 to Feb*  4* 1952  6  1952 to Feb* 18, 1952  17  0.6  4* 1952  3  1,9  4, 1952 to Mar, 17, 1952  11  0  Mar* 17, 1952 to Mar* 51, 1952  1  0  Mar. 51, 1952 to Apr, 14, 1952  4  2,6  Apr* 14, 1952 to Apr. 28, 1952  5  0  Apr.  5  0  Dec. 24* 1931 to Jan, Jan,  Feb.  Feb. 18 i 1932 to Mar* lifer*  28, 1952 to May  12, 1952  0  TABLE  IX  •BANKIA AND LIMNORIA SHANNON BAY, MASS1TT INLET Depth - 8 feet from "bottom Date Sep, 17, 1931 to Oct.  Infestation, Bankia  Area 261 s q , i Limnoria  1, 1931  361  0  1931 to Oct. 15, 1951  354  2*6  Oct* 15, 1951 to Oct. 29, 1931  554  0  Oct, 29, 1931 to NOT. 12, 1951  1,525  NOT, 12, 1951 to Nov* 26, 1951  21  0  NOT, 26, 1951 to Dec, 10, 1931  24  1.9  Dec* 10, 1951 to Dec. 24, 1931  85  1.5  Dec* 24, 1951 to Jan*  7, 1932  56  0  7* 1952 to Janw 21, 1932  102  0  Oet,  Jan*  li  Jan* 21, 1952 to Feb.  5*9  4, 1932  51  4, 1952 to Feb.. 18* 1932  6  0  3, 1932  16  0  3, 1952 to Mar. 17, 1932  52  1® 3  Mar. 17, 1952 to Mar. 31, 1932  28  0  Mar, 31, 1952 to' Apr* 14, 1932  77  9.5  Apr.  Feb,  Feb* 18, 1952 to Mar. Mar.  1*9  14, 1932 to Apr.  28, 1932  51  9.5  Apr* 28, 1952 to May  12, 1932  51  5*2  May- 12, 1932 to May  26, 1932  127  7.5  9, 1932  580  11.7  9, 1252 to June 3*5} 1932  168  May June  26, 1952 to June  June 23, 1952 to July  7, 1932  45  0,6  TABLE  IX  (Continued)  BAMIA AMD LBS'TORIA SH&MTOKT BAYj MSSSETT- UJL1T •Depth - 8 feet from bottom Date  July  Infestation. Bankia  7, 1932 to J u l y 21, 193 2  Area 261 sq* Limnoria  21  1.9  4, 1932  24  2*6  4, 1932 t o Aug. 18, 1932  6  10.5  Aug* 18* 1932 to Sep. 11, 1932  5  6*5  Sep*  8  1,9  J u l y 21, 1932 to Aug* Aug*  1, 1932 to Sep. 15, 1932  TABLE X BANKIA AMD LHKTORIA SHANNON BAY,. MASSETT INLET  " •;  Depth - 14 feet from bottom (zero t i d e level) Date Nov,  Infestation* Bankia  3, 1935 to Nov. 17, 1933  Nov, 17, 1935 to Dec,  93  Area 261 sq> Limnoria 0  1, 1933  119  X$ 3  1, 1933 to Dec, 15, 1933  35  1*3  Dec. 15, 1955 to Dec* 29, 1933  13  1,3  Dec. 29, 1935 to Jan* 12, 1934  25  1*9  Jan. 12, 1954 to Jan* 26, 1934  12  0  Jan, 26, 1954 to Feb, • 9, 1934  7  0  Feb.  9, 1954 to Feb. 26, 1934  4  0,6  Feb. 26, 1934 to Mar* 12, 1934  5  3© »2  Mar. 12, 1954 to Mar. 26, 1954  5  5,3  9, 1934  96  7*5  9, 1954 to Apr, 23, 1934  179  37,4  •7t ,1934  189  5*2  21, 1934  266  3*9  4j 1954  551  5*8  4, 1934 to June 18, 1954  751  5,2  2, 1934  14  1*9  2, 1934 to July 17, 1934  22  2,6  Dec.  Mar. 26 * 1934 to Apr, Apr.  Apr. 23, 1934 to May May  7, 1934 to l a y  May  21, 1934 to June  June  June 18, 1934 to J u l y July  July 17, 1934 to July 31, 1934  4  2,6  TABLE  XI  B3DR0GHAPHI0 DATA. Averages f o r s a l i n i t i e s and temperatures f o r i n t e r v a l s of block exposure Samples taken 6 feet from surface WILLIAM HEAD 0 Temp.  Cl/kg.  /oo Salinity  Sep. 20, 1932 to Oct* 20, 1952  10*4  17*30  51.26  Oct. 20* 1932 to Nov. 20, 1952  9.2  17*58  51.40  Nov* 20, 1952 to Dec. 20, 1952  8.2  17.14  50.97  Dec* 20, 1952 to Jan.20, 1953  7,4  17.14  30.97  Jan. 20, 1953 to Feb.20, 1933  6.8  17*21  51*09  Feb. 20, 1955 to Mar. 20, 1933  7,0  17.41  31*46  Mar* 20, 1933 to Apr.20, 1935  7.6  17.11  50*91  Apr* 20, 1955 to May  20, 1935  8*6  17.42  51.47  Ifey - 20, 1953 to June 20, 1955  9.8  17.51  51.27  June 20, 1955 to J u l y 20, 1955  10.4  17.04  50*79  J u l y 20, 1953 to Aug. 20, 1955  11,0  16.77  50.50  Aug. 20. 1955 to Sep. 20, 1955  10.8  17.01  30.73  Sep. 20, 1935 to Oct.20, 1955  9.8  17.09  50.88  Oct. 20, 1955 to Nov. 20, 1955  9*0  17.08  30,86  Nov. 20, 1955 to Dec* 20, 1955  8*1  17*12  50.95  Dec* 20, 1955 to Jan* 20, 1954  7*8  16*76  30.28  Jan* 20, 1954 to Feb.20, 1954  8*0  16.70  50.17  Feb. 20, 1954 to Mar. 20, 1954  8.1  16.81  30.57  Mar* 20, 1934 to Apr.20, 1954  8*7  17.00  50.72  Apr. SO, 1954 to May  20, 1954  9*7  17.04  50.79  20, 1954 to June 20, 1954  10.5  16*95  50.59  June 20, 1954 to J u l y 20, 1934.  11.1  17.05  50*77  Date  May  °()0 .  TABLE XI2 HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Average f o r temperatures and s a l i n i t y f o r i n t e r v a l s of block exposure Samples taken 6 feet from surface ESQHIMALT Date  •  0 .Temp*  °/oo Cl/kg.  % o Salinity  Hov,  4, 1935 to Dec*  9, 1955  8.8  17.04  50.79  Dee*  9, 1955 to Jan, 7, 1934  7.4  16*94  30*61  Jan,  7, 1934 to Feb.11, 1954  8.0  16.79  50*34  Feb, 11, 1934 to Mar. 11, 1954  8.5  16.88  50.50  Mar, 11, 1934 to Apr* 15, 1954  10.2  16*77  50,50  Apr, 15, 1954 to May  1954  11.8  16,79  50,54  May  1954  15.0  16.80  50.55  1954  14.5  16*84  30.43  1  1934 to June i i ,  June 11, 1954 to July  l,  TABLE  XIII  HYDBOGBAPHEC DATA . Averages f o r temperatures and s a l i n i t y f o r i n t e r v a l s o f block exposure Deptn - 6 feet from surface VICTORIA, INKER HARBOUR, JOHNSTONE ST, BRIDGE .0 , Temp,  Date  /oo • Cl/kg  /oo Salinity  Oct, 15, 1935 to Oct. 29j 1935  10.0  16*80  50.55  Oct, 29* 1933 to Nov. 11, 1953  9,8  16*66  50.10  Nov. 11, 1933 to Nov. 25, 1955  9*1  16*55  29*90  Nov. 25, 1933 to Dec.  9, 1935  8.0  16*37  29*58  9> 1933 to Dec. 27, 1955  7.5  16.55  29.87  Dec. 27, 1935 to Jan. 10, 1954  7.7  16*55  29.54  Jan. 10, 1934 to Jan. 24, 1954  7*5  16.22  29,51  Jan. 24j 1934 to Feb. 10* 1954  8.0  16*29  29.45  Feb, 10, 1934 to Feb. 25, 1934  8.2  16*55  29*54  Feb. 23, 1934 to Mar.  9, 1954  8*0  15*79  28,55  9, 1934 to Mar. 24, 1954  9.2  16*14.  29,16  6, 1954  9.6  16 .08  29*04  6i 1954 to Apr. 13, 1954  10.0  16.56  29*92  Apr. 13, 1934 to Apr. 27, 1954  11,5  16*25  29*57  Apr. 27, 1954 t o May  11, 1954  11*2  16*62  50*05  May 11, 1934 to  25, 1954  12.7  16*55  29,90  8, 1954  13*5  16*64  50*07  8, 1954 to June 22, 1954  14.8  16.65  50.08  7,' 1954.  14.4  16*80  50.55  7, 1934 to July 20, 1954  14*2  16.82  30.39  14.7  16.91  30.55  Dec.  Mar*  Jfer, 24, 1934 to Apr. Apr,-  May June  May  25, 1934 to June  June 22, 1934 to July July  July 20, 1954, to J u l y 31, 1934  TABES XIV HYDROGRAPHIO DATA Averages f o r temperatures and s a l i n i t i e s , DEPARTURE BAT  Date 1931  Depth  Oct.  1 t o Oct. 14  Oct.  15 to Oct. 27  Oct.  28 t o Nov.  Surface .  '  7  "  Nov.  9 t o Nov. 30  "  Dec.  1 t o Dec. 14  "  Dec. 16 t o Jan. 7 1932  »  Jan.*  "  8 t o Jan. 11  0 Temp.  /oo Cl/kg.  /oo Salinity  11.9  15.07  2*7 « 23  10.4  15.00  27.11  9*6  12.90  23.31  7*5"  15.06  27,21  • 7.0  15.20  27.47  6.3  IS & G 2  23.17  6.8  13*86  25*05  3.0  10.41  18.82  5.7  11,82  21.37  Jan* 13 t o Jan. 15  n  Jan.  17 to Jan* 20  "  5© 2  15.28  27.61  Jan.  21 to Feb. 4  "  .6*2  15.54  28.08  Feb.  5 to Feb. 25  "  7.1  9.06  16,38  5.8  15.95  28. 82  7.4  16*22  29.31  Feb* 26 t o Mar.  1  Mar*  9  4 t o Mar.  Mar, 10 to Mar* 16  « 4 f e e t below surface »  Mar. 19 to Apr. 9  "  7.9  15,41  27.85  Apr.  "  9,8  14.71  26.58  11 t o Apr* 27  Apr* 28 t o May  10  "  12.6  14.76  26.67  May  13 t o May  27  "  12.8  13.95  25.21  May  28 t o June  7  "  14,8  14.14  25$ 55  8 t o June 23  "  X7 # 1  15,56  24.51  June  TABLE, XI? (Continued) HTDROGEAPHIC DATA  Averages f o r temperatures and s a l i n i t i e s DEPARTURE BAT  C June 24, 1952 June 29 to July 8 July 11 to July 14 July 15 to JUly 26  /oo Salinity  Temp.  Surface  17.4  10.69  19.35  17.7  12.60  22.77  14*5  14.40  26,02  16 4 9  12*54  22,66  12*84  23© Si  2 feet he lowsurf ace 4 feet belowsurface »t  July 27 to Aug, 3  »  Aug,  If  8 to Aug. 13  /oo Cl/kg  Depth  . 17,0  17.4  65  TABLE XIV (continued )  EXDROGRAPHIC DATA Averages computed from thermograph records. Thermograph bulb placed 4 feet below surface. DEPARTURE BAY  Date 1932 Aug. 14 to Aug. 25  Mean Temp* C°  Mean Temp. 0°  16.9  Date 1955 Mar, 10 to Mar.19  2  17.8  Mar. 20 to Mar.29  6.6  3 to Sep, 12  15.5  Mar. 50 to Apr. 11.  8*1  Sep. 13 to Sep, 22  14.1  Apr. 12 to Apr.21  9.6  Sep* 23 to Oct.  15.6.  Apr. 22 to May  15.1  May  2 to May 11  9.8  Oct. 13 to Oct. 22  10.5  May- 12 to May 21  11.7  Oct. 23 to Oct, 51  10.5  May 22 to May 31  11.4  June 1 to June 10  14.1  Aug, 24 to Sepi Sep,  Oct.  Nov.  2  3 to Oct. 12 .  1 to Nov, 17  6.4  1  Nov. 18 to Nov* 20  8.9  June 11 to June 20  16.5  Nov. 21 to Nov* 28  8.4  June 21 to June 30  16,7  Nov. 29 to Dec*  8* 2  July  1 to July 10  16.5  July 11 to July 20  17.5  Dec.  2  6 to Dec. 20  Dec. 21 to Dec. 25  7.7  July 21 to July 50  19.6  Dec. 24 to Jan*  2  6*9  July 31 to Aug. 9  18.3  1935 3 to Jan. 12  6.4  Aug. 10 to Aug. 19  19*7  Jan. 13 to Jan. 25  6.1  Aug. 20 to Aug.29  18.6  Jan. 24 to Feb. 2  6,2  Aug. 30 to Sep. 8  14.8  Feb. 3 to Feb. 12  5.2  Sep. 8 to Sep.18  15.0  Feb, 13 to Feb. 22  5.8  Sep* 19 to Sep.28  12*0  Feb. 23 to liar.  6*2  Sep. 29 to Oct. 8  13,1  Jan.  9  TABLE XIV (Continued) . HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Averages computed from thermograph records. Thermograph bulb placed 4 feet below surface. DEPARTURE BAY Date 1933 Oct.  Mean  Temp. 0  Mean  Date 1934  Temp. 0°  9 to Oct. 18  11.8  Feb. 4 to Feb.13  4,6  Oct. 19 to Octo 28  10.4  Feb. 14 to Feb.23  4.9  Oct. 29 to Nov. 7  9.6  Feb. 24 to Mar. 5  5® 2  Nov.  8 to Nov. 17  9.5  Mar.  5.5  Nov. 18 to Nov. 27  9.5  Mar. 11 to Mar.13  Nov. 28 to Dec. 7  8.5  Mar. 14 to Mar.16  6,5  Dec.  7 to Dec. 17  7.5  Mar. 17 to Mar,26  7.4  Dec. 18 to Dec. 19  7.4  Mar* 27 to Apr. 5  7.7  Apr.  6 to Apr. 15  9,5 9.6  Dec. 20 to Dec. 27  6 to Mar.10 .  Dec. 28 to Dec. 29  7.5  Apr. 16 to Apr. 24  Dec. 30 to Jan. 8  7.2  Apr. 25 to May  4  11,0  1934 9 t6 Jan. 18  6.7  May,/ 5 to May 14  10.8  Jan. 19 to Jan. 24  6.6  May 15 to May 24  12,6  May 25 to May 31  15.1  June  15.8  Jan.  Jan. 25 to Jan.31 Feb. 1 to Feb. 3  4.3  1 to June 6  TABLE  XIV  HJDROGHAPHIO DATA Averages f o r temperatures and s a l i n i t y f o r i n t e r v a l s of one week Samples taken 3 feet from surface DEPARTURE BAT 0 Temp,  % o Cl/kg  June 12, 1934 to June 18, 1934  17.8  13.50  24*04  June 19, 1934 to June 25, 1934  17.2  12.77  23*08  June 26, 1934 to June 30, 1934  17.1  12.78  25*10  July •'2,1934 to July  9, 1934  17.5  15.70  24*76  July 10, 1934 to July 16j 1934  16.5  14*59  26*00  J u l y 17, 1954 to J u l y 23, 1934  16.8  11.92  21,55  July 24, 1954 to July 30, 1934  18© 1  15.49  24*58  July 31, 1954 to Aug. 6, 1954  15*4  14*39  26.00  Aug.  7, 1954 to Aug. 15, 1934  17.4  11.81  21*35  Aug., 14, 1954 to Aug. 20, 1934  18.8  13.14  23.75  Aug. 21, 1954 to Aug. 27, 1934  19*1  13.85  25.05  Aug, 28, 1934 to Sep, 3, 1934  18.0  14.01  25,52  Date  % o  Salinity  TABLE XV HTDROGRAPHIG DATA Averages f o r temperatures and s a l i n i t i e s f o r i n t e r v a l s of block exposure Surface samples VANCOUVER, GORE AVE, 0 Temp.  Date Oct, 14, 1931 to Nov.. ,4, ,1931"  O/ /oo Cl/kg.  % o Salinity  10.5  14.52  25.88  9,3  15*95  35 s 31  3, 1951  8*0  14*54  26.27  3, 1931 to Dec* 17, 1931  7.6  15.02  27.14  Dec. 17, 1931 to Dec, 51, 1951  7*4  14*07  25.45  Dec. 31, 1931 t o Jan* 13, 1932  7*5  15.17  27*41  Jan. 13, 1932 to Jan* 27, 1932  6.5  14*91  26.94  Jan. 27, 1932 to Feb. 10, 1932  6*1  15,47  27*95  Feb. 10, 1932 to Feb. 27, 1932  6.3  14*68  26*55  Feb. 27, 1952 to Mar*  9, 1932  6*1  15,67  24.70  9* 1932 to Mar. 19, 1932  7.6  15,85  24*99  Mar* 19, 1952 to Apr* 10, 1932  7.7  15*89  25,10  Apr. 10, 1932 to May  10, 1932  9,5  15.60  24*58  May  10, 1952 to May  21, 1932  11,5  11*56  20,55  May  21, 1952 to June  4, 1932  12*2  10.70  19,54  4* 1952 to June 18, 1952  15,8  9.27  16*76  2, 1932  14.6  9.22  16.67  2, 1952 to J u l y 16, 1932  15*9  10.26  18,55  J u l y 16, 1952 to J u l y 30, 1932  14*5  10*54  18*69  July 30, 1952 to Aug. 13, 1932  14.4  12.42  22.45  Nov.  4, 1931 to Nov. 18, 1931  Nov. 18, 1931 t o Dec. Dec.  Mar.  June  June 18, 1952 to J u l y July  TABLE  XV (continued)  HTDRO GRAPHIC DATA Averages f o r temperatures and s a l i n i t y f o r i n t e r v a l s of block exposure Surface samples VMCOBVER, GORE AVE.  0. Temp.  /oo Cl/kg.  Aug. 13, 1932 to Aug.27, 1932  15,3  11*29  20*41  Aug. 27, 1932 to Sep. 10, 1932  13.6  13 ©59  24*20  Sep. 10, 1932 to Sep.. 50, 1932  12.3  13,51  24.42  Oct.  1, 1932 to Oct. 15, 1932  11.3  14.45  26*11  Oct. 15, 1932 to Oct. 29, 1932  10.1  14*28  25*81  Oct. 89, 1932 to Nov.. 12, 1952  9.1  13.89  25*10  Date  /oo Salinity  Samples taken at zero t i d e l e v e l ( 10 feet from bottom) Nov. 18, 1932 to Nov. 26, 1932  5.0  12.28  22*09  Nov, 26, 1932 to Dec. 10, 195 2  4,6  13*48  24*56  Dec. 10, 1932 to Dec. 28, 1932  4.0  15.49  27,99  Dec, 26, 1932 to Jan.  7, 1955  4.1  15,41  27.85  Jan.  7, 1935 to Jan.  21, 1935  4*1  15.28  27.61  Jan.  21, 1935 to Feb.  4; 1955  4.1  25.55  27*70  Feb. 18, 1955  4.9  15*55  28,06  4, 1933  4.2  15,* 26  27,57  4* 1955 to Mar. 18, 1953  4.1  15,56  27*75  Mar* 18, 1955 to lifer. 30, 1935  4.a  15*11  27*50  Feb.  1955 to 4\  Feb. 18, 1955 to Mai*. Mar.  TABLE  XV (continued)  HZDROGRAPHIC DATA Averages f o r temperatures and s a l i n i t y f o r i n t e r v a l s of block exposure Surface samples VANCOUVER, GORE AVE, C Temp.  °/oo Cl/kg.  Mar* 30, 1955 to Apr* 10 * 1933  8*0  14*88  26*89  Apr, 10, 1933 to Apr. 24, 1955  8,9  15*17  27,41  Apr, 24, 1955 to May  15, 1933  9.7  15.73  24.81  15, 1935 to June 10, 1955  10.9  11,43  20.66  June 10, 1935 to June 24, 1933  15.3  9.44  17.07  June 24, 1953 to J u l y  8, 1955  13*2  8,70  15,73  8, 1955 to J u l y 22, 1935  14*7  8*78  15.88  5, 1955  15,2  9*35  16,87  5, 1933 to Aug. 19, 1955  15.5  11,06  19*99  2, 1955  13*7  12*60  22,77  2, 1935 to Sep. 16, 1953  12.1  12*24  22,12  Sep* 16, 1955 to Sep, 50, 1955  11*1  12*70  22*95  Sep. 50, 1953 to Oct, 14, 1935  10.7  13.99  25*28  Oct. 14, 1953 to Oct, 50, 1933  9.7  12.82  23,17  Oct. 30, 1955 to NOT. 13, 1955  9*0  13© 23  23.91  Nov. 13, 1933 to Dec,  1, 1935  8.6  13*33  24,09  1, 1953 to Dec* 16, 1955  8*0  13.64  24* 65  Dec. 16, 1935 to Jan* 2, 1954  7.0  14.15  25,57  Jan*  7.1  13.13  25*75  6*9  13.96  25.23  Date  May  July  J u l y 22, 1935 to Aug* Aug,  Aug. 19, 1955 to Sep* Sep.  Dec.  •2, •1954 to Jan., 15, 1954  Jan. 13, 1952 to Eeb,  2, 1954  °/oo Salinity  TABLE  XV  (continued)  HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Averages- f o r temperatures and s a l i n i t y f o r i n t e r v a l s of block exposure Surface samples  VANCOUVER,  C Temp.  Date Feb.  90RE  2, 1934 to Feb.16* 1934  AVE. /oo Cl/kg.  /oo Salinity  7.4  13.66  24.69  6, 1934  7.5  13,98  25.26  6* 1934 to Mar. 24, 1934  7.9  14,36  25.95  Mar. 24, 1934 to Apr. 9, 1934  8*6  13.10  23.68  1934  10.2  13.21  23.87  1934  10.9  10.09  18,24  Feb. 16, 1934 to Mar. Mar*  Apr.  9, 1934 to Apr.  Apr. 23, 1954 to May  19,  72 TABLE  XVI  BYDROGSAPHIC DATA Samples taken at daylight flood t i d e Depth - 6 f e e t below  surface  CRESCENT Date  0 Temp.  /oo Cl/kg*  /oo Salinity  May  18, 1933 to May  30, 1935  15.4  15.17  27.41  May  30* 1933 to June 30, 1955  16.5  15.81  24.96  June 30, 1933 to J u l y 30, 1953  18.7  11. 80  21« 2*1)  July 30, 1933 to Aug, 50, 1955  18.9  12.69  22.94  Aug. 30, 1933 to Sep. 30, 1935  14*6  13*68  24.72  Oct.  •1, 1933 to Oct* 16, 1955  12* 5  15* 28  27.61  Oct, 16, 1933 to Nov. 16, 1953  9.5  14.83  26.80  Nov. 16, 1933 to Dec.16, 1955  7*5  14.82  26.78  Dec. 16, 1933 to Jan.16, 1934  6.2  14*82  26,78  Jan. 16, 1934 t o Jan..31, 1954  7.0  14.64  26*46  Feb. 4, 1954  7.7  15.10  27.29  Mar.- 20, 1934 to Apr.16*. 1934  10*2  15* 32  27*68  Apr. 16, 1934 to May  14.4  14*94  27*00  Feb.  h-1934 to  16, 1954  73 TABLE  XVII  HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Bi-monthly averages of temperatures and s a l i n i t y Depth - 6 feet from surface  PRINCE RUPERT, FISHERIES EJFERBCMTAL STATION C Temp*  % o Cl/kg  4.6  14,89  26*91  It 1954  5.8  15.95  28.78  tor. 1, 1934 to Mar. 15, 1934  6.0  15.84  28.62  Mar. 15, 1934 to Apr.  1, 1934  6.6  15.91  28,75  1, 1934 to Apr* 15, 1934  6.7  16.08  29,05  1,. 1934  8.5  14.55  26.26  15, 1934  7*9  15.56  24*51  1, 1934  10* 2  12*65  22»86  1* 1934 to June 15, 1934  11.7  12.57  22 & 7 2  1, 1934  10.7  12.77  25.08  1, 1934 to J u l y 15, 1934  11.2  12.98  23.46  1, 1934  11.5  15.41  24,24  1, 1934 to Aug, 15, 1934  12.9  15.75  24.85  Date Feb.  1, 1934 to Feb. 15, 1934  Feb. 15. 1934 to Mar.  Apr.  Apr. 15, 1934 to May May  1, 1934 to May  May- 15 * 1934 to June June  June 15, 1934 t o J u l y July  July 15, 1934 to Aug* Aug*  % o Salinity  TABLE  XVIII  HYDROGBAPHIO DATA Surface samples BUCKLEY BAY, HASSETT INLET  October  November  December  January  February  March  % o Salinity  Time  C Temp«  /oo Cl/kg.  15100  15.5  9.09  16.44  15  17:00  14*5  8,48  15.34  22  14:00  ii.o  11.41  20.63  29  16:30  11.0  10*57 '  19,11  5  13:oo  10.5  7*57  13,69  12  16:oo  10.0  11*00  19.89  19  13:30  9*5  11.54  20.86  26  15:00  8*0  9,65  17.45  3  13:00  8.0  5.06  9*16  10  15:00  8*0  11.70  21,15  17  10:00  4.0  8*68  15.70  24"  15:00  6.0  10*05  18.17  31  9:00  6*0  8*29  14.99  12:00  7.0  9*92  17.94  14  9:00  4*0  8.99  16*26  21  15:00  5.5  11.35  20.52  28  8:oo  3.7  9.66  17.47  4  14:30  4*0  10.54  19.05  11  8:00  4.0  11.33  20.48  18  11:30  4*5  11.45  20.70  25  8:00  4.5  3  13:30  5.0  Date 8, 1931  7, 1932  TABLE XVIIl(Continued) HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Surface samples BUCKLEY BAY, MASSETT INLET  0 March  April  Date  Time  Temp,  10  8:00  4.5  17  11:00  6.0  24  17:00  7.0  31  11:00  6.5  28  9:30  10.0  °/oo Cl/kg.  Salinity  TABLE XIX HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Surface samples SHANNON BAY, MASSETT INLET Date  Time  0 Temp.  /oo Cl/kg.  September 24, 1931  15:50  14.5  11, 61  20.99  October  1  17:50  15.0  8  18:15  14  11*55  20*48  15  15:00  15.5  11.92  SI* 55  22  17:15  10.5  8.76  15,84  29  17:50  9.5  6*75  12*18  5  10:50  8.0  5*02  5.48  12  16:oo  9,0  10.55  18.71  19  IIJSO  7.0  10.50  18,62  26  16:14  6.5  11.04  19*96  3  15:00  7.5  11*81  21*55  10  15:45  8.0  11.80  21.55  17  18:50  7.7  8*91  16.11  24  10:15  6*5  8.96  16,20  31  14.25  5*5  8*99  16, 26  16:55  6,7  2*81  5,10  14  14:50  7.5  5.25  5,86  21  16:15  6.7  10*22  18.48  28  9:00  5.5  10,25  18,50  4  12:15  5.5  10.28  18.59  10:00  5.7  4*95  8.96  November  December  January  February  7, 1952  Salinit;  TABLE XIX (Continued) HHffiOGRiPHIC DATA Surface samples SHMNQN. I JAY, MAS SETT INLET  0 Temp.  /oo Cl/kg.  /oo Salinity  16.00  4,5  5,63  10.19  25  18.00  5,7  11<j$ 29  20.41  3  10 545  4,7  6.51  11.42  10  14t45  6,5  1.98  5.60  17  19:00  6.0  8.47  15* 32  24  9:30  6,3  5.67  „• 6.65  31  16:45  7.5  4.02  7,29  7  9:15  6.0  8.75  15,79  14  10:45  7.7  10.49  18.96  21  17:00  9,5  ____  28  11:00  5  16:30  12  Date  Time  February 18, 1932  March  April  May  June  July  10.55  18,71  9.0  11.18  20*21  13 :oo  7,0  9.64  17.45  19  17:00  6.5  6.87  12.45  26  15:00  10.3  10.05  18.17  2  19:00  9.3  11.00  19,89  9  10:00  7.7  11.27  20,57  16  13:00  6.5  11,18  20.21  23 30 7  11:00 15:45 18:30  11.3 11.5 11.7  14  11:00  12.5  11.10 11.45 11.52 11.65  20.07 20.70 20.46 21.06  TABLE  XIX (Continued)  HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Surface samples SHANNON BAY, MASSETT INLET  Temp.  o , /oo 01/kg  /oo Salinity  0  Time July •  August  September  21, 1932  17? 30  14.0  11.67  21*09  28  15 * 15  13*0  11.70  21*15  4  7:00  15.0  8.58  11  15:00  18.0  —  18  16:15  20.0  — —  25  10:00  14.7  12. 24  22*12  1  15:00  15.5  8.92  16.15  8  19:oo  12.0  7,92  14.55  15  9:00  11.7  15 • 5 2  —  TABLE XX HTDROGRAPHIC DATA Samples taken at zero tide l e v e l SHANNON,BAY,  MASSETT  0 Temp.  Date  (14 feet from bottom) LNL1T o/oo Cl/kg.  o/oo Salinity  November 17, 1953  9.6  9.45"  17,09  December  1  7.0  10.50  18.62  15  5.5  9,91  17.92  10,89  19.69  4.0  9.75  17.59  26  4,8  9.88  17.86  February 9  5,0  9,52  17,21  26  5,0  9.88  17.86  12  6,0  9.99  18.06  26  7*5  10.00  18*08  9  6.0  10.55  19.07  10.75  19.40  29 January 12, 1954:  March  April  23 May  7  8.0  11.05  10.5  10.47  18*95  4  11.0,  11,22  20,28  18  12,0  11,12  2  15.0  17  12,0  11.75  21*24  51  16*5  11.56  20.90  14  16.0  11.97"  21.64  21 June  July  August  '  '  _  19.98  20.10  TABLE  XXI  SESSILE ORGANISMS Depth - 1 foot from surface • WILLIAM BEAD Infestation* Balanus  Area 261 sq* cm* Bryozoa  20, 1955  0  1.0  20, 1953 to Dec* 20, 1955  0  0  Dec* 20* 1935 to Jan. 20, 1954  0  0  Jan* 20, 1934 to Feb* 20, 1954  0  0  Feb. 20, 1954 to Mar. 20, 1954  o  0  Mar* 20* 1934 to Apr* 20, 1954  5.0  0 .  Apr* 20* 1954 to May  20, 1954  5.0  0  May- 20, 1934 to June 20, 1954  1.0  0  June 20, 1954 to July 20* 1934  0  0  Date Oct* 20, 1953 to NOT*  NOT*  TABLE  XXII '  SESSILE ORGANISMS Depth - 6 feet from surface ESQUIMALT HARBOUR Date  Infestat ion. Balanus  Area 261. sc. • ' Bryozoa  NOT,  4> 1933 to Dec, 9, 1935  0  0  Dec,  9, 1933 to Jan. 7, 1934  0  0  Jan.  7, 1934 to Feb.  1954  0  0  Feb, 11, 1934 to Mar.11, 1934  0  0  to Apr.15, 1954  0  5.0  29.6  4.7  Mar, 11, 1934 Apr,  15, 1934 to May  May  12, 1934 to June 11, 1934  12, 1934  0  14.6  82 TABLE  XXIII  SESSILE ORGANISMS VICTORIA., INNER HARBOUR Depth - 6 feet from surface Infestation. 'Date  Area 261 sq* cm.  Balanus  Oct. 15, 1935 to Nov. 11," 1935  0  Nov. 11, 1955 to Dec.  9, 1955  0  9, 1955 to Jan. 10, 1934  0  Jan. 10, 1954 to Feb. 10, 1954  0  Feb. 10, 1954 to Mar.  9f 1934  0  Mar,  9, 1934 to Apr.  6, 1954  0  Apr.  6, 1954 to May  11, 1934  0  May  11, 1934 to May  25 j 1934  0  May  25 y 1954 to June  8, 1934  1,0  8, 1934 to June 22, 1954  1.0  Dec.  June  7, 1934  0  7, 1934 to July 20, 1954  0  June 22, 1954 to July July  TABLE  XXIV  SESSILE ORGANISMS DEPARTURE BAY Infestation* Date  Balanus  Mytllus  0  0  0  0  S  0  0  0  0  S  0  0  0  0  5£  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  Oct.  4, 1931 to Noy.  Nov.  4, 1931 to Nov. •18, 1951  Nov. 18, 1931 to Dec. Dec.  4, 1951  2, 1951  2, 1931 to Dec. 16, 1951  Dec. 16, 1931 to Dec. 50, 1931 Jan.  Area 261 sq> cm.  s  - • • St  1, 1932 to Jan. IS, 1932  Bryozoa  Serpulids  Jan. 13, 1932 to Jan. 27, 1952  s  0  0  0  0  Jan. 27, 1932 to Feb. 10, 1932  s  0  0  0  0  s  0  0  0  0  s  5.2  0  0  0  6, 1932  s  0  0  0  0  6, 1932 to Apr. 21, 1932  s  0  0  0  0  4* 1932  s  0  0  0  0  18, 1932  s  0  0  0  0  150.0  0  5.2  0  2, 1932*  0  0  0  0  Feb. 10, 1952 to Mar. Mar.  9, 1932 to Mar, 24, 1952  Mar. 24, 1952 to Apr. Apr.  Apr. 21, 1932 to May May-  9* 1952  4, 1932 to May  May 18, 1932 ;o June J  June 14, 1932 to Aug.  L4, 1932  s  Aug.  2, 1932 to Sep.  2, 1932  s  0.6  5.4  0  0  Sep.  2, 1932 to Oct.  4, 1932  s  5.2  0  0  0  Oct.  7, 1932 to Dec.  7, 1932  s  5.0  0  0  0  Dec.  4, 1932 to Feb.  4, 1935  s  0  0  0  0  Feb.  2, 1935 to Apr.  4, 1955  s  255.0  0  0  0  84 TABLE XXIV (continued) SESSILE ORGANISMS DEPARTURE BAY Infestation* Date Apr*  2, 1933  to May  Balanus  Mytilus  Bryozoa  Serpulids  s  670.0  0  0  0  s  870*0  0  0  0  145.0  0  2, 1935  May ..; 4, 1933 to June 15, 1955  4, 1953KX  May  4* 1933 to June  June  4, 1933 to June 29, 1 9 5 5  June 29, 1933 to July  Area 261 sq.* cm*  ss  8, 1935  790*0  19.0  -  -  136.0  0  140  0  -  -  July  8, 1933 to Aug. 8, 1955#  7*0  100,0  0  0  Aug.  8, 1935 to Sep.  0  127.0  0  0  Sept; 6, 1933 to Oct. 7, 1955  -  -  -  -  Oct*  7, 1955 to Nov.  7, 195  2*0  4.0  9  0  Nov*  7, 1935 to Dec*  4, 1953  0  0  0  0  Dec.  4, 1955 to Jan*  4, 1954  0  0 o  0  0  Jan.  4, 1954 to Feb. 4, 1934  -  -  -.'  -  Feb*  4, 1934 to Mar.  0  0  0  0  Mar*  4, 1954 to Apr. 4, 1 9 3 4  s5  60.0  8.0  Apr*  4, 1934 to May  SS  45.0  0 '  111,0  0  May  4* 1954 t o June A  457.0  4.0  0  0  June  4, 1934 to July  6, 1934#  0  4*0  37*0  0  July  6, 1954 to Aug.  6, 1934#  Aug.  9, 1934 to Sep. 1, 1954**  6, 1 9 5 5 ^  s  4, 1934  S  H  4, 1 9 3 4  1934#  Bottom ^Surface § 8 feet from bottom  42*0  0  10.0  0  5.0  325.0  29.0  0  0 1*0  85 TABLE XXV SESSILE ORGANISMS VANCOUVER, GORE AVE. Depth - zero t i d e l e v e l (10 feet from bottom) Infestation. Date  Area 261 sq.. cm.  Balanus  Mytilus  Bryozoa  Oct. 14, 1931 to Nov, •.,'=4, 1931  0  0  0  Nov.  0  0  0  Nov, 18, 1931 to Dec. 5, 1931  0  0  0  Dec.  3, 1931 to Dec. 17, 1931  0  0  0  Dec. 17, 1931 to Dec. 31, 1931  0  0  0  Dec. 31, 1931 to Jan. 13, 1932  0  0  0  Jan* 13, 1932 to Jan. 27, 1932  0  0  0  Jan. 27, 1932 to Feb. 10, 1932  0  0  0  Feb* 10, 1932 to Feb* 27, 1932  0  0  0  Feb. 27* 1932 to Mar*  0  0  0  0  0  0  Mar*  4, 1931 to Nov* 18, 1931  9, 1932  9, 1932 to Mar. 19, 1932  Mar. 19, 1932 to May  10, 1932  present  0  0  May  10, 1932 to May  21, 1952  0  0  0  May  21, 1952 t o June  4, 1952  0  0  0  4, 1952 to June 18* 1952  0  0  0  2, 1952  0  0  0  2, 1952 to July 16, 1952  0  2*0  0  July 16, 1952 to July 50, 19 52  1*0  0  0  July 50, 1952 to Aug. 15, 1952  0  0  0  Aug. 15, 1952 to Aug. 27, 1952  0  0  0  Aug. 27, 1952 to Sep. 10, 1952  0  0  0  June  June 18, 1952 to July July  86 TABLE XXV (continued) SESSILE ORGANISMS VANCOUVER, GORE AVE. Depth - zero t i d e level(10 feet from bottom) Infestation*  Area 261 sq. cm.  Date  Balanus  Mvtilus  i3.ryo7.na  Sep. 10, 1952 to Sep* 30, 1932  -  -  -  1, 1952 to Oct* 15, 1932  0  0  0  Oct. 15, 1952 to Oct. 29, 1932  0  0  0  Oct. 29, 1952 to Nov. 12, 1932  0  0  0  Nov, 12, 1952 to Nov* 26, 1932  0  0  0  Nov. 26, 1952 to Dec. 10, 1932  0  0  0  Dec. 10, 1952 to Dec. 26, 1932  0  0  0  Dec* 26* 1952 to Jan.  7, 1935  0  0  0  7, 1955 to Jan* 21, 1935  0  0  0  4* 1955  0  0  0  4, 1933 to Eeb. 18, 1933  0  0  0  4, 1955  0  0  0  4, 1935 to "Mar* 18, 1933  0  1*0  6  Mar, 18, 1955 to Apr* 10, 1953  0  0  0  Apr* 10, 1955 to Apr* 24, 1935  0  0  0  84, 1955 to June 10, 1953  0  0  0  June 10, 1933 to June 24, 1953  0  4*0  0  June 24, 1955 to July  8, 1935  0  0  0  8, 1935 to July 22, 1955  0  6*0  0  1*0  12.0  0  0  15.0  0  Oct*  Ian.  Jan, 21, 1955 to Eeb* Eeb.  Eeb, 18, 1955 to Mar, Mar,  Apr.  July  July 22, 1955 to Aug. Aug*  5, 1933  5» 1955 to Aug* 19, 1955  TABLE XXV (continued) SESSILE ORGANISMS VANCOUVER, GORE AVE, Depth - zero tide l e v e l (10 feet from bottom) • Infestation, Date Aug, 19, 1933 to Sep,  Balanus 2, 1933  Area 261 so, cm.  Mytilus  Bryozoa  0  6.0  0  2, 1933 to Sep. 16, 1933  1.0  4.0  0  Sep, 16, 1933 to Sep, 30, 1933  1.0  2,0  0  Sep* 30, 1933 to Oct, 14, 1933  0  1.0  0  Oct, 14, 1933 to Oct. 28, 1933  0  0  0  Oct, 30, 1933 to Nov, 13, 1933  0  0  0  Nov* 13, 1933 to Dec,  1, 1933  0  0  0  1, 1933 to Dec, 16, 1933  0  0  0 •  2, 1934  0  0  0  2, 1934 to Jan, 13, 1934  0  0  0  Jan. 13, 1934 to Feb. 2, 1934 Feb. 2, 1934 to Feb. 16, 1934 Feb. 16, 1934 to Mar* • B» 1934  9 0 0  0 0 0  0 0 0  6, 1934 to Mar, 24, 1934  0  0  0  3.0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1,0  1.0  Sep,  Dec b  Dec. 16* 1933 to Jan. Jan.  Mar.  Mar* 24, 1934 to Apr. Apr.  9, 1934  9, 1934 to Apr, 23, 1934  Apr. 23, 1934 to •May  19, 1934  TABLE XXVI SESSILE ORGANISMS CRESCENT Depth. - zero t i d e l e v e l (one foot from bottom) Infestation* Date  Area 261 sq> cm.  Balanus  Bryozoa  14.3  0  Sep.  1, 1932 to Oct. 1, 1932  Oct*  1, 1932 to Oct* 31, 1952  0  0  Oct. 31j 1952 to Nov* 50, 1952  0  0  Nov. 50, 1952 to Dec* 50* 1952  0  0  Dec* SO, 1952 to Jan. 30* 1935  "0  0  Jan, 50* 1955 to Feb. 28, 1955  0  0  Feb* 28, 1955 to Mar* 50, 1955  0  0  Mar. 30* 1955 t o Apr* 50, 1955  78.0  0  50, 1955  141*0  0  50, 1955 to June 50, 1955  555.0  5.9  Apr. 50, 1955 to May May  June 30, 1935 to July 50, 19 53  0  0  July 30, 1935 to Aug* 50* 1955  5.5  0  Aug* 50, 1955 to Sep. 30, 1935  0  0  1, 1955 to Nov* 16, 1953  157.0  0  Nov. 16, 1955 to Dec. 16, 1955  250.0  0  Dec, 16, 1955 to;Jan. 16* 1954  0  0  Oct,  Jan. 16, 1954 to Mar. 20, 1954  18.2  0  Mar. 20, 1954 to Apr. 16, 1954  210.0  0  Apr. 16, 1954 to May  170.0  0  16, 1954  TABLE  XXVII  SESSILE ORGANISMS FRINGE RUPERT Depth - 2 feet from bottom Infestation. Date  Area 261 sq. cm.  Balanus  Mytilus  Bryozoa  June 29, 1932 to July 20, 1932  0  0  4*4  5.7  J u l y 20, 1932 to Aug.  5, 1932  5.7  0  1.9  0  3, 1932 to Aug. 17, 1932  7.2  1.5  1.0  0  Aug. 17, 1932 to Aug. 51, 1932  3© 3  1.5  0  0  Aug. 31, 1S32 to Sep, 13, 1932  2*6  0  0  0  Sep. 13, 1952 to Sep. 28, 1932  0  0  0  0  Sep. 28* 1932 to Oct. 12* 1932  0  0  0  0  Oct. 12* 1952 to Oct. 25, 1932  0  0  0  0 .  Oct. 25, 1952 to Nov* 10, 1952  0  0  0  1.0  0  0  0 0  Aug.  Serpulids  Depth - 2 feet from surface 2, 1954  Mar.  1, 1954 to Apr.  Apr.  2, 1954 to July" 3, 1954  July  3, 1954 to Aug*  1, 1954  0 520*0  78*0  0  51.0  2.6  5.9  2.6  90 TABLE XXVIII SESSILE ORGANISMS SHANNON BAY, MASSETT INLET Depth - 14 feet from bottom (zero tide l e v e l ) Infestation. Date  Area 261 sq. cm.  Balanus  Mytilus  0  0  1, 1955  0  0  1, 1933 to Dec* 15, 1953  0  1*0  Dec. 15, 1933 to Dec. 29, 19 35  0  1*0  Dec. 29, 1933 to Jan* 18, 1934  0  0  Jan. 12, 1934 to Jan* 26, 1954  0  1*0  Jan. 86, 1934 to Feb.  9, 1934  0  0  9, 1934 to Feb. 26, 1954  0  0  Feb. 26, 1934 to Mar* 12, 1934  0  0  Mar. 12, 1934 to Mar. 26, 1954  0  1*0  Mar.- 26, 1934 to Apr,  9* 1934  0  1*0  9, 1934 to Apr, 25, 1954  0  2,0  Nov.  3, 1933 to Nov, 17, 1955  NOV. 17, 1933 to Dec* Dec.  Eeb,  Apr.  Apr* 23, 1934 to May  7, 1934  1*0  0  May  7, 1934 to May  21, 1954  16*0  0  May  21, 1954 to June  4* 1954  0  0  2,0  0  2, 1954  3,0  66,0  1934 to July 17, 1934  57*0  0  July 17, 1954 to J u l y 51, 1934  600*0  90.0  June  1934 to June 18, 1954  June 18, 1954 to July July  Table  XXIX  v e r t i c a l d i s t r i b u t i o n of the i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia DEPARTURE BAY  Date of Exposure  Counts per unit area of 261 sq, cm. and unit time of one month. Float  July 8 to August 8,  0-tide l e v e l "  Bottom  5,4  0  0  9,5  25,4  258,0  17,0  4.2  51.0  1935 October 7 to Nov, 7 1955  S  November 4 to Dec, 4, 1955 February 4 to March 4, 1954 .  2,2  March 4 to A p r i l 4, 1954  0,8  May 4 to June 4, 1954  1*7  J u l y 7 to August 9, 1954  ©  August 9 to Sept, 1, 1954 54.6  0.8  7.5  1,0  28,0  50.6  525,5  0-tide l e v e l - 8 feet from bo ttom.  92  T A B L E  Vertical d i s t r i b u t i o n of the infestation by Limnoria D E P A R T U R E  Date of exposure  B A Y  Counts per unit area of 26l 8q..cm. and unit time of one month. Float  Zero tide level* Bottom.  July 8 to August 8 , 1933  October 7 to November 4 , 1933  November 4 to December 4 , 1933  February 4 to March 4 , 1934  March 4 to A p r i l 4 , 1934  May 4 to June 4 , 1934  June 4 to July j>» 1934  July 7 to August 9 , 1934  G  3.1  0  6.6  33*0  0  0  19.0  14.4  I8.3  7-3  78.0  72.0  0  32.0  1.7  0  0  0  4.1  0.8 1.7  August 9 to September 1 ,  12.0 32.0  1934.  76.-2 1  178.0  37.3  Zero tide level = 8 feet from bottom.  422.3  93  TABLE  UXI  Vertical distribution o f the i n c i d e n c e of Balanus DEPARTURE BAY  Date of exposure  Count per u n i t area of 2 6 l sa.cm. and u n i t time of one month.  March 4 t o A p r i l 4,• 1934 May  4 t o June 1934  Float 31.0  Zero t i d e l e v e l bottom 0 0  4,  August 9 to September 1 , 1934 F e b r u a r y 2 to A p r i l 1933 J u l y 8 to August 8  9  300.0  300.0  3*0  3.0  4,  5.0 0  :  0  93.0  100.0  0  3  0  336.0  403.0  103.0  TABLE XXXII V e r t i c a l d i s t r i b u t i o n of the incidence of Mytilus DEPASTURE BAY Count per unit area of 2 6 l sq.. cm. per unit time of one month. Date of exposure  JtFloat  Zero tide level" Bottom  July 8 to August 8, 1933.  17.0  October 7 to Ixovemfeer 4, 1933.  0  3.0  0  6.7  0  0  March 4 to A p r i l 4,  im-...  32.0  16*0  May 4 to June 4, 1934.  0  3.0  0  June jj to July 6, 1934.  0  4.0  0  36.0  10.0  0  323.0  33.0  0  July j? to August 6, 1934. August 9 to September 1934.  1,  383  1  107  Zero tide level • 8 feet from bottom.  16  95  TABLE  XXXIII  V e r t i c a l d i s t r i b u t i o n of the i n c i d e n c e of Membranipora  DEPARTURE  BAY  C o u n t p e r u n i t a r e a o f 26l sq.. p e r u n i t t i m e o f one m o n t h .  Date  of  March  exposure  4 to A p r i l 1934.  June  4  to July 1934.  July  3  to August 1934.  August  Float 4  6  6  9 t o September  1934.  1  Zero  tide  level*  Bottom  33.0  0  0  0  40.0  0  16.0  0  0  29.0  0  0  80.0  * Zero  tide  cm.  level-  40.0  8 feet  from  bottom.  96  CMBRAL DI5CUSSI0H BMSJA  Th© southern stations of Vancouver island are characterized by a r e l a t i v e l y l i g h t but almost continuous Bankia infestation. There i s no indication of seasonal peaks i n the intensity of attack and l i t t l e variation i n i t s proportion from year to year.  I t i s at these stations  that open sea conditions obtain. Departure bay on the east coast of Vancouver island, which represents a body of water influenced by river discharge, i s subjected to an attack of moderate intensity®  Infestation may be p r a c t i c a l l y  continuous as was the case i n 1934.  Usually, however, -there ore  decided peaks of intensity during spring and f a l l . clearly shown i n 1932 and 1953.  Such peaks are  White (1929) reports for the year  1927 a heavy spring infestation i n March and f o r 1926 a somewhat lighter f a l l infestation which was confined to October. I t i s apparent from the present investigation that the infestation periods of both spring and f a l l may be of much longer duration than those previously reported and that the f a l l infestation i s much heavier than that occurring i n the spring*, For Vancouver harbour, Crescent and Prince Rupert the results are inconclusive.  Infestation i n Vancouver harbour appears to bs  almost lacking, I t i s possible however, i n view of heavy infestation reported by Townsend as having occurred i n 1929, that hydrographic conditions during the period of investigation may have been unusual© It i s recommended that i n future, several sites be investigated and  97  that more than one l e v e l be included i n -fee study®  At Crescent the  l i g h t i n f e s t a t i o n cannot be accounted f o r by reference to such hydrographic data as have been obtained©  The almost complete absence of  Bankia from p i l e s and other wooden structures indicates that the cond i t i o n obtaining at the s i t e and l e v e l investigated was representative. In Prince Rupert harbour the investigation has not been extended long enough f o r the r e s u l t s t o be interpreted s a t i s f a c t o r i l y . The most devastating i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia took place at Masset i n l e t , Q.ueen Charlotte islands, Fraser (1925) reported that the areas formed by the i n l e t s adjacent to Queen Charlotte islands to be the most favourable f o r Bankia growth.  In Shannon bay for the period  October 15 to November 12, 1931, on an area o f 261 square centimeters, there ware 1,880  entries o f Bankia.  for either station was  The minimum monthly i n f e s t a t i o n  5.  I t i s d i f f i c u l t to account s a t i s f a c t o r i l y for the variations noted i n i n t e n s i t y and time.  Where open sea conditions obtained a  l i g h t i n f e s t a t i o n was experienced. A heavy i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia was recorded f o r Masset fresh water.  i n l e t where the sea water i s diluted by  The temperatures f o r these areas were between 3° and  16° C. The s a l i n i t y averages f o r the three stations at the south end of Vancouver i s l a n d were about the same, the spread being from 29 to 32 parts per m i l l e .  The s a l i n i t y at zero tide l e v e l at Shannon bay  varied from 17 to 22 parts per m i l l e .  Thus there would seem to be  a r e l a t i o n between the heavy infestation by Bankia and a lowered s a l i n i t y range from 17 to 22 parts per m i l l e , when the temperature l i m i t s are from 3° to 12° C.  An intermediate i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia occurred at Departure bay.  The s a l i n i t y range at Departure bay was midway between that  for William Head and Shannon bay.  The temperature range at Depar-  ture bay was greater than that recorded f o r the stations at the south end of Vancouver island and at the Queen Charlotte i s l a n d i n - ' vestigated.  That the i n t e n s i t y of the i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia at  Departure bay i s related to the hydrographic data obtained f o r t h i s area can not be substantiated, since the hydrographic data obtained f o r Vancouver and Crescent are s i m i l a r to that obtained f o r Departure bay, yet the i n f e s t a t i o n at the l a t t e r place was  consistently  more intense than that found at the former s i t e s . Certainly the dominant f a c t o r favourable to the incidence of Bankia larvae does not seem to be one of high s a l i n i t y as contended by White (1929). While the main i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia occurred a t Shannon bay and Departure bay when the temperature ranged from 7° to 12° C.,  infes-  tation of destructive i n t e n s i t y by Bankia took place at the l a t t e r station during the month of August 1934 when the average temperature f o r the month ranged from 17.4° to 19.1° C. suggest that 7° to 12° C  0  Johnson and M i l l e r (1935)  represents the temperature range of effec-  t i v e breeding o f Bankia setaeea i n Puget sound, and that as long as the temperature of the water i s either above or below these l i m i t s , no attack of destructive i n t e n s i t y i s to be expected. Infestation of experimental blocks exposed concurrently at three l e v e l s at Departure bay indicate the necessity of using at least two l e v e l s f o r each s i t e to be investigated i n the future. bay these l e v e l s should be surface (float) and bottom.  For Departure  Infestation took place at the three levels i n v e s t i g a t e d * There  was no significant difference between the attack at the surface and at the zero t i d e l e v e l .  The a t t a c k at the bottom however, was  cidedly greater than that at the two higher levels*  de-  In certain i n -  stances the surface experimental block only'was attacked.  In other  eases, the attack was restricted to the lower levels. It i s possible that f o r short intervals, one to two months, a Bankia attack might be dangerous t o inadequately protected wooden hulls and to log booms but not to unprotected p i l i n g below the zero tide l e v e l .  GENERAL DISCUSSION  XJMxfOBIA  The infestation by Limnoria occurred at a l l times of the year at a l l the areas investigated except at Crescent and Victoria, at which stations a c t i v i t y ceased during the winter months. Infestation of destructive intensity occurred at William Head, Esquimalt, Departure bay, Crescent, Prince Rupert and Shannon bay. The attack at V i c t o r i a , Vancouver and Buckley bay was comparatively light,  The greatest a c t i v i t y was that noted for Departure bay and  Esquimalt, The hydrographic data f o r the three stations at the south end of Vancouver island are similar.  The infestation at William Head  and at Esquimalt i s much greater than that recorded f o r V i c t o r i a , At Crescent there was a cessation of the a c t i v i t y of Limnoria during the winter months. At Departure bay, where the average s a l i n i t y and temperature ranges are about the same as those for Crescent, the i n tensity of the Limnoria infestation lessened during the winter months but by no means ceased.  Thus there does not seem to be a relation-  ship between the intensity of infestation and the hydrographic data obtained.  Eraser (1925) found that no data available would account  f o r the nature of the distribution and the variation i n the extent of Limnoria infection. The maximum infestation i n the winter months occurred a t Departure bay.  The count f o r December 1 9 5 1 was 360 (bottom) while the sur-  face temperature averages varied from 6° to 8° C. The maximum during  the spring was during March, 1952,  565  (hottorn) while the temperature  averages at three feet from the surface ranged from 6°to 13° C, .greatest a c t i v i t y during the summer, 220 val  J u l y 8 to August 8, 1935®  The  (bottom) was f o r the i n t e r -  The temperature averages taken at three  feet from the surface were between the l i m i t s 16° and 19° C, The r e s u l t s of the investigation of the v e r t i c a l d i s t r i b u t i o n of the incidence of Liimioria point to the fact that the attack i s concentrated at the bo ttom.  The average infestation at the surface however,  of blocks continuously submerged was  greater than that at the zero  The contention that i n the study of the incidence o f  tide l e v e l .  marine wood borers, more than one l e v e l be investigated i s supported by the i n f e s t a t i o n data recorded f o r Limnoria, Since the test blocks could not be examined immediately  a f t e r they  were taken from the water, no data were procured with regard to the breeding habits of Limnoria.  Fraser (1925) noted f o r B r i t i s h Columbia  that the various stages of development were to be found from June to September,  Eofoid (1927) reported f o r San Francisco bay that gravid  female Limnoria were to be found at a l l times of the year, SESSILE ORGANISMS Balanus The incidence of Balanus was  r e s t r i c t e d to spring, summer and  fall  months. The settlement was most extensive at Departure bay,  Crescent,  and at t i e three northern stations, Prince Rupert, Shannon bay and Buckley bay. Crescent,  Spring and f a l l maxima of incidence were demonstrated at  Johnson and M i l l e r (1955) i n t h e i r studies at Friday harbour,  found two maxima of settlement of Balanus glandule Darwin, i n May  and  Sep tember. In general, t h e r e would seem to be a r e l a t i o n between the lowered s a l i n i t y and the i n t e n s i t y of incidence of Balanus. Incidence was recorded f o r the three l e v e l s investigated.  The  settlement at the surface and at the zero t i d e l e v e l were s i g n i f i c a n t l y greater than t h a t at' the bottom.  Mytilus Incidence of Mytilus e d u l i s occurred a t Departure bay, Vancouver, P r i n c e Rupert and Shannon bay.  No incidence of larvae was  for Crescent yet mussels here are quite p l e n t i f u l . there were no experimental  recorded  The f a c t that  blocks at the surface might account f o r  the f a i l u r e to obtain mussel set at this station. Settlement sporadic.  of mussels during the spring,summer and f a l l months was  The only record o f an incidence f o r the winter months was  that f o r Shannon bay. The main incidence occurred i n July and August.  The heaviest  settlement of larvae took place at Departure bay and Shannon bay. The suggestion i s put f o r t h that there i s a r e l a t i o n between the intensity of the incidence of Mytilus edulis and a lowered s a l i n i t y . Incidence occurred at the three levels investigated at Departure bay.  The s t r a t i f i c a t i o n was  q u i t e d i s t i n c t , the main settlement having  taken place at the surface (float)„  103  Bryozoa Tae Bryozoans that settled on the test blocks belonged to the family Electrinidae.  At Departure bay the chief species represented  was Membranipora v i l l o s a Hincks. Encrusting Bryozoans settled on the experimental blocks exposed at William Head, Esquimalt, Departure bay, Vancouver, Crescent and Prince Rupert® Incidence of Bryozoa took place i n the warmer months of the year. Ho incidence occurred during December, January and February. The heaviest settlement of Bryozoa was at Departure bay  0  Totals f o r the incidence of Bryozoa f o r four months at the levels surface (float), zero tide level and bottom are 80, 40 and 0 respectively.  The species represented was chiefly Membranipora v i l l o s a  which form 0*Donoghue (1927) found so abundantly on kelp within the bay. COMPARISON OF INFESTATION BY BANKIA AND LIMNORIA The, infestation of wood by the marine boring crustacean Limnoria presents a decided contrast to that of the mollusc borer Bankia.  The  l a t t e r must of necessity attack new material while i n the free swimming l a r v a l veliger stage, while the former seems to attack non infected wood as the adult© Limnoria infestation was more extensive than that by Bankia at nearly a l l the stations studied, Masset exception.  inlet being a conspicuous  The heaviest limnoria attack and the second greatest  Bankia attack occurred at Departure bay* During the f i r s t year of  104  the investigation at Departure bay, the Liimioria attack v;as much heavier than that of Bankia,  During the ensuing 22 months, attack  , of the former diminished while that of the l a t t e r increased. r  Infestation by both borers at V i c t o r i a and Vancouver was never more than 20 organisms per experimental block per month. At William Head, Esquimalt, Crescent and Prince Rupert, Limnoria effected a considerable infestation while that of Bankia was i n s i g n i f i c a n t i n comparison. The most devastating infestation by Bankia  occurred at the  Masset i n l e t stations, Shannon bay and Buckley bay. The attack by Limnoria at i t s greatest was numerically only one f o r t i e t h of the greatest caused by Bankia, COMPARISON OF INCIDENCE 0? BORING- AND SESSILE ORGANISMS The boring organisms, Bankia and Limnoria tended to concentrate at the bottom while the sessile organisms Balanus, Hytilus and encrusting Bryozoans tended to concentrate at the surfaces Since experimental blocks were not placed at more than one level except at the one station, the geographic comparison of the intensity of the incidence of the boring and sessile organisms does not seem to be feasible.  Bankia i n f e s t a t i o n was l i g h t at the southern end of Vancouver island.  There was no i n d i e l a t i o n of seasonal peaks i n the  i n t e n s i t y of attack.  A moderate Bankia  attack occurred a t Departure bay, on the  east coast of Vancouver i s l a n d . sporadic.  Attack may be continuous or  Usually there are decided peaks i n the spring and  f a l l , the l a t t e r being the more important.  The duration of  the f a l l and spring attacks was found to be longer than that reported by White (1989). Results o f Bankia studies carried on at Vancouver, and Prince Rupert are inconclusive.  Crescent  For Vancouver harbour, It  i s recommended that i n future, several s i t e s be investigated and that more than one l e v e l be included i n the study® Heaviest i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia took place at Buckley bay and Shannon bay, Masset i n l e t , Queen Charlotte islands.  In Shannon  bay f o r the period October 15 to November 12, 1931, on an area of 261 square centimeters, there were 1,830 entries of Bankia. The minimum monthly i n f e s t a t i o n f o r either station was 5. A comparison of Bankia i n f e s t a t i o n and the hydrographic cond i t i o n that obtains at the southern end of Vancouver island and a t Masset i n l e t , Queen Charlotte islands indicates that a lowered s a l i n i t y range of from 17 to 22 parts per m i l l e when  106  the temperatures are from 5° to 12° 0. Is accompanied by a heavy i n f e s t a t i o n .  6o  No r e l a t i o n between Bankia i n f e s t a t i o n and hydrographic conditions could be derived from the data obtained f o r Departure bay, Vancouver harbour  7.  5  Crescent and Prince Rupert harbour,  Results obtained f o r Departure bay point to the fact that the dominant factor favourable to i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia i s not one of high s a l i n i t y as contended by White (1929).  8.  While the main i n f e s t a t i o n by Bankia occurred at Shannon bay and Departure bay when the temperature ranged from 7° to 12° C., i n f e s t a t i o n of destructive i n t e n s i t y took place at the l a t t e r station during the month of August, 1934 when the average temperature ranged from 17,4° to 19.1° C.  9.  Infestation by Bankia of experimental blocks exposed concurrentl y at three l e v e l s at Departure bay indicate the necessity of using at l e a s t two levels f o r each s i t e to be investigated i n the future.  I0o  Bankia i n f e s t a t i o n occurred a t the three l e v e l s investigated. Attack at the bottom was greater than that at the surface or at the zero tide l e v e l .  No s i g n i f i c a n t difference i n attack was  obtained between that noted f o r the surface and zero tide l e v e l . . 11.  Limnoria i n f e s t a t i o n occurred at a l l times of the year i n a l l the areas investigated except Crescent and V i c t o r i a , at which  107  stations a c t i v i t y ceased during the winter months, 18.  Infestation by Limnoria  of destructive intensity occurred at  William Head, Esquimalt, Departure bay, Crescent, Prince Rupert and Shannon bay, The attack at Victoria, Vancouver and Buckley bay was comparatively l i g h t .  The greatest a c t i v i t y was that  noted f o r Departure bay and Esquimalt, 13.  Variations i n the time and intensity of Limnoria infestation could not be accounted f o r by the hydrographic data obtained.  14®  Infestation by Limnoria of destructive intensity occurred at temperatures from 6° to 19° C.  15.  The heaviest attack by Limnoria occurred at the bottom; attack at the surface was greater than at zero tide level.  16.  Settlement of barnacles occurred i n spring, summer and f a l l months. Incidence was most extensive at Departure bay, Crescent and at the three northern stations, Prince Rupert, Shannon bay and Buckley bay. Spring and f a l l maxima of incidence occurred at Crescent.  17.  Settlement of mussels during the spring, summer and f a l l months was sporadic. The only record of an incidence for the winter months was that for Shannon bay. The principal incidence occurred during July and August. The heaviest settlement of l a r vae took place at Departure bay and Shannon bay*  108  18  8  Encrusting Bryozoans s e t t l e d on experimental blocks exposed a t W i l l i a m Head, Esquimalt, Departure bay, Vancouver, Crescent and Prince Rupert  0  Incidence took p l a c e during the warmer months  of the year* 19o  Incidence o f serpulids occurred at Departure bay end Prince  Rupert* 20,  Results of s t r a t i f i c a t i o n studies made at Departure bay show that the p r i n c i p a l settlement of barnacles, mussels (Mytilus edulis) and e n c r u s t i n g Bryozoans, occurred at the surface (float)«  Settle-  ment was l e a s t on the blocks exposed at the bottom, 21,  Limnoria i n f e s t a t i o n was more extensive than that by Bankia at nearly a l l the stations studied, Masset i n l e t being a conspicuous  exception* Bankia  22*  The heaviest Ljjmxoria attack and the second greatest  attack occurred at Departure bay,  Results f o r Departure b a y showed that the boring organisms, Bankia and Limnoria tended to concentrate at the "bottom while  the s e s s i l e organisms, barnacles, mussels and encrusting Bryozoans tended to concentrate at the surface.  109  ACEGTOYiXSPavSNTS  The necessary financial assistance for this investigation was extended hy the Biological Board of Canada, the Department of Botany, University of B r i t i s h Columbia and by my parents. Working f a c i l i t i e s were provided by the Biological Board of Canada, s h e l l f i s h investigations (Pacific) and by the Department of Botany, University of B r i t i s h Columbia, I am indebted to Dr, C, McLean Fraser, head of the Department of Zoology, University of B r i t i s h Columbia, for his consistent and sympathetic interest i n this investigation.  Thanks are also due to Dr,  W.A. Clemens, Director, P a c i f i c Biological Station, Dr* C.B., Elsey in charge of s h e l l f i s h investigations at the P a c i f i c Biological Station and to Dr. A.H.  Hutchinson, head of the Department of Botany, Univ-  ersity of B r i t i s h Columbia, for their assistance and many courtesies and to Dr. J.L, Hart, P a c i f i c Biological Station, for his helpful criticisms. Acknowledgment i s made to Mr, J.L. McHugh f o r preparation of the charts used i n this work and to Dr. F. Dickson of the Department of Botany and to Professor G.J. Spencer of the Department of Zoology, University of B r i t i s h Columbia for photographic assistance. Special acknowledgment i s due to those who exchanged the experimental blocks and procured the hydrographic data. This investigation would have been impossible of execution without the consistent assistance of Mr. Ira Cornwall (Quarantine Station, William Head); Mr. Edward Cooke(Esquimalt and V i c t o r i a ) ; Dr. C.R. Slsey, Dr. N.M. Carter  110  and Mr. T.P. T u l l y (Pacific B i o l o g i c a l Station, Departure bay)| Mr. A, Oldershaw and Mr. J . Christopherson (Crescent); Mr. H. Beard Mr. J.R. Towns end (Vancouver); Dr. N.M,  Carter and Dr. H.N.  and  Brocklesby  (Fisheries Isperimental Station, Prince Rupert); Dr. A.L. Pritchard (Masset  inlet).  Ill CITATIONS At?/cod, 1924®  and Johnson, A , A , Marine structures, t h e i r deterioration and preservation.  National Research Council, Wash., B.C.  pp. 1-534, 169 f i g . Bartsch, P. 1924©  A monograph of the American shipworms.  B u l l , U.S.  National Museum, 122, 51 pp., 57 p i s . , 1 f i g . i n text. Clemens, 1955,  W.A. A check l i s t of the marine fauna and f l o r a of the Canadian P a c i f i c Coast. Nat, Res. Coun, Can.  Coe, W.R, 1952,  Season of attachment and rate of growth of sedentary marine organisms at the p i e r of the Scripps I n s t i t u t i o n of Oceanography, La Jo11a, C a l i f o r n i a .  B u l l , Scripps  Inst, Ocean., Tech. ser., 3, (5), pp. 57-86, p i s , 1-6, 5 f i g , i n text. Coker, R.E, 1925.  Breeding habits o f Limnoria at Beaufort. N.C.  Jour.  E l i s h a M i t c h e l l S c i . S o c , 59, pp. 95-100. F i e l d , Irving A. 1922,  Biology and economic value of the sea mussel, Mytilus e d u l i s . B u l l . U.S. Bur. Fish., 58, pp. 127-259, 150 f i g .  Fish, Charles J . 1925.  Seasonal d i s t r i b u t i o n of the plankton o f the Woods Hole region.  B u l l . U.S. Bur. Fish., 41, pp. 91-179, 77 f i g .  112  Fraser, C. McLean, 1925«  Marine wood borers i n B r i t i s h Columbia waters,  Trans,  Hoy, Soc, Can. Ser. 5, 17, (5), pp, 21-28, Fraserj C. McLean. 1925,  Marine wood borers i n B r i t i s h Columbia waters,  II  Trans. Hoy. Soc. Ser. 5, 19, (5), pp. 159-167. Gray e l ey, F,H. 1909,  Polyehaet larvae,  L i v. Mar. B i o l . Com. Memoir 19,  pp. 1-179, 4 p i s . Henderson, Jean T. 1924,  The g r i b b l e :  a study o f the d i s t r i b u t i o n  factors and  the l i f e - h i s t o r y of Limnoria lignorum at St. Andrews, XT.B.  Contr. Can. B i o l . 2, (14), pp. 507-525, 2 p i s .  Johnson, Martin W. and M i l l e r , Robert C, 1935.  The seasonal settlement of sliipworms, barnacles, and other wharf-pile organisms at Friday harbour, Washington. Uhiv. Wash. Pub. Ocean. 2, (1), pp. 1-18, 1 f i g *  Kbfoid, C.A. 1921.  The marine borers of the San Francisco Bay region. Report on the San Francisco Bay Marine P i l i n g Survey, 1, pp. 23-61, 36 p i s o 1 f i g . i n text.  •Kbfoid, C.A. and M i l l e r , Robert C. 1927.  Marine borers and their r e l a t i o n to marine construction on the P a c i f i c coast.  F i n a l report o f the San Francisco  Bay Marine P i l i n g Committee, (San Francisco, published by the Committee), pp. 188-545, f i g . 68-141.  113  Lucas, C C.  and Hutchinson,  0  1927.  A.Ho  A bio-hydrographical  investigation of the sea adjacent  the Eraser- river mouth®  to  Trans. Roy. Soc Can, Ser. 5,  31, (5), pp. 485-520. O'Donoghue, 1926,  C.H. Observations on the early development of Membranipora  v i l l o s a Hincks. pi.  Contr. Oan. B i o l , 3, (8), pp, 247-265,  1.  Sigerfoos, Charles P. 1908.  Natural history, organization, and l a t e development of Teredinidae, or shipworms.  B u l l , U.S. Bur. Fish., 27,  pp. 191-251, p i s . 7-21. Visscher, J . Paul, 1928.  Nature and extent of fouling of ships' bottoms.nBull. U.S. Bur. Fish., 45, p t . 2, pp. 195-852,  Wallace, 1919 V/hite,  40 f i g , i n text.  N.A. Isopoda from  0  the Bay of Fundy. Univ. Toronto Studies.  F.D.  1929.  Studies on marine borers. season of B.C.  I I I . A note on the breeding  Bankia (ffylotrya) setaeea i n Departure bay,  Contr. Can. B i o l . 4, (5), pp. 19-25, 1 f i g .  TABLE XXXI? HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Sea water samples taken at 6 foot l e T e l from surface WILLIAM HEAD 0  Date  Time  Temp.  °/oo 01/kg  Sep . 21, 1952  9:00  10.4  17.05  Sep. 24  10 **00  11.6  17.25  Sep, 27  10:00  10.9  16.92  Sep, SO  10:00  10.6  17.16  Oct.  5  14:00  10*0  17.57  Oct.  6  10:00  9*8  -17*45  Oct.  9  15:00  9.9  17.58  10.0  17.24  Oct* 1 2  ll:oo  Oct* 15  10:00  9*8  17.48  Oct* 18  9500  9.4  17*51  Oct* 21  11:00  9.4  17.47  Oct. 24  10:00  9.4  17.40  Oct* 27  9:00  9.4  17:64  Oct. 50  10:00  9.5  17.66  WOT.  2  11:00  9.0  17.59  NOT*  5  12:00  8.9  17.40  NOT.  8  14:00  9.2  17.45  NOT. 1 1  11:00  9*0  17.59  NOT. 1 4  11:00  8.9  17.41  NOT. 17  11:00  9.5  17.40  NOT. 20  14:00  9.0  17.21  TABLE XXXXV (Continued) HTDROGHAPHIC DATA Sea water samples taken at 6 foot l e v e l from surface WILLIAM HEAD 0,  Time  0 Temp.  Ebvo 25, 1952  10:00  8,6  17.24  HOT, 26  11:00  8.9  17,15  Nov, 89  14:00  8.9  17.27  Dec.  2  11:00  8,9  17.51  Dec.  5  14:00  8.6  17.54  Dec.  8  11:00  7.1  17.57  Dec. 11  10:00  7,7  17,99  Dec. 14  15:00  7.4  17.57  Dec. 17  10:00  7.8  17.25  Dec. 20  12:00  7,6  17 • 25  Dec. 25  11:00  7,6  17.50  Dec. 26  12:00  7.7  17.58  Dec. 29  10:00  7.6  17.27  Jan.  1, 1955  11:00  7.0  16.93  Jan.  4  14:90  7.6  17.27  Jan,  7  11:00  7,5  16.79  Jan. 10  14:00  7.6  17.13  Jan* 15  10:00  7.8  Jan. 16  11:00  7.1  17.09  Jan. 19  11:00'  6.5  17.13  Jan. 22  12:00  7.1  17.19  Date  /oo Cl/kg  TABLE XXXIV( Continued) HTDROGPAPHIC DATA Sea water samples taken at 6 foot l e v e l from surface • WILLIAM HEAD Date  Time  C Temp.  °/oo Cl/kg  Jan. 25, 1933  14:00  7.1  17,29  Jan. 28  14:00  7.1  17.56  Jan. 31  11:00  6.7  17.26  Feb.  3  10:00  7.0  17. 21  Feb.  6  10; 00  6,8  17.08  Feb.  9  15:00  6.5  16.96  Feb, 12  11:00  6*7  17,28  Feb. 15  12:00  6*5  17.19  Feb, 18  14:00  7.0  17.52  Feb. 21  10 :oo  6.7  17.55  Feb, 24-  9:00  7*0  17.66  Feb. 27  13:00  7,0  17.55  Mar,  2  11:00  6*9  17*20  Mar,  5  11:00  6.8  17* 21  Mar*  8  14:00  7*0  17*19  Mar, 11  10:00  7.0  17.14  Mar* 14  10:00  7*1  17.21  Mar. 17  10:00  Mar* 20  11:00  7.1  17.28  Mar. 23  14:00  7.2  17.13  Mar* 26  10:00  7.5  17.09  TABLE XXXIV (Continued) HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Sea water samples taken at 6 foot l e v e l from surface •-WILLIAM HEAD Date  Time  C Temp.  Cl/kg  Mar. 29, 1933  10 too  7,2  17.13  Apr,  1  10:00  7,0  17,20  Apr,  4  12:00  8,2  17.09  Apr,  7  11:00  7.3  17*11  Apr, 10  9:00  7.7  2J7 & 12  Apr, 13  10:00  7,8  ,17.34  Apr, 16  11:00  7.8  17,34  Apr, 19  10:00  8.0  17*55  Apr, 22  11:00  8.5  17*36  Apr, 25  10:00  8.3  17.55  Apr, 28  10:00  8,5  17.43  May -  1  10:00  8.3  17.43  May  4  9:00  8.5  17.26  lay  7  11:00  8,9  17*39  May  10  10:00  8.5  17.48  May  13  11:00  9.0  17,58  lay  16  13:00  9.2  17.41  May  19  9:00  8.9  17.39  May  22  14:00  9.3  17.32  May  25  10:00  9.2  17.59  May  28  10:00  9.9  17.34  /oo  TABLE XXXIV (Continued) -HYDROGRAPHIC DATA -Sea water samples taken at 6 foot l e v e l from surface • WILLIAM HEAD Date May  31, 1933  C Temp.  /oo Cl/kg  8:00  9.4  17.56  Time  June  3  8:00  9.6  17.24  June  6  10:00  9.3  17.19  June  9  13:00  9.8  17.48  June 12  14:00  10,6  17,41  June 15  9:00  9,8  17.55  June 18  11.00  10.6  17.06  June 21  14:00  10.4  16.92  June 24  14:00  10.6  17,10  June 27  10:00  10.5  17.12  June 30  11:00  10,1  17.19  July  3  10:00  10.6  16.69  July  6  11:00  10.5  17.22  July  9  9:00  9,6  17.56  July 12  9:00  9,9  17.29  J u l y 15  14:00  11.7  17.00  July 18  10:00  Hi 1  16.52  J u l y 21  10:00  July 24  10:00  11.1  16,94  July 27  10:00  10.6  17,09  July 30  10 too  10,6  16.81  16,62  TABLE XXXIV (Continued) .HYDROGRAPHIC DATA  .Sea water samples taken at 6 foot level from surface , p i L I A M HEAD  Date 1935  Time  0 Temp.  10 too  H«  X  16. 68  /oo Cl/kg  Aug,  2,  Aug,  5  10:00  10.6  17*11  Aug,  8  14:00  10.3  17.51  Aug, 11  10:00  10.4  17.37  Aug, 14  9:00  XX o 0  16,72  Aug, 17  9:00  XS@ 13  15*75  Aug, 20  10:00  XX© 8  16,63  Aug, 23  10:00  XX $ 2  16*73  Aug* 26  9:00  12.0  16.81  Aug, 29  9:00  11.0  16*77  Sep* 1  10:00  10,4  •17,10  Sep,  4  9:00  10.0  17,35  Sep,  7  15:00  10.6  17.37  Sep, 10  12100  10.9  17*39  Sep, 13  10:00  10*9  17.15  Sep. 16  10:00  10*4  16*94  Sep. 19  10:00  10.1  16.91  120 TABLE XXXIV(Continued) HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Sea water samples taken at' 6 foot l e v e l from surface WILLIAM HEAD C Temp.  Date September 22, 1953  October  November  /oo Cl/kg  9.37  17.41  25  9.37  17.59  28  9.76  17.20  1  10.11  4  10*0  17,41  7  10.0  17.10  10  9.8  16.96  15  10.5  16*77  16  10*2  16,65  ;  19  9*48  16*97  22  9.0  17.40  25  9*4  17*36  28  9,2  16.99  51  8.9  17.22  5  8.9  17,26  6  8.8  17.22  9  8,8  16.99  12  8,9  16.69  15  8.9  16,55  18  M  21  8.5  17  »  20  17.45  121 , TABLE XXXLV. (Cont inued) HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Sea water samples taken at' 6 foot l e v e l from surface WILLIAM HEAD  Lte  0 Temp,  /oo Cl/kg  24, 1935  8,6  17,22  27  8, 5  17.30  50  8.3  17.65  5  8.1  17.32  6  8.0  17.27  9  8.1  16.26  12  7.7  16.57  15  7.8  17© 12  18  8.1  16.66  21  7.7  17.52  24  7,5  16.84  27  7.2  16.74  50  7,8  16.64  1, 1954  8.0  16.68  4  8© 2  16.74  .77  7.8  16,65  10  7.8  16,97  15  . 7.8  16.75  16  8.1  16.77  19  8,0  16.84  7.5  16.25  22  • .  122 •TABLE XXXIV (Continued) •HZDSOG-RiPHIC DATA •Sea water samples taken at' 6 foot l e v e l from surface .WILLIAM HEAD C Temp.  /oo 01/kg  7.7  16*73  28  8.0  16. 61  31  8.0  16.55  February 5  7*0  16,77  6  8.0  16.75  9  8,0  16,71  12  8. 2  16,88  15  8*2  16.88  . 18  8.1  16*84  21  8,0  16,84  24  8*1  16.77  27  8*2  16*69  2  8*1  16.79  5.  7,7  16.63  8  8.1 .  16.84  11  7,8  16.83  14  7.8  16.87  17  8,6  16.92  20  8,8  16.95  .23  8,2  17.06  26  8.6  16.77  Date January 25, 1934  March  TABLE XXXIV( Continued) .HYDROGRAPHIC DATA .Sea water samples taken at 6 foot l e v e l from surface .WILLIAM HMD 0 Temp.  /oo Cl/kg  8. 8  16*69  1  7.8  16.85  4  8.4  17.12  7  8*9  17.11  10  8.8  16*99  13  9,0  17.00  16  9,0  17.22  19  9*6  17.19  22  9.5  17.05  25  9.5  16.93  28  10,0  16*89  1  9,2  17 <» 21  4  9,2  17.55  7  9,4  17.25  10  9,8.  17.05  ite 29, 1934 April  May  13  10,5  16.91  16  9,8  17.00  19  10.1  16,76  22  10,7  16,82  25  10,7  16*69  28  10,5  16.77  51  9,5  17.06  •CABLE XXXIV (Continued) HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Sea water samples taken at' 6 foot l e v e l from surface WILLIAM HEAD 0 Temp.  /oo Cl/kg  3, 1934  10.3  17.13  6  10.8  17.05  9  10.8  16.85  IS  10.8  17.09  15  10,6  16,93  18  10,8  16.93  21  11.3  16.65  24  12.5  16.58  27  10.4  17.26  50  11.3  17.30  3  11.2  17.57  6  11.9  16.92  9  10.8  16,75  12  10.4  17.50  15  10.7  17.15  18  10.9  17,12  21  11.5  17.03  24  11.8  17.13  27  11.8  17,30  30  10.4  17.43  Date .June  July  TABLE XXXV(  • HTDHOG-HAPHICDATA . Sea water samples taken one fathom from surface ESQUIMALT HARBOUR Date  Time  C Temp.  /oo 01/kg  Foy. 4, 1935  15130  9.1  17.48  Nov. 12  16:30  9.1  16.75  25  15:30  8,4  17,55  Dec. 9  15:00  8,0  17.24  Dec. 16  16:30  7.2  16.88  Dec. 25  15:50  7,2  17.05  Dec. 51  15:00  7.4  16. 62  Jan.  15:00  8.0  16.87  Jan. 21  15:30  8,0  16.58  Jan. 28  16:30  8,0  16.70  leb. 11  16:30  8,1  16.81  Feb. 18  ll:oo  8.3  16*95  Mar, 4  14:30  8.0  17,15  Mar. 11  16:50  9.1  16.84  Mar. 18  15:30  9.3  16.75  Mar. 28  15:45  9.2  16.80  Apr.  7  14:30  11,3  16.76  Apr. 15  16.'50  11.0  16*77  Apr. 28  15:00  12,2  16.58  May  12  15:00  12.5  16,93  May  20  16:45  15.2  16.87  UOY,  7, 1954  s - sulphide contamination.  TABLE  XXXV(Continued)  HYDROGRAPHIC DATA •Sea water samples taken one fathom from surface ESQUIMALT BARBOUR /oo Cl/kg 16,34  Date  Time  C Temp.  May 26, 1934  14:30  14*0  June  3  10:00  17.10  June 11  15:00  16,97  June 17  10:00  14.4  16,80  June 24  15:30  15.4  16.58  July  14:30  15 ® 1  17.04  1  TABLS  XXXVI  HYDRO GRAPHIC DATA  Sea water samples taken, a t depth of one fathom FEDERAL GOVERNMENT WHARF, VICTORIA HARBOUR  Date  Time  Temp.  °/oo 01/kg  Oct. 15, 19S5  16J00  10,0  16,56  Oct, 17  15:; so  9.3  16.46  Oct. 19  15550  9.4  16,80  Oct. 25  13J30  . 10.4  17.28  Oct. 24  15 5 50  10.3  16.82  Oct. 26  13530  10.2  17,55  Oct* 29  15 500  10.0  16,55  Oct. 51  13530  10.0  16,80  HOT*  2  13 550  10*5  16. 82  HOT.  5  13550  10.2  16,82  HOT.  6  13«30  10.2  16,84  NOT*  8  15 550  10.4  16.75  NOT. 10  15550  9.0  16*44  NOT. 11  16 550  9*0  16*20  NOT. IS  15 530  9.5  16,20  NOT. 15  15 550  9,0  16,45  NOT. 17  15530  9.1  16,96  NOT. 20  13 550  9.0  16.90  NOT* 22  13530  9,1  .17,02  NOT* 25  15 550  9.1  16.89  NOT* 24  13550  9,1  14,82  a - sulphide contamination  C  TABLE XXXVI (Continued) .  HYDROGRAPHIC DATA  Sea water samples taken at depth of one fathom •FEDERAL GOVERNMENT WHARF, VICTORIA HARBOUR Time  C Temp.  /oo Cl/kg  Nov. 25, 1933  13:30  9,0  17.21  Nov. 28  13:30  8.4  16.45  Nov. 30  13:30  8.2  16.96  Dec.  1  15:30  8.1  16*85  Dec.  4  15:50  7.4  16.49  Dec.  6  13:30  8,0  16.75  Dec.  7  15:50  8.0  14.68  Dec.  9  13:30  8.0  16.48  Dec. 11  15:30  8,1  17,52  Dec. 13  13:50  8.1  16*94  Dec* 15  13150  7.3  16.85  Dec. 16  15:30  7*5  17.10  Dec. 18  15:50  7.5  16.69  Dec. 19  13:30  7*5  15,85  Dee. 20  15:30  7.4  15,66  Dec* 22  13:50  8.0  16.44  Dec* 26  15:50  7.a  16.16  Dec* 27  15:50  7,1  16,54  Dec. 28  15:30  7.4  16*42  Dec. 29  15:30  8.0  16,35  Dec. 31  14:00  7.4  16.57  sulphide contamination.  TABLE XXXVI FEDERAL  Bate  (Continued)  GOVERITi.IEIT W H A R F , V I C T O R I A H A R B O U R  c  Time  Temp*  /oo 01/kg  Jan*  1, 1934  13 S30  8*0  16.15  Jan*  5  13'30  8.1  16.88  Jan.  8  13:30  8.0  16.55  Jan* 10  13:30  7.4  15,58  Jan* 11  13:30  7.4  16*54  Jan. 12  15:30  7.2  16*55  Jan* 15  13:30  7.4  16.68  Jan. 16  13:50  8*0  17*06  Jan* 17  13:50  8*0  16,74  Jan* 18  15:50  7.4  16.58  Jan* 19  15:50  8,0  17,54  Jan. 22  15:50  7*5  16.20  Jan* 23  15:30  7*2  14,71  Jan. 24  13:30  7.1  14*07  Jan. 25  13:50  7.5  16.65  Jan. 26  13:50  8.6  16.20  Jan* 29  15:50  7.4  16,29  Jan. 30  15:50  3d-1  16*64  Jan* 31  15:50  8» 1  16.55  Feb*  1  15:50  8.0  16,57  Feb.  2  15:30  8.0  15.81  Feb*  5  13:30  8.1  15*94  Feb*  6  13:50  8.1  16.55  s - sulphide contamination.  TABLE XXXVI (Continued) FEDERAL GOVERNMENT YffiARF, VICTORIA HARBOUR Date  Time.  C Temp.  /oo Cl/kg  Feb. 7, 1934  13530  8.5  15.96  Feb. 8  13:30  8.3  16*46  Feb. 9  13:30  8. 2  16.09  Feb* 10  13:30  8,1  16.14  Feb. 12  13:30  8.  2  16*55  Feb. 13  13:30  8.2  16,62  Feb* 14  13:30  8*2  16.55  Feb. 15  13:30  8.5  16.72  Feb* 16  13:30  8*5  16.11  Feb* 19  13:30  8t> £  15,88  Feb* 20  13:30  8,4  16,59  Feb. 21  13:30  8.  2  17*01  Feb. 22  13:30  8.2  16.17  Feb. 23  13:30  8*2  16.17  Feb.. 26  13:30  8.5  16,75  Feb. 27  13:30  8.2  16.46  Feb. 28  13:30  8.2  16.45  Mar. 1  13:30  8.5  16.54  Mar. 2  13:30  8.5  15.79  Mar* 5  13:30  7*4  15.59  Mar. 6  13:30  7.4  14,86  Mar, 7  13:30  8.1  14,25  Mar. 8  13:30  8. 2  15*09  s - sulphide oontaminati on*  TABLEXXXVI (Continued) FEDERAL GOVERNMENT WHARF, VICTORIA HARBOUR  c Time  Temp.  /oo Gl/kg  13:30  8,4  15.79  Mar, IS  13:30  9.1  16,72  Mar. 13  13:30  9,2  16.49  Mar. 14  13:30  9*2  16.01  Mar. 15  13:30  9,1  15,80  Mar. 16  13:30  9.2  16,55  Mar. 19  13:30  9.5  15.93  Mar, 20  13:30  9,2  16.04  Mar. 21  13:30  9© S  16,26  Mar. 22  13:30  9*2  l a r . 23  13:30  9.5  15.78  Mar. 26  13:30  9.2  16.46  liar, 27  13:30  9*2  16,83  Mar* 28  13:30  9.5  16.55  Mar. 29  15:30  9*4  16.68  Mar. 31  7:50  9.2  15,96  Apr,  2  7:50  9.2  16.92  Apr.  3  15:50  9.5  15.  Apr,  4  15:50  10.2  14.96  Apr.  5  15:50  10 « 2  15.52  Apr.  6  15:50  10,4  15,26  Apr,  9  15:30  9.5  16.81  Apr. 10  15:50  10.1  16,49  Date Mar.  9, 1934  s - sulphide contamination.  m  TABLE XXXVI (Continued) FEDERAL GOVERNMENT WHARF, V I C T O R I A HARBOUR  Time  0 Temp.  °/oo 01/kg  Apr, 11,, 1934  13530  10.0  16*87  Apr, 12  13:30  10.0  16.74  Apr* 15  13:50  10.4  15*95  Apr, 16  13:50  11.2  15.69  Apr, 17  15:50  11*0  16.02  Apr, 18  15:50  XX* X  IB* 98  Apr, 19  15:5©  11.4  16.46  Apr, 20  15:30  12*1  16.28  Apr, 25  15:50  11.4  16.55  Apr, 24  15:50  11.3  16*59 s  Apr, 25  15:50  11*3  16.50  Apr, 26  15:30  12.1  16,45  Apr. 27  15:39 •  X2s 2  16*26  Apr* SO  13:50  12.0  16.46  May  1  13:50  12.0  16.49  May  2  13:50  11.3  16*26  May  3  15:50  11.3  16*54  May  4  12:00  11*2  16.41  May  7  15:30  11,1  16.66  May  8  13:50  10.3  16*92  May  9  13:30  11*1  16*82  May  10  15:30  11.0  16,91  May  11  12:30  11.3  16*74  s - sulphide contamination  TABLE XXXVI (Continued) FEDERAL GOVERNMENT WBARF, VICTORIA BARBOUR  c  /oo  Date  Time  Temp.  Cl/kg  May  15, 1934  13530  15.1  16.46  May  16  13550  13^ 1  16.56  May  17  13530  15. 0  16.55  May  18  12500  13.0  16,40  May  21  15550  15.0  16.52  May  22  15 550  IS « 2  16.65  May  23  155 50  12 » 1  16,67  May  25  115 50  12.1  16*60  May  28  15550  14.1  16.52  May  29  15550  14.4  16.45  May  30  15550  12 «1  16.85  May  31  15550  15,1  16.45  June  1  11545  15*4  16.46  June  5  9 500  15,1  16.85  June  5  13 5 30  13© 2  16.85  June  6  15550  14.0  16,74  June  7  15 530  14.2  16*76  June  8  11530  13* 3  16.82  June 11  155 50  14.4  16.79  June 12  15530  15,4  16.80  June 13  13530  15.0  16.81  June 14  15550  15.1  16.75  June 15  13 550  15 e 2  16*77  TABLE XXXVI(Continued) FEDERAL G0V13PMMT. YfflARF, VICTORIA BARBOUR  c Temp.  /oo Cl/kg  9:00  14.4  16*65  June 18  13:30  15 © 2  16.55  June 19  13:30  15.2  16*55  June SO  11:30  15.2  16.46  June 21  13:30  15.2  16*51  June 22  11:45  15,1  16,59  June 25  13:30  15 0 3  16.46  June 26  15:30  14.1  16. 58  June 27  13:50  14.1  16*55  June 28  13:50  2  16*63  June 29  15:50  15 © 2  16*60  July  2  15:00  15*1  16*96  July  3  15:50  14,0  17,08  July  4  15:50  15.4  17.02  July  5  14:00  15.0  17.10  July  6  12:00  15.4  16*94  July  7  11:45  15.4  16.90  July  9  15:30  15* 1  16.77  July 10  15:30  14.4  16,75  J u l y 11  13:30  15.1  16.55  J u l y 12  13:50  15« 1  16*74  July 13  12:00  14.4  16.76  July 16  15:50  13© 3  16*84  Date June 17, 1934  Time  TABLE XXM (Continued) FEDERAL (K)VERFM3M" WHARF, VICTORIA HARBOUR  Time  0 Temp*  /oo 01/kg  J u l y 17, 1934  13:30  14.0  16.95  July 18  13:30  14*0  16.98  J u l y 19  13:30  13* 3  16.94  July SO  12:00  15.4  16,98  July 23  13:50  14.0  16*95  July 24  13:30  14.5  16.87  July 25  15:30  14,5  16.95  J u l y 26  13:50  15.0  16.77  July 27  11:45  16,0  16,77  July 30  13:50  15,4  17*02  July 31  15:30  14,5  17.07  Date  136 ..  TABLE XXXVII  HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Surface samples DEPARTURE BAY, B. C. o Date Oct.  e  /oo  /oo  c. Temp,  Cl/kg  10,4.  12.01  Temp.'  Cl/kg  12.0  15.63  Oct. 29  2  11.8  15,64  30  9,8  3  11.7  14.57  51  10,0  10*17  6  10.7  14.44  2  9.0  14.78  7  12.8  14.56  5  9,0  14,66  9  11.9  14.93  4  10.0  15.99  10  12& 7  14.95  5  9,0  IS© 32  12  11$ 8  15.05  6  9,5  14.23  13  11® 7  15.17  7  9,5  11*64  14  11.8  15,75  9  7.8  14. 27  15  12.1  15.01  15  8.5  15.24  16  11.7  14.53  16  7.5  13,64  19  11.8  14.29  17  7.0  14.24  20  11® 2  15,18  18  9.0  15 o 27  21  10.6  15,14  21  7.4  15.65  22  10*3  15.32  25  7,4  15*60  23  9.6  15.56  27  6.5  15.48  24  8.6  15.57  28  7.2  15*64  26  8.8  IS. 63  50  7,2  15,54  27  9.2  14.77  1  7.1  15.52  28  9.8  14.41  2  7.0  13.67  1,  1931  Date, r  HOT,  Dec.  10.77  TABLE XXXVII (Continued) DEPARTURE BAY, B . 0. Date Dec.  Jan.  c.  0.  /oo  Temp.  Gl/kg  3, 1951  7.2  15.75  Jan* 15  4  7.6  16,59  5  7.2  7  Date  /oo  Temp*  Gl/kg  3# 3  11.16  17  5.3  12, 20  '15.61  18  6*1  15*31  8.2  15*62  19  5,6  8*37  10  7.2 .  15.50  20  5*7  11.40  11  6*2  15.49  21  6.6  15.90  12  6.0  15,44  22  „3« 5  10.47  14  5.8  13© 81  25  6*0  15*80  16  • 6.1  14,95  24  5,6  15*57  18  7.4  11*56  25  5*0  16,74  23  6.5  12,87  26  5,6  15«5 3  28  6.5  13.21  1  5.7  15.94  29  5,8  12,14  2  4*9  16*89  30  5.8  13.81  5  4.5  15*27  51  5.8  12.22  4  4*7  14*93  2, 1952  6*0  10.70  5  5*9  15.91  4  6.1  13.15  6  6.5  16*04  7  7.4  13* 65  8  6.3  16.74  8  7.8  12*66  10  6*3  16* 12  9  6.0  12.81  11  6.0  16,05  11  6,8  16.07  15  5.3  15*99  15  2.4  9.41  17  5.5  15,51  14  2,2  10,67  18  5*3  15.98  Feb*  TABLE XXXVII( Con tinned) HEPARTURE BAY, B* 0.  0*  0  C Temp,  /oo Cl/kg  April 5  8,0  16*52  IB® 89  6  7*4  14.77  7,8  9.76  7  7.5  14*82  27  7.4  8.00  9  7*9  16.39  29  7.8  12,60  11  8*5  13.72  1  5.3  5,87  13  9.0  14.39  Temp*  /oo Cl/kg  24, 1932  7.2  14.21  25  7.8  26  Date  Samples taken 4 feet from surface  4  4.8  14.70  15  -9 © £  14.95  5  . 6,5.  16*52  18  8*8  14,66  16.18  19  9.5  15*76  7 8  6.1  16*27  20  9.5  15.88  9  6.3  16.07  22  10*0  14.85  10  7.3  15.49  25  10*8  14. 21  11  7.2  16.16  26  10.8  14.55  14  8.0  16,82  27  11.4  14.22  15  8.5  16*81  28  11.0  15.10  16  7.0  15.82  29  11,7  15*51  19  9.0  14*78  1  13,4  15.05  21  8.1  13.62  2  13* 4  15,05  24  7.0  16.09  3  13,8  14,57  29  7.5  15.34  4  13, 2  14.20  31  8.0  5  13,7  14.47  2  8.3  6  15.0  15,24  J  16.34  May  TABLEXXXVH (Continued) DEPARTURE BAY, B. C. Date May  9, 1932  %o C. Temp. . Cl/kg  C Temp  /oo Cl/kg  10.5  15.85  June 9  17*5  13.94  10  12.5  12.76  10  17.5  12.80  13  IS© X  14*21  14  21.0  11«. 11  14  12.5  15.75  15  18.0  12,56  16  15.0  15.80  16  18,0  14,67  17  13.1  14.08  17  15.0  13. 24  14.70  18  16,5  15*62  19  Fune  Date  20  11.8  15,79  20  16.5  14.42  23  12 © 2  14*89  21  14.8  15,41  25  15.2  12.04  22  17*5  15.96  26  15b. 8  12<> 27  25  17© 5  12.70  27  15.6  15.97  28  14.5  13,80  30  14*8  15.94  51  14*9  14.04  1  15.8  14*87  2  14.5  5  Surface samples 24  17*4  10, 69  2 foot .level 29  18.5  15.57  5  16.0  12*16  14.95  6  17.0  12.35  14.0  15.19  7  19*0  12.42  4  14.0  14.02  8  19,0  12 e 7 2  5  15.7  13.57  6  15 « 3  13.49  11  14,8  13*92  7  16.5  13.56  12 ' 14.0  14,06  8  16.2  14.54  15  14.44  July  4 foot level  14,2  TABLE XXXVII(Continued) DEPARTURE BAY, B, C. Date  Temp*  /oo Cl/kg  Date  - 14, 1952  14.9  15,19  July 28  15  15*0  15.56  18  18,0  8.24  19  16,8  21  0. Temp.  /oo Cl/kg  15.8  14*48  29  15*. 5  14,62  1  17,6  10.84  11.64  5  18,5  10*49  18  15.66  8  18*0  22  17*0  3.2©. 88  10  16.5  25  16.1  13 » 25  11  17*5  26  17.-5  12,75  12  17,0  27  • 17.8  15.79  15  18*0  c.  Aug.  141 TABLE XXXVII HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Averages computed from thermograph sheets. Thermograph placed a t 4 foot l e v e l from surface,  c.  Temp. (MEAN) .  Date Aug. 14, 1932  17,5  Temp. (MEAN)  Date Sept,  c.  c.  Temp. (MEAN)  Date  6  16  Sept. 29  14  30  14  1  14  15  17.5  7  16  16  17  8  14.5  16.5  9  15.4  2  14  18  16.5.  10  16  3  14  19  17.5  11  15.3  4  14.5  20  17  12  15,3  5  13.7  21  17  13  15.3  6  •13,5  22  16.5  14  15  7  23  16  15  24.  18  16  15  25  19.5  17  14.5  10  12.3  26  20  18  14.3  11  116 *7  27  19.5  19  13*5  12  11  28  17.5  20  13  13  10.7  29  17.5  21  13  14  10.5  30  17  22  13  15  9,5  31  16  23  13  16  9*7  1  16.5  24  12,8  17  10,3  2  16,5  25  13  18  10*5  3  15.5  13.5  19  10*3  4  15  27  13.5  20  10.3  5  14  28  14  17  Sept,  DEPARTURE BAY, B.C.  .  '26  .14.8  Oct.  8 9  13,5  .  13.5  TABLE XXXVII(Continued)  Date SI, 1952  DEPARTURE BAY, B. C. 0. c, Temp* Temp. (MEM) Date (MEAN) 10*6 Nov* 30 8,0  22  10.5  23  Date Jan* 7  0, Temp. (MEAN) 6,5  1  8.5  8  6,5  10.5  2  8.0  9  6,5  24  10.3  3  8*5  10  6.5  25  -LO © 5  4  7.5  11  6*5  26  10.5  5  7.0  12  6*5  27  10.5  6 to 20 missing  15  6,7  28  10.3  21  7*5  14  6,5  29  10*0  22  7.8  15  6.0  30  10,0  23  8.0  16  5,5  31  10.5  24  7,5  17  4.8  25  7.0  18  Dec.  . to 18 missing 18  9*5  26  7.5  19  5*7  19  3.7  27  6.8  20  6*5  20  8.5  28  6.5  21  6,5  21  8.0  29  6,5  22  6*7  22  9.0  30  6.5  25  6.5  23  9.3  31  6*5  24  6,7  24  7,8  1/55  7*0  25  6.5  25;  7.5  2  7.0  26  6.5  26  8.6  5  6*5 '  27  6,8  27  8.7  4  6,5  28  6*5  28  8.5  5  6.7  29  6.5  29  8*3  6  6.0  50  6.0  Jan.  143  TABLE XXXVII (Continued) DEPARTURE BAY, B.C.  Date Jan* 51, 1955 Feb.  C. Temp. (MEM) 6.0  -  Bate Feb, 25  C» Temp. (MEM) 7.0  Date A p r i l 20  C. Temp. (MEM) 11,6  1  5.5  24  6.5  21  11,5  2  5.5  25  6.5  22  11  5  5.5  26  —  25  11.4  4  5*5  27  24  11.5  5  5*5  28  25  11.8  6  5.5  Mar. 5  6,5  26  12  7  5  4  5.5  27  11*8  8  4,5  5  6  28  11  9  4.5 .  6  6.5  29  11  10  :  4.5  7  6  11  6  8  - 5,7  12  5*5  9  IS  4,8  14  30 May  11  1  10.5  5,7  2  9.8  10  5*5  5  9,2  4.5  11  5.5  4  9.5  15  5,5  12  6.5  5  9  16  5.5  15  6.5  6  8.5  17  5*5  14  6,8  7  8*5  18  6  15  7  8  9  19  6  16  6.5  9  10.0  20  6.5  17  6.5  10  12  21  6*5  18  6.5  11  12  28  7.5  19  6,5  12  12.5  NOTE; March 20 t o A p r i l 20 continued on next page.  , TABLE XXXVLI (Continued) DEPARTURE BAT, B.C. c. Temp,  0.  Date  Temp.  (MEAN)  Date  (MEAN;  March 20, 1935  6.5  April 7  21  6.5  8  8,5  22  6*5  9  8.5  25  6,5  10  8.5  24  6  11  8,5  25  6.5  12  9  26  7  15  9,5  27  7  14  9.2  28  7  15  8,5  29  6,5  16  8,5  50  7  17  9  51  7  18  9  4  7.8  19  10,9  5  8,5  6  8.5  April  8  TABLE XXXVII (Continued) DEPARTURE BAY, B, 0. c.  Date  ' Temp. (MEM)  c. Temp* (MEAN)  C  Date  Temp. (MEM)  Date  June 5  13.5  June 28  13, 1933  11  14  10.5  6  14.8  29  17,5  15  10.5  7  14  50  17.5  16  10.5  8  13  July 1  17  10.5  9  14  2  14.5  18  11  10  14  5  14,5  19  11« 5  11  15  4  15$ 5  20  14  12  16  5  17  21  15  13  16.3  6  17.5  22  15.8  14  16.5  7  17.8  23  11.5  15  17,5  8  16.8  24  11  16  17,5  9  17  25  10  17  17,5  10  18© S  26  10  18  17  11  1*7 Q 2  27  11.5  19  16. 5  12  16,5  28  11.5  20  16  15  14,5  29  11  21  16,5  14  17  50  11  22  16  15  18. 2  31  12« 5  23  16  16  18, 8  1  14  24  16,5  17  18.8  2  14.5  25  16  18  15.2  3  15  26  16.5  I  18  4  14.5  27  17  20  9  18  16  19.2  TABLE XXXVLT(Continued) DEPARTURE BAY, B, C...  c. Date  Temp. (MEAN) -  21, 1933  19.2  22  c. Date  (MEAN)  13  20  20  14  23  19.5  24  Aug,  , C. Temp. (MEAF)  Temp, Date 5  13  19.8  6  13  15  20  7  15,  19.2  16  20,5  8  14  25  19.5  17  20,5  9  16  26  20  18  19 © 5  10  16  27  19.5  19  16.5  11  15,2  28  19 # 2  20  17*0  12  15* 5  29  19.5  21  18.2  13  16  30  20  22  18.5  14  15.5  31  17.5  23  18,8  15  15$ 5  1  20.5  24  19.2  16  14.8  2  19  25  18,5  17  13  3  16.5  26  19.8  18  13.  4  17.5  27  20  19  12.8  5  18.8  28  19  20  1(3$ 2  6  16.8  29  16,5  21  11.8  7  17  30  15,8  22  11  8  19.5  31  14.5  23  11.2  9  20  Sept. 1  16  24  11.8  10  20  2  17  25  12  11  20.5  3  16,8  26  IS*  12-  20  4  15  27  12.5  Sept,  2  TABLE XXXVH (Continued) DEPARTURE BAY, B. C*  Date 28, 1955  Oct,  C, Temp. (MEM) .12.5  C* Temp. (MEM) Oct. 21  10.5  0* Temp. (MEM)  Date HOT. 13  9.5  29  11. 8  22  10  14  9  30  11.5  25  10*2  15  9,5  24  10.5.  16  9.5  1  13  2  15  25  10,5  17  9,3  3  13.5  26  10,5  18  9.5  4  15.8  27  10.5  19  9,5  5  15*8  28  10,5  20  9*2  6  15.8  29  10 •  21  9.5  7  15,5  30  10  22  10  8  15.5  31  10  23  10  9  15,5  1  10  24  9,7  •  Nov.  10  15  2  9.5  25  9.5  11  15  3  9.5  26  9.5  12  12.8  4  9.5  27  9  13  12  5  9,3  28  8.7,  14  11  6  9  29  8.5,  15  11  7  9  30  8*5  16  10.5  8  9.8  1  8.5  17  10.5  9  9,5  2  9  18  10,5  10  9  3  9  19  10.5  11  9,5  4  8.8,  20  10,5  12  5  8  10  Dec.  148 TABLE M?H(Continued) DEPARTURE BAY, B.C.  Date Dec.  Jan*  C. Temp. (MEA¥)  c.  0. Temp. Date  (MEM)  Temp. Date  (MEAN)  6, 1933  8  Jan, 4  7.5  Feb. 1  4*5  7  8  5  6.5  2  4,5  8  8  6  6*5  3  4  9  8,3  7  6  4  4  10  8  8  6.5  5  4,5  11  7  9  6.8  6  4.5  12  7  10  7.7  7  5  13  7.7  11  6.5  8  5  14  7,7  12  6.3  9  4,7  15  7,5  13  6  10  4,8  16  6,5  14  7.2  11  5  17  7  15  6.3  I  5  18  7,3  16  7.3  13  4*5  19  7*5  17  7  14  5  20 to 27 missing  18  6  15  5  28  7  19  6,8  16  4.8  29  8  20  6.5  17  5  30  8  21  7  18  5.  51  8.  22  6.5  19  4.8  1, 1954  7,5  25  7  20  4,8  2  7.7  24  6.5  21  5  5  8  25 to 51 missed  22  5  4  7.5  s  s  2  5  TABLE XXXHI (Continued)  DEPARTURE BAT, B.C. C.  Temp. Date  (MEAN)  Eeb 24, 1954 e  Mar.  5  Temp, (MEAN)  . Date Mar. 19  25  5  20  26  4.8  21  27  5*2  22  28  5.5  23  1  5* 5  24  2  -5»B  25  5  6  26  4  5.2  27  5  4,7.  28  6  -5. '  7  5  30  8  5.5  31  9-  6«"..  Apr. 1  6, to 13 missing  2 3  10 11  29  7  Temp. (MEM)  Date Apr. 11  9.5  7  12 •  9.7  7.5  15  10  7.7  14  11  7.5  15  9.5  7,7  16  9.5  8  17  10  8  18  11.5  8  19  12  8.5  20  15.5  8  21  15.8  V«5  23  3.13© 5  6.7  23  15.5  6.7  24  12.5  7  25  11.5  7.7  26  11  14  6.7  4  8  27  11.5  15  6.7  5  8.5  28  11.8  16  6.2  6  9.5  29  11.5  17  6.5  7  9.5  50  10.5  18  6.8  8  9.5  1  10.5  19  7  9  8.7  2  11  20  7  10  8  5  10.5  May  TABLE XXXVII (Continued) DEPARTURE BAY, B. 0.  Date 4, 1934  C. Temp. (MEAN)  Date  C. Tempo (MEAN)  10  May 86  5  9  87  15.3  6  9  88  15.5  7  8.5  29  15.5  8  9  30  15.5  9  11  51  15  10  10.8  11  15  June 1  15.3  11  2  15.7  12  12.5  3  15.7  15  13.5  4  15.7  14  13.5  5  16  15  12.5  6  16.7  16  13  17  18.5  18  12  19  10  20  10.5  21  12.5  22  13.5  23  14.5  24  14,8  85  14,3  TABLE XXXVJI (Continued) HYJ3R0GRAPHIC  DATA  Samples taken at three foot level below surface DEPARTURE BAY Date  *  /oo Cl/kg  Temp.  19S.10  18*4  15.16  13  19120  19.0  13.12  14  19:45  19,0  12,86  15  20:55  18*0  15,60  16  22:50  17,4  13# 21  17  20:15  16.7  13 « 51  9:00  16.5  15.64  19  10:10  16.9  12® 15  20  11:55  17.5  12,71  21  14:00  .17.5  13.28  22  16:50  16. 6  13.81  23  16 :00  18.0  l3e 21  24  17:20  18*5  12,45  25  17:50  18.7  11,83  26  19:50  18.0  12.07  27  19:00  17*0  12.77  28  19:00  16.8  8.6  13$- 37  29  19:15  15-9  5  8.4  13.9©  30  19:00  17.7  8.5  12.89  9:00  17.7  8.5  11*71  June 12, 1954  18  July  C  Time  •  pH  1 2  TABLE XXXVH (Continued) DEPARTURE BAY, B. C, Temp.  pH  /oo 01/kg  19:05  19-. 0  8,63  12.10  4  12:00  18.0  8.37  13.47  5  13:50  17.4  8.4  14.08  6  14:05  16.8  8,4  14.10  7  16:40  17.1  8.5  13.37  8  17:30  17.6  8.5  14,05  9  17:35  16,7  8,4  14.75  10  18:55  17.0  8,35  14.46  19:16 -  17.0  •8.57  14.39  ls  19:10  17.0  8. 2  14.25  13  19:45  16.8  8.37  14,03  14  19:00  17.2  8,27  14.18  15  19:00  16.-0  8.45  14.18  16  19:05  8,17'  15,06  17  19:50  .14*. 6  8.0  15.59  18  9:10  15.8  8.2  11.52  19  11:25  17.2  8.4  10,16  SO  16:15  17.0  8.4  11© 1*5  SI  15:00  16.7  8,3 .  12.09  22  15:50  17,3  ' 8,27  12© 22  23  16:15  19.4  8.4  10.72  24  17:30  20,0  8.4  11.34-  25  17:30  20.4  8.4  11,63  Date July  Time  3, 1934  il-  "  C.  TABLE XXXVHContinued) DEPARTURE BAY, B.C. Time  C. Temp.  pH  /oo Cl/kg  J u l y 26, 1934  19:00  18.2  8,3  13.47  27  19:20  17.0  8,3^  14.37  28  19:25  17.4  8.37  14,60  29  21:40  17.4  8.7  14.91  30  8:45  16.5  8.3  14.15  31  9:15  16.2  8,4  13.87  1  10:15  15.7-  8,4  14.70  2  9:00  15.8  8,35  14.43  3  • 14:20  15.6  8.45  15.82  4  15:50  15*- 3-  8.3  14.14  5  17:20  14.3  8* 3  14,89  6  19:45  15.0  8.6  14.92  7  20:30  15.0  8.6  14,76  8  19:20  16.7  8.3  10.36  9  i9:10 '  17 3  8.3  10.00  10  18:50'  18.0  8.5  10.76  ' 11  22:20  18.0  8.5  10.90  12  19:00  17,5  8.5  15.18  13  19:15  19.2"  8.4  12.70  14  19:40  18.8  8.37  113 & 32  15  19:15  20,4.  8.37  11.91  16  9:35  19.7  8.3  12.58  17  11:15  18.2  8,-37?  13.38  Date  Aug,  A  TABLE XXKVII (Continued) DEPARTURE BAY, B.C. Time  0, Temp.  pH  /oo 01/kg  13J55  17.0  8.2  14. 34  19  14:40  19.0  8,27  15,56  20  21:20  18.8  8.5  15,07  21  16:45  19.4  8,5  13.02  22  17:30  19.3  8.4  13,50  25  17:40  18*8  8,55  13.83  24  17S50  18.8  8,4  14.02  25  17 :45  19.0  8.4  14,01  26  • 16:45  20.1  8,57  14.11  27  19:00  18*6  8.4  14.48  28  18:55'  17.7"  8,5  14.65  29  17:50  16.7  8*3  15.17  50  19:25  16.7  8.5  ...14.57  31  23.20  17.8  8.6.  13*28  1  13:50  18*7  8,37  13.56  2  14; 40  18,8  8,4  13.82  3  17.40  19,5'  8*6  13.47  4  16.45  19.1  8.37  13.96  5  17.50  18.0  8.35  14,05  6  19:40  16.7  8,4  14. 63  8  17:00  17*5  8*4 •'•  14.55  12  17:00  14,. 0  8.1  15.42  15  8:30  12.0  7.9  15.62  Date Aug. 18, 1954  Sept.  TABLE XXXVUi;Continued) DEPARTURE BAY, B.C. Time  C. Temp.  pH  Cl/kg  9:00  11,3  7,9  15.85  15  10'tOO  11.7  8.0  15.91  17  9:00  14.1  8,3  12,61  18  9:00  14,0  . 8.4  15.45  19  17:00  15,1  8,4  15.95  20  13:00  15.0  8,4  15.96  24  16:45  1*3$ 5  8,5  15,08  27  16:45  14,2  8,3  14.48  Date Sept. 14, 1934  °/oo  TABLE XXXVIII HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Surface Sample GORE AVE, WHARF, VANCOUVER, B.C. /oo Cl/kg  11.4  14.73  15  11,2  13.86  16  11« H  14,99  17  11,0  14.48  19  11*0  14.05  20  10.0  14,86  21  10.6  15© 15  24  10.1  12,56  26  10,0  14.15  27  9,8  14.43  28  9*8  14,29  29  9,8  14,09  30  10.0  14,79  51  11.0  15,90  5  10.0  14*20  4  10,0  14, 66  5  10.0  13.98  6  10.0  13.00  7  9.5  13.42  9  9* 5  14.30  10  9.3  14.59  October 14, 1951  November-  c Temp.  Date  :  TABLE  38  (Continued)  GORE AYE. IfflARE, VANCOUVER, B. C*  C • Temp*  /oo Cl/kg  9.5  13.67  14  9.0  14, 33  16  9,0  17  9.0  14.40  18  8,4  13.94  19  8. S  13.37  20  8,3  13,96  21  7,8  14,19  23  7*8  14*22  25  8,0  14,80  26.  8.D  14*99  27  7,8  14.95  28  7,8  15.08  1  8.0  15,21  Date  Time  November 13, 1931  December  "3  11; 00  7.9  14.71  5  16 £00  7.8  14.70  7  16 SOO  7.7  15*24  9  16 500  7,5  14*63  11  16 500  7,4  15.02  12  16 500  7*5  15 & 33  14  12:00  7.5  15.88  15  15:30  7,8  15*57  16  16:00  7.8  15.04  158  TABLE 38  (Continued)  GORE AVE. vvBARE, VANCOUVER, B. C. Time  0. Temp,  /oo 01/kg  17, 1931  16:00  7.6  13,74  18  16:00  7,8  11.91  19  16:00  7,5  9.97  21  16 :30  7*5  13,67  22  16:30  7.4  12© *71  23  17:oo  7.4  14.84  24  16:30  7.4  14.53  26  14:30  7.8  15. 29  28  14:30  7,8  15.50  29  14:50  7,4  1*5© 21  30  15:10  7,7  15.40  31  15:00  7.5  15,73  2, 1932  14:50  7,5  15, 21  4  15:00  7,5  1*3© 51  7.5  15,50  Date  January  5 6  16:30  7.4  14.97  7  15:45  7,4  15,57  9  14:15  7,8  15,40  11  16:30  7,5  14,86  12  16:30  7.4  14.92  13  15:00  6,8  15.05  14  16:00  6.0  14.35  15  16:00  5o 9  14.69  TABLE 38  (Continued)  G-GRE ATE. WHARE, VANCOUVER, B, C. Time  c. Temp.  °/oo Cl/kg  16, 193S  15:00  '6.5  14.83  18  16:00  6.8  14.57  19  17:00  6.8  14.75  20  15:30  6.8  15.02  21  16:15  6.8  15.69  22  16:30  6.8  15.21  23  15:oo  7.0  15.40  26  17:00  . 6.2  14.92  27  16:30  6.4  15,57  29  15:30  6.5  15*84  50  14:20  6.0  15.69  1  15:30  5,6  14.62  5  16:50  5.8  15*42  '5  16 :50  6.0  15,95  6  i6:oo  6.0  15.19  8  17:00  6.5  15*98  9  17:00  6.5  15 « 31  10  17:00  6.5  15.40  11  17:00  6.4  15 o 21  13  15:30  5.0  15,47  20  15:50  •6.5  15.62  27  12:00  7.2  12,42  29  16:30  6.5  10.44  be  TABLE 38 (Continued) GORE AVE. -TSBAHF, VANCOUVER, : B.. C . .,  Date e  March.  April  0*  /oo  Time  Temp.  01/kg  3, 1932  17:15  6.0  14*15  5  17:00  7*0  15,13  7  16:15  6*8  14,95  12  14:00  8*2  13,26  15  17:00  7*0  14,28  16  14:50  7*0  13,76  19  12:00  8*5  14.03  25  17:00  7i5  14,36  25  11:50  8*2  14. 63  26  17:00  7.5  14*33  28  .14:00  8.4  14*18  29  14,50  7*7  14,39  50  16*05  7.0  13*09  51  17:10  7.5  11,83  1  14:00  7.7  2  16:15  7.5  13*41  6  16 250  7.5  14.73  7  15:50  8.0  14.13  9  11:50  8.0  14.19  11  15:00  8,0  13* 73  16  14:40'  9.6  13 © 25  22  ll:so  9.0  14.54  25  15:50  9,0  14.19  TABES  38 (Continued)  GORE AVE, WHARF, VANCOUVER, B, C,  April  May  June  0,  /oo  Time  Temp,  01/kg  25, 1932  14550  9.0  14.02  28  16150  10.0  12.70  50  14 500  10,5 .  7  15:00  11,5  12.96  11  17 550  10.5  xx«xs  15  17:00  10,9  10,81  14  15540  16  16 550  Ho 5  10,95  18  14:50  12.0  11.40  21  14:15  X2 & 5  XX# Xt5  25  14:00  11.5 -  10,96  26  11:50  10.5  X*3© XS  28  14:45  12.3  11.58  50  15S00  12.2  11.08  2  9:00  15.4  7.72  4  11:30  15.2  9.95  6  11:00  15.0  .8* 14  8  15:50  14.2  9.50  11  14:00  15,7  7,25  15  11:00  1*3 •> S  8.71  15  17:00  12.2  12.74  18  11:30  15.0  9.48  22  l6:oo  12.5  11.17  11.16  TABLE  38  (Continued)  GORE ATE. WHARF, VANCOUVER, B. 0.  June  July  August  c.  /oo Cl/kg  Time  Temp.  24. 1932  19 tOO  14.5  8.40  25  12:15  14,6  8.61  27  15:15  15.0  9.15  28  12:00  29  15:00  15,3  9.79  2  10:10  15.2  9.15  4  15:50  14.0  10.61  6  10:00  14.7  7.75  8  15:10  15,0  10.16  9  12:15  14.5  10.55  11  17:20  13© 3  10.39  13  11:15  13,0  10.05  16  10:00  13« 2  12*58  18  14:45  13.5  20  11:05  14.5  10,69  22  16:00  14.7  11.07  23  11:00  14,8  10,68  25  14:00  15.8  8.81  27  13:45  15,6  9,88  29  16t30  14,2  11*17  30  12:30  14,9  10.30  1  17:20  15,6  11.53  4  15:15  15.0  11,42  "f  8.  28  TABLE 38  (Continued)  WHAEE, VANCOUVER, B. C. Time  Ce Temp*  /oo Cl/kg  5,-1932  16:20  15© 2  12.57  6  12:20  15 » 3  11.97  •:8-  16:45  13.6  15,55  10  11:45  15.8  12,84  12  15,35  13,0  15*80  13  12:15  14,2  11*76  16  14:10  13,8  15.10  18  11:40  15.0  11,86  19  9:30  14.8  12«. 01  20  12:30  15.2  10*86  22  17:05  15.5  11.54  24  12:00  16.5  10.23  26  15:00  15,6  11.05  27  12:00  16 . 5,  29  14:45  14.8  11.41  September 1  16:20  13,5  12.89  3  12:30  12*. 9  13.77  6  12:30  IS. 2  14.13  8  14.45  14.2  12*57  9  17:40  13.9  13* 64  10  13:15  13.8  13. 59  12  17:30  12.7  14.13  14  13:15  15.8  11,88  Date August  9,63  TABLE 38  (Continued)  .©ORE AVE. WHARF, VANCOWEH, B. 0 . Time  c. Temp.  /oo Cl/kg  16, 1932  17:15  13.0  13,79  17  10:30  12.4  14.28  19  17:20  -LI* 5  13.50  21  17:20  12.5  10,87  23  13:15  11.7  14,30  24  14:10  12*0  13.77  27  14:30  11.8  14.55  28  17:15  11*8  14.09  1  13:00  11.5  14.69  4  17:00  12.0  14.47  6  15:45  11.5  14,15  8  12:00  11© 0  11  17:00  11.0  14, 69  13  13:30  11.0  14.73  15  11:30  10,9  14,00  17  15:30  10.8  14*07  19  15:30  10.5  14.32  22  11:00  10.0  14.26  25  16:oo  10,0  14.24  27  11:00  9,8  14. 29  29  10:30  9.4  14.53  2  16:45  9.5 •  14.84  3  16:30  9,4  14.48  5  11:00  9.3  13.48  Date  October  November  165 TABLE  38  (Continued)  GORE AVI. YfflARl, VANCOUVER, B, C. 0.  Date  Time  0/  00  Temp.  01/kg  9;30  9.0  13.76  10  16:00  9.1  14,36  12  14:50  9.0  12,66  16  15:00  9.0  13,56  18  14:30  9.0  8," 1932  •  Samples taken at zero tide l e v e l  December  19  14:30  5.0  12,17  21  9:00  5.0  12.27  24  16:00  4.2  26  11:30  4.0  14.71  29  14:00  5.2  14.78  SO  13:50  3  11:30  4*3  14,04  6  15:45  4.0  14.39  9  14:30  4.0  14,16  10  14:00  4.0  14,93  13  9.'30  4.0  15.14  15  12:00  4.1  15,44  17  9:30  4.0  15.80  20  10:15  4.0 -  14.86  22  16:00  4.1  15,88  24  10:30  4.0  15.67  27  13:15  4.4  15,63  14,90  TABLE  38  (Continued)  CORE AVE. WHARF, VANCOUVER, B. C. /oo Cl/kg  14;30  4.1  16.13  12:30  4.0  . 15.69  3, 1935  10:00  4.0  14.78  5  15:30  4.0  14.50  7  12:00  4.0  15.76  9  9:45  4.0  15.45  11  16 215  4,4  15.52  13  15:00  4.1  15,83  14  9:45  4.3  16,04  17  i6:oo  4.0  15.00  19  16:30  4.1  14.76  21  10:30  4.1  14.38  23  9:00  4.0  15.09  25  9:30  4,1  15.24  28  13:00  4,2  30  16:30  4,0  15,57  2  15:00  4.1  15.44  4  9:30  4,2  32  7  11:15  5.0  15.75  8  14:45  5,0  15.75  11  13:00  4.2  15.45  15  11:00  5,1  15.66  16  10:30  4,2  15.76  Time  December 29,  1932  31 January  February  c. Tamp.  Date  TABLE 38  (Continued)  GORE ATE, WHARF, VANCOUVER, ' B, C,  March.  °*  /oo Gl/kg  lo;50  4,2  14.79  20  17:00  5.0  21  15:15  5.0  25  9:50  4*0  28  14:50  4,0  2  15:50  4,1  15.26  4  9:30  «5« 1  15.26  7  10:00  4*0  14*96  8  14:30  4.1  15.03  10  10:00  4.1  15.76  11  9:45  4*0  15.79  13  15:30  4,2  15,46  15  11:00  4.3  15,44  17  15.*45  4,0  15.07  18  9:45  4*0  15. 36  21  14:30  4*5  14,85  22  15:30  4,0  14.98  23  15:00  4.1  15*28  25  11:00  4*2  15.35  .te  Time  • 18,1933  Temp,  Surface Samples  April  30  14:30  7,9  14.63  31  14:00  7.9  14. 21  1  13:00  7.9  14. 68  TAB:•E GORE ATE. 1  May  June  (Continued)  ', VANCOUVER, B. C. Time  C. Temp.  /oo Cl/kg  4, 1933  15:45  8*2  14,98  6  17:00  8.3  15,44  10  17:15  8.0  15.57  15  9:00  7*8  15 » 2*7  19  16:00  9.0  15.55  SO  17:00  9.5  15.06  21  16 :00  9.2  15.15  24  16 220  9*0  15,06  27  16:10  9..5  5  11:30  9,3  6  16:30  9,3  9  16:30  10,0  11  14:50  11.0  15  16:oo  9.5  15.75  17  17:30  10,0  15*08  19  16:30  11.2  11,48  22  14:00  10,5  11.54  26  14:30  10.5  11,29  29  16:30  10*7  12,59  1  11:00  11.1  11.17  3  12:40.  12* 1  10,89  5  16:oo  11.4  10,72  7  11:10  10,8  11© 22  Date April  38  TABLE 38  (Continued)  GORE ATE. YJBARF, TANCOUTER, B. C. Time  0. Temp.  /oo 01/kg  16:20  10.8  11,93  10  9:35  11.2  10.08  13  16:30  12.4  11.88  15  16,55  13.6  9,61  16  14:30  14.0  8,47  19  14:50  15.2  10,01  21  12:00  13.5  8,54  24  11:00  15.0  8.12  26  17:00  IS # 5  10,66  29  12:00  15,5  7.42  30  17:15  15.5  8,12  3  16:00  5  11:00  13 e 2  8.83  7  11:40  15,4  8.71  8  11:10  13 » 2  8.35  11  16:30  13.5  10.51  13  15:30  15.8  7.66  15  10:15  14.8  8.11  17  ' 16:15  14.5  10.29  19  12:00  15.0  8.40  22  10:00  15.0  7.72  24  15:15  15.8  8.35  27  15:00  15.0  10.05  Date June  9, .1933  8.83  TABLE 38  (Continued)  CORE AVE. WHARF,'. VANCOUVER, B. 0, ite  July  August  c.  /oo Cl/kg  Time  Temp,  28, 1933  17 J00  15.4  8,96  29  13; 00  15.5  8,35  31  16:00  15,7  8.02  4  15:30  14.4  10.69  5  13:00  14,0  10.94  7  17:00  14*3  11.96  9  11:00  15.0  11.45  11  17,0  17.2  9.17  12  12:00  16.4  9.59  15  17:00  15.4  12.89  18  16*30  14,4  12,17  19  12:30  15.7  10*23  22  11:5©  14.5  11,55  25  15:50  14,8  12,63  26  12:30  14.4  12,59  29  12:00  13.3  13.55  1  11:30  13© S  12.88  9  10:00  12*5  12*80  11  17:15  12.0  12.84  13  16:00  12*0  12,88  15  16:00  11.5  12.42  16  11:00  12© <5  10.28  18  14:45  11,5  IS© 39  20  13:45  12.0  15.01  171 TABES  38  (Continued)  GORE AYE. WHARF, VANCOUVER, B. C.  Time 16:45  11.0  12,81  83  10:15  10*5  14,10  28  17:30  11.0  11,98  39  17:00  11.0  IS** 31  30  11:00  10.8  12,31  3  14115  11,0  14.15  4  17:15  11*0  13,58  "7  11:30 ,  11.0  12,96  13  9:30  10.5  14.28  14  8:20  10.0  18  17:30  10*0  20  15:00  10*0  21  10:30  9.5  24  15:30  9,8  15.77  51  16:30  9.3  11.87  1  16:30  9,0  12*75  2  14:00  9*0  l i e 1*5  4  11:00  9,0  13*81  7  11:15  9,0  14*49  9  16:00  9*0  13.64  10  11:30  8,9  13,58  14  11:00  8.7  15,69  15  16:50  9.0  15,69  18  11:40  8.9  13.21  Dat;e ' 22, 1933  October  November  0  c. Temp.  /oo Cl/kg  TABLE 38  (Continued)  GORE AVE. WHARF, VANCOUVER, B. 0.  ^ate  Temp.  Cl/kg  14:30  9.2  13,77  9:45  8,7  12.19  2 7  16:00  8*5  13.40  29  16:45  8.0  14.33  30  15:00  8.0  12.56  2  10:15  8.5  15.90  6  16:15  8.0  14.38  7  11:00  8.2  15,08  9  11:15  7,8  13,00  13  16; 15  7*5  12.95  16  9:00  7*0  14.28  18  10:50  7.2  14.31  20  16:50  7,2  14.90  23  11:15  6*9  14.08  27  15:30  6.9  14.47  29  10:00  7.0  12.89  3, 1934  16:20  7,5  13*10  5  13:45  7.0  13.16  6  11:45  7*0  15.33  10  16:30  7.0  11.10  12  17:15  7.0  13*69  13  17:00  7.0  14.41  16  14:00  7.4  14.92  17  16:30  7.2  14.43  November 21, 1953, 2 5  December  January  Time  TABLE  38  (Continued).  GORE AVE. WEAK?, VANCOUVER, B. C. Bate January  February  March  c.  /oo  Time  Temp.  Cl/kg  20, 1934  10:45  6,5  13.43  24  16:45"  6.0  15,58  26  l6:oo  6,5  13,77  27  9:45  7.0  14.21  31  16:30  7.5  13,73  2  11:45  7.2  13.74  5  15:30  7,0  12.51  7  16:30  7.5  12& 92  10  10:15  7,8  13,50  14  10:15  7,5  14*42  15-  14:30  7,5  14. 58  16  10:15  7© 2  14.50  17  15:30  7.8  14,15  20  15:30  7.5  ,14.30  21  17:50  7,2  15.86  24  10:00  7.2  14.25  27  14:25  7*5  14.12  28  15:30  7,5  IS* 28  3  10:50  7,5  14,06  6  17:00  7.8  13,83  7  16.45  7.2  13.50  10  10:30  7,6  14.47  12  16:15  8.0  14*69  14  16:30  8.0  14.63  TABLE  38  (Continued)  GORE AVE. WHAHFj VANCOUVER, B. C.  u  March  A  Pi"il  a  x  Time  Temp,  17, 1934  10:15  8.0  14.59  1  9  11^15  8,2  14.55  2  1  17'.15  8,5  14.35  2  4  10:00  8.0  14,09  2  8  16:50  8,5  13,55  2 9  16:30  8.2  15,16  S I  10:30  8.7  12.91  3  16:50  8.6  15.59  4  9:15  8,7  18,48  7  10:00  8.9  10  16:50  9.0  15,59  11  17:15  9,2  14.02  14  9:50  9.0  14,08  16  16:15  10.0  , 12.94  18  16:45  11.0  12.80  21  15:20  12.0  12.70  11:45  11.4  12.58  25  17:00  11.5  10.61  28  10:50  11,0  10.61  50  15:00  11.5  10.47  2  11:15  11.0  8.65  5  11:20  10.0  8.82  7  15:50  10.2  10.99  9  16:50  11*0  . 10.46  e  25  May  '  Cl/kg  TABLE  asm  HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Samples taken a t 6 foot l e v e l below surface on daylight flood t i d e . CRESCENT C Time  Temp.  Cl/kg  13:30  14,0  15.67  22  17:00  14.0  15.57  25  17100  13.8  14.03  30  8:50  12*0  15.43  lune 1  10:30  13.5  15.18  5  16:00  15.7  11.44  7  15:30  15,3  11.09  12  8:00  13.5  15.62  15  11:00  17.. 7  15.47  19  14:30  18.5  14.86  22  16:30  19.5  12.88  27  8:00  17.0  13.77  29  8:30  17.7  14.01  July 3  15:00  17.8  9.43  8  17:00  17.7  11.91  11  8:00  15,8  12.61  13  10:00  16.7  13.74  I  13:30  18.0  14.92  17  16:30  18.8  10.42  19  17:00  19.5  10.08  D  ^te  % o  May 18, 1933  5  TABLE . XXXIX (Cont inued) HYDROGRAPHIC  DATA  Samples taken, a t 6 foot l e v e l below surface on daylight flood tide. . CRESCENT  Temp.  /oo 01/kg.  17:00  20*0  11.10  24  17:00  22.0  11.05  26  8:00  20.0  11.54  28  8:30  18,7  11.92  31  14:00  19.6  12.93  2  16:00  19,0  10.41  ?  17:00  19.7  11.97  9  8:00  17.3  14.05  18  17:00  21.5  12.12  18  17:00  21.0  12.25  23  8:00  19.2  13.07  25  8:50  19.0  13.51  28  13:00  17.7  14.15  30  15:00  15.8  1  14:30  18.5  14,35  6  8830  15.3  13.86  8  8:30  15.5  14.31  11  13:00  15*. 3  14.75  13  15:00  15.1  14.03  15  16:00  15.3  12.38  18  16:00  15.2  11.66  July 21, 1933  Aug*  Sept.  c.  Time  Date  TABLE XXXK (Continued) . HyDHOGBAPHIC DATA Samples taken at 6 foot l e v e l below surface on daylight flood tide. GBESCINT c. Temp.  /oo Cl/kg  8:00  13*5  11.94  25  10:00  11.3  13.50  29  16:00  13.5  14,70  30  13:00  12.0  15.04  2  16:30  14.5  . 14.99  4  17:00  15.0  15.33  6  8:00  12.7  15.60  10  11:30  12.5  15.30  12  13130  11.0  15.39  14  14:00  11.3  15.40  16  15:30  11.0  14.97  18  16:oo  10.7  14.57  20  17:00  9.5  14.11  23  9:30  9.0  14.58  25  11:30  10.7  15.09  27  13:30  10.8  15.08  31  15:30  10.2  15.20  3  8:00  9.0  14.42  6  8:30  8.5  15.31  8  10! 00  9.0  15.69  11  11:30  9.0  15.10  Date 21, 1933  Oct.  Time  TABLE  XXXK  (Continued)  B2DR0GRAPBI0 DATA Samples taken a t 6 foot l e v e l below surface on daylight f l o o d tide* CBESCMT Time  o. Temp.  13, 1933  13:30  9.3  14.25  15  14:30  9.0  14.63  17  15:00  9.0  14.84  20  9:00  8.5  14.90  23  11:00  10.0  14.90  27  14:00  8.0  15.53  2  8:00  7.7  14.45  4  8:00  5.5  14.32  6  9:00  7,0  14.68  8  10:30  6.7  13.93  12  13:00  6.5  15.36  14  14:00  6,5  15.31  20.  9:00  6,2  14.02  26  13:00 '  4,6  15,25  28  14:00  6.0  15.20  2, 1934  8:00  -6*5  14.73  4  9:30  5iQ  14,25  6  10:00  7.2  15.54  8  10:30  6.7  15.35  12  13:00  7.0  14.23  17  17:00  6.7  14.55  Date  0  /  /OO  Cl/kg  TABLE XXXIX (Continued) EYDROOPAPHIC DATA Samples taken  6 foot l e v e l below surface on daylight flood t i d e . CRESCENT /oo Gl/kg  9:00  7.0  15.50  25  13:00  6.7  14.84  27  13:00  7.0  15.83  29  14:30  7.2  14.87  31  8:00  7.5  14,49  2  8:00  8.0  14.87  6  8:30  7.3  15,36  20  8:30  10.0  15.22  22  8:30  10.0  15,54  24  11:00  10.0  15.70  27  14:30  9.7  15,52  30  17:00  11.2  14,61  5  8:30  10.7  14,67  7  9:30  10.5  15.52  9  13:00  11.0  14.41  11  16:00  12.2  14.71  20  8:00  13.5  15.84  24  13:30  15.3  15.14  26  15:30  16.0  13,95  4  8:00  13.0  14.83  Jan* 19, 1954  Feb*  Mar,  Apr*  May  o  Temp.  Date  Time  e  TABLE XL HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Samples taken at S meter depth from surface, PRINCE RUPERT Date Eeb,  Mar«  Apr.  0  c.  /oo Gl/kg  Time  Temp*  1, 1954  16 500  4.5  14.18  5  16 500  4.4  15.11  8  16 515  4,7  15.08  IS  16 5 50  5*1  15.21  15  16 500  6,0  15.71  19  16:00  6,3  16.06  2S •  16 530  5*6  15.92  26  16 550  5*4  16.04  1  16530  5.8  16,01  5  165 50  5,5  15.92  8  16 5 30  . 5,8  12  17 500  6,8  15*83  15  18 500  6.2  15.76  19  16 500  6.2  16.OS  22  16 540  6,8  15.90  26  16 5 30  7.2  15 & 51  29  18 500  6*7  16,38  2  17 5 30  6,8  8,1  16*66  5  17 500  6.8  8.0  16*31  9  17 500  6.4  8*0  15.64  12  17 5 00  6,9  7,95  15.69  pH  15 « 8J5  TABLE XL  (Continued)  HYDROGRAPHIC DATA Samples taken a t 2 .mster depth from surface. PRINCE RUPERT Date  Time  c. Temp.  pH  /oo Cl/kg  Apr. 16, 1954  17J00  7.0  8.0  16.21  25  •17:00  10.0  8,5  15.27  27  17:00  9.0  8,2  13.58  50  17:00  8.2  8.15  15. 26  3  17:00  7.8  8,0  15.40  7  17:50  7.8  8*08  12,99  10  17:30  8.4  8,0  12. 98  14  17:30  9.4  8.1  14.92  17  17!30  9,3  8.0  13.41  21  17 2 30  10.3  7.95  11,49  24  17:30  10.9  8,1  12*58  28  16:00  10,2  8.15  13.10  31  17:00  10.3  8,18  May  June  5  9:50  12. 6  12.58  7  17:00  12. 3  8.3  12.92  11  17:30  11. 6  8.25  IL2© 51  14  17:00  10.4  8.25  12.27  18  17:00  10.3  8© 2  12,59  21  17:oo  10.0  8.2  10,95  25  17 :00  11.2  8,25  13.44  28  17:30  11.5  8.26  14. 32  TABLE  XL (Continued)  B2DR0G-PAPHIC DATA Samples taken a t 2 meter depth from surface. PRINCE RUPERT pH  o, • /oo Cl/kg  11.0  8© 25  14. 22  17:00  11.5  8.4  13,58  9  17:00  IX© 9  8,4  10,86  12  17:00  10.5  8.25  X3© 25  16  16:30  10.7  8,3  13.74  19  17:00  11.8  8.2  11,56  23  17:30  10.5  8.2  12,65  26  18:00  12.7  8,4  14.34  30  17:00  11.6  8.25  14.74  2  12.6  8.2  X2© 83  6  12*9 '  8© 2  13.02  9  13.0-  8,3  13,96  13  X3©- 3  8,2  15.17  c  Time  " Temp.  By 1934  20:30  5  

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