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Orientation surveys in a changing district : a study of environment and attitudes as they affect the… Cobbin, Allan Lewis 1954

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ORIENTATION SURVEYS; IN A CHANGING DISTRICT A study of environment and attitudes as they affect the Alexandra Neighbourhood House area 1953-54. by Allan Lewis Cobbin Thesis Submitted i n Part i a l Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK Accepted as conforming to the standard required for the degree of Master of Social Work School of Social Work 19.54 The University of Bri t i s h Columbia ABSTRACT This thesis deals with the problems confronting a Neighbourhood House in a d i s t r i c t which has been affected by business and industrial encroachment, growth of a r t e r i a l roads, "isolation" of certain sec-tions of the d i s t r i c t . It questions the effective-ness of the agency's present role in such a d i s t r i c t and suggests possible changes. It further points out the feelings of many of the residents toward the dis-t r i c t , their opinions about Alexandra House and their programme suggestions for adults and children. The social welfare significance of this thesis is that i t illustrates the future effectiveness of a group work agency i n a changing community. In addition, i t indicates what adjustments are necessary i n order that the agency may most effectively meet the needs of their membership i n such a community. Finally, i t notes what effect the changing d i s t r i c t has had on i t s residents. The principal method used i n this thesis was a survey (a schedule) which was composed of three parts: (1) General questions to residents about the agency and the d i s t r i c t . (2 ) Specific questions to parents and (3) Specific questions to senior citizens, teen-agers, etc. The results were analyzed and presented i n tabular form using cross-tabulation of specific questions to ascertain more meaningful results. Some charts and an a r t e r i a l photograph were also used to present a more descriptive graphic picture of certain areas of the d i s t r i c t . The findings of this thesis show: (1) that the future of the agency is limited to a fifteen or twenty year period i n view of industrial encroachment and the life-expectancy of most buildings of the d i s t r i c t , (2) that the d i s t r i c t has become more transient than formerly, (3) that the d i s t r i c t has been divided into at least five "pocket areas" by the growth of art e r i a l roads and the construction of new bridge spans. These findings indicate that the agency should investigate the following p o s s i b i l i t i e s : (1) offering new programme, (2) offering increased programmes to adults, (3) i n i t i a -ting at least two more extension programmes and increas-ing the service to the one already i n operation, (4) carefully investigating any future changes i n the dis-t r i c t which may affect i t t role i n the d i s t r i c t . By so doing, the agency w i l l be able to offer maximum ser-vice to residents of the eastern section of the K i t s i -lano d i s t r i c t . •ACKNOWLEDGMENT The writer would like to acknowledge the many hours of fine work done i n collecting survey informa-tion by the staff and students of Alexandra Neigh-bourhood House during the 1952-53 Programme Year. Much information presented in this thesis from the survey would have been impossible without their able assistance. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter 1. Historical Summary of Neighbourhood Page Houses' Development  Tentative desirable standards of Neighbourhood Houses. Past and present programmes of Alexandra House, comparative s t a t i s t i c s . Similar services offered in surrounding areas. Definition of agency's "Effective Area". Membership Maps from 1951-53 1 Chapter 2. Detailed Descriptive Summary of the Eastern Section of the Kitsilano District  Growth of ar t e r i a l roads. The effect of the new Granville Street Bridge. Churches and schools. Social Agencies. Parks and Playgrounds. Private recreation, Mil i t a r y reserves and c i v i l buildings. Demolition and reconstruction, commercialization and industrialization. Reactions and resistance to industrialization. The type and condition of housing 14 Chapter 3 . Attitudes, Reactions and Feelings of the Residents of the Eastern Section of the Kitsilano District _ The residents' feelings towards their d i s t r i c t . The transiency factor. Is the d i s t r i c t a transitory area? Residents' attitudes towards the agency, it$._ purpose and programme. The degree of interest i n the agency. Programme suggestions from the residents. How and where residents employ their leisure hours 3 5 Chapter 4. The Future Role of Alexandra Neighbour-• hood House.  Physical aspects of the agency's "Effective Area". Resistance to industrial development; Re-evaluation of the agency's future role. . Long and Short term plans for the agency. The value of present and future programme. The "Pocket Areas". Conclusions... 55 APPENDICES Page 1. Bibliography (a) Background References 72 (b) Sources for t h i s study 72 (c) Schedule 74 TABLES, and CHARTS IN THE TEXT (a) Tables Table 1 Comparative Programme S t a t i s t i c s from 1948-52. Number of Groups* Enrolment, Attendance, Regularly Scheduled, Special Events,etc 7 Table 2 Comparative Programme S t a t i s t i c s from 1948-52. Services to I n d i -viduals, Unduplicated Count of Members, Volunteers, Students 8 Table 3 Residents' Future Plan as Affected by the Construction of the new Granville Street Bridge 17 Table 4 Residents''Reasons for Moving into the K i t s i l a n o D i s t r i c t . . . 3 6 Table 5 Residents' Future Plans 37 Table 6 Future Plans i n Relation to Feel-ings About the Area 3 8 Table 7 Length of Residence i n Relation to Future Plans 41 Table 8 School C l a s s i f i c a t i o n of Children i n Relation to Future Plans 42 Table 9 Length of Residency i n Relation to Friends 43 Table 10 Length of Residence i n Relation to Degree of Interest i n the agency 46 Table 11 Programme Interests 47 Table 12 Knowledge of Agency i n Relation to Length of Residence 50 Table 13 The Transiency Factor i n the Play-school at Alexandra Neighbourhood House 5 6 Page Table 14 Cumulative Registration of Children and Adult Members of Alexandra Neighbourhood House 65 (b) Charts Figure 1 D i s t r i b u t i o n of Membership 1951 12A Figure 2 D i s t r i b u t i o n of Membership 1952 12B Figure 3 D i s t r i b u t i o n of Membership 1953 12C Figure 4 A e r i a l Photograph of A r t e r i a l Thoroughfares i n the D i s t r i c t . 16 Figure 5 Flow of T r a f f i c over Granville Street Bridge and " c l o v e r l e a f s " 19 Figure 6 Cumulative Registration at Alexandra Neighbourhood House 63 ORIENTATION SURVEYS IN A CHANGING DISTRICT A study of environment and attitudes as they affect the Alexandra Neighbourhood House area 1953-54. Chapter 1 HISTORICAL SUMMARY OF NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSES' DEVELOPMENT.  The term "Neighbourhood House" is one which originated i n America. It is now used almost interchangeably with the terms "Settlement House" and "Neighbourhood Centre". In the book "Readings i n the Development of Settlement Work", i t is noted that: "The terms 'Settlement Houses' and 'Neighbourhood Houses* are often confusing to the reader when used interchange-ably. Historically, the word originated i n England and was used to describe people who settled i n a working class neighbourhood i n order to better understand the prevailing conditions and help to improve them. The term 'Neighbour-hood House' is American i n origin and is used as a term denoting an activity centre for people of a particular neighbourhood." 1. Regardless of the interchange of names, the fact that the neighbourhood is used as a base of operation is universally accepted. The f i r s t Neighbourhood House i n the City of Vancouver was Alexandra Neighbourhood House which was established as a Social Group Work Agency i n 1938. Prior to that time, the Neighbourhood House was the Alexandra Non-Sectarian Children's Orphanage. The Board of Alexandra Neighbourhood House i s nominated at the annual meeting of Alexandra Community Activities (the parent body of Alexandra Neighbourhood House) and i s , i n actuality the Alexandra Neighbourhood House Committee of the Alexandra Community 1 . Pacey, Lorene, M. Readings i n the Development of Settle- ment Work,Association Press, New York, 1 9 5 0 . - 2 -Activities body. Alexandra Neighbourhood House has financial autonomy and, in such a role, deals directly with the Community Chest of Greater Vancouver for it*-- finances, not through the Alexandra Community Activities body. RELATIVE STANDARDS, OF ALEXANDRA NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE. In reviewing the activities of Alexandra Neighbourhood House, i t was f e l t advisable to l i s t suitable c r i t e r i a of Neighbourhood Houses and examine the work being done by Alexan^ dra Neighbourhood House i n the light of these c r i t e r i a . The c r i t e r i a selected are drawn from an article by Jean Maxwell and John McDowell entitled "We Believe" (a tentative statement of desirable standards for Settlements and Neighbourhood Centres.) The following is an excerpt from the a r t i c l e : '"We believe that our most decisive concern should be neighbourhood l i f e and i t s development. We are con-cerned with strengthening family l i f e and therefore we work with a l l age groups. We are concerned with the strengthening of relationships among community groups of different cultural, economic, religious and social backgrounds. We are concerned about the rela-tionship of the neighbourhood to the whole community. To achieve individual growth and good human relations requires good living conditions. Therefore, a settle-ment's board, staff and membership work together for adequate and just conditions, housing, health and employment and for c i v i l rights and social security. A settlement f u l f i l l s i t s purpose by providing inter-group experiences for people of a l l ages, regardless of race, creed, nationality or p o l i t i c a l belief, living together i n a circumscribed geographical area. To pro-vide these experiences, i t is imperative that profession-a l leadership is provided, equipped with f u l l under-standing and knowledge of human needs and capacities and of the process of individual and group relations, community organization and social action. We believe that the neighbourhood centre should be able to define by boundaries the neighbourhood i t serves and 1 to explain why these boundaries are real." It is recognized that although the above statement is of a very general nature and is written to encompass a l l Neigh-bourhood Houses; i t is sufficiently basic so.that It can be used i n evaluating the service of one particular agency. In reference to the c r i t e r i a , the programme of Alex-andra Neighbourhood House is set up with the view to serving a l l age groups regardless of cultural, economic, religious and social backgrounds. As the Executive Director has noted: "In short then, the agency offers programmes to a l l those persons who live i n i t s area of service, who f i l l the membership requirements and who 2 are able to benefit to any extent from group experience." The agency too, i n i t ^ r role as a Neighbourhood House, is concerned about the relationship of the neighbourhood to the whole community. This can perhaps be best illustrated by two examples: F i r s t , i n the F a l l of every year, the agency holds a Neighbourhood Coffee Party to which i s invited representatives of a l l church groups i n the area, the Kitsilano Community Centre, representatives from the Family Welfare Bureau, Metropolitan Health Unit, West Unit City Social Service, Catholic and Children's Aid Societies, a l l school representatives and other such social agencies within the area of service of the agency. The purpose of the Coffee Party i s two-fold: (1) to enable agency staff members to become better acquainted with the resources of the area; and (2) to interpret T~. Maxwell & J. McDowell, - "We Believe" National Federation of Settlements, Inc., New York, New York. - Pages 1 & 2. 2. "The Focus and Function of Program at Alexandra Neighbourhood House" - April 1953 - Page 2. - 4 -to the guests the purpose and function of Alexandra Neighbourhood House i n the neighbourhood. Second, while the majority of board members work i n the neighbourhood encompassed by the agency, only two of the f i f t e e n board members reside i n the area. As a r e s u l t , r e l a t i o n s h i p with many businesses i n the area i s very p o s i t i v e . Generally speaking, Alexandra Neighbourhood House does provide an opportunity for a var i e t y of i n d i v i d u a l , group and i n t e r -group experiences for a l l people of a l l ages regardless of creed, colour or ethnic backgrounds. One exception to t h i s , however, i s the East Indian group l i v i n g west of G r a n v i l l e Street and north of Fourth Avenue. These people have shown l i t t l e i n t e r e s t i n the agency and a l l e f f o r t s on the part of the agency to bring them into the programme with few exceptions, have f a i l e d . I t should be noted that the Sikh Temple which serves the whole Vancouver East Indian Community i s located i n this area and a good deal of s o c i a l and recreative a c t i v i t y i s carried on there. It has been noted e a r l i e r that the value of a f u l l y q u a l i f i e d professional s t a f f cannot be overstressed. At the time of writing, the agency s t a f f composed of the Executive Director, Group Work Supervisor and three S o c i a l Group Workers are professionally trained s o c i a l workers. The following excerpt from "The Focus and Function of Program at Alexandra Neighbourhood House" i s borne out by the agency f e e l i n g toward professional leadership: "Without good leadership, the value of any programme i s n e g l i g i b l e . At this agency, the leadership i s composed of a f u l l - t i m e professional s o c i a l group work s t a f f , part time s p e c i a l i s t s , students from The School of S o c i a l Work and large corps of volun-teers. Alexandra Neighbourhood House i s referred to as a s o c i a l group work agency, because, as a basis for i t s work with people, i t uses the s o c i a l group work method. This method i s not just a c o l l e c t i o n - 5 -of random ideas but rather i t is a sc ient i f ic system of working with groups based on a sound body of know-ledge and to be prepared to use i t effectively. The social group work method is based on the premise that to work intensively with people i n groups, a per-son must be able to understand their behaviour. With this knowledge, a person then, by working through the group which is the natural unit of our society, can better help people to help themselves." 1. The f i n a l cr i ter ion noted is that a neighbourhood should be able to define i ts boundaries by natural barriers. At i t s inception as a Neighbourhood House in 1938} the boundaries of Alexandra Neighbourhood House were defined as being from Sixteenth Avenue to the waterfront (north and south) and from MacDonald Street to Oak Street (west and east). However, both i n terms of natural barriers and in terms of where the membership lives i n re lat ion to the agency, the area served by the agency is consider-ably smaller than such a defined area. This w i l l not be discussed here as i t w i l l be reviewed i n greater deta i l later i n the chapter. Generally speaking, the standards of Alexandra Neigh-bourhood House as compared with a tentative statement of desirable standards is quite favourable. PAST AND PRESENT PROGRAMME OFFERED AT ALEXANDRA NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE.  The programme of any neighbourhood house must, of course, be constantly evaluated both i n terms of the memberships' needs and i n terms of whether or not the agency may feasibly in i t ia te a new programme area. In keeping with this basic group work technique, the programme at Alexandra Neighbourhood House has been evaluated and changed when necessary and when the alterations or additions could be made sat i s factor i ly . 1. Ibid - Pag* 4 The previous statement is "borne out by the following comments on "The Comparative Statistics for November and March -Programme Ye ar 1948-1949 to 1951-1952 inclusive". (See Table W I M ) The number of groups with definite enrolment increased in Clubs, Teams, Interest Groups and Inter-group Councils while they decreased in the number of classes offered. This shows a change in the interest of the membership and in the amount of pro-gramme which the agency i s able to offer. The number of groups without definite enrolment shows a corresponding decrease in keeping_with the increased number of groups with definite enrolment. The change here i s one of change of focus of programme in keeping with the members' interests. The enrolment over the five year period also reflects the changes of interest from the number of groups without definite enrolment to those of definite enrolment. Another factor which further bears out this change in focus and interest is in the Attendance at Groups. As might be expected, that while there is an increase in attendance at Club meetings etc. there is a slight decrease in Athletic, Educational and Social a c t i v i t i e s . The quality of the work being done with individuals at the agency during the years 1948-1952 may be reflected in the steady increase in the conferences both with and on behalf of individuals. One f i n a l factor which shows the changing role of the agency programme and the type of programme the agency is able to offer, is in the area of volunteers and students and the hours of their service at the agency. The number of volunteers used and their total hours shows an increase while those of the students TABLE #1 COMPARATIVE STATISTICS for NOVEMBER & MARCH - PROGRAM YEAR 1948-49 to 1951-52 inclusive. 1948-49 1949-50 1?50-51 l?51-52 1. Number of Groups a. Regularly Scheduled WITH Definite Enrolment 38 39 45 42 45 43 45 47 Clubs 16 17 " 16 21 25 24 21 21 Classes 6 8 5 3 3 3 1 1 Teams 1 1 2 2 3 3 5 4 Interest Groups 7 7 15 11 r 9 8 11 11 Inter-Club Councils,Committees,etc. 6 5 1 4 4 4 3 6 b. Regularly Scheduled WITHOUT Definite Enrolment 6 7 4 8 7 8 8 Athletic Activities - - - - 11 1 • - 3 Educational Activities - - - 1 1 - - -"Social Recreation (Dances,cards,etc.) 3 6 3 5 5 7 - 5 2. Enrolment: 667 685 a.Regularly Scheduled WITH Definite Enrolment 525 588 517 513 705 610 Clubs 248 300 210 278 410 373 257 343 Classes 90 75 48 29 67 57 7 7 Teams 15 15 29 30 46 47 75 57 Interest Groups 82 91 139 97 100 108 146 152 Inter-Club Councils,Committee?,etc. 90 64 46 38 38 2° ?o 56 3. Attendance at Groups: a. Regularly Scheduled WITH Definite Enrolment 1696 2308 1929 2200 2372 1317 2190 1894 Clubs 588 902 664 836 1056 722 733 749 Classes 125 262 95 61 125 58 24 15 Teams 52 112 80 96 104 37 168 110 Interest Groups 212 219 400 392 228 123 329 284 Inter-Club Councils,Committees,etc. 147 84 52 4 7 47 30 26 92 b. Regularly Scheduled WITHOUT Definite Enrolment 861 964 674 1333 689 532 525 427 Athletic Activities - - - 71 - 28 95 Educational Activities - - — 22 12 31 - -Social Recreation (Dances,cards,etc.) 496 534 174 464 606 501 497 332 c. Special Events: Number 6 2 2 2 4 5 2 2:l •• Attendance 250 100 42 47 81 104 252 280 d. Games Room 333 430 457 588 368 244 340 242 TABLE #2 COMPARATIVE STATISTICS for NOVEMBER & MARCH - PROGRAM YEAR 1948-49 to 1951-52 inclusive. 1948-4? 1949-50. 1950-51 1951-52 4. Services to Individuals: a. Conferences - 165 181 I l l 25 251 123 226 264 With Individuals 100 87 23 173 92 198 236 In Behalf of Individuals 65 24 2 39 31 28 28 5. Unduplicated Count of Members: a. Total 541 690 374 563 654 769 521 607 b. Under 18 years - 204 394 452 430 346 408 c. Over 18 years - 170 169 320 339 175 199 6. Volunteers: a. Number - 52 u 26 34 49 46 b. Hours of Service 226 197 329 230 I64 352 331 7. Students: a. Number 9 8 11 10 11 10 8 9 b. Hours of Work 594 540 688 720 512 576 - 9 -shows a decrease i n both numbers and hours. Table #1 thus indicates the change i n programme at the agency over a five year period as a result of the following condi-tions: (1) the memberships' interests, (2) the services which the agency i s able to offer, (3) the number and attendance of the mem-bers and the quantity and quality of volunteers and student leader-ship and (4) the number of hours of service they provide. OTHER SIMILAR SERVICES OFFERED IN THE SURROUNDING AREAS: There are three other major agencies who offer "leisure time" services and social recreation to the residents of the area or a section of the area "served" by Alexandra Neighbourhood House. Each of these w i l l be discussed on the basis of who they are serving and the programme they are offering i n relation to any possible dup-l i c a t i o n of service with Alexandra Neighbourhood House. (1) ALMA BRANCH Y.M.C.A. In keeping with the new policy i n Y.M.C.A. work of estab-lishing branch Y.M.C.A.'s. i n certain sections of the city, the Y.M.C.A. established a branch office at the corner of Broadway Avenue and* Alma Street. It*-; purpose was one of decentralization; i.e. to move the Y.M.C.A. out to various communities rather than centralize one large programme i n one building in the centre of Vancouver. Membership i s open to boys and young adults between the ages of six and twenty-five. While their programme is of the interest group and mass activity to some extent, much of i t is on the friendship group basis. Their programme is even further decentral-ized because most of their groups meet at the members' homes. The largest percentage of their membership comes from the area surround-ing the agency. However, their eastern boundary as recorded, extends - 10 -as far as Granville Street. The Director of the Alma Branch, pointed out that very few of their membership come from east of MacDonald Street. From the above, i t may then be understood that the job being done at the Alma Branch of the Y.M.C.A. detracts in no way from the work being done at the Neighbourhood H0use and that there is l i t t l e , i f any, duplication of service. (2) KIVIEW BOYS' CLUB . Kiview Boys1 Club is situated at 633 West Eighth Avenue. In keeping with the type of programme offered by the Vancouver Boys' Clubs' Association, Kiview Boys' Club offers a mass activity and to a lessor extent, interest group programmes emphasizing games-room, hobby shop, body building and gym activ i t i e s for boys between the ages of six and eighteen years. Co-educ ational social activities for teenagers of both sexes are provided, but only on a mass activity basis. The Director of the Kiview Boys* Club stated that while some of their members do come from the area west of the Boys' club, the majority of younger members live near the agency. The teenagers, on the other hand, being more mobile than the younger members, come from south, east and west of the Club. It is recognized that, in the past, there had been some duplication of service between the Neighbourhood House and the Boys* Club in reference to some teenagers but that in proportion to the total receiving services, the number was very small. It appears that there is no duplication of service at the present time. From the ahove statements then, i t may be concluded that, because of the type of programme offered and to whom i t is offered, - 11 -there i s l i t t l e or no dupl i c a t i o n of service between the Kiview Boys' Club and the Neighbourhood House. (3) THE KITSILANO COMMUNITY CENTRE: The K i t s i l a n o Community Centre i s located at 2495 West 12th Avenue. This, p h y s i c a l l y i s the largest of a l l the leisure time agencies i n the area. The programme of the Community Centre i s quite d i v e r s i f i e d i n nature and i s offered to a l l ages. They have a large gymnasium f o r indoor a c t i v i t i e s and the expanse of nearby Connaught Park f o r outdoor programme. Their programme i s p r i n c i p a l l y of two types i (1) intere s t groups which are offered to a l l ages and (2) mass a c t i v i t y type of programme. Unlike the Alma Branch of the Y.M.C.A. the Kiview Boys' Club and the Neighbourhood House, membership at the Community Centre i s not limited to those l i v i n g i n the nearby community. The Executive Director mentioned that while the largest percentage of t h e i r membership does come from those l i v i n g near the agency, t h e i r membership comes from a l l parts of the c i t y . The teenage dances at the centre are quite well attended by many teenagers who are members at the Neighbourhood House. While there appears there might be some dup l i c a t i o n of ser-' vice to teenage membership of the Neighbourhood House, there i s l i t t l e or no dupl i c a t i o n among the younger and adult members. It would appear then, that i n a l l three agencies i n the surrounding area there i s l i t t l e or no dupl i c a t i o n of service and programme to residents of what i s referred to as the K i t s i l a n o d i s t r i c t . No indications have been given to show just which area the agency serves and th i s w i l l be done i n the following section of this chapter. - 12 -DEFINITION OF THE "EFFECTIVE AREA" OF THE AGENCY. As a basis for determining the "Effective Area" of the agency, an examination of the distribution of membership i s indicated - (See Membership Maps 1, 2 and 3 . ) A brief examination of the maps illustrates that the area surrounded by Fourth Avenue, Granville Street, Burrard Street and Broadway, draws an average of 32 .7% of the agency membership. Further examination of this area shows an increase from 29 .54$ i n 1 9 5 0 - 5 1 to 4 3 . 0 5 $ i n 1 9 5 2 - 5 3 . Certain structural changes i n the area have affected this change, but those w i l l be discussed i n more detail i n the following chapter. The area north of the agency, bordered by MacDonald Street, Sixteenth Avenue, Granville Street and Broadway, shows a constant decrease from 1 0 . 0 7 $ i n 1 9 5 0 - 5 1 to 5 . 8 6 $ i n 1 9 5 2 - 5 3 . A principal reason for this decrease was the completion of the Kitsilano Community Centre i n 1950 and the commencement of programme then. The area bordered by Arbutus Street, Fourth Avenue, Granville Street and the waterfront has shown a decrease from 15.04$ i n 1 9 5 0 - 5 1 to 6 . 0 0 $ i n 1 9 5 2 - 5 3 -The area east of Granville Street to Oak Street and from the waterfront to Sixteenth Avenue shows a variance over the three year period. The area west of the agency bordered by Arbutus Street, Broadway, Fourth Avenue and Granville Street has shown a constant increase i n membership from 14 .09$ i n 1 9 5 0 - 5 1 to 2 0 . 3 8 $ i n 1 9 5 2 - 5 3 . MtM8€RSHlP MAP I9SI - 5 2 tfMSED O N 6 , ^ 9 M E M B E R S H I P ) / 0 - 7 % feme D I S T R I B U T I O N O F M E M B E R S H I P - / A L E X A N D R A N E l f i H B O U R H O O D H O U S E F I G U R E ^ N / b . 3 L M E M 6 E R 5 H IP M A P 1952.-53 C 8 A S E D OM 3 ; / COUNT U P TO M A R C H » 9 S 3 ) 3 0 d % 4 50%-32% - rj - 1 3 -The area bordered by MacDonald Street, Broadway, Arbutus Street and Kitsilano Beach has shown a consistency i n membership throughout the three year period. From the above discussion, i t may be noted that the area having the greatest percentage of membership Is bordered by Broad-way on the south, the waterfront (False Creek) on the north, Granville Street on the east and Arbutus Street on the west. The combined percentage of membership coming from these areas i n 1 9 5 0 - 5 1 was 5 4 . 6 7 $ , 4 8 . 8 3 $ i n 1 9 5 1 - 5 2 and 6 9 . 4 3 $ i n 1 9 5 2 - 5 3 . From these four areas combined, comes more of the agency member-ship than any other combined area totals. This area, then, may be described as the "Effective Area" of Alexandra Neighbourhood House. According to the membership maps, the heart of the Effective Area i s the section bordered by Burrard Street, Fourth Avenue, Granville Street and Broadway. Using this Effective Area as a basis, a survey was carried out to determine the degree of interest expressed by residents of this area to the agency, the type of programme they would like to see at the agency and their length of residence i n the area. In addition, some questions about future residence and the effect of the construction of the new Granville Street Bridge were asked. The results of the survey w i l l be discussed i n greater detail i n another Chapter, but f i r s t there w i l l be an examination of the physical aspects of the "Effective Area", the demolition and re-construction taking place and the reactions and resistance by the Kitsilano residents to these changes. CHAPTER 2. DETAILED DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY OF THE EASTERN SECTION OF THE KITSILANO DISTRICT. It was determined i n the previous Chapter that the "Effective Area" of Alexandra Neighbourhood House was the area bordered by the water on the north, Broadway on the south, Gran-v i l l e Street on the east and Arbutus Street on the west. In order to better understand this Effective Area of the Neighbourhood House, a detailed description of the physical aspects of the area must be given to break down the area into i t s physical components. The following headings and discussion on them i s intended to give a more detailed picture of this area: GROWTH OF ARTERIAL ROADS: In keeping with the growth of the City of Vancouver, the British Columbia Electric Railway decided after the war, to implement trolley buses i n their transit system instead of street cars. In order to do this effectively, the company i n conjunction with the city's Department of Pavements and Bridges, worked out a plan to remove the street car tracks on Fourth Avenue, Broadway and Granville Street and convert to trolley buses. Work was begun on this i n 1949 and by 1950, street cars were no longer used on Fourth Avenue and Broadway. When the tracks were removed, the streets were then repaved with a new asphalt surface. As might well be expected, these roads were soon subject to increased vehicle as •y-well as Electric Railway t r a f f i c . Burrard Street thus became a "speedway" and a fast and convenient method of reaching the centre of town. - 1 5 -The growth of these a r t e r i a l roads had a two-fold effect on the Neighbourhood House: 1) It "isolated" the agency to an increased degree on the north, south, east and west and thus divided the "Defined Area" into separate parts and has cut even the "Effective Area" into several smaller communities or neighbourhoods. 2) It limited the membership at the Agency to those who were able to cross these natural barriers. A l l efforts on the part of the agency to obtain a pedestrian cross-walk at Seventh Avenue on Burrard Street have failed. With the opening of the new Granville Street Bridge i n March of 1954, F i r Street has become a main thoroughfare leading from the city centre. Although this w i l l undoubtedly alleviate some of the t r a f f i c on Burrard Street, i t has made the "Effective Area" of the Neighbourhood House even smaller than i t was previously. In addition, the south west span has increased the flow of t r a f f i c along Fourth Avenue. When the main span i s opened to t r a f f i c in July, i t w i l l re-establish Granville Street as a main ar t e r i a l road. Figure #4 is an aerial photograph of a large part of the "Effective Area" of Alexandra Neighbourhood House. It shows very clearly how the area has been "cut'up" by main a r t e r i a l thorough-fares. The area marked i n red shows the main roads and the "clover-leafs" which were uncompleted when the photograph was taken. THE AFFECT OF THE NEW GRANVILLE STREET BRIDGE ON THE DISTRICT:  Apart from F i r Street and Fourth Avenue becoming increased natural barriers i n the area, the physical aspect of the new bridge - 16 -FIGURE #4 AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING PART OF AGENCY'S "EFFECTIVE AREA" AitfD ALL ARTERIAL ROx\DS OF THE DISTRICT.  SOURCE: AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC SURVEYS LIMITED SEA ISLAND,B.C. - 17 -has been of considerable importance. In a l l , between thirty and forty housing units were demolished to make way for the construc-tion of the F i r Street span. Many of these buildings were apart-ments and multi-family dwellings and many of the people i n these residences were members of the agency. In addition, many people, particularly those living on F i r Street and near Granville Street, now find themselves living almost under one of the spans of the bridge. This could have some effect on their feelings towards the community and their future plans. The following Table #3 i n d i -cates the concern and indecision of some residents about the bridge and their future plans: TABLE #3 RESIDENTS' FUTURE PLANS, AS AFFECTED BY THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE NEW GRANVILLE STREET BRIDGE. DOES: THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE BRIDGE AFFECT THESE PLANS? PLANS FOR NO NO FUTURE YES NO ANSWER CO-OP. TOTAL STAY 4 43 5 - 52 MOVE 8 '27 3 - 38 NO PLANS 6 23 2 - 31 NO CO-OP. 1 5 - 6 TOTAL 18 :94 15 — 127 The material for the above table was obtained from a survey (mentioned i n the f i r s t Chapter) of 127 residents of the eastern Kitsilano d i s t r i c t . This survey and other pertinent i n -formation derived from i t , w i l l be discussed i n greater detail i n the next Chapter. This table indicates that of those surveyed, only 41$ definitely plan to remain i n the area. Of those who do plan to remain, only 3$ feel that the effect of the new bridge w i l l - 18 -be beneficial. Their reasons are two-fold: (1) the owners' property value w i l l be increased because of i t s value as a possible future industrial site and (2 ) the increase i n t r a f f i c (because the bridge is a main thoroughfare ) w i l l bring a corres-ponding increase in business. The table further indicates that 24$ of those surveyed have no definite plans for their future residence and 29$ defin-i t e l y plan to move. Altogether, then, 53$ of those residents surveyed, either plan to move from the d i s t r i c t or are undecided as to their future residence. From this then, i t may be assumed that the construction of the new bridge has had some effect on the residents 'future plans. The question, "What plans do you have about your future residence?" was followed by: "Does the construction of the new Granville Street Bridge affect these plans?" This second question should have asked: "Has the construction of the new Granville Street Bridge necessitated making plans about future residence?" Those who answered "No" to the second question were merely indi -cating that the construction of the bridge had not affected the decision which they had made. Thus the question did not have the value i t might have. In the light of the answers received about the residents' future plans, however, i t does indicate that some decision about their future had to be made. It further shows their concern about the construction of the bridge i n the d i s t r i c t . Another main affect of the bridge on the d i s t r i c t , is the completion of the two "cloverleafs" at the south end of the bridge. This i s well exemplified by the Figure # 5 . This map shows the L E G E N D •mm* N O R T H - B O U N D T R A F F I C • S O U T H - B O U N D T R A F F I C S O U R C E B C . E L E C T R I C , R L Y . , CO., L T D . P L A M N INQ. A N D SCHBOULINCT DEPT. l7tV\ M A Y 1 9 5 A-A P P R O X I M A T E S C A L E : 11 Vi . = 200O ft - 20 -n o r t h and south flow of t r a f f i c over the c e n t r a l and a u x i l i a r y -spans of the G r a n v i l l e S t r e e t Bridge and includes the t r a f f i c f l o w around the " c l o v e r l e a f s " . More s p e c i f i c a l l y , the map shows that the north and east bound t r a f f i c enters along Fourth Avenue, passes under the main span east of G r a n v i l l e S t r e e t and then on to the main span at F i f t h Avenue. The west and south bound t r a f f i c turns west to Fourth Avenue. The c o n s t r u c t i o n of these " c l o v e r l e a f s " has r e s u l t e d i n much of the d e m o l i t i o n i n the e a s t e r n s e c t i o n of the K i t s i l a n o d i s t r i c t . A few houses s t i l l remain on F i f t h and S i x t h Avenues both east and west of G r a n v i l l e S t r e e t . These houses are mostly i n a run-down c o n d i -t i o n and one does not have to look too f a r i n t o the f u t u r e to see t h e i r removal. As a point of i n t e r e s t , these houses w i l l show a marked c o n t r a s t to the green grass and f l o r a l shrubbery which the B r i t i s h Columbia E l e c t r i c Railway plans to " b e a u t i f y " the grounds surrounding the " c l o v e r l e a f s " . THE CHURCHES AND SCHOOLS OF THE AREA: The l a r g e number and great v a r i e t y of churches i n the e a s t e r n K i t s i l a n o d i s t r i c t i n d i c a t e s that i t was once a t h r i v i n g r e s i d e n t i a l area of Vancouver. I n the "Defined Area" of the Neighbourhood House, there are no l e s s than f i f t e e n churches. However, i n the " E f f e c t i v e Area" i t s e l f , there are f i v e churches. These are l o c a t e d i n the f o l l o w i n g p l a c e s : (1) The Jehovah's Witnesses H a l l at the corner of Seventh Avenue and Pine S t r e e t , (2) S a i n t Augustines, a Roman C a t h o l i c Church at the corner of E i g h t h Avenue and Maple S t r e e t , (3) The F i r s t B a p t i s t Sunday School i n the Eighteen Hundred block west Second Avenue, (4) The - 21 -Sikh Temple i n the Nineteen Hundred block west Second Avenue and (5) The Chinese Inland Mission i n the Sixteen.Hundred block west Eleventh Avenue. The other ten churches are spread throughout the agency's "Defined Area". One church had to be removed because of the F i r Street span of the new bridge. This was the Russian Orthodox Church s i t u -ated at the corner of Seventh Avenue and F i r Street. I t was noted i n one of the d a i l y newspapers i n the F a l l of 1 9 5 3 » that, "The Russian Orthodox Church, i n imminent danger of having a Granville Bridge p i l l a r i n i t s p u l p i t , plans to re-locate on a new s i t e at Fo r t y - t h i r d and Quebec Street, C i t y Engineer John Oliver has served notice to the church to be out of i t s present l o c a t i o n at Seventh and F i r by October 3 1 s t . The C i t y has paid $ 5 0 , 0 0 0 . 0 0 f o r 1 the property." The price paid by the C i t y f o r this property, gives some i n d i c a t i o n of i t v a l u e and the value of nearby property for i n d u s t r i a l development i n the d i s t r i c t . There are only two schools within the boundaries of the " E f f e c t i v e Area" of the agency, namely Henry Hudson, a public school, located at the corner of Cornwall and Maple Street and Saint Augustines, a Roman Catholic parochial school at the corner of Eighth Avenue and Arbutus Street. There are a t o t a l of eight schools i n the agency's "Defined Area" of service. The school which most of the six to twelve year old House members attend i s Lord Tennyson situated on Eleventh Avenue between Cypress and Maple Streets. The majority of the s i x to twelve year old g i r l s attend-T~. The Vancouver Sun - September 1 8th 1953> Page 3 8 . - 22 -ing the agency extension programme naturally go to the Henry Hudson School. As the agency " E f f e c t i v e Area" i s part of the d i s t r i c t served by K i t s i l a n o High School, many of the teenage mem-bers attend t h i s school which i s located at Trafalgar and Tenth Avenue. King Edward High School, which a few members attend, i s on Oak Street, the eastern boundary l i n e of the agency's "Defined Area" of service. In addition to the above mentioned schools, there are i n the larger area, Athlone Private School at Twelfth Avenue and F i r Street, Fairview High School of Commerce ( a commer-c i a l high school) i n the F i f t e e n hundred block west Broadway, C e c i l Rhodes Public School and Shurpass School i n the Sixteen hundred block west Tenth Avenue. SOCIAL AGENCIES IN THE AREA; There are seven major public health, welfare and recrea-t i o n a l agencies i n the d i s t r i c t surrounding Alexandra Neighbour-hood House. The V i c t o r i a n Order of Nurses, the Family Welfare Bureau and the Children's Aid Society are a l l located i n the Six-teen hundred block west Tenth Avenue. The K i t s i l a n o Community Centre, which was discussed i n the previous chapter, i s situated at the corner of Twelfth Avenue and Larch Street. The West Unit of the C i t y S o c i a l Service Department i s located at Broadway and G r a n v i l l e Street. To the east of Gra n v i l l e Street, two agencies are located, The Canadian National .Instutute for the Blind located at the corner of Spruce Street and Broadway and the Jewish Community Centre at the corner of Eleventh Avenue and Oak Street. The Catholic Children's Aid Society was i n the process of moving from Itfr l o c a t i o n at the corner of Seventh Avenue and Granville - 23 -Street at the time the survey was being conducted. Of the agencies noted above, the Ci t y S o c i a l Service Department i s the only one i n the Neighbourhood House's " E f f e c t i v e Area". PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS IN THE DISTRICT: There are three sizable parks i n the K i t s i l a n o d i s t r i c t . The largest of these i s Connaught Park which i s bounded by Vine and Larch Streets, Tenth Avenue on the north and Twelfth Avenue on the south. This park on which K i t s i l a n o Community Centre i s located, i s used through the year f o r a wide variety of sports a c t i v i t i e s . The entire park area i s grassed and has many s o f t b a l l and baseball diamonds and a cric k e t p i t c h . The second i s Gran-v i l l e Park which i s bounded by F i r and Pine Streets on the east and west and Fourteenth and Fifteenth Avenues on the north and south. This park has the poten t i a l of being a very a t t r a c t i v e spot, but at present i s not a well-used area. Re-seeding of the ground surface, some shrubbery and standard park f a c i l i t i e s would enhance t h i s park considerably. , The t h i r d i s K i t s i l a n o Park which i s bounded by the water, Cornwall Street and Yew and Balsam Streets. This park overlooks K i t s i l a n o Pool. It i s a very popular spot during the summer but has no f a c i l i t i e s f or any sports. I t may be noted from the foregoing, that while the K i t s i l a n o d i s t r i c t does have some park f a c i l i t i e s , they are en-t i r e l y inadequate to serve the area for which they were intended. A well supervised Parks Board summer playground would aid greatly i n providing recreation f a c i l i t i e s for many of the children of the d i s t r i c t . - 24 -PRIVATE OUTDOOR RECREATION FACILITIES IN THE AREA: There are three private recreation areas i n the d i s -t r i c t . One of these i s the Vancouver Lawn Tennis and Badminton Club Limited situated i n the Sixteen Hundred block west F i f -teenth and Sixteenth Avenues. The second i s the B.C. E l e c t r i c Lawn Tennis Club i n the Seventeen Hundred Block west Fif t e e n t h Avenue. The t h i r d i s the Terminal C i t y Bowling Club i n the Seventeen Hundred block west Thirteenth Avenue. The majority of members of these clubs do not reside i n the nearby d i s t r i c t . In the Eighteen Hundred block west F i r s t Avenue, there i s a large grass covered area which i s owned by the Coco Cola Company Lim-i t e d . At present, t h i s area i s unused but i t i s s u f f i c i e n t l y large to be used for some type of outdoor recreational programme. MILITARY RESERVES. AND CIVIC BUILDINGS: Three sections of the K i t s i l a n o d i s t r i c t are used as m i l i t a r y reserves, namely, the Bessborough Armories located i n the Two Thousand block west Eleventh Avenue, the Seaforth Armor-ies located i n the Seventeen Hundred block west F i r s t Avenue, and the R.C.A.F. Supply Depot which extends from the foot of Burrard Street to the waterfront and from Cypress Street to the water-f r o n t . In a l l , the area of about nine c i t y blocks i s u t i l i z e d by the R.C.A.F. Unit. There i s only one C i v i c building located i n the d i s t r i c t . This i s a newly constructed building on the corner of Broadway and Pine Street, and houses the School Board and the B. C. Teachers' Federation o f f i c e s . - 25 -DEMOLITION AND RECONSTRUCTION; Although the razing of houses for the advent of busi-ness i n industry has been evident for many years, much of the recent demolition i n the d i s t r i c t has been attributable to the construction of the new Granville Street Bridge. The most extensive demolition and reconstruction for the bridge was carried out i n the following areas: (1) Between Fourth and F i f t h Avenue i n the Fourteen Hundred block (east of Granville Street). This demolition was completed to make way for the Hemlock Street one-way approach to the main span of the bridge and for the construction of one of the "clover-leafs". Several housing units i n this section of the d i s t r i c t as well as several light industry businesses were torn down. ( 2 ) Between Fourth and Seventh Avenues i n the Fifteen Hund-red block (west of Granville Street). Most of this demolition was carried out i n order to construct the other "cloverleaf" and the south west thoroughfare spans from the main span. (3) In the Fifteen Hundred block west Eighth (west of Granville Street). This demolition was effected because of the F i r Street thoroughfare from the main span of the bridge. In a l l , this span over-passed three c i t y blocks (viz: Fourth, F i f t h and Sixth Avenues i n the Fifteen Hundred block). In addition to this, the previously mentioned Russian Orthodox Church i n the Fifteen Hundred block west Seventh Avenue had to be removed. The majority of the housing units demolished i n the d i s t r i c t , were i n this four block section of the d i s t r i c t . (4) There was considerable demolition on a small triangle of land horded by Fourth Avenue, Granville Street and the Fourth - 26 -Avenue,"run-off" from the bridge. The vehicle and truck route to Granville Island formerly went through this area. This land was over-passed on two sides by the construction of two new spans and i s now subject to increased city-bound t r a f f i c on the third side. There were a few housing units i n this area, and these were torn down along with the demolition of several business sites. Other demolition i n and surrounding the "Effective Area" of the agency, but not as the result of the hew Granville Bridge constuction, i s a s follows : (1) The south east corner of Pine Street i n the Sixteen Hund-red block Broadway Avenue has been under construction for some time. This land is the site of additional School Board and B.C. Teachers' Federation offices. (2) The south east corner of Sixth Avenue and Burrard Street is at present under construction. Some type of structure for business offices is being erected. (3 ) Several housing units i n the Seventeen Hundred block west Second Avenue and i n the Seventeen Hundred block Pine Street have recently been demolished. Several buildings i n this area have been condemned by the cit y and demolition permits have been issued. While much of the recent demolition i n the d i s t r i c t has been because of the new bridge construction, i t can be seen that there are several areas, even within the agency's "Effective Area", where business and light industry are i n f i l t r a t i n g . The area north of Fourth Avenue, between Burrard and Fir Streets i n par-- 27 -ticular, i s one i n which extensive changes have taken place. This w i l l be discussed i n greater detail later in this chapter. COMMERCIALIZATION AND INDUSTRIALIZATION: Commercialization and industrialization may be separ-ated into two parts; business (i.e. a l l shops, stores, offices, etc.) and industry (i.e. light and heavy, factories, manufactu-ring plants, etc.) Growth of both industry and business in this area, shows very clearly, the changes which have taken, and are taking place. From this, i t is possible to see some indication of the trend for the future. A) BUSINESS: The majority of business stores and shops are located along both sides of the main a r t e r i a l roads of the d i s t r i c t . Granville Street i n particular, from Fourth to Sixteenth Avenues i s a street made up entirely of business stores. Some sections of this street are regarded as one of the more exclusive shop-ping d i s t r i c t s of the city. Both sides of Broadway, from Oak Street to Arbutus Street i s another main arte r i a l road where there i s a heavy concentration of stores and business offices. Fourth Avenue (on both sides of the street as far west as Vine Street) and to a lesser extent, Burrard Street, are two more thorough-fares where the concentration of business is quite heavy. With few exceptions, there are no housing units on these main a r t e r i a l roads. In recent years, there has been an increase i n construc-tion of business stores on Broadway, between Granville and Arbutus Streets. Those businesses which were i n operation prior - 28-to the construction of new buildings, had to renovate their stores and offices to compete effectively with the new businesses. There are several small stores, private businesses and confec-tionaries scattered throughout the Kitsilano d i s t r i c t . In some c ases, these are surrounded by multi-family and single-family houses. An example of this i s a printing shop located i n the middle of the Eighteen Hundred block on Eighth Avenue and border-ed on each side by residential homes. Similarily, on Fifth and Sixth Avenues, i n the Fifteen and Sixteen Hundred blocks, there are several houses located between shops and light industry factories. B) INDUSTRY: The majority of the heavy industry i n the d i s t r i c t i s north of Fourth Avenue and close to the waterfront. Some heavy industry i s also located between Cornwall Street and First Avenue just west of Burrard Street. The majority of the light industry i s located i n the Sixteen Hundred block on Fifth, Sixth and Seventh Avenues. The south side of the Seventeen Hundred block on Sixth Avenue i s another area in which there is a large amount of light industry. It must be noted that some of the sites of small factories and manufacturing plants are within two or three blocks of the Neighbourhood House. As was noted earlier, the growth of industry i n a d i s t r i c t where many people s t i l l reside, has resulted i n action by the City Council and by the residents of the Kitsilano d i s t r i c t . - 29 -REACTIONS; AND RESISTANCE TO DEMOLITION AND RECONSTRUCTION.  The reactions and resistance to growth of industry and demolition and reconstruction resulted i n action by three separ-ate groups: A) The Di s t r i c t Fire Warden, of the City of Vancouver Fire Department, ruled that the area east of Burrard Street was a Number Two Fire Zone. This meant that any new construction i n the dis-t r i c t was to be of f i r e resistant material. It i s , of course, be-yond the scope of this thesis to attempt to determine the degree to which this has impeded industrial encroachment. However, i t i s significant to the extent that i t has decreased industrial devel-opment. B) The Lower Kitsilano Ratepayers' Association has been a very active community group which has strongly opposed the Advance-ment of industry. It was noted i n the November 6 t h 1952 edition of the Kitsilano Times that: "A ten-year fight against encroachment of industry west of Burrard was won this week by a mushrooming or-ganization that banded to wage a s t i f f battle to save their homes deteriorating i n value. Lower Kitsilano Ratepayers' Association carried the fight right into City Hall. Re-zoning was ordered and under the new zoning, Fourth Avenue from Burrard Street to Arbutus i s restricted to threes-storey commercial structures, as i s also the west side of Burrard and both sides of Second and Third i n the Eight-een Hundred block to three storey multiple dwellings. Burrard i s 1 the.dividing line for industry1.1 It was further noted i n the June 1. The Kitsilano Times Vol.59,NoI2052,Thursday Nov.6th 1 9 5 2 . - 30 -17th. 1954- edition of the Kitsilano Times that one of the plans for the f a l l meetings of the Lower Kitsilano Ratepayers' Associa-tion was: "To continue alert for further industrialization west 1 of Burrard Street". C) On June 24th 1954, i t was reported i n the Kitsilano Times that" "The City Council approved i n principle a petition from residents to re-zone the area (between Burrard and Maple Streets from the tram tracks on Sixth Avenue to the lane north of Fourth Avenue) from industrial to three storey multiple dwellings so that 2 apartment could be constructed". The City Council has shown much concern over the advancement of industry into the eastern section of the Kitsilano d i s t r i c t . Their decisions have resulted i n the re-zoning of the area west of Burrard Street and the past and present building restrictions. TYPE AND CONDITION OF HOUSING IN THE DISTRICT: Because this d i s t r i c t was an exclusive residential area of the city in the early 1900's, the majority of homes built were large single-family dwellings. However, as the ci t y grew i n pop-ulation, the more popular residential d i s t r i c t s became those fur-ther removed from the city centre. As industry and business be-came mora solidly established along the northern side of False Creek, the eastern section of the Kitsilano d i s t r i c t changed from an exclusive residential area to an area where people of more modest income settled. This trend has continued u n t i l some sec-T! The Kitsilano Times, Vol . 5 9 , No.2053, Tuesday, June 16th 1952 2. The Kitsilano Times, Vol.59,No.2054, Wednesday,June 24th 1 9 5 2 . - 3 1 -tions of the d i s t r i c t are now regarded as near-slum or slum sections of the city. In particular, the houses i n the area north of Fourth Avenue to Cornwall Street and between Burrard and Granville Streets have become very dilapidated and "run-down". Almost a l l the houses are of wooden construction and even the exteriors of many of the houses are finished i n wood. Much of the encroachment of light industry has taken place in this specific section of the d i s t r i c t . The area to the south of Fourth Avenue (in the Seventeen Hundred block) is another area where there has been an increased amount of industry encroachment and this has likewise affected the conditions of the housing. Houses to the south and the east of the Neighbourhood House are quite large in size, for the most part, and are either multi-family or apartment-house dwellings. These are generally i n f a i r condition although some major repairs and painting would greatly enhance their appearance. The area bounded by Burrard and Arbutus Streets and by Eighth and Fourth Av/enues shows less effect of the growth of busi-ness and industry than do the aforementioned sections of the dis-t r i c t . The majority of houses i n this area are of wooden exterior but many have obviously been kept i n good repair. Painting and minor repairs to some of ,the houses would improve their appearance considerably. The area west from Burrard to Arbutus streets and Fourth Avenue to Cornwall Street has been affected to some extent by the -32-small business concerns and some light industry. Unlike many of the nearby areas of the d i s t r i c t , this has not affected the con-dition of the houses which remain. One reason for this is undoubt-edly the large number of apartment blocks which are located (par-t i c u l a r l y on Cornwall, Cypress, Maple and Arbutus Streets.) near Kitsilano Beach. In a l l the above mentioned areas, the condition of the streets adds very l i t t l e to the appearance of the neighbourhood i n general and the housing i n particular. With the exception of the main a r t e r i a l roads, the streets are covered with a rough asphalt surface and have no curbs and the boulevards of the streets therefore, present a very unkempt appearance. With regard to the condition and the type of housing i n the eastern Kitsilano d i s t r i c t , the following points seem to be evident: (1) The condition and type of housing i s the poorest i n areas where there is the greatest amount of industrialization. (2) Many houses are being maintained, not for their poten-t i a l as a source of rental income but because of the value of the land as future possible industrial sites. (3) The removal of a l l remaining houses i n the area (bounded by Burrard Street on the west, Granville Street on the east, the Burrard Bridge on the north and Fourth Avenue on the south) is foreseen i n the near future. Many of these houses have already been condemned. (4) The condition of the streets i n the areas discussed is a detrimental factor i n the general appearance of the neighbour-hood. - 33 -In this chapter an attempt has been made to show i n de-t a i l a l l the major physical components of the "Effective Area" (and some of the surrounding areas) of Alexandra Neighbourhood House. From this, i t is possible to draw several specific con-clusions about the area which the agency serves: (1) The development of a r t e r i a l roads has resulted i n i n -creased t r a f f i c and has divided the "Effective Area" into several smaller areas. (2) The construction of the new Granville Street Bridge has had a three-fold effect: (a) It has resulted i n the demolition of at least forty housing units; (b) It has resulted i n many r e s i -dents deciding to move from the d i s t r i c t (c) It has resulted i n concern and indecision on the part of many more residents. (3 ) Industrial development has become firmly established i n many areas east of Burrard Street and within the next ten years more encroachment of industry i s foreseen in this area. ( 4 ) There is insufficient park and playground space i n the d i s t r i c t and the services which are i n effect are not exclusive to the Kitsilano residents. (5 ) There has been an increase in the number of business stores, shops, and offices on the main arte r i a l roads i n the past few years. (6) The fact that there has been reactions and resistance to industrial growth by the residents shows a certain amount of concern and neighbourhood feeling. The decisions by the City Council and the Fire Warden shows the concern of the city about increasing industrialization. - 34 -In the next chapter there w i l l be discussion on the attitudes and feelings of the residents toward the d i s t r i c t i n which they l i v e . In particular, their opinions about the agency and i t ^ r present usefulness and programme and how they spend their leisure hours w i l l be discussed. CHAPTER 3 ATTITUDES, REACTIONS AND FEELINGS OF THE RESIDENTS OF THE EASTERN SECTION OF THE KITSILANO DISTRICT. In the 1 9 5 3 Annual Report by the Executive Director of Alexandra Neigbourhood House, i t was noted that: "In order to set i t s sights and gain proper perspective on the future operation of the agency, the Board of Directors at a meeting i n June at the end of the 1 9 5 1 - 5 2 regular programme carefully evaluated the current changes in the area surrounding the House. It noted that i n the past few years there has been some encroachment of business and industry into the neighbourhood, and that the construc-tion of the new Granville Street Bridge has had, and w i l l have further physical and emotional " effects on the area east and north of the agency." This statement showed the concern of the agency to the physical changes of the area and the accompaning emotional as-pects of the residents living near the agency. As a result of this concern, i n the spring of 1953» the Board of Directors decided that a survey should be made to determine the feelings, opinions and attitudes of the people of the area, to the dis-t r i c t i n which they live, the agency, i t s programme and other pertinent information. The area used for the survey, was the previously mentioned "Effective Area" of the agency. The survey workers were instructed to explain that the survey was not an agency recruting drive, but that factual information was a l l that was wanted. They were further instructed to give some interpreta-tionabout the type of programme offered at the agency and to note 1 . Executive Director's Report, 1 9 5 3 -the condition of the housing, recent demolition and other structural changes i n the d i s t r i c t . It was hoped that every f i f t h home might be visited, and thus have a return of approximately two hundred schedules. How-ever, the f i n a l number of returns received was one hundred and twenty-seven. With the tabulation of these survey results, however, much valuable information about the d i s t r i c t , the r e s i -dents and their attitudes and feelings may be determined. In this chapter, much of the information which this survey revealed w i l l be discussed under specific headings. THE RESIDENTS' FEELINGS TOWARDS THE DISTRICT IN WHICH THEY LIVE.  The residents* own feelings to the eastern Kitsilano d i s t r i c t may at f i r s t have been determined by their reasons for moving into the d i s t r i c t i n the f i r s t place. One of the ques-tions asked on the survey was "How did you come to move into the area?" The replies to this question may be seen i n the follow-ing Table #4. TABLE #4 REASONS FOR MOVING Persons Percent-• " INTO DISTRICT Answering age Nearer Work 1 5 12% Lower Rent 11 9% Born Here 1 1% Friends and relatives live here 22 17% No other place avail-11% able 14 Like area or bought house 3 7 29% No specific reason 1 3 10% 8% Convenient 1 0 No co-operation 4 * - V/o TOTALS! 127 : 100$ - 3 7 -I t i s interesting to note that when the people moved into the area, the largest percentage (29$) did so because they e i t h e r l i k e d the area or they had bought a house. It would seem then, that these people at one time had decided to reside, with some degree of permanence, i n the area. As determined by the survey, the average length of residence i n the area was 10.1 years. This average may be f a i r l y high because of the lengthy residency of some of those surveyed. This further indicates that the people's feelings towards the area were quite favour-able and that they planned to remain for some time i n the d i s -t r i c t . Another question asked on the survey was: "What plans do you have about your future residence? The following Table indicates the results to this question. TABLE #5 FUTURE PLANS OF RESIDENTS FUTURE PLANS NUMBER PERCENT Stay 42 3 3 $ Move 34 2 7 $ No d e f i n i t e plans 47 3 7 $ No co-opera-t i o n 4 •\% . TOTALS 127 100$ The largest group, those without d e f i n i t e plans for future residence, indicates the uncertainty of a majority of people l i v i n g i n the d i s t r i c t . The change i s the result of the new construction, demolition and encroaching i n d u s t r i a l i z a t i o n which was discussed i n the previous chapter. It i s also i n t e r e s t -- 38 -ing to note that only 33% or one third of those interviewed, definitely planned to remain i n the d i s t r i c t . A further i l l u s -tration of the feelings of the people and their uncertainty about their future residence, may be seen in the following Table: TABLE #6 FUTURE PLANS IN RELATION TO FEELINGS ABOUT AREA IS THIS A GOOD AREA TO BRING UP CHILDREN? Plans for future residence YES NO NO CO-OP. TOTAL Stay 10 5 2 17 Move 7 9 1 17 : No plans 4 2 1 7 No co-opera-tion — — 4 4 TOTAL 21 16 8 45 From the above Table, i t may be seen that only seven-teen people of those who answered the question had definitely decided to move while those deciding to stay or with no def-in i t e plans, totalled twenty-four. These figures again show the feelings of uncertainty which i s prevalent among the r e s i -dents. The reasons given for those who plan to move further illustrates the feelings of the residents. Those who planne'd to move from the d i s t r i c t , gavoe the following reasons: - Area is now too crowded ) - Too much t r a f f i c and t r a f f i c too heavy ) - Too much industrialization ) - Poor companionship ) - Becoming a run-down d i s t r i c t ) - 39 -- Becoming a commercial area ) - No playground f a c i l i t i e s ) - Too many undesirable people ) On the other hand, those who were undecided or who planned to stay i n the d i s t r i c t , gave the following reasons: -Near shopping, schools, beaches, transportaion and churches -Good home upbringing i s more important than the d i s t r i c t -Good Playschool and programmes at Alexandra House -Friendly neighbours i n the d i s t r i c t -Enjoyable beach concerts at Kitsilano Beach. -Lots of playmates for children -This d i s t r i c t no worse than many others. Following the question which produced the above men-tioned replies, was the question, "Do you think the construc-tion of the new Granville Street Bridge w i l l affect this?" Of the thirty-seven replies to this question, 43$ f e l t that i t would have an affect on the d i s t r i c t as a place to bring up children. Their reasons were as follows : Increase i n industry, increase i n t r a f f i c and noise, increase i n commercialization and higher rents. The 57$ who f e l t that the new Granville Street Bridge would have no affect on the d i s t r i c t as a place to bring up children a l l gave the same reply: "Parental authority and home up-bringing are more important than the changes i n a d i s t r i c t . " - 40 -From the above discussion then, i t may be noted that i n the past, people had moved into the d i s t r i c t with inten-tions of staying. However, recent changes i n the area, (viz: reconstruction) have had a decided affect on the residents. Some have been forced to move through demolition, others have decided to move and a number have indefinite plans while a few, (most of them long time residents) have decided to remain. In general, the feelings of the residents of the d i s t r i c t are one of concern, confusion and indecision. These feelings may be further elaborated by answering the following question: "Is the d i s t r i c t a transitory area?" THE TRANSIENCY FACTOR: In the past few years, i t has been thought.that the "Effective Area" of the agency was one i n which a great many changes were taking place. Physical changes like increased industrialization were easily discernible. There was the f e e l -ing too, that the houses i n the d i s t r i c t were deteriorating because those who owned them were keeping them for their value as possible future industrial sites and not as a source of income for rental. With regards to the residents, i t was f e l t that many stayed only a short while and then moved to better d i s t r i c t s of the city. That i s , they used the d i s t r i c t as a place to become oriented and settled in the city and save money which would enable them to move to more attractive di s t r i c t s of the city. As was mentioned earlier i n this chapter, the average length of time of residence i n the d i s t r i c t was 10.1 years. - 41 -This figure indicates that the eastern part of the Kitsilano d i s t r i c t has not been the transitory area in terms of short term residents as was previously thought. However, with the advent of the new Granville Street Bridge, the feelings of the people have definitely changed i n some cases, and has resulted i n indecision i n others. This may best be seen by comparing the length of residence i n the dis-t r i c t with their plans for the future. This is seen i n the following Table #7. TABLE #7 LENGTH OF RESIDENCE'IN :RELATION TO FUTURE PLANS  LENGTH OF RESI- PLANS FOR FUTURE RESI DENCE DENCE IN AREA STAY MOVE- NO DEFIN- NO CO-OP-ITE PLANS: ERATION Less than one year 7 4 4 15 One to two years 7 5 3 15 Two to five years, 13 9 3 25 Five to ten years, 6 7 3 16 Ten to fifteen years 10 ' 4 6 20 Over fifteen years 21 3 6 2 32 No answer given 4 4 TOTAL 64 32 25 6 L27 The above table brings many other facts to light: 25.2$ of those interviewed had lived i n the d i s t r i c t for over fifteen years. 65.6$ of those who have lived i n the area for more than fifteen years, plan to remain, or, as one woman i n her seventies aptly expressed i t : "This is i t ; I'm ? t'oo old to move to another place and besides.,; you get to love a - 42 -d i s t r i c t despite any changes." Only 9«3$ of those interviewed who have lived i n the area fifteen years or more planned to move while 18.6$ of those i n the same classification have no definite plans. This indicates that those who have lived i n the d i s t r i c t for the longest periods of time plan to remain there. On the other hand, of the forty-nine people who have lived i n the area for five years or less, 42$ have definitely decided to move while 58$ have no definite plans or do plan to leave the d i s t r i c t . As further proof of the above statements, two other questions asked on the survey may be compared: "The ages of the children (according to school classification) whose parents were interviewed" and "the plans of the residents for the future." TABLE #8 SCHOOL CLASSIFICATION OF CHILDREN IN RELA-TION TO FUTURE PLANS  NAMES OF CHILD-REN ACCORDING PLANS OF RESIDENTS ABOUT A FUTURE RESIDENCE TO SCH.CLASSIF. STAY MOVE NO PLANS NO CO-OP. TOTAL In High School 8 1 0 1 - 19 K In Public School 13 1 2 4 - 29 2 In Kindergarten 2 1 - - 3 2 Pre-School 15 - 9 7 - 31 X Children grown up or no children 46 2 1 19 _ 86 Unknown — — 5 TOTALS; 84 3 1 5 1 7 3 (2 - Denotes the number of children whose parents were interviewed) Table #8 points out that those residents whose children have grown up or who have no children plan to remain^the d i s t r i c t to a far greater degree than those who have children i n the pre-school group or older. It further indicates that the older group Cthose whose children have grown up or have no children) i s much - 4 3 -more permanently settled than those with school age children. Thus we may say that the desire to move is more prevalent among the younger residents than among the long term residents. Another factor which indicates the degree of transiency In the d i s t r i c t i s seen i n comparing the following two survey questions: "How long have you lived i n this area?" and "Do you 'travel' with the same crowd a l l the time?". Table # 9 points out that those who have lived the shortest per-iod of time in the d i s t r i c t (from less than one year to five years) do not tend to travel with the same crowd a l l or most of the time. On the other hand, those residents who hav/e lived more than five years i n the d i s t r i c t do tend to associate with the same crowd a l l of the time. TABLE #9. LENGTH OF RESIDENCE IN RELATION TO FRIENDS LENGTH OF "DO YOU 1 TRAVEL' WITH THE SAME CROWD RESIDENCY AL1 L THE TIME?" • . . . YES NO NO CO--OP. TOTAL Less than one year 3 2 - 5 One to two years 5 2 - 7 Two to five years 6 .4 - 10 Five to ten years 9 1 - 10 Ten to fifteen years 9 1 - 10 Over fifteen years 10 2 - 12 No co-oneration — - 4 4 TOTAL 42 12 4 •>8 This table may indicate that the longer people live t i n the d i s t r i c t , the more lik e l y i t is that they w i l l have a def-- 44 -i n i t e group of friends. On the other hand, the table i n d i -cates that those who have l i v e d i n the area for f i v e years or less,- have fewer d e f i n i t e friends. This may be because the person has moved from another area i n the c i t y or because he i s a new resident i n the c i t y and has not yet made new friends. In any event, i t does indicate that the area i s becoming more transient than i t was previously. In answering the question, "Is the d i s t r i c t a t r a n s i t o r y area?", four d e f i n i t e points are brought out: (1) The average length of residence i n the area of those interviewed, i s 10.1 years. (2 ) Those people who have l i v e d f o r the shortest time i n the area do not "travel* with the same crowd a l l the time whereas those who have l i v e d f i v e or more years i n the area tend to do so. (3) The majority of those interviewed who have no ch i l d r e n or whose children have grown up, plan to remain i n the d i s t r i c t , whereas the majority of those with pre-school children or child r e n of school age either plan to move or are undecided about t h e i r future plans. (4) The newer residents to the d i s t r i c t ( i . e . those who have l i v e d i n the area from one week to f i v e years) are more unsettled about t h e i r future plans than those who have l i v e d i n the d i s t r i c t f or more than f i v e years. Thus'the above posed question may be answered by saying that although some of the opinions about the "E f f e c t i v e Area" being an area of t r a n s i t i o n are somewhat exaggerated, the - 45 -trend, at least among the newer residents, i s i n that direc-tion. There are some indications also, (as noted i n Chapter 2) that the construction of the new Granville Street Bridge w i l l have an increasing influence on the transition among the r e s i -dents of the d i s t r i c t . THE RESIDENTS' ATTITUDES AND OPINIONS TOWARD THE AGENCY, ITJV. PURPOSE. USEFULNESS AND PROGRAMME:  The f i r s t question asked i n the survey was: "Are you interested i n such a place (as Alexandra Neighbourhood House) in this area?" The answer to this question indicated that 72$ of those interviewed were interested i n such a place, 21$ were not, while no co-operation was received from 7% of those interviewed. Those who were not interested in the agency, gave the following reasons for their answer: - such a place is not needed - not interested for myself - no time - busy at home - - too much noise there - spend spare time at Legion - keep to self - agency should be for children - don't get out much only - own children too young - don't know what i t i s like. - moving - doesn't offer what I want In the following Table #10, the two questions: "the length of residence i n the area" and "the interest expressed i n the agency" are compared. - 46 -TABLE #10 LENGTH OF RESIDENCY IN RELATION TO DEGREE OF INTEREST IN THE AGENCY.  LENGTH OF RESI- ARE YOU INTERESTED IN ANY AGENCY IN THIS AREA? DENCE IN AREA YES NO NO ANS.OR TOTAL NO CO-OP. Less than one year 1 5 2 1 18 One to two years 8 5 1 14 Two to five years 17 7 1 24 Five to ten years 11 4 1 7 Ten to fifteen years 14 6 1 21 Over fifteen years 2 7 2 1 29 No co-operation - - 4 4 TOTAL 92 26 9 127 It is noted from Table #10 that those who have lived i n the area for the longest and the shortest periods of time are the ones most interested i n the agency. The majority of those who replied negatively to the question of whether or not they were interested did so for two reasons. Fi r s t , they were moving out of the d i s t r i c t . Second, their children were too young to attend the agency and they consequently prevented the parents from attending. THE TYPE OF PROGRAMME THAT THE RESIDENTS WANT: One of the questions on the survey asked those surveyed the type of programme they would like to see provided by Alexandra Neighbourhood House. One hundred and seventy-one answers were received from the one hundred and twenty-seven who were interviewed. The following Table #11 l i s t s the type of interests and the number of those Interested in that par-ticular area of programme: - 47 -TABLE #11 THE VARIETY OF INTERESTS EXPRESSED INTERESTS INDICATED IN SURVEY ACTUAL NUMBER OF THOSE INTERESTED. Dances, (old time, modern, seguare) etc. 2 8 Bingo 1 5 Something for children 1 3 Wide Variety of activities 3 Paved lot for ro l l e r skating 1 Musical programme 4 Sports programme 9 Educational programme ) Character talks ) 12 Films - good lectures for adults) Social evenings 7 Whist Drives for older people 3 Knitting, needle work, etc. 11 Cards 1 3 Young couples''groups 4 More adult programmes 8 Whatever children and parents want 6 Crafts 3 Badminton 8 Gym programme 3 Hobby shop 2 Power tools 2 Checkers 2 Talent shows 1 Singing Mothers' club 3 4 Classes on birds, flowers, gardens 3 Mechanics 2 TOTAL 171 In the survey, under the heading "Specific Questions for Parents", they were asked what type of programme they would like to see at Alexandra Neighbourhood House for their children. The answers were the same as those indicated in Table #11 with the addition of the following l i s t : a kinder-garten, cooking groups, band or orchestra, expressive art, library, drama groups; Some of the suggestions listed above are already offered in the Alexandra Neighbourhood House pro-gramme. Others, like mechanics, badminton and a gymnasium - 48 -programme are not too feas i b l e because of either the high cost or because of the physical structure of the building. There are, however, several suggestions i n the l i s t which could w e l l be of value to the agency programme. The suggestion of holding dances (of a l l types) appeared to be a very popular interest of those Interviewed. The agency programme does include an occasional teenage dance and a weekly adults' square dance group, but has no programme of dances and s o c i a l evenings f o r adults. I t may be possible f o r the "Sunny Seniors" - a group of e l d e r l y women - to sponsor such an evening event i n an attempt to meet t h i s expressed i n t e r e s t . Another p o s s i b i l i t y i s to properly publicize such an event at the beginning of the programme year ( i n September) a f t e r many of the younger members' parents have been interviewed i n registering t h e i r children. It i s possible that such a pro-gramme would not meet with too much success, and i t would have to be evaluated from time to time, but i t should d e f i n i t e l y be investigated because of the interest expressed. The suggestion of holding bingo or whist drives i s another area yi/hich might be investigated. I t i s true that an agency may not be i n complete contiguity with i t J v purpose and function i n staging such a programme. However, i f such a programme were carried out, i t would resu l t i n increased pub-l i c i t y for the agency and many of those attending may become interested i n other areas of programme. Another i n t e r e s t expressed by those residents who were surveyed was i n having an educational programme for adults. - 49 -At present, some discussions and films are being conducted f o r the New Canadian Club - a group of new immigrants to Canada residing i n the d i s t r i c t - and th i s group might be ex-panded to include a l l interested adults. A '•Family Night" type of programme i s planned for the programme thi s year. Kn i t t i n g , sewing and needle work" :.is : another ex-•J, pressed area of interest for the agency programme. At present there i s a group of women - ca l l e d the Self-Help Group - who meet on a co-operative basis to do q u i l t i n g work. This group i s a l l that remains of a much larger group (who met during the war to sew and k n i t ) . I t i s possible that this group may undertake the r e s p o n s i b i l i t y of picking up on this expressed i n t e r e s t using t h e i r own group as the.nucleus of a new club. Generally speaking, the interests expressed by those surveyed are for an increase i n a c t i v i t i e s for adults. Before an extensive programme was prepared for adults, however, a more detailed expression of intere s t would have to be received. This might be obtained from the Playschool Mothers' Group, the Henry Hudson Mothers' Group, A u x i l i a r y Womens' Church groups i n the d i s t r i c t and the l i k e . From the expressed interests of some of the'residents of the d i s t r i c t , i t would appear that the agency i s offering neither a large enough programme for adults and senior c i t i z e n s nor a programme which i s s u f f i c i e n t l y varied. The " f i n a l section of this chapter notes how and where the residents of the d i s t r i c t spend t h e i r time. This - 5 0 -information is particularly valuable i n terms of determining whether or not some of the residents' leisure time activities might be provided by the agency programme. HOW THE PEOPLE OF THE DISTRICT EMPLOY THEIR LEISURE HOURS  In elaborating on the details of where the r e s i -dents spend their leisure hours, i t may be advisable to f i r s t note, the length of time of residency i n the area and the r e s i -dents' knowledge of the agency. The following Table #12 i n d i -cates this information. TABLE #12. KNOWLEDGE • OFJ.AGENCY IN RELATION TO LENGTH OF RESIDENCY  KNOWLEDGE OF AGENCY LENGTH OF RESI- YES NO NO ANS. TOTAL DENCY IN AREA NO CO-OP. Less than one year' 6 10 - 16 One to two years 10 6 - 1 6 Two to five years 18 2 - 20 Five to ten years 1 6 4 - 20 Ten to fifteen years 17 - - 17 Over fifteen years 2 9 3 - 32 No answer ) 6 6 No co-operation) TOTAL 9 6 2 5 6 127 The above Table #12 indicates that 7 5 $ of those people interviewed had heard of the agency, whereas only 11$ of the residents had no knowledge of i t . One answer on the survey indicated that of a l l those interviewed, only 2 6 $ were members (or at least one member of the family was a member) of the agency. It appears then, that although many people know of the agency, few are actually members. One possible reason for this is that the programme being offered at present, is of l i t t l e or no i n t -erest to them. The above Table also indicates that the longer people have lived i n the area, the more li k e l y i t i s that they - 51 -have heard of the agency. Under the heading of "Specific Questions for Young Adults, Teenagers, Senior Citizens, etc." one question asked was "How do you spend your 'spare time 1 (i.e. - evenings and week-ends)?" The following interests and activities were noted: Theatre Bowling Pool Hall Kitsilano Community Centre Skating Car Riding Beer drinking Dancing Leather Work Reading Y.W.C.A. Badminton Legion Sewing Bingo P.T.A. Model Aircraft Singing Sports Gardening Hunting Cards Vis i t i n g ( i n and out of home) Church Pro-Rec. Walking Knitting Entertaining at home. In this l i s t , dancing, cards, bingo, some adult recreational activities and other special interest areas might be effectively incorporated into a programme for adults. Another question: "What type of programme would in t -erest you at Alexandra Neighbourhood House?" was asked to tiiis age group of people. Their answers were as follows: - 52 -Dancing General Adult Programme Neighbourhood Story telling Place to meet people Movies Teenage dances Quilting Cards Young adult groups Sports Bingo Whist Red Cross Work P.T.A. Lectures Musical Activities Educational talks Ping-Pong Library f a c i l i t i e s Discussion groups Mechanics Crafts It w i l l be noted that the above l i s t of a c t i v i -ties is quite similar to the one listed earlier i n this chap-ter. Some of the above-listed ac t i v i t i e s , however, might be feasibly implemented i n a programme for adults. The interests which were the most popular with the adults were; dancing, a place to meet people, lectures, educational and discussion talks. As was noted earlier, no such type of programme is being offered to adults by the Neighbourhood House at the pres-ent time. One point should be noted here, however, and that i s that although some adults have expressed an interest and have given suggestions about the programme they would like to see impltmented, the difference between those interested and those actually attending such a programme, may be quite great. There-fore continued evaluation of any new programme should be carried out. On the other hand, some sort of programme might well be - 53 -attempted in view of the interests expressed. In examining the attitudes, reactions and f e e l -ings of the Kitsilano residents towards the d i s t r i c t i n which they l i v e , and Alexandra Neighbourhood House and It's programme, there are six points which must be mentioned. (1) When the residents of the Kitsilano d i s t r i c t f i r s t moved into the area, the majority of them did so with the intention of remaining permanently or at least for a long time. (2) Results from the survey show that the d i s t r i c t i s more of a transitory area now than i t was formerly. (3) There is much uncertainty among residents of the d i s t r i c t about their future plans (partly because of the con-struction of the Granville Street Bridge). Only 33% of those surveyed definitely plan to remain in the d i s t r i c t . (4) The majority of those planning to move, have either pre-school children or children of school age. The majority of those who plan to remain either have no children or have children who have grown up. (5) Seventy-two percent of those people interviewed are interested in such a place as Alexandra Neighbourhood House in the d i s t r i c t in which they l i v e . (6) Those residents who were interviewed, have some definite plans as to the type of programme they would like to see at the agency. The above are merely some of the highlights of the survey which were brought forth i n this chapter. They def-i n i t e l y indicate that the majority If people i n the d i s t r i c t -54 -(at least among those surveyed) are interested in the agency and some type of programme there. In the next chapter, some recommendations, suggestions and summary conclusions as to the future of the agency i n terms of 1U '"< future role' In the d i s t r i c t and it&' methods of operation w i l l be noted. CHAPTER 4. THE FUTURE ROLE OF ALEXANDRA NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE. PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF THE AGENCY1S "EFFECTIVE AREA".  The transitional changes in the Eastern Kitsilano d i s t r i c t have generally been contiguous with the growth and development of the City of Vancouver. As might be expected, the change i n the d i s t r i c t from a more exclus-ive residential area to an area of middle and working class residents was a gradual one u n t i l the post-war years. This transition has continued to the point where certain sections of the di s t r i c t are now regarded as slum or near-slum areas. Other sections of the d i s t r i c t , however, have shown a slower transition rate. The principal reason for the difference i n this rate has been the encroachment of industry which has affected some sections to a greater degree than others. The areas closest to False Creek (where heavy and light industry are solidly established) have been those affected to the greatest degree by industrialization. The construction of a r t e r i a l roads and the great increase i n construction since World War II have resulted in a much faster rate of transi-tion than i n previous years. Property owners now see the Value of their property i n i t s potential as land for industrial - 56 -or business sites and not i n rental revenue. The condition of the housing has likewise shown the effects of this potential. The construction of the new Granville Street Bridge has caus:ed much demolition and has divided the area into small "isolated pockets". The residential area has been further encroached upon by the growth of business along a l l main thoroughfares throughout the d i s t r i c t . Thus the "Effective Area" of the Neighbourhood House is now divided into at least five smaller contained areas. The effect of post-war transition on the agency's "Effective Area" is exemplified in agency programme, by the following Table #13. TABLE #H THE TRANSIENCY FACTOR IN THE PLAYSCHOOL AT ALEXANDRA NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE  PROGRAMME YEAR CHILDREN REGISTERED TERMINATION BECAUSE OF REMOVAL FROM AREA PERCENTAGE IN TURNOVER 1950 -51 75 30 40$ 1951-52 63 19 30$ 1952-53 70 27 38$ 1953-54 68 24 TOTALS 276 100 35,7^ Source: PLAYSCHOOL STATISTICS, ALEXANDRA NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE. THE RESIDENTS' CONCERN ABOUT THE CHANGING DISTRICT: As shown i n the survey, the effect of recent transitional changes i n the d i s t r i c t indicates concern and con-- 57 -fusion on the part of a number of the residents. The older residents and the ones who have lived for the longest time i n the area, plan to remain while the younger and new residents either plan to move or are undecided about their future plans. When people f i r s t moved into this area, many did so either be-cause they liked the area or because they had bought a house. This indicates that many residents planned to remain, with some degree of permanance. With the increase of construction, industrialization and business, however, some residents have been forced to move, others have decided to move and many are undecided. Generally then, the residents' feelings towards the d i s t r i c t have changed as the d i s t r i c t has changed. RESISTANCE TO INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT: In spite of physical and emotional effects which the transitional changes have brought, there are two factors i n particular which show the resistance to the indus-t r i a l development. The f i r s t and perhaps the most important of these, was the action of the Lower Kitsilano Ratepayers' Association. In November of 1 9 5 2 , the Lower Kitsilano Rate-payers won a ten year fight against the encroachment of indus-try west of Burrard Street. The City Council decided that no future industry would be allowed (except three storey commer-c i a l structures) west of Burrard Street. The second factor was the order by the District Fire Warden that a l l new build-ing constructions would be constructed of fireproof material. These two factors alone w i l l impede the encroachment of further - 58 -industrialization and business for several years. Looking at the area east of Burrard Street and north of Fourth Avenue, however, one sees l i t t l e hope for a re-establishment of r e s i -dential homes. Within the next four or five years, however, industry w i l l have taken over the d i s t r i c t completely. The future role of Alexandra House i n this d i s t r i c t i s not exem-p l i f i e d entirely by this area, however. RE - EVALUATION OF THE AGENCY'S: FUTURE ROLE; In the f i n a l chapter of his thesis, E.J. Helm suggested that there were three roles which Alexandra Neighbour-hood House might investigate for the future: (1) "Alexandra House could be used as a "base unit" from which community group work could be ad-ministered. In this way, needy "pocket areas" such as north of Fourth Avenue and east of Granville Street could be served. The area east of Granville Street and below Ninth Avenue is characterized by low income, crowded house-holds, low-rent and a high delinquency rate which i s indicative of the need of social services. With a good admin-istration, an adequate budget and professional staff, this project could be extended to other needy areas which have been studied by the Community Chest and Council. (2) The huilding and property on which Alexandra House is located could be sold and a Neigh-bourhood House could be established i n anoth-er area. The Survey Report of Group Work and R ecreation of Greater Vancouver which was published by the Community Chest and Council i n 1945? stated a number of areas which should be given for such new devel-opments. Setting up a neighbourhood house in one of these areas would mean time and effort devoted to a worthy cause. The fact that the l i f e of the present building i s limited i s a practical reason for moving. The staff is at present a good working unit which could be maintained for such a worthy venture. - 59 -(3) With such a long history as Alexandra House boasts, there i s bound to be a certain amount of sentiment attached to i t . If i t is more desirable to maintain this build-ing, i t would be feasible to devote i t entirely to a Kindergarten programme. At present, the Kindergarten membership has to be limited because of a lack of space. There are a large number of children, within the extended boundaries of the d i s t r i c t , who could be met at certain points and brought safely to the Agency. This would make i t more convenient for the mothers and would mean that the service could extend over a larger area".. In the light of a more detailed study of the area i t s e l f and the survey (conducted one year after the above mentioned "possible roles" for the agency), i t may be pointed out that two of the above noted suggestions are no longer entirely valid. The survey results indicate that of one hundred and twentyvseven residents interviewed, there were a total of eighty-two children. Thirty-one (or 37%) of these were of Kindergarten or Pre-School age. A number of these child-v ren were under two years of age and would not, therefore, be eligible for a Play School Programme. The number of inter-views of the survey is sufficiently large to give an ade-quate indication of the number of children i n the d i s t r i c t . As not a l l parents would send their children to the Kinder-garten, this number would not be large enough to feasibly include a Kindergarten programme at the present time at the 1 . E.J. Helm. "Alexandra Neighbourhood House" - a survey of the origins and development of a Vancouver In s t i -tution i n relation to i t s local environment. Pages 6 9 - 71. - 60 -agency. Even i f such a programme were attempted, the building would have to undergo extensive alterations to make i t suitable. While the suggestion of selling the building and property of Alexandra House and establishing another agency i n another area cannot be refuted, i t does not appear to be wise to re-locate the agency when i t is adequately serving the residents of the eastern Kitsilano d i s t r i c t . The survey results further show that 79% of those interviewed had heard of the agency and that 72% were interested i n such a place. Admittedly, the l i f e of the agency building i s limited but the l i f e of a l l residential homes i n the area is likewise limited. The suggestion of maintaining the present build-ing as a "base unit',' moving into needy "pocket areas" and doing a community group work job s t i l l appears to be quite valid. This w i l l be discussed i n greater detail i n exam-ining the long and short term plans for the future Alex-andra House. LONG TERM PLANS FOR THE AGENCY: Alexandra Neighbourhood House is at present l i v -ing i n the shadows of commercialization and industrializa-tion. As the City of Vancouver grows, new industry w i l l be forced to move farther from the centre of the city. Already there are indications that industry is moving into sections of the eastern Kitsilano d i s t r i c t and is being included in the "ring" of industrial growth which - 61 -surrounds any large sized city. Although there have been definite indications of resistance to this development, they are but "stop-gaps" i n the face of eventual industrializa-tion. It i s , of course, impossible to state the exact time when this development w i l l be complete, but one may safely assume that i t w i l l occur within the next fifteen or twenty years. There are three reasons for this: (1) Vancouver is the major sea-port city on the west coast of Canada and in this role the city w i l l , barring any economic failure, continue to expand and develop. In-dustrial development has played an important part i n the growth of the city since World War II. In any city where industry is increasing, the older residential areas of the city surrounding the city centre are demolished to make room for industrial expansion. Thus the eastern section of the Kitsilano d i s t r i c t , among the earlier residential areas of the city, w i l l be forced out. (2) The growth of a r t e r i a l roads and the spans of the new Granville Street Bridge have resulted i n sections of the residential areas being "under" the bridge or i n isolating many remaining areas into small "pockets". (3) Because the majority of houses i n the dis-t r i c t are quite old and of wooden construction, their l i f e expectancy would not appear to exceed fifteen or twenty years. Alexandra House is also of wooden construc-tion and it£: l i f e expectancy like-wise probably cannot - 6 2 -exceed this same period. As was noted i n one of the earlier chapters, the land on which the agency is located is even now a valued spot and the size of the property (half a city block) makes i t an ideal location for a large industrial site. The agency could easily be re-located i n one of the needy areas, as suggested by the Community Chest and Council, when i t is no longer effectively serving the community. SHORT TERM PLANS FOR THE AGENCY: While i n the distant future Alexandra Neighbour-hood House is faced with almost certain extinction, the pros-pects for the next ten and possibly fifteen years is quite bright. There are three important reasons why the agency w i l l be able to operate effectively as a leisure time agency i n it^--" present location for some time. ( 1 ) The attendance at the agency, while showing some fluctuation (for valid reasons) has been f a i r l y consistent. Figure # 6 shows the cumulative attendance figures from 1 9 4 8 to 1 9 5 4 . Figure # 6 illustrates very clearly that the attend-ance at the agency has been very stable, particularly from 1 9 5 2 to 1 9 5 4 , even i n the face of many changes. It may be" assumed that this s t a b i l i t y i n attendance w i l l continue for some time. ( 2 ) The professional staff, consisting of the Execu-tive Director, the Programme Director and three social group workers, is a well integrated working unit who have shown i n <ZU&tAL/qTiv'£ J?EG/ST/?/9T/o,\J /JT X<<9A/OF/? /SODS £ / - / 3S<{ 800 /9</8 - </9 AiOV. JuAr. /9</3 - d'O 'VOW. SlitR. Jl)W. A/Q\/. Jo/0 /96'J.- 3~<3 AJoy/. MfHZ. Jurv TOO 4,00 jroo 30 o 3-00 CBAJTHE Ci.aSBJ> Kirs t&nMUtyiTV CCA/T#£ 60 V 0,0 JOUNCE: <9££X/?/V£>tf/? /V£/G.//8oo£rtooo noose. sr/i-r/ST/cs f/Goee A/a. 4, - 64 -the past that they are capable of operating a very effective programme. In addition, Alexandra House i s well-known for maintaining a very active group of volunteers who, under care-f u l supervision, help to carry out various leadership responsi-b i l i t i e s . In addition, students from the School of Social Work at the University of British Columbia, under the super-vision of the professional staff members,contribute many hours of work toward the effectiveness of agency programme. (3i) As was noted i n one of the earlier chapters, there i s l i t t l e or no duplication of service being offered to Alexandra House members at the present time. On the basis of these three major factors, Alexandra .Neighbourhood House w i l l be able to operate effect-ively i n i t f r role as a leisure time agency i n the d i s t r i c t for the next ten to fifteen years. However, much detailed study w i l l have to be put forth i n meeting specific problems when they arise. A discussion on the present programme and possible future programmes exemplifies this point. PRESENT AND FUTURE PROGRAMMES AT THE AGENCY: While the present programme at the Neighbour-hood House i s meeting the present needs of many of the mem-bership i n many ways, i t must be remembered that definite changes i n the physical structure of the d i s t r i c t and the interests of the area residents^might well necessitate chang-ing methods of approach i n order that the agency operate at optimum efficiency i n the group work f i e l d . The following - 65 -Table #14 showing the total number of agency members, the number of children and the number of adults in programme from 1948 to 1954 may well indicate this: CUMULATIVE REGISTRATION OF CHILDREN AND ADULT MEMBERS OF ALEXANDRA NEIGH-•BOURHOOD.HOUSE FROM 1948-1954. PROG. ft . NOVEMBER ft MARCH, ft JUNE YEAR CHILDREN, ADULTS,TOTAL CHILDREN,ADULTS,TOTAL CHILDREN,ADULTS,TOTAL •48-49 541 690 705 i • '49-50 204 170 374 394 169 563 420 174 594 '50-51 352 102 654 430 139 569 434 339 773 •51-52 346 175 521 408 199 607 433 210 643 •52-53 359 146 505 420 183 603 442 192 634 '53-54 342 114 456 433 171 .. 604 488 • 172 660 SOURCE: ALEXANDRA NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE STATISTICS (2 Those 18 years of age and younger) This Table points out that the ratio of children members to adult members has been almost three to one from 1948 to the present time. Many of those interviewed on the survey commented that there were too few activities for adults at Alexandra House at the present time and they were therefore not interested i n the agency. Several suggestions for programme at Alexandra House were unfeasible because of prohibitive costs or because of the physical structure of the agency. Suggestions for adult programmes such as knitting, sewing and needle work, dances of a l l types, educational discussions, card games and social evenings should a l l be investigated i n view of this ex-pressed interest and the feeling that there are too few adult a c t i v i t i e s being presented. - 66 -There i s one factor, pointed out by the survey, that cannot be overstressed. Although much interest has been ex-pressed by the d i s t r i c t residents, attendance at such programmes ( i f they were to be provided) may not meet agency expectations. This is exemplified by comparing the results of two questions asked on the survey. One question asked: "Are you interested i n such a place (as Alexandra House) in this area?" The answers were: YES - 72$, NO -.21% and NO CO-OPERATION - 7%. Another question asked: "If Alexandra Neighbourhood House were to offer the type of programme that you want, would you attend?" The answers to this question were: YES - 41$, NO - 21$, NO CO-OPERATION - 3 8 $ . (The reasons why those interviewed would not attend the agency programme have been mentioned previously and need not be repeated here.) In comparing these two ques-tions, i t is noted that while 72$ of those interviewed were interested, only 41$ of them would attend agency programme. One of the basic social group work tenets, i n using programme as a medium for group interaction i s that of constant evalua-tion of programme. Any new programme areas initiated should be evaluated i n terms of the following c r i t e r i a : (1) The memberships' expressed needs. (2) The memberships' unexpressed needs. (3) The effectiveness of the programme i n meeting these needs. (4) The new programme's contiguity with other areas of programme. ( 5 ) The new programme's contiguity with the purpose and function of the agency. - 67 -The procedure initiated i n the 1954 programme year of interviewing the parents of the six to twelve year old members during registration is very sound and should be con-tinued. This personal contact with some of the younger mem-bers' parents can be implemented effectively to interpret the purpose of the agency and possibly to recruit the parents them-selves into new programme areas. Added publicity for the development of new programme areas could be given through the neighbourhood paper, which is received by many d i s t r i c t r e s i -dents. At present, the paper does make notification of spec-c i a l events held at the agency but news of the agency does not appear as a regular item i n a definite section of the paper. Even i f such publicity were possible only once a month, i t would greatly ameliorate the present methods of publicity. Although the present programme i s quite effective i n providing group experience for people of a l l ages, the suggestions of new programme for both children and adults should be investigated. This would provide the agency member-ship with the best possible programme i n i t ^ - role as a l e i s -ure time centre. THE "POCKET AREAS". In January of 1949, Alexandra Neighbourhood House began an extension programme i n the annex of Henry Hudson School located at the corner of Cornwall and Maple Streets. Itf ; pur-pose was to provide a programme for six to twelve year old g i r l s on a three afternoon a week basis, i n the nearby d i s t r i c t . t - 6 8 -The programme proved to be very successful and has been con-tinued every year since 1949. Because the growth of a r t e r i a l roads i n recent years has "isolated" this section of the agency's "Effective Area" to an increasing degree, the agency should, i f possible, expand this programme. Activities might be offered to six to twelve year old boys also on a three afternoon per week basis at f i r s t . The present programme for g i r l s could be ex-panded to five afternoons a week. If the programme for the boys proves to be as successful as the g i r l s ' programme, i t . could be expanded to a five afternoon per week basis at a later date. Even i n the light of more recent study on the agency's "Effective Area", the suggestion i n E.J.Helm's thesis, of main-taining the present agency building as a "base unit" and having extension programmes i n other isolated areas, is s t i l l valid. The previously mentioned area to the north of Fourth Avenue and east of Burrard Street should not be considered i n view of the ever-increasing industrial encroachment. There are, however, two areas i n particular which should be investigated for their suit-a b i l i t y i n ini t i a t i n g extension programmes. The f i r s t area, west of the agency, is bordered by Burrard and Arbutos Streets, Broadway and Fourth Avenues. This area i s "isolated" to the extent of being bordered on three sides by main ar t e r i a l roads. At present, approximately 20$ of the agency membership resides i n this area. This is the area which includes the most attractive homes in the d i s t r i c t and has had the least encroachment by business and industry. If - 6 9 -emphasis is to be placed on serving the "needy pocket areas" of the d i s t r i c t , this is one area which should definitely be investigated. The second "pocket Area" is to the east of the agency and is bordered by Oak and Granville Streets and Broadway and Sixth Avenue. This area is bound on two sides by main thorough-fares and by a span of the new bridge and a concentration of industry north of sixth avenue. At the present time, approxi-mately 2% of the agency membership resides i n this area. Crowded housing conditions exist to some extent but there are s t i l l quite a number of houses remaining i n spite of recent changes i n the d i s t r i c t . One of the principal d i f f i c u l t i e s i n init i a t i n g programme i n this area would be i n obtaining a suit-able building for an extension unit. If the agency were to develop extension programmes i n these two areas and also increase the service in the Henry Hud-son area, i t could decrease or change the programme now being offered i n the main agency building. There is probably more neighbourhood feeling i n the small "pocket areas" than i n larger "Effective Area" of the agency. This should be one factor which would f a c i l i t a t e the implementation of extension programmes. The present building could offer programme to those residents who live i n the area horded by Fourth Avenue, Burrard SJtreet and Broadway and Granville Street and handle a l l administrative affairs. This area in i t s e l f , i s another "pocket area" i n the larger d i s t r i c t . In the "pocket areas", the staff members would have to do a community group work type of job at f i r s t i n initiating the extension programmes. The d i f f i c u l t i e s of such an endeavour are numerous; building rental, staff and leadership for these new extension units, and a limited'budget, to mention but a few, but with careful planning and a, more de- ' tailed study of the areas, such an undertaking is possible. It w i l l have to be initiated slowly at f i r s t , on a t r i a l basis, and be constantly evaluated, but i t is one necessary step which the agency must f i n a l l y take i f i t wishes to provide maximum service to the residents of a changing d i s t r i c t . CONCLUSIONS:: The purpose of this study has been three-fold: (1) To discuss changes taking place in the d i s t r i c t i n recent years and their physical and social effect on Alexandra Neighbourhood Hbuse. (2) To determine what effect the construction of the new Granville Street Bridge would have on the residents and the agency. (3) To determine what the function of Alexandra House might be as a result of these changes. The physical and social effects of construction, demolition and business and industrial encroachment on both the d i s t r i c t and the residents have been discussed in detail i n previous chapters. However, i n summary, the following high-lights are noted: (1) The d i s t r i c t has been divided into several "pocket ^areas" to an increased degree by the construction of industrial - 7 1 -and commercial buildings and of the development of art e r i a l roads. (2) There is a greater degree of transiency among the residents than there was formerly. (3) Many residents are uncertain about their future plans of residence. (4) The usefulness of the agency as a leisure time centre w i l l probably not exceed fifteen or twenty years in view of industrial encroachment. Because of changes i n the d i s t r i c t and the sugges-tions contained i n the survey, the following points should be investigated by the agency: ( 1 ) The possibility of offering new programmes sugges-ted by the residents. (2) The possibility of offering more and a greater variety of programme to adults. (3) The possibility of init i a t i n g at least two more extension programmes in the "pocket areas" and increasing the service of the one already in operation. As these suggestions could become invalid i n the light of new developments i n the d i s t r i c t , the agency should watch closely any changes which might further affect the agency's r-ole i n the community. The agency's role should be evaluated at least every two or three years. By so doing, Alexandra Neighbourhood House w i l l be able to function effectively i n the remaining years of it*fv existence. - 72 -BIBLIOGRAPHY A. BACKGROUND REFERENCES Carpenter, Daniel, "The Neighbourhood". New York Society for Ethnical Culture, Ethnical Frontiers. New York, 1948. Handasyde, Elizabeth, City or Community. London, The National Council of Social Service, 1949. Maxwell, Jean; McDowell, John: We Believe. National Federa-tion of Settlements, New York, 1950. Pacey, Lorene, M. Readings i n the Development of Settlement  Work. Association Press, New York, 1950. Rothstein, David, "The Role of Settlements i n Building World Citizenships" National Federation of Settlements, New York, 1952. Webb, Sydney and Beatrice, Methods of Social Study, London, Longmans Green, 1932. B« SOURCES FOR THIS STUDY I. Reports and Surveys (a) Public Opinions Survey by the Public Relations Committee of the Community Chest and Council of Greater Van-couver, December 1952. (b) Constitution of Alexandra Neighbourhood House. (c) Annual Reports of Alexandra Neighbourhood House. (d) Monthly Reports of Alexandra Neighbourhood House. (e) Community Chest and Welfare Council, Survey Report on Alexandra Neighbourhood House 1948. (f) The Focus and Function of Programme at Alexandra Neighbourhood House - April 1953* - 73 -II. Other Documentary Material (a) Alexandra Neighbourhood House Programme Statistics 194-8-54. (b) Alexandra Neighbourhood House Membership File Cards 1948-54. (c) The Kitsilano Times. (d) The Vancouver Sun. (e) Material from the Planning and Scheduling Department of the Bri t i s h Columbia Electric Railway. (f) Thesis by E. J. Helm on Alexandra Neigh-bourhood House. III. Interviews (a) Mr. B. Robinson, Executive Director of Alexandra Neighbourhood House. (b) Mr. D. Yard, Executive Director of Alma Branch of the Y.M.C.A. (c) Mr. B. Norman, Executive Director of Kiview Boys' Club. (d) Mr. M. Smith, Executive Director of Kitsilano Community Centre. (e) Mr. S. Sigmundson, Transportation Manager, of the British Columbia Electric Railway. i - 74 -C. SCHEDULE ALEXANDRA NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE AREA SURVEY  OVERALL COMPILATION TOTAL RETURNS 127 NO CO-OPN. 4 BASE 123 GENERAL QUESTIONS - PART I. Introduction: - Explanation of Survey - outline area to be surveyed and why:  1. Have you ever heard of Alexandra Neighbourhood House? Yes 98 No 25 2. Are you, or any member of your family a member of A . N. H, Yes 32 No 21. Why not now 3. Are you interested i n such a place in this area? Yes 92 No 22 .Why not No Co-op. 9 4. If so, what type of program would you like to see at A.N.H. 5 . If A.N.H. were to offer this type of program, would you attend? Yes 52 No 2 Z No Co-op. 49 Why not? 6 . How long have you lived i n this area? Average 1 0 . 1 years  Longest 4 9 years. Shortest 1 week. 1 7. How did you come to move into this area: (CHECK)(1) nearer work 1 5 (2) lower rent 11 ( 3 ) born here 1 (4) friends and relations live here 2 1 ( 5 ) no ther place available 14 ( 6 ) other - specify - no co-operation - 4 - like area or bought house - 3 5 - no specific reason - 10 - convenient - 6 8. 'What plans do you have about your future residence Stay - 4 2 - Move - 34 - No Plans - 4 3 - No co-operation - 4 9 . Does the construction of the new Granville Street Bridge affect these plans Yes 1 5 No 8 5 Undecided 3 No CO-OP. 20 - 7 5 -C. SCHEDULE - Cont'd.  SPECIFIC QUESTIONS FOR PARENTS; PART II 1. How many children do you have? 8 2 In High School 20 In Public School 31 In Kindergarten 2 Pre-School 29 2. What type of program would you like to see for your children at A.N.H. \ 3. Would you permit your children.to attend A.N.H. i f this type of program were offered Yes 31 No 2 No Answer 94 Why not? Danger crossing roads 4 Too young 1 4. Do you consider this area a good place to bring up children? Yes 32 No 14 Undecided 1 No Answer 8 0 Why. ;  Why not 5 . Do you think the construction of the new Granville Street Bridge w i l l affect this? Yes 1 6 No 21 SPECIFIC QUESTIONS FOR YOUNG ADULTS, TEENAGERS, SENIOR CITIZENS, etc. / PART III  1. How do you spend your "spare time" (i.e. evenings and weekends)? CHECK: Theatre — Frequently 1 6 Occasionally 3 0 Bowling — " 5 " 8 Pool Hall- " 1_ " 4 Kitsilano Com.Centre - » 2_ " 5 Other (Specify) . 2 . Do you "travel" with the same crowd a l l the time: Yes 34 No. 17 No Answer 76 3. What type of program would interest you at A.N.H. Specify: No Answer - 7 5 No Suggestions - 2 7 COMMENTS: ' - 76 -C. SCHEDULE Cont'd.  DETAILED ANSWERS'. TO THE QUESTIONS: ABOVE:  PART I. QUESTION 2. REASONS WHY THOSE SURVEYED ARE NOT AGENCY MEMBERS: - don't get out much - kept busy with childre n - adults don't need i t - don't know what goes on there - don't go out much - have own friends - need baby s i t t e r - Alexandra House has dis-couraged because of de-fe c t i v e c h i l d - thought programme for children only - childr e n too young - a place for children - haven't time - too old - just moved here - l o s t husband(wife)recently - childre n grown up - entertainment at home - children not interested - other interests - husband works nights PART I. QUESTION 3 REASONS- WHY SOME OF THOSE SURVEYED ARE NOT INTERESTED IN SUCH A PLACE AS ALEXANDRA NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE: - place not needed - no time - busy at home - should be f o r children only - c h i l d r e n too young - not interested ourselves but O.K. fo r others - spend spare time at Legion - keeps to s e l f - don't know what i t ' s l i k e - too much noise there - doesn't o f f e r what I want - don't go out much - moving - 77 -C. SCHEDULE Cont'd. PART I. QUESTION 4 THE TYPE OF PROGRAMME THOSE SURVEYED WOULD LIKE TO SEE AT ALEXANDRA NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE:  - dances,(old time,square - bingo teenage) - something for children - wide var i e t y of a c t i v i t i e s - paved l o t for skating - music programme - educational programme - good lectures f o r adults-- whist drives for older people - young couples' groups - gym programme - c r a f t s - badminton - power tools - talent shows - mothers' club - mechanics sports films - character talks s o c i a l evenings k n i t t i n g , needle work, etc. cards more adult programme whatever childre n and parents want hobby shop checkers singing care f o r flowers, birds and gardens PART I. QUESTION 5 REASONS, WHY THOSE SURVEYED WOULD NOT ATTEND THE AGENCY EVEN IF THEY WERE OFFERED THE TYPE OF PROGRAMME THEY WANTED. - no time - too many children - not interested - moving - danger crossing streets - home entertainment best - can't afford baby s i t t e r - work nights - f o r children only - keep to s e l f - too old - 78 -C. SCHEDULE Cont'd. PART I I . QUESTION 2. THE TYPE OF PROGRAMME THE PARENTS SURVEYED WOULD LIKE TO SEE FOR THEIR CHILDREN.  Generally the same as Part I, Question 4 with the follow-ing additions: - kindergarten - band or orchestra - l i b r a r y - drama - cooking - expressive art - more d i s c i p l i n e and super-v i s i o n PARTII. QUESTION 4. SURVEYED PARENTS' FEELINGS AS TO WHETHER OR NOT THE AREA IS A GOOD PLACE TO BRING UP CHILDREN. WHY: - near shopping - near schools - good parents most important - near beaches - good nursery school - near church - near buses - good neighbours - good beach concerts - no worse than any other d i s t r i c t - l o t s of playmates MY NOT: - poor companionship - heavy t r a f f i c - rundown d i s t r i c t - commercial area - crowded - no playground f a c i l i t i e s - i n d u s t r i a l i z a t i o n - too much t r a f f i c - undesirable people - 79 -C. SCHEDULE Cont'd. PART I I . QUESTION 5 SURVEYED PARENTS' REASONS WHY THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE NEW BRIDGE WILL OR WILL NOT AFFECT THE AREA AS A PLACE TO BRING UP CHILDREN. WHY IT WILL: WHY NOT: - parental authority more important - increase i n industry - increase i n t r a f f i c and noise - increase commercialization - higher rents - decrease t r a f f i c PART III. QUESTION 1 HOW THOSE SURVEYED EMPLOY THEIR LEISURE TIME: - skating - bingo - model a i r c r a f t - sports - beer drinking - dancing - leather work - reading - Y.W.C.A. - Badminton - Legion - entertaining at home - car r i d i n g - P.T.A. - singing - gardening - hunting - cards -. v i s i t i n g ( i n and out of home) - church - Pro-Rec. - walking - k n i t t i n g - sewing - 8 0 -C. SCHEDULE Cont'd. PART I I I . QUESTION 3. WHAT TYPE OF PROGRAMME THOSE SURVEYED (YOUNG ADULTS,TEEN-AGERS, SENIOR CITIZENS) WOULD LIKE TO SEE AT ALEXANDRA NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE. - dancing - general programme - sports - whist - movies - q u i l t i n g - young adults' groups - P.T.A. - musical a c t i v i t i e s - ping pong - discussion groups - neighbourhood story t e l l i n g - place to meet people - bingo - Red Cross work, - teenage dances - cards - good for youngsters - lectures - educational talks - l i b r a r y f a c i l i t i e s - mechanics - c r a f t s 

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