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A study of the correlation between intelligence, school grades and after-school occupation in 356 cases… Edgar, Edmund George 1938

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A STUDY OF THE CORRELATION BE TWEES' INTELLIGENCE» SCHOOL GRADES AND AFTER-SCHOOL OCCUPATION IN 356 CASES OF STUDENTS IN THE WEST VANCOUVER -SCHOOLS. by Edmund George E d g a r  A T h e s i s s u b m i t t e d f o r the Degree o f MASTER in  OF ARTS  the Department of EDUCATION  The U n i v e r s i t y  of B r i t i s h  April,  1938  Columbia  Contents Cha,pter ' Introduction  v  1. 2„  Tlie Genera,! H i s t o r y o f t h e Ca.ses Tlie S e l e c t i o n o f t h e C a s e s Fumber o f Cases Records a v a i l a b l e  1 4  3.  The A s s e m b l i n g o f t h e D a t a P r e p a r a t i o n of the Data Sheet E n t e r i n g of the Information The B a r r S c a l e A l l o t t i n g o f t h e Grades D i s t r i b u t i o n o f t h e Ca.ses o v e r t h e  8  Grades  4.  D i s t r i b u t i o n c f t h e L e t t e r Grades Maximum j M e d i a n • > andMinimum Marks i n each Grsde D i s t r i b u t i o n o f t h e C a s e s as t o I n t elligence. n u m b e r i n g and L i s t i n g o f t h e C a s e s f o r purposes of Comparison The C o r r e l a t i o n o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and S c h o o l 20 Grades I n t e l l i g e n c e and S c h o o l Grad.es C o m p a r i s o n o f G r a d e s o f Boys and G i r l s C o m p a r i s o n o f f i r s t s i x G r a d e s and l a s t s i x Grades S c h o o l G r a d e s and M a t r i c u l a t i o n I n t e l l i g e n c e and M a . t r i c u l a t i o n I n t e l l i g e n c e and A f t e r - S c h o o l O c c u p a t i o n  5.  Some S p e c i a l Conclusion Appendix  Cases  5343 i-xxxix  List  o f .Tables  Table  Page  1.  The Development o f t h e S c h o o l S y s t e m o f West V a n c o u v e r between 192-3 and 1957  3  2.  Tlie D i s t r i b u t i o n o f t h e C a s e s a c c o r d i n g t o t h e number o f g r a d e s a t t e n d e d  14  5.  The ilumber o f Cases i n e a c h Grade  15  4.  D i s t r i b u t i o n o f t h e L e t t e r Grades  '5.  Maximum, Med:an5 and Minimum marks i n e a c h Grade.  15 and 16 17  6„.  G r a d e s a s s i g n e d on t h e B a s i s o f I n t elligence  17  7.  B l o c k Graph showing D i s t r i b u t i o n of I n t e l l i g e n c e i n 356 C a s e s o f t h i s s t u d y  18  8.  A Sampling o f the L i s t i n g s o f the Grades e a r n e d by e a c h Case  19  9.  C o m p a r i s o n o'f I n t e l l i g e n c e G r a d e s o f 157 Boys ( l ~ V l )  and S c h o o l  20  10.  Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e ' a n d School G r a d e s o f 169 G i r l s Tl-Vl.)  20  1.1.  C o m p a r i s o n o f S c h o o l G r a d e s and I n t e l l i g e n c e o f 326 Boys and G i r l s ( l - V l )  21  12„  Numbers o f B o y s o b t a i n i n g S c h o o l Grade above o r b e l o w I„0,« R a t i n g s  22  13.  Number o f G i r l s o b t a i n i n g S c h o o l G r a d e s above o r b e l o w I.Q,. R a t i n g s ?  22  14.  C o m p a r i s o n o f I n t e l l i g e n c e ^and S c h o o l R a t i n g s o f 170 Boys ( V l l - X l l )  (  .  •  23  iv 15.  C o m p a r i s o n o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and S c h o o l R a t i n g s o f 180 G i r l s (Vll-Xll)  23  16.  C o m p a r i s o n o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and S c h o o l R a t i n g s o f 350 Roys and G i r l s (Vll-Xll)  23  17.  C o m p a r i s o n o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and S c h o o l R a t i n g s o f 172 Boys ( l - X l l )  24  18.  C o m p a r i s o n o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and S c h o o l R a t i n g s o f 184 G i r l s ( l - X l l )  24  19„  C o m p a r i s o n o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and S c h o o l G r a d e s o f 356 Boys and G i r l s ( l - X l l )  24  20.  C o m p a r i s o n o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and S c h o o l Grades(Percentages)  25  21.  C o m p a r i s o n o f S c h o o l Grades o f t h e f i r s t s i x years w i t h those of the second s i x years (314 c a s e s )  26  22.  C o m p a r i s o n o f S c h o o l G r a d e s and R a t i n g s 27 b a s e d on M a t r i c u l a t i o n A v e r a g e s (118 c a s e s )  23.  C o m p a r i s o n o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and R a t i n g s 29 b a s e d on M a t r i c u l a t i o n a v e r a g e s (118 c a s e s )  24.  C o m p a r i s o n o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and O c c u p a t i o n a l Ratings  9  31  Introduction This  thesis,  as c a n he seen f r o m t h e t i t l e ,  of the s c h o l a s t i c occupations The  attainments  i n t e l l i g e n c e , and a f t e r - s c h o o l  o f a. number o f West V a n c o u v e r  correlation  i s a study  of intelligence  children.  and s c h o o l g r a d e s h a s  always been a, s u b j e c t o f g r e a t i n t e r e s t  t o t h e w r i t e r , and  the  s u b j e c t i n the s c h o o l s  o p p o r t u n i t y t o make a s t u d y  of t h i s  o f West V a n c o u v e r ha,s been d e e p l y The  conditions f o r this  appreciated.  s t u d y h a v e been v e r y  favourable  b e c a u s e o f c e r t a i n a d v a n t a g e s w h i c h o b t a i n i n such as West V a n c o u v e r .  P e r h a p s t h e most f a v o u r a b l e o f t h e s e  cumstances {is t h e s i z e Of t h e d i s t r i c t . s m a l l enough t o a l l o w a f a i r l y the  children  cir-  West V a n c o u v e r i s  c l o s e acquaintance  with  8,11 o f  i n t h e s c h o o l s and y e t l a r g e enough t o p r o v i d e a  s u f f i c i e n t number o f c a s e s study  a district  reliable.  t o make t h e f i n d i n g s o f such a  In a d d i t i o n t h e s c h o o l p o p u l a t i o n i s f a i r l y  s t a b l e as a l a r g e p r o p o r t i o n o f t h e r e s i d e n t s own t h e i r own hQmes and t h e r e  i s no g r e a t t u r n o v e r  Other f a c t o r s which a s s i s t of the g r a d i n g  i n such  of students  i n the .schools.  a study a r e the u n i f o r m i t y  i n t h e West V a n c o u v e r s c h o o l s , t h e a v a i l a b i l i t y  vi of the r e c o r d s ? the y e a r s  of Experience  s c h o o l s , and h i s p e r s o n a l a c q u a i n t a n c e  o f the w r i t e r i n t h e w i t h so many o f t h e  stu-  dents. In  s u c h a s i t u a t i o n i t i s p e r t i n e n t t o a s k : What can  obtained  from a q u a l i t a t i v e  the f i n d i n g s  study of t h i s  of such a study bear  ions of experienced  information?  tea.chersjregarding such t o p i c s  ion  i n t h e l a n g u a g e and  as t h e  success  s c i e n c e s u b j e c t s , and  school  of boys  In the l i g h t  of such  under our  i n f o r m a t i o n s h o u l d we  poorer  modify  or  come  care?  F o r many y e a r s girls  and  the d i s p r o p o r t -  change -our i d e a s as t o what i s b e s t f o r t h e s t u d e n t s who  leaving  of endeavour.  t h e w r i t e r has  s e e n l a r g e numbers o f boys  s c h o o l and. s t a r t i n g  I t has  to work i n v a r i o u s  appeared t h a t the c h i l d r e n of l e s s  a v e r a g e i n t e l l i g e n c e h a v e b e e n f o r c e d ' to a c c e p t o c c u p a t i o n s and  T h i s , a c c o r d i n g to the p s y c h o l o g i s t s ,  W h e t h e r t h e a n a l y s i s o f t h e data, o f  study.--Irears o u t t h i s  concept  Ban  be  seen  f a c t o r of I n t e r e s t i n such a study i s the p r o p o r t -  I wish  i n and  s u g g e s t i o n s can be made w h i c h m i g h t r a i s e  i e n c y of our  this  later.  of cases which r e q u i r e s p e c i a l treatment  Here a g a i n  than  the' more m e n i a l  i s as i t s h o u l d be.  "Another  fields  t h a t the b t i g h t e r s t u d e n t s went on t o the more  r e s p o n s i b l e -position's.  ion  opin-  b e t w e e n t h e amount o f a t t e n t i o n g i v e n t h e a v e r a g e and  pupils?  and  Would  out t h e o f t e n e x p r e s s e d  p e r f o r m a n c e '"of b o y s and g i r l s , t h e r e l a t i v e girls  be  out of s c h o o l . the  effic-  work. t o e x p r e s s my  me-in t h i s w o r k , , t h o s e who made t h e f i n d i n g s o f t h i s  a p p r e c i a t i o n to a l l who by  t h e i r h e l p and  s t u d y more v a l i d .  have a s s i s t e d  e f f i c i e n c y have ;  Chapter The  Tlie 356 all  1  G e n e r a l H i s t o r y o f the  cases  in this  of t h e i r education  Cases.  s t u d y have r e c e i v e d  practically  i n the E l e m e n t a r y and H i g h S c h o o l s  of  West V a n c o u v e r .  These s c h o o l s have been r e o r g a n i s e d s e v e r a l  times  l a s t few y e a r s  d u r i n g the  and  a brief history  of  v a r i o u s changes i s r e q u i r e d f o r the p u r p o s e s o f t h i s Tlie g r o w t h o f the has  been r a p i d .  ober* and  1911.  over  1050  At  d a t e , 1938,  p u p i l s are e n r o l l e d  Between 1911  and  "teachers employed was School grades being School.  study.  e d u c a t i o n a l s y s t e m of West V a n c o u v e r  A one-room s c h o o l was this  the  1923  ,first  opened i n Oct-  t h i r t y teachers are i n the v a r i o u s  employed  schools.  the number o f e l e m e n t a r y  school  i n c r e a s e d to ten,, p u p i l s o f the H i g h  accommodated, a t the N o r t h V a n c o u v e r H i g h  In September, 1 9 2 3 , t h e West V a n c o u v e r H i g h  School  began as a two-room s c h o o l i n the H o l l y b u r n E l e m e n t a r y building 1927,  arid was  to a s c h o o l o f f o u r rooms by  In September, 1 9 2 3 , t h e r e were i n o p e r a t i o n two  school d i v i s i o n s , five  Increased  three  elementary  a t P a u l i n e J o h n s o n , two  School  high  c l a s s e s at Hollyburn  a t Dundarave, one  June,  School,  at Cypress  Park,  and  one at* t h e G a p i l a n o  Timber Gamp on Upper C a p i l a n o .  September, 1927,the new H i g h S c h o o l Street  b u i l d i n g a t Seventeenth  and Inglewood Avenue was opened w i t h a s t a f f  teachers, there being schools  a t t h a t time two ten-room  i n operation, Hollyburn  In  and P a u l i n e  of f i v e  elementary  Johnson; a two-  room e l e m e n t a r y s c h o o l a t Dundarave and a s i n g l e  room a t Cap-  ilano.  drop i n the  Between 1927 and 1933 t h e r e was a s l i g h t  school population with teachers  from t h i r t y  a r e s u l t a n t . r e d u c t i o n i n t h e number o f  i n 1927 t o t w e n t y - s i x  T h i s number was i n c r e a s e d t o t w a n t y - n i n e  i n September, 1933.  i n 1934 and to t h i r t y  i n 1936. The ver  g r e a t e s t change i n e d u c a t i o n a l p o l i c y  occurred  i n t h e summer o f 1933 when t h e J u n i o r H i g h  s y s t e m was i n a u g u r a t e d . the  grades, increase ition so  nine  buildof s i x  d i v i s i o n s and e m p l o y i n g .eleven t e a c h e r s .  i n the H i g h S c h o o l s  An  p o p u l a t i o n n e c e s s i t a t e d an add-  o f two rooms i n t h e s p r i n g o f 1934 b u t o v e r c r o w d i n g was  s e r i o u s t h a t f o u r o f the S e n i o r  The  remained  H i g h D i v i s i o n s h a d t o be  rooms i n t h e H o l l y b u r n B u i l d i n g w h i l e  J u n i o r High School  High School  in  i n the H i g h S c h o o l  a combined J u n i o r and S e n i o r H i g h S c h o o l  moved t o f o u r v a c a n t the  School  A t t h a t time g r a d e s V I 1 and V l l l o f  e l e m e n t a r y s c h o o l s were p l a c e d  ing forming  i n West Vancou-  and t h e two Commercial c l a s s e s o f t h e  i n the High School b u i l d i n g .  a d d i t i o n o f s i x rooms t o the. H i g h S c h o o l b u i l d i n g  t h e summer o f 1936 e n a b l e d  the Board o f School  Trustees  to b r i n g a l l t h e c l a s s e s o f t h e J u n i o r and S e n i o r H i g h t o g e t h e r u n d e r one r o o f .  Schools  By September, 1937,, the . s c h o o l pop-  3 u l s . t i o n * lia.d increa.sed to 520 i n the combined H i g h S c h o o l and 560  i n t h e two e l e m e n t a r y  s c h o o l s o f H o l l y b u r n and P a u l i n e  Johnson,, Table  1.  Tlie Development o f the S c h o o l  System o f West  V a n c o u v e r between 1923 and 1937, Date  1923 1926-27 1927 ^ (Sept.]  Hollyburn  Pauline Johnson  Inglewood (High School,  Ro orris  Rooms  Ro oms  3 o f 1-V111 #2 o f 1X-X1  5 o f 1-V111  6 o f 1-V111 #4 o f 1X-X1  10 o f 1-V111  10 o f 1-V111  10 o f 1-V111  #5 o f 1X-X1 .-  1932- 33  10 o f 1-V111  10 o f 1-V111  #7 o f 1X-X11  1933- 34  6 o f 1-V1  8 o f 1-V1  #12 o f V l l - X l l  1934- 36  6 o f 1-V1 #4 o f X - X l l  8 o f 1-V1  #9 o f V11-1X #2 o f 1X-X11  8 o f 1-V1  #16 o f V l l - X l l  1936-37  6 o f 1-V1 •  # High School  Divisions.  Chapter  2  Tlie S e l e c t i o n o f t h e C a s e s , The  359 c a s e s were chosen  s t u d e n t s who have p a s s e d and  through  the West V a n c o u v e r  i n c l u d e a l l t h o s e f o r whom r e c o r d s f o r f i v e  were a v a i l a b l e . all  from among a p p r o x i m a t e l y  I t was f i r s t  the elementary  These t o t a l l e d  betically.  The n e x t  o r more  to g a t h e r  years  together  t h e West V a n c o u v e r S c h o o l s s i n c e  about  4500 and were t h e n f i l e d  s t e p was  a t i o n a v a i l a b l e f o r each  to c h e c k t h e amount  alpha-  of i n f o r m -  i n d i v i d u a l and when some p r o g r e s s h a d  been made i n the c o m p i l i n g o f t h i s made f o r a d d i t i o n a l  Schools  and h i g h s c h o o l r e c o r d c a r d s o f a l l t h e  c h i l d r e n who h a d a t t e n d e d 1923.  necessary  1500  list  a f u r t h e r s e a r c h was  i n f o r m a t i o n w h i c h h a d n o t been e n t e r e d on  the v a r i o u s r e p o r t c a r d s . /"The  records a v a i l a h l e  1. E l e m e n t a r y  f o r this  School Record  s t u d y were as f o l l o w s :  Cards,  ( I n g e n e r a l use s i n c e  1927) 2. H i g h  School Record  Cards.  (a) West V a n c o u v e r H i g h  School Report  Cards  i n use  f r o m 1,923 t o 1931, ( D u p l i c a t e s o f r e p o r t c a r d s home t o p a r e n t s )  sent  5 (b) H i g h S c h o o l R e c o r d c a r d s s i m i l a r  to (a) i n use  f r o m 1931-33. (c) West "Vancouver H i g h S c h o o l s R e c o r d Cards i n use s i n c e 1933, ( i ) Permanent R e c o r d Cards  (covering  school  recorols  f r o m Grade T i l t o Grade X l l ) ( i i ) A n n u a l R e p o r t Cards  (, d u p l i c a t e s  o f cards sent  home t o p a r e n t s ) (d) R e c o r d ca,rds o f some s t u d e n t s t r a n s f e r r e d . various  from  J u n i o r and S e n i o r H i g h S c h o o l s o f o t h e r d i s -  tricts, (e) R e c o r d Cards  received with enrolling  o t h e r e l e m e n t a r y and p r i v a t e .(f) R e s u l t s  pupils  from  schools,  o f M a t r i c u l a t i o n E x a m i n a t i o n s f r o m 1923  to 1937. (g) R e s u l t s The  o f many s t a n d a r d i s e d  Intelligence  Tests,  D e t r o i t , pintner-Cunningham,  and H a g g e r t y  i n the  lower grades.  The O t i s , N a t i o n a l , and Terrnan i n t h e  higher grades, (h) R e c o r d s  o f t h e o c c u p a t i o n s o f stud.ents a f t e r  leaving  school,  ( o b t a i n e d by the w r i t e r by p e r s o n a l  inquiry  of the i n d i v i d u a l ,  o,f f r i e n d s , and o f o t h e r  teachers. As w i l l  be seen f r o m t h e above l i s t  compiled from r e p o r t cards of v a r i o u s purposes  of t h i s  t h e i n f o r m a t i o n was  types.  I  u  c  k  i  s t u d y t h e methods o f g r a d i n g u s e d  l  y  f  o  r  t  h  e  throughout  6  t h e West. V a n c o u v e r S c h o o l s • •'fairly .uniform, obtainable.  and,  d u r i n g the p e r i o d under- r e v i e w  were  g r a d e f o r grp.de, c o m p a r a b l e r e c o r d s were  I n the p u b l i c s c h o o l r e c o r d c a r d s  i t was  found  E h a t changes i n g r a d i n g  f r o m p e r c e n t a g e marks t o l e t t e r g r a d e s  and v i c e - v e r s a o c c u r r e d  from year  years  t o y e a r , and  l e t t e r g r a d e s were g i v e n f o r one  marks f o r the o t h e r . g r a d i n g metbods|wiIl records  The be  t h a t i n some  t e r m and  c o - o r d i n a t i o n of these  described l a t e r .  percentage two  different  In the H i g h  School  p e r c e n t a g e marks were a v a i l a b l e f o r a l l c a s e s up  J u n e , 1-9.33, and  s i n c e 1933,  till  e x c e p t f o r some f i n a l June exam-  i n a t i o n marks, a l l marks i n the combined H i g h S c h o o l s  have been  on t h e l e t t e r - g r a d e ba,sis. H o s t of t h e i n f o r m a t i o n as t o the i n t e l l i g e n c e o f various  i n d i v i d u a l s was  obtained  the e l e m e n t a r y s c h o o l s . o n l y i n r e l a t i v e l y few  the  from the r e c o r d cards used i n  Many d i f f e r e n t t e s t s were u s e d , i n s t a n c e s were l a r g e v a r i a t i o n s  and between  the v a r i o u s , t e s t s found.  One  t e s t , h o w e v e r , j u d g i n g by  c a s e s i n t h i s s u r v e y , was  c o n s i s t e n t l y f i v e or ten p o i n t s below  the a v e r a g e o f t h e o t h e r t e s t s ? but  as t h i s p a r t i c u l a r  had/been g i v e n - t o no more than t h i r t y s t u d y , and  test  cases of  this  as r e s u l t s o f f r o m t h r e e t o f i v e t e s t s w e r e a v a i l -  a b l e f o r the m a j o r i t y o f t h e c a s e s , should have l i t t l e The  o f the 356  the  t h e r e s u l t o f t h i s one  e f f e c t on the f i n d i n g s o f t h i s  report.  I n t e l l i g e n c e Tests used i n the l o c a l s c h o o l s  the p e r i o d u n d e r c o n s i d e r a t i o n were t h e the D e t r o i t and  test  during  pintner-Cunningham,  t h e H a g g e r t y i n t h e l o w e r g r a d e s , and  the O t i s ,  7 H a t i o n a l and Terman i n the u p p e r g r a d e s . Intelligence and,  T e s t s were g i v e n  i n certain years,  As a g e n e r a l  rule  i n Grades one, e i g h t and n i n e ,  i n grades  s i x and t e n o r e l e v e n .  Chapter  5  Th.e-Assembling o f t h e D a t a . The  next  step a f t e r  t h e f i l i n g o f the c a r d s was t h a t o f  the p r e p a r a t i o n p f a s h e e t f o r e n t e r i n g the d a t a r e l a t i n g to each c a s e .  B e c a u s e o f t h e l a r g e number o f ca,ses i n the s t u d y  the amount o f data, to be e n t e r e d was r e d u c e d only  those  facts  of p a r t i c u l a r  importance  t o a., minimum,  to t h i s  survey  being provided f o r . From the sample sheet, i t w i l l be seen left  f o r pa.rticula.rs o f t h e n a t i o n a l i t y  was f e l t of  i f only'to explain'in  some measure  to language d i f f e r e n c e s , a t t i t u d e s  was  o f the p a r e n t s .  t h a t some r e c o r d s h o u l d be made o f t h e r a c i a l  the cases,  due  t h a t space  towards  It origin  difficulties  education,and  the amount o f e d u c a t i o n which c e r t a i n groups of n a t i o n a l s 7  consider best f o r their i n many c a s e s bracing  the n a t i o n a l i t y  "Canadian".  e r e d as E n g l i s h , The  children.  o f t h e .parents was an a l l - e m -  Where, p o s s i b l e t h e r a c i a l  Scottish,  occupation  I t was f o u n d however, t h a t  Swedish,  o r i g i n was e n t -  French etc. ?  o f t h e f a t h e r was i n c l u d e d .because  such  i n f o r m a t i o n . t e l l s much as t o t h e home b a c k g r o u n d o f each  case.  ©  The  space f o r the s c h o o l r e c o r d s p r o v i d e s f o r a r a t i n g  f o r a l l o f t h e t w e l v e g r a d e s , w i t h f u r t h e r spaces below f o r a combined r a t i n g  on the g r a d e s  s c h o o l f r o m grade  one to grade  o b t a i n e d i n the e l e m e n t a r y s i x ; i n the J u n i o r H i g h  from grade  seven  to gre.de n i n e and i n the S e n i o r H i g h  f o r grades  t e n and e l e v e n o r f o r g r a d e s  further block i s provided f o r a rating ment t h r o u g h o u t scholastic  the grades.  a-ttainment i n c l u d e  grade, grades  ca.n a t r u e p i c t u r e  on s c h o l a s t i c  A  attains  f o r recording the  t h e a-ge o f the c h i l d repeated.  of the c h i l d ' s  School  t e n to twelve.  The e n t r i e s  s k i j i p e d and g r a d e s  School  i n each  Only i n t h i s way  s c h o o l h i s t o r y be shown,  and a l t h o u g h no c o r r e c t i o n h a s been made f o r a p u p i l b e i n g under-age o r over-age pupil's  records.  Spa.ce i s p r o v i d e d f o r t h e age a t w h i c h  ed i n t h e M a t h e m a t i c s  s u b j e c t s , f o r the average  In the spa.ce a t the extreme  i s a b l o c k f o r the l e t t e r grade w i t h the averages  reached m a t r i c u l a t i o n .  o f the o t h e r 117 s t u d e n t s who  The f i r s t  average  c o v e r s the s u b j e c t s Literature,  S t u d i e s , F r e n c h Grammar, F r e n c h C o m p o s i t i o n ,  Authors, L a t i n  right  a s s i g n e d each i n d i v i d u a l i n  of E n g l i s h C o m p o s i t i o n , E n g l i s h Grammar, E n g l i s h Social  obtain  s u b j e c t s and t h e S c i e n c e s , and f o r t h e  of a l l subjects.  comparison  each  t h e M a t r i c u l a t i o n e x a m i n a t i o n , f o r the a v e r -  o b t a i n e d i n the language  average  e s t i m a t e o f each  i n f o r m a t i o n next p r o v i d e d f o r i s t h a t of the M a t r i c -  i n d i v i d u a l wrote age  a fair  a t t a i n m e n t can be o b t a i n e d a t a g l a n c e .  -The ulation  i n a grade  Latin  Grammar, Greek Grammar and Greek A u t h o r s .  10 The  second  average  covers  t h e s u b j e c t s o f A l g e b r a , Geometry,  A r i t h m e t i c , P h y s i c s , Chemistry  and Geography, and i n the  Senior M a t r i c u l a t i o n Examination, In t h i s  analysis  of M a t r i c u l a t i o n  were computed on t h e r e s u l t s ulation  examination  of supplemental  ulation  examinations  isleft  training  mark and g i v e an i n a c c u r a t e  ability  Some d a t a a r e a v a i l a b l e  t o cope w i t h t h e M a t r i c -  i s carried  i s used  i n this  the l e t t e r grades  The  f o r many o f t h e c a s e s a t  This  s u r v e y f o r n o t i n g any s u b s e q u e n t s c h o o l courses.  o f t h e page p r o v i d e s  of the I n t e l l i g e n c e  and. t h e o c c u p a t i o n  records i n  on i n A c c o u n t a n c y , Pharmacy, e t c .  The b o t t o m s e c t i o n details  scholastic  C o l l e g e s , , and a t c e n t r e s where  i n s p e c i a . l c o m m e r c i a l and o t h e r  Scale  The r e s u l t s  were o m i t t e d p u r p o s e l y as t h e s e  f o r the l a t e r  the U n i v e r s i t y , a t B u s i n e s s  tests,  complete M a t r i c -  Examination.  each c a s e .  ing  the averages  w r i t t e n b y each i n d i v i d u a l .  of the i n d i v i d u a l ' s  Some space  space  results  of the f i r s t  would t e n d t o change t h e a v e r a g e estimate  Trigonometry.  space  T e s t s , t h e average  i n comparison w i t h  f o r the  s c o r e o f these  the other  causes  or job r a t i n g .  occupation  o r j o b r a t i n g was o b t a i n e d f r o m ' t h e  of Occupational  Volume 1 o f " G e n e t i c  Barr  I n t e l l i g e n c e , which i s d e s c r i b e d i n Studies of Genius",  Terman e t A l , as  follows? 'To  obtain this  representative  s c a l e Mr. P . E . B a r r drew up a l i s t o f  o c c u p a t i o n s , each d e f i n i t e l y  and c o n c r e t e l y  1.1 d e s c r i b e d , and b a d t h i r t y judges  r a t e them on a s c a l e o f 0 t o  100 a c c o r d i n g t o t h e g r a d e o f i n t e l l i g e n c e w h i c h each was b e l i e v e d t o demand.  The r a . t i n g s were t h e n d i s t r i b u t e d and  P» E. v a l u e s were computed f o r a l l t h e o c c u p a t i o n s . values express  i n the case  o f each o c c u p a t i o n t h e number o f  u n i t s of i n t e l l i g e n c e which, ion  of these  inary  The P.E.  a c c o r d i n g to the composite o p i n -  t h i r t y j u d g e s , t h e o c c u p a t i o n demands f o r o r d -  success. In  the use of t h i s s c a l e i t i s only necessary  t o compare  t h e o c c u p a t i o n w h i c h i s t o be ra,ted, w i t h t h e o c c u p a t i o n scale value  whose  i s known, a n d t o a s s i g n i t t h e v a l u e p o s s e s s e d b y  t h e s c a l e d o c c u p a t i o n w h i c h i t most nea,rly m a t c h e s .  Intermed-  i a t e v a l u e s may be u s e d i n r a t i n g o c c u p a t i o n s w h i c h do n o t a/ppear i n t h e s c a l e . agree f a i r l y  I t h a s been found  that different  judges  c l o s e l y i n rating the intellectual.demands of  occupations by t h i s s c a l e . Barr Scale values unquestionably  correspond  I t c a n n o t be c l a i m e d t h a t t h e e x a c t l y to the f a c t s , b u t they  a p p r o x i m a t e t h e f a c t s , more c l o s e l y t h a n w o u l d  the. j u d g m e n t o f a n y one i n d i v i d u a l . ' I t must f u r t h e r b e a d m i t t e d  that the occupational r a t i n g s  g i v e n t o many i n d i v i d u a l s a r e n o t f i n a l . s i n c e most o f t h e c a s e s l e f t be f u l l y  The p e r i o d o f t i m e  s c h o o l i s t o o s h o r t f o r many t o  s e t t l e d i n t h e i r occupations  1 Genetic Studies of Genius,  a,nd where an i n d i v i d u a l  Terman e t A l . V o l . 1.  S t a n f o r d U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1925.  Pages 67, t o 69.  12 is  i n t r a i n i n g f o r a. p a r t i c u l a r  the  rating  of that  The n e x t most  until  forms all  s t e p i n t h i s w o r k , and the  sheets.  It  various  sets  parisons or h e r  a s s e m b l i n g of the  on f i l e .  the  data  f r o m the  Fo a t t e m p t -was made a t  be n o t e d  of marks  to  that  a, common b a s i s ,  p o i n t e d out  grade  i n each  class.  that both l e t t e r grades  various  g r a d i n g the on the  i t was n e c e s s a r y  to  and thus  to be made and a p l a n i n g of each  respective  is given  one w h i c h i n v o l v e d  i n f o r m a t i o n a v a i l a b l e was e n t e r e d  will  she  occupation.  t i m e , wa.s the  report  o c c u p a t i o n he or  has  data  reduce enable  individual  It  a l r e a d y been  and p e r c e n t a g e marks have period  under c o n s i d e r a t i o n .  either  l e t t e r grades recotirse years,  to  was  i m p o s s i b l e to  o r p e r c e n t a g e marks  d e t a i l e d records  b u t a,s  these  records  k e p t by the  to  1933,  The number o f as  o f the  case was a p e r f e c t l y letter  grades  p r i o r to  1933  such  cases,  there  were  the g r o u p .  in  grades.  p e r c e n t a g e marks straightforward u s e d i n the and i n the  of  each g r a d e  process,  elementary  schools  but i n  schools  generally  a n u m e r i c a l e q u i v a l e n t had to be, o b t a i n e d to  grading within  the  a l l o w an a c c u r a t e g r a d i n g w i t h i n each grade  Tlie a v e r a g i n g  some y g a r s  through  were n o t g e n e r a l l y a v a i l a b l e  b o t h p e r c e n t a g e marks and l e t t e r  c a s e of the  without  teachers  made s u c h a, c o n v e r s i o n u n n e c e s s a r y  enough c a s e s  each  convert  satisfactorily  a c o n v e r s i o n c o u l d n o t be a t t e m p t e d . however,  com-  in his  been u s e d i n the West V a n c o u v e r S c h o o l s d u r i n g the It  cases  for the in  since  allow  T h i s was done by g i v i n g , the  follow-  13 ing  v a l u e s t o the v a r i o u s l e t t e r  C, 4; C-,3; D»2$ E their  }  1,  These e q u i v a l e n t s were then added,  sum d i v i d e d by the'number o f s u b j e c t s g r a d e d and t h e  quotient  t a k e n t o two pla.ces o f d e c i m a l s .  then e n t e r e d i n t h e a v e r a g e I t w i l l be n o t e d and  g r a d e s : A, 7; B, 6; 6+, 5;  This result  column u n d e r the c o r r e c t  grade.  on some d a t a s h e e t s t h a t p e r c e n t a g e  converted l e t t e r averages  was  averages  a r e e n t e r e d f o r t h e one g r a d e ,  thus c o v e r i n g c a s e s where s t u d e n t s were marked u n d e r two different  systems i n t h e one y e a r .  In the f i n a l g r a d i n g w i t h -  i n t h e g r a d e b o t h o f t h e s e a v e r a g e s were c o n s i d e r e d and where a difference  i n l e t t e r grade  o c c u r r e d andaverage o f t h e two  g r a d e s was t a k e n . When a l l a v a i l a b l e a start  data, were e n t e r e d on t h e d a t a  was made i n p l a c i n g  according  to h i s g r a d e  g r a d e .were r a n k e d  each i n d i v i d u a l  averages.  The g r a d e s  i n o r d e r and g r a d e s  sheets  w i t h i n t h e group earned  allotted  i n each  on.the  basis  o f A t o t h e t o p 5 p e r c e n t , B t o the n e x t 20 p e r c e n t , C-f-to the n e x t 15 p e r c e n t , G t o t h e m i d d l e  20 p e r c e n t , C- t o t h e n e x t  15 p e r c e n t , D to the n e x t 20 p e r c e n t , and E t o the l o w e s t 5 percent. line  These l e t t e r g r a d e s were t h e n e n t e r e d i n the l o w e s t  o f the s c h o o l r e c o r d t a b l e under the c o r r e c t grade.  s h o u l d be n o t e d each g r a d e  that  c a r e was t a k e n t o rank the c a s e s w i t h i n  as h i g h e r p e r c e n t a g e marks a r e g i v e n i n some g r a d e s .  When t h e l e t t e r g r a d e s to  f o r each  t w e l v e were e n t e r e d , a v e r a g e s  grades  It  of the grades  from one  were f o u n d f o r t h e e l e m e n t a r y  f r o m one t o s i x , f o r the h i g h s c h o o l g r a d e s  from  seven  14 to  twelve;, and f o r t h e w h o l e s c h o o l l i f e  o f each  individual.  These a r e p l a c e d on t h e sample s h e e t s i n s q u a r e s 1, 2 and 3 respectively, Tlie t o t a l number o f c a s e s i n t h i s s t u d y i s 356 and t h e d i s tribution  o f t h e s e c a s e s o v e r t h e g r a d e s i s shown b y t h e f o l l -  owing d i a g r a m . the  On t h e l e f t - h a n d  side of the t a b l e are l i s t e d  g r a d e s one t o n i n e r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e b e g i n n i n g g r a d e s o f  t h e s e 356 c a s e s , w h i l e a l o n g t h e t o p a r e l i s t e d  the grades three  to ttwelTev. r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e g r a d e s r e a c h e d o r c o m p l e t e d . Table 2  e  Tlie D i s t r i b u t i o n  o f t h e Cases a c c o r d i n g  to the  number o f g r a d e s a t t e n d e d . Commencing in ' Grade 1  111  IV  V  VI  V l l  1  1  -  4  12  11  1  111  1  IV V  •  Vlll  IX  X  XI.  X l l  11  17  9  1  4  3  7.  6  8  2  19  3  8  16  14  3  16  1  9  14  13  8  22  1  6  10  10  19  4  5  28  9  -  10  16  VI Vll Vlll  1  IX  1 1  For  e x a m p l e j o f t h e 356 c a s e s , one i n d i v i d u a l  attended from  g r a d e 1 t o gra.de 1 1 1 ; o n e , g r a d e 1 t o g r a d e I V ; f o u r , g r a d e 1 to g r a d e V I ; 1 7 , g r a d e 1 t o g r a d e I X ; n i n e , g r a d e V I t o g r a d e Xll;  1  and 28, grade V I to grade X I .  spent from f i v e  A l l o f t h e 35-6 c a s e s have  t o e l e v e n yea.rs i n t h e s c h o o l s .  15 Table)3.  The.Number o f Cases i n e a c h Grade and t h e c o r r e s -  p o n d i n g Number o f c o m p l e t e 1 -  Records. 11  <  111  IV  V  VI  61  110  171 •  237  283  • 329  Numbe r o f R e c o r d s 61  110  169 ,  246  282  355  XI  Xll  Number o f Ca,ses  Vll Numb e r o f C a s e s  349  Numb e r o f R e c o r d s 3 6 7  IX  X  332  292  228  167'  104  409  306  <i*ii  163  103  VI11  Tlie d i s c r e p a n c y b e t w e e n t h e number o f c a s e s g r a d e and t h e number o f c o m p l e t e  i n each  records o f these cases i s  e x p l a i n e d b y t h e f a c t t h a t b o t h l e t t e r and p e r c e n t a g e were a v a i l a b l e  grades  i n c e r t a i n c a s e s , w h i l e i n o t h e r s no l e t t e r .  o r p e r c e n t a g e ' g r a d e s were recorded-.  When l e t t e r g r a d e s were  g i v e n n u m e r i c a l v a l u e s ~ and t h e s e v a l u e s a v e r a g e d , d i s t r i b u t e d on t h e 5 p e r c e n t , 20 p e r c e n t following distribution  resulted.  and t h e n  ( e t c . ) ba.sis, the  An e x a m i n a t i o n o f t h i s  table  shows t h a t t e a c h e r s g e n e r a l l y f o l l o w q u i t e f a i t h f u l l y t h e d i r e c t i o n s f o r a s s i g n i n g l e t t e r g r a d e s on t h i s p e r c e n t a g e b a s i s . .This u n i f o r m i t y i s , as w o u l d be e x p e c t e d , more m a r k e d i n t h e . middle grades i n which T a b l e 4,  cases.  D i s t r i b u t i o n o f the Averages o f the numerical  values of the L e t t e r  1  t h e r e a r e more  Grades.,  A  1 6.35-6.72  11 6.06-6.28  111 5.78-6,71  IV 5,67-6.27  B  5.60-6.14  5.27-6.00m  4.90-5.75  4.93-5.57  C+  4.70-5.29  4.87-5.09  4.47-4.82  s e e page 1 3 ,  .  4,67-4.90  16  1  11  111  c  4,10-4.57  4.28-4.83  3.89-4.44  3.94-4,64  c-~  3.83-4.00  3,69-4.26  3.44-3,87  3.50-3,87  D  3.14-3.80  2.90-3.64  2.52-3.40  2.86-3.46  E  •2.12-2.94  1.66-2.87  1.19-2.48  1.92-2.86  Vll  Vlll  V -  Yl  •IV"  A  5.78-6.33  5,83-6.44'  5.50-6.46  5.90-6,17  B  -4,88-5. 76  4.92-5.75  4.54-5.46  4.75-5.73  C*  4,26-4.85  4.46-4.90  4.15-4.48  4.28-4,73  C  3.76-4.22  4.00-4.44  3.72-4.12  3,82-4.26  C-  3.33-3.72  3.46-3.96  3.39-3.70  3.40-3.79  2,85-3.45  2.67-3,37  2,50-3,36  1.40-2.83  1.85-2.61  2,16-2,45  D E  2.06-2,72 IX  X  XI  Xll  A  5.74-6.30  5.97-6.30  5,78-6.34  6.12-6,33  B-  4.73-5.71  4,94-5.78  5,03-5.75  5.12-5,87  C4  4.14-4.70  4.53-4.91  4,50-4.97  4.68-5.09  C  3.64-4.09  3.78-4.40  4,03-4.48  4.13-4.65  C-  3.25-3,62  3.49-3.77  3.56-3.94  3.60-4.11  D  2 31 ~* 3 © SO  2.63-3,42  2.85-3.52  2.73-3.57  E  1.44-2.21  2.04-2.50  2,31-2.77  2,10-^2,68  tahle gives  t h e maximum, median, and m i n i -  e  The f o l l o w i n g  mum p e r c e n t a g e marks i n each o f the g r a d e s .  Tlie maximum and  minimum marks a r e n o t i c e a b l y u n i f o r m f r o m g r a d e s t h r e e to eight  inclusive,  Erom g r a d e n i n e on t h e median mark i s t e n  17 percent* l o w e r  than from g r a d e s  the o f t e n e x p r e s s e d  111 t o V l l l ,  o p i n i o n t h a t averages  thus h e a r i n g out  d e c l i n e from  grades  1 to X l l . . Table  5.  Maximum, M e d i a n , and Minimum marks i n each Grade. 1  11  111  IV  V  VI  Maximum  93  90  88  87  87  88  Median  76  79  72  70  72  72  Minimum  40  40  • 35  34  51  57  Vll  Vlll  IX  X  XI  Xll  Maximum  88  86  93  83  78  85  Median  70  71  64  60  61  61  Minimum  52  46  46  40  40  45  F o r most o f t h e c a s e s f r o m intelligence and  t e s t s were a v a i l a b l e .  t h e i r averages,  together with  ages p l a c e d on t h e d a t a s h e e t s . shows t h e d i s t r i b u t i o n Table  6.  two t o f i v e  of v a r i o u s  These r e s u l t s were t h e gra.ding from  entered  these  The accompanying b l o c k  o f t h e 356 c a s e s  Grades A s s i g n e d  results  avergra/ph  as t o i n t e l l i g e n c e .  on t h e B a s i s o f I n t e l l i g e n c e .  A  129 2/3 t o 139  B  118  C+  113 1/3 t o 117 3/5  C  106  C-  101 1/2 t o 105 4/5  t o 129 1/2  t o 113  D  88 3/5 t o 101  E  51 1/2 t o  88  T a b l e 7.  18  Block graph of  shov^ing  Intelligence  556 c a s e s  distribution  in  of t h i s  study.  Number o f Cases in  each g r o u p  dtxzh.  So  Sf- Sf  2j1 j 14- 7f  2628 50 55 48 49156 t+  0?  <}*• f9 '<>*•  Intelligence  / 0  f  c a s e s were l i s t e d  1 9 1 0  e n t e r e d on the d a t a  computed, d i s t r i b u t e d  as f o l l o w s  9.  f'f '^f- *>/ /3+ /3f  Quotients.  w h e n ^ , l l - a v a i l a b l e , i n f o r m a t i o n was s h e e t s and a l l a v e r a g e s  "f  and e n t e r e d , the  i n o r d e r to o b t a i n the v a r i o u s  c o m p a r i s o n s between i n t e l l i g e n c e  and c l a s s  grades,  between  19 intelligence  and m a t r i c u l a t i o n  r e s u l t s , between  intelligence  and o c c u p a t i o n s , e t c . These c a s e s a r e l i s t e d by number as f o l l o w s (a)  By numbers 1 to 356 as a l p h a b e t i c a l l y a r r a n g e d .  (b)  By t h e i n i t i a l  (c)  By the Roman f i g u r e s 1 t o X l l t o show g r a d e s f o r w h i c h  r e c o r d s were (d)  available.  By the y e a r i n w h i c h each s t u d e n t who  r i c u l a t i o n wrote (e)  B o r G to s i g n i f y sex.  completed to Mat-  the e x a m i n a t i o n .  By the a d d i t i o n o f t h e l e t t e r C i f t h e s t u d e n t took  Commercial T a b l e 8.  options  i n g r a d e s IX t o X l l .  A Sampling of the L i s t i n g s  o f the Grades earned by  each Case.  Case l u m b e r  S c h o o l Grades 1-V1 V l l - X l l l - X l l  2 0 2 B 1 1 l - X l l 36 B  A  A  M a t r i c u l a t i o n Averages Lang. Maths.fc A l l Sub. I CJ Sciences A A A A  C  C-  C  204B Y-X132  B  B  B  205B 111-1X  C  C  C  206B VI-XI31  C  C  c  C-  D  207B 1V-X1135 o  c  c  E  B  D  Cf  c*  C  B  1-X1137  B  C4  B  C  c-  211 B1-X1137  A  B  B  B  C-f  210G  Prom t h e s e r e c o r d s i t comparisons.  B  B  C-  D  D  C*  D  C-  B  C-  C  D  •E  E  B  B  C4  B  Cf  E  209G 1-1V  was a  C4 •'  D  203G11-V111  208B 1-1X  lob.  Ck.-' B  s i m p l e m a t t e r to o b t a i n the v a r i o u s  Chapter The C o r r e l a t i o n The iculars  records  o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and S c h o o l Grades.  o f the 157 hoys and 169 g i r l s  f o r whom p a r t -  o f S c h o o l work i n g r a d e s 1 to VI were a v a i l a b l e were  next s t u d i e d of  4.  and s c a . t t e r diagrams made to show t h e comparison  s c h o o l grades, w i t h i n t e l l i g e n c e . ' The s c a t t e r  immediately f o l l o w i n g  diagrams  show the c o m p a r i s o n between s c h o o l g r a d e s  f r o m 1 to V I and i n t e l l i g e n c e f o r boys a l o n e , f o r g i r l s  alone,  and f o r b o t h s e x e s .  T a b l e 9. Comparison o f I n t e^ l l3i-g§e?n ° c e >an/ S c h o o l g r a d e s ® o f ,157 B o y s . 1  n  ,e  n d  Intelligence grading  A  B  C*  C  •'•:<•/• A :• :  2  3  3  1  1 14 : 8  9  4  ,': Cf  S c h o o l Grades  1'  •  E7  D  E  Intelligence grading  S c h o o l , Grades  A  _ B  a  A  2  2  ,3  B  3 16  5 ..  1-V1  c-  D  4  1  2  7  2  3  -C  E  2  4  10  3  3  0i  3  4  2; 10  5  .4  C  3 10 15  5  5•  6  1  1  6 :5  6  C-  2  3  4  7  7  1  3  7  3  3  2. 5  18  2  1  6  1  •" cD  C-  1-V1  T a b l e 10. Comparison o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and S c h o o l Grades o f 169 g i r l s .  1  9  13  5  D  4  4  E  '  2  5  21 T a b l e 11. .Comparison o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and S c h o o l Grades o f 326 Boys and G i r l s . Intelligence grading. A  School A  B  4  5 •  Gra.des  C+  C  6  1  C-  D  8 • 13  5  2  4'  Gi  4  7  9  17  5  6  C  3  14  15  15  10  10  1  c-  2  o  4  10  12  13  1  6  9  14  30  a.-  4  11 we  see  O f t h e 526  of B r a t i n g  to t h e i r  67 o r 21.2  percent  intelligence removed  p e r c e n t were tv/o  and  b e t t e r than D i n school 10  per-  a n a l y s i s o f t h e t a b l e shows t h a t o f  i n school grades,  T a b l e s . 9 and  o r 32,5  l a s t m e n t i o n e d f o u r were o f JO i n t e l l i g e n c e  s c h o o l r a t i n g s o f A,  girls  c a s e s , 106  as  p e r c e n t were t h r e e removed; and 8 o r 2.5  c e n t were f o u r removed. An the e i g h t c a s e s  Intelligence  o b t a i n e d a s c h o o l g r a d e one  from t h e i r i n t e l l i g e n c e g r a d i n g ; removed; 25 o r 7.9  5  rated B i n intelligence  a l e t t e r grade which corresponded o r 38 p e r c e n t  of  7  I n t h e i r s c h o o l work f r o m g r a d e 1  S i m i l a r l y 30 s t u d e n t s  w e l l as i n s c h o o l w o r k .  g r a d i n g ; 120  10  that four students  r a t i n g A o b t a i n e d an A r a t i n g  obtained  !  1  E  to. gra.de V I .  E  B  D  Erom T a b l e  1-V1  two  two  o f C-  intelligence  of B i n t e l l i g e n c e  and  obtained  ,  c o u l d do •no  grades.  show t h a t b o y s do n o t  r a t e as h i g h as the  l  i n t h e i r s c h o o l g r a d e s when t h e s e g r a d e s a r e compared w i t h  the i n t e l l i g e n c e  ratings.  22 In" T a b l e 9 i t w i l l be seen -tha.t more boys r e c e i v e d g r a d e s b e l o w t h e i r i n t e l l i g e n c e g r a d e s than above. of Grade A i n t e l l i g e n c e  school  Three  boys  r e c e i v e d B' g r a d e s i n t h e i r s c h o o l work,  e i g h t o f B i n t e l l i g e n c e r e c e i v e d Cf i n t h e i r s c h o o l w o r k , and I n a l l 64 r e c e i v e d l o w e r s c h o o l g r a d e s t h a n i n t e l l i g e n c e  grades  and 41 r e c e i v e d h i g h e r g r a d e s . T a b l e 12. Numbers o f boys o b t a i n i n g S c h o o l Grades above o r b e l o w I.Q.. r a t i n g s , (of. 157 c a s e s ) Grades b e l o w  I.e... r a t i n g .  1 grade below  37  1 g r a d e above  24  2 grades below  19  2 ,grades above  13  3 grades below  8  3 g r a d e s above  3  4 gra.des above  1  From T a b l e 10 i t w i l l obtains. gence  68 g i r l s  be s e e n tha.t a n o p p o s i t e  condition  o b t a i n e d b e t t e r s c h o o l gra.des t h a n  intelli-  r a t i n g s and 47 r e c e i v e d p o o r e r s c h o o l g r a d e s .  T a b l e 13. Numbers o f g i r l s below (  Grades above 1,0;.. r a t i n g .  I.Q,. r a t i n g s ,  Grades b e l o w  o b t a i n i n g S c h o o l Grades above o r  ( o f 169 c a s e s ) ratings.  Grades above I,Qi. r a t i n g s .  1 grade below  23  1 g r a d e above  36  2 grades below  16  2 g r a d e s above  19  3 grades below  6  ' 3 gra.des a.bove  8  4 grades below  2  4 g r a d e s a.bove  5  Hie between  scatter  d i a g r a m s w h i c h f o l l o w show s i m i l a r  comparisons  i n t e l l i g e n c e and s c h o o l g r a d e s o f V l l t o X l l i n T a b l e s  14, 15 and 1 6 , and between the w h o l e  school l i f e  i n t e l l i g e n c e and a. g r a d i n g b a s e d on  o f t h e i n d i v i d u a l i n T a b l e s 1 7 , 18 and 19,  23 Ta.bie.s 14, 15, and 16. Comparison School Ratings  on Grades  o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and  Vll-Xll,  .BOYS (170) Intelligence grading  GIRLS (ISO)  School grades V l l - X l l  Intelligence  .A, B  School grades A  B  C+- C  <>  2  2  1  I 12  9  4  1  8  5  9  4  8  5 14  7  7  2  8  9  5  6  2  5  4 12 13  6  C4-  C-  C  iC  c-  C-  D  D  E  ,E  3  1  Table:15 „ Vll-Xll  BOYS and GIRLS (350) Intelli gence grading A  School grades A  B  6  C4 C 4  C+ C  12 4--, 12  Vll-Xll C- D  E  1  8131 tL4 13 21  6  1  7  3  8 21 13 15  4  C-  3  8 12  7ll5  3  D  2  8 11 .16 33  3  4  7  E T a b l e .16.  C- D  E  1 • 5  "Table o*14.  Grades  Vll-Xll  24 Tables, 1 7 , 18 and 1 9 . Ratings  on Grades  Comparison  of Intelli,? gence and S c h o o l  l-Xll.  BOYS ( 1 7 2 )  GIRLS ( 1 8 4 )  Intelligence grading  A  B  G+ C  A  4  5  1  B  2 17  7 10  4  6  2 13  2  4  1. 3  6  8  6  5  c-  2  3  4  3  9  D  1  1  6  6 15  Ct  c  School grades l - X l l C- D  Intelligence  6  3 .5  E  B  C+C  A  2  3  B  16  4  E  2  School grades A  7  6  C  9  9 111  C-  1  4  31 •  3 :2  9  T a b l e 18,  BOYS and GIRLS (.356) Intelli-  School grades  l-Xll  C-- D  Cf C  E  ding  A  B  A  6  7. 4  B  8  C+  1 13 11 19 ' 5  C  4 12 15 19 .10 14  3 1  t  33 11 16  4 4  C-  3  7 13 12 14  D  4  3  9 17 31 ,2  E T a b l e 1-9.  9  6  6• 9  1 1  Q  2  l-Xll  E  3  3 11 16  E  ?  Grades  C-D  6  C*  T a b l e 17 ,  l-Xll  3  25 An to  a n a l y s i s o f T a b l e s .14 and, 1,5 shows t h a t g i r l s  do b e t t e r  t h a n the boys  with intelligence  (when s c h o o l g r a d e s  r a t i n g s ) i n the upper  are  grades.  continue  compared  Figure 4  'shows t h a t 40 boys o b t a i n e d s c h o o l g r a d e s h i g h e r than intelligence  r a t i n g s and  F i g u r e 5 shows t h a t  68 g i r l s  than t h e i r i n t e l l i g e n c e school  that  school grades.  o b t a i n e d s c h o o l grades h i g h e r  r a t i n g s and  t h a t 56 o b t a i n e d l o w e r  grades,  A further similarity ing  a,'-school grade  The  similarity  is  73 o b t a i n e d l o w e r  their  i n the p e r c e n t a g e  c o r r e s p o n d i n g to t h e i r  c o n t i n u e s i n the groups  n o t so h i g h and  Ta,ble20,  i s noted  i s shown c l e a r l y  Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e  Grades 1-V1 lumber of cases  obtain-  intelligence  where the  rating.  correlation  i n the f o l l o w i n g and  School  grades.  Grades V l l - X l l 326  table,  Grades  l-Xll  350  356  32,3/  34.0/  Grade o f I . f .  32,5/  One  grade  removed.  38,0/  37,7/  Two  grades  removed  21.2/  20.9/  20.0/  removed 7,9/  -8.3/  5,9/  .9/  1,1/  6  Three- g r a d e s Four grades It attained  2.5/  i s interesting  to note  e i t h e r .the g r a d e  immediately of  removed  ;  a l s o be n o t e d  39.0/  70 p e r c e n t of/ a l l c a s e s  of t h e i r i n t e l l i g e n c e  above o r below.  correlation  that  - -  o r the  grade  T h i s shows a c o n s i d e r a b l e -degree  of i n t e l l i g e n c e  and  school grades.  t h a t o v e r the t w e l v e g r a d e s  It  may  the c o r r e l a t i o n i s  somewhat h i g h e r than o v e r e i t h e r  the f i r s t  s i x or the l a s t s i x  g r a d e s ti>ken s e p a r a t e l y . T a b l e 21.  Comparison  o f School.* Grades* o f t h e f i r s t - s i x cu  y e a r s l w i t h ! t h e " " l a s t ; s i x ; y e a r s * 3 (314 c a s e s ) School grades 1-V1  School grades V l l - X l l B  Cf  C  C-  5  2  1  10 29  9  13  5  C +  15  7  14  3  7  C  10 13  IS 11  11  1  4  15 12  8  4  4  8 13  33  8  A  A  5  B  2  C-  D  r\  E  3  E  Li]  Number of c a s e s  314  Grade f o r g r a d e  107  34,1/  One  grade  123  3 9,2/  Two  g r a d e s -removed  removed  Three g r a d e s Eour grades H e r e . a g a i n we Intelligence  removed removed  find  :  60  19,1/  23  7.3/  1  015/  a l m o s t the same p e r c e n t a g e as i n the  School grades t a b l e ,  thus s u g g e s t i n g t h a t the  cor-  r e l a t i o n between e l e m e n t a r y s c h o o l work and h i g h s c h o o l work i s somewhat s i m i l a r The  to t h a t between I n t e l l i g e n c e  and  s c h o o l grades,  c o r r e l a t i o n between the e l e m e n t a r y s c h o o l g r a d e s and  h i g h s c h o o l g r a d e s would  be h i g h e r i f the whole  had been p r e s e n t e d , forjthe g r e a t e r the range  the  distribution  o f marks i n the .  27 distributions,  the h i g h e r the . c o r r e l a t i o n .  l o w e r end o f t h e d i s t r i b u t i o n  In t h i s  c a s e , w i t h the  c u t o f f (owing to t h e d r o p p i n g o u t  of the p o o r e r s t u d e n t s ) the c o r r e l a t i o n  i s n a t u r a l l y lower.-  The n e x t s c a t t e r diagram shows t h e r e l a . t i o n between  school  g r a d e s and m a t r i c u l a t i o n a v e r a g e s o f t h e 118 p u p i l s who completed, h i g h s c h o o l and who wrote T a b l e 22. Comparison  o f S c h o o l Grades  M a t r i c u l a t i o n Averages, Matriculation gra.de  and R a t i n g s b a s e d on  (118 c a s e s )  Average  School. Grade  A  B  C+  A  2  2  1  B  4 10  6  4  Ct  7  3  C  4  C-  2  D  C-  D  5-  1  2  2  6  3  .1  2  6  4  6  1  2  8  14  1  ,1  1  1  3  E  C  Grade f o r g r a d e  35.6/  One  43.2/  grade  removed  Two g r a d e s removed  '  the M a t r i c u l a t i o n E x a m i n a t i o n .  1  14.4/  Three g r a d e s removed  5.1/  F o u r g r a d e s removed  0,9/  The s c h o o l g r a d e s i n t h i s  E  one s t u d y were a l l o t t e d  a v e r a g e g r a d e made b y each o f t h e 118 m a t r i c u l a n t s  on t h e  i n comparison  28 w i t h t h e o t h e r 117.  The n o n - m a t r i c u l a n t s were n o t c o n s i d e r e d  i n t h i s p a r t i c u l a r p a r t o f t h e s t u d y so as t o o b t a i n a t r u e r estimate of the p o s i t i o n The  table  o f each s t u d e n t w i t h i n  t h e group.  on t h e p r e c e d i n g page shows, t h a t n e a r l y  of t h e 118 c a s e s g r a d e d t h e same o r a t t a i n e d above o r b e l o w t h a t  of the other r a t i n g .  mentioned i n the t a b l e ,  i s that  80 p e r c e n t  grades  immediately  The extreme  o f a b o y , who, a f t e r  case,last obtaining  an a v e r a g e o f D t h r o u g h o u t h i s s c h o o l c a r e e r , o b t a i n e d a B on the M a t r i c u l a t i o n  average.  I t i s i n t e r e s t i n g to note that  i n d i v i d u a l h a s an i n t e l l i g e n c e g r a d i n g o f B, s u g g e s t i n g o n l y when t h e f i n a l d r i v e  this  that  i n g r a d e X l l o c c u r r e d , d i d t h e boy-  apply h i m s e l f to the utmost. The  n e x t s t u d y mad^ was t h a t  gence and M a t r i c u l a t i o n vestigation  results.  o f ,the  c o m p a r i s o n of- I n t e l l i -  F o r the purpose of t h i s i n -  t h e l a n g u a g e s end s c i e n c e s were t a k e n  as h a s b e e n e x p l a i n e d p r e v i o u s l y ,  Tlie f o l l o w i n g  separately scatter  dia-  grams show t h e t r e n d toT/ards a r e l a t i v e l y h i g h c o r r e l a t i o n s i m i l a r to the previous s c a t t e r The  1  c o r r e l a t i o n o f I n t e l l i g e n c e and language averages i s :  f a i r l y h i g h and the f a c t t h a t a higher correlation b e a r s o u t -the _ The  diagrams,  than I n t e l l i g e n c e  supposition  c o r r e l a t i o n s of  Intelligence  and l a n g u a g e s have  and t h e S c i e n c e a v e r a g e s  that group i n t e l l i g e n c e  t h e s e t h r e e work o u t a s  tests  follows?  Averages  .49  Intelligence  and M a t r i c u l a t i o n  Intelligence  and M a t r i c u l a t i o n  language Averages  .60  Intelligence  and M a t r i c u l a t i o n  Science Averages  ,39  29 favour  those who  T a b l e 23. Averages.  a r e good i n l a n g u a g e .  Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e  Intelligence grading  Matriculation'Averages, A  B  C+  C  C- D  A  2  1  2  -  1  B  2  8 .3  5  4  1  c+  4  7  3  3  3  C  5  2  5  4  6  1  1  3  4  2  .3  4  1  D  1  4  -  1  6  8  4  1  1  4  M a t r i c u l a t i o n Language A v e r a g e s A B Ct C C- D  Intelligence grading  1  -  2  1  5  4  5  5  1  B  Cf  5  5 '3  1  C  5  5  3  2  2  5  1  A  F I  B  3  C-  1  D  the s u r v e y  -  ...  -  1  .  1 .. 8  9  1  4  1  3  Cf .  4  4  4  3  1  1  5  5  C  4  -  7  6  5  1  7  4  1  C-  2  3  2  2' 4  3  2  2  3  •1  4  4  1  3  7  3  -  2-  »  4  A  o f the 118  2  D  •  a l s o be p o i n t e d out  common among t e a c h e r s  E t h a t the  M a t r i c u l a t i o n cases that g i r l s  boys i n the l a n g u a g e s u b j e a t s and standing  M a t r i c u l a t i o n Science Averages A B Ct C C- D E 3  E  I t may  E  c-  E  Intelligence grading  and M a t r i c u l a t i o n  r e s u l t s obtained bear  out  the  belief  g e n e r a l l y do b e t t e r than t h a t boys o b t a i n h i g h e r  i n t h e m a t h e m a t i c a l s u b j e c t s and  from  i n the s c i e n c e s .  the  30 The  r e c o r d s o f t h e c a s e s were n e x t  our t o f i n d  out i f t h e r e were any c o n n e c t i o n between  gence and the j o b s u n d e r t a k e n The  s t u d i e d i n an endeav-  on l e a y i n g  intelli-  school.  most marked f i n d i n g was t h a t t h e m a j o r i t y o f the s t u -  dents who  drop  out o f s c h o o l i n g r a d e s  do so when t h e y f i n d  seven,  t h e g o i n g too h a r d .  e i g h t , and n i n e  The boys become  e r r a n d b o y s , g r o c e r y s t o r e c l e r k s and manual l a b o u r e r s , and the girls  become housemaids o r pax"cel c h e c k e r s Of t h e 356 c a s e s  i t was f o u n d  t h a t 254 were  employed o r were c o n t i n u i n g t r a i n i n g skilled  occupation.  and w r a p p e r s . gainfully  towards a p r o f e s s i o n o r  The m a j o r i t y o f t h e remainder  were a t  home, i n some c a s e s h e l p i n g i n the home', w h i l e o t h e r s were faking business The  ratings  courses  o r h a d moved t o o t h e r h i g h s c h o o l s .  o f t h e o c c u p a t i o n s were b a s e d  S c a l e and showed a d e f i n i t e lation.  t r e n d towards a p o s i t i v e  o b t a i n e d t h e same g r a d i n g .on the j o b a n a l y s i s as  on i n t e l l i g e n c e ;  108 o r 42.5/ were one g r a d e removed; 58 o r  were two g r a d e s  removed; 14 o r 5,5/ were t h r e e  removed;. 7 o r 2.8/ were f o u r g r a d e s of  A i n t e l l i g e n c e was An a n a l y s i s  i n a D grade  lower  removed and one s t u d e n t occupation.  than  on j o b r a t i n g .  cases  on i n t e l l i g e n c e , w h i l e This ten percent  only  difference  may .perhaps be e x p l a i n e d by the f a c t 'that where an was  grades  o f t h e s c a t t e r d i a g r a m shows t h a t 105  g r a d e d h i g h e r on j o b r a t i n g 84 g r a d e d  corre-  The s c a t t e r d i a g r a m w h i c h f o l l o w s shows t h a t 66 o r  26 p e r c e n t  22.9/  on the B a r r  individual  i n t r a i n i n g f o r a p a r t i c u l a r v o c a t i o n , he o r she was  given  31 the r a t i n g b e l o n g i n g  to that occupation.  a p r o p o r t i o n would n o t succeed  I t i s probable  that  i n t h e i r chosen o c c u p a t i o n a.nd  would be f o r c e d t o a c c e p t p o s i t i o n s w h i c h w o u l d r a t e lower on the B a r r  Scale,  Ta.ble 24, Ratings.  Comparison o f I n t e l l i g e n c e a.nd O c c u p a t i o n a l (254  cases)  Intelligence grading  Occupational  Rating  A  C-  A  -  B  Cf  C  B  5 5 1 1 1 13 26 11 7 3  C+  10 12  9  c  10 12  18  3 2  D  6 1  13 10  14 7  of the cases  The o c c u p a t i o n  occupation iduals,  o f son o r d a u g h t e r and e x p l a i n s why c e r t a i n  indiv-  and 1935,  were s u c c e s s f u l i n  were i d l e  for-two  o r more  interesting  t o remain i n s t e a d y  environment, In others  as w e l l  qualified,  years,  s t u d y m i g h t w e l l be. made o f i n d i v i d u a l  and o f members o f v a r i o u s f a m i l i e s .  spoiling  or that on the  employment w h i l e many o t h e r s , j u s t  ure  influ-  o f the f a t h e r o f t e n has a b e a r i n g  obtaining  cases  3 •  the o b t a i n i n g o f t h i s  e s p e c i a l l y between 1931  A very  1  shows t h a t i n many i n s t a n c e s  ence ha.d s o m e t h i n g t o do w i t h job.  7  8  E  E  4 1  9 6  6 11  c-  A study  D  In many c a s e s  fail-  employment can be t r a c e d to the home failure  c a n be tra.ced t o a p i t i f u l  of. children,..! p a r t i c u l a r l y  i n c e r t a i n more  affluent  32 f a m i l i e s j. and, i n one o r two c a s e s p a r t i c u l a r l y , t o a, d i B t i n c t •lack o f p e r s o n a l i t y individual. much c l o s e r  i n an o t h e r w i s e b r i g h t  Such a. s t u d y , however, would i n v o l v e investigation  o f home c o n d i t i o n s  possible.for  this project,  considerable  t r a i n i n g i n S o c i a l Service  so  and h a r d - w o r k i n g not only a  than has been  b u t i t would a l s o n e c e s s i t a t e  o b t a i n e d were t o be a c t e d  work i f t h e i n f o r m a t i o n  on and t h e v a r i o u s  helped, t o overcome t h e i r many h a n d i c a p s .  individuals  Some n o t e w i l l be  made o f a, number o f s p e c i a l c a s e s i n a s u p p l e m e n t a r y but  the h i s t o r y  school h i s t o r y  o f these cases w i l l o f each ca.se.  a  chapter  r e f e r p r i n c i p a l l y to t h e  Chapter  The  special  many s i m i l a r  5,  Some S p e c i a l  Cases,  cases  in this  listed  ones among the 356  c h a p t e r are t y p i c a l  cases  of t h i s  study.  c a s e s were p i c k e d a t random f r o m among 43  cases  w h i c h t h e r e was  An  contained  some n o t i c e a b l e f e a t u r e .  i n each  treatment  and  collectively  show the t y p e s o f problems d i s c l o s e d by little ity in  n o t e has been t a k e n  o f c a s e s where the r e f e r e n c e to t h i s  in this  ca.ses where the i n d i v i d u a l has intelligence, It  s c h o o l grades  come to a, f i n a l cases will  done.  of v a l u e  The intellect  treatments  the s t u d y ,  Naturally  c h a p t e r o f the v a s t major-  said  that  occupation to t h e s e  In c e r t a i n  form^but  t h e r e are many  cases  in  rating. special  cases  that  i t i s too soon to  some e v i d e n c e ' w i l l be  have n o t  following  deal with  done as w e l l as  these  o b t a i n e d which  i n the h e l p i n g o f l a t e r p r o b l e m  cases Immediately who  these  d e c i s i o n b u t a f t e r more y e a r s of s t u d y of  i t i s hoped t h a t be  and  of  explanation i s  o b t a i n e d the same g r a d e s  i s with students s i m i l a r  much needs t o be  The  i n each  i n d i v i d u a l s have r u n t r u e to  i t m i g h t be  of  cases.  s t u d e n t s of h i g h  t h e y s h o u l d have.  34 S p e c i a l Case This  case  t e s t s ) whose the f i r s t  210 G l - X l l  i s that of a g i r l  school grades  s i x years  of A i n t e l l i g e n c e  dropped f r o m an average  t o an average  three years.  accuracy  o f the h i g h s c h o o l grades  The. M a t r i c u l a t i o n  i n M a t r i c u l a t i o n was the b e s t t h i s  The years last  explanation f o r this  c a n be found four years  influence  i n the g i r l ' s  as an average student  interest  out the  o f 56 p e r c e n t  c o u l d do - g i v i n g  girl's  i n the l a s t i n Art,  e v e r y t h i n g h a d been s u b o r d i n a t e d  three  D u r i n g the to' A r t , i n  a b i l i t y and a t p r e s e n t she i s T h i s i s a ca.se i n w h i c h t h e  o f t h e home s u r r o u n d i n g s  i s particularly  obvious.  g r a n d f a t h e r i s a l e a d e r i n Vancouver a r t c i r c l e s  and p r o m i s e d  to p u t h e r through. A r t S c h o o l as soon as she  passed h e r M a t r i c u l a t i o n  to  r e s u l t s hear  16w a v e r a g e  doing w e l l a t the A r t S c h o o l ,  est  of B during  o f C-.  w h i c h s u b j e c t she h a s a, s p e c i a l  The  jj on f o u r  l i t t l e b e t t e r than C- d u r i n g  the l a s t  a rating  37  examination,  b u t such was h e r i n t e r -  i n A r t (and s i c i - i n g ) t h a t she gave o n l y t h e minimum  time  her regular school subjects.  S p e c i a l Case 83 B 111-^X11 37 T h i s e a s e i s an example o f a boy o f g r a d e A i n t e l l i g e n c e • failing  t o do v e r y much a f t e r l e a v i n g  B averages  a l l through  a B average. a drug  school.  s c h o o l and p a s s e d  T h i s boy made  Matriculation  S i n c e g r a d u a t i o n he has spent  with  s e v e r a l months as  s t o r e d e l i v e r y boy b u t w i t h no a m b i t i o n s  towards  phar-'  ,35" macy as a p r o f e s s i o n . to s i m i l a r  characteristics  ary motives are but  t h e y can  to.  I t i s true  of an  i n the  insufficient  do w e l l  g r a d u a t e d and wha.t l i t t l e  T h i s hoy's l a c k o f a m b i t i o n can be  the  that  t h a t he  he has  occupation  to b r i n g  things  only  rest  that  a y e a r has  may  out  family.  Ordin-  t h e i r best  efforts  circumstance forces passed since  do much b e t t e r  done s i n c e g r a d u a t i o n  where h i s a b i l i t i e s  utmost,  i n the  this  boy  future,  holds l i t t l e  c o u l d be  Case 31  G i s that  but  promise  u s e d to  G V-Xll  the  o f a g i r l who  34  graded A  on  intelligence..  o f g r o u p t e s t s were as f o l l o w s ; N a t i o n a l  142;  Terman A a t age  131  1/3. This g i r l  14,  125;  Terman B a t age  comes o f a f a m i l y  r a t e w e l l above the  a t age  nine,  127;  Average  16,  i n which a l l f o u r  a v e r a g e In i n t e l l i g e n c e . An  ranked w e l l a l l through s c h o o l ;  children  older  brother  a s i s t e r 18 months younger  p a s s e d e n t r a n c e a t 12  l / 2 a.nd g r a d u a t e d f r o m H i g h S c h o o l  year before  s i s terman d. a y o u n g e r b r o t h e r ,  grading The off  her  older  in intelligence, failed school  records  from grade f i v e  in this  to grade  ment i n g r a d e s e l e v e n typical  them  (  S p e c i a l Case 31  Results  of the  traced  and  to complete Gra.de  leaders  falling  ten w i t h a. c o n s i d e r a b l e  twelve.  This  Ct  ten.  c a s e ,show a g r a d u a l  case seems to  of many i n w h i c h . s t u d e n t s have l i t t l e  k e e p i n g up w i t h the  of  one  improvebe  difficulty  i n the m i d d l e g r a d e s and  in  then i n -  3© grades of  n i n e and  t e n make grade o f C, .0- o r D,  The  m o t i v a t i o n i s shown i n such c a s e s by an i n c i d e n t  o c c u r r e d when t h i s g i r l was  i n grade V l l l .  e r a t e l y w e l l i n g r a d e V l l and  Grade V l l l  an announcement made i n the second Vlll  year  iation  not  A f t e r d o i n g mod-  she was  week o f Hay  t o the West V a n c o u v e r s t u d e n t who  o n l y the  with a total province.  She  stirred  i n her  She  t o o k p l a c e -and  f o u r y e a r s , making g r a d e s C in Xll,  done v e r y l i t t l e  The  father,  until  did.  just  r e c e n t l y , when, a f t e r  u n s a t i s f a c t o r y s c h o o l r e c o r d of t h i s  by  seems t o be  the g i r l ' s  death.  other s i m i l a r factors.  the b e s t e x p l a n a t i o n , and  enrollment  She  percent  Since graduation t h i s  at a business c o l l e g e  the  student  cannot in sports,  L a c k of  this  girl  course.  be blamed on home i n f l u e n c e , e x c e s s i v e p a r t i c i p a t i o n  ation  the h i g h  o f C i n IX, JJ i n X,  she began t a k i n g a b u s i n e s s  p o o r companions o r any  the  f i n i s h i n g w i t h andaverage 6 f 67  on the M a t r i c u l a t i o n E x a m i n a t i o n .  of her  i n the  s h o u l d have completed  however, t o o k  death  district  e n t e r e d h i g h s c h o o l when the change to  i n t h r e e y e a r s a.s h e r y o u n g e r s i s t e r  and  assoc-  f o u r t h i n rank  school course  has  grade  i n June c a r r i e d o f f  the medal f o r the  o f 526 marks out o f 600  by  d i d b e s t i n the E n t -  began t o work and  cash p r i z e but a l s o  f o u r - y e a r course  i n XI  which  t h a t a c a s h p r i z e w o u l d be g i v e n by a l o c a l  rance Examinations.  Of  importance  motiv-  i s borne  out  on h e r . f a t h e r [ s  37 S p e c i a l Case 327 Case 327 gence who girl  on  G i s .the  has  was  done,very l i t t l e s i n c e  I. f . a v e r a g e ranks t h i r d 6  e x a m i n a t i o n hut h e r the  This g i r l intelligence. few  eleven  good enough to l e a d h e r  pared w i t h  .11-Xll  case o f a g i r l  a B average throughout her She  G  117  in  intelli-  leaving school.  among the recorded  356  c a s e s and made  years  in  school.  a B grade when com-  matriculants.  comes f r o m a f a m i l y of s e v e n , a l l of  superior  The  provides  f a t h e r d r i v e s a d e l i v e r y van  a.nd  of the home a d v a n t a g e s a v a i l a b l e to most of the  provide  food  f o r the  This g i r l  i s almost wholly  done.  She  i s now  jobs  failed  without ambition  and,  on  even when that  r e s p o n s i b l e h e r e , as a younghas  B 111-X11  only  done a  few  37  c a s e i s i n t e r e s t i n g b e c a u s e of the i n c o n t r a s t , the  p o s i t i o n w i t h w h i c h the boy rates A  to  school.  S p e c i a l Case 202  "record o f the boy  and  f o r h e r s e l f things  to complete, g r a d e X and  since leaving  This  being.used  employed.as a c l e r k a t a bakeshop.  Home e n v i r o n m e n t i s p l a i n l y er b r o t h e r  apparently  West Van-  family.  employed i n housework w i l l n e v e r see have to be  This  y e a r i n the M a t r i c u l a t i o n  c o u v e r c h i l d r e n , most o f h i s e a r n i n g s  odd  of grade A  a v e r a g e o n l y gave h e r  other  35  intelligence, A  excellent  school  somewhat mediocre  a p p e a r s to be  satisfied.  i n s c h o o l g r a d e s and A  This  boy  in Matric-  38  u l a t i o n r e s u l t s - having seven y e a r s . one  l e d h i s e l a s s during the l a s t s i x or  On g r a d u a t i o n  o f the Canadian hanks.  the boy accepted I t i s admitted  a, p o s i t i o n  t h a t t h e r e a r e many  o p p o r t u n i t i e s i n v a r i o u s branches of banking, made no a t t e m p t s  with  b u t t h i s boy h a s  to b e t t e r h i s q u a l i f i c a t i o n s during the l a s t  y e a r . He began t o t a k e a c o u r s e a f t e r the t h i r d evening  i n t y p e w r i t i n g b u t gave up  and h a s done n o t h i n g  since.  I t seems  as i f he b e l i e v e s t h a t l e a d e r s h i p i n , l i f e w i l l come as e a s i l y to h i m a s l e a d e r s h i p i n cla.sswork h a s come i n t h e p a s t .  It is  h o p e d t h a t t h i s i m p r e s s i o n o f h i s a t t i t u d e p r o v e s t o be wrong.  S p e c i a l Case 147 B  1V-X1  One c a s e i n w h i c h f i n a n c i a l c i r c u m s t a n c e s Boy's w i t h d r a w a l f r o m s c h o o l i s tha.t :of 147 B.  hastened a In t h i s  case  t h e b o y h a d au i n t e l l i g e n c e r a t i n g o f B, a s c h o o l r e c o r d o f C through  t h e g r a d e s and t h e n l e f t  brother at plastering.  s c h o o l t o work w i t h h i s  I n t h i s case the boy's s t a n d i n g  off  i n -grade e l e v e n .  He h a d l i t t l e  and  w a n t e d t o g e t o u t and eaam a l i v i n g . e s p e c i a l l y  i n t e r e s t i n s c h o o l work as a t t h a t  t i m e t h e f a m i l y was l a r g e l y dependent on t h e e a r n i n g s older brother.  fell  of the  The  f o l l o w i n g c a s e s form' a s a m p l i n g o f t h o s e i n w h i c h  s t u d e n t s h a r e done b e t t e r . t h a n w o u l d be e x p e c t e d f r o m intelligence  rating.  their  They show t h e e f f e c t o f hard, work, good  home, i n f l u e n c e , a.nd a t t e n t i o n t o t h e j o b on h a n d . S p e c i a l Case'88G 1V-X11  35. i  Case 88G of  i s a c a s e o f a g i r l w i t h an I.CJ,. o f 93  t h r e e t e s t s ) p a s s i n g most o f t h e s u b j e c t s o f the m a t r i c -  u l a t i o n examination. ing  I n r e f e r e n c e t o t h i s case i t i s i n t e r e s t -  t o n o t e t h a t o f the 118  o n l y 23 h a d  casesjgoing through to M a t r i c u l a t i o n  I.Q.. 's o f l e s s t h a n 110 and o f t h e s e 23 o n l y 5  p a s s e d t h e M a t r i c u l a t i o n e x a m i n a t i o n a t one In of  (average)  this  n i n e , she  grade  case the g i r l  twenty.  d i d not s t a r t s c h o o l t i l l  r e p e a t e d g r a d e V1B,  I X and w r o t e  attempt.  was  the  age  16 y e a r s o l d g o i n g i n t o •  t h e M a t r i c u l a t i o n e x a m i n a t i o n a t t h e age  of  D e s p i t e t h e age 20, h e r s u c c e s s i n p a s s i n g most o f t h e  f  s u b j e c t s o f H i e M a t r i c u l a t i o n e x a m i n a t i o n shows t h a t an  enor-  mous amount o f w o r k must h a v e been done t o a c h i e v e t h i s  result.  The' I.Q,„  o f 93 i s rea.sona.bly a c c u r a t e , h e r two  sisters having,  i n t e l l i g e n c e q u o t i e n t s w i t h i n a few p o i n t s o f 93. S p e c i a l C a s e s 49G The  e f f e c t o f h a r d w o r k "is a l s o shown i n the c a s e s o f  t h e s e two g i r l s who c i a l work The  111-X11C and 71G V1-X1C.  c o m p l e t e d K o u r a.nd t h r e e y'ea.rs o f commer-  respectively.' f o r m e r , o f I.Q,,  r a t i n g D,  o b t a i n e d a P average  40 throughout h e r school was  very painstaking  now d o i n g  career.  She was n o t q u i c k  to l e a r n , b u t  and t h o r o u g h i n a l l h e r work.  s a t i s f a c t o r y work as a. s t o r e  The  latter girl,  age  throughout h e r school  has  done w e l l as a s t o c k  She i s  clerk.  o f C grade i n t e l l i g e n c e s , o b t a i n e d  an A  c a r e e r , and s i n c e l e a v i n g exchange  aver-  school  stenographer.  S p e c i a l Case 157 B 111-XC An  example o f s u c c e s s  case 157 B. C-  In t h i s  due t o a. s p e c i a l  work a s p e c i a l a p t i t u d e 2-g- y e a r s  i s tha.t o f  case a boy o f I, 0. r a t i n g D made D and  g r a d e s f r o m g r a d e s 111 t o X,  last  ability  I n two y e a r s  o f commercial  f o r b o o k k e e p i n g showed up and f o r the  he has been d o i n g w e l l i n the o f f i c e  o f one o f  the V a n c o u v e r newspapers.  S p e c i a l Case 258 B 1 1 - X l l 57 The  most o u t s t a n d i n g  i n t e l l i g e n c e making a f i n e case 258B. on  example  o f a boy o f r e l a t i v e l y low-  record i n high  T h i s b o y , o f D grade  school  i n t e l l i g e n c e , made a B average  t h e M a t r i c u l a t i o n e x a m i n a t i o n , and t h i s  o f t h r e e months d u r i n g h i s l a s t  i s that of  d e s p i t e an absence  year.  T h i s b o y , o f an I . Q, a v e r a g e o f 105 on f o u r t e s t s , ved  impro-  f r o m an a v e r a g e o f C- i n g r a d e s 1-V1 t o a n a v e r a g e o f B i n  the l a s t  s i x years.  In a d d i t i o n he took p a r t  of games, d e l i v e r e d p a p e r s f o r two y e a r s musical, a b i l i t y , went t o E n g l a n d w i t h  in a fair  share  and, because o f h i s  the K i t s i l a n o  Boys' Band_  41 on  their last  oisco  i n the  vrork had week.  He  a l s o 'accompanied the band to San  s p r i n g of 1937,  and  or p e r f o r m a n c e s  up w i t h h i s band work, as w e l l as p l a y i n g i n a champ-  e r r o r i n the  Such an accomplishment would s u g g e s t  I n t e l l i g e n c e Quotient, but o f f o u r t e s t s and  of 97 and  r e s p e c t i v e l y I t i s reasonable  107  o f 105  i s reasonably  as two  as the  on an a v e r a g e  These two obtained  The 116,  y o u n g e r boy  passed  while  the  One  o f B and A  37 B 111-X11  o l d e r b r o t h e r , w i t h an i n the  but  the r e a l  w i t h an  for their  f o r w h i c h b o t h gave up Since graduation  a t the age  same y e a r a t the age case  also  of  of  17, of  109,  19.  i s the average 19,  of  of  o b t a i n e d i n the ,  i n t e l l i g e n c e q u o t i e n t of  that both brothers helped reason  intelligence  Intelligence Quotient  f e a t u r e of t h i s  M a t r i c u l a t i o n Examination Is o b v i o u s  C  Intelligence Quotient  76-|- p e r c e n t w h i c h the o l d e r , even a t age  It  the  36  r e s p e c t i v e l y and  the M a t r i p u l a t i o n E x a m i n a t i o n  interesting  's  o f B„  36 B, w i t h an  passed M a t r i c u l a t i o n  given i s  to assume t h a t  a r e c a s e s o f b r o t h e r s o f C-f and  averages  s  correct.  s c h o o l grades  Matriculation  I, Q .  an  b r o t h e r s have I.  S p e c i a l Oases 36 B 1 1 - X l l 36 and  who  each  i s d o i n g irery w e l l i n S e n i o r M a t r i c u l a t i o n and i s  i o n s h i p rugby team.  I, 0.  Fran- •  i n c o n n e c t i o n w i t h h i s band  to a t t e n d f o u r to s i x p r a c t i c e s  He  keeping  trip.  109.  each o t h e r a g r e a t d e a l ,  s u c c e s s was  the  r e g u l a r study  so much t i m e . ; these  two  b r o t h e r s have not done so  very  42 well, but  Tlie 3rounger one would p r o b a b l y have obtained, a bank j o b  for a slight  d i s f i g u r e m e n t , and b o t h have been w o r k i n g  with  their father, a building  both  t h e s e b o y s i s an  contractor.  inability  to be  They a r e e x c e e d i n g l y r e s e r v e d and u l a r with  One  a t ease w i t h  shy,  and  t h e i r s c h o o l chums, t h e y a r e h a n d i c a p p e d  such w i l l i n g  and  people.  though b o t h a r e pop-  r e s e r v e whenever t h e y a p p l y f o r a p o s i t i o n . t h a t two  weakness'of  by  their  It i s unfortunate  s t e a d y w o r k e r s s h o u l d have done  lit-  tle  b e t t e r t h a n l a b o u r i n g work on house c o n s t r u c t i o n f o r n e a r l y  two  y e a r s . I t seems as i f t h e s e  w e l l brought  up, had  t h e i r 8,11 round In office  April, of one  o t h e r i s due  spent  b o y s , who  so much time  development has 1938  two  have been v e r y  on t h e i r  studies that  been n e g l e c t e d .  the y o u n g e r boy  o b t a i n e d employment i n the  of the V a n c o u v e r magazine a g e n c i e s , w h i l e to l e a v e f o r E n g l a n d  a t any  time  to e n r o l l  the i n the  Royal A i r Force.  S p e c i a l Case 230 The  last  case  of t h i s  G 11-X11  series  an  i n t e l l i g e n c e g r a d i n g o f C-  to  grade twelve without h a v i n g  grade.  T h i s g i r l was  r i c u l a t i o n , b u t by  not  by  continued  i s ,that of a g i r l  succeeded  by h e r  T h i s i s an  and  prolonged  effort.  with  the work  grade or h a l f -  t e a c h e r s to make -Mat-  c o n s i s t e n t l y h a r d work she  i n t e l l i g e n c e making up  who  i n completing  to r e p e a t an$  expected  w i t h a n ' a v e r a g e o f 60 p e r c e n t . r e l a t i v e l y low  37  obtained a  example of one  f o r an  pass of  i n n a t e weakness  Conclusion In c o n c l u d i n g esting cular  to note study.  the main p a r t o f t h i s  the s i m i l a r i t y In each s t u d y  i n the  results  70 p e r c e n t  h i g h and sons.  in intelligence  elementary  The  school  the  e n v i r o n m e n t f r o m w h i c h the  extent  factor  o r .job  Prom the  Wo  their  extent  ambitions  realized?  i s the  and  It i s  controlling  school grades,  the examinat-  ratings.  results  of t h i s  study  groups, f o r there are do not  take  two  full  i t would appear t h a t a  of our  s c h o o l work a c c o r d i n g  i n t e l l i g e n c e who  intelligence  i n h i s place within  depends on  l a r g e p r o p o r t i o n , say 80 p e r c e n t ,  other  w i l l be  to suppose t h a t i n t e l l i g e n c e  results  compari-  to a l a r g e  c h i l d .comes, the  i n p l a c i n g each i n d i v i d u a l  on w i t h  i n yet other  a s k e d . Is n o t  ambitions  g r o u p , 'whether the g r a d i n g ion  and  o p p o r t u n i t i e s w h i c h he w i l l have  to w h i c h t h e s e  reasonable  cases  in intelligence  the f a c t o r w h i c h d e t e r m i n e s  w h i c h he w i l l h a v e , the the  and  q u e s t i o n might w e l l he  the p a r e n t s )  parti-  and^matriculation results, in  ratings  (of  of each  or more of the  show i d e n t i c a l a r n e a r i d e n t i c a l g r a d e s school grades,  report i t i s inter-  students w i l l  to t h e i r a b i l i t y . o t h e r groups,> one  advantage of t h e i r  carry The of h i g h  innate  44  p o w e r s , and t h e o t h e r a g r o u p o f 'below a v e r a g e  ability,  need  f a r more c o n s i d e r a t i o n t h a n t h e y a r e r e c e i v i n g a t p r e s e n t , l e , as t e a c h e r s , must d e c i d e w h e t h e r we a r e g o i n g t o g i v e a g r e a t e r ' p r o p o r t i o n o f o u r t i m e and e f f o r t t o t h e s e m i s f i t s , and so e l i m i n a t e t o a l a r g e e x t e n t t h e many p r o b l e m i n s c h o o l and o u t o f school,,  cases which  The s a m p l i n g o f s p e c i a l  occur  cases  shows much more s h o u l d be done b y home-room t e a c h e r s and couns e l l o r s - t o improve  the e f f i c i e n c y  treatment of these cases.  of the schools i n t h e i r  Appendix Sample  o f Permanent R e c o r d  Card  Sample o f permanent R e c o r d C a r d  (limp)  Sample o f West Yandouver H i g h S c h o o l R e c o r d C a r d i n use 1923-31 Sample o f West Y a n c o u v e r H i g h S c h o o l R e c o r d Oa^d i n u s e 1931-33 • Sample o f West Y a n c o u v e r H i g h S c h o o l s R e p o r t Ca.rd i n use s i n c e 1933 Sample o f West V a n c o u v e r H i g h S c h o o l s „. permanent Record C a r d i n use s i n c e 1953 Sample D a t a  Sheet  Sample Grade R e c o r d i n g Sheet  (Gr. V l l )  Sample S h e e t showing t h e d i s t r i b u t i o n o f t h e l e t t e r g r a d e s and p e r c e n t a g e g r a d e s i n Gra.de V l l A d a p t a t i o n o f t h e Ba.rr S c a l e Records Cases 62 131 223 246  and D a t a S h e e t s o f F o u r G G B B  111-IX 1 1 1 - X l l 35 111-X11 C 111-1X  Sample  ii a S h e e t s o f the S p e c i a l Cases o f Chapter 5 327 G 11-X11 35 202 B 111-X11 37 147 B IV-XI 88GG I V - X l l 35 49 G 111-X11 C 71 G V I - X I C 258 B 11-X11 37 36 B 11-X11 36 37 B 1 1 1 - X l l 36 210 G l - X l l 37 83 B m - x i i m 31 G V - X l l 34 230 G 1 1 - X l l 37  xxxi-xxxix  Sample o f permanent, r e c o r d c a r d used  i n the schoo  of B r i t i s h . Columbia-from' 1926 on,  i6SX-08i-H0T ' o p t . i S j o '^nao jofl g  JSOMOI  8qj sojuojpnj  a  - s p u i S j o -jnaD .reel 09 ^ I P P I ™ 01? ssjTOipar,  • s p B j S j o -jaoD jpfl oz J x a n o q ; s e } « o j p n j Q  - a p t u S j o -jnao .red 03 J ^ s a oq}  ' 9 p u j g jo. '}nso » d o do% sq} s s j u o i p n j  — : s M o n o j S-B Sp-era s q /CBOI s j o o f q n s nt.  0  SBrcBDjpni g y  San^n—moN  "—'dTqsjspBSi j o aoaopjASi —  -  H  i  -  j  d  s  - 9 D ] A j a s  looqog  -Ioj}noo-j-[9g -jnonQH  •jooqos  ISJH  rpnpnoo  " " " B s s p  0} n o n o t n o j a  no  .—-.  ^ K d o j a jo 8x03  ni n o p n o ^ y  10 A'RtranBm.rad,,'jJoOoOqJo s  "AVJJIMBHOH  "—saaunuj^  i p n j s s a i o q p a n nojJ-rjjBfls.xj  .i'lfts-»  u'P SaiABs'i n o  A"I0UO. , 0 0  „'J oiP S n; psus sq n  <&  O j  O  o a  $Z m  M  •0 o  6j. «  « . P K-'W  <i o j 3 a o a 5  O  E TO bo » PI S a ft  W %  o x  ' 9SQ OJQ—-aiON  Sample o f pe rman-entrd co r d c a r d u s e cl i n t h e sehe ols•; v  m  -  e  -  —-  Sex..  H I G H  S C H O O L  ;  :  C O U R S E .  INTELLIGENCE TESTS. Name of Test.  School:.—...:—. D a t e o f entry....  Score.  Address..——......  OJ Q  4 . -  Score."  a  Name of Test.  N  o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a f r o m .'-19.26] on,  o i  "3 Q  a  a  M  Date o f leaving.  Reasons for leaving  Reasons f o r .leaving.  Grade.!...-.  Grade.  English Literature..  Book-keeping.  Composition...  ...  History, World.........  Arithmetic  Spelling..  Geometry  Business Correspond  Latin G r a m m a r —  Economics  French Authors...  Applied Mechanics,  French Grammar...:.  Shop-work  Greek Authors  Sheet-metal ,  Electricity Physiology...— Dietetics  Agriculture  Needlework  Biology...'. Trigonometry.....  ...  Household A r t .  Norm.  Score.  Name of ' Test.  Norm.  outside  activities-  Application Physical  General Science  Geography  Score.  Attitude toward  German Grammar.... Drawing  activities..  work-  Machine-shop work. Printing.  Physics.  Name of Test:  A t t i t u d e t o w a r d school  G e r m a n Authors..—..  Chemistry  a  Commercial L a w ~  Latin Authors.  Botany  a  Civics  ...........  Greek G r a m m a r  <  . Typewriting.... Penmanship  .  d  a  Shorthand  History, Canadian...  Algebra—  STANDARDIZED T E S T S .  Special  defects.. aptitudes..  Remarks'.  Preparation a n d home-study Honour..... Conduct  Music Clothing, etc  Manners  Self-control  property.... Evidence  . . . A t t e n t i o n i n class....:  Reliability.—:  Service  Care of School  spirit  of leadership...  N O T E . — R a t i n g i n s u b j e c t s m a y be m a d e a s f o l l o w s : — D a y s absent D a y s late  A  Indicates t h e t o p 5 p e r cent, o f grade  B  indicates t h e n e x t 2 0 p e r cent, o f grade,  • C i n d i c a t e s t h e m i d d l e 50 p e r c e n t , o f g r a d e . D  i n d i c a t e s t h e n e x t 20 p e r cent, o f g r a d e .  E  i n d i c a t e s t h e l o w e s t 5 p e r cent, o f grade.  .-.  Sample ;::of /p;ermanent: reeoi^dV ^ :  •aJoog  OJOOg  •8JT!a  JO  . JO  •o-i TH  tnjoN  •ajoog  OJOOg  •orna  8jT»a  JS8I  JO  JO  OJ  xa 'a  M OJ  a  I?  «  a.  :  : b f > B n l t i s h Columbia, from:/-i^2j>on/v--'^' '--/^\V v  f  'tniON  In' the ;' send*  iy Sample  o f permanent  of B r i t i s h  record  c a r d used  i n the s c h o o l s  Columbia, f r o m 1930 on.  "  "  •"• %oz  "  opdtu  oq  a  ^03 " ." 0 %ST " " +0 " " %IBWN " a spEjS in sridnd jo %g d o £ psp-iEMB y "  &vm ^ D o f q n g  ui  3UI}KH  :opuj*)  JO^O-J  |  —:SA\O[[OJ GB  "  (limp)  O  CO CD  cd  o  a  ACHIEVEMENT TESTS NameofTest | Score 1  O  6  INTELLIG:  S-r  ENCE TESTS Name of Test | Date 1 Score |M.A; 1  GO  <  V  s  V  Q  cd +-> P I  CD  S i3 CD  O O  W  P3 c/D  co W PH  1  j 1 J | I 1 1 j 1 |  T3 - tu  u  a  CO o cq £> w  o  Reading—Oral Reading •— Silent Spelling - Languages & Lit. Grammar Composition Writing' Mathematics Geography History • Nature " Music Rank in Grade ' No. Pupils in Grade Times Late Days Absent Teacher's Initials  o o  1 Date 1  PH"  CQ  a  o  p  t <  c S  o a  "&  >.  a  :  « 'o I o <:  J1 Ill  I T  Sample o f permanent r e c o r d c a r d used i n the s c h o o l s of B r i t i s h Columbia- from 1930 on. ( l i m p ) «0 to t-  o  Uj CO  w w O O <  oo GO  m  Q <  •<!  O  —  (N  "o o O  00  1 A fl •I  *a  H  •OJO  Br  • i-H  Q  si  ffi  «  o  • r-H  1> —  00  w  © I-H  •  <  Ph  O  •PI-  3" I  Q PH O PH  '•O  CO  o  oo PH  o »-> M S co  .O o  PH PH  co O  co  "  V  Sample o f the r e p o r t  c a r d used  H i g h S c h o o l f r o m 1925  PROVINCE  OF  BRITISH  MONTHLY  COLUMBIA  REPORT  STUDENT  GRADt  , COURSE  TEACHER  PROMOTED TO  GRADE  PRINCIPAL JUNE..  192..  i n the Y/est V a n c o u v e r to  1931.  Sample o f the r e p o r t c a r d used i n the '"est Vancouver F i g h S c h o o l f r o m 1923 t o 1931.  School  Days  Days  Present  Times 1-  2.  (a)  Literature  (b)  Composition  History  3.  Mathematics:  4.  7.  (a)  Arithmetic  -  -  -  (b)  Algreba  -  -  -  (c)  Geometry  -  -  Science:  5.  6.  Tarrtv  English;  (a)  - '  (b)  -  -  Latin: (a)  Composition  (b)  Authors  -  -  French: (a)  -  (b)  -  -  Drawing  8.  Geography  -  -  9.  Manual  Training  -  -  or Domestic  Science  10. 11. Average Standing  i  n  Class * -  N u m b e r in C l a s s -  -  A p p l i c a t i o n to "Work General  Conduct  -  -  _ _  -  -  -  -  Sample o f t h e r e p o r t c a r d used i n t h e "/est Vancouver F i g h S c h o o l f r o m 1923 t o 1931.  P a r e n t s are  revested  to  s  i  s  „  a  n  a  r  e  t  u  r  ^  n  Promptly.  da„  REMARKS:  y  ,„  h  o  m  e  s  t  u  d  y  "  ^  ;  ;  P  e  n  t  ^  'oHowi„  B  Sample o f t h e r e p o r t c a r d used i n the West V a n c o u v e r F i g h S c h o o l f r o m 1931 t o 1933.  ffiest Battcmmer High  ^rhonl  PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  1  P R E D . J. PATTERSON, M . A . , I*«inoipai.  "Mens aana in corpore sano"  M O N T H L Y  R E P O R T  STUDENT GRADE;....  COURSE...  TEACHER  REMARKS:  TRANSFERRED (TO..  PROMOTED TO GRADE..  PRINCIPAL  ••"•".•HM..~.w.„^.„l  Sample of the report card used i n the West.Vancouver F i g h School from 1931 to 1933.  W E S T V A N C O U V E R HIGH S C H O O L • : : ] ?.". .  .  Sept.  N A M E  Oct.  Nov.  i  1 ] Dec i  Days Present  -  Days A b s e n t  -  Times T a r d y  -.  i  •i  .  j >• F e b .  .  Grade Mfir.  April  May  June  _ -  General • Conduct  -  A t t i t u d e to School  -  -  1 1 Y  Application to "Work General Progress  r  DECEMBER  OCTOBER SUBJECTS  1. E n g l i s h : (a)  2. Social  TOTALS  Pupil's Marks  Class Aver.  Pupil's Murks  Class Aver.  FEBRUARY Pupil's Marks  Class Aver.  ) APRIL  Pupil's j Class Marks 1 Aver.  JUNE Pupil's Marks  Grammar -  (c)  Literature -  Studies  =  Year's Aver.  Class Aver.  Units . Won  -  Composition  (b)  A=Excellent B Satisfactory C=Pair D=P.oor E=Bad.  (History)  3. Health & P h y s i c a l E d . 4. M a t h . : (a)  Algebra  (b)  -  •  -  Geometry  -  __I  —  --i  (c)  ,(b) fi F r e n c h i (a) ..(b) •  (b)  •  .'  8. M a n . T r . or H o m e E c o n . 9. T y p i n g '  -  10. Shorthand  -  -  -  -  11. J u n i o r Business 12.  -  Book-keeping  13  J.  Total'  , >'  N u m b e r in Class  -  Student's Standing in Class .1: - .  iA;  jsuo.'  <  -  *  3 0 . .narks per subject. M a x i m u m of •*© marks m a y be given for class work, note books or essays. Examinations may be oral or written •th. P a o o ' S t a n d a r d average EOfft, and \0% on caoh—subject-; In grading the work of the whole year is taken into consideration. 'Class honor average 75%, eaoh-eubjcot 00%. Oceond Olasa honor overage 60%, each oubjcot S0-%. iwarded T o p 5% of pupils in grade; " B " , next 20%; " C - | - " , next 15%; " C " , next 2 0 % ; " C — • " , n e x t . 15%; " D " , next 2 0 % ; " E " , lowest 5%.  itvera;:  -  VI  Sample o f t h e r e p o r t c a r d used  i n t h e West 'Vancouver  H i g h S c h o o l f r o m 1931 t o 1933.  Both parents arc requested to sign this report.  ~~  7  h  a  s  spent the following  time daily in home study in the month of 103  Time  "  Signatures of Parents or Guardians (1)  September  t  (2) U>  October  (2) (1)  November  (2) (1)  December  (2)  January  .(2)  February  (2)  March  (2)  April  (2)  May  (2)  _  »> U)  (1)  (I)  (1)  (1) June  N  -  B  (2)  '~re„K ^io u\ t e stut™v e r v d° ' T l ~ *» * ™ hours' mCa S Promptness and regularity ^ e a n L J Parents can best h i . I. . . i ?, °e over-emphasized. interferes with the r e g u t r home , S. ""thing ° i n d e n t is in attendance every 'day! ' '° ' i  S  h  S  t U  m  U  S  t  <  Y "  t  o  V"™*-  s e < ! i n  t  h  REMARKS  P t  BY PARENTS {  r  d  t  h  a  t  vii Sample o f t h e a n n u a l r e p o r t f o r m used i n t h e West 1935, WEST VANCOUVER jgjv;": S E N I O R  f  HIGH  SCHOOLS  HIGH  JUNIOR  STUDENT'S  REPORT  SUBJECTS  Credits  193_  HIGH  3_  SCHOLASTIC  EATINGS  Composition Grammar  A  Top  B  Next  5% i n G r a d e 20%  Literature  C -|- "  15%  Spelling & W r i t i n g  C  20%  Social  "  O—  "  15%  D  "  20%  Studies  E Lowest  Health  "C"  Arithmetic  5%  "  Grade—Average)  Algebra  R E M A R K S  B Y  T E A C H E R S  Geometry  OCT.  Deportment  DEC.  Deportment  Latin French General  Science  Chemistry Physics Geography Home  Economics  Woodwork  MAR.  Deportment  JUNE  Deportment  Metalwork Mechanical Drawing Electricity Typing Shorthand Junior  Business  Bookkeeping Accounting Standing in June  Art  193  Music TOTAL  N u m b e r in Grade R a n k of S t u d e n t  CREDITS  | |  J|  | |,  J |  No.  of D a y s A b s e n t  |  |  |  |  |  |  |;  No.  of T i m e s L a t e  1  1  1  I  I  I  I I  Parents'  [  Teacher.  H o u r s of Homework  Signatures  (Oct.) (Doc.) (Mar.)  Registration  :  W.V.S.B.—Form No, 1—Dewest: Printing Co., West Vancouver  Sample o f t h e a n n u a l r e p o r t f o r m used i n t h e West V a n c o u v e r H i g h S c h o o l s s i n c e 1933.  ATTENDANCE Regular attendance is absolutely essential to satisfactory progress. When a student is absent a note should be sent to the registration teacher giving reason for absence. In any case of illness the rule regarding Return Certificates must be observed.  GUIDANCE Parents are requested to study these reports carefully. Please do not wait for a special invitation to confer with the principal and staff regarding the student's difficulties. Mutual cooperation with the Registration Teacher and Principal will assist the student to choose the most suitable courses.  HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION DIPLOMA Students who reach a satisfactory attainment in each of the subjects in which credit has been given to the extent of 120 High School Credits will be recommended to receive a High School Graduation Diploma.  PROMOTION Final examinations require a pass standard of 50% in each subject. "D" and "E" scholastic ratings in any subject are considered unsatisfactory. The work of the whole year will be taken into consideration before recommending promotion to a higher grade.  Sample of the permanent record card In use i n the ?/es Vancouver High Schools since 1937).  Q  - cs oi f-f r-i  $&js  6 £ o  g S S SH  Sample •••data-" sheet. Birthday  Name.-  R a t i o n a l i t y of parents; nocu-oation of father R oho o l 'Record ——-i  • -iH-rada  1  i  11 111^ IV  V  1 V l l : v n : . IX  VI  -xi: X l l  n~rnHps • rvfiTiRated.'  •h,VR ragR,.  - ;'  .'. Letter:, j&ada--  • Maitriculatiori-Be cords ' .-. . Age  Av-. Sng.,S.S . Ay. I'laths . Average iSe—J-i' .tAa " o , " i  Jun.Mat.  u  -  •  .'. Sehijfet.. Subsequent s c h o l a s t i c record.  ' Records of I n t e l l i g e n c e Test  O.fitiupat.i.nn',  Test Age  , ' i•. q .  ,  -Hating-  Average  X  Sample o f s h e e t used f o r r e c o r d i n g the g r a d e s o b t a i n e d by the 356 c a s e s o f t h i s s t u d y . On t h i s ' s h e e t a r e r e c o r d e d the g r a d e s made i n grade V l l .  j# I ft  §  St.3  |  ft  I  •  • / J  r  •  •j • ft ft  •  J  -ffftU.ii .. i . iii  *T " UI  ft:  |  j i %  ft ft  ij • • • ft  J  -—tax-. -  \„  w  ••  j• • • ^ ft  *  r  injl  ft •  • *«  ^, , I  p>  „ a J mil wwn  • • •  1•  •  * ft  • i iiiiii]  '  I •  r*  1  •«  j  [•  ft ft ft ft  *  HBBHHHHBMI *  ««  • • 8*  ft '  9  ft «  • •  •  i  —  j  ea • •  *  ft ft  •# • » • 9 ft  ft  ft  ft • • •  • •  AJL^JF,. '• -• IS"  •  • •  j •  • •  ft  ft  ft • • •  • *  • ••  • • ft •  •  » 9  ft ft •  •j&y• • » 5.9  • E.17  6.46  • • """"|  br^rtrH—r—t [  '1  *  •  xi Sample s h e e t showing the d i s t r i b u t i o n  o f the l e t t e r  g r a d e s and p e r c e n t a g e g r a d e s i n Grade V l l A  0;*  C  6.46 4,48 4.00 - 6.17 4,46 4,00 5.90 4,45 4.00 5,75 4.44 3.97 5.75 4.43 3,97 5.64 4.43 3.96 5.59 4.41 3.94 5.58 . 4.36 3,93 5,50 4.34 3.92 4.33 3.92 B 4. 35 3.87 5.46 4.53 3.84 5.45 4. 53 3,83 5.41 4.31 3,82 4.30 3.. 82 5.35 .4.29 3.81 5.33 5. 33 4.27 3.80 5.32 4.26 3.80 .5,314.25 3,80 5*28 4.25 3.79 5,28 4: © £j 2 3.79 5 25 4.20 3.78 5,24 4,17 3,78 5,22 4.17 3,75 5.15 4.16 3.74 5,09 4.16 3.72 5.09 4.16 5.08 4.16 C5,08 4,15 . 3.70 5,05 4.15 3.69 5,04 3,65 5,00 3.63 5.00 G 3.62 43.95 4.12 3.61 4.11 4.93. 3. 60 4,85 4,11 3, 60 4.11 4.80 3.59 4.71 • 4,10 3,58 4. 70 4.08 3.57 4.68 4,08 .3.54 4,67 4.07 3 52 4,67 4.07 3.51 4.64 4.07 3.50 4,61 4,04 3.50 4.60 4.04 3.50 4.59 4.04 3.48 4.58 4,04 3,48 4.55 4.00 4,54 d  e  C-  D  3.46 2.88 3,45 2.83 3.45 2.80 3.45 2. 70 3. 43 2,68 3.43 2.67 5.42 3.42 • E 2.61 3. 40 3. 39 2.59 3,39 2.55 2.54 D 2,41 3.37 .2,37 3.37' 2.36 3.36 2.34 3.35 3.34 3.33 3. 33 3,33 3, 33  ,A 88^ 87 85 85 8,3  :  3.30 3,29 5,28 3.24 3 © 2 *^) 3 o 20 •3.16 3.16 3.15 3.13 3.09 3.08 3.05 3.04 3, O l 3,01 3,00 3.00 2.96 2.96 2.93 2,90 2,89 2.88  '  'B 82 82 82 ,82 82 82 82 81 81 ,81 •81 81 80 80 80 ,80 79 79 79 79 79 ,78 78 78 78 78 78 ,78 77 77 77 77 76 76 76 76 :  C-f 75 75 •75  C-f  33  lb%  75 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 73 73 73 73 73 . 73 75 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 G 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71  10%  70 70 70 70 70 . . 70 70 70 69 69 69 , 69 • 69 69 69 69 :  C68 68 68 68 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66 66  D . 65 65  65%  65 65 65 65 6-5 64 64 64 64 64 64 63 63 63 63 62 62 62 62 62 62 62 61 61 61 61 61 60 60 59 59 59 59 E 58 58 58 57 57 53 52  xii The. . a d a p t a t i o n o f the B a r r S c a l e u s e d o f g r a d i n g the c a s e s o f t h i s  study, on  f o r the  the b a s i s o f  purpose occupat-  ions. A I n v e n t i v e genius (Edison type) Surgeon (Mayo B r o s . ) Research. L e a d e r ( L i k e B i n e t o r P a s t e u r ) W r i t e r (Van Dyke) High N a t i o n a l O f f i c i a l , Cabinet o f f i c e r , Great M u s i c i a n (Paderewski)  foreign minister.  B G r e a t merchant,Owns and o p e r a t e s a ,$1,000,000 b u s i n e s s . " U n i v e r s i t y p r o f e s s o r , A.M. o r Ph. D. t e a c h e s , writes and does r e s e a r c h . . P u b l i s h e r , h i g h c l a s s maga,zine, newspaper o r p e r i o d i c a l . J o u r n a l i s t , High c l a s s w r i t e r or e d i t o r . P h y s i c i a n , 6-8 y e a r s prepara.ti.on above H i g h S c h o o l , income #5,000 and up. Educational administrator. Superintendent c i t y schools 2000 t o 5000. C o l l e g e o r Normal Grad, C o n s u l t i n g E n g i n e e r , • I n charge of c o r p s of e n g i n e e r s . G r e a t w h o l e s a l e m e r c h a n t , b u s i n e s s c o v e r i n g one o r more states. A r c h i t e c t , t r a i n i n g e q u a l to t h a t o f c o l l e g e g r a d u a t e . M i n i n g ' E n g i n e e r , t h o r o u g h knowledge o f m i n i n g and e x t r a c t i o n of m e t a l s . A r t i s t , h i g h c l a s s .painter o f p o r t r a i t s e t c . T e c h n i c a l E n g i n e e r , t h o r o u g h knowledge o f the p r o c e s s e s o f an i n d u s t r y . , • Lawyer, i n town o f moderate s i z e , income |1000-$5000, T e a c h e r i n c o l l e g e , degree o f A.B. o r A. M, , most p r o g r e s s i v e , 'y M e c h a n i c a l E n g i n e e r , d e s i g n s and c o n s t r u c t s machines a.nd machine t o o l s . I n d u s t r i a l c h e m i s t , t h o r o u g h knowledge o f the c h e m i s t r y o f manufacturing processes. P r e a c h e r , m i n i s t e r i n town of 1000-5000, c o l l e g e g r a d u a t e . H i g h s c h o o l t e a c h e r , C o l l e g e o r Normal g r a d u a t e , n o t the most p r o g r e s s i v e . S e c r e t a r i a l work, p r i v a t e s e c r e t a r y to h i g h s t a t e o f f i c i a l . M u s i c i a n , s u c c e s s f u l p l a y e r o r s i n g e r i n good company. Land owner and o p e r a t o r , very l a r g e farms o r r a n c h e s . T r a i n d i s p a t c h e r , must be m e n t a l l y a l e r t . S u r v e y o r , t r a n s i t man, c i t y o r c o u n t r y s u r v e y o r . A r t t e a c h e r , i n h i g h s c h o o l , three or f o u r y e a r s s p e c i a l t r .  xiii •  D e n t i s t , g r a d u a t e , 2-5 y a a r s t r a i n i n g , i n s m a l l town. M a n u f a c t u r e r , employs f r o m 20 to 50 men, makes s m a l l a r t i c l e s . M u s i c t e a c h e r , 2-4 y e a r s s p e c i a l t r a i n i n g , not c o l l e g e t r a i n i ng , M a s t e r m e c h a n i c , t h o r o u g h knowledge i n h i s f i e l d of m e c h a n i c s . P h a r m a c i s t , i n town o f f r o m 1000-5000popu&&.t i o n , .Osteopath, t r a i n i n g e q u a l t o c o l l e g e g r a d u a t e . Grammar g r a d e t e a c h e r , n o r m a l g r a d u a t e , e x p e c t s to make p r o f e s s i o n teaching. Landscape gardener. P r i m a r y t e a c h e r , no c o l l e g e t r a i n i n g , two y e a r s s p e c i a l t r a i n ing. E d i t o r , s m a l l p a p e r , • c o n s i d e r a b l e j o b work. C h e f , employed i n l a r g e f i r s t - c l a s s h o t e l s , Nurse and M a s s e u r , g r a d u a t e , L i b r a r i a n , i n small i n s t i t u t i o n or p u b l i c l i b r a r y . S t e n o g r a p h e r , u s e s s h o r t h a n d and t y p e w r i t e r . Foreman, s m a l l f a c t o r y , shop, e t c . S t o r e k e e p e r and owner, s m a l l town, r e t a i l d e a l e r , g e n e r a l or special store. R a i l r o a d passenger conduetor. C l e r i c a l work, b o o k k e e p e r s , r e c o r d e r s , a b s t r a c t o r s , e t c .  Travelling  s a l e s m a n , s e l l s d r u g s , g r o c e r i e s , hardwa.re, d r y goods, e t c . E l e c t r o t y p e r , p r e p a r e s wood c u t s . D e t e c t i v e , t r a c e s c l u e s , e t c . Employee o f d e t e c t i v e b u r e a u . P h o t o g r a p h e r , a few months t r a i n i n g , e x p e r i e n c e i n s t u d i o . Linotype operator. L i t h o g r a p h e r , makes p r i n t s f r o m d e s i g n s w h i c h he p u t s on stone. Wood p a t t e r n maker. M e t a l p a t t e r n maker. ' D a i r y owner and manager, s m a l l d a i r y , 50-100 cows. M e c h a n i c a l r e p a i r m a n , i n shop o r f a c t o r y , keeps machines i n condition. S t a t i o n a g e n t , i n s m a l l town, a c t s as baggage man, freight agent, operator, e t c . U n d e r t a k e r , i n s m a l l tov/n, six- months s p e c i a l s c h o o l i n g , Telegra.ph o p e r a t o r , i n s m a l l town. Salesman, i n d r y g o o d s h a r d w a r e , g r o c e r y s t o r e . T a i l o r - , employee i n t a i l o r i n g shop, .• p o t t e r n makes j a r s , j u g s , c r o c k e r y , .earthenware. C a r p e n t e r , knows woodworking- t o o l s , can f o l l o w d i r e c t i o n s i n ™ , v a r i o u s p r o c e s s e s o f wood c o n s t r u c t i o n • work. B o o k b i n d e r , s e t s up and b i n d s books o f a l l s o r t s . E l e c t r i c r e p a i r m a n , r e p a i r s e l e c t r i c ^ d e v i c e s , u t e n s i l s and machines. G a r d e n e r , g a r d e n i n g , t r u c k f a r m i n g , owns a.nd o p e r a t e s s m a l l plots. • :  xiv C (con,) Plumber., average Stone mason, Porest ranger. Letter carrier.  t r a i n e d plumber  employee.  CT i n s m i t h , makes v e s s e l s , u t e n s i l s , e t c . , from p l a t e d s h e e t metal. H a r n e s s maker. G e n e r a l p a i n t e r , knowledge o f m a . t e r i a l s u s e d necessa.ry. P l a s t e r e r , knowledge o f m a t e r i a l s u s e d n e c e s s a r y . M e t a l f i n i s h e r , p o l i s h e s and l a c q u e r s m e t a l f i x t u r e s . Baker. • B u t c h e r , n o t shop owner, a,ble to make c u t s p r o p e r l y . Bricklayer, T e l e g r a p h and t e l e p h o n e l i n e s m a n . S t r u c t u r a l s t e e l w o r k e r , h e a v y work demanding some s k i l l . P o l i c e m a n , average p a t r o l m a n . R a i l r o a d f i r e m a n , on f r e i g h t o r p a s s e n g e r t r a i n . C i t y f i r e f i g h t e r , h a n d l e s the o r d i n a r y f i r e f i g h t i n g apparatus, Brakeman, on f r e i g h t o r p a s s e n g e r t r a i n . Pa,rm t e n a n t s , on s m a l l t r a c t s o f l a n d . S t r e e t - c a r conductor* Cook, i n r e s t a u r a n t o r s m a l l h o t e l . Telephone o p e r a t o r . D Ship r i g g e r ,  i n s t a l l i n g cordage system on s a i l i n g v e s s e l s , working under s u p e r v i s i o n . G e n e r a l repairman-, r e p a i r s b r o k e n a r t i c l e s , uses woodworking tools. V u l c s n i s e r , u n d e r s t a n d s the p r o c e s s o f h a r d e n i n g r u b b e r . Moving p i c t u r e o p e r a t o r , o p e r a t e s machine w h i c h p r o j e c t s p i c tures. B a r b e r , n o t owner, has charge o f c h a i r . M u n i t i o n w o r k e r , average.. . C o b b l e r and shoemaker, r e p a i r m a n i n shoe shop. T i r e r e p a i r e r , i n g e n e r a l a u t o m o b i l e r e p a i r shop. S m e l t e r work, m e t a l p o u r e r s , c a s t i n g c o l l e c t o r s . Switchman, t e n d i n g s w i t c h i n r a i l w a y y a r d s . Junkman, c o l l e c t o r o f j u n k , , L e l i v e r y m a n , d e l i v e r s g r o c e r i e s , e t c . , w i t h team o r mule, Drayman, • D a i r y hand, m i l k i n g , care o f s t o c k under s u p e r v i s i o n . S a w m i l l w o r k e r , h e a v y work, l i t t l e s k i l l r e q u i r e d . Teamster,, • Bar tender. Laundry  w o r k e r , v a r i o u s k i n d s of work i n l a u n d r y , p r a c t i c a l l y unskilled. • '  XV  D (con. ) j?arm l a b o u r e r , u n s k i l l e d and u s u a l l y i n e f f i c i e n t . Bongshoreman , loa,ds and unloa.ds c a r g o . M i n e r , d i g g e r and s h o v e l l e r , e t c . Waterworks man, a, v a , r i e t y o f odd j o b s , a , l l u n s k i l l e d . T r a c k l a y e r , does h e a v y work u n d e r s u p e r v i s i o n , "Day l a b o u r e r , on s t r e e t , i n f a c t o r y o r shop as r u s t a b o u t . E R a i l r o a d s e c t i o n hand, r e p l a c e s t i e s e t c . under s u p e r v i s i o n H o s t l e r , c a r e o f h o r s e s , i n l i v e r y , f e e d and sa.les s t a b l e s . C i r c u s r u s t a b o u t , does h e a v y work about c i r c u s . Garbage c o l l e c t o r . Odd j o b s , Hobo, ;  i  XV  R e c o r d s and  data sheets  Cases  The  111-1X 111-X11 V-Xll C 111-1X  grades  age  35  of f o u r sample c a s e s .  used  i n the H i g h  i g n o r e d because these l e t t e r 5/£ t o A,  cases.  f o l l o w i n g pages show c o p i e s o f the r e p o r t forms  t h e da,ta s h e e t s letter  62 G 131 G 223 B 246 B  o f f o u r sample  20%  t o B,  marks have been  etc,  s  used.  School  grades  feasis,  Por  I t s h o u l d 'be n o t e d till  1933  that  have been  were n o t a s s i g n e d on these years  and  the  the  percent-  xvii  iGST-OSij-rcot 'api«3 jo ^ nao aad 09 aippjtn 9(0 sa^coipai o jpuj&j j o -^naa aad Q I$*>AS.O\ ©TO sajBojpuj a -apmS jo -joeo aad OS ?saa arf} sajtsajpaj "a g p B ^ jo ^uao jarl OS ?xan oqj sa*TJ3ipni; a -apujg jo -;aaa lad o doj eqj sajnofpnr V I —: SAtonoj EB apura aq £.sxa s p o f q n s nj Snijcji—-HIO& I  "dfusiapuai jo aonspiAa •—ijaafloja jo aj^o toimoa-jjss " —monou ••  •jooips  T[SJH  —sjorraoji  -—  J^HFUfll'H  —i£pu?s anion pou nouBaudaij i—SSKHIXIJUIY avisos  oj noHotnojd no . ; j  ]  h0  +• y h  - . ^ y y SI  S  ft-  U 0  ft 0  •: i y  «>  «1 ft  0  !» y  ! o V) ft 0 i y C) 0 Q <1 1 0 =5  a 0 Q6 y y  y  ! <J  I  1  0  >  S. y  ft y  y  0 «) y  y  [  u  y  I  i ft  0  ft ft  &  i ^  0 Uj % + y  y  y 0  PI y U y y y 0 y <!l y y y y  y  41 Q y  >$ |  V)  Is  Q  *>  1 ft  y CJ <J  ii  >,  y U  ft  t*  1  jy y  QC  ! B 3  C  j  • !• I I I 3  r.5  K  B  II' O X C  Domestic  VI  '?1  Manual T  5  'a a  | S 1 a Q S  xvii  HIGH SCHOOL COURSE. INTELLIGENCE TESTS.  1 "  Date of entry.... pato of leaving. Reasons for leaving.  £ of!  KOB  Reasons for leaving. STANDARDIZED TESTS.  English Literature.. Composition.... History, World History, Canadian.., Arithmetic „.. Algebra. .... Gcome tryLatin Authors Latin Grammar..... French Authors French Grammar... Greek Authors.. Greek Grammar German Authors German Grammar... Drawing. General Science... Agriculture. Botany ChemistryPhysics Geography... Biology  Spelling..., Civics Commercial Law. Business Correspond! Economics...-. Applied Mechanics. Shop-work Sheet-metal workMachine-shop work. Printing Electricity— Physiology... Dietetics Needlework... Household Art... Music Days absentDays late  Attitude toward school activities Attitude toward outside activitiesApplication Physical defects... Special aptitudes... Remarks*.. Preparation and home-study Attention in class..... Honour Reliability Manners Conduct „ Self-control Care of property... .Service... . School spiritEvidence of leadership... NOTE.—Rating in subjects may be made as follows:A Indicates the top 5 per cent, of grade B Indicates the next 20 per cent, of grade. . C indicates-the middle 50 per cent, of grade. D indicates the next 20 per cent, of grade. E indicates the lowest 5 per cent, of grade.  xrii  XTiii  ft  Is  •ty  U  ©  c 5  m  0 0  0 y y  t  +  i 0 y y  y  fty  y  •>> <?  % $?!  ft  fty  y y  pi  m  ,1  0  *>  1  «,  y  fty ft n ft n 0 fl ft ft Hi « m ftii "111 ft si l <- s ftftIII  i y  ft  li  j  i 1 B  Mi E  It! 3 IPi  S  1  1  h a "  .j  :l  :  . :  £  >  3  I»  i  i i \ J i i Is B l - a s J I ' l a g s s i a i l 3 l i t * I§ 1 3 s J n -s is «i s i 1  3 :  f  S ! i l ? 1 f S s * « 5 S I S o »« ? 1 * 8 1  62 G 111-1X  game  Birthday  Pat3.ona.lity o f p a r e n t s Occupation of f a t h e r  J  u  l  y  1 8  »  1  9  1  -9 y e a r s  9  Canadian-Scottish  Janitor  School Becord Grade  1  11 L l l  IV  V.  9  10  12  . Age  VI  V l l v i i : L IX  X  14 ' 15 16-: .7  13  XI X l l  :  Grades. aJrip-nfid 7t  i.  :  .•Xp*t.pr  TO  b  Grades r e p e a t e d  .41 3.7 3. C  r Taflo f  1  C-  i  I)  —  D  S..29 3.3 ^ A ' D  2.75 D Matriculation  \  D  L-Q  D  55  7  2.00 D  Records Av.. Eng.,S.S . A T . l i a t h s .  Age  X  I.S< L) •  ft'i  Q  n  n  o  p  •  2.43 D Average  Jun.Mat. Sen.Mat. Subsequent  scholastic  record.  Records of T n t e l l i g e n c e T P H ' Test . ' •• National. Terman  O o c i l T l a t i nn  Age  I.Q.  9  91  16  97  Housework  (irregular)  i Rating  Average•  D  -  • 94'  XX  SJTUS  apujg. jo jnao j a d OS ^IPPini e n j sajuaipTij o •epajS j o -jnao jsdos i x a u aqj sa^Baipnr a jo =inai> Jad o ^SSAHOJ stfj sojisojpni g •optuS j o -giiaa j a d g d o j an.} sajBOfpnj y — : EAiouoj SB apura a q Jura s^oafqns nj Sa^pia;—-aio^  -flmsiapBaj jo aanapjAa —IPjds tootpg ' oojijag — — ^ladojd jo aiBo --•"loj;noo-jias • -;otipao3 —- • s-iantrajs •"•jnonoi-j; •  —  ipttjs oraoq pan troratusdaj^  ryor  [Mi  ^ ni  ^  O M  a a«  P o >. -n 5 "% p & 5 M H  G,3  S  & «  £  XX  IGCI-OiU-IVi  JlE.lS JO J P « J 3 JO  HIGH SCHOOL COURSE. INTELLIGENCE TESTS.  Date of entry.... Date of leaving. Grade... Book-keeping... Snort Land Typewriting Penmanship Spelling. Civics | Commercial Law Business Correspond Economics Applied Mechanics... Shop-work Sheet-metal work Machine-shop work... Printing Electricity Physiology Dietetics Needlework... Household Art... Music Clothing, etc Days absent Days late  STANDARDIZED TESTS.  Attitude toward school activities. Attitude toward outside activities. Application Physical defects . Special aptitudes. Remarks". ' Preparation and home-study Attention in class Ilonour Reliability Manners Conduct Self-control Care ot property Service School spirit Evidence ot leadership NOTE.—Rating In subjects may be mode as follows :— A Indicates the top G per cent, of grade B indicates the nest 20 per cent, of grade. C indicates the middle 50 per cent, of grade. D indicates the next 20 per cent, of grade. E indicates the lowest 5 per cent, of grade.  •o-i  •«•"•  ajoos  •BJOO  j H t/)  1 "I  6 z  lOGI-OBi-KOJ B)UJS JO •.  ^pnja jo  •jsoj  Q U  LLIGI  5 5  "O-I VK  •IBJOJJ  ajca a  OT  c  OJOJg  1  j  j  •ajca  U H  sox  1  N  H z  •b-v  Tit  jsox JO  •ajoas  —r  11  j  •ajua •js^x JO  c  S (X  N  £  1  Q Q  i i Q  j  c  a  Q  i  S  | a  1  J  ity of par Occupat!on of pan  1  g  defects....  s  xxi  PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  FRED. J. PATTERSON, D.A., Principal Mens Sana In corpon MONTHLY  REPORT  OF STUDENT  '/>>/  6  GRADE..  / X  A  COURSE . .^ty(jaJ&u^  PROMOTED TO GRAIDE  '34  ,  X  PRTNCIPAI  ia3i-33  Days Present - - Days Absent - - Times Tardy - 1. English Literature 2. English Composition 3. History - - - i. Arithmetic - - - • G. Algebra 6. Geometry - - - . 7. Science (a) - - 8. " . (b) - - 9. Latin (a) Compositfoi 10. " (b) Authors 11. French (a) - - - 12. " <b) - - - 13. -- -  '4  22.  3S  c~  _La_  to 3o  6>o  %-  -7917. Typewriting ' - - • 18 Man: Train, or Dom. Sc.|| Average • Standing in Class - - . Number In Class - - 3% \JS Application to Work - _General Progress ' - - General Conduct - - A signifies Excellent; It, Good; C, Fair; D, Poor. First-class Honors m ii" -""li subject. Pass Sea"iTdard: Aver, of 50: 40 in each subject. 1 In each subject. Second-class Honors: Aver 6  •cuts are renu**t°d '° s  ...has spent tlie folio » daily in home study in the month of... iron of Parents or Guardian;  .""'student Is in attendance every day. REMARKS BY PARENTS:  xxii  k  3*  o o a 3  n n  ffi  M  5 B  4*  •a 3 £  H P O  w  Ha s  O i to i  !  3N 45  3N  UN  AM «3  I  •K  £ 3 - ° 9 R  O  % *  R W  t»  I Is  si  « 8 3 9  II * a l i i i 1 -e JI  xxii  Mams  ;131 G..111-Xll'36  N a t i o n a l i t y ' o f parents  B i r t h d a y Oct. 1, 1918  Scottish  Oocurjatlon of f a t h e r E n g i n e e r "school  •  16 years  :  -•  ,  Be c o r d  i : 11 L l l  ' > Grade  IV . V ¥1  8  '- A-o-a..' .  9  10  V l l v i i ; L IX  11  12 13 . 14  X : XI X l l 15  16  4.9'  3.9 L " " 5.35  .17 :  b •b  Grades repeated  63%.  76% 70% 64%  D . OT X-  L e t t e r Grade  I  C 1  CT  '  •'  1  o  M a t r i c u l a t i o n Becords Age Av. Bng.,S.S .. A T . Maths. J.un.Kat.. 1?  G C 2"  B  -60%.. a',_ • .•;35/C.--E  I  B  C-  D  c c  Average •- 53^ D  Sen.Mat. Subsequent s c h o l a s t i c r e c o r d  Records of T n t f i l l i m n n s  Test  To + 0  Or, Olivia, t i n n  0  Age  I.Q.  national  9  109  f i v e months, low Telephone  National  11  127  Operator.  Terman  13  116  Terman A  14  115  Average  116 3 /  A p p r e n t i c e d a t Drug store  , Rating  xxir  |jo  •aptroSjo ^tiao ladoe aiPPJtn eq? sa;uo]pai o -apciS jo -iaao jad OS 3xan en;; sajTJOipnf a -apiuS jo -iaao lod^e do? aqj sa^rajpiii y BAVOIIOJ su o pBca aq irarsjoafqiis «{ StqjtfH—-axoN "'djqsjapBat jo oanapjAg; aoiAJag " £jiadoj<I jo 9JTQ  -iaaa^atTs. J S S M O I ; OTH sajnoiptn; jo -^uaa jad.OS ,xaa atp sa,B3ipnr a a  —:  •«JI(Is looqos rojiuoo-jps •  •asup m; nojma^y qSlH °1  'tooqag  n o r ) o m o i d no  JO  "Xpnjs amoq pac uonnasdajj —saanxixjy Te-iaajs -Irao P^Iiy  „MOO,I „ , 'aitiji „ ,,'poof) „ „',nail90s3„ ssn A"ftTjanum"j8d no nj oq oj,—-HXON  looqos sajAuai;.  1  |  j  i  4  d  ft)  <j  to  $  *  0  <!)  u <j <S <t  u  t5  <!*  <!;  1u  u «9  cs  0  u  1 "J 1o  <o  N  u  t  a)-  0 0  ii  l!) 1  | |  Q  |  1  a c 1  j  !  i  1  £ 1  c i  I I  > i  imestlc Science  j  xxiv  iOW-0  r  HIGH SCHOOL COURSE. INTELLIGENCE TESTS.  1  Date o( entry Date ot leaving. .  Electricity... Physiology... Dietetics Household Art... Music Clothing, etc Days absent Days late  Attitude toward school activities Attitude toward outside activities... Application Physical defects.. Special aptitudes.. Itemarks". Preparation and home-study Attention in class... Honour Reliability MannersConduct Self-control property Service School spirit. Evidence of leadership NOTE.—Hating ofde graasdefollows :A lndlca inthesubtopject5spermaycenbet,ma D lndlca'es the next 20 per cent, of grade, C indicaies the middle 50 per cent, of grade, D indicai es the nest 20 per cent, of grade, E indicai es the lowest 5 per cent, of grade.  A.Q.  Score.  . -4  Norm.  a  Date.  |  K |  Name ot Test.  Score.  Book-keepingShorthand | Typewriting J Penmanship Spelling. Civics Commercial Law... Business Correspond]., Economics Applied Mechanics...].. Shop-work Sheet-metal workMachine-shop work... Printing  Date.  English Literature... Composition nistory, World -....] History, Canadian... Arithmetic Algebra Geometry Latin Authors Latin Grammar French Authors French Grammar Greek Authors Greek Grammar German Authors German Grammar... Drawing General Science Agriculture Botany Chemistry Physics _ Geography Biology  Name of Test.  STANDARDIZED TESTS.  XXY  I  litest Uannittuer PROVINCE  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA  FRED. J. PATTERSON, H.A.. Principal Mens Sana In corpore sano MONTHLY  REPORT  OF STUDENT  J**  GRADE. .  <X  3  y~  X//C  COURSE... TEACHER...  P R O M O T E D T O GRADE...  PRINCIPAL  XXV  192  Sept. Oct.  Days Present - - - -  Nov.  Tan, Feb. Mar. -*•* 7'-  '?  /  Zo 2-  3  Apr. May '3 /  June Average S3 /  /  1. English Literature - 2. English' Composition  7*  c  /OO  7. Science (a) - - - 8. " (b) - - - 9. Latin (a) Composition 10. •" (b) Authors - 11. French (a) - - 12. ' " (b)  c c. a  s3oo/{ K<?e /-/A/G  ?3 3S  -  72-  c  9$  —/ 93 4/  —/ -— &'7  fj 63  *)  17. Typewriting - - - IS Man. Train, or Dom. Sc. Standing in Class - - Number In Class - - Application to Work - General Progress - - General Conduct - - -  — /  "7o  o  ft  #  £7 7JV7  7°  4. Arithmetic - - - - 5. Algebra - - - - - -  15  70  Ci-  S3  7t-7  7/  /  *  3  /<£  1  ; 40 First-class In each suHbojneo cr t.s: Aver. 75; CO in each subject. Second-class Honors: Aver  r  n  Both parents are requested to sign this report. ...lias spent the folk time dally in home study in the month of... 132 Time Signatures of Parents or Guardians (1) September (2) (1) October (2) (1) November (2> (1) December (2) ID , , January (2) ID February (2) (1) March 12) (1) April (2) ID May 121 (1) (2) N.I1.—real, A Higsh S c h o o l s om oneeta onstwt o hour s es rs ious hometuds,t ,rty ddoayfr e' ed, Promptne 'geullpariltyhecasncnhootolifbebhyeovsm eeree m pht ahsoaitzseudc .c i - a r c i i i M cuii uesi n i n g n o th itnhteerfsetruedsentwitis h tih e r e g u l a r h o m e s t u d y p e r i o d , a n d thiantg n attendance every day.  •June  REMARKS BY PARENTS:  xxv i (35 5 5 H  u  - j  33  id 1  p  6  w  •3  HOOLS  o  8  E  //  J  53  p  l  X  y y  X  y  «:  \  •> •> >  V  S  f  /  5! 0  ! N  * >  i  i  0)  A  H  X  '9  i  1) CO  3 w  <j  0  %  y  5" 3  <<?  y  u  c c 1  a °I a $ CM  3 S  i  >  ©  jho  to  &  E 6  s  N  s !'CO I a8s :6 do g « | g B a H  ty  • >  11  j  if  <J  ^ _c  «:  «?  s  r, (§  to  (50 0  x  !^  >  1  X0  a  s:  >•.  \  t. *i <9  X  6  d  >  0  »  I  s  A A  " 3 3 1 1  O  (t  t  5  >  6  *§ Cc' « »1 Ml J R  Wff  <j  «?  B  0  B  A*  t  !  -  +  «J  W  ^  ?  c  O  *0  1  C  a  S3  1  t (O  3  a t  1 a i 1 e 3 g. to te  c :  1  i  <1 O  a  s o1  ?! 2i 0 i 1 &  1  £  i 13 1i  c  =  ! 1 3 II s fS |1 C<L C 1« 1 8 S!eo o o 1i 1 1 1 8s S3 S H 1 E  o  2  to  xxvi  M a r a  e  B i r t h d a y A u g . 18,. 1 9 1 8 .  2 2 5 B V-X11C  gattonality  of parents  7 years.  ifelgh  O c c u p a t i o n of; f a t h e r - G r o c e r School Record  1  Grade •  IT  1 1 111  lffi  Ace (Trades  sTrip-oed  (trades  repeated  vi  Vll.'  12  12  5 ,39 3 . 3 ; .,' , T . e t t e r  B  R-rade  4.0  13  .i ,.59  B  D  vi i: .  4.2 3 7  c4 6.0  C  X...  IX  XI i n  15' 16  14  r  '%  '  5.3  5  B  B  -  17  7  B  5 6. 17 A.  B  '.iatriculation Becords Age  AT. J?,.  Bng.,S.S . A i r . Hatha...  T . P W f f T T S (TP C  5,5  Average  B  .Tun . H a t . Sen.Mat. Subsequent  scholastic  record.  Qconiw-tii n'n„ Test National •nations.!  Age 12 -  I.Q,.  Bookkeeper, wholesale  138  grocers.  116 Rating-  Average  127  J ZGSI-OSZ KOX KBJS j=o -;ne3 aod-n jsaaujt sq? sajBarpni g ppoj3j jo -?033 jad 05 ;xaa aq? saitoipuj a  -aptjjS jo ^nao jad OS oippjui am sajtrajpui Q 'Optus jo inoa aad OS ?^oa aq$ saiuoipni a -apnaa jo -\u^ jad g doj aqj a^uDjpui y .  — SAOHOJ su apira eq Sum s^oafqns xt\ 3nn*a—'HXOW  I -„i  :  djqsjapuDi. jo aaaapjAg;  —4HttIs  looqas  "  ijiadoad jo a « o  -sDjaaas  •••.Cpnjs aaioq pun noi^judsjj Jooj „ ..Mpjjt „ „'pooo „ '4H9tl33xs[ „ osn.  ^  * looqos t["IH °^ ttoHoraoid *tto ao inaanuraja3 jooqo's SafiWi'  |  1  i  !  i  i  |  nj.pgjjgq ox—"HJ;ON (i  ia0  a  | i  [  1j j }  ! j  i  j  i i  Q '  vats  3 to  «i  i  4^ M  ^ S i  .  <l i i  IS:  i i  Si  i  • vSjS!  Oil!  #1*1  *j« i 4! i-n  •  & em's,  JN af*  <>  •i i |  i  •  1  ji Manual T  Nature Si  c  Geo graph;  'S <  History, (  H t  1  Compositi  K  I a  Domestic  I  c  e  History, )  i  Subject.  .a  Literature  ri £  Language.  1  % " | I Q  B  xxviii  IGCl-0 Address... School , Date of entry.... Date of leaving.  HIGH SCHOOL COURSE. INTELLIGENCE TESTS.  Hcnsons for leaving. STANDARDIZED TESTS.  Grade Rook-keeplng... Shorthand Typewriting... Penmanship.... Spelling Civics Commercial Law Business Correspond Economics Applied Mechanics... Shop-work Sheet-metal work Machine-shop workPrinting. Electricity Physiology Dietetics Needlework Household ArtMusic Clothing, etc Days absent , Days late  I  Attitude toward school activities. Attitude toward outside activities Application Fhyslcal defects . Special aptitudes. Remarks , Preparation and home-study Attention In class Honour Reliability Manners Conduct Self-conirol _ Care of property Service School spirit Evidence of leadership NOTE.—Rating In subjects may be made ns follows:— A Indicates the top ! > per cent, of grade It Indicates the next 20 per cent, of grade. C Indicates the middle 30 per cent, of grade. D Indicates the next 20 per cent, of grade. E Indicates tlie lowest 5 per cent, of grade.  xxix  xxix  XXX  fa&e-K:i^246'-B ' i l ' l - l x .  B i r t h d a y S e p t . 2,7, .1917 Wl-iflV.'  t a t l o ^ O c c u M t i o n .of ,fa-tfaer .. B u i l d i n g  8 years,  r  Contractor/  :  S c h o d l .Record; Srade  .  •.,.-.}.  1  11 111  • Aa-e  IV  9  10  ;v  Yi  ii  V l l Y i i : >-ix 1513 14 16  1S  X  ;  XI  -fl •}  _Gra.<ies sTup-n^d  :x \  ::Gra.d:es.. r ' f i f i f i ^ t f i ^ ,  ^^^^g"  -f  .7.4$ 76£ ; 69? ' 69; G•  B r——  4.0-  1  c- c-  61% 69^ ;,4.^=1 i  C-  C  C ' GG-: 3.5  M a t r l c u l a t : i o r i vfieeofcfe.  G  ;  Age  Avy Eng.:,;S»S .... A Y . Maths> :  £S r*.T- o - w ' r » aies  Sufes 0130X6 n t S c h o l a s t i c  Records  nf  T V ^ T M  Test  ? E R I N  ..;  i.  mnrirrj,  T  ^  .  Q  ..QCGl]J)a.t.^r :; iri  Age  House p a i n t e r  /Eational  10  115  lational.  13  121  Te'rman A  14  111  -Sational  14  117.  1:5:  ,109  Average;  3.75  . Average  Of  .Ratlh-g-C-  G  [-jifean.Q.j, 327' G l l - X l l  35  B i r t h d a y May  - R a t i o n a l i t y ' of parents  4, 1919  •  9 years.  English . v  Occupation of f a t h e r  Truck d r i v e r  "S/c-hbiol 'Reapfed.. :.Grade .  1  11  ill  7  7  IV 8  v.. VI .9  711 v i i : . : i x  : 10  11  "b  Grades n*i,rr:v:>fi  Xi X l l  12 13  '.. 14 15  X  .' p:  • ..^Grades' T&opw.f^ri-  73.^ 69,^ 82% T i P t t P T  0-  •^T-a.d.fi'.  A  C  74? '80%: 84$  ' 80 B  ;  B •'• A  A.T. Eng..»,SvS k AT.. M a t h s . ftr T,an gna gp p .-,  ; •72^  . Of : B  : B  B  Average; '  r  J u n . V a t . 15  5 .42 v•  _B_  Matr i c u l a t i e h "Records Age  4«8<  :• 72.'^ . B ' : " 72^  P,  :  ' *•<* > ' 1  J  ;5uhsed:uent s c h o l a s t i c r e c o r d .  AHe;cerds o f T i i t e n i ;  '. T e s t national Bational  r  o  r  i  ^  T r  „ „ +  ; Age  I.Q. Ecu's e^Torfc^ C l e r k a t Window "bakery.  .8 .  •A.  w y .—  TP : i ^n  • Average  A  ,  137  •• -Rating.;  xxxii  202 B 1 1 1 - X 1 1 37 Nationality  Birthday  of parents  Occupation of f a t h e r  Dec. '14, 1920  9 years.  Scottish  . Salesman  S c h o o l ' 'Record Grade  1  11 111  IV  9  8 Grades  V  9  skipped  VI 10'  711 v i i : : I X 13 11 12  X  XI X l l  14  15 16  D  . G-rn,dfts_r epe a t ed  7 3 ^ 75$ 7 7$ 80$  ij>TOr sen  3Le±:fc.P> y  r y'a T  r\  Matriculation Age  G  R  B  B"  16  E n g . j S i S . AT>. J i a t h s .  82-Jr$  A  A'  82-§-$  A  scholastic  Records of I n t e l 1 i • . : • Test  P - P ^ P  . 'Haggerty  A  vp.r.nrr\  i  T  F  I  A  +  B  .  _0ccupa.t-i nr|  Age  I .Q.  8  above _ipbl p  0 National  •,  124  10  National  11  Terman B  16  Average  5.6  5„8  A  B  B  6.1  Average" 82$% A  Sen.Mat. Subsequent  6.3  6.5 A  JiP-p-gi.i-a, g o s -  .' Jun.Mat.  B.  B  Records Av.  80$ .86$ 6.3  A  146 \  152 120 JL 3 o*o  -Rating--  A  Naiiie: ;,147vB  1V-XT  Birthday  .Sept. .7, 1917  8 years  S c h o o l .Her(^-M&'4.l Grade •  1  11  ill  . IV V  VI  11  12  10  Aee  V l l v i i : it  XI. X l l  15  15  16 ,17  Grades ,,skip-oed • '  ;  ••h&i&e.&r. r e p e a l e d ' i 69$  T ' P I ' ^ ^  ' i ^ P - t t P T»  '••••f^.f' q'#fa' '  Ma t r i c u l a t i o n Age"  C  •  ,0  •Records  C™  755  7-6;* 67$ 5.73 63? ; •  Of  C-  C  B :';  3.8  A Y . Eng.,3.3 •f A Y . MathsV 8c LPhguage-S-:  ;  G  3.88  -  •;Sen.Mat. Subsequent; : S c h d l a s t i c rervnrd y  :  •:  National:  Occirnp.-hi  Age ;  Na t i o n a l - — • v- •  11 •• 14  :  ' "'  1 G  :  Plasterer  • 119 125  C-  Average  B  121  :  C  Jun.vat.  •',,;:'••' T e s t •  C .B  •  Average -  ::• ^'aeerds-df Y r i ^ p i ^ i ^ n - - Tr~+ ~  60$ >3.2 1  C  X X X I V  'Name: .880-: 1V-X11:35  ..Birthday  ^Nati'onailjby ;.:.^  9  yews  . English  :  Occupation  3"an. 50 , 1915  of fr-.thnr  S c h o o l Recafrdi,.. Grade  1  11 111  IV  :  12 13  — — k s e '• \;  :V :V1  Vll'  v i i : • TT  14  15  67? 7  75% 70$ 4.5 7 6£  16  17 ;  •  XI X l l  18 19  20'.'  ; b " . r e p e a - f ^ d '  fay-fir age  70z:  ...(  Tiet,;'Le.r_L? ra.dR  .  T  03„33  0  :  G-  C  o—  3 © 33 G  AT.  Eng.,3.3 *• A T . l l a t h s v n ia P " e s • '8* - Q r> i a t ) n p q ••"Average • 49$ D. ' 50^ D '50$ D •: 20 ;  Age  •z • 9  Jun.Kat.  1  -Sen ..Mat* Subsequent  s c h o l a s t i c re cord.  A :Becdj?ds o f T T o t f l i i i p - « V - T - - t ~ C' T e s t '• Age  Occ'.ipp.t.i n-Y) i . q . •;  A t home  90 • .. N a t i o n a l  ; 15 . ;  ' 88  O t i s S e l f - a d i a i n i s t e :?ing 16 ' 101  Average  , \  ' :o •'  93  55$ ;3.,0 2.C C-  Ji,fatr;iculatlon. Ra c o r d s  :  :  Grades, s l d p f t d  _—-trades  ;  x  "Rating--  •D  E  XXXV  49: G 111-XllC  Name  Birthday  Hay 6, 1917  10  years  :ffati dnall t y o f parents Canadian :  Qcc.UDati on ,of' f a t h e r L i n o typ e bp e r a to r; School  Record  w G r a d e / ' '" :  -~ •  1  IX . L l l  1Y  9  Afl-e  10  Y  Yl  V l l . -,:vIX  11 : 12  15  is:  14  '4.1 I  69  :  •XI X l l  16  17  18  -Grades -skip-ned',,•..• : :  Grades :r epeated' 5e 5t  5.5  —.—iLmarciga. • T.P'f t p r 'fir-iris:  '"B;  ' • • ' :  B  5 \al B  G  • P f c-f:  B  4.4 C f  •6.0 . -H SatriculatIon  4.6£  3,7  BecO:IN1S:.  Age: Av. Eng.yS.S . Av, M a t h s .  Average  5.0 B  '•  A :Jun.Mat> ;. j&eh.Mat. S,uhs e oue nt so ho l a s t1c. r e c n r d .  ;  \ He c o r d s  o f Tr.t.-TM  T  n  „ „ •. Age  :  :  National  •... .: -Terman A  •>:\-'-• ,- ••' ;  ;0:c.G.Tipa.t.i.n.w.  +  t'\-'"•.;• . •'• T e s t  '~\'  •••Average  ::./..-  i-A, :  9  98  15  190  01erk  5  ftrygoods  •Hating  "': - --\  I)  99  store,  C  XXXV1  71  Name  G  V1-X1C  Birthday  jKiationallty of parents  M  a  y  •  2 1  '  1 9 1 5  years  6  S c o t c h 'Canadian  O c c u p a t i o n o f father' \.''\Lab6u-r'e-r; S c h o o l Record,-.,  1  "w./, .Grade  —  A.tfe  .:..  •- Grarlfts  slfip-oed :• J  11 i l l "  1V  V.' V I , ''il  :  Vll. v i i : 12 -, 13 14  Grades r e p e a t e d :  *>  s.o;  ATOr^y T,ettpr  Graf-lP  6,0 Age  :  \  32$ : 7 5 ;  71| : 79?,  A\  B ,  •  Yatriculation  . • • X XI X l l 15 16  6.2  B  A  A  Records Av.c  E n g . ,3.3 . :Avv Ilaths . • %f  Q P I  .:.''...  6.17  Average:..  Q Y 1 n o c* ..  A  cTun.Kat. ;San .-Mat Subsequent  scholastic  R e c o r d s o f T r t . * n i ^l™,,  V'.; ":'['";  Test •  rennrr- ,  m^i-r--  .-,  '-  -• -  J  -Age.:./;:. I.Q.  Per.:ip,-»-hi stenographer, jn Wtn r-.VhroVp.r s . o f f ri c p,, 1  :' ••' •  ' ••• •—;  'Terman. Q:. T'o-pmian  n,  1  . ' : ... .:;.' :  !  103 1  1  -Rating--  « J  01* - "  Aye-rage  , v  iio; 2/]  X 3 0 C T 1 1  'lame  ; 258B11-X11 37  B i r t h d a y ^ly  8,," 19.18  12-years  .; N a t i o n a l l ty, of p a r e n t s .Canadaan O.ceux>ataon:--.'of., fatherv" S&lesman S c h o o l -Recdr-d; Grade  V  1  11 . 111 8  A^e_. Grades  711 Y H : •IX  •V, Y l  1Y 9  10 ;'• i i  12..  X  1.5  14  16  XI X l l : 17 18  sMfi£sxt__ "p.  ' -' /Gtn&e-S r e p e a t e d :  4 ;42- 3*-8; 72$  •  iur.er ge. ;  . . T;Pf tpr- G-rndR  : G  .. .  C-  3  i  78/ '7,9? 5,:(  c  C-  B  3 . 6 C~  Age  ).41 •5.4 1 4, 14  B '' B 5.67  :  aatrlcuiation  :  B  ,'.B  B  Records • A Y . Eng.,,,SvS •••Av.iiatiiS'., Ti^ngtiagR-H-  ^  J"un ."-"at. 18 i : 69i^V-B': ' :  :  : -8i$  4.73 : Ayerage  A  74$  B  "S en.Mat. ;  Suhsequent  scholastic  -Becords: of ^ t a i .'Test / .'•••'••.  raanrd  ;  . H a g g e r t y ..  Age  '  I.Q.  : - : ? ' • . • • ,  12 '  , / v ;Averagev,:.  .100  : 103...  !^:..18.  :  •••  Senior, Ma t r 1 o u 1 a t i o n  107  •;. "• 13,  . . :-Te'rman:B '."  :  Occupy.t-i m-)  +  • .  /National  T  m„„ . .  ' ' / N a t i o n a l •'  v'/•'•-  G  ;:Ratln;g-  :  . D  B  105^'  Qj  36-B 1 1 - X l l  Name:  36  Birthday  N a t i o n a l i t y of parents E n g l i s h ; Occupa, tion ;  School  of f a t h e r  Builder  M^ ?k 1 ° r(  1919  6  11 y e a r s  •  and Gon-J-ractor  Renord: •  yGrade  1  11 i l l :  IV  ___Aai©.:_..,.  7 : 8  9  i ^ — J l r a d e s : / s k i p p e d - ..  h  ^~--JjXml£LS  Yl  711  10.. 11 ;  YII:  12 15  IX 14,:,  . v • •X I X l l 15 16  17  a  1  r e pe a te d':  r.  75$ 72$ : 72;;:  kvprnga-.-. ':'  Y  c-  TiettKOi....;Gra^:p/  G  G.f  0  t '2$  5.17  G4:•; 4.d Matriculation  .Jun,iMat,.  :B'".' ;  t. 68 5.4 2 5, B  B  B  Records  ;Av./Eng. ,:s^S  Age  'C  C  B  :71$ 74$  17  A t . liaths » 82$  A:  4.91 B Ayerage  -  7 0 f $ B  - .;;Se:n.Jfet,;. Subsequent  .Becords  s c h o l a s t i c : renoTrj.  o f jnt^-A^  ,  s  „ .  Test ...Pihtner  -iQcCiipa-f.-i a r . Age  Cunningham  National  11  national Terman 'Terman A German'A :Aye rage:  No s t e a d y occupation;, 119  working  114  (Now wo r k i n g wi t h Yancou ve r  115 12  120  13 -±8-  113  C4  116*  with father. ,  isTaice  lll-Xll'Jip  Birthday  m h  >  5  >  1  9  1  7  1 0  y  e  a  r  S  N a t i o n a l i t y : -of.parents/ E n g l i s h O d c u p a t i o h of f a t h e r School  B u i l d e r arid  Record .  ''  Contractor  Grade/.  •, ••  1  11  Age  ...  Ill 10  Ml  ;  Vll." v i i :t i x  VI •:  IV V  :  12  16  14  13,  X : XI X l l : 17  18  19;  - i ~ . Gr-KlQ.s sKispeiLv••  ^•• .firad:es/::repeatea- < ;:  77$: 77%* ;79$ :  :  M a t r i c u l a t i o n Beeords Age  At.  B  •B  .0*.  Letter:, 'Grade  74%"  Brig.',;8vS ;.; A v v B i :  77$  B  B  80%'  81$  Haths. BV .:  >..  B  :;A':  B  A 6.1  :' Average ;  . • 76*$  '•  6.8 L ••o„7S  79£  A • ' B 6.33  |5V7:5. JL  • TiP'iW'trnP) fir'e'R'"-  '.i'J,un.;Mat-i  79^  »  A  B ;/  V ;s.en.Mat. ;S:Ulpaequent: s c h o l a s t i c , r e c o r d . . :  \ B:e;cdrd's:: o f / T n t e l l i ; s e n c e - v T ' p . « + c : • Test • :' Age  :  :  ':':-;,,, " .;• N a t i o n a l  l'.- --i. :  :;.;••  Occupfl.tinn,  1  ;  • •  :  Terman:-'..-;•'.'....  j;:;Te;rman A ... :  Average  .  I.Q.  Ml  104  :•' M4:  ; 116'  •108: " ...14' "-i  :  •"li. 15  li. 109  .109*;  go  steady  employment,  w o r k i n g w i t h father.*'•• To go  I  to  Englandfor  enrollongg^^n 3?orce  Boyal A i r  .xi 210 G l - X l l 37  ;Name  ' N a t i o n a l i t y di-- p a r e n t s Occu-oatlon School  Jan.6.. 1920  Birthday  11 y e a r s  Amerlcaii-Ganadian  of f a t h e r  Hanufaoturer' s Agent  iQCCTCi  •". Grade  1  .11 i l l  Lgs  7  8', • •9 : -10 10 11  IV'- V  —^liiia^sfi-^Jsi^Qii^  V l l / v i i : . IX  VI  12  : x iX l l  15 14  15 .16 17  '•: h  Gxs.ces r e p e a t e d , 5.1 4  -—^••"•p^qp-p T i P t f P T .. V VP rl.P  Age  79$ 7 7 f 4.2 4.' • £.89' 4.1 I 3.45  :  B  T  MatriGulation  4.5C 845 >77$ .' 645 :  04 A  A  B  ' B : Cj  B  4 n §  Becards  0  O f -  Av.,i3ng. ,3.3 . A T * Maths * .Average A--- L np"itag s••• P  :-/Jun.Matw 17  59%  c ; D  5.27 B  o  0  :.- 51$  V.Cr. :  56$  0-  •  ;  \;|en.Mat. guhse.quent s c h o l a s t i c  Be;c,ords :af f r v t . - * . ! i ,$-' Test " v  k •?  rec-rrd.  ' -. -. T r  ; Age .•  -; :  —  Hr.t i cnr.l n  ;  —  —^—^.rPA jirfiop~ T3 -  :  Ocei]Jia:-hin^  t  I.Q.  7 -  Li 5 5 -• —'• *l' II  in .  1 AP  J. X——  '•  A"i"/'  Attend!ng  A r t Scho.ol..  r.  '  -Rating:  .  17  ... ',•  \ A v e r age; i ; '.;•'/•'  :  B  :  1 3 2 ir>"  xli 83 B 1 U - X 1 1 '37  •Name  Nationality Occupation  Birthday. S e p t . A 9 1 9 1  of..parents; E n g l i s h o f .father  1° years  Scottish  ••: ' ^ i n i s t ; .;;  S c h o o l -Record Grade  1  i l l • IV V Y l  ill-  __—Aere  9.. 8. ••••  10  vii vi 12  11  - ix  x ".XI X l l  I :w  13  15 : 16  14  17  Grades ••skipped Grades ;.r-fipea+fid.'  •  r  ; 78$ !•, 67  ^ . p j c i s q - . - \'  :  71;  ' - B - "::  4.8J 82$; 5.4" )  82$  0  B  B  !r„?5 r!  Age  • Atf. Bng.,8vS '"ifSi'-n-guage-a;  1 7 ' 69^ B  .AvV. Jlaths • 71$  B  C "• G i  5,41 B  ;  •"a t r- i c u l a t i o n "Records  A B :  :  4.88  /  .B  •  •  Aver.a'ge  5,35 B  ;  • 70$ B  /; Sen.Mat. Subsequent, s c h o l a s t i c  $',Becords. o f | n f e H i ^ f  ' Test;.; ;.; •.'••,;.• ; ; i r a t i o n a i ' • :.3 a t l d n a l  I  ;•; n a t i o n a l  ;$;  ••; ' • Terman B. /. • ..  .Terman A .Avarage.; • /  D  record.  fc„ ;  :0c Cirpafefn^:  t  ; Age  I.Q.  '10  137  I  11:  ;' 12 •;'  ;  ;  A  storedeliyery  ' 143 ; 138  ••Bating-  • 18 <;..•" :'120  ; 19 '••  Drug  120 131  3.1  xlii 31 .G. V - X l l  Ifame  Satipnallty  of parents  OeeupationoJ School  34  father  B i r t h d a y June 6, 1916 E  n  g l  l  Meat  s  k  packer.  Record  Grade  1  11 111  i IV  VI  V  Age  10  ;/ Vflfradea -  8 years  ;  711  11  v i i : . IX  12  15  X .: X I  14;  15  xii  16 ; 17  skip^M-  'Graces'< rapaa.^ed £vpr p;q  7  5.76  r  •  *0% ••:: b.. 28 . 77/ 65; BO 4  B 0.4  v'B  .52$ •6.5% 4.E  C  B :  C  J4.45 04!  l l a t r I c u l a t l o n Becords :  Age  Av. Bng.,3.3 •*e L a n g u g ° s •  Av. , Haths:.  n  Jun.Mat. 17  ]  •79^  . '55^ n-  -R  4.69 C4  Average 67$. .04.  $;.Beh.*Mat.. ; S u h s e q uent s c h o l a s t i c  Vv.  r e c n r r ] . ,  Test .  Age  Wati OVTA"! V'..:  9  v:L WP Trripun A'.  ..•.'.'14 V  ;  . V V L V . . V V: JV'^oT^ari "R  * v..;- A v e r a g e  '  '  15  I.Q. 142 ' 125 ?•• 127V''  1 s i -l  A t home f o r , two o r t h r e e y e a r s Has "been 4 a k i n g a "business c o u r s e s i n c e her, f a t h e r ' s : deadlu  -"•Ra-tin-g-  3CJL 2. x x  Name:  Birthday < ^  230  G n-yn 37 N a t i o n a l i t y 01* p a r e n t s B c o t t i R h of  Oocu-oation  father- :  t n  •  34.;  n .  1 Q 1 8  V  R  ^  ,nnn^ />t r  :  g  0  'School Behnrd ' Grade-  ' ----- - ... 1  '11 111 . IV V VI. 9 10 11 •12 '.•13  :—Ass......  V l l v i 1:."IX 14 15 16  X 17  Xi: X l l 18 19  1..: Grades ..stei^§asL___ -JivGradaS ^  r p y  r s ^ / t R d "\  j.gp  •5.0::5.4 185;: V6.8J I 77  _  B  C4  AB  C-  75$ ;4.4! 5  C-f  B  o . l . 0-^,  3  v  . l  -3-ri • G- . 'D . B  04 3.83  .  0  M a t r i c u l a t i o n Be c or dr, AT.. E n g .,,8 .SJ . A T . :iiaths> & • •S<?i ances 19: 61$ C 57f:.. :o  Age;  :  cruri..Mat-.  4»46  ;  ,  ;  Average' * 0  :&eriiMat*i Subsequent:-scholastic, r e c o r d .  •Be cord s; o f Test  rrt:wi i.i  r  e  n  C  R  « *«  Oco-ippr.-; Age  P i n t n e r Cunningham  I.Q. 1©0  ifatlohal'  12  107  Watlohai  13  100  . Terman "B''  18:  104  C-  lQ2f  Average'  Senior- M a t r i c u l a t i o n  ;•?.£. t i n g  0|  R  

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