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A study of the correlation between intelligence, school grades and after-school occupation in 356 cases… Edgar, Edmund George 1938

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A STUDY OF THE CORRELATION BE TWEES' INTELLIGENCE» SCHOOL GRADES AND AFTER-SCHOOL OCCUPATION IN 356 CASES OF STUDENTS IN THE WEST VANCOUVER -SCHOOLS. Edmund George Edgar A Thesis submitted f o r the Degree of MASTER OF ARTS i n the Department of EDUCATION The U n i v e r s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia by A p r i l , 1938 Contents Cha,pter ' I n t r o d u c t i o n v 1. Tlie Genera,! H i s t o r y of the Ca.ses 1 2„ Tlie S e l e c t i o n of the Cases 4 Fumber of Cases Records a v a i l a b l e 3. The Assembling of the Data 8 P r e p a r a t i o n of the Data Sheet E n t e r i n g of the I n f o r m a t i o n The B a r r S c a l e A l l o t t i n g of the Grades D i s t r i b u t i o n of the Ca.ses over the Grades D i s t r i b u t i o n c f the L e t t e r Grades Maximum j Median •> andMinimum Marks i n each Grsde D i s t r i b u t i o n of the Cases as to I n t -e l l i g e n c e . numbering and L i s t i n g of the Cases f o r purposes of Comparison 4. The C o r r e l a t i o n of I n t e l l i g e n c e and School 20 Grades I n t e l l i g e n c e and Sc h o o l Grad.es Comparison of Grades of Boys and G i r l s Comparison of f i r s t s i x Grades and l a s t s i x Grades School Grades and M a t r i c u l a t i o n I n t e l l i g e n c e and M a . t r i c u l a t i o n I n t e l l i g e n c e and A f t e r - S c h o o l Occupation 5. Some S p e c i a l Cases 53-C o n c l u s i o n 43 Appendix i - x x x i x L i s t of .Tables Table Page 1. The Development of the School System of 3 West Vancouver between 192-3 and 1957 2. Tlie D i s t r i b u t i o n of the Cases a c c o r d i n g 14 to the number of grades a t t e n d e d 5. The ilumber of Cases i n each Grade 15 4. D i s t r i b u t i o n of the L e t t e r Grades 15 and 16 '5. Maximum, Med:an5 and Minimum marks 17 i n each Grade. 6„. Grades a s s i g n e d on the B a s i s of I n t - 17 e l l i g e n c e 7. B l o c k Graph showing D i s t r i b u t i o n of 18 I n t e l l i g e n c e i n 356 Cases of t h i s study 8. A Sampling of the L i s t i n g s of the Grades 19 earned by each Case 9. Comparison o'f I n t e l l i g e n c e and S c h o o l 20 Grades of 157 Boys ( l ~ V l ) 10. Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e ' a n d S chool 20 Grades of 169 G i r l s Tl-Vl.) 1.1. Comparison of S c h o o l Grades and I n t e l l i - 21 gence of 326 Boys and G i r l s ( l - V l ) 12„ Numbers of Boys o b t a i n i n g S chool Grade 22 above or below I„0,« R a t i n g s 13. Number of G i r l s o b t a i n i n g S chool Grades 22 above or below I.Q,. R a t i n g s ? ( . • 14. Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e ^and S c h o o l 23 R a t i n g s of 170 Boys ( V l l - X l l ) i v 15. Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e and School 23 R a t i n g s of 180 G i r l s ( V l l - X l l ) 16. Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e and School 23 R a t i n g s of 350 Roys and G i r l s ( V l l - X l l ) 17. Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e and School 24 R a t i n g s of 172 Boys ( l - X l l ) 18. Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e and School 24 R a t i n g s of 184 G i r l s ( l - X l l ) 19„ Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e and School 24 Grades of 356 Boys and G i r l s ( l - X l l ) 20. Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e and School 25 Grades(Percentages) 21. Comparison of School Grades of the f i r s t 26 s i x y e a r s w i t h those of the second s i x y e a r s (314 cases) 22. Comparison of School Grades and R a t i n g s 27 based on M a t r i c u l a t i o n Averages (118 cases) 23. Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e and R a t i n g s 29 based on M a t r i c u l a t i o n averages (118 cases) 24. Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e and Occupat- 31 i o n a l R a t i n g s 9 I n t r o d u c t i o n This t h e s i s , as can he seen from the t i t l e , i s a study of the s c h o l a s t i c attainments i n t e l l i g e n c e , and a f t e r - s c h o o l occupations of a. number of West Vancouver c h i l d r e n . The c o r r e l a t i o n of i n t e l l i g e n c e and school grades has always been a, subject of great i n t e r e s t to the w r i t e r , and the opportunity to make a study of t h i s subject i n the schools of West Vancouver ha,s been deeply appreciated. The c o n d i t i o n s f o r t h i s study have been very favourable because of c e r t a i n advantages which ob t a i n i n such a d i s t r i c t as West Vancouver. Perhaps the most favourable of these c i r -cumstances {is the s i z e Of the d i s t r i c t . West Vancouver i s small enough to allow a f a i r l y c l o s e acquaintance with 8,11 of the c h i l d r e n i n the schools and yet l a r g e enough to provide a s u f f i c i e n t number of cases to make the f i n d i n g s of such a study r e l i a b l e . In a d d i t i o n the school p o p u l a t i o n i s f a i r l y s t a b l e as a l a r g e p r o p o r t i o n of the r e s i d e n t s own t h e i r own hQmes and there i s no great turnover of students i n the .schools. Other f a c t o r s which a s s i s t i n such a study are the u n i f o r m i t y of the grading i n the West Vancouver schools, the a v a i l a b i l i t y v i of the r e c o r d s ? the years of Experience of the w r i t e r i n the s c h o o l s , and h i s p e r s o n a l acquaintance w i t h so many of the s t u -dents. In such a s i t u a t i o n i t i s p e r t i n e n t to ask: What can be obtained from a q u a l i t a t i v e study of t h i s information? Would the f i n d i n g s of such a study bear out the o f t e n expressed o p i n -i o n s of e x p e r i e n c e d tea.chersjregarding such t o p i c s as the s c h o o l performance '"of boys and g i r l s , the r e l a t i v e success of boys and g i r l s i n the language and s c i e n c e s u b j e c t s , and the d i s p r o p o r t -i o n between the amount of a t t e n t i o n g i v e n the average and p o o r e r p u p i l s ? In the l i g h t of such i n f o r m a t i o n s h o u l d we modify or change -our ideas as to what i s b e s t f o r the s t u d e n t s who come under our c a r e ? For many y e a r s the w r i t e r has seen l a r g e numbers of boys and g i r l s l e a v i n g s c h o o l and. s t a r t i n g to work i n v a r i o u s f i e l d s of endeavour. I t has appeared t h a t the c h i l d r e n of l e s s than average i n t e l l i g e n c e have been forced' to accept the' more m e n i a l o c c u p a t i o n s and t h a t the b t i g h t e r s t u d e n t s went on to the more r e s p o n s i b l e -position's. T h i s , a c c o r d i n g to the p s y c h o l o g i s t s , i s as i t should be. Whether the a n a l y s i s of the data, of t h i s study.--Irears out t h i s concept Ban be seen l a t e r . "Another f a c t o r of I n t e r e s t i n such a study i s the p r o p o r t -i o n of cases which r e q u i r e s p e c i a l treatment i n and out of s c h o o l . Here again s u g g e s t i o n s can be made which might r a i s e the e f f i c -i e n c y of our work. I w i s h to express my a p p r e c i a t i o n to a l l who have a s s i s t e d me-in t h i s work,,those who by t h e i r h e l p and e f f i c i e n c y have made the f i n d i n g s of t h i s study more v a l i d . ; Chapter 1 The General H i s t o r y of the Cases. Tlie 356 cases i n t h i s study have r e c e i v e d p r a c t i c a l l y a l l of t h e i r education i n the Elementary and High Schools of West Vancouver. These schools have been reorganised s e v e r a l times during the l a s t few years and a b r i e f h i s t o r y of the v a r i o u s changes i s required f o r the purposes of t h i s study. Tlie growth of the e d u c a t i o n a l system of West Vancouver has been r a p i d . A one-room school was , f i r s t opened i n Oct-ober* 1911. A t t h i s date, 1938, t h i r t y teachers are employed and over 1050 p u p i l s are e n r o l l e d i n the v a r i o u s schools. Between 1911 and 1923 the number of elementary school "teachers employed was i n c r e a s e d to ten,, p u p i l s of the High School grades being accommodated, at the North Vancouver High School. In September, 1923,the West Vancouver High School began as a two-room school i n the H o l l y b u r n Elementary School b u i l d i n g arid was Increased to a school of four rooms by June, 1927, In September, 1923,there were i n operation two h i g h school d i v i s i o n s , three elementary c l a s s e s at Hollyburn School, f i v e at Pauline Johnson, two at Dundarave, one at Cypress Park, and one at* the Gapilano Timber Gamp on Upper Capilano. In September, 1927,the new High School b u i l d i n g at Seventeenth St r e e t and Inglewood Avenue was opened with a s t a f f of f i v e teachers, there being at that time two ten-room elementary schools i n ope r a t i o n , Hollyburn and Pauline Johnson; a two-room elementary school at Dundarave and a s i n g l e room at Cap-i l a n o . Between 1927 and 1933 there was a s l i g h t drop i n the school p o p u l a t i o n with a r e s u l t a n t .reduction i n the number of teachers from t h i r t y i n 1927 to twenty-six i n September, 1933. This number was increased to twanty-nine i n 1934 and to t h i r t y i n 1936. The g r e a t e s t change i n educa t i o n a l p o l i c y i n West Vancou-ver occurred i n the summer of 1933 when the Ju n i o r High School system was inaugurated. At that time grades VI1 and V l l l of the elementary schools were placed i n the High School b u i l d -i n g forming a combined J u n i o r and Senior High School of s i x grades, nine d i v i s i o n s and employing .eleven teachers. An increase i n the High Schools p o p u l a t i o n n e c e s s i t a t e d an add-i t i o n of two rooms i n the sp r i n g of 1934 but overcrowding was so s e r i o u s that four of the S e n i o r High D i v i s i o n s had to be moved to f o u r vacant rooms i n the Hol l y b u r n B u i l d i n g while the J u n i o r High School and the two Commercial c l a s s e s of the High School remained i n the High School b u i l d i n g . The a d d i t i o n of s i x rooms to the. High School b u i l d i n g i n the summer of 1936 enabled the Board of School Trustees to b r i n g a l l the c l a s s e s of the J u n i o r and Senior High Schools together under one roof. By September, 1937,, the .school pop-3 uls.tion* lia.d increa.sed to 520 i n the combined High School and 560 i n the two elementary schools of Hollyburn and Pauline Johnson,, Table 1. Tlie Development of the School System of West Vancouver between 1923 and 1937, Date 1923 1926-27 1927 ^  (Sept.] 1932- 33 1933- 34 1934- 36 1936-37 Hollyburn Ro orris 3 of 1-V111 #2 of 1X-X1 6 of 1-V111 #4 of 1X-X1 10 of 1-V111 10 of 1-V111 6 of 1-V1 6 of 1-V1 #4 of X - X l l 6 of 1-V1 • Pauline Johnson Rooms 5 of 1-V111 10 of 1-V111 10 of 1-V111 10 of 1-V111 8 of 1-V1 8 of 1-V1 8 of 1-V1 Inglewood (High School, Ro oms #5 of 1X-X1 .-#7 of 1X-X11 #12 of V l l - X l l #9 of V11-1X #2 of 1X-X11 #16 of V l l - X l l # High School D i v i s i o n s . Chapter 2 Tlie S e l e c t i o n of the Cases, The 359 cases were chosen from among approximately 1500 students who have passed through the West Vancouver Schools and i n c l u d e a l l those f o r whom records f o r f i v e or more years were a v a i l a b l e . I t was f i r s t necessary to gather together a l l the elementary and h i g h school record cards of a l l the c h i l d r e n who had attended the West Vancouver Schools since 1923. These t o t a l l e d about 4500 and were then f i l e d alpha-b e t i c a l l y . The next step was to check the amount of inform-a t i o n a v a i l a b l e f o r each i n d i v i d u a l and when some progress had been made i n the compiling of t h i s l i s t a f u r t h e r search was made f o r a d d i t i o n a l i nformation which had not been entered on the v a r i o u s report cards. /"The records a v a i l a h l e f o r t h i s study were as f o l l o w s : 1. Elementary School Record Cards, (In general use since 1927) 2. High School Record Cards. (a) West Vancouver High School Report Cards i n use from 1,923 to 1931, (Duplicates of report cards sent home to parents) 5 (b) High School Record cards s i m i l a r to (a) i n use from 1931-33. (c) West "Vancouver High Schools Record Cards i n use since 1933, ( i ) Permanent Record Cards (covering school recorols from Grade T i l to Grade X l l ) ( i i ) Annual Report Cards (, d u p l i c a t e s of cards sent home to parents) (d) Record ca,rds of some students t r a n s f e r r e d from . v a r i o u s J u n i o r and Senior High Schools of other d i s -t r i c t s , (e) Record Cards r e c e i v e d with e n r o l l i n g p u p i l s from other elementary and p r i v a t e schools, .(f) Results of M a t r i c u l a t i o n Examinations from 1923 to 1937. (g) Results of many standardised I n t e l l i g e n c e Tests, The D e t r o i t , pintner-Cunningham, and Haggerty i n the lower grades. The O t i s , N a t i o n a l , and Terrnan i n the hig h e r grades, (h) Records of the occupations of stud.ents a f t e r l e a v i n g school, (obtained by the w r i t e r by personal i n q u i r y of the i n d i v i d u a l , o,f f r i e n d s , and of other teachers. As w i l l be seen from the above l i s t the information was compiled from r e p o r t cards of various types. I u c k i l y f o r t h e purposes of t h i s study the methods of grading used throughout 6 the West. Vancouver Schools d u r i n g the p e r i o d under- review were • • ' f a i r l y .uniform, and, grade f o r grp.de, comparable re c o r d s were o b t a i n a b l e . In the p u b l i c s c h o o l r e c o r d cards i t was found Ehat changes i n g r a d i n g from percentage marks to l e t t e r grades and v i c e - v e r s a o c c u r r e d from year to y e a r , and t h a t i n some years l e t t e r grades were g i v e n f o r one term and percentage marks f o r the o t h e r . The c o - o r d i n a t i o n of these two d i f f e r e n t g r a d i n g metbods|wiIl be d e s c r i b e d l a t e r . In the H i g h School r e c o r d s percentage marks were a v a i l a b l e f o r a l l cases up t i l l June, 1-9.33, and s i n c e 1933, except f o r some f i n a l June exam-i n a t i o n marks, a l l marks i n the combined High Schools have been on the l e t t e r - g r a d e ba,sis. Host of the i n f o r m a t i o n as to the i n t e l l i g e n c e of the v a r i o u s i n d i v i d u a l s was o b t a i n e d from the r e c o r d cards used i n the elementary s c h o o l s . Many d i f f e r e n t t e s t s were used, and o n l y i n r e l a t i v e l y few i n s t a n c e s were l a r g e v a r i a t i o n s between the v a r i o u s , t e s t s found. One t e s t , however, j u d g i n g by the cases i n t h i s s u r v e y , was c o n s i s t e n t l y f i v e o r t e n p o i n t s below the average of the o t h e r t e s t s ? but as t h i s p a r t i c u l a r t e s t had/been g i v e n - t o no more than t h i r t y of the 356 cases of t h i s s t u d y , and as r e s u l t s of from t h r e e to f i v e t e s t s were a v a i l -a ble f o r the m a j o r i t y of the c a s e s , the r e s u l t of t h i s one t e s t s h ould have l i t t l e e f f e c t on the f i n d i n g s of t h i s r e p o r t . The I n t e l l i g e n c e Tests used i n the l o c a l s c h o o l s d u r i n g the p e r i o d under c o n s i d e r a t i o n were the pintner-Cunningham, the D e t r o i t and the Haggerty i n the lower g r a d e s , and the O t i s , 7 H a t i o n a l and Terman i n the upper grades. As a general r u l e I n t e l l i g e n c e Tests were given i n Grades one, eight and nine, and, i n c e r t a i n years, i n grades s i x and ten or eleven. Chapter 5 Th.e-Assembling of the Data. The next step a f t e r the f i l i n g of the cards was that of the p r e p a r a t i o n pf a sheet f o r e n t e r i n g the data r e l a t i n g to each case. Because of the l a r g e number of ca,ses i n the study the amount of data, to be entered was reduced to a., minimum, only those f a c t s of p a r t i c u l a r importance to t h i s survey being provided f o r . From the sample sheet, i t w i l l be seen that space was l e f t f o r pa.rticula.rs of the n a t i o n a l i t y of the parents. I t was f e l t that some record should be made of the r a c i a l o r i g i n of the cases, i f only'to e x p l a i n ' i n some measure d i f f i c u l t i e s due to language d i f f e r e n c e s , a t t i t u d e s towards education,and the 7amount of education which c e r t a i n groups of n a t i o n a l s cons i d e r best f o r t h e i r c h i l d r e n . I t was found however, that i n many cases the n a t i o n a l i t y of the .parents was an all-em-b r a c i n g "Canadian". Where, p o s s i b l e the r a c i a l o r i g i n was ent-ered as E n g l i s h , S c o t t i s h , Swedish, F r e n c h ? e t c . The occupation of the f a t h e r was included .because such in f o r m a t i o n . t e l l s much as to the home background of each case. © The space f o r the school records provides f o r a r a t i n g f o r a l l of the twelve grades, with f u r t h e r spaces below f o r a combined r a t i n g on the grades obtained i n the elementary school from grade one to grade s i x ; i n the Junior High School from grade seven to gre.de nine and i n the Senior High School f o r grades ten and eleven or f o r grades ten to twelve. A f u r t h e r b l ock i s provided f o r a r a t i n g on s c h o l a s t i c a t t a i n s ment throughout the grades. The e n t r i e s f o r recording the s c h o l a s t i c a-ttainment include the a-ge of the c h i l d i n each grade, grades skijiped and grades repeated. Only i n t h i s way ca.n a true p i c t u r e of the c h i l d ' s school h i s t o r y be shown, and although no c o r r e c t i o n has been made f o r a p u p i l being under-age or over-age i n a grade a f a i r estimate of each p u p i l ' s attainment can be obtained at a glance. -The information next provided f o r i s that of the M a t r i c -u l a t i o n r e c o r d s . Spa.ce i s provided f o r the age at which each i n d i v i d u a l wrote the M a t r i c u l a t i o n examination, f o r the aver-age obtained i n the language s u b j e c t s , f o r the average obtain ed i n the Mathematics subjects and the Sciences, and f o r the average of a l l s u b j e c t s . In the spa.ce at the extreme r i g h t i s a b l o c k f o r the l e t t e r grade assigned each i n d i v i d u a l i n comparison w i t h the averages of the other 117 students who reached m a t r i c u l a t i o n . The f i r s t average covers the subjects of E n g l i s h Composition, E n g l i s h Grammar, E n g l i s h L i t e r a t u r e , S o c i a l S t u d i e s , French Grammar, French Composition, L a t i n Authors, L a t i n Grammar, Greek Grammar and Greek Authors. 10 The second average covers the subjects of Algebra, Geometry, A r i t h m e t i c , P h y sics, Chemistry and Geography, and i n the Senior M a t r i c u l a t i o n Examination, Trigonometry. In t h i s a n a l y s i s of M a t r i c u l a t i o n r e s u l t s the averages were computed on the r e s u l t s of the f i r s t complete M a t r i c -u l a t i o n examination w r i t t e n by each i n d i v i d u a l . The r e s u l t s of supplemental examinations were omitted purposely as these would tend to change the average mark and give an inaccurate estimate of the i n d i v i d u a l ' s a b i l i t y to cope with the M a t r i c -u l a t i o n Examination. Some space i s l e f t f o r the l a t e r s c h o l a s t i c records i n each case. Some data are a v a i l a b l e f o r many of the cases at the U n i v e r s i t y , at Business Colleges,, and at centres where t r a i n i n g i s c a r r i e d on i n Accountancy, Pharmacy, etc. This space i s used i n t h i s survey f o r n o t i n g any subsequent school-in g i n specia.l commercial and other courses. The bottom s e c t i o n of the page provides space f o r the d e t a i l s of the I n t e l l i g e n c e Tests, the average score of these t e s t s , the l e t t e r grades i n comparison with the other causes and. the occupation or job r a t i n g . The occupation or job r a t i n g was obtained from'the Barr Scale of Occupational I n t e l l i g e n c e , which i s described i n Volume 1 of "Genetic Studies of Genius", Terman et A l , as follows? 'To obtain t h i s s c a l e Mr. P.E.Barr drew up a l i s t of re p r e s e n t a t i v e occupations, each d e f i n i t e l y and co n c r e t e l y 1.1 d e s c r i b e d , and bad t h i r t y judges r a t e them on a s c a l e of 0 to 100 a c c o r d i n g to the grade of i n t e l l i g e n c e which each was b e l i e v e d to demand. The ra.tings were then d i s t r i b u t e d and P» E. v a l u e s were computed f o r a l l the o c c u p a t i o n s . The P.E. v a l u e s express i n the case of each o c c u p a t i o n the number of u n i t s of i n t e l l i g e n c e w h ich, a c c o r d i n g to the composite o p i n -i o n of these t h i r t y j u d g e s , the o c c u p a t i o n demands f o r ord-i n a r y s u c c e s s . In the use of t h i s s c a l e i t i s o n l y n e c e s s a r y to compare the o c c u p a t i o n which i s to be ra,ted, w i t h the o c c u p a t i o n whose s c a l e v a l u e i s known, and to a s s i g n i t the v a l u e possessed by the s c a l e d o c c u p a t i o n which i t most nea,rly matches. Intermed-i a t e v a l u e s may be used i n r a t i n g o c c u p a t i o n s which do not a/ppear i n the s c a l e . I t has been found t h a t d i f f e r e n t judges agree f a i r l y c l o s e l y i n r a t i n g the i n t e l l e c t u a l . d e m a n d s o f oc c u p a t i o n s by t h i s s c a l e . I t can not be c l a i m e d t h a t the B a r r S c a l e v a l u e s correspond e x a c t l y to the f a c t s , but they u n q u e s t i o n a b l y approximate the f a c t s , more c l o s e l y than would the. judgment of any one i n d i v i d u a l . ' I t must f u r t h e r be a d m i t t e d t h a t the o c c u p a t i o n a l r a t i n g s g i v e n to many i n d i v i d u a l s are not f i n a l . The p e r i o d o f time s i n c e most of the cases l e f t s c h o o l i s too s h o r t f o r many to be f u l l y s e t t l e d i n t h e i r o c c u p a t i o n s a,nd where an i n d i v i d u a l 1 G e n e t i c S t u d i e s of Genius, Terman et A l . V o l . 1. S t a n f o r d U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1925. Pages 67, to 69. 12 i s i n t r a i n i n g f o r a. p a r t i c u l a r o c c u p a t i o n he or she i s g i v e n the r a t i n g of that o c c u p a t i o n . The next s tep i n t h i s work, and the one which i n v o l v e d most t i m e , wa.s the assembling of the data from the v a r i o u s r e p o r t forms on f i l e . Fo attempt -was made at g r a d i n g the cases u n t i l a l l the i n f o r m a t i o n a v a i l a b l e was entered on the data s h e e t s . I t w i l l be noted that i t was necessary to reduce v a r i o u s se ts of marks to a, common b a s i s , and thus enable com-p a r i s o n s to be made and a p l a n i n g of each i n d i v i d u a l i n h i s or h e r r e s p e c t i v e grade i n each c l a s s . I t has a l r e a d y been p o i n t e d out that both l e t t e r grades and percentage marks have been used i n the West Vancouver Schools d u r i n g the p e r i o d under c o n s i d e r a t i o n . It was i m p o s s i b l e to conver t e i t h e r l e t t e r grades or percentage marks s a t i s f a c t o r i l y without recotirse to d e t a i l e d r e c o r d s kept by the teachers through the y e a r s , but a,s these records were not g e n e r a l l y a v a i l a b l e such a c o n v e r s i o n c o u l d not be at tempted. The number of c a s e s , however, made such a, c o n v e r s i o n unnecessary as there were enough cases to a l l o w an accurate g r a d i n g w i t h i n each grade i n both percentage marks and l e t t e r g r a d e s . Tlie a v e r a g i n g of the percentage marks of each grade f o r each case was a p e r f e c t l y s t r a i g h t f o r w a r d p r o c e s s , but i n the case of the l e t t e r grades used i n the elementary schools i n some ygars p r i o r to 1933 and i n the schools g e n e r a l l y s i n c e 1933, a n u m e r i c a l e q u i v a l e n t had to be, o b t a i n e d to a l l o w g r a d i n g w i t h i n the g r o u p . T h i s was done by g i v i n g , the f o l l o w -13 ing values to the various l e t t e r grades: A, 7; B, 6; 6+, 5; C, 4; C-,3; D»2$ E } 1, These equivalents were then added, t h e i r sum d i v i d e d by the'number of subjects graded and the quotient taken to two pla.ces of decimals. This r e s u l t was then entered i n the average column under the c o r r e c t grade. I t w i l l be noted on some data sheets that percentage averages and converted l e t t e r averages are entered f o r the one grade, thus covering cases where students were marked under two d i f f e r e n t systems i n the one year. In the f i n a l grading with-i n the grade both of these averages were considered and where a d i f f e r e n c e i n l e t t e r grade occurred andaverage of the two grades was taken. When a l l a v a i l a b l e data, were entered on the data sheets a s t a r t was made i n p l a c i n g each i n d i v i d u a l w i t h i n the group according to h i s grade averages. The grades earned i n each grade .were ranked i n order and grades a l l o t t e d on.the b a s i s of A to the top 5 percent, B to the next 20 percent, C-f-to the next 15 percent, G to the middle 20 percent, C- to the next 15 perc e n t , D to the next 20 percent, and E to the lowest 5 percent. These l e t t e r grades were then entered i n the lowest l i n e of the school record t a b l e under the c o r r e c t grade. I t should be noted that care was taken to rank the cases w i t h i n each grade as h i g h e r percentage marks are given i n some grades. When the l e t t e r grades f o r each of the grades from one to twelve were entered,averages were found f o r the elementary grades from one to s i x , f o r the hig h school grades from seven 14 to twelve;, and f o r the whole s c h o o l l i f e of each i n d i v i d u a l . These are p l a c e d on the sample sheets i n squares 1, 2 and 3 r e s p e c t i v e l y , Tlie t o t a l number of cases i n t h i s study i s 356 and the d i s -t r i b u t i o n of these cases over the grades i s shown by the f o l l -owing diagram. On the l e f t - h a n d s i d e of the t a b l e are l i s t e d the grades one to ni n e r e p r e s e n t i n g the b e g i n n i n g grades of these 356 c a s e s , w h i l e along the top are l i s t e d the grades t h r e e to ttwelTev. r e p r e s e n t i n g the grades reached or completed. Table 2e Tlie D i s t r i b u t i o n of the Cases a c c o r d i n g to the number of grades attended. Commencing 111 IV V VI V l l V l l l IX X XI. X l l i n ' Grade 1 1 1 - 4 12 11 17 9 1 4 11 1 3 7. 6 8 2 19 111 1 3 8 16 14 3 16 IV 1 9 14 13 8 22 V • 1 6 10 10 19 VI 4 5 28 9 V l l - 10 16 V l l l 1 1 1 IX 1 For examplej of the 356 c a s e s , one i n d i v i d u a l attended from grade 1 to gra.de 111; one, grade 1 to grade IV; f o u r , grade 1 to grade V I ; 17, grade 1 to grade IX; n i n e , grade VI to grade X l l ; and 28, grade VI to grade X I . A l l o f the 35-6 cases have spent from f i v e to e l e v e n yea.rs i n the s c h o o l s . 15 Table)3. The.Number of Cases i n each Grade and the c o r r e s -ponding Number of complete Records. < 1 - 11 111 IV V VI Number of Ca,ses 61 110 171 • 237 283 • 329 Numbe r of Records 61 110 169 , 246 282 355 V l l VI11 IX X XI X l l Numb e r of Cases 349 332 292 228 167' 104 Numb e r of Records367 409 306 <i*ii 163 103 Tlie d i s c r e p a n c y between the number of cases i n each grade and the number of complete r e c o r d s of these cases i s e x p l a i n e d by the f a c t t h a t b o t h l e t t e r and percentage grades were a v a i l a b l e i n c e r t a i n c a s e s , w h i l e i n o t h e r s no l e t t e r . o r percentage' grades were recorded-. When l e t t e r grades were g i v e n n u m e r i c a l v a l u e s ~ and these v a l u e s averaged, and then d i s t r i b u t e d on the 5 p e r c e n t , 20 p e r c e n t ( e t c . ) ba.sis, the f o l l o w i n g d i s t r i b u t i o n r e s u l t e d . An e x a m i n a t i o n of t h i s t a b l e shows that t e a c h e r s g e n e r a l l y f o l l o w q u i t e f a i t h f u l l y the d i r -e c t i o n s f o r a s s i g n i n g l e t t e r grades on t h i s percentage b a s i s . .This u n i f o r m i t y i s , as would be expected, more marked i n the . middle grades i n which t h e r e are more cases. Table 4, D i s t r i b u t i o n of the Averages of the n u m e r i c a l v a l u e s of the L e t t e r Grades., 1 11 111 IV A 6.35-6.72 6.06-6.28 5.78-6,71 5,67-6.27 B 5.60-6.14 5.27-6.00m 4.90-5.75 4.93-5.57 C + 4.70-5.29 4.87-5.09 4.47-4.82 . 4,67-4.90 1 see page 13, 16 1 11 111 •IV" c 4,10-4.57 4.28-4.83 3.89-4.44 3.94-4,64 c-~ 3.83-4.00 3,69-4.26 3.44-3,87 3.50-3,87 D 3.14-3.80 2.90-3.64 2.52-3.40 2.86-3.46 E •2.12-2.94 1.66-2.87 1.19-2.48 1.92-2.86 V - Y l V l l V l l l A 5.78-6.33 5,83-6.44' 5.50-6.46 5.90-6,17 B -4,88-5. 76 4.92-5.75 4.54-5.46 4.75-5.73 C* 4,26-4.85 4.46-4.90 4.15-4.48 4.28-4,73 C 3.76-4.22 4.00-4.44 3.72-4.12 3,82-4.26 C- 3.33-3.72 3.46-3.96 3.39-3.70 3.40-3.79 D 2,85-3.45 2.67-3,37 2,50-3,36 E 2.06-2,72 1.40-2.83 1.85-2.61 2,16-2,45 IX X XI X l l A 5.74-6.30 5.97-6.30 5,78-6.34 6.12-6,33 B- 4.73-5.71 4,94-5.78 5,03-5.75 5.12-5,87 C 4 4.14-4.70 4.53-4.91 4,50-4.97 4.68-5.09 C 3.64-4.09 3.78-4.40 4,03-4.48 4.13-4.65 C- 3.25-3,62 3.49-3.77 3.56-3.94 3.60-4.11 D 2 e 31 ~* 3 © SO 2.63-3,42 2.85-3.52 2.73-3.57 E 1.44-2.21 2.04-2.50 2,31-2.77 2,10-^2,68 The f o l l o w i n g tahle gives the maximum, median, and mini-mum percentage marks i n each of the grades. Tlie maximum and minimum marks are n o t i c e a b l y uniform from grades three to eight i n c l u s i v e , Erom grade nine on the median mark i s ten 17 percent* lower than from grades 111 to V l l l , thus hearing out the often expressed opinion that averages d e c l i n e from grades 1 to X l l . . Table 5. Maximum, Median, and Minimum marks i n each Grade. 1 11 111 IV V VI Maximum 93 90 88 87 87 88 Median 76 79 72 70 72 72 Minimum 40 40 • 35 34 51 57 V l l V l l l IX X XI X l l Maximum 88 86 93 83 78 85 Median 70 71 64 60 61 61 Minimum 52 46 46 40 40 45 For most of the cases from two to f i v e r e s u l t s of various i n t e l l i g e n c e t e s t s were a v a i l a b l e . These r e s u l t s were entered and t h e i r averages, together with the gra.ding from these aver-ages placed on the data sheets. The accompanying block gra/ph shows the d i s t r i b u t i o n of the 356 cases as to i n t e l l i g e n c e . Table 6. Grades Assigned on the Bas i s of I n t e l l i g e n c e . A 129 2/3 to 139 B 118 to 129 1/2 C+ 113 1/3 to 117 3/5 C 106 to 113 C- 101 1/2 to 105 4/5 D 88 3/5 to 101 E 51 1/2 to 88 Table 7. 18 Block graph shov^ing d i s t r i b u t i o n of I n t e l l i g e n c e i n 556 cases of t h i s study. Number of Cases i n each group dtxzh. 2 j 1 j 2628 50 55 48 49156 1 9 1 0 9. So Sf- Sf 14- 7f t+ 0? <}*• f9 '<>*• / 0 f "f f'f '^f- *>/ /3+ /3f I n t e l l i g e n c e Quotients. when^,ll-available, i n f o r m a t i o n was entered on the data sheets and a l l averages computed, d i s t r i b u t e d and entered, the cases were l i s t e d as follows i n order to obtain the various comparisons between i n t e l l i g e n c e and c l a s s grades, between 19 i n t e l l i g e n c e and m a t r i c u l a t i o n r e s u l t s , between i n t e l l i g e n c e and occupations, etc. These cases are l i s t e d by number as follows (a) By numbers 1 to 356 as a l p h a b e t i c a l l y arranged. (b) By the i n i t i a l B or G to s i g n i f y sex. (c) By the Roman f i g u r e s 1 to X l l to show grades f o r which records were a v a i l a b l e . (d) By the year i n which each student who completed to Mat-r i c u l a t i o n wrote the examination. (e) By the a d d i t i o n of the l e t t e r C i f the student took Commercial options i n grades IX to X l l . Table 8. A Sampling of the L i s t i n g s of the Grades earned by each Case. School Grades M a t r i c u l a t i o n Averages Case lumber 1-V1 2 02B11l-Xll 36 B V l l - X l l A l - X l l A Lang. A Maths.fc A l l Sub. Sciences A A I CJ A lob. C4 •' 203G11-V111 C C- C D 204B Y-X132 B B B C B Cf B B 205B 111-1X C C C C- D 206B VI-XI31 C C c C- D D C* D 207B 1V-X1135 o c c E B C- B C-208B 1-1X c* D C f C D 209G 1-1V E • E E 210G 1-X1137 B C4 B C c - Ck.- ' B B 211 B1-X1137 A B B B C-f B C4 B Prom these records i t was a simple matter to obtain the various comparisons. Chapter 4. The C o r r e l a t i o n of I n t e l l i g e n c e and School Grades. The records of the 157 hoys and 169 g i r l s f o r whom pa r t -i c u l a r s of School work i n grades 1 to VI were a v a i l a b l e were next s t u d i e d and sca.tter diagrams made to show the comparison of school grades, with i n t e l l i g e n c e . ' The s c a t t e r diagrams immediately f o l l o w i n g show the comparison between school grades from 1 to VI and i n t e l l i g e n c e f o r boys alone, f o r g i r l s alone, and f o r both sexes. Table 9. Comparison of Int e l l i g e n c e an of ,157 Boys. I n t e l l i - School Grades 1-V1 Table 10. Comparison of Int-®^ 13-§? n° , e > n d / S c h o o l grades e l l i g e n c e and School Grades of 169 g i r l s . I n t e l l i - School, Grades 1-V1 gence grading A B C* C C- D E gence grading A _ B a - C c- D E '••:<•/• A :• : 2 3 3 1 A 2 2 ,3 1 14 : 8 9 4 B 3 16 - 4 1 2 ,': Cf 1' 2 4 10 3 3 0i 3 5 5 . 7 2 3 4 2; 10 5 .4 C 3 10 15 5 5 • 6 1 •" c- 1 6 : 5 6 C- ' 2 2 3 4 7 7 1 D 1 3 7 9 13 5 D 3 3 2 . 5 18 2 • E 7 4 4 E 1 6 1 21 Table 11. .Comparison of I n t -e l l i g e n c e and School Grades of 326 Boys and G i r l s . I n t e l l i g e n c e School Gra.des 1-V1 g r a d i n g . A B C + C C- D E A 4 5 6 1 B 4' 30 • 8 • 13 5 2 Gi 4 7 9 17 5 6 C 3 14 15 15 10 10 1 c - 2 o a.-4 10 12 13 1 D 4 6 9 14 ! 7 E 1 10 5 Erom Table 11 we see t h a t f o u r students of I n t e l l i g e n c e r a t i n g A o b t a i n e d an A r a t i n g In t h e i r s c h o o l work from grade 1 to. gra.de V I . S i m i l a r l y 30 s t u d e n t s r a t e d B i n i n t e l l i g e n c e as w e l l as i n s c h o o l work. Of the 526 c a s e s , 106 or 32,5 percent o b t a i n e d a l e t t e r grade which corresponded to t h e i r i n t e l l i g e n c e g r a d i n g ; 120 or 38 p e r c e n t o b t a i n e d a s c h o o l grade one removed from t h e i r i n t e l l i g e n c e g r a d i n g ; 67 or 21.2 p e r c e n t were tv/o removed; 25 or 7.9 p e r c e n t were t h r e e removed; and 8 or 2.5 p e r -cent were f o u r removed. An a n a l y s i s of the t a b l e shows t h a t of the e i g h t cases l a s t mentioned f o u r were of JO i n t e l l i g e n c e and of B r a t i n g i n s c h o o l grades, two of C- i n t e l l i g e n c e o b t a i n e d , s c h o o l r a t i n g s of A, and two of B i n t e l l i g e n c e c o u l d do •no b e t t e r than D i n s c h o o l grades. Tables. 9 and 10 show t h a t boys do not r a t e as h i g h as the l g i r l s i n t h e i r s c h o o l grades when these grades are compared w i t h the i n t e l l i g e n c e r a t i n g s . 22 In" Table 9 i t w i l l be seen -tha.t more boys r e c e i v e d s c h o o l grades below t h e i r i n t e l l i g e n c e grades than above. Three boys of Grade A i n t e l l i g e n c e r e c e i v e d B' grades i n t h e i r s c h o o l work, e i g h t of B i n t e l l i g e n c e r e c e i v e d Cf i n t h e i r s c h o o l work, and In a l l 64 r e c e i v e d lower s c h o o l grades than i n t e l l i g e n c e grades and 41 r e c e i v e d h i g h e r grades. Table 12. Numbers of boys o b t a i n i n g School Grades above or below I.Q.. r a t i n g s , (of. 157 cases) Grades below I.e... r a t i n g . Grades above 1,0;.. r a t i n g . 1 grade below 37 1 grade above 24 2 grades below 19 2 ,grades above 13 3 grades below 8 3 grades above 3 4 gra.des above 1 From Table 10 i t w i l l be seen tha.t an o p p o s i t e c o n d i t i o n o b t a i n s . 68 g i r l s o b t a i n e d b e t t e r s c h o o l gra.des than i n t e l l i -gence r a t i n g s and 47 r e c e i v e d p o orer s c h o o l grades. Table 13. Numbers of g i r l s o b t a i n i n g School Grades above or below I.Q,. r a t i n g s , (of 169 cases) ( Grades below r a t i n g s . Grades above I,Qi. r a t i n g s . 1 grade below 23 1 grade above 36 2 grades below 16 2 grades above 19 3 grades below 6 ' 3 gra.des a.bove 8 4 grades below 2 4 grades a.bove 5 Hie s c a t t e r diagrams which f o l l o w show s i m i l a r comparisons between i n t e l l i g e n c e and s c h o o l grades of V l l to X l l i n Tables 14, 15 and 16, and between i n t e l l i g e n c e and a. g r a d i n g based on the whole s c h o o l l i f e of the i n d i v i d u a l i n Tables 17, 18 and 19, 23 Ta.bie.s 14, 15, and 16. Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e and School Ratings on Grades V l l - X l l , .BOYS (170) GIRLS (ISO) I n t e l l i -gence grading .A, B C4-C c-D E School grades V l l - X l l I n t e l l i - School grades V l l - X l l gence C-iC C-D ,E A B C+- C C - D E <> 2 2 1 6I 12 9 4 1 8 5 9 4 3 8 5 14 7 7 2 8 9 5 6 2 1 5 4 12 13 1 • 5 "Table o*14. Table:15 „ Grades V l l - X l l BOYS and GIRLS (350) School grades V l l - X l l A B C4 C C- D E 4 1 tL4 13 6 1 21 7 3 I n t e l l i gence grading A 6 8131 C + C C-D E 12 21 4--, 12 8 3 8 12 2 8 11 .16 13 15 4 7 l l 5 3 33 3 4 7 Table .16. 24 Tables, 17, 18 and 19. Comparison of Intelli,? Ratings on Grades l - X l l . gence and School I n t e l l i -gence BOYS (172) School grades l - X l l I n t e l l i -gence grading A B G+ C C- D E A 4 5 1 B 2 17 7 10 4 Ct 6 2 13 2 4 c 1. 3 6 8 6 5 2 c- 2 3 4 3 9 D 1 1 6 6 15 6 E 3 .5 A B C* C C-31 • E GIRLS (184) School grades l - X l l A B C + C C - D E 2 3 4 6 6 16 7 9 9 111 1 3 4 9 3 :2 3 11 9 Q 16 2 3 1 1 Table 17?, Table 18, Grades l - X l l BOYS and GIRLS (.356) I n t e l l i - School grades l - X l l d i n g A B Cf C C-- D E A 6 7 . 4 t B 8 33 11 16 4 C + 1 13 11 19 ' 5 4 C 4 12 15 19 .10 14 3 C- 3 7 13 12 14 1 D 4 3 9 17 31 6 • E , 2 6 9 Table 1-9. 25 An a n a l y s i s of Tables .14 and, 1,5 shows that g i r l s continue to do b e t t e r than the boys (when school grades are compared with i n t e l l i g e n c e r a t i n g s ) i n the upper grades. Figure 4 'shows that 40 boys obtained school grades higher than t h e i r i n t e l l i g e n c e r a t i n g s and that 73 obtained lower school grades. Figure 5 shows that 68 g i r l s obtained school grades higher than t h e i r i n t e l l i g e n c e r a t i n g s and that 56 obtained lower school grades, A f u r t h e r s i m i l a r i t y i s noted i n the percentage obtain-ing a,'-school grade corresponding to t h e i r i n t e l l i g e n c e r a t i n g . The s i m i l a r i t y continues i n the groups where the c o r r e l a t i o n i s not so h i g h and i s shown c l e a r l y i n the f o l l o w i n g t a b l e , Ta,ble20, Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e and School grades. Grades 1-V1 Grades V l l - X l l Grades l - X l l lumber of cases 326 350 356 Grade of I.f 6. 32,5/ ;32,3/ 34.0/ One grade removed. 38,0/ 37,7/ - - 39.0/ Two grades removed 21.2/ 20.9/ 20.0/ Three- grades removed 7,9/ -8.3/ 5,9/ Four grades removed 2.5/ .9/ 1,1/ I t i s i n t e r e s t i n g to note that 70 percent of/ a l l cases a t t a i n e d e i t h e r .the grade of t h e i r i n t e l l i g e n c e or the grade immediately above or below. This shows a considerable -degree of c o r r e l a t i o n of i n t e l l i g e n c e and school grades. I t may a l s o be noted that over the twelve grades the c o r r e l a t i o n i s somewhat h i g h e r than over e i t h e r the f i r s t s i x or the l a s t s i x grades ti>ken separately. Table 21. Comparison of School.* Grades* of t h e f i r s t - s i x cu yearslwith! the""last; s i x ; years* 3 (314 cases ) School School grades V l l - X l l : grades 1-V1 A B C + C C-E Number of cases Grade f o r grade One grade removed Two grades -removed Three grades removed Eour grades removed A B Cf C C- D E 5 5 2 1 10 29 9 13 5 15 7 14 3 7 10 13 IS 11 11 1 2 4 15 12 8 4 4 8 13 33 8 r\ 3 Li] 314 107 123 60 23 1 34,1/ 3 9,2/ 19,1/ 7.3/ 015/ Here.again we f i n d almost the same percentage as i n the I n t e l l i g e n c e School grades t a b l e , thus suggesting that the cor-r e l a t i o n between elementary school work and h i g h school work i s somewhat s i m i l a r to that between I n t e l l i g e n c e and school grades, The c o r r e l a t i o n between the elementary school grades and the h i g h school grades would be h i g h e r i f the whole d i s t r i b u t i o n had been presented, forjthe g r e a t e r the range of marks i n the . 27 d i s t r i b u t i o n s , the higher the . c o r r e l a t i o n . In t h i s case, with the lower end of the d i s t r i b u t i o n cut o f f (owing to the dropping out of the poorer students) the c o r r e l a t i o n i s n a t u r a l l y lower.-The next s c a t t e r diagram shows the rela.tion between school grades and m a t r i c u l a t i o n averages of the 118 p u p i l s who com-pleted, h i g h school and who wrote the M a t r i c u l a t i o n Examination. Table 22. Comparison of School Grades and Ratings based on M a t r i c u l a t i o n Averages, (118 cases) M a t r i c - Average School. Grade u l a t i o n gra.de A B C + C C- D E A 2 2 1 B 4 10 6 4 Ct 7 3 5- 1 2 C 4 2 6 3 .1 C- 2 2 6 4 6 1 D 1 2 8 14 1 E ,1 1 1 3 Grade f o r grade 35.6/ One grade removed 43.2/ Two grades removed 14.4/ Three grades removed 5.1/ Four grades removed 0,9/ ' The school grades i n t h i s one study were a l l o t t e d on the average grade made by each of the 118 mat r i c u l a n t s i n comparison 28 w i t h the o t h e r 117. The n o n - m a t r i c u l a n t s were not c o n s i d e r e d i n t h i s p a r t i c u l a r p a r t of the study so as to o b t a i n a t r u e r e s t i m a t e of the p o s i t i o n of each student w i t h i n the group. The t a b l e on the p r e c e d i n g page shows, t h a t n e a r l y 80 percent of the 118 cases graded the same or a t t a i n e d grades immediately above or below t h a t of the o t h e r r a t i n g . The extreme c a s e , l a s t mentioned i n the t a b l e , i s t h a t of a boy, who, a f t e r o b t a i n i n g an average of D throughout h i s s c h o o l c a r e e r , o b t a i n e d a B on the M a t r i c u l a t i o n average. I t i s i n t e r e s t i n g to note t h a t t h i s i n d i v i d u a l has an i n t e l l i g e n c e g r a d i n g of B, su g g e s t i n g t h a t o n l y when the f i n a l d r i v e i n grade X l l o c c u r r e d , d i d the boy-ap p l y h i m s e l f to the utmost. The next study mad^ was t h a t of ,the comparison of- I n t e l l i -gence and M a t r i c u l a t i o n r e s u l t s . For the purpose of t h i s i n -v e s t i g a t i o n the languages end s c i e n c e s were taken s e p a r a t e l y as has been e x p l a i n e d p r e v i o u s l y , Tlie f o l l o w i n g s c a t t e r d i a -grams show the t r e n d toT/ards a r e l a t i v e l y h i g h c o r r e l a t i o n -s i m i l a r to the p r e v i o u s s c a t t e r d i a g r a m s , 1 The c o r r e l a t i o n of I n t e l l i g e n c e :and language averages i s f a i r l y h i g h and the f a c t t h a t I n t e l l i g e n c e and languages have a h i g h e r c o r r e l a t i o n t h a n I n t e l l i g e n c e and the Science averages bears out -the s u p p o s i t i o n t h a t group i n t e l l i g e n c e t e s t s _ The c o r r e l a t i o n s of these t h r e e work out as f o l l o w s ? I n t e l l i g e n c e and M a t r i c u l a t i o n Averages I n t e l l i g e n c e and M a t r i c u l a t i o n language Averages I n t e l l i g e n c e and M a t r i c u l a t i o n S c i e n c e Averages .49 .60 ,39 29 favour those who are good i n language. Table 23. Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e and M a t r i c u l a t i o n Averages. I n t e l l i - Matriculation'Averages, gence grading A B C+ C C- D E A 2 1 2 - 1 B 2 8 .3 5 4 1 c+ 4 7 3 3 3 C 5 2 5 4 6 1 c - 1 3 4 2 .3 4 1 D 1 4 - 1 6 8 4 E 1 1 4 I n t e l l i - M a t r i c u l a t i o n Lang-gence grading uage A B Averages Ct C C- D A F I 1 - 2 1 B 3 5 4 5 5 1 Cf 5 5 '3 1 3 C 5 5 3 5 5 C- 1 2 2 7 4 1 D 5 1 2 3 I n t e l l i -gence grading E • M a t r i c u l a t i o n Science Averages A B Ct C C- D E A 2 3 - ... - 1 B . 1 .  8 9 1 4 1 Cf . 4 4 4 3 1 C 4 - 7 6 5 C- 2 3 2 2 ' 4 3 D •1 4 4 1 3 7 E - 2- » 4 1 1 2 3 I t may also be pointed out that the r e s u l t s obtained from the survey of the 118 M a t r i c u l a t i o n cases bear out the b e l i e f common among teachers that g i r l s g e n e r a l l y do b e t t e r than the boys i n the language subjeats and that boys obtain higher standing i n the mathematical subjects and i n the sciences. 30 The records of the cases were next studied i n an endeav-our to f i n d out i f there were any connection between i n t e l l i -gence and the jobs undertaken on l e a y i n g school. The most marked f i n d i n g was that the m a j o r i t y of the stu -dents who drop out of school i n grades seven, e i g h t , and nine do so when they f i n d the going too hard. The boys become errand boys, grocery store c l e r k s and manual labourers, and the g i r l s become housemaids or pax"cel checkers and wrappers. Of the 356 cases i t was found that 254 were g a i n f u l l y employed or were continuing t r a i n i n g towards a p r o f e s s i o n or s k i l l e d occupation. The m a j o r i t y of the remainder were at home, i n some cases h e l p i n g i n the home', while others were f a k i n g business courses or had moved to other h i g h schools. The r a t i n g s of the occupations were based on the Barr Scale and showed a d e f i n i t e trend towards a p o s i t i v e corre-l a t i o n . The s c a t t e r diagram which follows shows that 66 or 26 percent obtained the same grading .on the job a n a l y s i s as on i n t e l l i g e n c e ; 108 or 42.5/ were one grade removed; 58 or 22.9/ were two grades removed; 14 or 5,5/ were three grades removed;. 7 or 2.8/ were fo u r grades removed and one student of A i n t e l l i g e n c e was i n a D grade occupation. An a n a l y s i s of the s c a t t e r diagram shows that 105 cases graded h i g h e r on job r a t i n g than on i n t e l l i g e n c e , while only 84 graded lower on job r a t i n g . This ten percent d i f f e r e n c e may .perhaps be explained by the f a c t 'that where an i n d i v i d u a l was i n t r a i n i n g f o r a p a r t i c u l a r v o c a t i o n , he or she was given 31 the r a t i n g belonging to that occupation. I t i s probable that a proportion would not succeed i n t h e i r chosen occupation a.nd would be fo r c e d to accept p o s i t i o n s which would rate lower on the Barr Scale, Ta.ble 24, Comparison of I n t e l l i g e n c e a.nd Occupational Ratings. (254 cases) I n t e l l i - Occupational Rating gence grading A B Cf C C- D E A - 5 5 1 1 1 B 13 26 11 7 3 C + 10 12 9 6 4 1 c 10 12 18 1 9 7 c- 6 11 6 8 D 3 2 13 10 14 1 E 7 3 • A study of the cases shows that i n many instances i n f l u -ence ha.d something to do with the obt a i n i n g of t h i s or that job. The occupation of the f a t h e r often has a bearing on the occupation of son or daughter and explains why c e r t a i n i n d i v -i d u a l s , e s p e c i a l l y between 1931 and 1935, were s u c c e s s f u l i n obtaining employment while many others, j u s t as w e l l q u a l i f i e d , were i d l e for-two or more years, A very i n t e r e s t i n g study might w e l l be. made of i n d i v i d u a l cases and of members of various f a m i l i e s . In many cases f a i l -ure to remain i n steady employment can be traced to the home environment, In others f a i l u r e can be tra.ced to a p i t i f u l s p o i l i n g of. children,..! p a r t i c u l a r l y i n c e r t a i n more a f f l u e n t 32 f a m i l i e s j. and, i n one or two cases p a r t i c u l a r l y , to a, d i B t i n c t •lack of p e r s o n a l i t y i n an otherwise b r i g h t and hard-working i n d i v i d u a l . Such a. study, however, would involve not only a much c l o s e r i n v e s t i g a t i o n of home conditions than has been p o s s i b l e . f o r t h i s p r o j e c t , but i t would a l s o n e c e s s i t a t e a considerable t r a i n i n g i n S o c i a l Service work i f the information so obtained were to be acted on and the various i n d i v i d u a l s helped, to overcome t h e i r many handicaps. Some note w i l l be made of a, number of s p e c i a l cases i n a supplementary chapter but the h i s t o r y of these cases w i l l r e f e r p r i n c i p a l l y to the school h i s t o r y of each ca.se. Chapter 5, Some S p e c i a l Cases, The s p e c i a l cases l i s t e d i n t h i s chapter are t y p i c a l of many s i m i l a r ones among the 356 cases of t h i s study. The cases were picked at random from among 43 cases i n each of which there was some n o t i c e a b l e f e a t u r e . An explanation i s contained i n each treatment and c o l l e c t i v e l y these treatments show the types of problems d i s c l o s e d by the study, N a t u r a l l y l i t t l e note has been taken i n t h i s chapter of the vast major-i t y of cases where the i n d i v i d u a l s have run true to form^but i n reference to t h i s i t might be s a i d that there are many ca.ses where the i n d i v i d u a l has obtained the same grades i n i n t e l l i g e n c e , school grades and occupation r a t i n g . I t i s w i t h students s i m i l a r to these s p e c i a l cases that much needs to be done. In c e r t a i n cases i t i s too soon to come to a, f i n a l d e c i s i o n but a f t e r more years of study of these cases i t i s hoped that some evidence ' w i l l be obtained which w i l l be of value i n the h e l p i n g of l a t e r problem cases. The cases Immediately f o l l o w i n g deal with students of high i n t e l l e c t who have not done as w e l l as they should have. 34 S p e c i a l Case 210 G l - X l l 37 This case i s that of a g i r l of A i n t e l l i g e n c e jj on four t e s t s ) whose school grades dropped from an average of B during the f i r s t s i x years to an average l i t t l e b e t t e r than C- during the l a s t three years. The. M a t r i c u l a t i o n r e s u l t s hear out the accuracy of the h i g h school grades as an average of 56 percent i n M a t r i c u l a t i o n was the best t h i s student could do - g i v i n g a r a t i n g of C-. The explanation f o r t h i s 16w average i n the l a s t three years can be found i n the g i r l ' s i n t e r e s t i n A r t , During the l a s t four years everything had been subordinated to' A r t , i n which subject she has a, s p e c i a l a b i l i t y and at present she i s doing w e l l at the A r t School, This i s a ca.se i n which the i n f l u e n c e of the home surroundings i s p a r t i c u l a r l y obvious. The g i r l ' s grandfather i s a l e a d e r i n Vancouver a r t c i r c l e s and promised to put her through. A r t School as soon as she passed her M a t r i c u l a t i o n examination, but such was her i n t e r -est i n A r t (and sici-ing) that she gave only the minimum time to h er r e g u l a r school s u b j e c t s . S p e c i a l Case 83 B 111-^X11 37 This ease i s an example of a boy of grade A i n t e l l i g e n c e • f a i l i n g to do very much a f t e r l e a v i n g school. This boy made B averages a l l through school and passed M a t r i c u l a t i o n with a B average. Since graduation he has spent s e v e r a l months as a drug store d e l i v e r y boy but with no ambitions towards phar-' ,35" macy as a p r o f e s s i o n . This hoy's l a c k of ambition can be traced to s i m i l a r c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s i n the r e s t of the f a m i l y . Ordin-ary motives are i n s u f f i c i e n t to b r i n g out t h e i r best e f f o r t s but they can do w e l l the things that circumstance forces them to. I t i s true that only a year has passed since t h i s boy graduated and that he may do much b e t t e r i n the f u t u r e , but wha.t l i t t l e he has done since graduation holds l i t t l e promise of an occupation where h i s a b i l i t i e s could be used to the utmost, ( S p e c i a l Case 31 G V - X l l 34 Case 31 G i s that of a g i r l who graded A on i n t e l l i g e n c e . . Results of group t e s t s were as f o l l o w s ; National at age nine, 142; Terman A at age 14, 125; Terman B at age 16, 127; Average 131 1/3. This g i r l comes of a f a m i l y i n which a l l f o u r c h i l d r e n rate w e l l above the average In i n t e l l i g e n c e . An older brother ranked w e l l a l l through school; a s i s t e r 18 months younger passed entrance at 12 l/2 a.nd graduated from High School one year before her o l d e r s i s terman d. a younger brother, of Ct grading i n i n t e l l i g e n c e , f a i l e d to complete Gra.de ten. The school records i n t h i s case ,show a gradual f a l l i n g o f f from grade f i v e to grade ten with a. considerable improve-ment i n grades eleven and twelve. This case seems to be t y p i c a l of many i n which.students have l i t t l e d i f f i c u l t y i n keeping up w i t h the leaders i n the middle grades and then i n -3© grades nine and ten make grade of C, .0- or D, The importance of m o tivation i s shown i n such cases by an i n c i d e n t which occurred when t h i s g i r l was i n grade V l l l . A f t e r doing mod-e r a t e l y w e l l i n grade V l l and Grade V l l l she was s t i r r e d by an announcement made i n the second week of Hay i n her grade V l l l year that a cash p r i z e would be given by a l o c a l assoc-i a t i o n to the West Vancouver student who d i d best i n the Ent-rance Examinations. She began to work and i n June c a r r i e d o f f not only the cash p r i z e but a l s o the medal f o r the d i s t r i c t w i t h a t o t a l of 526 marks out of 600 f o u r t h i n rank i n the province. She entered h i g h school when the change to the four-year course took place -and should have completed the h i g h school course i n three years a.s her younger s i s t e r d i d . She however, took four years, making grades of C i n IX, JJ i n X, Of i n XI and C i n X l l , f i n i s h i n g with andaverage 6f 67 percent on the M a t r i c u l a t i o n Examination. Since graduation t h i s g i r l has done very l i t t l e u n t i l j u s t r e c e n t l y , when, a f t e r the death of her f a t h e r , she began taking a business course. The u n s a t i s f a c t o r y school record of t h i s student cannot be blamed on home i n f l u e n c e , excessive p a r t i c i p a t i o n i n sports, poor companions or any other s i m i l a r f a c t o r s . Lack of motiv-a t i o n seems to be the best explanation, and t h i s i s borne out by the g i r l ' s enrollment at a business c o l l e g e on h e r . f a t h e r [ s death. 37 S p e c i a l Case 327 G .11-Xll 35 Case 327 G i s .the case of a g i r l of grade A i n i n t e l l i -gence who has done,very l i t t l e since l e a v i n g school. This g i r l on I. f 6. average ranks t h i r d among the 356 cases and made a B average throughout her eleven recorded years i n school. She was good enough to lead her year i n the M a t r i c u l a t i o n examination hut her average only gave her a B grade when com-pared with the other 117 m a t r i c u l a n t s . This g i r l comes from a f a m i l y of seven, a l l of superior i n t e l l i g e n c e . The f a t h e r d r i v e s a d e l i v e r y van a.nd provides few of the home advantages a v a i l a b l e to most of the West Van-couver c h i l d r e n , most of h i s earnings apparently being.used to provide food f o r the f a m i l y . This g i r l i s almost wholly without ambition and even when employed i n housework w i l l never see f o r h e r s e l f things that have to be done. She i s now employed.as a c l e r k at a bakeshop. Home environment i s p l a i n l y r e s p onsible here, as a young-er b r o t h e r f a i l e d to complete, grade X and has only done a few odd jobs s i n c e l e a v i n g s c h o o l . S p e c i a l Case 202 B 111-X11 37 This case i s i n t e r e s t i n g because of the e x c e l l e n t school "record of the boy and, i n c o n t r a s t , the somewhat mediocre p o s i t i o n w i t h which the boy appears to be s a t i s f i e d . This boy rates A on i n t e l l i g e n c e , A i n school grades and A i n M a t r i c -38 u l a t i o n r e s u l t s - h a v i n g l e d h i s e l a s s d u r i n g the l a s t s i x or seven y e a r s . On g r a d u a t i o n the boy accepted a, p o s i t i o n w i t h one of the Canadian hanks. I t i s admitted t h a t t h e r e are many o p p o r t u n i t i e s i n v a r i o u s branches of banki n g , but t h i s boy has made no attempts to b e t t e r h i s q u a l i f i c a t i o n s d u r i n g the l a s t y e a r . He began to take a course i n t y p e w r i t i n g but gave up a f t e r the t h i r d evening and has done n o t h i n g s i n c e . I t seems as i f he b e l i e v e s t h a t l e a d e r s h i p i n , l i f e w i l l come as e a s i l y to him as l e a d e r s h i p i n cla.sswork has come i n the p a s t . I t i s hoped t h a t t h i s i m p r e s s i o n of h i s a t t i t u d e proves to be wrong. S p e c i a l Case 147 B 1V-X1 One case i n which f i n a n c i a l c ircumstances hastened a Boy's withdrawal from s c h o o l i s tha.t :of 147 B. In t h i s case the boy had au i n t e l l i g e n c e r a t i n g of B, a s c h o o l r e c o r d of C through the grades and then l e f t s c h o o l to work w i t h h i s b r o t h e r a t p l a s t e r i n g . In t h i s case the boy's s t a n d i n g f e l l o f f i n -grade e l e v e n . He had l i t t l e i n t e r e s t i n s c h o o l work and wanted to get out and eaam a l i v i n g .especially as at t h a t time the f a m i l y was l a r g e l y dependent on the earnings of the o l d e r b r o t h e r . The f o l l o w i n g cases form' a sampling of those i n which s t u d e n t s hare done b e t t e r . t h a n would be expected from t h e i r i n t e l l i g e n c e r a t i n g . They show the e f f e c t of hard, work, good home, i n f l u e n c e , a.nd a t t e n t i o n to the job on hand. S p e c i a l Case'88G 1V-X11 35. i Case 88G i s a case of a g i r l w i t h an I.CJ,. of 93 (average) of t h r e e t e s t s ) p a s s i n g most of the s u b j e c t s of the m a t r i c -u l a t i o n e x a m ination. In r e f e r e n c e to t h i s case i t i s i n t e r e s t -i n g to note t h a t of the 118 casesjgoing through to M a t r i c u l a t i o n o n l y 23 had I.Q.. 's o f l e s s than 110 and o f these 23 o n l y 5 passed the M a t r i c u l a t i o n examination a t one attempt. In t h i s case the g i r l d i d not s t a r t s c h o o l t i l l the age of n i n e , she repeated grade V1B, was 16 years o l d going i n t o • grade IX and wrote the M a t r i c u l a t i o n examination a t the age o f twenty. f D e s p i t e the age 20, h e r success i n p a s s i n g most of the s u b j e c t s of Hie M a t r i c u l a t i o n examination shows t h a t an enor-mous amount of work must have been done to achieve t h i s r e s u l t . The' I.Q,„ of 93 i s rea.sona.bly a c c u r a t e , h e r two s i s t e r s h a v i n g , i n t e l l i g e n c e q u o t i e n t s w i t h i n a few p o i n t s o f 93. S p e c i a l Cases 49G 111-X11C and 71G V1-X1C. The e f f e c t of h a r d work "is a l s o shown i n the cases of these two g i r l s who completed Kour a.nd three y'ea.rs of commer-c i a l work r e s p e c t i v e l y . ' The former, of I.Q,, r a t i n g D, o b t a i n e d a P average 40 throughout her school career. She was not quick to learn,but was very painstaking and thorough i n a l l her work. She i s now doing s a t i s f a c t o r y work as a. store c l e r k . The l a t t e r g i r l , of C grade in t e l l i g e n c e s , obtained an A aver-age throughout her school career, and since l e a v i n g school has done w e l l as a stock exchange stenographer. S p e c i a l Case 157 B 111-XC An example of success due to a. s p e c i a l a b i l i t y i s tha.t of case 157 B. In t h i s case a boy of I, 0. r a t i n g D made D and C- grades from grades 111 to X, In two years of commercial work a s p e c i a l aptitude f o r bookkeeping showed up and f o r the l a s t 2-g- years he has been doing w e l l i n the o f f i c e of one of the Vancouver newspapers. S p e c i a l Case 258 B 1 1 - X l l 57 The most outstanding example of a boy of r e l a t i v e l y low-i n t e l l i g e n c e making a f i n e record i n h i g h school i s that of case 258B. This boy, of D grade i n t e l l i g e n c e , made a B average on the M a t r i c u l a t i o n examination, and t h i s despite an absence of three months during h i s l a s t year. This boy, of an I. Q, average of 105 on four t e s t s , impro-ved from an average of C- i n grades 1-V1 to an average of B i n the l a s t s i x years. In a d d i t i o n he took part i n a f a i r share of games, d e l i v e r e d papers f o r two years and, because of h i s musical, a b i l i t y , went to England with the K i t s i l a n o Boys' Band_ 41 on t h e i r l a s t t r i p . He also 'accompanied the band to San Fran- • oisco i n the spring of 1937, and i n connection with h i s band vrork had to attend four to s i x p r a c t i c e s or performances each week. He i s doing irery w e l l i n Senior M a t r i c u l a t i o n and i s keeping up with h i s band work, as w e l l as p l a y i n g i n a champ-io n s h i p rugby team. Such an accomplishment would suggest an e r r o r i n the I n t e l l i g e n c e Quotient, but as the I, Qs. given i s on an average of four t e s t s and as two brothers have I. 's of 97 and 107 r e s p e c t i v e l y I t i s reasonable to assume that the I, 0. of 105 i s reasonably c o r r e c t . S p e c i a l Oases 36 B 1 1 - X l l 36 and 37 B 111-X11 36 These two are cases of brothers of C-f and C i n t e l l i g e n c e who obtained school grades of B and A r e s p e c t i v e l y and also M a t r i c u l a t i o n averages of B„ The younger boy 36 B, with an I n t e l l i g e n c e Quotient of 116, passed the M a t r i p u l a t i o n Examination at the age of 17, while the o l d e r b r o t h e r , with an I n t e l l i g e n c e Quotient of 109, passed M a t r i c u l a t i o n i n the same year at the age of 19. One i n t e r e s t i n g f e a t u r e of t h i s case i s the average of 76-|- percent which the o l d e r , even at age 19, obtained i n the , M a t r i c u l a t i o n Examination with an i n t e l l i g e n c e quotient of 109. It Is obvious that both brothers helped each other a great deal, but the r e a l reason f o r t h e i r success was the regular study f o r which both gave up so much time. ; Since graduation these two brothers have not done so very 42 w e l l , Tlie 3rounger one would probably have obtained, a bank job but f o r a s l i g h t disfigurement, and both have been working with t h e i r f a t h e r , a b u i l d i n g c o ntractor. One weakness'of both these boys i s an i n a b i l i t y to be at ease with people. They are exceedingly reserved and shy, and though both are pop-u l a r with t h e i r school chums, they are handicapped by t h e i r reserve whenever they apply f o r a p o s i t i o n . I t i s unfortunate that two such w i l l i n g and steady workers should have done l i t -t l e b e t t e r than labouring work on house c o n s t r u c t i o n f o r n e a r l y two years. I t seems as i f these two boys, who have been very w e l l brought up, had spent so much time on t h e i r studies that t h e i r 8,11 round development has been neglected. In A p r i l , 1938 the younger boy obtained employment i n the o f f i c e of one of the Vancouver magazine agencies, while the other i s due to leave f o r England at any time to e n r o l l i n the Royal A i r Force. S p e c i a l Case 230 G 11-X11 37 The l a s t case of t h i s s e r i e s i s ,that of a g i r l who with an i n t e l l i g e n c e grading of C- succeeded i n completing the work to grade twelve without having to repeat an$ grade or h a l f -grade. This g i r l was not expected by her teachers to make -Mat-r i c u l a t i o n , but by c o n s i s t e n t l y hard work she obtained a pass with an'average of 60 percent. This i s an example of one of r e l a t i v e l y low i n t e l l i g e n c e making up f o r an innate weakness by continued and prolonged e f f o r t . Conclusion In concluding the main p a r t of t h i s report i t i s i n t e r -e s t i n g to note the s i m i l a r i t y i n the r e s u l t s of each p a r t i -c u l a r study. In each study 70 percent or more of the cases show i d e n t i c a l ar near i d e n t i c a l grades i n i n t e l l i g e n c e and school grades, i n i n t e l l i g e n c e and^matriculation r e s u l t s , i n h i g h and elementary school ratings and i n yet other compari-sons. The question might w e l l he asked. Is not i n t e l l i g e n c e (of the parents) the f a c t o r which determines to a l a r g e extent the environment from which the c h i l d .comes, the ambitions which he w i l l have, the o p p o r t u n i t i e s which he w i l l have and the extent to which these ambitions w i l l be r e a l i z e d ? I t i s reasonable to suppose that i n t e l l i g e n c e i s the c o n t r o l l i n g f a c t o r i n p l a c i n g each i n d i v i d u a l i n h i s place w i t h i n the group, 'whether the grading depends on school grades, examinat-ion r e s u l t s or .job r a t i n g s . Prom the r e s u l t s of t h i s study i t would appear that a l a r g e p r o p o r t i o n , say 80 percent, of our students w i l l c a rry on with t h e i r school work according to t h e i r a b i l i t y . The other Wo groups, f o r there are two other groups,> one of high i n t e l l i g e n c e who do not take f u l l advantage of t h e i r innate 44 powers, and the o t h e r a group of 'below average a b i l i t y , need f a r more c o n s i d e r a t i o n than they are r e c e i v i n g at p r e s e n t , l e , as t e a c h e r s , must decide whether we are going to g i v e a g r e a t e r ' p r o p o r t i o n of our time and e f f o r t to these m i s f i t s , and so e l i m i n a t e to a l a r g e e x t e n t the many problem cases which occur i n s c h o o l and out of school,, The sampling of s p e c i a l cases shows much more s h o u l d be done by home-room t e a c h e r s and coun-s e l l o r s - to improve the e f f i c i e n c y of the sc h o o l s i n t h e i r treatment of these cases. Appendix Sample of Permanent Record Card Sample of permanent Record Card (limp) Sample of West Yandouver High School Record Card i n use 1923-31 Sample of West Yancouver High School Record Oa^d i n use 1931-33 • Sample of West Yancouver High Schools Report Ca.rd i n use since 1933 Sample of West Vancouver High Schools „. permanent Record Card i n use since 1953 Sample Data Sheet Sample Grade Recording Sheet (Gr. V l l ) Sample Sheet showing the d i s t r i b u t i o n of t h e l e t t e r grades and percentage grades i n Gra.de V l l Adaptation of the Ba.rr Scale Records and Data Sheets of Four Sample Cases 62 G 111-IX 131 G 111-Xll 35 223 B 111-X11 C 246 B 111-1X i i a Sheets of the S p e c i a l Cases of xxxi-xxxix Chapter 5 327 G 11-X11 35 202 B 111-X11 37 147 B IV-XI 88GG I V - X l l 35 49 G 111-X11 C 71 G VI-XI C 258 B 11-X11 37 36 B 11-X11 36 37 B 111-Xll 36 210 G l - X l l 37 83 B m - x i i m 31 G V - X l l 34 230 G 1 1 - X l l 37 Sample of permanent, record card used i n the schoo of B r i t i s h . Columbia-from' 1926 on, i 6 S X - 0 8 i - H 0 T - s p u i S jo -jnaD .reel 09 ^IPPI™ 01? ssjTOipar, 0 'opt.iS j o '^nao jofl g JSOMOI 8qj sojuojpnj a -aptuS jo -jnao .red 03 J^sa oq} SBrcBDjpni g •spBjS j o -jaoD jpfl oz J x a n o q ; s e } « o j p n j Q '9pujg jo. '}nso » d o do% sq} s s juo ipnj y — : s M o n o j S-B Sp-era sq /CBOI sjoofqns nt. San^n—moN "—'dTqsjspBSi jo aoaopjASi — - H i j d s l o o q o g - 9 D ] A j a s .—-. ^ K d o j a j o 8 x 0 3 - -Ioj}noo-j-[9g r p n p n o o "—saaunuj^ "AVJJIMBHOH - j n o n Q H " " " B s s p n i n o p n o ^ y i p n j s s a i o q p a n nojJ-rjjBfls.xj ,,'JOOJ .i'lfts-» u ' P 0 0 0 . , „ ' J n o i P o x S '9SQ •jooqos ISJH 0} n o n o t n o j a no 10 A'RtranBm.rad jooqos SaiABs'i n o A"IUO n ; p s u s s q OJQ—-aiON <& O j O o a $ Z m M • 0 o E TO « « . P K-'W <i o j 3 a o a 5 6j. bo » PI S O W % a ft Sample o f pe rman-entrd co r d card use cl i n the sehe ols-•v; of B r i t i s h Columbia from .'-19.26] on,: ; N a m e - - — - Sex. . Address . .——.. . . . . S c h o o l : . — . . . : — . D a t e o f en try . . . . D a t e o f l e a v i n g . R e a s o n s f o r l e a v i n g Grade . ! . . . - . E n g l i s h L i t e r a t u r e . . C o m p o s i t i o n . . . . . . H i s t o r y , W o r l d . . . . . . . . . H i s t o r y , C a n a d i a n . . . A r i t h m e t i c A l g e b r a — . G e o m e t r y . . . . . . . . . . . L a t i n A u t h o r s . L a t i n G r a m m a r — F r e n c h A u t h o r s . . . F r e n c h G r a m m a r . . . : . G r e e k A u t h o r s G r e e k G r a m m a r , G e r m a n A u t h o r s . . — . . G e r m a n G r a m m a r . . . . D r a w i n g G e n e r a l Sc ience A g r i c u l t u r e B o t a n y ... C h e m i s t r y P h y s i c s . G e o g r a p h y Biology. . . ' . T r i g o n o m e t r y . . . . . R e a s o n s f o r . l eav ing . G r a d e . B o o k - k e e p i n g . S h o r t h a n d . T y p e w r i t i n g . . . . P e n m a n s h i p S p e l l i n g . . C i v i c s C o m m e r c i a l L a w ~ B u s i n e s s C o r r e s p o n d E c o n o m i c s A p p l i e d M e c h a n i c s , S h o p - w o r k S h e e t - m e t a l w o r k -M a c h i n e - s h o p work . P r i n t i n g . E l e c t r i c i t y P h y s i o l o g y . . . — D i e t e t i c s N e e d l e w o r k H o u s e h o l d A r t . M u s i c C l o t h i n g , etc D a y s absent D a y s late H I G H S C H O O L C O U R S E . I N T E L L I G E N C E T E S T S . A t t i t u d e t o w a r d schoo l ac t iv i t i e s . . A t t i t u d e t o w a r d outs ide a c t i v i t i e s -A p p l i c a t i o n P h y s i c a l d e f e c t s . . S p e c i a l a p t i t u d e s . . Remarks ' . Name of Test. OJ Q Score. 4 . - Name of Test. o i "3 Q Score." a a M STANDARDIZED T E S T S . Name of Test: d a Score. Norm. < Name of ' Test. a Score. Norm. a P r e p a r a t i o n a n d h o m e - s t u d y . . . A t t e n t i o n i n class. . . .: H o n o u r . . . . . R e l i a b i l i t y . — : M a n n e r s C o n d u c t S e l f - c o n t r o l C a r e of p r o p e r t y . . . . S e r v i c e S c h o o l s p i r i t .-. E v i d e n c e of l e a d e r s h i p . . . N O T E . — R a t i n g i n subjec t s m a y be m a d e as fo l l ows : — A Indicates the top 5 per cent, of grade B ind ica te s t h e n e x t 20 per cent, o f grade , • C i n d i c a t e s the m i d d l e 50 per cent, o f grade . D i n d i c a t e s the n e x t 20 per cent, of grade . E i n d i c a t e s the lowest 5 per cent, of grade . OJ xa Sample ;::of /p;ermanent: reeoi^dV ^  In' the:;' send* :f : b f > B n l t i s h Columbia, from:/-i^2j>on/v--'^'v'--/^\V •aJoog JO •o-i T H •ajoog • o r n a JO 'tniON OJOOg • 8 J T ! a . JO tnjoN OJOOg 8 j T » a J S 8 I JO 'a OJ « a M a. I? i y Sample of permanent record card used i n the schools of B r i t i s h Columbia, from 1930 on. (limp) GO S-r O O CO CD cd o cd +-> P I CD S CD i3 O O W P3 c/D co W PH" o o PH1 " " •"• %oz " " a ^03 " . " 0 " %ST " " +0 " " % I B W N " a spEjS in sridnd jo %g d o £ psp-iEMB y —:SA\O[[OJ GB o p d t u o q &vm ^ D o f q n g u i 3UI}KH : o p u j * ) JO^O-J ENCE TESTS 6 ACHIEVEMENT TESTS | a ENCE TESTS M.A; 1 ACHIEVEMENT TESTS | < s V ENCE TESTS Score | ACHIEVEMENT TESTS | Score 1 INTELLIG: Date 1 ACHIEVEMENT TESTS | V Q INTELLIG: Name of Test | ACHIEVEMENT TESTS | NameofTest | 1 Date 1 T3 - tu u a CO o cq £> w Reading—Oral j Reading •— Silent 1 Spelling J - Languages & Lit. | Grammar I Composition Writing' 1 Mathematics 1 Geography j History • 1 o CQ a o p t < c S Nature | " Music o a "& >. a: Rank in Grade ' No. Pupils in Grade Times Late Days Absent Teacher's Initials « ' o I o <: J1 Ill I T Sample of permanent record card used i n the schools of B r i t i s h Columbia- from 1930 on. (limp) «0 to H Q « '•O o »-> M S co t - o Uj CO w w O O •<! < o o GO " o o O 00 *a •OJO • i-H ffi o • r-H 00 © • I - H •PI-3" I Q PH O PH CO oo PH .O o PH PH Q < O w < Ph O o co O co m — (N 1 A fl • I B r s i 1> — " V Sample of the report card used i n the Y/est Vancouver High School from 1925 to 1931. P R O V I N C E O F B R I T I S H C O L U M B I A MONTHLY REPORT S T U D E N T G R A D t , C O U R S E T E A C H E R P R O M O T E D T O G R A D E J U N E . . P R I N C I P A L 192.. Sample of the r e p o r t card used i n the '"est Vancouver F i g h School from 1923 to 1931. School D a y s D a y s Present T i m e s Tarr tv 1- E n g l i s h ; (a) L i t e r a t u r e 10. 11. (b) Compos i t i on 2. H i s t o r y 3. M a t h e m a t i c s : (a) A r i t h m e t i c - - -(b) A l g r e b a - - - -(c) G e o m e t r y -4. Sc ience: (a) - ' (b) - -5. L a t i n : (a) C o m p o s i t i o n - -(b) A u t h o r s - - - -6. F r e n c h : (a) -(b) - -7. D r a w i n g 8. G e o g r a p h y - - -9. M a n u a l T r a i n i n g -o r D o m e s t i c Sc ience A v e r a g e S t a n d i n g i n C l a s s * - -N u m b e r in C l a s s - - _ A p p l i c a t i o n to "Work - -Genera l C o n d u c t - - _ P a r e n t s are r e v e s t e d to s i s „ a n a r e t u r n ^ P r o m p t l y . Sample of the r e p o r t card used i n the "/est Vancouver F i g h School from 1923 to 1931. d a „ y , „ h o m e s t u d y " ^ ; ; P e n t ^ ' o H o w i „ B R E M A R K S : Sample of the r e p o r t card used i n the West Vancouver F i g h School from 1931 to 1933. ffiest Battcmmer H i g h ^ r h o n l PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1 P R E D . J. PATTERSON, M . A . , I*«inoipai. "Mens aana in corpore sano" M O N T H L Y R E P O R T STUDENT GRADE;.... TEACHER COURSE... REMARKS: TRANSFERRED (TO.. PROMOTED TO GRADE.. PRINCIPAL ••"•".•HM..~.w.„^.„l Sample of the report card used in the West.Vancouver Figh School from 1931 to 1933. W E S T V A N C O U V E R HIGH S C H O O L N A M E 1 • : : - - ] i •i . j . Grade ] ?.". . . Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec >• Feb. Mfir. A p r i l May June T O T A L S Days Present -i i Days Absent -Times Tardy - . - -_ General • Conduct -Attitude to School -Application to "Work General Progress -1 A = E x c e l l e n t 1 B = S a t i s f a c t o r y Y C = P a i r D=P.oor ) E = B a d . r S U B J E C T S 1. E n g l i s h : (a) Composition (b) Grammar -(c) Literature -2. Social Studies (History) 3. Health & Physical E d . -4. M a t h . : (a) Algebra - -(b) Geometry -(c) O C T O B E R D E C E M B E R F E B R U A R Y A P R I L J U N E Year's Aver. Units . W o n Pupil's Marks Class Aver. Pupil's Murks Class Aver. Pupil's Marks Class Aver. Pupil's j Class Marks 1 Aver. Pupil's Marks Class Aver. -• __I — - - i ,(b) fi French i (a) ..(b) (b) .' • • 8. Man. T r . or Home Econ. 9. Typ ing ' - - - -10. Shorthand -11. Junior Business 12. Book-keeping 13 J. -Total' , >' < Number in Class -Student's Standing in Class - * -.1: - . iA; jsuo.' 3 0 . .narks per subject. Maximum of •*© marks may be given for class work, note books or essays. Examinations may be oral or written •th. Paoo'Standard average EOfft, and \0% on caoh—subject-; In grading the work of the whole year is taken into consideration. 'Class honor average 75%, eaoh-eubjcot 00%. Oceond Olasa honor overage 60%, each oubjcot S0-%. iwarded Top 5% of pupils in grade; " B " , next 20%; " C - | - " , next 15%; " C " , next 20%; " C — • " , next. 15%; " D " , next 20%; itvera;: " E " , lowest 5%. Both parents arc requested to sign this report. ~ ~ 7 h a s spent the following time daily in home study in the month of " 103 Time Signatures of Parents or Guardians September (1) t (2) October U> (2) November (1) (2) December (1) (2) _ January »> .(2) February U ) (2) March (1) (2) Apr i l (I) (2) May (1) (2) June (1) (2) N - B ' ~ r e „ K i ^ i o S u \ h t m S e t U s t u t ™ v U e S r t v < d ° ' T l ~ *» * ™ hours' Promptness and regularity ^ e a n L J Y mCa"S t o V"™*-Parents can best h i . I . . . i ? , ° e over-emphasized. interferes with the r e g u t r home , s e < ! i n S . ""thing t h ° i n d e n t is in attendance every 'day! P t ' r ' ° d ' t h a t R E M A R K S B Y P A R E N T S { V I Sample of the r e p o r t card used i n the West 'Vancouver High School from 1931 to 1933. v i i Sample of the annual r e p o r t form used i n the West 1935, WEST VANCOUVER HIGH SCHOOLS jgjv;": S E N I O R H I G H J U N I O R H I G H f S T U D E N T ' S R E P O R T 1 9 3 _ 3 _ S U B J E C T S Credi t s S C H O L A S T I C E A T I N G S A T o p 5% i n G r a d e B N e x t 20% C - | - " 15% C " 20% O — " 15% D " 20% E L o w e s t 5% " " C " G r a d e — A v e r a g e ) C o m p o s i t i o n G r a m m a r L i t e r a t u r e S p e l l i n g & W r i t i n g S o c i a l S t u d i e s H e a l t h A r i t h m e t i c A l g e b r a R E M A R K S B Y T E A C H E R S G e o m e t r y O C T . D e p o r t m e n t L a t i n F r e n c h G e n e r a l S c i e n c e C h e m i s t r y D E C . D e p o r t m e n t P h y s i c s G e o g r a p h y H o m e E c o n o m i c s W o o d w o r k M A R . D e p o r t m e n t M e t a l w o r k M e c h a n i c a l D r a w i n g E l e c t r i c i t y T y p i n g J U N E D e p o r t m e n t S h o r t h a n d J u n i o r B u s i n e s s B o o k k e e p i n g A c c o u n t i n g S t a n d i n g i n J u n e 193 A r t M u s i c T O T A L C R E D I T S N u m b e r i n G r a d e | J - | J R a n k of S t u d e n t | | | , | R e g i s t r a t i o n T e a c h e r . N o . o f D a y s A b s e n t | | | | | | |; [ N o . o f T i m e s L a t e 1 1 1 I I I I I P a r e n t s ' S i g n a t u r e s (Oct . ) H o u r s o f H o m e w o r k (Doc . ) ( M a r . ) : W.V.S.B.—Form No, 1—Dewest: Printing Co., West Vancouver Sample of the annual r e p o r t form used i n the West Vancouver High Schools s i n c e 1933. ATTENDANCE Regular attendance is absolutely essential to satis-factory progress. When a student is absent a note should be sent to the registration teacher giving reason for ab-sence. In any case of illness the rule regarding Return Certificates must be observed. GUIDANCE Parents are requested to study these reports care-fully. Please do not wait for a special invitation to confer with the principal and staff regarding the student's dif-ficulties. Mutual cooperation with the Registration Teacher and Principal will assist the student to choose the most suitable courses. HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION DIPLOMA Students who reach a satisfactory attainment in each of the subjects in which credit has been given to the extent of 120 High School Credits will be recom-mended to receive a High School Graduation Diploma. PROMOTION Final examinations require a pass standard of 50% in each subject. "D" and "E" scholastic ratings in any subject are considered unsatisfactory. The work of the whole year will be taken into consideration before recom-mending promotion to a higher grade. Sample of the permanent record card In use in the ?/es Vancouver High Schools since 1937). Q - cs oi f-f r-i $&js 6 £ o g S S SH Name.- Sample •••data-" sheet. Birthday Rationality of parents; nocu-oation of father R oho ol 'Record • -iH-rada 1 11 — — - i i 111^ IV V VI V l l : v n : 1 . IX - x i : X l l n~rnHps • rvfiTiRated.' •h,VR ragR,. - ; ' .'. Letter:, j&ada--• Maitriculatiori-Be cords ' .-. . Age Av-. Sng.,S.S . Ay. I'laths . Average -Jun.Mat. iSe—J-i'i.tAau " o , " • .'. Sehijfet.. Subsequent scholastic record. ' Records of Intelligence Test Test Age , ' • i . q . , Average O.fitiupat.i.nn', -Hating-X Sample of sheet used f o r recording the grades obtained by the 356 cases of t h i s study. On this' sheet are recorded the grades made i n grade V l l . j # I ft § St.3 | I • • ft / J • j • J r -ffftU.ii .  i . iii • ft *T U I" • ft ft: | j i % \„ ij • • ft ft • ft ' • ft ft « « 9 -—tax-. J • • ft « • *« • * ft - w j • • • • • ft ^ ft • • ft • i [ • j • « ft ft * r i n j l „ a J 8 * mil wwn iiiiii] * HBBHHHHBMI * ft ft * • • • I • ' j e a • # • » • 9 r* i • • ft ft ft ^, , p> 1 • 1 — ft • • • • • • • • ft • I AJL^JF,. '• -• IS" j • • • ft ft • • • • * '1 • • • * • ft ft • • • • ft • » 9 • b r ^ r t r H — r — t """"| • [ •j&y• • » • 5.9 E.17 6.46 x i Sample sheet showing the d i s t r i b u t i o n of the l e t t e r grades and percentage grades i n Grade V l l A 0;* C C- D ,A C-f 33 6.46 4,48 4.00 3.46 2.88 88^ lb% 10% 65% - 6.17 4,46 4,00 3,45 2.83 87 75 70 65 5.90 4,45 4.00 3.45 2.80 85 74 70 65 5,75 4.44 3.97 3.45 2. 70 85 74 70 65 5.75 4.43 3,97 3. 43 : 2,68 8,3 74 70 65 5.64 4.43 3.96 3.43 2.67 74 70 6-5 5.59 4.41 3.94 5.42 ' 'B 74 . . 70 64 5.58 . 4.36 3,93 3.42 • E 82 74 70 64 5,50 4.34 3.92 3. 40 2.61 82 74 70 64 4.33 3.92 3. 39 2.59 82 74 69 64 B 4. 35 3.87 3,39 2.55 ,82 73 69 64 5.46 4.53 3.84 2.54 :82 73 69 64 5.45 4. 53 3,83 D 2,41 82 73 , 69 63 5.41 4.31 3,82 3.37 .2,37 82 73 • 69 63 5.35 4.30 3.. 82 3.37' 2.36 81 73 . 69 63 5.33 .4.29 3.81 3.36 2.34 81 73 69 63 5. 33 4.27 3.80 3.35 ,81 75 69 62 5.32 4.26 3.80 3.34 •81 73 62 .5,31- 4.25 3,80 3.33 81 73 C- 62 5*28 4.25 3.79 3. 33 80 73 : 68 62 5,28 4: © £j 2 3.79 3,33 80 73 68 62 5 d 2 5 4.20 3.78 3, 33 80 73 68 62 5,24 4,17 3,78 ,80 73 68 62 5,22 4.17 3,75 3.30 79 73 67 61 5.15 4.16 3.74 3,29 79 73 67 61 5,09 4.16 3.72 5,28 79 67 61 5.09 4.16 3.24 79 G 67 61 5.08 4.16 C- 3 © 2 *^) 79 72 67 61 5,08 4,15 . 3.70 3 o 2 0 ,78 72 67 60 5,05 4.15 3.69 •3.16 78 72 67 60 5,04 3,65 3.16 78 72 67 59 5,00 3.63 3.15 78 72 67 59 5.00 G 3.62 3.13 78 72 67 59 43.95 4.12 3.61 3.09 78 72 67 59 4.93. 4.11 3. 60 3.08 ,78 72 66 4,85 4,11 3, 60 3.05 77 72 66 4.80 4.11 3.59 3.04 77 71 66 E 4.71 • 4,10 3,58 3, Ol 77 71 66 58 4. 70 4.08 3.57 3,01 7 7 71 66 58 4.68 4,08 .3.54 3,00 76 71 66 58 4,67 4.07 3 e 52 3.00 76 71 66 57 4,67 4.07 3.51 2.96 76 71 66 57 4.64 4.07 3.50 2.96 7 6 71 66 53 4,61 4,04 3.50 2.93 71 52 4.60 4.04 3.50 2,90 C-f 71 4.59 4.04 3.48 2,89 75 71 D 4.58 4,04 3,48 2.88 75 71 . 65 4.55 4.00 •75 65 4,54 x i i The. .adaptation of the Barr Scale used f o r the purpose of grading the cases of t h i s study, on the b a s i s of occupat-ions. A Inventive genius (Edison type) Surgeon (Mayo Bros.) Research. Leader (Like B i n e t or Pasteur) Writer (Van Dyke) High N a t i o n a l O f f i c i a l , Cabinet o f f i c e r , f o r e i g n m i n i s t e r . Great Musician (Paderewski) B Great merchant,Owns and operates a ,$1,000,000 business." U n i v e r s i t y p r o f e s s o r , A.M. or Ph. D. teaches, writes and does research. .Publisher, h i g h c l a s s maga,zine, newspaper or p e r i o d i c a l . J o u r n a l i s t , High c l a s s w r i t e r or e d i t o r . P h y s i c i a n , 6-8 years prepara.ti.on above High School, income #5,000 and up. E d u c a t i o n a l a d m i n i s t r a t o r . Superintendent c i t y schools 2000 to 5000. College or Normal Grad, Consulting Engineer,•In charge of corps of engineers. Great wholesale merchant, business covering one or more s t a t e s . A r c h i t e c t , t r a i n i n g equal to that of c o l l e g e graduate. Mining'Engineer, thorough knowledge of mining and e x t r a c t -ion of metals. A r t i s t , h i g h c l a s s .painter of p o r t r a i t s etc. T e c h n i c a l Engineer, thorough knowledge of the processes of an i n d u s t r y . , • Lawyer, i n town of moderate s i z e , income |1000-$5000, Teacher i n c o l l e g e , degree of A.B. or A. M, , most progress-i v e , 'y Mechanical Engineer, designs and constructs machines a.nd machine t o o l s . I n d u s t r i a l chemist, thorough knowledge of the chemistry of manufacturing processes. Preacher, m i n i s t e r i n town of 1000-5000, c o l l e g e graduate. High school teacher, College or Normal graduate, not the most p r o g r e s s i v e . S e c r e t a r i a l work, p r i v a t e s e c r e t a r y to h i g h s t a t e o f f i c i a l . M usician, s u c c e s s f u l p l a y e r or s i n g e r i n good company. Land owner and operator, very l a r g e farms or ranches. T r a i n d i s p a t c h e r , must be mentally a l e r t . Surveyor, t r a n s i t man, c i t y or country surveyor. A r t teacher, i n h i g h s c h o o l , three or four years s p e c i a l t r . x i i i • D e n t i s t , graduate, 2-5 yaars t r a i n i n g , i n small town. Manufacturer, employs from 20 to 50 men, makes small a r t i c l e s . Music teacher, 2-4 years s p e c i a l t r a i n i n g , not c o l l e g e t r a i n -i ng , Master mechanic, thorough knowledge i n h i s f i e l d of mechanics. Pharmacist, i n town of from 1000-5000popu&&.t ion, .Osteopath, t r a i n i n g equal to c o l l e g e graduate. Grammar grade teacher, normal graduate, expects to make pro-f e s s i o n teaching. Landscape gardener. Primary teacher, no c o l l e g e t r a i n i n g , two years s p e c i a l t r a i n -i n g . E d i t o r , small paper,•considerable job work. Chef, employed i n large f i r s t - c l a s s h o t e l s , Nurse and Masseur, graduate, L i b r a r i a n , i n small i n s t i t u t i o n or p u b l i c l i b r a r y . Stenographer, uses shorthand and typewriter. Foreman, small f a c t o r y , shop, e t c . Storekeeper and owner, small town, r e t a i l d e aler, general or s p e c i a l s t o r e . R a i l r o a d passenger conduetor. C l e r i c a l work, bookkeepers, recorders, a b s t r a c t o r s , e t c . T r a v e l l i n g salesman, s e l l s drugs, g r o c e r i e s , hardwa.re, dry-goods, etc. E l e c t r o t y p e r , prepares wood cuts. D e t e c t i v e , t r a c e s c l u e s , etc. Employee of d e t e c t i v e bureau. Photographer, a few months t r a i n i n g , experience i n studio. Linotype operator. Lithographer, makes p r i n t s from designs which he puts on stone. Wood p a t t e r n maker. Metal p a t t e r n maker. ' D a i r y owner and manager, small d a i r y , 50-100 cows. Mechanical repairman, i n shop or f a c t o r y , keeps machines i n c o n d i t i o n . S t a t i o n agent, i n small town, acts as baggage man, f r e i g h t agent, operator, e t c . Undertaker, i n small tov/n, six- months s p e c i a l schooling, Telegra.ph operator, i n small town. Salesman, i n d r y g o o d s h a r d w a r e , grocery s t o r e . Tailor-, employee i n t a i l o r i n g shop, .• p o t t e r n makes j a r s , jugs, crockery, .earthenware. Carpenter, knows woodworking- t o o l s , can f o l l o w d i r e c t i o n s i n :™ , various processes of wood c o n s t r u c t i o n • work. Bookbinder, sets up and binds books of a l l s o r t s . E l e c t r i c repairman, r e p a i r s e l e c t r i c ^ devices, u t e n s i l s and machines. Gardener, gardening, truck farming, owns a.nd operates small p l o t s . • -x i v C (con,) Plumber., average t r a i n e d plumber employee. Stone mason, Porest ranger. L e t t e r c a r r i e r . C-Tinsmith, makes v e s s e l s , u t e n s i l s , e t c . , from p l a t e d sheet metal. Harness maker. General p a i n t e r , knowledge of ma.terials used necessa.ry. P l a s t e r e r , knowledge of m a t e r i a l s used necessary. Metal f i n i s h e r , p o l i s h e s and lacquers metal f i x t u r e s . Baker. • Butcher, not shop owner, a,ble to make cuts p r o p e r l y . B r i c k l a y e r , Telegraph and telephone linesman. S t r u c t u r a l s t e e l worker, heavy work demanding some s k i l l . Policeman, average patrolman. R a i l r o a d fireman, on f r e i g h t or passenger t r a i n . C i t y f i r e f i g h t e r , handles the ordinary f i r e f i g h t i n g appar-atus, Brakeman, on f r e i g h t or passenger t r a i n . Pa,rm tenants, on small t r a c t s of land. S t r e e t - c a r conductor* Cook, i n restaurant or small h o t e l . Telephone operator. D Ship r i g g e r , i n s t a l l i n g cordage system on s a i l i n g v e s s e l s , working under s u p e r v i s i o n . General repairman-, r e p a i r s broken a r t i c l e s , uses woodworking t o o l s . V u l c s n i s e r , understands the process of hardening rubber. Moving p i c t u r e operator, operates machine which p r o j e c t s p i c -t u r e s . Barber, not owner, has charge of c h a i r . Munition worker, average.. . Cobbler and shoemaker, repairman i n shoe shop. T i r e r e p a i r e r , i n general automobile r e p a i r shop. Smelter work, metal pourers, c a s t i n g c o l l e c t o r s . Switchman, tending switch i n railway yards. Junkman, c o l l e c t o r of junk, , Leliveryman, d e l i v e r s g r o c e r i e s , e t c . , with team or mule, Drayman, • Da i r y hand, m i l k i n g , care of stock under s u p e r v i s i o n . Sawmill worker, heavy work, l i t t l e s k i l l r e q u i r e d . Teamster,, • Bar tender. Laundry worker, various kinds of work i n laundry, p r a c t i c a l l y u n s k i l l e d . • ' X V D (con. ) j?arm labourer, u n s k i l l e d and u s u a l l y i n e f f i c i e n t . Bongshoreman , loa,ds and unloa.ds cargo. Miner, digger and s h o v e l l e r , etc. Waterworks man, a, va,riety of odd jobs, a,ll u n s k i l l e d . Track l a y e r , does heavy work under s u p e r v i s i o n , "Day l a b o u r e r , on s t r e e t , i n f a c t o r y or shop as rustabout. E R a i l r o a d s e c t i o n hand, replaces t i e s etc. under s u p e r v i s i o n H o s t l e r , care of horses, i n l i v e r y , feed and sa.les s t a b l e s . C i r c u s rustabout, does heavy work about c i r c u s . Garbage c o l l e c t o r . Odd jobs, ; Hobo, X V i Records and data sheets of f o u r sample cases. Cases 62 G 111-1X 131 G 111-X11 35 223 B V - X l l C 246 B 111-1X The f o l l o w i n g pages show copies of the report forms and the da,ta sheets of f o u r sample cases. It should 'be noted that l e t t e r grades used i n the High School t i l l 1933 have been ignored because these l e t t e r grades were not assigned on the 5/£ to A, 20% to B, etc, s feasis, Por these years the percent-age marks have been used. xvi i iGST-OSij-rcot 'api«3 jo ^nao aad 09 aippjtn 9(0 sa^coipai o jpuj&j j o -^naa aad Q I$*>AS.O\ ©TO sajBojpuj a -apmS jo -joeo aad OS ?saa arf} sajtsajpaj "a g p B ^ jo -^uao jarl OS ?xan oqj sa*TJ3ipni; a -apujg jo -;aaa lad o doj eqj sajnofpnr V I —: SAtonoj EB apura aq £.sxa spofqns nj Snijcji—-HIO& I toimoa-jjss " —monou •• "dfusiapuai jo aonspiAa •—ijaafloja jo aj^o —sjorraoji -— J^HFUfll'H —i£pu?s anion pou nouBaudaij i—SSKHIXIJUIY avisos •jooips T[SJH oj noHotnojd no . ; j ] h 0 +• y h i i *> ft 0 0 y 0 y 0 [ - . ^ y ft- •: i y «> «1 ft ft PI y U > y y 1 ft y 0 ft y y SI S CJ <J V) !» y y <!l y y y y Is i ^ & S. Q y ! o V) ft y u 41 Q y 0 i y C) 0 y U <1 1 Q 0 =5 y ft y >, 0 0 ! <J I >$ | a Uj % + y I 0 «) y y U 0 Q 6 i ft ft y y 1 y 0 t* y j y y 1 Q C 5 VI 'a a ' ? 1 j ! B 3 C • !• 3 r. I I I I I ' 5 K B O X C Manual T Domestic | S 1 a Q S xvi i Date of entry.... pato of leaving. Reasons for leaving. English Literature.. Composition.... History, World History, Canadian.., Arithmetic „.. Algebra. ..  Gcome try-Latin Authors Latin Grammar..... French Authors French Grammar... Greek Authors.. Greek Grammar German Authors German Grammar... Drawing. General Science... Agriculture. Botany Chemistry-Physics Geography... Biology Reasons for leaving. Spelling..., Civics Commercial Law. Business Correspond! Economics...-. Applied Mechanics. Shop-work Sheet-metal work-Machine-shop work. Printing Electricity— Physiology... Dietetics Needlework... Household Art... Music Days absent-Days late H I G H S C H O O L C O U R S E . INTELLIGENCE TESTS. 1 " £ of! KOB STANDARDIZED TESTS. Attitude toward school activities Attitude toward outside activities-Application Physical defects... Special aptitudes... Remarks*.. Preparation and home-study Attention in class..... Honour Reliability Manners Conduct „ Self-control Care of property... .Service... . School spirit-Evidence of leadership... NOTE.—Rating in subjects may be made as follows:-A Indicates the top 5 per cent, of grade B Indicates the next 20 per cent, of grade. . C indicates-the middle 50 per cent, of grade. D indicates the next 20 per cent, of grade. E indicates the lowest 5 per cent, of grade. x r i i X T i i i ft U © c 5 Is li Mi I t ! 3 I P i •t-y m 0 0 y ft y ft pi 0 + y y t y y m i y y 0 ft y y 0 •>> <? % $ ?! *> «, 1 y ft y ft n ft n 0 fl ft ft Hi « m ft i i "111 ft ft si l <- s ft ft III i y E i i 1 B 1 i 1 J a " S h 1 .j :l i \ j . : £ : -3 3 f : > I-» i i Is B l - a s J I ' l a g s s i a i l 3 l i t * I S ! i l ? 1 f S s * « 5 S I S o »« ? 1 * 8 1 ,1 § 1 3 s J n -s is «i s i game 62 G 111-1X B i r t h d a y J u l y 1 8 » 1 9 1 9 -9 y e a r s Pat3.ona.lity of p a r e n t s C a n a d i a n - S c o t t i s h O c c u p a t i o n of f a t h e r J a n i t o r S c h o o l Becord Grade 1 11 L l l IV V. VI V l l v i i : L IX X XI X l l . Age 9 10 12 13 14 ' 15 16-: .7 : Grades. aJrip-nfid Grades r e p e a t e d b TO X \ :.41 3.7 i. 7t 3. i S..29 3.3 I.S< ^ A ' L) • 55 . • X p * t . p r rfTaflo C C-1 — I) D D D L-Q D 7 2.75 D 2.00 D M a t r i c u l a t i o n Records Age Av.. Eng.,S.S . A T . l i a t h s . ft'i Q n n o p • Average Jun.Mat. Sen.Mat. 2.43 D Subsequent s c h o l a s t i c r e c o r d . Records of T n t e l l i g e n c e T P H ' Test . ' •• Age I.Q. N a t i o n a l . 9 91 Terman 16 97 Average• D - • 94' O o c i l T l a t i nn Housework ( i r r e g u l a r ) i R a t i n g XX SJTUS jo =inai> Jad o ^ SSAHOJ stfj sojisojpni g apujg. jo -jnao jad OS ^IPPini enj sajuaipTij o •epajS jo -jnao jsdos i x a u aqj sa^Baipnr a •optuS jo -giiaa j ad g doj an.} sajBOfpnj y — : EAiouoj SB apura aq Jura s^oafqns nj Sa^pia;—-aio^  —IPjds tootpg ---•"loj;noo-jias • •"•jnonoi-j; • — ' oojijag — — -;otipao3 —- • s-iantrajs -flmsiapBaj jo aanapjAa l^adojd jo aiBo ipttjs oraoq pan troratusdaj^  ^ ni ^ ryor [Mi O M a a « 5 "% p & 5 M H G,3 P o >. -n S & « £ Date of entry.... Date of leaving. Grade... Book-keeping... Snort Land Typewriting Penmanship Spelling. Civics | Commercial Law Business Correspond Economics Applied Mechanics... Shop-work Sheet-metal work Machine-shop work... Printing Electricity Physiology Dietetics Needlework... Household Art... Music Clothing, etc Days absent Days late XX IGCI-OiU-IVi JlE.lS JO -JP«J3 JO H I G H S C H O O L C O U R S E . INTELLIGENCE TESTS. STANDARDIZED TESTS. Attitude toward school activities. Attitude toward outside activities. Application Physical defects . Special aptitudes. Remarks". ' Preparation and home-study Attention in class Ilonour Reliability Manners Conduct Self-control Care ot property Service School spirit Evidence ot leadership NOTE.—Rating In subjects may be mode as follows :— A Indicates the top G per cent, of grade B indicates the nest 20 per cent, of grade. C indicates the middle 50 per cent, of grade. D indicates the next 20 per cent, of grade. E indicates the lowest 5 per cent, of grade. •o-i •b-v 1 j j Tit •«•"• ajoos •BJOO 1 6 z j H t/) U •ajca "I sox H Q U N •jsoj LLIGI "O-I 5 5 c OT H z V K •IBJOJJ OJOJg —r •ajoas ajca •ajua a jsox JO 1 1 •js^x JO 1 j c S (X N s g c j a i J 1 i i Q defects.... | ity of par on of pan £ 1 Q Q Q S a Occupat! lOGI-OBi-KOJ B)UJS JO •. p^nja jo 1 xxi PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FRED. J. PATTERSON, D.A., Principal Mens Sana In corpon MONTHLY REPORT O F S T U D E N T '/>>/ 6 '34 GRADE.. / X A COURSE . .^ty(jaJ&u^ , PROMOTED TO GRAI DE X PRTNCIPAI ia3i-33 Days Present - - -Days Absent - - -Times Tardy - -1. English Literature 2. English Composition 3. History - - - -i. Arithmetic - - - • G. Algebra 6. Geometry - - - . 7. Science (a) - - -8. " . (b) - - -9. Latin (a) Compositfoi 10. " (b) Authors 11. French (a) - - - -12. " <b) - - - -13. - - -c~ 3S _La_ 6>o '4 22. to  3o %--79-17. Typewriting ' - - • 18 Man: Train, or Dom. Sc.|| Average • Standing in Class - - . Number In Class - - -Application to Work - -_General Progress ' - - -General Conduct - - -3% \JS m ii A signifies Excellent; It, Good; C, Fair; D, Poor. First-class Honors " -""li subject. Pass Sea"iTdard: Aver, of 50: 40 in each subject. 1 In each subject. Second-class Honors: Aver 6 •cuts are renu**st°d '° ...has spent tlie folio » daily in home study in the month of... iron of Parents or Guardian; .""'student Is in attendance every day. REMARKS BY PARENTS: xxii k o o a n n 5 B •a 3 £ H P O w H ! a s 3 N «3 •K £ 3 - ° 9 3 ffi R O R W % * t» I Is 3* 3N 4* 45 si O i to i UN M AM I « 8 3 9 II * a l i i i 1 -e JI xxii Mams ;131 G..111-Xll'36 Birthday Oct. 1, 1918 16 years Nationality'of parents Scottish • : Oocurjatlon of father Engineer - • , " s c h o o l B e c o r d '> Grade i : 11 L l l IV . V ¥1 V l l v i i ; L IX X : XI X l l '- A-o-a..' . 8 9 10 11 12 13 . 14 15 16 .17 : b Grades repeated •b 63%. 76% 70% 64% 4.9' 3.9 L " " 5.35 Letter Grade D . OT C CT B G C B C - D X - 1 ' •' 2" I o 1 I c Matriculation Becords Age Av. Bng.,S.S .. A T . Maths. Average J.un.Kat.. 1? -60%.. a',_ • .•;35/C.--E •- 53^ D Sen.Mat. c Subsequent scholastic record Records of Tnt f i l l imnns T o 0 + 0 Test Age I.Q. national 9 109 National 11 127 Terman 13 116 Terman A 14 115 Or, Olivia, t i n n Apprenticed at Drug store f i v e months, low Telephone Operator.  , Rating Average 116 3/ xxir •aptroSjo ^tiao ladoe aiPPJtn eq? sa;uo]pai o |jo -iaaa^atT.s JSSMOI; OTH sajnoiptn; a -apciS jo -iaao jad OS 3xan en;; sajTJOipnf a jo -^uaa jad.OS ,xaa atp sa,B3ipnr a -apiuS jo -iaao lod^e do? aqj sa^rajpiii y — : BAVOIIOJ su opBca aq irarsjoafqiis «{ StqjtfH—-axoN "'djqsjapBat jo oanapjAg; •«JI(Is looqos aoiAJag " £jiadoj<I jo 9JTQ rojiuoo-jps • •asup m; nojma^y - "Xpnjs amoq pac uonnasdajj —saanxixjy Te-iaajs „MOO,I „ , 'aitiji „ ,,'poof) „ „',nail90s3„ ssn 'tooqag qSlH °1 nor)omoid no JO A"ftTjanum"j8d looqos sajAuai;. no -Irao nj P^Iiy oq oj,—-HXON 1 | j i 4 d ft) <j 1 u u cs u N to 0 «9 u 0 $ * u 1 "J <o t a)-<!* <j 1 o 0 0 <!) <S <t ii l!) u <!; t5 1 | | j | Q a c 1 1 j ! i 1 £ 1 c I i I > i imestlc Science xxiv Date o( entry Date ot leaving. . English Literature... Composition nistory, World -..] History, Canadian... Arithmetic Algebra Geometry Latin Authors Latin Grammar French Authors French Grammar Greek Authors Greek Grammar German Authors German Grammar... Drawing General Science Agriculture Botany Chemistry Physics _ Geography Biology Book-keeping-Shorthand | Typewriting J Penmanship Spelling. Civics Commercial Law... Business Correspond]., Economics Applied Mechanics...].. Shop-work Sheet-metal work-Machine-shop work... Printing Electricity... Physiology... Dietetics Household Art... Music Clothing, etc Days absent Days late iOW-0 r 1 H I G H S C H O O L C O U R S E . INTELLIGENCE TESTS. Name of Test. Date. Score. a | . K | -4 Name ot Test. Date. Score. Norm. A.Q. STANDARDIZED TESTS. Attitude toward school activities Attitude toward outside activities... Application Physical defects.. Special aptitudes.. Itemarks". Preparation and home-study Attention in class... Honour Reliability Manners-Conduct Self-control property Service School spirit. Evidence of leadership NOTE.—Hating in subjects may be made as follows :-A lndlca D lndlca' C indicai D indicai E indicai the top 5 per cent, of grade es the next 20 per cent, of grade, es the middle 50 per cent, of grade, es the nest 20 per cent, of grade, es the lowest 5 per cent, of grade. X X Y I litest Uannittuer P R O V I N C E O F B R I T I S H C O L U M B I A FRED. J. PATTERSON, H.A.. Principal Mens Sana In corpore sano MONTHLY REPORT O F S T U D E N T J** 3 y~ X / / C G R A D E . . < X COURSE... TEACHER... P R O M O T E D T O GRADE... P R I N C I P A L X X V 192 Sept. Oct. Nov. -*•* Tan, Feb. Mar. Apr. May June Average Days Present - - - - '? 7'- Zo '3 S3 / 2- 3 / / / 1. English Literature - -2. English' Composition 7* Ci- 70 £7 c S3 7J-7° V7 4. Arithmetic - - - - -5. Algebra ------/OO — / 9$ 7. Science (a) - - - -8. " (b) - - - -9. Latin (a) Composition -10. •" (b) Authors - -11. French (a) - - -12. ' " (b) c ?3 "7o c. 3S o 72- —/ -— &'7 15 s3oo/{ K<?e /-/A/G a ft —/ 93 fj # c 4/ 63 17. Typewriting - - - -IS Man. Train, or Dom. Sc. *) Standing in Class - - - -Number In Class - - - -Application to Work - - -General Progress - - - -General Conduct - - - -7t-7 7/ * / 3 /<£ 1 r;n First-class Honors: Aver. 75; CO in each subject. Second-class Honors: Aver 60: 40 In each subject. Both parents are requested to sign this report. time dally in home study in the month of... ...lias spent the folk 132 Time Signatures of Parents or Guardians September (1) (2) October (1) (2) November (1) (2> December (1) (2) January ID , , (2) February ID (2) March (1) 12) April (1) (2) May ID 121 •June (1) (2) N.I1.—A High School stud, real, serious home st Promptness- ,t do from one to two hours' ry day if he means to succeed, 'gularily cannot be over-emphasized. i-arciiiM cuii uesi nelp the school by seeing that nothing interferes with the regular home study period, and that the student is in attendance every day. REMARKS BY PARENTS: xxv i id 3 3 1 w - j t B I g (35 H5 5 u p 6 •3 o HOOLS HOOLS c ? -HOOLS A* «J + HOOLS <j t ( t HOOLS 8 W ! E 0 6 «? > 5 A A // s B " 3 3 1 1 *§ Cc' « 53 Wff »1 Ml J R J l X >•. '9 1 0 > \ 0) y p O ^ s: X i > 1) d a H ! N i I x ! ^  i r, to 3 CO w a ° a $ 3 S _c u (§ c c I i CM © 1 t. *i <9 X 0 y » X y X «: 6 •> •> > \ V A S if f / «: * > 11 5! 0 «? <j 0 (5 0 <J % y 5" 3 0 <<? y t-y ^ s •> > N s j j s !' 8 : a s « | a H ho CO 6 B to d o g & E 6 O 1 3 1 S 1 a g. te a 3 i to 1 3 a e < t 1 i a O 1 C t (O 1 C 8 E s o 1 ! « s o 1 o S3 1 1 o 3 *0 c : ? ! 2 i 0 i 1 & II 8 S! S H s e 13 S f o to 1 i 1 2 i c | 1 = 1 i £ <L C 1 1 1 xxvi M a r a e 225B V-X11C g a t t o n a l i t y of p a r e n t s i f e l g h B i r t h d a y A u g . 18,. 1918. 7 y e a r s . O c c u p a t i o n of; f a t h e r - G r o c e r S c h o o l Record Grade 1 11 111 I T vi V l l . ' vi i : . I X X... X I i n • Ace lffi 12 12 13 14 15' 16 17 (Trades sTrip-oed (trades r e p e a t e d 5 ,39 3 . 3 ; .i ,.59 4.2 3 7 r '% ' 5.3 5 - 7 5 6. .,' , T.etter R-rade B D B c4 B B B A . 17 4.0 C 6.0 B ' . i a t r i c u l a t i o n B e c o r d s Age A T . Bng.,S.S J?,. T . P WffTTS (TP C . Air. Hatha... Average .Tun .Hat. Sen.Mat. 5,5 B Subsequent s c h o l a s t i c r e c o r d . T est Age I.Q,. N a t i o n a l 12 - 138 •nations.! 116 Qconiw-tii n'n„ Bookkeeper, w h o l e s a l e  g r o c e r s .  R a t i n g -Average 127 J ZGSI-OSZ KOX -aptjjS jo ^nao jad OS oippjui am sajtrajpui Q KBJS j=o -;ne3 aod-n jsaaujt sq? sajBarpni g 'Optus jo inoa aad OS ?^oa aq$ saiuoipni a ppoj3j jo -?033 jad 05 ;xaa aq? saitoipuj a -apnaa jo -\u^ jad g doj aqj a^uDjpui y . I - „ i — : SAOHOJ su apira eq Sum s^oafqns xt\ 3nn*a—'HXOW djqsjapuDi. jo aaaapjAg; —4HttIs looqas " -sDjaaas ijiadoad jo a « o •••.Cpnjs aaioq pun noi^judsjj * looqos t["IH °^ ttoHoraoid *tto ao inaanuraja3 jooqo's SafiWi' Jooj „ ..Mpjjt „ „'pooo „ (i'4H9tl33xs[ „ osn. ^ia0 nj.pgjjg aq ox—"HJ;ON | 1 i i 1 j [ | j } i ! j ! i | j i i i vats Q ' 3 to <l i i 4^ M IS: i ^ S i i . «i Si i i • vSjS! *j« i • Oil! & i - n 4! #1*1 e m ' s , JN af* <> •i i | i • 1 1 j i ri £ . a e i c I Subject. K H t I a 1 ' S < c Language. Literature Compositi History, ) History, ( Geo graph; Nature Si Manual T Domestic % " | I Q B Address... School , Date of entry.... Date of leaving. Hcnsons for leaving. Grade Rook-keeplng... Shorthand Typewriting... Penmanship.... Spelling Civics Commercial Law Business Correspond Economics Applied Mechanics... Shop-work Sheet-metal work Machine-shop work-Printing. Electricity Physiology Dietetics Needlework Household Art-Music Clothing, etc Days absent , Days late I xxvii i IGCl-0 H I G H S C H O O L C O U R S E . INTELLIGENCE TESTS. STANDARDIZED TESTS. Attitude toward school activities. Attitude toward outside activities Application Fhyslcal defects . Special aptitudes. Remarks , Preparation and home-study Attention In class Honour Reliability Manners Conduct Self-conirol _ Care of property Service School spirit Evidence of leadership NOTE.—Rating In subjects may be made ns follows:— A Indicates the top !> per cent, of grade It Indicates the next 20 per cent, of grade. C Indicates the middle 30 per cent, of grade. D Indicates the next 20 per cent, of grade. E Indicates tlie lowest 5 per cent, of grade. xxix xxix X X X fa&e-K:i^246'-B ' i l ' l - l x . Birthday Sept. 2,7, .1917 8 years, t a t l o ^ W l - i f l V . ' r OccuMtion .of :,fa-tfaer .. B u i l d i n g Contractor/ S c h o d l .Record; Srade . •.,.-.}. 1 11 111 IV ; v Y i V l l Y i i : >-ix X ; XI -fl •} • Aa-e 9 10 i i 1 S 13 14 15-16 _Gra.<ies sTup-n^d ::Gra.d:es.. r ' f i f i f i^tfi^ , : x \ ^^^^g" .7.4$ 76£ ; 69? ' 69; -f 61% 69^ ;,4i.^  =1 G • B r — — 1 c- c- C- C ' GG-: Matrlculat:iori ; vfieeofcfe. 4.0- C 3.5 G Age Avy :Eng.:,;S»S .... AY. Maths> £S r*.T- o - w ' r » aies i. . Average 3.75 G Sufes 0130X6 nt S c h o l a s t i c mnrirrj, Records nf T V ^ T M ? E R I N . . ; T ^ . Q Test /Eational l a t i o n a l . Te'rman A -Sational Age 10 13 14 14 1:5: 115 121 111 117. ,109 ..QCGl]J)a.t.^ riri:; House p a i n t e r .Ratlh-g--C-Average; O f [-jifean.Q.j, 327' G l l - X l l 35 Birthday May 4, 1919 • 9 years. - R a t i o n a l i t y ' of parents E n g l i s h . v Occupation of f a t h e r Truck d r i v e r "S/c-hbiol 'Reapfed.. :.Grade . 1 11 i l l IV v.. VI 711 v i i : . :ix X i X l l 7 7 8 .9 : 10 11 12 13 '. 14 15 Grades n*i,rr:v:>fi "b .' p: X • ..^ Grades' T&opw.f^ri-73.^ 69,^  82% ' 80 74? '80%: 84$ 4«8< 5 . T i P t t P T •^ T-a.d.fi'. 0- C A B ; B •'• A . Of v • : B Matr i c u l a t i e h "Records _B_ Age A.T. Eng..»,SvS rftr T,an gna gp p .-, k AT.. Maths. Average; ' Jun.Vat. 15 ; •72^ : B :• 72.'^ . B ' : :" 72^ P, ' *•<* >1' J ;5uhsed:uent s c h o l a s t i c record . 42 B AHe;cerds; of T i i t e n i r o r i ^ T r „ + „ '. Test ; Age I.Q. n a t i o n a l .8 . B a t i o n a l TP : •A. w y .— i ^ n • Average A , 137 Ecu's e^Torfc^ Clerk at Window "bakery. •• -Rating.; x x x i i 202 B 111-X11 37 N a t i o n a l i t y of parents S c o t t i s h Birthday Dec. '14, 1920 9 years. Occupation of father . Salesman School' 'Record Grade 1 11 111 IV V VI 711 v i i : : IX X XI X l l 8 9 9 10' 11 12 13 14 15 16 Grades skipped D . G-rn,dfts_r epe at ed ij>TOrnse- 73^ 75$ 7 7$ 80$ 80$ .86$ 6.3 6.3 5.6 5„8 3Le±:fc.P> y rTy'a r\ R G B" B B B. A A' A B B M a t r i c u l a t i o n Records 6.5 A Age Av. Eng.jSiS JiP-p -g i . i -a , g o s -. AT>. Jiaths. Average" .' Jun.Mat. 16 82-Jr$ A 82-§-$ A 82$% A Sen.Mat. Subsequent s c h o l a s t i c vp.r.nrr\i 6.1 A Average Records of Intel 1 i P - P ^ P T F I A + B . • . : • Test Age I .Q. . 'Haggerty 8 above _ipbl p 0 124 N a t i o n a l •, 10 146 N a t i o n a l 11 \ 152 Terman B 16 120 A _0ccupa.t-i nr| -Rating--JL 3 o*o Naiiie: ;,147vB 1V-XT Birthday .Sept. .7, 1917 8 years School .Her(^ -M&'4.l Grade • 1 11 i l l . IV V VI V l l v i i : it XI. X l l Aee 10 11 12 15 15 16 ,17 Grades ,,skip-oed • '; ••h&i&e.&r. repealed ' i T ' P I ' ^ ^ 69$ 755 67$ 7-6;* 5.73 63? ; • 60$ >3.2 1 ' i ^ P - t t P T» '••••f^.f' q'#fa' ' • C C ™ Of C- B :'; G • C . B : Ma t r i c u l a t i o n •Records ,0 C 3.8 C Subsequent; :Schdlastic rervnrd y Age" AY. Eng.,3.3 8c LPhguage-S-: •f AY. MathsV ; Average --3.88 C Jun.vat. •;Sen.Mat. ::• ^ 'aeerds-df Y r i ^ p i ^ i ^ n - - Tr~+:~ •',,;:'••' Test • Age : 1'G"' : •: N a t i o n a l : ; 11 • 119 Na t i onal-—• v- • • 14 125 Average B 121 Occirnp.-hi P l a s t e r e r C-X X X I V 'Name: .880-: 1V-X11:35 ^Nati'onailjby:;.:.^ . E n g l i s h ..Birthday 3"an. 50 , 1915 9 yews Occupation of fr-.thnr School Recafrdi,.. Grade 1 11 111 IV :V: :V1 V l l ' v i i : • TT x : XI X l l — — k s e '• 12 13 14 15 16 17 ; • 18 19 20'.' \; Grades, s l d p f t d _ — - t r a d e s " . r e p e a - f ^ d ' ; b fay-fir age ...( 70z: : 67? 7 70$ 75% 4.5 7 6£ 55$ ;3.,0 2.C Tiet,;'Le.r_L?Tra.dR . 0- 0 G- C C- •D E 3„33 Ji,fatr;iculatlon. Ra cords o — 3 © 33 G Subsequent s c h o l a s t i c re cord. Age A T . Eng.,3.3 • 9z • n 1 ia P"e s *• A T . l l a t h s v • '8* - Q r> i a t ) n p q • ••"Average Jun.Kat. •: 20 ; 50^ D 49$ D. ' '50$ D -Sen ..Mat* A :Becdj?ds of T T o t f l i i i p - « V - T--t~ C' Test '• Age i . q . •; 90 • ; : .  N a t i o n a l ; 15 ;. ' 88 Oti s S e l f - a d i a i n i s t e : ?ing 16 ' 101 Average , \ ' :o •' 93 Occ'.ipp.t.i n-Y) At home "Rating--X X X V Name 49: G 111-XllC :ffati :dnall t y of parents Canadian Birthday Hay 6, 1917 Qcc.UDati on ,of' f a t h e r Lino typ e bp era to r; School Record 10 years w G r a d e / ' '": -~ • 1 IX . L l l 1Y Y Y l V l l . -,:vIX •XI X l l Afl-e 9 10 11 : 12 i s : 14 15 : 16 17 18 -Grades -skip-ned',,•..• : : Grades :r epeated' —.—iLmarciga. 5.5 5 e 5t 5 \al '4.1 I 69 3,7 4.6£ • T.P'f t p r 'fir-iris: ' •': '"B; B B G • Pf c-f: B C •6.0 . -H S a t r i c u l a t I o n BecO:IN1S:. 4.4 Cf Age: Av. Eng.yS.S . Av, Maths. Average ' • A :Jun.Mat> ;. j&eh.Mat. ;S,uhs e oue nt so ho l a s t1c. r e c nr d . 5.0 B \ He cords of Tr.t.-TM T n „ + „ •. t':\-'"•.;• . •'• Test Age i-A, : : N a t i o n a l 9 98 •... .: -Terman A ::./..- 15 190 •>;:\-'-• ,- ••' '~\' "': - --\ •••Average I) 99 ;0:c.G.Tipa.t.i.n.w. 01erk 5 ftrygoods store, •Hating X X X V 1 Name 71 G V1-X1C Birthday M a y • 2 1 ' 1 9 1 5 6 years jKiationallty of parents Scotch 'Canadian Occupation of father' \.''\Lab6u-r'e-r; School Record,-., "w./, .Grade 1 11 i l l " 1V: V.' VI, V l l . v i i : . • • X XI X l l A.tfe .:.. ' ' i l 12 -, 13 14 15 16 •- Grarlfts slfip-oed :• J — Grades repeated: *> \ ATOr^y s.o; 71| : 79?, 32$ : 7 5 ; T , e t t p r Graf-lP • B , A \ A Y a t r i c u l a t i o n Records 6,0 B 6.2 A Age : Av.c Eng. ,3.3 . :Avv Ilaths . • %f Q P I Q Y 1 n o c* .. .:.''... Average:.. cTun.Kat. ;San .-Mat -Subsequent s c h o l a s t i c rennrr- , 6.17 A Aye-rage Records of T r t . * n i ^ l™,, m ^ i - r - - '-J -• -V'.; ":'['"; Test • .-, -Age.:./;:. I.Q. :' - ' ••• - 'Terman. Q:. 1 . ' : ...: .:!;.' 103 • • ' • •—; T ' o - p m i a n n, 1 1 « J - " , v iio; 2/] Per.:ip,-»-hi s t e n o g r a p h e r , j n Wtn r-.VhroVp.r 1 s . o f f ri c p,, -Rating--01* X 3 0 C T 1 1 'lame ; 258B11-X11 37 .; N a t i o n a l l ty, of parents .Canadaan Birthday ^ly 8,," 19.18 12-years O.ceux>ataon:--.'of., fatherv" S&lesman School -Recdr-d; Grade V 1 11 . 111 1Y •V, Y l 711 YH: •IX X XI X l l A^e_. 8 9 10 ;'• i i 12.. 14 1.5 16 : 17 18 Grades sMfi£sxt__ ':-' /Gtn&e-S repeated "p. : iur.er ;ge. • 4 ;42- 3*-8; 72$ 3 i 78/ '7,9? 5,:( ).41 •5.4 1 4, . . T;Pf tpr- G-rndR .. . : G C- C- c B B ' ' B B ,'.B G 14 3:. 6 C~ a a t r l c u i a t i o n Records 5.67 B Age • A Y . Eng.,,,SvS ^ T i^ng t iagR -H-•••Av.iiatiiS'., : Ayerage J" un ."-"at. 18 i :::69i^V-B': ' : -8i$ A 74$ B "S;en.Mat. 4.73 Qj Suhsequent s c h o l a s t i c raanrd T -Becords: of ^ t a i m„„ + . . .'Test / • . ; Age I.Q. .'•••'••. . Haggerty .. ' : - : ? ' • . • • , .100 ' ' /National •' 12 107 /National ' •;. "• 13, : 103... v'/•'•- . . :-Te'rman:B '." :!^ :..18:. , / v:;Averagev,:. ••• . D 105^' Occupy.t-i m- ) Senior, Ma t r 1 o u 1 a t i o n ;:Ratln;g-B Name: 36-B 1 1 - X l l 36 Birthday M^r(?k 1 6° 1919 11 years N a t i o n a l i t y of parents E n g l i s h ; • Occupa,;tion of father B u i l d e r and Gon-J-ractor School Renord-yGrade 1 11 : • i l l : IV Y Y l 711 YII: IX . v • • XI X l l ___Aai©.:_..,. 7 : 8 9 10.. 11 ; 12 15 14,:, 15 16 17 i^—Jlrades:/skipped- .. h 1 a ^~--JjXml£LS r e pe a te d': kvprnga-.-. 75$ 72$ : 72;;: r. t 0 '2$ : 71$ 74$ t. 68 5.4 2 5, ':' TiettKOi....;Gra^:p/ c- G.f G B C ' C :;B'".' B B M a t r i c u l a t i o n Records G4:•; 4.d 5.17 B Age ;Av./Eng. ,:s^S A t . liaths » Ayerage .Jun,iMat,. 17 82$ A : - 7 0 f $ B - .;;Se:n.Jfet,;. Subsequent s c h o l a s t i c : renoTrj. 4.91 B .Becords of jnt^-A^ , s „ . Test ...Pihtner Cunningham Na t i o n a l n a t i o n a l Terman 'Terman A German'A Age 11 12 13 -±8-:Aye rage: C4 119 114 115 120 113 116* -iQcCiipa-f.-i a r . No steady occupation;,  working with f a t h e r . ,  (Now wo rkin g wi th Yancou ve r isTaice l l l - X l l ' J i p N a t i o n a l i t y : -of.parents/ E n g l i s h Birthday m h > 5> 1 9 1 7 1 0 y e a r S Odcupatioh of f a t h e r B u i l d e r arid Contractor School Record '' Grade/. •, •• 1 11 . ... I l l : IV V VI •: Vll." v i i : t i x X : XI X l l : Age 10 M l ; 12 13, 14 16 17 18 1 9 ; - i ~ . Gr-KlQ.s sKispeiLv-^•• .firad:es/::repeatea-; :< •• » '• 77$: 77%*: ;79$ 79^ 77$ 81$ 79£ 6.8 > . . L •-o„7S Letter:,:'Grade . 0 * . •B B B B A • ' B B :;A': B M a t r i c u l a t i o n Beeords |5V7:5. JL 6.33 A Age A t . Brig.',;8vS • TiP'iW'trnP) fir'e'R'"-;.; Avv Haths. :' Average ; '.i'J,un.;Mat-i 74%" B i : 80%' BV .: . • 76*$ B ; / V ;s.en.Mat. ;S:Ulpaequent: s c h o l a s t i c , r e c o r d . . : 6.1 A :\:;B:e;cdrd's:: of/Tntelli;sence-vT ' p .«+c 1 : • Test • :' Age . I.Q. M l 104 ':':-;,,, " .;• N a t i o n a l : :•' M4: ; 116' l'.-:--i. • • Terman:-'..-;•'.'.... :" ...14' "-i •108: I :;.;•  j;:;Te;rman: A ... •"li. 15 li . 109 Average .109*; Occupfl.tinn, go steady employment,  working with father.*'••  To go to E n g l a n d f o r enrollongg^^n Boyal A i r 3?orce . x i ;Name 210 G l - X l l 37 Birthday Jan.6.. 1920 11 years ' N a t i o n a l i t y di-- parents Amerlcaii-Ganadian Occu-oatlon of fat h e r Hanufaoturer' s Agent School iQCCTCi •". Grade 1 .11 i l l IV'- V VI V l l / v i i : . IX : x i X l l Lgs 7 8', • •9 : -10 10 11 12 15 14 15 .16 17 — ^ l i i i a ^ s f i - ^ J s i ^ Q i i ^ '•: h Gxs.ces repeated , -—^••"•p^qp-p 5.1 4 4.5C : 845 >77$ .' 645 79$ 77f 4.2 4.' • £ .89' 4.1 I 3. T i P t f P T .. VTVP rl.P B : 04 A B A B ' B : Cj 0 c ; D 45 M a t r i G u l a t i o n Becards 4 n § O f -Age Av.,i3ng. ,3.3 A--- LPnp"itagos••• . AT* Maths * .Average :-/Jun.Matw 17 59% 0 :.- 51$ V.Cr. : 56$ 0- • ; \;|en.Mat. guhse.quent s c h o l a s t i c rec-rrd. 5.27 B Be;c,ords :af f r v t . - * . ! i k •? ' T r -.t -. ,$-'v Test " ; Age : I . Q . .• 7 - L i 5 5 r . :-; — Hr.t i cnr.l i n . -• —'• * l ' I  ' 1 A P n ; — —^—^.rPA jirfiop~ T3 - ... ',• J. X—— . 1 7 : \ Aver age; i ; '.;•'/•' '• A"i"/' : 1 3 2 ir>" O c e i ] J i a : - h i n ^ Attend!ng A r t Scho.ol.. -Rating: B x l i •Name 83 B 1U-X11 '37 Birthday. Sept. 1 A919 1° years N a t i o n a l i t y of..parents; E n g l i s h S c o t t i s h  Occupation of .father ••: ' ^ i n i s t ; .;; School -Record Grade 1 i l l - i l l • IV V Y l v i i v i I : w- ix x ". XI X l l __—Aere . 8. ••.-9 10 11 12 13 14 15 : 16 17 Grades ••skipped Grades ;.r-fipea+rfid.' • ^ . p j c i s q - . - \': ; 78$ !•, 67 71; 82$ 4.8J 82$; 5.4" ) 4.88 ' - B - ":: 0 B B : A B : B C "• Gi •"a t r- i c u l a t i o n "Records !r;„?5 r! 5,41 B Subsequent, s c h o l a s t i c record. Age •;Atf. Bng.,8vS '"ifSi'-n-guage-a-.AvV. Jlaths • / • • Aver.a'ge ; 1 7 ' 69^ B 71$ . B • 70$ B /; Sen.Mat. 5,35 B $',Becords. of | n f e H i ^ D fc„t; f ' Test;.; ;.; ; Age I . Q . ; ; •.'•,;.• ;;irationai ' '10 137 • :.3 a t l d n a l I 11: ' 143 I ;•; n a t i o n a l ;' 12 •;' ; 138 ;$; ••; '• Terman B. • 18 <;..•" ' : 120 /. • .. .Terman A ; 19 '•• 120 .Avarage.; • / A 131 3.1 :0c Cirpafefn^: Drug s t o r e d e l i y e r y ••Bating-x l i i Ifame 31 .G. V - X l l 34 S a t i p n a l l t y of parents E n g l l s k Birthday June 6, 1916 8 years OeeupationoJ f a t h e r Meat packer. School Record Grade 1 11 111 i IV V VI 711 v i i : . IX X .: XI x i i Age 10 ; 11 12 15 14; 15 16 ; 17 ;/ Vflfradea s k i p ^ M -- 'Graces'< rapaa.^ed £vpr rp;q 5.76 7 • *0% ••: : b.. 2 77/ 8 . 65; .52$ •6.5% 4.E B 0.4 BO 4 v'B C B : C l l a t r I c u l a t l o n :Becords J4.45 04! Age Av. Bng.,3.3 •*e Langu ng°s• Av. , Haths:. Average Jun.Mat. 17 ] • 7 9 ^ -R . '55^ n- 67$. .04. $;.Beh.*Mat.. ; Suhsequ ent s c h o l a s t i c r e c n r r ] . , 4.69 C4 Vv. Test . Age I.Q. Wati OVTA"! 9 142 V'..: v:L WP Trripun A'.; ..•.'.'14 V ' 125 ?• .VVLV. .V V: JV'^oT^ari "R ' ' 15 127V'' * v..;- Average 1 s i -l At home for, two or three years Has "been 4aking a "business course since her, father's: deadlu -"•Ra-tin-g-3CJL 2. x x Name: 230 G n-yn 37 N a t i o n a l i t y 01* parents B c o t t i R h Oocu-oation o f father- :: ,nnn^ g/>t 0r B i r t h d a y < ^ t n • 34.; 1 Q 1 8 n . V R ^ R 'School Behnrd ' Grade- ' ----- - ... 1 '11 111 . IV V VI. V l l v i 1: ."IX X Xi: X l l :—Ass...... 9 10 11 •12 '.•13 14 15 16 17 18 19 1..: Grades ..stei^§asL___ -JivGradaS r s ^ / t R d "\ ^ r p y j . g p _ •5.0: :5.4 185;: V6.8J I 77 75$ ;4.4! 5 . 3 v . l C4 B AB C- C-f B 04 • G- . 'D . -3-ri B o . l . 0-^, M a t r i c u l a t i o n Be c or dr, 3.83 0 cruri..Mat-. :&eriiMat*i Age; 19: AT.. Eng. ;,,8 .SJ 61$ C . A T . :iiaths> : & • •S,<?i ances ; 57f:.. :o Average' * 0 Subsequent:-scholastic, r e c o r d . 4»46 0| •Be cord s; of rrt:wi i.i r e n C R « *« Test P i n t n e r Cunningham i f a t l o h a l ' W a t lohai . Terman "B'' Age 12 13 18: I.Q. 1©0 107 100 104 Oco-ippr.-; Senior- M a t r i c u l a t i o n ;•?.£. t i n g Average' C- lQ2f 

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