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Red Magic by Michel de Ghelderode : a production analysis and record Irwin, Michael John Richard Carlyon 1967

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RED MAGIC BY MICHEL DE GHELDERODE: A PRODUCTION ANALYSIS AND RECORD by MICHAEL JOHN RICHARD CARLYON IRWIN B.A., University of B r i t i s h Columbia, 1958 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS i n the Department of Theatre We accept th i s thesis as conforming to the required standard THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA A p r i l , 1967 In p r e s e n t i n g t h i s t h e s i s in p a r t i a l f u l f i l m e n t o f the r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r an advanced deg ree a t the U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a , I a g ree t h a t t h a L i b r a r y s h a l l make i t f r e e l y a v a i l a b l e f o r r e f e r e n c e and s t u d y . I f u r t h e r ag ree t h a t p e r m i s s i o n f o r e x t e n s i v e c o p y i n g o f t h i s t h e s i s f o r s c h o l a r l y p u r p o s e s may be g r a n t e d by the Head o f my Depar tment o r by h i s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s . . I t i s u n d e r s t o o d t h a t c o p y i n g o r p u b l i c a t i o n o f t h i s t h e s i s f o r f i n a n c i a l g a i n s h a l l not be a l l o w e d w i t h o u t my w r i t t e n p e r m i s s i o n , Depar tment o f T h e a t r e The U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a V a n c o u v e r 8, Canada Da te i i ABSTRACT Red Magic i s a p l a y i n t h r e e a c t s by M i c h e l de G h e l d e r o d e . As p a r t o f t h i s t h e s i s , i t was d i r e c t e d by M i c h a e l I r w i n and produced on November 2-5, 1966, a t the F r e d e r i c Wood S t u d i o T h e a t r e on t h e campus o f t h e U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h Columbia* T h i s w r i t t e n t h e s i s i s an a n a l y s i s o f the p l a y i n p r e p a r a t i o n f o r , and a r e c o r d o f t h a t p r o d u c t i o n . I t i s d i v i d e d i n t o t h r e e s e c t i o n s * The f i r s t s e c t i o n i s a d i s c u s s i o n i n essay form of t h e a u t h o r , t h e p l a y , and t h e p r o d u c t i o n . P e r t i n e n t b i o g r a p h i c a l i n f o r m a t i o n about th e a u t h o r i s f o l l o w e d by a d i s c u s s i o n o f t h e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o f h i s p l a y s as they appear i n Red Magic. The p l a y I t s e l f I s a n a l y s e d as t o p l o t , theme, d i a l o g u e , c h a r a c t e r , r e l e v e n c e t o our t i m e , p l a y w r i g h t ' s i n t e n t , t y p e o f u n i v e r s e d e p i c t e d , and f o r c e s a t work b e h i n d t h e a c t i o n . Because t h e r e a r e a v a i l a b l e no p u b l i s h e d i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s o f Red Magic, t h i s p a r t i s l i m i t e d t o t h e d i r e c t o r ' s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n . A s p e c i f i c a pproach t o t h e s t y l e o f p r o d u c t i o n and t o t h e s o l u t i o n o f problems f o l l o w s . A b i b l i o g r a p h y completes the essay s e c t i o n . The second s e c t i o n i s t h e s p e c i f i c a n a l y s i s o f t h e s c r i p t . O p p o s i t e t h e pages of s c r i p t appear a n a l y t i c a l n o t e s f o r each F r e n c h scene under th e f o l l o w i n g h e a d i n g s : P u r p o s e , A c t i o n s , Dominant Emotions, C h a r a c t e r Dominance, Mood, Rhythmic Image, Shape, S t a g i n g , D i f f i c u l t i e s , M e c h a n i c a l Problems and B e a t s . I n t h e t e x t on the f a c i n g pages a r e shown the scene d i v i s i o n s , c u t s , b l o c k i n g , b e a t d i v i s i o n s , l i g h t i n g and sound cues, and some s t a g e d i r e c t i o n s . The s c r i p t i s p r e c e d e d by i m p o r t a n t f a c t s and acknowledgements about t h e p r o d u c t i o n , a c o s t ABSTRACT (Continued) i i i breakdown, a box o f f i c e r e p o r t , and keys t o u n d e r s t a n d i n g t h e a n a l y t i c a l i n f o r m a t i o n and t h e symbols used i n t h e t e x t . Complete l i g h t i n g , sound, p r o p e r t y and costume p l o t s f o l l o w t h e s c r i p t . The t h i r d and f i n a l s e c t i o n c o n s i s t s of t h e m a t e r i a l r e c o r d o f t h e p r o d u c t i o n . Costume s k e t c h e s a r e f o l l o w e d by a r e n d e r i n g o f the s e t and photographs i n c o l o u r of the a c t u a l p r o d u c t i o n . F o l l o w i n g t h e s e a r e samples of t h e program and newspaper r e v i e w s . L a s t l y , the b l u e p r i n t s o f t h e ground p l a n and con-s t r u c t i o n drawings a r e i n c l u d e d as f o l d o u t s . S u p e r v i s o r i v TABLE OF CONTENTS Page THE AUTHOR, THE PLAY, AND THE PRODUCTION 1 An essay i n c l u d i n g : i n f o r m a t i o n about t h e a u t h o r ' s l i f e and t i m e s , t h e r e l a t i o n s h i p o f Red Magic t o h i s o t h e r p l a y s , the d i r e c t o r ' s a n a l y s i s and i n t e r p r e t a t i o n o f Red Magic. and t h e d i r e c t o r ' s a pproach t o t h e p r o d u c t i o n o f Red Magico BIBLIOGRAPHY 38 C o n t a i n i n g : de Ghelderode's p l a y s a v a i l a b l e i n E n g l i s h T r a n s l a t i o n , i m p o r t a n t a r t i c l e s and books a v a i l a b l e on de Gh e l d e r o d e , and books i n f l u e n c i n g t h e d i r e c t o r i n h i s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n . ANALYSIS OF THE SCRIPT OF RED MAGIC 2j,0 C o n t a i n i n g : a scene by scene a n a l y s i s under s p e c i f i c h e adings o p p o s i t e t h e t e x t , and o t h e r p e r t i n e n t i n f o r m a t i o n . P r o d u c t i o n F a c t s and Acknowledgements 41 C o s t Breakdown 42 Box O f f i c e R e p o r t 43 Key t o Headings Used t o D e s c r i b e t h e T e x t 44 Key t o F a c i n g Pages o f S c r i p t 46 Te x t and A n a l y s i s 49 L i g h t i n g P l o t 132 Sound P l o t 136 P r o p e r t y P l o t 138 Costume P l o t 141 V LIST OP ILLUSTRATIONS AND BLUEPRINTS Page Costume Sketches 142 Rendering of the Set 151 Photographs 152 Program 155 Reviews 157 Blueprints Poldout THE AUTHOR, THE PLAY, AND THE PRODUCTION THE AUTHOR AND HIS PLAY M i c h e l de Ghelderode was b o r n 1898 and d i e d a t s i x t y - t h r e e i n 1962. I n 1916, a f t e r a few y e a r s of e x t e n s i v e t r a v e l , he began w r i t i n g p l a y s . T w e n t y - s i x y e a r s l a t e r he wrote h i s l a s t p l a y i n 19^2. E s t i m a t e s o f h i s t o t a l o u t p u t v a r y , b u t t h e f i g u r e runs somewhere between f i f t y and one hundred p l a y s . S i x t e e n have been p u b l i s h e d i n E n g l i s h . H i s g r e a t e s t c r e a t i v e p e r i o d o c c u r r e d from about 1925 - 1935. From 1927 i n t o t h e e a r l y t h i r t i e s , he was co n n e c t e d w i t h t h e F l e m i s h P o p u l a r T h e a t r e . I t was nea r t h e end o f t h i s a s s o c i a t i o n , i n 1931, t h a t he wrote Red M a g i c . De G h e l d e r o d e 1 s n a t u r e r e q u i r e d t h a t he work a l o n e . A r e c l u s e , he became a f i g u r e wrapped i n mystery about whom a t a n g l e o f m i s c o n c e p t i o n s grew up. I n f a c t , h i s l i f e was q u i t e commonplace. He was h a p p i l y m a r r i e d and had a few c l o s e f r i e n d s . He s u f f e r e d from c h r o n i c asthma. H i s home was a c l u t t e r o f b r i c - a - b r a c v a r y i n g i n w o r t h , b u t each p i e c e was o f e m o t i o n a l s i g n i f i c a n c e t o him. P a u l i n e C h r i s t i a n i t y , w i t h i t s emphasis on s i n i n t h e w o r l d and s a l v a t i o n a f t e r d e a t h , became h i s main r e l i g i o u s i n t e r e s t . He had l i t t l e use f o r t e m p o r a l l y minded c l e r g y . De Ghelderode's f a t h e r worked i n a museum s t i m u l a t i n g i n h i s son an I n t e r e s t i n t h i n g s from t h e p a s t . From h i s p s y c h i c a l l y s e n s i t i v e mother, an i n s p i r i n g s t o r y t e l l e r , grew an i n t e r e s t i n t h e f a n t a s t i c , the u n u s u a l and t h e s u p e r n a t u r a l . The p l a y f u l , t he b i z a r r e , and the c e l e b r a n t a s p e c t s o f l i f e i n h i s c o u n t r y f a s c i n a t e d him: c a r n i v a l s , b e l l s , p u b l i c e v e n t s and d i s t u r b a n c e s , music h a l l s , e c c e n t r i c s , and r o v i n g s t r e e t c h a r a c t e r s . A s t u d e n t o f music, he f a v o u r e d t r a d i t i o n a l g e n r e s , r e j e c t i n g J a z z . The p e r i o d o f t r a n s i t i o n from g o t h i c t o r e n a i s s a n c e t i m e s i s the p e r i o d i n wh i c h many o f h i s p l a y s a r e s e t , i n c l u d i n g Red Mag i c . P a i n t e r s and e n g r a v e r s o f d i s t o r t i o n embedded i n a m a t r i x o f r e a l i t y , C a l l o t , E l - G r e c o , Bosch and B r e u g h e l , d i r e c t l y i n s p i r e d h i s unique approach t o t h e a t r e . De Ghelderode, though F l e m i s h , wrote i n F r e n c h and some of h i s p l a y s were produced a t the time of t h e i r w r i t i n g , even b e i n g t r a n s l a t e d i n t o Dutch, b u t they g e n e r a t e d l i t t l e e n t husiasm i n t h e w i d e r t h e a t r i c a l w o r l d . I n t h e 1950*s a sudden i n t e r e s t i n h i s works su r g e d up i n P a r i s . S i n c e t h e n h i s p l a y s have r e c e i v e d s t e a d y and i n c r e a s i n g l y wide p r o d u c t i o n . L i t t l e c r i t i c a l m a t e r i a l has as y e t appeared i n E n g l i s h on de Ghelderode, and v i r t u a l l y n o t h i n g on Red Magic. C e r t a i n l y no books have appeared d e a l i n g e x c l u s i v e l y w i t h h i s works, o t h e r t h a n Hauger's a n t h o l o g i e s . Samuel Draper, who spe n t some time i n c l o s e a s s o c i a t i o n w i t h de Ghelderode, became h i s s e l f -a p p o i n t e d promoter i n A m e r i c a and wrote s e v e r a l r e p e t i t i v e a r t i c l e s more i n t h e s p i r i t o f a campaign f o r h i s r e c o g n i t i o n t h a n o f d e t a c h e d c r i t i c i s m . The' Tulane Drama Review d e v o t e d one i s s u e t o him and a r t i c l e s have appeared i n a few c o l l e c t i o n s o f c r i t i c a l e s s a y s on modern t h e a t r e . M a t e r i a l o f s i g n i f i c a n c e appears i n t h e b i b l i o g r a p h y t o t h i s e s s a y . De Ghelderode's s t y l e o f t h e a t r e might be c a l l e d p o e t i c 4. e x p r e s s i o n i s m . H i s w r i t i n g i s p o e t i c i n b o t h the l i t e r a r y and t h e a t r i c a l senses o f t h e term, l i t e r a r y i n t h a t i t i s crowded w i t h images and e v o c a t i v e p h r a s e s , o f t e n h i g h l y compressed, and t h e a t r i c a l i n Cocteau's sense t h a t o b j e c t s on the s t a g e a r e ch a r g e d w i t h a s i g n i f i c a n c e beyond t h e i r n o r m a l v a l u e t o t h e p o i n t where they have a l i f e of t h e i r own. The o b j e c t s r e f l e c t t he c h a r a c t e r s and add an energy o f t h e i r own t o d i s t o r t and h e i g h t e n t h a t r e f l e c t i o n . De Ghelderode was no t a s u r r e a l i s t , b u t the movement o b v i o u s l y a f f e c t e d h i s a e s t h e t i c s . Nor was he an e x p r e s s i o n i s t , e s p e c i a l l y i n so f a r as t h a t movement was concerned w i t h s o c i a l change, b u t h i s a t t i t u d e toward t h e d i s t o r t i o n o f o b j e c t s i n l i n e w i t h t h e i r p s y c h o l o g i c a l s i g n i f i c a n c e i s e x p r e s s i o n i s t l c . I n t h e s e ways, de Ghelderode was a p r o d u c t o f h i s t i m e s . He a n t i c i p a t e d A r t a u d , however, i n i n t r o d u c i n g h e i g h t e n e d s e n s u a l i t y w h i c h , combined w i t h d i s t o r t i o n , produces a k i n d o f "Theatre of C r u e l t y " from the empathic v i o l e n c e of t h e c h a r a c t e r s ' immersion I n t h e s e n s u a l w o r l d . But t h e p a r t i c u l a r b l e n d t h a t i s de Ghelderode can n o t be seen as t h e sum o f the movements c u r r e n t o r a n t i c i p a t e d i n h i s t i m e s . H i s i n d i v i d u a l c h o i c e s o utweigh them t o make h i s t h e a t r e a h i g h l y i n d i v i d u a l b l e n d o f e l e c t i c i s r a . Bed Magic c o n t a i n s f a c e t s common t o many o f de Ghelderode's p l a y s . A s t o r y i s t o l d . De Ghelderode b e l i e v e d t h a t a n a r r a t i v e i n t e r e s t was n e c e s s a r y t o a p l a y . T h i s s t o r y i s v e r y s i m p l e and v i o l e n t ; i t i s n o t v e r y s i g n i f i c a n t i n i t s e l f , b u t s e r v e s as a framework f o r a st u d y i n c h a r a c t e r . As i n many o f •5. h i s o t h e r p l a y s , once th e s t o r y had s e r v e d i t s p u r p o s e , i t was n o t brooded over o r h i g h l y p o l i s h e d . The s t o r y ends i n v i o l e n t d e a t h , m u l t i p l e d eaths i n f a c t . Death i s a common theme f o r de Ghelderode and f o r him i t r e p r e s e n t e d b o t h a punishment and a r e l e a s e , a punishment as a J u s t payment f o r s i n and as a r e l e a s e from a s i n f u l w o r l d . The w o r l d i s Satan's p l a y g r o u n d , dangerous t o l i v e i n and u n m e r c i f u l t o i t s v i c t i m s . ° Whether man h i m s e l f makes i t so o r whether i t i s s e t up t h a t way i s n o t c l e a r , b u t b e i n g i n a s t a t e of s i n , man c e r t a i n l y does n o t escape from i t e x c e p t t h r o u g h d e a t h . S i n has a v e r y s p e c i a l meaning f o r de Ghelderode which must be made c l e a r f o r an u n d e r s t a n d i n g o f Red Magic and h i s o t h e r p l a y s . I t i s n o t i n t h e n a t u r e o f what c o n s t i t u t e s a s i n which i s u n u s u a l . E x c e s s i v e g i v i n g way t o t h e a p p e t i t e s , s e l f i s h n e s s , i n j u s t i c e , v i o l e n c e t o f e l l o w men, the u s u a l c a t a l o g u e w i l l s u f f i c e . However, t h e way s i n m a n i f e s t s i n t h e w o r l d i s an a r t i s t i c p r i n c i p l e f o r him, even i f n o t d e m o n s t r a b l e i n f a c t . The p r i n c i p l e i s m e d i e v a l i n o r i g i n , and p a r t o f t h e h e r i t a g e o f the p e r i o d chosen f o r t h i s p l a y . A p e r s o n who s i n s w i l l show the e f f e c t of t h o s e s i n s i n some p h y s i c a l d i s t o r t i o n and i n t h e d i s t o r t i o n of h i s p o s s e s s i o n s . Of c o u r s e , s i n i n t h i s sense can n o t r e f e r t o a s i n b u t o n l y t o a s t a t e o f s i n , a b e i n g out o f God's g r a c e , out of harmony w i t h a g i v e n b a l a n c e i n t h e w o r l d o f s o u l and body. Almost w i t h o u t e x c e p t i o n , t h e f a c t of b e i n g i n t h i s w o r l d produces a s t a t e of s i n w h i c h m a n i f e s t s as an i n c r e a s i n g d i s t o r t i o n w i t h age. I n some o f 6. de Ghelderode's p l a y s a s i n l e s s c h a r a c t e r s u r v i v e s , as i n t h e case o f M i s s J a i r u s , b u t i n Red Magic t h e r e i s none. The doors t o t h e a d m i s s i o n o f s i n a r e t h e senses and t h e i r a t t e n d e n t a p p e t i t e s . Through them, Satan's w o r l d g r a d u a l l y i n v a d e s a c h a r a c t e r u n t i l he i s t o t a l l y i n v o l v e d w i t h i t . He d e s i r e s t o pos s e s s e v e r y t h i n g and i s p o s s e s s e d by e v e r y t h i n g . The s t u d y i n Red Magic i s c e n t r e d a t t h e p o i n t where the f o r c e s produced by a s t a t e o f s i n overwhelm a c h a r a c t e r and d e s t r o y what remains o f h i s c o n t r o l o ver them. The g r e a t e s t r e a l i t y i n de Ghelderode's p l a y s must, t h e n , be o f t h e se n s o r y spectrum e x p r e s s e d i n s e n s u a l t erms. T h e r e f o r e , t h i s p l a y , l i k e h i s o t h e r s , i s s t e e p e d i n r i c h s i g h t s and sounds, as w e l l as s m e l l s and t a c t i l e q u a l i t i e s communicated e m p a t h i c a l l y t h r o u g h v i s i o n and h e a r i n g . A nother a s p e c t , common t o o t h e r p l a y s and i n Red Magi c, i s t h e f o r c e of the mob. Crowds appear on o r o f f s t a g e i n many o f de Ghe l d e r o d e ' s p l a y s and u s u a l l y r e p r e s e n t an i m p o r t a n t f a c t o r i n t h e outcome o f t h e p l a y s o r i n t h e power b e h i n d t h e a c t i o n . T y p i c a l l y t h i s mob i s a Nemesis agent, an i n s t r u m e n t o f t h e m o r a l system o p e r a t i v e i n t h e p l a y . Hieronymus' attempt t o pass c o u n t e r f e i t money b r i n g s t h i s a v a l a n c h e i n r e s p o n s e . They appear i n t h e name o f t h e law b u t a r e o b v i o u s l y out t o l y n c h . The law I s n o t t h a t o f j u s t i c e , b u t o f mi g h t , c l o a k e d i n r e s p e c t a b l e terms. I r o n i c a l l y , i t c a r r i e s out t h e u n i v e r s a l m o r a l i t y b e h i n d t h e p l a y w h i l e p e r p e t r a t i n g g r o s s i n j u s t i c e i n terms o f the s i t u a t i o n . More o f t h a t l a t e r . E r o t i c energy i s a n o t h e r common f a c t o r . Red Magic i s p a r t i c u l a r l y c h a r g e d w i t h s u p p r e s s e d o r newly r e l e a s e d s e x u a l energy though i t r a r e l y appears i n an o v e r t s e x u a l a c t i o n . N e v e r t h e l e s s , t h e c o n s t a n t f a c t o f o f f s t a g e c o p u l a t i o n o r a t t e m p t s a t c o p u l a t i o n , and o n s t a g e , t h e d e s i r e f o r c o p u l a -t i o n pervades t h e p l a y . T h i s energy i s t h e s t r o n g e s t s i n g l e p s y c h i c f o r c e p r e s e n t . Hunger, g r e e d and f e a r a r e v e r y s t r o n g , t o o , h u t t h i s s e x u a l energy i s m a n i f e s t i n a l l t h e major c h a r a c t e r s , even Romulus f o r a moment. I n Hieronymus i t i s c l o s e l y l i n k e d t o a v a r i c e ; the g r e a t e r h i s a v a r i c e , t h e g r e a t e r h i s s u p p r e s s e d s e x u a l d e s i r e ; s a t i s f a c t i o n o f t h e a v a r i c e r e q u i r e s immediate s a t i s f a c t i o n o f s e x u a l hunger w h i c h b u r s t s o u t . S e x u a l energy i s t h r e a t e n i n g i n i t s power; I t i s a l s o i n f e c t i o u s i n t h a t i t d i s t o r t s t he o u t e r w o r l d i n t h e eyes o f t h e p e r s o n under i t s c o n t r o l , c r e a t i n g a m a g i c a l w o r l d o f l i v e t h i n g s ; and i t i s one o f t h e p r i m a r y s o u r c e s o f energy f o r t h e performance o f magic. I n t h e s e ways i s i t s l i n k w i t h the t i t l e and t h e d e m o n i a c a l w o r l d c l e a r . A n o t h e r c h a r a c t e r i s t i c used p a r t i c u l a r l y i n Red Magic b u t common t o many o t h e r p l a y s , i s t h e s t r u c t u r a l use of l o n g s o l o speeches. To c a l l them s o l i l o q u y s and i m p l y t h a t t h e y come between a c t i v i t y , o r i n v o l v e d e c i s i o n making i n p r e p a r a t i o n f o r a c t i o n would be wrong. They c o n t a i n complete a c t i o n s i n them-s e l v e s i n t h a t the c h a r a c t e r p u r s u e s ends and succeeds o r f a i l s i n a t t a i n i n g them. I n f a c t , Hieronymus goes t h r o u g h a g r e a t number o f f e a r s w h i c h he su p p r e s s e s o r succumbs t o , and d e s i r e s w h i c h he s a t i s f i e s o r s h e l v e s o r r e p l a c e s . The s o l u t i o n s o r 8. a t t e m p t s a t s o l u t i o n s a r e u s u a l l y by means o f i m a g i n i n g s o r h a l l u c i n a t i o n s . A c l e a r p a t t e r n o f a c t i o n emerges complete i n i t s e l f . Never i s one o f t h e s e s o l o passages i n t e r r u p t e d ; they f e e l completed b e f o r e Hieronymus i s r e q u i r e d t o i n t e r -a c t w i t h o t h e r s . L i k e o v e r t u r e s , they c o u l d s t a n d a l o n e . By p r o v i d i n g a c o n c e n t r a t e d f o c u s on one c h a r a c t e r , they s e r v e c h a r a c t e r i z a t i o n r a t h e r t h a n p l o t . They a l s o s e r v e , by t h e i r p o s i t i o n a t t h e b e g i n n i n g o f t h e a c t s , t o s e t atmos-phere t h r o u g h a c t i v i t y w i t h o u t t h e c o m p l i c a t i o n o f p l o t . De Ghelderode i s v e r y f o n d of t h i s d e v i c e , perhaps p a r t l y i n s p i r e d by the cinema's a b i l i t y t o make extended c l o s e - u p s t u d i e s , because i t p r o v i d e s the k i n d o f I n t i m a t e r e v e l a t i o n he needs i n h i s s t u d i e s of s i n g l e , i s o l a t e d h e r o e s . De Ghelderode's c h a r a c t e r s a r e u s u a l l y condensed and c i r c u m s c r i b e d ; they behave w i t h g r e a t d e n s i t y of a c t i o n i n a r a t h e r narrow f i e l d . Whole a r e a s o f t h e i r l i v e s , i f we were t o ask o u r s e l v e s about them, remain unknown. However, t h e f a c t i s t h a t we do n o t need t o ask about t h e s e a r e a s u s u a l l y because t h e r e i s such a v a r i e t y and completeness p r e s e n t e d w i t h i n t h e frame of r e s t r i c t i o n . The c h a r a c t e r s a r e n o t s c h e m a t i c , b u t they a r e compressed. B u t w h i l e t h e r e a r e l a r g e a r e a s of t h e i r l i v e s about w h i c h we know n o t h i n g , t h e r e i s no h i n t t h a t we s h o u l d i n f e r u n s t a t e d depths about them. They a r e what they say and do. A l o t o f unnamed and uncon-t r o l l a b l e e n e r g i e s may be l e t l o o s e , and we may not know when the y w i l l appear, b u t they a r e a l l r e c o g n i z e d by us b o t h w i t h i n 9. t h e c h a r a c t e r and i n h i s environment. The s o u r c e s o f mystery and a p p r e h e n s i o n do n o t e x i s t i n what t h e c h a r a c t e r s o r f o r c e s a r e b u t i n when they w i l l a c t as we know they must. I n t h a t sense t h e r e i s an i n e v i t a b l e n e s s about t h e a c t i o n . Red Magic, t h r o u g h the c h a r a c t e r o f Hieronymus, p r e s e n t s a p a r t i c u l a r l y good example of t h e m e r c u r i a l n a t u r e of a c t i o n i n de Ghelderode's p l a y s . R a r e l y does a c h a r a c t e r pursue an o b j e c t i v e i n a r a t i o n a l , s t r a i g h t f o r w a r d way. The r o u t e i s u s u a l l y e i t h e r d e v i o u s , o r f u l l o f d i v e r s i o n s and h e s i t a t i o n s caused by a t r a i n of a s s o c i a t i o n s . The a c t i o n i s a s s o c i a t i v e o r i n t u i t i v e r a t h e r than l o g i c a l . The g o a l s a r e c o n s t a n t l y i n v i e w b u t f e l t f o r , n o t aimed a t . However, t h e o t h e r c h a r a c t e r s i n t h i s p l a y , e s p e c i a l l y Armador and S y b i l l a , a r e n o t so t y p i c a l of t h i s u n s t e a d i n e s s . F i n a l l y , as i n h i s o t h e r p l a y s , de Ghelderode's language i s h i s own i n s t r u m e n t of e x p r e s s i o n , n o t p a r t i c u l a r l y s u i t e d t o the uniqueness o f t h e c h a r a c t e r s . T h i s i s t o be e x p e c t e d from a p o e t i c p l a y w r i g h t . The beggar speaks w i t h the same c o n c e n t r a t e d imagery, the same u n h e s i t a t i n g c l a r i t y as does Hieronymus, Armador, o r S y b i l l a . Only the Monk b r i n g s t h e cadences o f h i s v o c a t i o n w i t h him, y e t , i t i s q u e s t i o n a b l e whether t h e purpose i s t o p r o v i d e a c h a r a c t e r i s t i c f o r t h e Monk as a p e r s o n o r t o make t h e Monk a means of c r i t i c i z i n g a g r o u p . Though t h e o n l y o b v i o u s example i n t h e p l a y , con-s i d e r i n g de Ghelderode's b i a s a g a i n s t t h e w o r l d l y c l e r g y , t h i s must be a c c e p t e d f o r what i t i s , s o c i a l c r i t i c i s m . 10. Red Magic i s a t y p i c a l i n i t s s m a l l c a s t - one r e a s o n f o r i t s s e l e c t i o n as a t h e s i s p r o d u c t i o n . As a consequence, g r e a t e r need e x i s t s t h a n i s g e n e r a l l y p r e s e n t i n o t h e r de Ghelderode p l a y s , t o see t h e complete s t o r y of each c h a r a c t e r . T h i s p l a y c o n t a i n s fewer o b v i o u s l y t h e a t r i c a l e l e m e n t s : no songs, c h o r a l d e v i c e s , masks, massive r i t u a l s o r u n u s u a l s t a g i n g e f f e c t s . THE PLAY AND ITS MEANING Red Magic i s a c h a r a c t e r s t u d y . Only about h a l f o f the scenes a r e v i t a l t o t h e p l o t . As a c h a r a c t e r s t u d y , i t c a n n o t be u n d e r s t o o d e x c e p t t h r o u g h i t s theme: man must n o t s i n , t h a t i s , l o s e c o n t a c t w i t h God; i f he does, he w i l l pay f o r t h a t s i n on e a r t h a c c o r d i n g t o the degree of i t s i n f e c t i o n . The p l a y says n o t h i n g about the l i f e a f t e r d e a t h . The p u n i s h -ment f o r s i n i s gruesome d e a t h , d i s f i g u r e m e n t , d i s c o m f o r t , and the l o s s o f c o n t r o l o v e r one's a c t i o n s , t h a t i s , l o s s of one's s o u l . The I n i t i a l l o s s o f God's g r a c e o c c u r s t h r o u g h f o r g e t t i n g about God's p r e s e n c e by immersion i n the w o r l d of t h i n g s . S a t a n c o n t r o l s t h e w o r l d u s i n g t h e d e s i r e s t o rob h i s v i c t i m s o f t h e i r s o u l s . However, u n i v e r s a l m o r a l j u s t i c e i s o p e r a t i v e i n the w o r l d so t h a t degrees o f s i n c a n be p u n i s h e d a c c o r d i n g l y . S a t a n must p l a y by t h e r u l e s o f God's game. The s i n l e s s s t a t e i s t h a t o f b e i n g i n c o n t a c t w i t h the harmony t h a t i s God's, b u t a m i l d s t a t e o f s i n i s k e e p i n g a b a l a n c e and s t a b i l i t y once caught i n t h e w o r l d o f d e s i r e s . A man whose l i f e i s f u l l o f many i n t e r e s t s , spreads out t h e d i s t o r t i o n s r e s u l t i n g from h i s 1 1 . v a r i o u s c o n t a c t s w i t h the w o r l d so t h a t he remains wholesome, a t l e a s t i n body, though h i s b a s i c d i s c o m f o r t from s i n r e m a i n s . Another way of s a y i n g t h i s i s t o say t h a t the d i s t o r t i o n s r e s u l t i n g from g i v i n g way t o t h e d e s i r e s a r e a m a t t e r o f e x p o s u r e . The man who has a b r o a d base o f d e s i r e s i s d i s t o r t e d by each a l i t t l e , whereas the man who l i m i t s h i m s e l f t o one a r e a becomes v e r y out o f b a l a n c e and i s s h a r p l y d i s t o r t e d by h i s i mmoderation. Immoderate immersion i n one a r e a i s a g r e a t e r s i n t h a n moderate immersion i n s e v e r a l . Thus th e m o r a l system o p e r a t i v e t h r o u g h the theme o f t h i s p l a y i s b o t h m e d i e v a l and C h r i s t i a n on t h e one hand and Greek on the o t h e r . More w i l l be s a i d about t h i s m o r a l system l a t e r t o j u s t i f y t h e e n d i n g o f the p l o t and t o e x p l o r e t h e degree o f r e s p o n s i b i l i t y p o s s i b l e f o r the c h a r a c t e r s . The p l a y , as a c h a r a c t e r s t u d y , d e a l s w i t h t h e d i s i n t e g r a t i o n o f a man who has s i n n e d d e e p l y . The p r o c e s s of the d i s i n t e g r a t i o n o c c u r s i n a moody, u n s t a b l e atmosphere, and i s e x p r e s s e d t h r o u g h d i g r e s s i v e , e m o t i o n a l l y o r i e n t e d , and chopped up a c t i o n s . The r e s u l t c o u l d be a t l e a s t f u z z i n e s s and a t w o r s t chaos. P l o t and d i a l o g u e h o l d t h e a c t i o n t o g e t h e r a c t i n g as s k e l e t a l members. The p l o t i s A r i s t o t e l i a n and w i l l be a n a l y s e d below. I t s e t s up a s i t u a t i o n w h i c h p u t s g r e a t s t r a i n on Hieronymus and causes h i s i n n e r t e n s i o n s t o b r i n g about h i s d e s t r u c t i o n . The d i a l o g u e i s p o e t i c i n i t s c o m p r e s s i o n and image c o n t e n t , a d d i n g t o t h e s e n s u a l and mood a s p e c t s o f t h e p l a y . However, i t I s p r o s e and as such c o n s i s t s o f c o m p l e t e , l i t e r a r y s e n t e n c e s . These r e i n f o r c e n o t t h e 12. c h a r a c t e r s ' g r o p i n g and e m o t i o n a l c o n d i t i o n , but r a t h e r t h e s t a b i l i t y o f t h e mora l u n i v e r s e , t h e p o s i t i o n o f the a u t h o r as a god. Even i n h i s most d i s t r a c t e d s t a t e , Hieronymus i s c l e a r l y a b l e t o e x p r e s s h i m s e l f i n complete s e n t e n c e s . I n summary, t h e n , t h e p l o t and d i a l o g u e a c t as s c a f f o l d i n g w h i c h keeps o r d e r i n t h e e x p r e s s i o n o f c h a r a c t e r and theme. The p l o t I s v e r y s i m p l e . A group of u n u s u a l c h a r a c t e r s , a beggar, a Monk, a c o n man, and t h e w i f e o f the v i c t i m c a r r y out a p r e a r r a n g e d p l o t t o r o b a m i s e r . H a v i n g succeeded, t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s p l o t a g a i n s t each o t h e r c a u s i n g two murders and the n e a r exposure o f t h e r e m a i n i n g c o u p l e . The m i s e r , h a v i n g t r i e d t o pass c o u n t e r f e i t c o i n i n a l l i n n o c e n c e , and h a v i n g been d r i v e n mad by h i s i n a b i l i t y t o r e c o n c i l e h i s d e l u s i o n s w i t h t h e f a c t s o f t h e w o r l d about him, i s a r r e s t e d by t h e c i t y a u t h o r i t i e s who d i s c o v e r overwhelming, i f i n c o r r e c t , e v i d e n c e t h a t he i s a l s o a murderer. He i s dragged o f f t o e x e c u t i o n . The d r a m a t i c problem h i n g e s upon whether Hieronymus w i l l d i s c o v e r t h e hoax b e i n g p l a y e d on him. The f i r s t a c t shows the c o m p l e t i o n of t h e phase o f i n f i l t r a t i o n by t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s i n t o h i s house and i s c l i m a x e d by t h e i r s u c c e s s . The a u d i e n c e senses t h a t something odd, something t h r e a t e n i n g t o Hieronymus, i s g o i n g on, b u t u n t i l t h e l a s t scene i n A c t 1, i t does n o t know p r e c i s e l y what. I t c a n p r o p e r l y a s s e s s , however, t h a t somebody i s up t o no good. I t i s i n t h i s mood o f a p p r e h e n s i o n t h a t t h e d r a m a t i c problem o p e r a t e s and p r o v i d e s suspense i n t h e f i r s t a c t . A g r e a t many q u e s t i o n s a r e r a i s e d and t h e n answered suddenly a t t h e end o f t h e a c t : Who i s t h e g h o s t ? What does 1 3 . . t h e beggar want? What i s t h e w i f e up t o ? Why does th e Monk v i s i t ? Are t h e s e f o u r p e o p l e a c t i n g s i n g l y o r i n c o n c e r t ? The whole of t h e second a c t d i r e c t l y c o n c e r n s the d r a m a t i c problem. The m i s e r b e g i n s i t by q u e s t i o n i n g what i s happening t o him. He i s k e p t i n a s t a t e of n e c e s s a r y b e l i e f i n the powers of the a l c h e m i s t by t h e r e p o r t s o f s t r a n g e b u t c o r r o b o r a t i n g e v e n t s from t h e beggar, by t h r e a t s from t h e Monk o b l i q u e l y based on Hieronymus' v u l n e r a b l e p o s i t i o n as an a c c o m p l i c e i n alchemy, by t h e e v i d e n c e o f s m a l l amounts of newly-made " g o l d " , and f i n a l l y by t h e p o s s e s s i o n o f t h e keys t o i n f i n i t e r i c h e s and I m m o r t a l i t y . Y e t , whenever he i s l e f t a l o n e , o r whenever he comes u n e x p e c t e d l y upon something w h i c h i s i n c o n g r u o u s , he b e g i n s t o q u e s t i o n . Suspense i s thus m a i n t a i n e d f o r t h e f i r s t t w o - t h i r d s of the second a c t . The l a s t t h i r d i s e n t i r e l y t a k e n up w i t h k n o c k i n g him out and r o b b i n g him. The t h i r d a c t s l i g h t l y changes th e q u a l i t y o f t h e d r a m a t i c problem. The m i s e r o n l y once comes c l o s e t o r e c o g n i z i n g what has happened t o him, b u t he does so a t t h e l o w e s t p o i n t i n h i s f o r t u n e s b e f o r e f i n a l d i s a s t e r s t r i k e s . By t h i s t i me our sympathies a r e d i v i d e d between Hieronymus and t h e young c o u p l e . Suspense r e s u l t s p r i m a r i l y from t h e i n t e r n a l q u a r r e l s o f t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s and the a p p r e h e n s i o n t h a t r e s u l t s from t h e m i s e r becoming uncon-t r o l l a b l e and t h r e a t e n i n g t o t h e i r p l a n s . The d r a m a t i c problem c o n t i n u e s r i g h t t h r o u g h the end o f t h e p l a y . The l a s t few moments show t h e m i s e r f a c e d w i t h d e a t h y e t r e f u s i n g t o b e l i e v e h i m s e l f v u l n e r a b l e . The problem has changed i t s form. I t I s no l o n g e r a q u e s t i o n o f whether he w i l l d i s c o v e r a hoax b u t whether he w i l l see t h e consequences of the e v i d e n c e s t a c k e d 14. a g a i n s t him and t h e t r u t h o f h i s own f a l l i b i l i t y . J u s t as i t i s h i s f a i l u r e t o see h i m s e l f c l e a r l y w h i c h has caused h i s f a i l u r e t o s o l v e t h e e a r l i e r form o f t h e d r a m a t i c problem, so too h e r e , he f a i l s t o see h i m s e l f , now i n s a n e , f a c i n g an a c c u s a t i o n w h i c h , w h i l e i n f a c t f a l s e , i s n e v e r t h e l e s s l o g i c a l and m o r t a l t o him. The i n c i t i n g moment o c c u r s when Romulus b e g i n s h i s p e r -s u a s i o n o f Hieronymus i n A c t 1, Scene v. T h i s moment i s q u i t e l a t e i n t h e p l a y , making a j u s t i f i c a t i o n o f some of the e a r l i e r scenes d i f f i c u l t . By t h i s t i m e the a u d i e n c e must be v e r y a n x i o u s t o know what i s g o i n g on, and y e t n o t be I r r i t a t e d a t not h a v i n g had any c l u e s . The p r e c e d i n g scenes must t h e r e f o r e be used t o r a i s e suspense by b e i n g f u l l o f p o i n t e d , e n i g m a t i c b e h a v i o u r . The c r i s i s o r moment o f d e c i s i o n f o l l o w s q u i c k l y as Hieronymus agrees t o a c c e p t Armador i n t o t h e house. The c l i m a x of t h e p l a y i s h a r d t o i s o l a t e . Because Hieronymus n e v e r has a c l e a r moment o f r e c o g n i t i o n , t h e r e i s no e m o t i o n a l r e s o l u t i o n . The p l o t i s r e s o l v e d i n t h e l a s t scene a t the moment of Hieronymus 1 a r r e s t , b u t the c l i m a x b u i l d s from t h e r e and c o i n c i d e s w i t h t h e r o a r o f t h e crowd e n g u l f i n g Hieronymus. B u t , t h i s c l i m a x i s o n l y the l a s t of a s e r i e s b e g i n n i n g w i t h the d e a t h o f Romulus and f o l l o w e d by the r e t u r n o f Hieronymus, the escape o f Armador and S y b i l l a and the d e a t h o f t h e Monk. I t i s g i v e n more w e i g h t , however, by the i n t r o d u c t i o n o f t h e powers of law and mob v i o l e n c e ..acting as Nemesis a g e n t s , by the c o m p l e t i o n of t h e c o n s p i r a c y , and by t h e moment o f 15. t r a n q u i l i t y b e f o r e the f i n a l onslaught. Even though c o n s t a n t l y expected, t h e r e Is no r e c o g n i t i o n scene. Nor i s there any r e v e r s a l ; the a c t i o n i s a l l d o w n h i l l . However, Hieronymus h i m s e l f does not experience t h i n g s t h a t way. He, i r o n i c a l l y , a l s o experiences no r e v e r s a l f o r the reason t h a t he b e l i e v e s h i s f o r t u n e to be c o n s t a n t l y r i s i n g . E m o t i o n a l l y , he experiences a d e f i n i t e h i g h and low p o i n t . His l o n g s o l o speech opening Act 111 marks h i s g r e a t e s t sense of w e l l - b e i n g , of omnipotence. He gains the freedom to a c t as he has always s e c r e t l y wanted t o . Yet, even t h i s scene has i t s dark p e r i o d s of doubt f o r him. His lowest p o i n t f o l l o w s i n Scene i i i a f t e r f l e e i n g the c i t i z e n r y . Though t h i s i s the p e r i o d of g r e a t e s t d e s p a i r , l i k e Scene i , i t i s shot through w i t h i t s o p p o s i t e , a f a i t h i n h i s omnipotence. Being v i o l e n t and extended, these two scenes are the most i n t e n s e i n the p l a y . I f the f i r s t a c t s u f f e r s from a l a c k of c l a r i t y about what i s happening around Hieronymus, the t h i r d a c t has i t s weaknesses too. C e r t a i n a m b i g u i t i e s crop up i n the p l o t a f t e r the robbery i s complete. We are suddenly informed of Romulus' t r e a c h e r y and the Monk's knowledge of i t . How d i d he f i n d out? Was he p r e v i o u s l y a p a r t y to i t ? The s c r i p t suggests t h i s but i s not c l e a r . Did Armador, knowing Romulus' nature, i n t e n d to k i l l him In any case, and a f t e r him, the Monk? I f Romulus had behaved h i m s e l f or i f the Monk had not been so keen on S y b i l l a , would the s t o r y have been d i f f e r e n t ? Because these p o i n t s are not c l e a r , the sudden deaths a t the end of the p l a y tend to be 16 . c o n f u s i n g t o t h e a u d i e n c e . A c l e a r s t a n d has t o he t a k e n on each and t h e n c l e a r l y d r a m a t i z e d . A t f i r s t g l a n c e t h e p l o t appears t o u p h o l d an u n j u s t s o l u t i o n . Hieronymus i s n o t a murderer y e t must d i e a h o r r i b l e d e a t h as one. Two o f t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s escape s c o t f r e e , and Romulus and the Monk, who w i t h i n the p l a y i t s e l f a r e t h e l e a s t Immoral, a r e murdered. E v a l u a t i n g t h e outcome i n terms o f t h e p r e v i o u s l y mentioned concept of s i n , u s i n g t h e n o t i o n o f immoral s t a t e r a t h e r t h a n I s o l a t e d immoral b e h a v i o u r , w i l l a l t e r t h e whole p i c t u r e . The p l a y s t u d i e s t h e l a s t s t a g e s of s i n i n Hieronymus whose c o n d i t i o n i s t h e wo r s t o f any shown. Hieronymus has been a m i s e r f o r many y e a r s . A t t h e b e g i n n i n g o f t h e p l a y we a r e shown t h e h a b i t u a l c o n d i t i o n o f h i s l i f e . He i s t e r r i b l y o u t o f b a l a n c e , o b s e s s e d w i t h money. E v e r y t h i n g i s - measured, even t h e immeasureable, I n terms of I t s w o r t h i n g o l d . The " u n p o s s e s s i b l e " i s thought p o s s e s s e d . D e n i a l of a l l a p p e t i t e s o t h e r t h a n a v a r i c e i s complete; he w i l l n o t e a t f o r the c o s t , keep warm f o r t h e c o s t , o r s a t i s f y h i s s e x u a l d r i v e s f o r the c o s t e i t h e r o f p r o s t i t u t e s o r o f h i s w i f e ' s v i r g i n i t y , a h i g h l y v a l u e d a s s e t . Hieronymus' s c a l e of v a l u e s i s v e r y s i m p l e . There i s a t e m p t a t i o n t o suggest t h a t h i s d e n i a l o f sex and t h e p r e s e r v a t i o n o f h i s w i f e ' s v i r g i n i t y means t h a t he p l a c e s a s p e c i a l v a l u e on sex as suc h . However, Hieronymus lumps h i s w i f e ' s v i r g i n i t y i n w i t h s e v e r a l n o n - s e x u a l and e q u a l l y a b s u r d i t e m s as b e i n g among h i s p o s s e s s i o n s . I f f o r c e d to,he would be h a r d p r e s s e d t o g i v e any of them a p r i c e i n terms o f g o l d , b u t he b e l i e v e s t h a t they can be p r i c e d even i f he does n o t 17. a c t u a l l y g i v e them an e v a l u a t i o n . Hieronymus i s i m p o t e n t , n o t as an o r g a n i c f a c t , b u t because f a c e d w i t h sex h i s sense o f l o s s exceeds h i s d e s i r e f o r g r a t i f i c a t i o n . There i s n o t h i n g t o s u ggest t h a t when f a c e d w i t h t h e bawds i n t h e t h i r d a c t , he c o u l d n o t f u n c t i o n . Because the o n l y v a l u e t h a t he c a n a t t a c h t o a n y t h i n g i s t h a t of g o l d , i n c o m p a r i s o n t o the Monk o r Romulus, he i s d i s t o r t e d beyond r e c o g n i t i o n . The Monk knows no s a c r e d v a l u e s b u t h i s t e m p o r a l l i f e i s b r o a d ; he has a l u s t f o r l i f e t h r o u g h f o o d , sex, i n t r i g u e and humour. Romulus, t o o , t h r o u g h c u n n i n g , l i v e s a f u l l l i f e , d e n y i n g h i m s e l f n o t h i n g f o r a l l t h a t he i s a beggar. S y b i l l a and Armador a r e t h e y o u n g e s t , the most v i t a l , t h e l e a s t hardened i n t o o b s e s s i o n s w i t h t h i n g s p h y s i c a l . They a r e open t o a g r e a t e r p o s s i b i l i t y o f g r a c e t h a n t h e o t h e r s . Age, o f c o u r s e , i s a f a c t o r . The newly b o r n a r e s i n l e s s , b u t a t some p o i n t become t r a p p e d by t h e w o r l d . D i s -t o r t i o n t a k e s t i m e , exposure; Armador and S y b i l l a have n o t committed themselves t o S atan's w o r l d l o n g enough t o have l o s t t h e i r f l e x i b i l i t y . I t I s o b v i o u s , however, from t h e prognos-t i c a t i o n s made by Armador about t h e i r f u t u r e l i f e t o g e t h e r , t h a t they w i l l d e g e n e r a t e i n t o t h e i r own p a t t e r n s o f d i s t o r t i o n . Looked a t t h i s way, t h e f i n a l s o l u t i o n seems j u s t . Romulus and t h e Monk, as c a n c e r s , must be removed and they b r i n g about t h e i r own d e s t r u c t i o n by o v e r r e a c h i n g t h e i r c a p a c i t y f o r c u n n i n g and g r a f t r e s p e c t i v e l y . Armador and S y b i l l a , who s t i l l have a v i t a l i t y and a p o s s i b i l i t y of s a l v a t i o n , can escape b u t a r e e f f e c t i v e l y e x i l e d . 1 8 . Hieronymus 1 d i s e a s e ( d i s - e a s e ) has g a i n e d such p r o p o r t i o n s t h a t he i s becoming a danger t o o t h e r s , f i r s t l y t o h i s w i f e , whom he i s f o r c i n g i n t o a r e s t r i c t i v e mold, and u l t i m a t e l y t o the g r e a t e r s o c i e t y . He c o n t r i b u t e s n o t h i n g e i t h e r p r o d u c t i v e l y o r p r o c r e a t l v e l y t o i t and i t i s now f a c e d w i t h c o p i n g w i t h h i s r e l e a s e d , v i o l e n t , and d e s t r u c t i v e d e s i r e s . The c o n s p i r -a t o r s a r e a l i m i t e d danger t o t h o s e n e a r e s t them, b u t Hieronymus has the p o t e n t i a l t o r u n amok. He i s t h e most d e s s i c a t e d and warped, t h e most p o t e n t i a l l y d e s t r u c t i v e and so must pay w i t h the most h o r r i b l e d e a t h , a d e a t h I n b e w i l d e r m e n t . As a r i t u a l , Hieronymus 1 d e a t h i s t h a t o f a scapegoat. W h i l e n o t m o r a l l y i n n o c e n t , he has heaped on him a punishment n o t d e s e r v e d i n terms o f human law. The e v i d e n c e a g a i n s t him i s f a l s e . The r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s o f t h e c i t y whom we see, the Monk and Romulus, and o t h e r s whom we hear about, i n d i c a t e t h a t t h e whole s o c i e t y i s I n a s t a t e o f s i n . The p e o p l e need a v i c t i m on t o whi c h t o p i l e t h e i r g u i l t s . B e i n g worse t h a n they are, they r e c o g n i z e t h e i r s t a t e i n him and i n k i l l i n g him, assuage t h e i r g u i l t . The M a g i s t r a t e r e p r e s e n t s n o t the c l e a n a i r sweeping out t h e s t e n c h o f c o r r u p t i o n , b u t merely c l e a n e r a i r f l u s h i n g out one of t h e w o r s t s o u r c e s o f i t s own p o l l u t i o n . The crowd, t h e r e f o r e , i s d r i v e n on by a demonic, d e s t r u c t i v e f o r c e , a need f o r s e l f -p r e s e r v a t i o n i n Satan's w o r l d . The laws of t h e i r c i t y a r e t h e i r e xcuse, y e t they a r e t h e i g n o r a n t i n s t r u m e n t s o f the immutable m o r a l law of God's u n i v e r s e . D i s c u s s i o n o f t h e q u e s t i o n o f s i n and i t s m a n i f e s t a t i o n s i n t h e w o r l d does n o t answer t h e q u e s t i o n of r e s p o n s i b i l i t y . 19. Are t h e c h a r a c t e r s r e s p o n s i b l e f o r t h e i r s t a t e and a c t i o n s , o r a r e they t h e pawns of the S a t a n i c f o r c e s beyond t h e i r c o n t r o l ? I n some ways t h e forms o f t h e p l a y seem t o e x p r e s s a f i x e d , permanent, r a t i o n a l u n i v e r s e i n w h i c h i t i s p o s s i b l e t o become o r i e n t e d and make d e c i s i o n s . The language i s r a t i o n a l i n form and remains a c l e a r means o f e x p r e s s i o n f o r a l l t h e c h a r a c t e r s , even I n t h e i r moments of g r e a t e s t d i s t r e s s . The form o f t h e p l a y i s c l o s e d t o t h e e x t e n t t h a t the p l o t i s u n i f i e d i n a c t i o n , t h a t the s e t t i n g i s u n i f i e d i n time and p l a c e , t h a t t h e c a s t i s s m a l l and t h a t the p a t h of each a c t i o n i s c o m p l e t e . Y e t t h e p l a y i s t h e s t u d y o f a c h a r a c t e r e n t e r i n g chaos and l o s i n g c o n t r o l ; i n d e e d , he has a l r e a d y l o s t some of i t a t the b e g i n n i n g . Many scenes a r e p r e s e n t j u s t f o r t h e i r a t m o s p h e r i c v a l u e , i m p l y i n g n ebulous f o r c e s a t work. They seem t o seep from th e o u t e r w o r l d i m p i n g i n g on t h e i n n e r w o r l d s of t h e c h a r a c t e r s , o r t o emerge from a fragment of t h e i r b e i n g and dominate t h e i r whole p e r s o n a l i t y . I f t h e s e c h a r a c t e r s a r e r e s p o n s i b l e , they must be condemned, b u t each i n h i s own way demands p i t y from us w i t h t h e p o s s i b l e e x c e p t i o n of Armador and Romulus. I f we c o u l d blame the c h a r a c t e r s f o r t h e i r c o n d i t i o n , we c o u l d n o t p i t y them i n t h e i r b e w i l d e r m e n t and s t r u g g l e . Because o f the m o r a l p h i l o s o p h y which j u s t i f i e s t h e c o n c l u s i o n o f t h e p l o t , we must assume t h a t r e s p o n s i b i l i t y does l i e i n some-measure w i t h t h e c h a r a c t e r s . F i r s t l y , they must n o t s i n . However, the c a r d s a r e s t a c k e d a g a i n s t them. The s i n l e s s s t a t e , b e i n g the f i r s t s t a t e known t o man, has n o t h i n g t o w h i c h i t c a n be compared. The s i n l e s s man i s n o t aware of t h e s t a t e o f s i n and 20. so can n o t guard h i m s e l f a g a i n s t l o s i n g i t . The e x t e r n a l w o r l d i s t h e r e and "brings an i n e v i t a b l e i n t e r e s t i n i t s e l f . Not u n t i l t r a p p e d by t h e a u t o m a t i c response of t h e d e s i r e s does the p e r s o n know t h a t he i s m i s s i n g something, i n d e e d , he merely f e e l s u n c o m f o r t a b l e and does n o t a s s o c i a t e h i s s t a t e w i t h h i s f e e l i n g s . S e c o n d l y , h a v i n g s i n n e d i n i t i a l l y , t h e r e I s a r e s p o n s i b i l i t y t o keep sane, t h a t i s t o keep a b a l a n c e d i n v o l v e m e n t W i t h t h i n g s p h y s i c a l so t h a t o t h e r s a r e n o t i n f e c t e d and so t h a t h e a l t h i s k e p t as good as p o s s i b l e . However, m o d e r a t i o n becomes i n c r e a s i n g l y d i f f i c u l t w i t h t i m e as t h e f o r c e s a t work become more and more unmanageable. The i n i t i a l l o s s o f t h e s o u l , o r c o n t a c t w i t h t h e d i v i n e s p a r k , i s f o l l o w e d by a l o s s o f t h e body as an i n t e g r a t e d , h e a l t h y mechanism. I n our age when "God i s dead", a sense o f p o s s e s s i n g a s o u l and f i x e d i d e n t i t y seems v e r y d i s t a n t . The p o s s i b i l i t y o f God's g r a c e i s n o t shown i n t h e p l a y and does n o t seem p o s s i b l e t o u s . As we, t o o , sense our i n a b i l i t y t o cope w i t h a l l the consequences of our a c t s , our i n a b i l i t y t o r e l y on t h e c o n t i n u i t y o f our i d e n t i t y so t h a t tomorrow we can b e l i e v e i n what we do t o d a y , our i n a b i l i t y t o t a k e r e s p o n s i b i l i t y and make d e c i s i o n s i n the f a c e o f t o o many unknowns, so do we i d e n t i f y w i t h t h e s e c h a r a c t e r s . The p l a y i s n e g a t i v e i n i t s statement and m e r e l y i m p l i e s a p o s i t i v e m o r a l system. We see what happens t o s i n n e r s i n v a r i o u s s t a t e s of degeneracy, b u t we a r e n o t shown the example of a s i n l e s s man. However, I f we a r e t o r e g a r d t h i s p l a y as u p h o l d i n g some p o s i t i v e v a l u e s , as I t h i n k 21. we must i n vi e w o f de Ghelderode's b e l i e f s , we have t o - . f i n d t h o s e v a l u e s i n an i n t e r p r e t a t i o n w h i c h p r e s e r v e s a f i x e d , m o r a l u n i v e r s e t o whi c h t h e i n d i v i d u a l must be o r i e n t e d . The mo r a l system w i l l c o n t i n u e . Loss of c o n t r o l and r e s p o n s i b i l i t y may o c c u r b u t the p e n a l t i e s must s t i l l be p a i d . Hieronymus' d e a t h I s a r i t u a l , t h e c l i m a x of a s e r i e s o f r i t u a l s used i n t h e p l a y . The whole use of the d o l l i s an e l a b o r a t e r i t u a l d e s i g n e d t o compensate f o r s t e r i l i t y . I t s s t a b b i n g i s a m a g i c a l a c t i n t e n d e d t o k i l l t h e f e a r s o f b e i n g watched and c o v e t e d . So, t o o , i s the r i t u a l o f ma t i n g t h e c o i n s a m a g i c a l a c t . Most o f Hieronymus' l i f e i s spent i n some way l e v e r i n g t h e s u p e r n a t u r a l t o h i s ends. T h i s i s one r e a s o n why he can so e a s i l y b e l i e v e i n Armador's m a g i c a l powers. The Monk b r i n g s a d i f f e r e n t a s p e c t o f r i t u a l i s m i n t o t h e p l a y , an a s p e c t w h i c h throws i n t o s h a r p r e l i e f Hieronymus' p e c u l i a r r e l a t i o n s h i p t o r i t u a l . The Monk performs r i t u a l as a game; i f t h e game i s u s e f u l i n g a i n i n g him h i s ends so much t h e b e t t e r , b u t any b e l i e f i n i t s power as r i t u a l i s a b s e n t . I n h i s r e l a -t i o n s h i p w i t h Hieronymus, he has a p p a r e n t l y drawn the m i s e r i n t o a j o k i n g a t t i t u d e about r i t u a l , b u t i t i s a l s o a p p a r e n t t h a t i n b e i n g b l e s s e d , i n g i v i n g i m a g i n a r y c h a r i t y , i n b e i n g r e p r i m a n d e d by the c h u r c h , Hieronymus i s touched and needs t h e s e c u r i t y g i v e n him by i t . We a r e asked t o see him l a u g h i n g a t and d e s p e r a t e l y n e e d i n g r i t u a l a t the same t i m e . The a m b i g u i t y of t h e g r o t e s q u e , i t s a b s u r d i t y and i t s p a i n -f u l n e s s , a r e the c r o s s h a i r s o f c r u e l t y i n t h i s p l a y . The more demented Hieronymus becomes, t h e more l u d i c r o u s y e t raw he i s . 22. The s e n s u a l r i g o r o u s n e s s , t h e f r i g h t f u l t a c t i l i t y of o b j e c t s , o f images, of a c t i o n s a c t u a l , r i t u a l i z e d and i m p l i e d , f o r c e an i n v o l v e m e n t i n what from a r a t i o n a l p o i n t o f view i s o f t e n r i d i c u l o u s o r extreme and, a t t i m e s , even s i l l y . The t o t a l e f f e c t o f t h e s e o p p o s i n g p o l e s i s an e x h a u s t i n g t e n s i o n , a b a t t e r i n g i n t o numbness of t h e s e n s i b i l i t i e s . T h i s c r u e l t y , i n A r t a u d ' s sense, i s the s o u r c e o f p u r g a t i o n . I t p a r t a k e s o f t h e p u r g a t i o n o f b o t h t r a g e d y and comedy, f e a r and p i t y on t h e one hand and l a u g h t e r and r e p r o v a l on t h e o t h e r . But i t a l s o p a r t a k e s o f a p u r g a t i o n o f t h e a p p e t i t e s t h r o u g h a k i n d o f nauseous v o y e u r i s m . The p l a y I s n o t p r i m a r i l y a v i s u a l e x p e r i e n c e . R a t h e r i t i s t a c t i l e . T h i s i s n o t t o say t h a t one does n o t see t h e p l a y . R a t h e r I t i s t o say t h a t t h e eye must r e c e i v e i m p r e s s i o n s w h i c h emphasize t h e t a c t i l e v a l u e s : h e a t , c o l d , roughness, smoothness, h a r d n e s s , s o f t n e s s , e t c . The whole sens o r i u m i s i n v o l v e d ; t h e eye l i n k s up w i t h the e a r , w i t h t h e memory s t i r r e d by i m a g i n a t i v e images, w i t h e m p a t h e t i c r e a c t i o n s t o t h e a c t i n g , t o produce a t o t a l b o d i l y immersion i n the w o r l d o f t h e s t a g e . The n a t u r a l sense of d i s t a n c e o f t h e eye from th e s e t must be f o u g h t a g a i n s t so t h a t the o b j e c t s a r e f e l t , the space i n t h e room i s c r o w d i n g and d u s t y and s u f f o c a t i n g . The s m e l l s a r e s t i f l i n g . M a t e r i a l s a r e grubby o r ; g l i t t e r i n g , o f f e n d i n g and h i t t i n g t h e eye r a t h e r t h a n b e i n g r e c e i v e d by i t . Sounds s u r r o u n d and pervade the s e t from o u t s i d e , and i n s i d e the s e t t h e d i a l o g u e i s c h a r g e d and e v o c a t i v e . O b j e c t s on t h e s t a g e must t h e r e f o r e have a s e n s u a l r e a l i t y e x p r e s s e d t h r o u g h t h e i r appearance b e i n g r e c o g n i z a b l e 23. n o t as a r t i f a c t s b u t as s u b s t a n c e s e x u d i n g t h e i r r e a l i t y . The shape o f t h i n g s may be e x a g g e r a t e d o r d i s t o r t e d as l o n g as t h a t change does n o t keep them from b e i n g s t i l l what they a r e : Jugs o f c l a y , beams of wood, noses o f f l e s h o r daggers of s t e e l . The m a t e r i a l must l e a k o u t . Hieronymus 1 w o r l d i s a w o r l d o f t h i n g s , v a l u a b l e i n t h e m s e l v e s , w h i c h p r e s s him, and crowd h i s l i f e . E v e r y t h i n g i s i n danger of becoming u n c o n t r o l l a b l e t o him; h i s c l u t t e r i s n e c e s s a r y and t e r r i b l e . The room i s h i s j o y and h i s t r a p , as i f he had l o c k e d h i m s e l f i n h i s own w a l k - i n s a f e . B u t , the w a l l s have h o l e s i n them, g r e a t d a r k c o r n e r s i n w h i c h l u r k u n d e f i n a b l e e n e r g i e s and m y s t e r i e s . I n t h i s sense Red Magic i s i n the same stream as Endgame or Happy Days. That i s t h e stream of modern r e a l i s m i n which t h i n g s dominate t h e s t a g e , i n w hich t h e i r l a c k of o r d e r has r e l e a s e d a t h r e a t e n i n g energy, i n w h i c h men a r e s t r i p p e d o f s i g n i f i c a n t a c t i o n m e r e l y b e i n g l e f t a c t i v i t y ; i n which,aware of i t or n o t , men a r e a l o n e . The a l i v e , r e s p o n s i v e , m a g i c a l q u a l i t y o f t h e p h y s i c a l w o r l d I s i n c r e a s e d by t h e imagery and symbolism embedded i n the d i a l o g u e . I n t h e f i r s t l i n e s , we a r e bombarded: the c o i n i n t h e s k y , t h e moon, t h e symbol o f l u n a c y , w i t h a p i e c e t a k e n out o f i t as i f i t were a c o o k i e ; the g r a v e y a r d under t h e house, symbol o f d e a t h and home of g h o s t s ; shadows i n every c o r n e r ; a c a n d l e t h a t c a n g i l d a room. To s e a r c h out and l i s t e v e r y Image would t a k e t o o l o n g . However, the a s s o c i a t i o n s o f g o l d , sex, b l o o d and magic, g i v i n g as they do t h e p l a y i t s t i t l e , d e s e r v e e x p l o r a -t i o n . The c o l o u r s r e d and g o l d were o f t e n d o n f u s e d i n a n c i e n t t i m e s , o l d g o l d b e i n g o f t e n a l l o y e d w i t h copper f o r s t r e n g t h . 24. Hieronymus* v e i n s r u n w i t h g o l d , h i s l i f e b l o o d . S y b i l l a ' s b l o o d i s used m a g i c a l l y t o make g o l d . G o l d has a magic o f i t s own t o t r a n s f o r m t h e w o r l d t o s u i t t h e owner. I t s e n e r g i e s a r e a l s o s e x u a l , c r e a t i n g as i t does i n c r e a s e d w e a l t h from i t s e l f by u s u r y ; the image of p r o p a g a t i n g g o l d seems a p p r o p r i a t e . The w i t h h o l d i n g and r e c h a n n e l l i n g o f s e x u a l a c t i v i t y has l o n g been a s s o c i a t e d w i t h m a g i c a l c u l t s . Hence Hieronymus' c h a s t i t y and t h e a l c h e m i s t s l u s t i n e s s . Magic b r i n g s t o mind d e v i l i s h e n e r g i e s w h i c h pervade the s u r r o u n d i n g s . Other images o c c u r q u i t e r e g u l a r l y . E s p e c i a l l y r e l a t i n g t o Hieronymus i s the image o f t h e s p i d e r ; Hieronymus i s i d e n t i f i e d w i t h t h a t i n s e c t by h i s own words and by S y b i l l a ' s . H i s house i s a n e t i n w h i c h he c a t c h e s t h i n g s and i n w h i c h he i s c a u g h t . I t f e e l s as i f i t were f u l l o f webs as w e l l . The a c t i o n i s i n j e c t e d w i t h t h e symbols o f t h e c h u r c h and i t s r i t u a l s , r e f e r e n c e s t o dreams and n i g h t m a r e s , t o b u r n i n g , e s p e c i a l l y b u r n i n g f l e s h , h o t l i q u i d g o l d and hot b l o o d , t o d e a t h as e x e c u t i o n , b u r i a l and decay, and t o m u t i l a t i o n s o f t h e body. Why d i d de Ghelderode, l i v i n g i n t h e t w e n t i e t h c e n t u r y , choose t o study t h e d o w n f a l l o f a man i n t h e s i x t e e n t h c e n t u r y ? I doubt i f de Ghelderode reasoned out h i s I n t e r e s t i n t h a t p e r i o d ; we know t h a t he r e g a r d e d h i s a r t as an i n s t i n c t i v e e x p r e s s i o n . What, t h e n , was he i n s t i n c t i v e l y e x p r e s s i n g about modern man t h r o u g h t h i s v e h i c l e ? When the p l a y i s p l a y e d o r r e a d , such a q u e s t i o n seems c u r i o u s l y u n n e c e s s a r y ; the p l a y demands no j u s t -i f i c a t i o n beyond I t s e x i s t e n c e as an e x p e r i e n c e . However a p o s s i b l e e x p l a n a t i o n f o l l o w s . I t does n o t p r e t e n d t o be t h e 25. f i n a l answer. The t r a n s i t i o n p e r i o d from G o t h i c t o r e n a i s s a n c e t i m e s was f u l l o f s t r e s s . M a r s h a l McLuhan, whose t h e o r i e s i n s p i r e t h i s e x p l a n a t i o n , would say t h a t t h e new p r i n t t e c h n o l o g y was so a l t e r i n g man's sen s o r y b a l a n c e t h a t he was c o n f u s e d and u n s t a b l e . He was moving out o f a p e r i o d o f a t tachment t o a r e s o n a t i n g , i c o n i c u n i v e r s e w h i c h touched him and t o w h i c h he responded w i t h a sense of p e r s o n a l magic. The p e r i o d o f breakdown had been l o n g underway by 1500. U n q u e s t i o n e d f a i t h i n an i c o n i c u n i v e r s e , had g i v e n way t o doubt by t h e end o f the t w e l f t h c e n t u r y w i t h a g r o w i n g i n t e l l e c t u a l i n q u i r y and detachment t h r o u g h s c h o l a s t i c i s m and a r i s i n g s p e c i a l i s m t h r o u g h t e c h n o l o g y . The sudden immediacy of e a r t h l y t h i n g s , newly c o g n i z e d as s e p a r a t e from th e u n i f i e d u n i v e r s e , c r e a t e d a l a c k of s e c u r i t y . Man as a s e p a r a t e c r e a t u r e , saw t h i n g s as s e p a r a t e d and, l i k e him, t h e i r e n e r g i e s were no l o n g e r c o n t r o l l a b l e by a c e n t r a l l y p l a c e d God. They behaved i n an u n s t a b l e , demonic way, t h r e a t e n i n g t o r u n amok. The c o o l d e t a c h -ment o f the p r i n t - o r i e n t e d eye had not y e t calmed t h i n g s down, r o b b i n g them o f t h e i r m a g i c a l essences and s u b s t i t u t i n g laws o f n a t u r e . The t h r e a t of and f a s c i n a t i o n w i t h t h e e e r i e , v i b r a n t , b u t s u n d e r i n g w o r l d became the prime c o n c e r n . O l d g o a l s , founded i n t h e u n i t y and seamlessness of the u n i v e r s e , were becoming i r r e l e v a n t ; w i t h t h e i r o b s o l e s c e n c e , the o l d m o r a l i t y l o s t i t s c o m p u l s i o n b u t r e t a i n e d i t s t h r e a t and g u i l t s . A n o t v e r y i n t e l l i g e n t man l i k e Hieronymus, becoming overwhelmed by a need f o r s e c u r i t y and f i n d i n g none o f r e a l s i g n i f i c a n c e i n t h e o l d forms would seek i t i n something of power and f a m i l i a r i t y , i n t h e c o m f o r t i n g , t a c t i l e s t a b i l i t y of g o l d . I t becomes an o b s e s s i o n 26. w i t h him. O t h e r s , more c l e a r - h e a d e d and l e s s p r e s s e d by g u i l t b u t n e e d i n g an o u t l e t f o r t h e i r t e n s i o n s , t u r n t o t h e b o d i l y p l e a s u r e s . Pood, d r i n k , sex and p o l i t i c a l power become, the g o a l s o f t h e s e t y p e s r e p r e s e n t e d here by t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s . The Monk has chosen a form of s e c u r i t y which has become h o l l o w . The men o f t h e w o r l d , however, have moved f u r t h e r ; Romulus and Armador a r e a f f e c t e d by t h e new age. They can change t h e i r r o l e s t o s u i t t h e i r p u r p o s e s ; they a r e s p e c i a l i s t s i n t h e con game, M a c h i a v e l l i a n men d i v i d i n g themselves up so t h a t they c a n d i v i d e up the w o r l d and conquer i t by s u i t i n g t h e i r a c t i o n s o b j e c t i v e l y t o each s i t u a t i o n . They have a p o i n t o f v i e w and a p o i n t o f c o n t r o l w h i c h swamps the t o t a l l y immersed man l i k e Hieronymus. U l t i m a t e l y , they too must c l a s h w i t h each o t h e r , as they do i n the p l a y , f o r each wants t o be u n c h a l l e n g e d i n h i s s p e c i a l t y . They have tremendous energy r e l e a s e d by t h e i r s i n g l e - m i n d e d n e s s , by t h e i r new v i e w of the w o r l d as c o o l l y m a n i p u l a b l e . They a r e f r e e from magic and i t s m e s m e r i z a t l o n , b u t can use t h e p r e t e n s e o f magic t o mesmerize o t h e r s . Hieronymus* b l i n d n e s s t o what i s o b v i o u s i s t o us u n b e l i e v a b l e , b u t when seen t h i s way, q u i t e e x p l a i n a b l e . W h i l e we may f i n d Hieronymus' b l i n d n e s s u n b e l i e v a b l e , i t has a t e r r i b l y c o m p e l l i n g r i n g . I t s t r i k e s h a r d a t our own t w e n t i e t h c e n t u r y numbness i n t h e f a c e o f an e q u a l l y overwhelming, u n c o n t r o l l a b l e u n i v e r s e . I n McLuhan's terms we a r e f a c e d w i t h e l e c t r i c media. We a r e b e i n g f o r c e d t h r o u g h our c h a n g i n g s e n s o r -ium t o c l i n g d e s p e r a t e l y t o an outmoded s e t o f b e h a v i o u r s , I d e a l s , p a t t e r n s o f t h i n k i n g , and v a l u e s , w h i l e s e n s i n g t h a t they a r e empty. Our c o o l , r a t i o n a l l y o r d e r e d w o r l d i s becoming a l i v e , chancy, u n p r e d i c t a b l e . I t a l s o t h r e a t e n s t o r u n amok. We ca n n o t comprehend i t i n i t s u n i t y . I t i s t o o m a s s i v e . Y e t our t i n k e r i n g t h r e a t e n s t o r e l e a s e consequences t o o complex t o c o n t r o l o r p r e d i c t . We t o o , a r e v u l n e r a b l e and i f a con man c o u l d some-how c o n v i n c e us t h a t t h e u n i v e r s e i s t r u l y knowable, c o n t r o l l a b l e , and b e n i g n , we would, i f n o t c a r e f u l , be drawn i n . I n s e e k i n g s o l a c e , we t o o , t u r n t o t h e immediate, the crowded w o r l d o f b e l o n g i n g s and p l e a s u r e s , and v e r y r e c e n t l y w i t h the i n c r e a s i n g s t e p up i n e l e c t r i c communications, t o t h e w o r l d o f v i o l e n c e and s e n s a t i o n a l i s m i n our i m a g i n a t i v e l i v e s , t h e b e t t e r t o c o v e r up our f e a r s o r t o f o c u s them and so purge them. I n a r t , we demand the s e n s u a l immediacy w h i c h our a u d i o - t a c t i l e age demands i n answer t o our changed sens o r i u m . We want t o be e n f o l d e d i n r i t u a l , s u r r o u nded by f e e l i n g s and sounds. T h i s i s what de Ghelderode o f f e r s , a study about a n o t h e r p e r i o d o f change, u p h e a v a l and t r i a l i n w h i c h we can see o u r s e l v e s i n an e x p r e s s i o n s u i t a b l e t o the age i n t o w h i c h we a r e moving. We have a vague sense, t o o , o f h a v i n g s i n n e d , of b e i n g out o f t o u c h ; we want t h e f e a r s of i t s p e n a l t y purged from u s . I f t h i s t h e o r y i s t e n a b l e , de G h e l d e r o d e ' s post-war a c c e p t a n c e seems s t r a n g e l y r i g h t i n v i e w of t h e e x p a n s i o n of t e l e v i s i o n w i t h i t s s t e p p e d up p r e s s u r e s upon us t o a c c e p t a u n i f i e d w o r l d . B e f o r e e n t e r i n g upon a d i s c u s s i o n o f t h e i n d i v i d u a l c h a r a c t e r s , i t might be w e l l t o draw t o g e t h e r t h e t h r e a d s o f the f o r g o i n g a n a l y s i s . The p l a y s d e a l s w i t h the c o n d i t i o n o f man, i n p a r t i c u l a r t h e c o n d i t i o n o f man i n an extreme s t a t e . I t i s s e t a g a i n s t an i m p l i e d u n i v e r s e of f i x e d m o r a l p r i n c i p l e s based on C h r i s t i a n i t y 28. i n i t s m e d i e v a l form. A p i c t u r e o f a c h a o t i c w o r l d , t h i s f i x e d r e f e r e n c e p o i n t i s h e l d i n view by r a t i o n a l d i a l o g u e , and an A r i s t o t e l i a n p l o t s t r u c t u r e . The c o n d i t i o n of s i n i s e x p r e s s e d t h r o u g h e r r a t i c a c t i o n , moodiness, an a t t a c k on t h e t o t a l s e n s o r i u m , s e n s u a l a c t i n g , and d i s t o r t i o n . The purpose o f the p l a y i s t h e r a p e u t i c as a p u r g a t i v e o f v o l u p t u o u s n e s s and and i l l u s t r a t i o n o f the consequences of s i n . No p o i n t e d r e f e r -ence i s made t o our t i m e s , b u t as an i m i t a t i o n of man's r e l a t i o n -s h i p w i t h h i m s e l f and r e a l i t y i n a time when t h i s r e l a t i o n s h i p was s i m i l a r t o our own, i t s r e l e v a n c e t o us becomes c l e a r . We know n o t h i n g about Hieronymus' background, h i s f a m i l y , the s o u r c e of h i s w e a l t h , h i s t r a d e ( i f a n y ) , h i s c l a s s , h i s e d u c a t i o n , o r h i s p o l i t i c a l i n v o l v e m e n t . We do know t h a t he. has n e v e r s l e p t w i t h h i s w i f e and we s u s p e c t t h a t he c u n n i n g l y i n v e i g l e d her i n t o m a r r y i n g him so t h a t he c o u l d posses h e r . S y b i l l a i s a t h i n g t o him, a r a t h e r d i f f i c u l t t h i n g t o c o n t r o l a t t i m e s , but v e r y v a l u a b l e . She e a t s too much, i s always c o l d , c o m p l a i n s about l a c k of sex, and has a bad temper. She has been l e s s demanding b u t more w i l f u l s i n c e the g h o s t appeared. She seems t o have a c c e p t e d t h e d o l l , a s o l u t i o n t o t h e i r c h i l d l e s s -n ess he has f o u n d p a r t i c u l a r l y s a t i s f y i n g . The f a c t t h a t she p r o b a b l y i s a bad housekeeper would i r r i t a t e h i s squearaishness. That she goes out t o o o f t e n or t h a t she spends a l o t of t i m e i n h e r room does n o t b o t h e r him. He seems t o have no a t t a c h m e n t s i n the community, though o b v i o u s l y h i s p r e s e n c e a f f e c t s p e o p l e because he i s concerned about what they w i l l t h i n k o f h i s changed c i r c u m s t a n c e s and because t h e i r r e a c t i o n t o him i s so v i o l e n t . 29. A c t u a l l y , i t i s q u i t e e x t r a o r d i n a r y how w e l l he knows the Monk and Romulus. H i s attachment to Romulus i s o b v i o u s l y p l e a s u r e a b l e . S i n c e he g i v e s Romulus n o t h i n g e x c e p t the p r o s p e c t w h i c h t h i s p l a y u n f o l d s , we may wonder i f Romulus has n o t had the c h e s t o f g o l d i n mind f o r a l o n g t i m e . N e v e r t h e l e s s they a r e v e r y easy w i t h each o t h e r and have d e v e l o p e d a p a t t e r n of b a n t e r about d a i l y t r a f f i c . C e r t a i n l y Romulus' a t t i t u d e s u p h o l d t h e m i s e r ' s and g i v e him c o m f o r t . The Monk i s o b v i o u s l y h i s c o n f e s s o r whom he h a t e s and y e t needs. To Hieronymus th e c h u r c h i s v e r y impor-t a n t , e s p e c i a l l y i n i t s m o r a l guidance^,and even though he f e e l s i n e x p l i c a b l y g u i l t y i n t h e p r e s e n c e of t h e Monk, he ca n n o t h e l p s e e i n g h i m s e l f as an i n t e n s e l y m o r a l man, p a r t i c u l a r l y so because o f h i s a b s t i n a n c e s . Hieronymus' g o a l i s t o amass w e a l t h , p r e f e r -a b l y i n g o l d . The o n l y more i m p o r t a n t g o a l , w h i c h o c c u r s t o him when he has i n f i n i t e w e a l t h , i s t o have e v e r l a s t i n g l i f e i n o r d e r t o e njoy t h a t w e a l t h . U n c o n s c i o u s l y he c r a v e s a v o l u p t u o u s l i f e , a d e s i r e c o n s c i o u s l y r e l e a s e d once the p r e s s u r e of p o v e r t y i s removed. That he i s a p u r i t a n o n l y because he b e l i e v e s b e i n g so w i l l i n c r e a s e h i s w e a l t h i s shown by t h e r a p i d i t y w i t h w h i c h he drops h i s a s t r i n g e n c y . Hieronymus, n e v e r v e r y i n t e l l i g e n t , has become s t u p i d because of h i s i n c r e a s i n g l y narrow v i e w , b u t he i s q u i t e c u n n i n g i n l i t t l e ways. He b e l i e v e s h i m s e l f t o be a g r e a t schemer. He has a g r e a t d e a l of i m a g i n a t i o n and a l a r g e c a p a c i t y f o r e c s t a c y and f e a r i n t h e s i n g l e a r e a of a c t i v i t y p e r m i t t e d i n h i s l i f e . A l o t o f h i s time i s spent f i g h t i n g t e m p t a t i o n and. he has no sense of humour t o s o f t e n h i s t e n s e s t a t e . H i s l i f e i s h a l f ' f a n t a s y ; h i s t h o u g h t s , a s e r i e s of i n t e n s e a s s o c i a t i o n s . 30. : He i s v e r y u n s t a b l e , m e r c u r i a l ; i t i s h i s c r o s s i n g of the l i n e between s a n i t y and madness, i l l u s i o n and d e l u s i o n which i s t h e s u b j e c t o f t h e p l a y . The s c r i p t i s c l e a r t h a t p h y s i c a l l y he i s q u i t e o l d and v e r y f a t . I n l i n e w i t h h i s n a t u r e , he s h o u l d be q u i c k and v i t a l , somewhat j e r k y , b e n t , g r i m , q u i c k o f eye, p r o b a b l y b a l d i n g and w e a r i n g i l l - f i t . t i n g c l o t h e s t h a t were once o f q u a l i t y b u t a r e p r o b a b l y second hand. L i t t l e a l s o can be s a i d o f S y b i l l a ' s background. A g a i n we know n o t h i n g o f h e r f a m i l y , c l a s s o r e d u c a t i o n . The b i g g e s t q u e s t i o n i s why she m a r r i e d Hieronymus. I t c o u l d have been a r r a n g e d by an o l d father,now dead, o r have been an a c t o f d e s p e r a t i o n . I t seems h a r d t o imagine t h a t i t c o u l d have been by c h o i c e . Y e t , she i s o b v i o u s l y d i s i l l u s i o n e d t h a t i t d i d n o t work o u t . At l e a s t , she wanted c h i l d r e n . E x p e r i e n c e has ta u g h t h er n o t t o buck Hieronymus too ha r d because he i s danger-ous, b u t b e i n g more i n t e l l i g e n t t h a n he, she has l e a r n e d how t o l i v e around him. He d e n i e s h er t h e o b v i o u s , however, f o o d and warmth and sex, and t h e s e she g e t s as b e s t she can. N a t u r a l l y h i g h l y sexed, h er hunger has become a c r a v i n g , b u t by f o o l i n g Hieronymus w i t h t h e i d e a t h a t a g h o s t has a r i s e n from t h e g r a v e -y a r d under t h e house, and i s h a u n t i n g i t , she has been a b l e t o s p i r i t Armador i n and out a t w i l l . S t i l l , y e a r s of r e p r e s s i o n have made h e r i n s a t i a b l e . Any o p p o r t u n i t y , even w i t h Hieronymus o r t h e Plonk, i s e x c i t i n g , a t l e a s t a t f i r s t . Her prime d r i v e i n l i f e i s t o s a t i s f y h e r b a s i c u r g e s . The p l o t t o rob Hieronymus i s t o t h i s end, because s u c c e s s w i l l s e c u r e Armador w i t h whom she has f a l l e n q u i t e r o m a n t i c a l l y i n l o v e . Armador and t h e n e a r n e s s o f s u c c e s s have made h e r b i t t e r n e s s about Hieronymus 31. t a k e an a c t i v e l y s a d i s t i c t u r n . She t e a s e s him whenever p o s s i b l e by t a l k i n g i n r i d d l e s and so g a i n i n g power o v e r him. Her b o l d n e s s a t t i m e s even f r i g h t e n s h e r , b u t i t e x c i t e s h e r more. Romulus, she t o l e r a t e s , b u t h i s i n t e r e s t i n her i s r e p u l s i v e ; he i s so d i r t y . The Monk i s good f u n , b u t he s m e l l s and one c a n have t o o much o f him i n c l o s e p r o x i m i t y . P r o b a b l y n e a r i n g t w e n t y - f i v e , she i s t h i n b u t s h a p e l y . Her eyes g l i n t from out o f d a r k s o c k e t s . Her c l o t h e s a r e shabby, b u t as r e v e a l i n g as she c a n g e t away w i t h . Romulus has a c l e a r r o l e i n the o u t s i d e w o r l d . He i s an agent f o r everyone. H i s b e g g i n g a c t s as a c o v e r f o r the more l u c r a t i v e a c t i v i t y o f s p y i n g . He i s v e r y c u n n i n g , v e r y smooth, v e r y d i r t y , o b v i o u s l y a beggar, and out f o r no one e x c e p t Romulus. Everyone b e l i e v e s he i s h i s f r i e n d . A t r u e p a r a s i t e , he c a n h a t c h a scheme b u t n o t l e a d i t . He i s p r o b a b l y the one who has f o u n d out about Hieronymus, who knows h i s weaknesses, and who c u t h i m s e l f i n t o t h e p l o t by s u g g e s t i n g i t t o Armador. He a l s o p r o b a b l y I n c l u d e d the Monk as a n e c e s s a r y a d j u n c t t o t h e scheme. H i s g o a l , t o g e t what he can when he can. P r o b a b l y a p p r o a c h i n g m i d d l e age, he i s d i r t y and d r e s s e d i n a p p r o p r i a t e r a g s . Armador knows Romulus f o r what he i s , b u t i n h i s d e s p e r a t e s t a t e f i n d s him u s e f u l . He i s t h e most c l e v e r and p e r c e p t i v e p e r s o n i n the p l a y . He c o n t r o l s every s i t u a t i o n by a l i t h e n e s s o f mind and dominance o f w i l l . He i s on the r u n and must g e t o u t o f t h e c o u n t r y , presumably because h i s shady d e a l i n g s have been d i s c o v e r e d . Romulus p r o b a b l y i n t r o d u c e d him t o S y b i l l a as a way o f g e t t i n g t o know Hieronymus, and what s t a r t e d out as a 32. r o u t i n e s e d u c t i o n f o r f i n a n c i a l g a i n , has t u r n e d i n t o a s u r p r i s i n g l y p l e a s a n t romance; i n f a c t , he c o u l d make i t p e r -manent. Her s e x u a l demands a r e e x h a u s t i n g , o f c o u r s e , b u t v e r y e x c i t i n g , and a t h i s age he s t i l l has p l e n t y o f r e g e n e r a t i v e power. Hieronymus i s r i d i c u l o u s l y easy t o con and t h e tempta-t i o n i s t o enjoy some t e a s i n g , b u t the p o s s i b l e l o s s I s too g r e a t and the dangers of h i s s i t u a t i o n t o o p r e s s i n g . He t o l e r a t e s the Monk whom he agreed t o i n c l u d e i n an e a r l i e r weak moment b e f o r e he f o u n d out how easy Hieronymus was t o d e a l w i t h . The Monk i s becoming a n u i s a n c e i n h i s demands f o r S y b i l l a as t h e p r i c e f o r s i l e n c e , b u t as l o n g as s u c c e s s i s p r o b a b l e , even t h a t p r i c e c a n be a c c e p t e d . Armador i s a debased a r i s t o c r a t , f a s t i d i o u s , p r e t e n t i o u s , c r u e l l y handsome, and f l a s h i l y d r e s s e d . He has a sense of o b j e c t i v i t y and humour about what he does. He ca n a c t q u i c k l y and s u r e l y , murder w i t h o u t a qualm, and rob w i t h z e s t . He i s the most a t t r a c t i v e o f t h e c h a r a c t e r s ; we d e s p i s e h i s a c t s b u t admire t h e i r d a r i n g and somehow a r e charmed by h i s p e r s o n a l i t y . A f t e r h i s l o v e scene w i t h S y b i l l a , we warm t o the p a i r and w h i l e a t times we may f e e l f o r Hieronymus, h i s e x c e s s e s a l i e n a t e him. The Monk s e r v e s a double r o l e I n the p l a y and so i s more complex t h a n the r e s t o f the c o n s p i r a t o r s . He i s de Ghelderode's t o o l f o r c r i t i c i s m o f the t e m p o r a l l y o r i e n t e d c l e r g y ; he speaks some l i n e s p u r e l y from t h i s p e j o r a t i v e r o l e . H i s major d r i v e i n l i f e i s t o have a good t i m e . E v e r y t h i n g t h a t he comes a c r o s s has a humorous a s p e c t . B o d i l y f u n c t i o n s a r e e s p e c i a l l y e n j o y -a b l e . E a t i n g , d r i n k i n g , and sex a r e the purpose of l i f e and a r e 33-pursued with r e l i s h . He i s perfectly secure In his r o l e as Monk even though tense as a man. While he may have abjured salvation, he has basic shelter and food and an entry into any house he desires. Romulus has long been a source of ripe s t o r i e s f o r him and the prospect of gaining p r i v i l e g e s by his presentation of a cash donation to his superiors, no questions asked, i s very tempting. Besides, S y b i l l a has long been on his mind and he often v i s i t s Hieronymus to pinch her bottom. She has been a b i t reluctant but as payment fo r assistance i n f reeing her. . . well, why not? He enjoys his power to cow others with the r i t u a l s of the church and Is a voyeurist, r e l i s h i n g t h e i r sins i n confession. Approaching middle age, active but degenerate, f l o r i d i n complexion, morally rotten and decaying ph y s i c a l l y , he i s blown up l i k e a bag and emits gas as a c h a r a c t e r i s t i c symbol of his condition. He sees i n this habit only an amusing form of power to make others squirm, p a r t i c u l a r l y the f i n i c k y Hieronymus. I f he i s f a t , very f a t and bouncy, he i s not the usual j o v i a l monk, for his mouth i s twisted and his eyes g l i n t . We l i k e him as we would a f a t frog. The Magistrate i s powerful, unyielding, and e f f i c i e n t . The Guards do th e i r job well. As a f i n a l note on character, i t i s important not to see these characters as just stock types. The j o v i a l monk, the miser, the thi n wife, the perfidious beggar, the sharp parasite spring to mind and may serve as a basis for i d e n t i f y i n g them. But, by the time t h e i r i d i o s y n c r a t i c d i s t o r t i o n s are absorbed, 34. t h e y become unique de G h e l d e r o d i a n c r e a t i o n s . An a t t e m p t t o p l a y them as s t r a i g h t t y p e s w i l l k i l l t he s p i r i t o f t h e p l a y . THE SPECIFICS OF APPROACH A l a r g e a s p e c t o f t h e a n a l y s i s of any s c r i p t must be what the d i r e c t o r sees i n i t , and t h e r e f o r e must be c a l l e d i n t e r p r e -t a t i o n . However, the manner of approach t o i t s p r o d u c t i o n , s o l u t i o n s t o problems p r e s e n t e d by the s c r i p t , and d i s t o r t i o n s o f t h e s c r i p t a r e c l e a r l y much more a m a t t e r o f c h o i c e . R a t h e r than, t r y t o f i n d some n o v e l manner of e x p r e s s i o n , t h i s d i r e c t o r has t r i e d t o be t r u e t o t h e meaning of t h e s c r i p t as i t appears t o him, and t o be as s t r a i g h t f o r w a r d as p o s s i b l e i n i t s e x e c u t i o n . The s t y l e of t h i s p r o d u c t i o n of Red Magic was d e t e r m i n e d by t h e n e c e s s i t y f o r r e a l i s m as d i s c u s s e d above. Each f a c t o r i n p r o d u c t i o n was judged by whether i t produced a s i m i l a r e x p e r i e n c e t o t h a t of l o o k i n g a t a B r e u g h e l p a i n t i n g . A t f i r s t g l a n c e , a B r e u g h e l p i c t u r e appears q u i t e s i m p l y r e a l i s t i c . On c l o s e r e x a m i n a t i o n , i t becomes a l i v e w i t h l i t t l e p o i n t s of a c t i v i t y w h i c h f i l l t h e i r a r e a s i n t h e p i c t u r e w i t h demonic l i f e . C o n t i n u e d e x a m i n a t i o n l e a d s t o a p i l i n g up o f t h e s e i m p r e s s i o n s so t h a t one i s overwhelmed and f a s c i n a t e d by t h e h o r r i b l e f o r c e s a t work g i v i n g e x p r e s s i o n t o t h e d i a b o l i c s p i r i t l e t l o o s e on the e a r t h . The p l a y b e g i n s w i t h a l l the semblance of n o r m a l c y . S t r a n g e t h i n g s a r e s a i d p e r f e c t l y n o r m a l l y ; s t r a n g e a c t i o n s o c c u r as i f they were h a b i t ; the odd i s a c c e p t e d as the n o r m al by t h e c h a r a c t e r s . F i n a l l y , the a c t i v i t y becomes i n s a n e , n i g h t m a r i s h and d r i p p i n g w i t h a s e n s u a l r e a l i t y w h i c h p r e s s e s a g a i n s t our 35. bodies. The acting style was to follow t h i s pattern, becoming larger and larger as the play progressed, but always overflowing with more Immersion i n the senses than the size of the gestures could hold. The costumes were to appear normal at f i r s t , but were to be seen to gradually r e f l e c t the inner nature of the characters a f t e r the audience had become f a m i l i a r with them. The set was to be quite normally r e a l , dingy i n atmosphere, allowing the imagination to see i n i t s dark corners, i t s twisted beams, i t s d i l a p i d a t i o n , i t s once f i n e , s o l i d construction, the r e f l e c t i o n of Hieronymus degenerating into c l u t t e r and dust and dark patches. The time scheme i s not clear i n the play. The f i r s t act c l e a r l y takes place i n the early morning before and a f t e r dawn, but the second act, beginning the day a f t e r Arinador's a r r i v a l , seems to take place over a whole day and half the night. Hieronymus mentions events which have occurred i n the night as though i t were just morning. The staging was designed to have the act begin i n late afternoon and end just before midnight. Thus the t h i r d act follows a f t e r a b r i e f pause and continues through dawn. The relationship of time passing i n action to time passing i n performance i s such that, with a c l e a r l y defined second act, the compression increases s l i g h t l y throughout the play. De Ghelderode describes the play as taking place In olden times. However, t h i s can be made more s p e c i f i c by the knowledge that his major interests centred In the early sixteenth century i n his homeland. Anachronisms are not uncommon i n de Ghelderode's 36. w r i t i n g and appear a few tim e s i n t h i s p l a y . The t e x t has many c u t s . These were made f o r s e v e r a l r e a s o n s . Hieronymus' a c t i o n s and statements a r e o f t e n r e p e a t e d o r o f t e n f i l l e d w i t h r a p i d l i t t l e d i g r e s s i o n s which i n c r e a s e t h e d a r t i n g , m e r c u r i a l e f f e c t o f h i s n a t u r e . A l r e a d y u n c l e a r i n some a r e a s , p a r t i c u l a r l y as t o d e t a i l s of p l o t , the t e x t was o f t e n s i m p l i -f i e d by removal o f some o f t h e s e r e p e t i t i o n s and d i g r e s s i o n s , enough b e i n g l e f t t o keep t h e e s s e n t i a l n a t u r e o f the a c t i o n s i n t a c t . F u r t h e r m o r e , the l o n g speeches a t t h e b e g i n n i n g o f each a c t r e q u i r e v e r y g r e a t a c t i n g s k i l l i f they a r e t o be kept i n t o t o . F o r t h e s e r e a s o n s and the time l i m i t on r e h e a r -s a l s , as much was o m i t t e d o f t h e s e speeches as c o u l d s a f e l y be c u t . Other reasons f o r t h e much l e s s e x t e n s i v e c u t t i n g o f the o t h e r p o r t i o n s of the t e x t were t o remove awkward t r a n s l a t i o n s , t o a v o i d t h e d u p l i c a t i o n i n words of what was b e i n g a c t e d when th e a c t i o n was s u f f i c i e n t , t o a s s i s t t h e a c t o r s when they c o u l d n o t d e l i v e r l i n e s a d e q u a t e l y , and t o a s s i s t t h e f o r w a r d movement o f t h e p l a y i f i t was b e i n g h e l d up. Any r e f e r e n c e s t o Hieronymus' age and b u l k were c u t f o r reaso n s g i v e n below. Two s e r i o u s problems were d e a l t w i t h , one by compromise and the o t h e r by a d d i n g some a c t i o n t o t h e p l o t i n t h e form o f mime. Hieronymus, as p l a y e d by a s t u d e n t a c t o r , would n o t have been c o n v i n c i n g padded t o a g r e a t s i z e or d e p i c t e d as v e r y o l d . T h e r e f o r e , t h e s p i d e r image was employed i n an e f f o r t t o make use of t h e a c t o r ' s l o n g l i m b s and a c t i v e movement. He was p l a y e d as an i n d e t e r m i n a t e l y aged man w i t h a y o u t h f u l body b u t w i t h the h a b i t u a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s and f i x e d ways of an o l d e r man. 37. The p u f f e d up abdomen o f t h e money s p i d e r s u g g e s t e d a d i s t o r t i o n e f f e c t e d by some p a d d i n g t o i n c r e a s e h i s t r u n k s i z e . The o t h e r problem was the f a c t t h a t what was happening i n t h e f i r s t a c t of the p l a y was v e r y u n c l e a r . Much e f f o r t had t o be p u t f o r t h t o make c l e a r who t h e gho s t was, and what t h e purpose was o f the v a r i o u s p e o p l e who came and went. The s o l u t i o n s t o t h i s p roblem appear i n the scene a n a l y s i s o f t h e p l a y w h i c h f o l l o w s . I 38. BIBLIOGRAPHY PLAYS: Ghe l d e r o d e , M i c h e l de, " E s c u r i a l " , t r a n s . A b e l , L i o n e l , i n The Modern T h e a t r e , Volume 5, ed. B e n t l e y , E r i c , New Y o r k , Doubleday Anchor Books, 1957, PP. 161-178. Ghelderode, M i c h e l de, Seven P l a y s Volume 1 & Volume 2_, t r a n s . Hauger, George, New Yo r k , H i l l and Wang, Mermaid Dramabooks, 1§64. G h e l d e r o d e , M i c h e l de, "The S t r a n g e R i d e r " , t r a n s . Horner, L u c i e T. and C l e a v e r , D a l e G., i n Chi c a g o Review. 9-: 96-108, W i n t e r 1956. REFERENCES: A b e l , l i o n e l , "Our Man I n The l6th C e n t u r y : M i c h e l de Ghelderode", i n T u l a n e Drama Review. 8:62-71, F a l l 1963. D r a p e r , Samuel, "An I n t e r v i e w With M i c h e l de Ghel d e r o d e " , i n T u l a n e Drama Review. 8: 39-50, F a l l 1963. D r a p e r , Samuel, " D i s c o v e r y of Ghel d e r o d e " , i n The Commonweal. 73: 113-H5, October 28, i960. D r a p e r , Samuel, " I n f e r n a l T h e a t r e " , i n The Commonweal. 71: 279-282, December 4, 1959. D r a p e r , Samuel, " M i c h e l de Ghel d e r o d e : I898-I962", i n The Commonweal. 76: 166-167, May 11, 1962. Draper, Samuel, " M i c h e l de Ghelderode: A P e r s o n a l Statement", i n T u l a n e Drama Review. 8:33-38, F a l l 1963* G h e l d e r o d e , M i c h e l de, "Ostend I n t e r v i e w s " , I n Seven P l a y s . Volume 1 and _2, t r a n s . Hauger, George, New Yor k , H i l l and Wang, Mermaid Dramabooks, 1964. G h e l d e r o d e , M i c h e l de, "To D i r e c t o r s and A c t o r s : L e t t e r s , 1948-1959," i n Tulane Drama Review. 9: 41-62, Summer, 1965. G i l m a n , R i c h a r d , "Ghelderode i n A m e r i c a " , i n The Commonweal. 76: 259-260, June 1, 1962. G r o s s v o g e l , D a v i d I . , 20th Century F r e n c h Drama. New Yor k , Columbia U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1958. Hauger, George, " D i s p a t c h e s From The P r i n c e Of O s t r e l a n d e " , i n T u l a n e Drama Review. 8: 24-32, F a l l 1963. H e r z , M i c h e l i n e , "Tragedy, P o e t r y and t h e B u r l e s q u e i n Ghelderode's T h e a t r e " , i n Y a l e F r e n c h S t u d i e s . 29: 92-101, Spring-Summer 1962, 39. BIBLIOGRAPHY ( c o n t i n u e d ) McLuhan, M a r s h a l l , The Gutenberg G a l a x y . T o r o n t o , U n i v e r s i t y o f T o r o n t o P r e s s , 1962. McLuhan, M a r s h a l l , U n d e r s t a n d i n g Media. New Y o r k , M c G r a w - H i l l Book Co., 1964. R i c h a r d s o n , J a c k ''Michel de Ghelderode", i n T h e a t r e A r t s . 46: 22-24, August 1962. Weiss, A u r e l i u , "The T h e a t r i c a l World o f M i c h e l de G h e l d e r o d e " , i n T u l a n e Drama Review. 8: 51-6l, P a l l 19^ 3 • W e l l w a r t h , George, " M i c h e l de Ghelderode: The T h e a t r e o f the G r o t e s q u e " , i n T u l a n e Drama Review. 8:11-23, P a l l 19^ 3• 4-0 RED MAGIC b y M i c h e l d e G h e l d e r o d e PROMPT BOOK AND S C R I P T A N A L Y S I S C H A R A C T E R S : H i e r o n y m u s S y b i l l a T h e C a v a l i e r A r m a d o r R o m u l u s The M o n k T h e M a g i s t r a t e M e n a t A r m s T h e C r o w d S c e n e - F l a n d e r s , i n d a y s o f o l d . D i r e c t e d b y : D e s i g n e d b y : M i c h a e l I r w i n P e n n y W o l v e r t o n 4 1 . PRODUCTION F A C T S AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS R e d M a g i c was p r e s e n t e d i n t h e F r e d e r i c Wood S t u d i o T h e a t r e o n t h e s o u t h - w e s t c o r n e r o f U n i v e r s i t y B o u l e v a r d a n d t h e W e s t M a l l a t 8:30 o n N o v e m b e r 2 t o 5 a n d a t 12:30 o n N o v e m b e r 3, 1966. A maximum r e h e a r s a l t i m e o f o n e m o n t h a n d n i n e t y , h o u r s was p e r m i t t e d a n d a b u d g e t o f $300.00 was s e t . T i c k e t s s o l d f o r $1.00 f o r a d u l t s a n d $.75 f o r s t u d e n t s . T h e a c t o r s v*ere a l l s t u d e n t s o r s t a f f members a t t h e U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a . T h e show was g i v e n a f i n e p h y s i c a l p r o d u c t i o n b y i t s d e s i g n e r , M r s . P e n n y W o l v e r t o n , a s t u d e n t e n r o l l e d i n T h e a t r e 405 ( D e s i g n ) t h e p r e v i o u s y e a r . T h e S c e n i c D e p a r t m e n t S t a f f a t t h e U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a m o u n t e d t h e s e t . T h e r e s t o f t h e p r o d u c t i o n s t a f f w e r e s t u d e n t s . 42. COST BREAKDOWN Scenery M a t e r i a l s Vancouver T e x t i l e s - Dacron C u r t a i n 2.57 Douglas P a i n t Co. - CBC Med. Y e l l o w , CBC Deep B l u e 9.12 P a i n t u sed from Scene Shop 19.00 2000 B r d . F t . 1x3 used from Scene Shop 15.00 S t o r e s i t e m s STORES 4121 .29 R o y a l t y Fee Samuel F r e n c h (Canada) L t d . 105.00 T i c k e t s 1 Rubber Stamp w i t h T i t l e 2 .l6 P u b l i c i t y The Ubyssey - 4 Ads - 1 c o l x 6" O c t . 28, Nov. 1, 3 & 4 4-1.60 A c t o r ' s Expense O u t - o f - p o c k e t expenses t o John J o h n s t o n 26.00 Ou t - o f - p o c k e t expense t o M i c h a e l I r w i n ( D i r e c t o r ) 44.26 FEES Donn E l l i o t t 25.00 G e l i Green (House Manager Fee) 10.00 I 300.00 T i c k e t S a l e s : $228.25 L o s s : $ 71.75 43« BOX OFFICE REPORT Date U n s o l d U n s o l d T i c k e t s S t u d e n t Benches Comps TOTAL T i c k e t s Benches Sold© T i c k e t s S o l d $1 $1 S o l d @ .75 @ .50  Wed. 17 20 19 23 0 34 $36.25 Nov.2 |19.00 #17.25 Thurs. 42 20 1 43 0 7 33 . 2 5 (Noon) I 1.00 132 . 2 5 Nov. 3 Thurs. 32 20 8 35 0 18 34 . 2 5 Nov.3 I 8.00 #26.25 F r i . 3 20 13 68 0 9 64.00 Nov.4 #13.00 #51.00 S a t . 3 17 5 72 3 13 Nov.5 $ 5.00 #54.00 #1.50 60.50 97 97 46 241 3 81 46.00 #180 .75 #1 .50 #228 .25 D e p o s i t s #228.25 44. KEY TO HEADINGS USED TO DESCRIBE THE TEXT PAGE ORDER: The n o t e s f o r t h e scene o r scenes a p p e a r i n g on a page o f s c r i p t a r e begun on the page o p p o s i t e and c o n t i n u e d on s u c c e e d i n g pages u n t i l f i n i s h e d . The o n l y e x c e p t i o n i s t h e l i s t i n g o f BEATS. The d e s c r i p t i o n o f the BEATS u s u a l l y appears on t h e page o p p o s i t e t h e i r l i s t i n g i n t h e t e x t . I f a scene b e g i n s on a page o f t e x t , t h e BEATS p r e c e d i n g the scene d i v i s i o n appear f i r s t on the page o p p o s i t e and the BEATS s u c c e e d i n g t h e scene d i v i s i o n appear a t t h e end o f t h e n o t e s . THE PURPOSE OF THE HEADINGS: PURPOSE - T h i s h e a d i n g i s d e s i g n e d t o e x p l a i n t h e r e a s o n f o r the scene's e x i s t e n c e i n terms o f p l o t , c h a r a c t e r development, theme, o r suspense. ACTIONS - Each c h a r a c t e r i n t h e scene i s l i s t e d w i t h th e a c t i o n he pu r s u e s throughout t h e scene. The i n f i n i t i v e f o r m u l a i s used: " t o " p l u s v e r b and c l a r i f y i n g p h r a s e s . A t a l l t i m e s an attempt i s made t o employ e v o c a t i v e v e r b s c o n t a i n i n g t h e p s y c h o l o g i c a l m o t i v a t i o n f o r t h e a c t i o n . DOMINANT EMOTIONS - Each c h a r a c t e r i n t h e scene has l i s t e d the i m p o r t a n t emotions o r c o m b i n a t i o n o f emotions he e x p e r i e n c e s i n t h e scene. CHARACTER DOMINANCE - The c h a r a c t e r who dominates the o t h e r s , r a t h e r t h a n t h e most i m p o r t a n t c h a r a c t e r t o t h e au d i e n c e i s mentioned h e r e . Any change i n dominance i s a l s o r e f e r r e d t o . T h i s h e a d i n g i s o m i t t e d i n scenes w i t h o n l y one c h a r a c t e r . MOOD - An at t e m p t has been made t o a v o i d d e s c r i b i n g mood i n terms r e f e r r i n g t o t h e c h a r a c t e r s ' emotions or i n terms of shape. Words d e s c r i b i n g t h e atmosphere on s t a g e as f e l t by the a u d i e n c e i s t h e aim. RHYTHMIC IMAGE - Images drawn from f i r e a r e used t h r o u g h o u t t o evoke t h e p s y c h i c and p h y s i c a l movement of t h e a c t i o n . SHAPE - Changes i n tempo, t e n s i o n s , r h y t h m i c p a t t e r n s , volumes and e m o t i o n a l s i z e s a r e l i n k e d t o t h e c h a n g i n g a c t i o n s . 4-5. KEY TO HEADINGS USED TO DESCRIBE THE TEXT ( c o n t i n u e d ) STAGING - The r a t i o n a l e b e h i n d the movement i s e x p l a i n e d . -DIFFICULTIES - D i f f i c u l t i e s p r e s e n t e d by t h e t e x t o r by t h e s e t a r e d i s c u s s e d . MECHANICAL DIFFICULTIES - When used, t h i s h e a d i n g i s l i m i t e d t o a d i s c u s s i o n o f p a r t i c u l a r t e c h n i c a l p r oblems. BEATS - Be a t s r e p r e s e n t t h e breakdown o f a c t i o n i n t o manageable u n i t s . Each b e a t can b e f u r t h e r b r o k e n down i n t o t a s k s w h i c h r e v e a l every a c t i o n i n minute d e t a i l b u t t h i s has n o t been done i n t h i s prompt book. Each b e a t c o n t a i n s a TITLE, an attempt t o summarize the a c t i o n i n a s l o g a n . Each b e a t c o n t a i n s t h e h e a d i n g , ACTIONS, under w h i c h i s l i s t e d t he a c t i o n each c h a r a c t e r p ursues d u r i n g t h e b e a t . These a c t i o n s do n o t c o n t r a d i c t t h e a c t i o n s l i s t e d above b u t r e p r e s e n t a more s p e c i f i c breakdown. B e a t s o f t e n c o n t a i n a NOTE under which a r e l i s t e d p a r t i c u l a r problems e n c o u n t e r e d i n t h e b e a t n o t mentioned e l s e w h e r e . W h i l e t h e r e a r e many p a r a l l e l d e s c r i p t i o n s i n t h e s e h e a d i n g s , an a t t e m p t has been made t o a v o i d d u p l i c a t i o n o f any i n f o r -m a t i o n , though, of c o u r s e , t h e same i n c i d e n t i s o f t e n r e f e r r e d t o from s e v e r a l p o i n t s o f v i e w . Facing page 46 KEY TO FACING PAGES OF SCRIPT - DIAGRAM 46. KEY TO FACING PAGES OJ? SCRIPT On each f a c i n g page: o f s c r i p t a r e n o t e d the f o l l o w i n g : Scene d i v i s i o n s i n heavy b l a c k l i n e s e x t e n d i n g t o l e f t m a r g i n , Scene number i n t h e a c t i n s m a l l Roman n u m e r a l s , B e a t d i v i s i o n s i n t h i n b l a c k l i n e s , B e at numbers i n t h e scene i n A r a b i c n u m e r a l s , C u t s i n l i n e s and d i r e c t i o n s i n heavy b l a c k l i n e s , A l t e r a t i o n s i n words w h i c h a r e p r i n t e d i n , A l t e r a t i o n s i n d i r e c t i o n s w h i c h a r e p r i n t e d i n and e n c l o s e d w i t h b r a c k e t s , A l t e r a t i o n s i n word o r d e r w h i c h a r e i n d i c a t e d by b r a c k e t s around the p h r a s e i n q u e s t i o n w i t h arrows l e a d i n g t o t h e p l a c e s o f i n s e r t i o n , A l t e r a t i o n s i n the placement o f d i r e c t i o n s w h i c h a r e i n d i c a t e d i n a l i k e manner, Movement i s i n d i c a t e d by symbols o r g a n i z e d as shown i n t h e diagrams o p p o s i t e t h i s page: DIAGRAM A - The r e p e a t e d stamp used b e s i d e t h e s c r i p t i s a m i n i a t u r e o f t h e ground p l a n (see f o l d out b l u e p r i n t s ) . 1 Door t o s t r e e t 2 Window s h u t t e r s 3 Window casements 4 Door t o c e l l a r 5 L i n e m a r k i n g t h e edge of s i x - I n c h p l a t f o r m 6 S t a i r l a n d i n g 7 A r c h t o s t a i r case l e a d i n g u p s t a i r s 8 Hob o f f i r e p l a c e 9 F i r e p l a c e NOTES: F o r o t h e r symbols on the stamp, see PROPERTY PLOT. DIAGRAMS B - Symbols used t o i n d i c a t e movement and g e s t u r e B l . C i r c l e - i n d i c a t e s a p o s i t i o n from w h i c h a move o r i g i n a t e s o r a t w h i c h i t ends. The pause s e p a r a t i n g t h e end o f one movement and the b e g i n n i n g o f t h e n e x t may be v e r y s h o r t . B2. C i r c l e w i t h L e t t e r - i n d i c a t e s the o r d e r I n w h i c h movements o c c u r . L e t t e r s appear a l p h a b e t i c a l l y . A p l a i n c i r c l e w i t h o u t a l e t t e r i n d i c a t e s t h e p o s i t i o n o f the c h a r a c t e r a t the t e r m i n a t i o n o f t h e 4-7. KEY TO FACING PAGES OF SCRIPT (continued) DIAGRAMS (continued) B 2 . l a s t move i n d i c a t e d on the pr e v i o u s ground p l a n (see DIAGRAM Ca). Each l e t t e r on the ground p l a n r e f e r s to a l e t t e r i n the s c r i p t . Thus one l e t t e r i n the s c r i p t may r e f e r to s e v e r a l i n the ground p l a n i f s e v e r a l c h a r a c t e r s move a t once (see DIAGRAM Cb-b). O c c a s i o n a l l y , a c h a r a c t e r w i l l r e t u r n to a pre v i o u s p o s i t i o n and i f c o n f u s i o n w i l l not r e s u l t , the o r i g i n a l c i r c l e and l e t t e r of t h a t p o s i t i o n i s repeated i n the s c r i p t and a double path of movement i n d i c a t e d on the ground p l a n (see DIAGRAM C c ) . B3. C i r c l e w i t h Arrow - i n d i c a t e s a g e s t u r e which i s u s u a l l y e x p l a i n e d i n the s c r i p t o r on the ground p l a n or i s s e l f e x p l a n a t o r y . B4. C i r c l e w i t h P o i n t - i n d i c a t e s the d i r e c t i o n o f the c h a r a c t e r s trunk i f important. G e n e r a l l y , t h i s i s l e f t out, i n which case the trunk d i r e c t i o n i s e i t h e r obvious or f a c e s i n some measure toward the audience. O c c a s i o n a l l y , t h i s symbol i n d i c a t e s trunk p o s i t i o n In the course of a move (see DIAGRAM Cd). B5. Dot i n Text - i n d i c a t e s the s t a r t of a move which ends wi t h a l e t t e r . Sometimes two c h a r a c t e r s b e g i n to move simultaneously but stop a t d i f f e r e n t times i n which case one dot w i l l be f o l l o w e d by two l e t t e r s . Or a move may be begun by one character, and f o l l o w e d by another b e f o r e the f i r s t has stopped i n which case two dots f o l l o w one another to be f o l l o w e d by one or two l e t t e r s depending upon whether the moves end simultaneously or not. The t e x t makes c l e a r which c h a r a c t e r moves f i r s t . O c c a s i o n a l l y a l e t t e r appears w i t h no dot accompanying i t i n which case a ge s t u r e or change i n trunk p o s i t i o n appears on the ground p l a n . B 6 . M u s i c a l Pause Symbol - i n d i c a t e s a pause i n e i t h e r the s c r i p t or the ground p l a n s , B 7 . S o l i d L i n e J o i n i n g C i r c l e s - i n d i c a t e s the path of movement f o l l o w e d by Hieronymus, B8. Dashed L i n e - i n d i c a t e s the Monk's path, B9. Dotted L i n e - i n d i c a t e s Armador's path, 48. KEY TO FACING PAGES OF SCRIPT ( c o n t i n u e d ) DIAGRAMS ( c o n t i n u e d ) BIO. Dot-Dash L i n e - i n d i c a t e s S y b i l l a ' s p a t h , B l l . Dot-Dot-Dash L i n e - i n d i c a t e s Romulus' p a t h , B12. S c a l l o p e d L i n e - i n d i c a t e s t h e M a g i s t r a t e ' s p a t h , B13. L i n e of C r o s s e s - i n d i c a t e s the Guards' paths.. NOTES: O c c a s i o n a l l y o t h e r symbols a r e used b u t t h e y a r e e x p l a i n e d as used o r a r e c l e a r w i t h o u t e x p l a n a t i o n . I f a move begun on one page c o n t i n u e s on t o t h e n e x t , t h e p a t h of movement i s shown l e a d i n g from o r t o a c i r c l e (see DIAGRAM C e ) . I f a c h a r a c t e r must make a g e s t u r e i n o r d e r t o move, th e g e s t u r e i s n o t mentioned; f o r i n s t a n c e , i f he must s t a n d up i n o r d e r t o move. Facing page 49 Lighting' Cues: LQ - 1 ; LQ - 2 : scene i RED MAGIC * ACT ONE SCENE—A chamjic^jn^he olden style. Door and window,; left. Low door, ft^kimifrhli •farther to the right, a staircase '•• leading to the upper floor. Table. Chairs. Great metal-'' bound chest. It is the. end of the night. HIERONYMUS oucovowiiiw*^ ***, a candle m4m4*m$do*< v» rnw-e. 1 .'HJEROIS'YMUS.' The constellations fill, the sky. Who owns L Q-3 (all these .stars? I .swear they burn away in sheer waste. Audi •the moon .is missing. It lias been stolen. When it comes I •back, it will have had a piece taken out of it. What a huge) might, full of shadows, .8. . Shadows, are not worth j jiriuch. , , . And a few will o' the wisps—fof my house; islands on art old burial ground that no one wanted. . c . .{ I^Wn*4»H»gi»»*j I own this ground and all that its depths con-• 'tain. Bones of vanished men. Who has their souls? God! ;or the devil? They arc not worth much, souls. ? . . 'jwwgM>i>ifa.J»».i>ig.i&ij There arc treasures in here—copper,! silver, jewels, relics. But it would mean dkains-r-not with' :jnv hands, witn a &^&*t. Must. I buy a ,-i  Awe! 1 ^ *®®&Q<e*tP&&^tif*e*e^ i^ w)M<w«»wiHfe.ii • fw***J[ Emptiness,' everywhere!*1 AiWk«j jfo«g»»tfrnth*. What can I do with it? . . It is only at night that each thing' {takes on its full value. I am double at night?B**l*»*»ti*#« • \immimt I sleep on my feet. I act, I think, I look, and make; use of my time. I steal time, so that I shall have lived mofet 4 9 . ACT 1. SCENE 1 - HIERONYMUS PURPOSE: to e s t a b l i s h what becomes t h e i s s u e , t h e d r i v i n g f o r c e o f t h e p l a y , t h e d e l u s i o n s , s t r a n g e mind of Hieronymus, h i s v a l u i n g e v e r y t h i n g i n terms o f i t s w e a l t h ; h i s s e e i n g g o l d as m a g i c a l and s e x u a l ; h i s v i e w o f h i m s e l f as sane and v i r t u o u s ; h i s f e a r o f s i n t o e s t a b l i s h t h e mood of t h e p l a y t o e s t a b l i s h some e x p o s i t i o n : Hieronymus' environment o f p o v e r t y , h i s e x a c t w e a l t h , h i s r e l i g i o n , t h e t ime and p l a c e . ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o s e c u r e h i m s e l f i n an i n s e c u r e w o r l d . DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Hieronymus - f e a r o f n o t h a v i n g enough, s u p p r e s s e d by a s a t i s f a c t i o n and s e n s u a l j o y i n h i s p o s s e s s i o n s , e s p e c i a l l y the g o l d t h e n , f e a r of s i n s u p p r e s s e d by a s a t i s f a c t i o n a t h i s v i r t u o u s n e s s i n a d e g e n e r a t i n g environment. MOOD: The m y s t e r i o u s i s evoked by shadows, dimness, f l i c k e r i n g f l a m e , odd sounds. The demonic i s evoked by g r o t e s q u e t h o u g h t s and a c t i o n s , s m a l l b r i g h t i r r e g u l a r p a t c h e s o f c o l o u r , a misshapen body, s e x u a l magic, r e f e r e n c e s t o s i n , d e a t h , t h e d e v i l , w i t c h e s and d e p r i v a t i o n . A l l t h i s i s t i n g e d w i t h t h e humour o f i n c o n g r u i t y o v e r l a i d w i t h t h e r e p u l s i v e . SHAPE: The scene b e g i n s q u i e t l y , w i t h l i t t l e eager o u t b u r s t s . From t h e e a t i n g on, each b e a t s w e l l s and s u b s i d e s as a d e s i r e i s k i n d l e d and s a t i s f i e d , b u i l d i n g t o t h e b i g g e s t p o i n t as Hieronymus r e v e l s i n h i s c o i n s . A sudden pause f o l l o w s h i s slamming shut th e c h e s t . The l a s t b e a t b e g i n s w i t h a q u i e t , t e n s e f e a r r e l e a s e d t h r o u g h s m a l l e x p l o s i o n s o f s e l f - r i g h t e o u s n e s s , and ends q u i e t and r e l a x e d . The g e n e r a l shape i s from repose t o r e p o s e t h r o u g h i n c r e a s i n g b u i l d s , w hich change i n c h a r a c t e r . 50. S T A G I N G : T h e movement I s l a r g e l y d e t e r m i n e d b y t h e p o s i t i o n o f t h e p r o p s : t h e w i n d o w , t h e d i s h e s , t h e c a n d l e f o r r e a d i n g , t h e i t e m s r e f e r r e d t o i n t h e i n v e n t o r y , t h e c h e s t a n d t h e t a b l e f o r w r i t i n g . T h e a c t i v i t y i s g e a r e d t o t h e s h a p e : i n c r e a s -i n g l y f l u i d movement i n t h e s w e l l s o f p l e a s u r e a b l e e m o t i o n , d e c r e a s i n g s i z e o f movemen t i n t o s h o r t , s h a r p g e s t u r e s i n t i m e s o f f e a r . T h e c a n d l e i s o n t h e t a b l e w h i c h b e c o m e s t h e f o c u s o f a t t e n t i o n , t h o u g h t h e c h e s t i s a s t r o n g s e c o n d -a r y f o c u s . D I F F I C U L T I E S : T h e a b r u p t b e g i n n i n g w i t h a w k w a r d p h r a s e s i s h a r d t o a c t . T h e a c t o r m u s t b e a b l e t o s u s t a i n a l o n g s o l i l o q u y w i t h v a r i e t y . T h e s e n s u a l i n t e n s i t y m u s t come o n s t r o n g l y a n d y e t n o t s t e a l t h e t h u n d e r f r o m t h e r e s t o f t h e p l a y . T h e g r o t e s q u e c a n e a s i l y l o s e i t s p a l n f u l n e s s u n l e s s a t t h i s s t a g e i t i s u n d e r p l a y e d b y s e e m i n g v e r y n o r m a l . M E C H A N I C A L D I F F I C U L T I E S : T h e c h e s t m u s t b e e m p t y y e t c o n t a i n a d e v i c e w h i c h w h e n r a t t l e d w i l l make a n o i s e l i k e a p i l e o f c o i n s . B E A T S : 1. T I T L E : S e a r c h i n g t h e N i g h t . A C T I O N : H i e r o n y m u s - t o g r a s p t h e w o r t h o f t h i n g s i n t h e n i g h t . Facing page 51 MICHEL DE GHELDERODE [ACT I I 4 waking hours than those people who sink themselves _h u^seless siccp.afSi*Mvi^|oro'ifeW>fo he ptcfa up a jug 5;w jm.. - "P d /«« aruf goes through ilia motions of filling a $*m.\ This jug t$' jempty. Fill the §M&. [He drinks.} I am hungry. This' Imorscl will do me. {He pretends to take something from " • : " " -l: ,mus? Do you maintain there was nothing in your :nothing on this dish? Cornel Since you are no longer audtancc. 'the candle lights him up clearly.} Shine on me, .little flame, and let me profit from your warm light. Creep j into the corners and gild my room, so that I am in the I center of a golden cube. I»«<4W(}4«*3«&«H^^ _ [He . opens an account /woft.jcThis book of yellow parchment contains the inventory of my possessions. I must go ' through it again. Hieronymus, healthy in mind and body,. • owns, by virtue of the just laws, a gabled house, with its : garden, well, lawn, trees, the birds that live in the trees,, land the air and the windsthat circulate around and within j ithe said, property. There is the watchdog, that costs little; !. tp »w "* i f own a \?1 a*»-gwm» He feeds himself by gnawing his cjjain.j wife and her clothing, and, furthermore, utensils! !and furniture. All of this, counting the wife and the dog,. ;is worth a thousand royal florins. ... I was forgetting! : that I own a ghost which is domiciled here and which Ij |bought with the house. It doesn't eat or wear anything] lout, yet it: makes itself useful, for its presence keeps awayj ; people with evil designs. What would a ghost be worth?? I, *?. 'Kk^»k^«i^t"Wg5»^otolwi«»i». [Lowering his voice.] • '-. And I own a bronze chest with cunning locks that con-? i tains four columns of ten florin pieces bearing the image! i of the emperor, and four of the same with the image of! : the empress, all arranged in battle order. .*} . [He muses.]!• [These golden columns don't produce anything—nothing' I except the enchantment of my senses, for as well as look-; Ling at the gold, I touch it, I listen to it. 1 sniff it and I lick'  s itffifat there is no interest. Should I entrust it to a banker' : &&»*»MsStoi^? Rather fling it straight, away lateMt-b |<ptt* [He muses.] j8*>«fr -'gold has magic properties^Listcn, 51 ACT 1 SCENE 1 - BEATS 2 . TITLE: E a t i n g . ACTION: Hieronymus - t o s a t i s f y a gnawing hunger w i t h o u t w a s t i n g f o o d . NOTE: S e n s u a l i n v o l v e m e n t must be s t r o n g l y p l a y e d * 3. TITLE: G i l d i n g h i s Wo r l d . ACTION: Hieronymus - t o s u r r e n d e r t o t h e metaphor t h a t t h e g o l d l i g h t i n a c a n d l e f l a m e c a n make a g o l d w o r l d . NOTE: T h i s b e a t i s v e r y s u b j e c t i v e , a l m o s t an o r g a s m i c , h a l l u c i n a t o r y t r a n c e a c t i n g as a s p r i n g b o a r d i n t o t h e n e x t b e a t . 4. TITLE: T a k i n g S t o c k . ACTION: Hieronymus - t o s u f f u s e h i m s e l f w i t h h i s p o s s e s s i o n s . NOTE: T h i s i s an h a b i t u a l a c t i o n ; t h e l i s t i s known by h e a r t . The f i r s t p a r t i s s a i d by r o t e b u t has t h e e f f e c t o f an i n c a n t a t i o n w h i c h c u l m i n a t e s i n an atte m p t t o u n i t e p h y s i c a l l y w i t h t h e g o l d t h r o u g h d i r e c t s e n s o r y c o n t a c t . 5. TITLE: S e x i n g G o l d . ACTION: Hieronymus - t o c o n j u r e t h e c o i n s i n t o p r o p a g a t i n g . NOTE: The s e x u a l a c t o f t h e c o i n s i s a s u b s t i t u t e f o r Hieronymus' l a c k o f sex l i f e . T h e r e f o r e , t h e a c t i o n must make us f e e l t h a t he i s i n d u l g i n g i n a sex a c t , an a c t suddenly s h a t t e r e d by t h e sounds o f a r e a l orgasm o f f - s t a g e . T h i s b e a t i s t h e peak o f s e n s u a l i t y i n t h i s scene; he n e a r l y swoons. Facing page 52 : R E D MAGIC s' Hieronymus j You have male florins bearing the head, of the emperor, and female florins with a woman's head.. There is a sovereign law in the universe that requires that nil that is male and all that is female attract each other, unite and reproduce. It is the Creator's will! [Ua-nttm4$i] Tonight I shall mingle the male and female coins. My chest will be a bower of love. Afterward, I shall find young ones, ncwlv bom golden florins that will grow up like their parents. I shall many them. [He ^ s^^mhis chest, lie knack and, making a great noise, mixes the coins to-gether] Make love! join together your golden bodies, your golden dcsiresl Let gold bring forth gold! Imperial !heads, let your haughty lips touch, open, and grow moist! :Link together, tongues of gold! l.<jfaali.in>'fe»aT>ake»0'Jwle-wi iwnl'"Ohi'irih>i|frh. Conceive! Female coins, become so great that you almost burst! It. is blessed, it is just, that, your grand race should perpctuaj^ Jto {•ion of the\\Nor\di\J^ 6 an aYiimat is heard from d^ ove.^ HiEKONYMUs stands ut> Sound and shuts the chest savagely, fl hcardxSSomconc moaisea. Cues: ' Is it the gold alreatfy? Is it the gold enjoying sensual de-<;o t tight? . . . For it was like a sensual cry. [He listens.} No. w It is the ghost dreaming in the wall. He is dreaming of the past when lie had flesh and bones. Awl - who Jwows •»wJ»'>tow<M»7 [He comes back .m&SUfh-at the table] Vffiiata,, , fine piece of work I have' just doxieljDisturbed.} But is ~"' 7 Tfns~g7)oTlI^ ^ Is there not perhaps witchcraft : behind it? I clon't want to forgo my salvation. No, the devil shall not have my soul. I am the owner of my soul, and such 1 shall remain! [Troubled.) That is something I had forgotten in the inventory." [He writes.) Item, one im-mortal soul, ornamented with divers virtues' No, I am not deluding myself. I am chaste, abstemious, diligent, without anger, without vanity, without envy. Six deadly sins that I have nothing to do with. The seventh? . . . I am thrifty. [Pleased wi'th himself.] Thriftyl . . ; They call me a miser? Because I am the opposite of a prodigal? If I were .a miser, would you find me joyful and given to laughter, LQ - 4 as I am by nature? . . . A4j®WftUr^ s®y»!«4«>4g*M •m*&& Pahl Ncverl Neither in paintings, nor in religious; 52. ACT 1 SCENE 1 - BEATS 6. TITLE: S q u a r i n g F a c t s w i t h Fancy ACTION: Hieronymus - t o e x p l a i n t h e moan NOTE: The i r o n y i s t h a t t h e "ghost" i s Armador and he has i n d e e d c a u sed t h e moan from S y b i l l a . 7. T i t l e : Gnawing Doubts ACTION: Hieronymus - t o r e s t o r e t h e shaken image o f him-s e l f . NOTE: The b e a t b e g i n s w i t h sudden f e a r and ends w i t h g r e a t s e l f - s a t i s f a c t i o n and calm i n p r e p a r a t i o n f o r t h e sudden b e g i n n i n g o f t h e n e x t scene. Facing page 53 MICHEL DE GHELDERODE books, nor in the farces of the rhetoricians, nor on tire universal stage! All misers are M», haggard, angry uu» j pleasant, and miserable. So, I write, "with virtues" (The • proof that I have strong virtues is that the devil has never troubled inc. ]?Z»&»*&t&w&r^k&kh$^^ «mnt And, Cod knows, the devil is busy in this parish! Last, vcar thev burned three witches on the same fire . . . even though it' didn't scene n 1 LQ - 5 roeli very "icjL^ J . Tlie ^OTTS7~T . .' ,{A shape glides^ap\7dly°dl)wnthe stairs, passes in front of' tin! table, blows out the candle and disappears noisily] through the. door. In the darkness, HIEKONYMOS howls with fright.) Help! Who put it out? . ?. Who is there? [He bumps against the furniture.) Is it you, devil? Answer mc! It is dark. I. am going to have mv immortal soul stolen. Stop, thief! Sybilla! Sybilla, wife, are you asleep? otwriftw] I am trembling. Mv hair is damp, '.is-w^ -^***^ ^ . . . It was ^^^^^i^!^ j<ft<fft»«foMHJ It hfs closed the door behind it. It^ vas a well-brought-up spirit, life thinks.] It"WM"Owiy'"tln«' ghootn'^ fa jgava.3a»o bad turn. Where is he going at this hour? U4g SQ - 2 j$&4e-4»gh*. [A cock crows.] Ne, Dawn. The ghost is punc-n _ Itual. He put mv candle out because he knew that dawn i>V)J - o ; x v a $ breaking. A good ghost, who practices economy. £W# 2' 'fin; night lias gone. SVHU.I.A, wearing a long white night) gown and looking like a sleepwalker, comes downstairs.* Sybilla. You called me, Master? ' [ Hieronymus. No,. Yes. . . . My voice accidentally called; you. Dawn is here. The shutters must be opened, so tpat iti L Q - 6 can settle itself in the room." [SYSIIXA opens the shutters.''; \Pale light.} Wife, I have been awake all night. There arc-[things to do,which are only possible at night, which are: • only clear in darkness. Have you slept well? { i. Sybilla. Badly! . . . How can you sleep in a house'; (where no clock ticks? I have only one sheet. And I dreamed( [of the ghost. . . . " | , Hieronymus. Was it you who moaned? ^ | I Sybilla. Perhaps I- did moan. But do they who do^ natj [sleep hear tire cries and groans of those who do sleep? l\ \dreamed that the ghost was lying on me and suffocating-; pre. I could feel his elbows, his knees, and his quick breath-j G-ptcks up tray H-dears dishes 53 ACT 1 S C E N E 11 - H I E R O N Y M U S . ARMADOR B R I E F L Y . THEN S Y B I L L A P U R P O S E : t o e s t a b l i s h t h e t i m e o f d a y t o r e v e a l m o r e o f H i e r o n y m u s * m i s e r l i n e s s : l i m i t e d b e d -c l o t h e s , n o c l o c k , n o f i r e , n o f o o d f o r h i s w i f e t o I n t r o d u c e S y b i l l a a s d o m i n a t e d b y H i e r o n y m u s b u t I n t h e p r o c e s s o f r e b e l l i n g w i t h s e c r e t a c t i o n s , w i t h t a u n t s a n d c o m p l a i n t s t o e s t a b l i s h H i e r o n y m u s ' l u s t f o r S y b i l l a t o c r e a t e s u s p e n s e b y t h e s t r a n g e e s c a p e o f A r m a d o r f r o m t h e h o u s e w h i c h r a i s e s s e v e r a l q u e s t i o n s : Who i s h e ? Why i s h e c o n s i d e r e d a g h o s t b y b o t h H i e r o n y m u s a n d S y b i l l a ? What i s he d o i n g t h e r e ? t o c r e a t e s u s p e n s e b y t h e m y s t e r i o u s n a t u r e o f S y b i l l a ' s r e a l m o t i v e s A C T I O N S : H i e r o n y m u s - t o d o m i n a t e h i s w i f e ( S h e h o l d s h i m i n s e x -u a l b o n d a g e b u t h e c o n t r o l s h e r e n v i r o n m e n t . ) S y b i l l a - d o u b l e a c t i o n - t o p r e v e n t a n y p o s s i b l e d i s -c o v e r y a b o u t h e r l o v e r a n d t o r e s i s t t h e o v e r -w h e l m i n g d e s i r e t o b a i t H i e r o n y m u s DOMINANT E M O T I O N S : H i e r o n y m u s - f e a r , t h e n s u s p i c i o n m i x e d w i t h s e x u a l d e s i r e a n d s a d i s m S y b i l l a - i m p a t i e n c e , memory i n d u c e d e u p h o r i a , c o n t e m p t , h u n g e r CHARACTER D O M I N A N C E : S y b i l l a d o m i n a t e s f r o m h e r e n t r a n c e t o l i g h t i n g t h e f i r e . H i e r o n y m u s d o m i n a t e s t o t h e e n d o f t h e s c e n e . MOOD: T h e a t m o s p h e r e c r a c k l e s f r o m s u s p i c i o n , i r r i t a b i l i t y , i n d e c i s i o n a n d t h e s t r o n g d e s i r e s o f s e x a n d h u n g e r . RHYTHMIC I M A G E : S t a t i c e l e c t r i c i t y , s p a r k i n g f l a m e . 5*. ACT 1 SCENE 11 - HIERONYMUS. ARMADOR BRIEFLY. THEN SYBILLA SHAPE: A f t e r a sudden b e g i n n i n g as t h e c a n d l e I s b l o w n o u t , a sense o f p a n i c f o l l o w s w h i c h i s b r o u g h t under c o n t r o l t o t h e p o i n t o f t r a n q u i l i t y . The c o n v e r s a t i o n between S y b i l l a and Hieronymus s t a r t s j e r k i l y d u r i n g w h i c h S y b i l l a ' s remembrance of t h e g h o s t becomes v e r y s e n s u a l . The c o n v e r s a t i o n b u i l d s w i t h a s t e a d y i n t e r c h a n g e i n w h i c h Hieronymus becomes i n c r e a s i n g l y dominant and S y b i l l a I n c r e a s i n g l y c o m p l a i n i n g . The scene ends as i t began w i t h a sudden b r e a k l e a v i n g , however, enough t i m e f o r a g l o a t i n g word from Hieronymus. I n g e n e r a l , sudden b r e a k s b e g i n and end a passage c o n t a i n i n g t h r e e p e r i o d s o f t e n s i o n and two p e r i o d s o f r e l a x a t i o n . STAGING: The scene a f t e r t h e c a n d l e i s e x t i n g u i s h e d i s p l a y e d up c e n t r e where use c a n be e f f e c t i v e l y made o f t h e shadows. S y b i l l a , d u r i n g h e r i n i t i a l dominance, i s a c t i v e and below Hieronymus who i s s t a t i c and i m p o t e n t u p s t a g e . Hieronymus, d u r i n g h i s p e r i o d o f dominance, i s a c t i v e , l e a v i n g S y b i l l a s t a t i c down l e f t . The down l e f t p o s i t i o n i s p a r t l y d e t e r -mined by t h e p o s i t i o n o f t h e f i r e p l a c e , p a r t l y by the o p p o r t u n i t y i t g i v e s f o r a l a r g e movement w i t h t h e p i c t u r e , and p a r t l y by t h e b a l a n c e needed a c r o s s the s t a g e from the door knock. S y b i l l a I s presumably g o i n g t h r o u g h a morning h o u s e k e e p i n g r o u t i n e . DIFFICULTIES: The sudden e n t r a n c e and e x i t of Armador throws th e a u d i e n c e i n t o c o n f u s i o n , and s i n c e t h e r e f e r e n c e s i n t h e d i a l o g u e t o the g h o s t a r e v e i l e d , t h e r e i s a danger t h a t t h e a u d i e n c e w i l l n o t f o l l o w . W h i l e i t i s n o t n e c e s s a r y t h a t t h e a u d i e n c e know e x a c t l y what i s happening, i t i s n e c e s s a r y t h a t suspense, as mentioned under "PURPOSE", n o t be d e s t r o y e d by c o n f u s i o n . BEATS: 1. TITLE: The Ghost S t r i k e s . ACTIONS: Armador - t o c o n f u s e Hieronymus i n o r d e r t o make an escape. Hieronymus - t o r e c o v e r h i s w i f e . NOTE: T h i s i s a t r a n s i t i o n a l b e a t . Armador has e n t e r e d b e f o r e i t s t a r t s w h i l e Hieronymus i s t a l k i n g about t h e d e v i l i n t h e p a r i s h , and S y b i l l a e n t e r s as he d i s c u s s e s t h e g h o s t ' s p u n c t u a l i t y . 55. ACT 1 SCENE 11 - HIERONYMUS. ABMADOR BRIEFLY. THEN SYBILLA BEATS: NOTE: ( c o n t i n u e d ) The change i n time of day, t h e waking up o f t h e town, t h e mechanics of summoning S y b i l l a a r e a l l embedded i n Hieronymus 1 c o n f u s i o n . 2. TITLE: P l a s t e r i n g Over t h e . C r a c k s ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o probe t h e doubts he f e e l s about th e moaning. S y b i l l a - t o d e f l e c t I n q u i r y i n t o a c o n f i r m a -t i o n o f t h e g h o s t . NOTE: The r u s e o f t h e ghos t i s o b v i o u s l y w e l l e s t a b l i s h e d . Because t h e t a s k s c o n t a i n e d I n t h i s b e a t a r e n o t ob v i o u s they a r e g i v e n below: TASKS: a Hieronymus - t o c o v e r up h i s c o n f u s i o n a t h e r e n t r a n c e by g i v i n g o r d e r s (obeyed: she sucks i n the dawn a i r ) . S y b i l l a -b Hieronymus S y b i l l a -c Hieronymus S y b i l l a -t o obey, t o e n j oy the morning a i r . t o p r e p a r e t h e ground f o r q u e s t i o n -i n g . t o use h i s q u e s t i o n t o a t t a c k him, and so un s e a t h i s b a l a n c e . t o c a p t u r e t h e i n i t i a t i v e by mention-i n g t h e g h o s t ( p a r t l y s u c c e s s f u l ; he i n t e r r u p t s h er w i t h t h e q u e s t i o n he was g o i n g t o work up t o l a t e r . ) . t o ask h e r p o i n t b l a n k t o a v o i d a d i r e c t answer t o use h i s q u e s t i o n a g a i n t o a t t a c k him and un s e a t him t o use the g h o s t as an excuse f o r t h e moan t o back up h e r c o n t e n t i o n w i t h d e t a i l s . (But t h e memory o f t h e d e t a i l s d i s t r a c t s h e r i n t o a r e v e r i e ) . She has won n e v e r -t h e l e s s . 56. ACT 1. SCENE 11 - HIERONYMUS. ARMADOR BRIEFLY. THEN SYBILLA NOTE: ( c o n t i n u e d ) d Hieronymus - t o l a u g h a t her l o s s o f spunk ( i n h e r r e v e r i e ) and c o n f i r m h er i n h i s mind as a t e c h n i c a l v i r g i n ( g h o s t s don't c o u n t ) . S y b i l l a - no r e a c t i o n . e Hieronymus - t o excuse h i s n o t p e r s u i n g t h e g h o s t who has " c u c k h o l d e d " him. S y b i l l a - t o t a u n t him w i t h c o w a r d i c e , and t o e x u l t i n t h e i r o n y o f the s i t u a t i o n . Fkcing page 57 ' " RED MAGIC • 7' lug. He •weighed heavy and moved on me like a living creature. Hieronymus [amused]. Ho, ho . . . The spirit was cold. He must have been rjwarc of his strange behavior. Didn't he make off like a thief? ... He must have stolen yourj heat from you.'Ail the same, I can't be on the lookout and! go after him With an arquebus. Apart from my wasting; match and powder, he would make a fool of me and have: his revenge.^  e Sybilia. i es, they say the vengeance of ghosts is terrible, since they have nothing to fear from ordinary justice. [Pause] This specter doesn't frighten me. He often visits: me, and as I am alone every night, his presence is company Hieronymus. Don't light the fire. Go back to bed until the sun is up. It is spring. Sybilia. I'm hungry. Hieronymus. It's unnecessary for you to eat, since you .are going to sleep* (He takes a picture down from the wall.]. •Look at this! Hunger is often suggested by the imagination. .Teed your^r^Tgination. This is a fine Dutch picture, show-ing fruits, fcai*., crested flagons, Sm*m. Look! Eat with your gaze! Drink with your eyes! Sybilia. It's very fine; but I shall -still grow thin.from'' it. Hieronymus. I _ don't like fat • women. Your leanness f\Someone knocks at. the door.]*Who's that? . <P-.?Off with you, in those clothcsl If the visitor who is knocking at the door gazed on you, so transparent, so deli-cate, lie would fail in love with you and carry you off. SYBILLA, resigned, but with a hypocritical smile, goes back SQ - 5 'upstairs.- The knocking at the door is heard again, then a scene m 1 5Q-4 _ , . raucous voice sines: » 2 » J »K • t » Voice. I-i-i-i-ite mis sa est! hook] mas; wa Hierpnymns [hanging u/j. the picture, and hiding his . It's* th* matutinal frock, the dawn monk. He's said , the pig, and is qnit of duties from the rooming on-rdjStrn»)'t doesn t cost much to make oneself agreeable" ~o~ fReopeW the door.} , The Monk [comirlg mj.' Good morning, my son..You have grown fatter since yesterday,* ° '• Hieronymus. I shall have the doorway made bigger—for 57. A C T 1 S C E N E 1 1 - B E A T S 3. T I T L E : D e n y i n g t h e N e c e s s i t i e s A C T I O N S : H i e r o n y m u s - t o s a v e money a n d p u n i s h S y b i l l a b y c u t t i n g d o w n o n f u e l a n d f o o d . S y b i l l a - t o p r o t e s t . N O T E : S y b i l l a p r o d u c e s a n a c c o m p a n i m e n t o f k e e n i n g p r o t e s t . A C T 1 S C E N E 1 1 1 - H I E R O N Y M U S . THE MONK P U R P O S E : t o p r e p a r e f o r t h e i n c i t i n g a c t i o n ( B y e a t i n g i n f r o n t o f H i e r o n y m u s , t h e M o n k a r o u s e s h i s h u n g e r s o t h a t t h e f o o d R o m u l u s b r i n g s w i l l b e t t e r s e r v e t o p u t H i e r o n y m u s i n a r e c e p t i v e m o o d . ) t o p r o v i d e a n i n t e r l u d e o f l a u g h t e r t o i n t r o d u c e a n o t h e r o f t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s a n d s k e t c h t h e e s s e n t i a l f e a t u r e s o f h i s c h a r a c t e r : d r y , c y n i c a l h u m o u r ; h y p r o c r i s y : s e n s u a l g r o s s n e s s t o e s t a b l i s h H i e r o n y m u s 1 d i s l i k e o f t h e M o n k b u t h i s n e e d f o r t h e f o r m s o f r e l i g i o n t o m a i n t a i n h i s p i o u s i m a g e o f h i m s e l f A C T I O N S : H i e r o n y m u s - t o d e f e n d h i m s e l f a g a i n s t t h e M o n k ' s p r o v o c a -t i o n s M o n k - t o a r o u s e H i e r o n y m u s ' h u n g e r a n d t o r e c o n n o i t r e f o r R o m u l u s N O T E : One o f t h e c o n s t a n t s i n t h e M o n k ' s a c t i o n s i s t o e n j o y e v e r y t h i n g t h a t he c a n . DOMINANT E M O T I O N S : H i e r o n y m u s - i r r i t a t i o n ( a t b e i n g d i s t u r b e d , a t b e i n g t e a s e d ) , e x t r e m e h u n g e r , a n n o y a n c e ( a t b e i n g g i v e n m o n e y , a t t h e s m e l l ) M o n k - b e m u s e d d e t a c h m e n t ( h i s g e n e r a l s t a t e ) , h i l a r i t y ( a t t h e s m e l l ) 58. ACT 1 SCENE 111 - HIERONYMUS. THE MONK CHARACTER DOMINANCE: The Monk c o n t r o l s t h e scene. MOOD: Sour b o l s t e r o u s n e s s grows out o f a l u s t y , c y n i c a l v i t a l i t y a l l u n d e r l a i d w i t h d i s t r u s t . RHYTHMIC IMAGE: P l e a s a n t t o r c h l i g h t . SHAPE: The c o u n t e r p o i n t o f t h e Monk's c h a n t w i t h Hieronymus' speech - the fo r m e r i n s i s t e n t and p l e a s a n t , t h e l a t t e r r ough and i r r i t a t i n g - i s f o l l o w e d , a f t e r t h e Monk's g r e e t i n g , by a pause, w h i c h h o l d s us i n suspense as he g i v e s Hieronymus the once o v e r . The c o n t e s t o f w i t s b e g i n s , the Monk r e l a x e d , Hieronymus t e n s e and s a r c a s t i c ; i t i s e s p e c i a l l y o b v i o u s d u r i n g t h e b l e s s i n g . The scene cl i m a x e s - w i t h a cr e s c e n d o o f n o i s e a f t e r t h e Monk b r e a k s w i n d . STAGING: The Monk must e a t a t t h e t a b l e . Because t h e scene i s so s h o r t , t h e a c t i o n i s h e l d c l o s e t o t h e t a b l e . Hieronymus must g e t as f a r as p o s s i b l e from t h e Monk a f t e r t h e s t i n k and y e t be a b l e e a s i l y t o t a k e the s t a g e f o r h i s l a s t l i n e . DIFFICULTIES: The r e a s o n f o r the scene i s n o t t o o c l e a r . W h i l e i t i s n e c e s s a r y t o i n t r o d u c e the Monk i n t h e f i r s t a c t so t h a t he w i l l n o t be a new, s t r a n g e c h a r a c t e r I n th e second a c t , the m o t i v a t i o n f o r h i s v i s i t i s weak. However, t h e Monk's u n u s u a l a c t i o n I n coming i n t o e a t c o u l d be made t o h e l p a sense o f gro w i n g mystery i f he pe e r s about a t t i m e s , and i f he appears t o come i n o r d e r t o a v o i d b e i n g seen g i v i n g way t o t e m p t a t i o n . To have him J u s t drop i n i s n o t s a t i s f a c t o r y . MECHANICAL PROBLEMS: E a t i n g a s u f f i c i e n t amount i n a s h o r t t i m e BEATS: 1. TITLE: C l e a n i n g House f o r t h e V i s i t o r . 59. ACT 1 SCENE 1 1 1 . - BEATS ACTIONS: Hieronymus - to pack his wife off and tidy up. Sybilla - to obey NOTE: Hieronymus gets sidetracked by his lust and can Just refrain from handling her as the knock i s repeated, interrupting him. 2. TITLE: Admitting the Old Fraud ACTIONS: Hieronymus - to l e t the Monk i n . Monk - to make his presence f e l t (Includes the chant). NOTE: The Monk makes a definite, rapid entrance. He examines Hieronymus before greeting him. Facing page 60 MICHEL DE GHELDERODE,, [ACT as yon, spherical monk, not for me.jpo you still guzzle "TrTucTi? T Tfte Monk. I fast every day that God sends, s«4 in making myself thinner, I make myself fatter. It's a mystery. After my death, people will say it was a miracle. Yes, Master Hieronymus, like you I pretend to eat'and drink,. W Providence maintains my monkish flesh. [He. slaps his [Ih fumbles in his robe, brings out a bag, gropes in ii, and produces a black pudding and a bottle.} But, having had to undergo exhausting temptations during the night—all ,of which I overcame'—I am today allowing myself some •consolation. [He eats the black pudding in a couple of bites 'and drains the bottle.] $ • • ; Hieronymus [dazed]. Oh . . . oh . . , Black pudding! [Wine! . . . Oh, Father! I am hungry, thirsty . . . Oh! I. . . I've got gnawing pains . . . I'm shaky on my !P»ns .P. „ s The Monk [finishing his meal). My son, think of the 'thousands of creatures who are hungry and thirsty, and whose lot one must alleviate in Christian fashion. Give them alms, in the name of Christ. Let the rich begin!; 4 .'Mat's why 1 came to see yon. . . . ^ P Hieronymus [annoyed]. Willingly. How manv times will .it be returned to me? Seventy-seven hinesr^Grve me vour : blessing, Father.* sheets) j The Monk [Messing]. In nomine Pater . . . ; Hieronymus [going through the motions of giving coins]. ;For the poor, please ... A gesture for a gesture ffiWjs •And this chanty is costing tne as much as the blessing is-•' costing you. 'TJJ!1LM<^^ the i'na^lary_jnonev^. ~5 TTi7uV]<slmr7Iie^ ^ ; i'lieranymus. You laugh at my charity? 1 ' The Monk [hilarious]. Not at all. ... I had an evil: ' . thought, in view of your pious antics. It lias just escaped' : from me. (urn ^oai) -.Hieronymus [holding ^is nose). You stinking creature: ... pah! You pollute the air I. breathe. y. \ ; The Monk*I givd you it, this incense: I give it to you.; i Breathe it deeply, before it fades away. It's a reward for; your snout. Cood-by, my^ son. [He. goes, laughing.] I, Hieronymus [furious]. I'll talk to you in the same Ian-; 6o. ACT 1 SCENE 111 - BEATS 3. TITLE: S o f t e n i n g up the V i c t i m ACTIONS: Monk - t o rub Hieronymus 1 nose i n f o o d w i t h o u t g i v i n g him any Hieronymus - t o cope w i t h h i s hunger pangs NOTE: The Monk i s p l a y i n g a p a r t and ex a g g e r a t e s as a r e s u l t . 4. TITLE: A B l e s s i n g ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o p l a c a t e h i s c o n s c i e n c e by a r i t u a l t o t a k e any f o r c e out o f t h e r i t u a l by s c o f f i n g a t i t Monk - t o r u n t h r o u g h t h e r o u t i n e o f b l e s s i n g f o r alms NOTE: I t must be v e r y c l e a r I n the mime t h a t no money has changed hands. 5. TITLE: A S t i n k ACTIONS: Monk - t o enjoy the e f f e c t o f h i s f l a t -u l e n c e t o t h e f u l l e s t Hieronymus- t o c o n t e n d w i t h t h i s a f f r o n t NOTE: There must be no sound o f b r e a k i n g w i n d I n any o f t h e times t h a t Monk does i t . Facing page 61 RF.D' M A G I C guosre. (Ha turns his bottom to the door—and thinks better (Sliakmg hi i'l^ keep these unhealthy fumes for myself, is fist.) Trnmpl [Calming 'down.) No, I shan't say that: I'll only think it. One mustn't annoy the monks.; They-are a rich and powerful caste. You will inherit from; me, holy man. Mow much for heaven? [He closes the doori SCehe Iv *,*»*,"*i^ '*<'*""***e**^ ^ comes down the j stairs'?She wears a black mantle with a hood.] You are not asleep? Where are you going so early? Sybilla. To mass. Hieronymus. Very good. Since you are fasting, you must take advantage of it by taking Communion. It's free. Pray for me, so that I may increase my indulgences, and if they distribute bread at the table of the poor, sneak in with thein—but don't sav a word to anyone. I have a horror of! scandaImongcring.(C^ ^ 2. SYKIIXA draws near. HIERONYMUS kisses her from a dis-tance, without touching her lips. His wife hides her face and weeps, or pretends to weep. * 0 j Sybilla. Is that all I get? A sham! What did I marry for?: • Other women know caresses and love. • Hieronymus [indignantly]. Are you reproaching rne for 'my purity? Yes, women are always either being amorous ]or making passionate grimaces. Wfoyft.<Moryw<^ ten'!»«noe«l" :m*^w«}"'*t4»w4^ p»t^ "Joi>"il>-i8"yuii»Wifc [Haughtily.} Haven't I given you a I chi!a?£ ' j Sybilla. Yes, a child born of neither your flesh nor mine.; A parody of a child that doesn't grow, doesn't cry, doesn't! cat a crumb. 9 Hicjonymus. That is ideal. Look to him, milkless' ' mother. I love you—prudently. I swear it. I detest these; 'erotic fools who dissipate their nights and their strength'; on women. [Uneasy.] You are faithful to rne, aren't you? • Sybilla. What gallant would make eyes at me, dressed as' •I am, without colors, without jewels, and with only the. odor of my own wretchedness for perfume? Hieronymus. Complaining like thisfHyhen I am leaving the greater part of my possessions to you? You still have your virginity. You have a treasure in that. ' M 61 ACT 1 SCENE I V - HIERONYMUS. SYBILLA PURPOSE: t o i n t r o d u c e S y b i l l a ' s " v i r g i n i t y " w h i c h (1) j u s t i f i e s much of h e r l a t e r e x c e s s i v e p a s s i o n , (2) f u r t h e r empha-s i z e s Hieronymus' f a l s e v a l u e s i n t h i n k i n g a v i r g i n a l w i f e w o r t h more t h a n a normal w i f e , (3) e x p l a i n s t h e s e x u a l r e p r e s s i o n we have a l r e a d y seen and w i l l see i n Hieronymus, (k) i s a n o t h e r i r o n i c g r o t e s q u e r i e t o remove S y b i l l a from t h e house so t h a t Romulus c a n make h i s p r o p o s i t i o n ACTIONS: Hieronymus - i n i t i a l - t o c o u n s e l h i s w i f e on h e r b e h a v i o u r w h i l e a t mass - subsequent - t o admonish h i s w i f e f o r h e r a t t i t u d e t o him, and when t h a t f a i l s , t o c o n v i n c e h i m s e l f t h a t he i s c o r r e c t . S y b i l l a - i n i t i a l - t o go t o mass subsequent - t o e x p e l from h e r s e l f Hieronymus and e v e r y t h i n g he st a n d s f o r DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Hieronymus - o u t r a g e S y b i l l a - l o a t h i n g CHARACTER DOMINANCE: I n s p i t e o f h e r d e l i b e r a t e s u b m i s s i v e n e s s a t the b e g i n n i n g , S y b i l l a c o n t r o l s Hieronymus f o r she has d i v i d e d him between h i s d e s i r e f o r " p u r i t y " and d e s i r e f o r s ex. MOOD: The mood i s v i o l e n t , Jagged, s h a t t e r i n g . RHYTHMIC IMAGE: A s t r i n g o f e x p l o d i n g f i r e c r a c k e r s 62 ACT 1 SCENE I V - HIERONYMUS. SYBILLA SHAPE: A b u i l d from q u i e t contempt t h r o u g h an argument w i t h i n c r e a s i n g o u t b r e a k s o f n o i s e u n t i l S y b i l l a ' s e x i t , t h e h i g h p o i n t , i s f o l l o w e d by Hieronymus' e r r a t i c c a l m i n g down. STAGING: S y b i l l a i s i n t e n t on l e a v i n g . T h e r e f o r e , Hieronymus must p h y s i c a l l y b a r h e r way u n t i l she s t a y s o f h e r own a c c o r d t o f i n i s h t h e f i g h t . S y b i l l a must have room t o move away from Hieronymus a f t e r t h e " k i s s " . Because she must e n t e r from t h e s t a i r s , Hieronymus s h o u l d s t o p h e r b e f o r e she g e t s t o o f a r on s t a g e y e t l e a v e h e r enough room t o r e j e c t him by moving i n t o a c l e a r a r e a away from him. A l o n e , Hieronymus must end up i n t h e c h a i r , b u t by assuming t h a t t h r o u g h t h e window she i s v i s i b l e w a l k i n g away from t h e house, Hieronymus c a n be made t o use t h e upstage p l a t f o r m . Hieronymus' eyes a r e r a r e l y o f f S y b i l l a , b u t she l o o k s s t r a i g h t a t him o n l y a t t h e peak o f t h e i r argument* DIFFICULTIES: S y b i l l a ' s r e a c t i o n t o Hieronymus' n o t k i s s i n g h e r i s n o t e a s i l y e x p l a i n a b l e . Under t h e c i r c u m s t a n c e s i t would seem more sense t h a t she would r e a c t u n f a v o u r a b l y o n l y i f he d i d k i s s h e r . One m o t i v a t i o n might be t h a t she i s so i n t e r e s t e d i n s e x u a l s t i m u l a t i o n t h a t any male would do, i n w h i c h case she must be v e r y h i g h l y s e x e d c o n s i d e r i n g t h e r e c e n t e x i t o f t h e " g h o s t " . That s u p p o s i t i o n would a l s o e x p l a i n her genuine d i s a p p o i n t m e n t t h a t t h i s r a r e g e s t u r e by Hieronymus p r o v e s t o be a sham. Or, t h e g e s t u r e may a r o u s e h e r n o r m a l l y h i d d e n d i s a p p o i n t m e n t about t h e poor s t a t e o f h e r m a r r i a g e . De Ghelderode's e q u i v o c a l s u g g e s t i o n t h a t she p r e t e n d s t o weep would seem t o i n d i c a t e t h a t h e r a c t i o n i s a r u s e t o make Hieronymus t h i n k she s t i l l l o v e s him. However, h e r o b v i o u s g r o w i n g anger s u g g e s t s more. BEATS: 1. TITLE: The Send O f f ACTIONS: Hieronymus t o c o u n s e l h i s w i f e on h e r b e h a v i o u r a t mass S y b i l l a - t o w a i t p a t i e n t l y u n t i l Hieronymus i s f i n i s h e d 63 ACT 1 SCENE IV - HIERONYMUS. SYBILLA BEATS: ( c o n t i n u e d ) NOTE: O b v i o u s l y S y b i l l a does n o t n o r m a l l y go t o mass. Mass may be h e r excuse f o r a m e e t i n g w i t h t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s . 2. TITLE: S c r a t c h i n g H i s Eyes Out ACTIONS: S y b i l l a - t o r e j e c t Hieronymus Hieronymus - t o i n d u l g e i n a " k i s s " and t h e n t o b e r a t e S y b i l l a f o r h e r i n g r a t -i t u d e . NOTE: The r i d i c u l o u s n e s s o f the " k i s s " makes i t h a r d t o J u s t i f y u n l e s s Hieronymus i s shown t o be e n j o y i n g a s t i m u l a t i o n i n a f a n t a s y w h i c h she i n t e r r u p t s . Facing page 64 10 M I C H E L D E G H E L D E R O D E [ACT I Sybilla. The spiders stand guard over it. • A Hieronymus. You are rich! Ask the theologians. Rich! Sybilla [in a low voice). What grief' to be rich with that, and how 1. envy the whores! • 9 [Site goes out. llieronyums {sneering}. Trollop! Her thin lips have keen edges. ]^Wrm*f43ri«m*wm*^^ ~]7n5nl?iy7[~l!A having this way with her. Indeed, it's very hard; and some-times lustful ideas blaze up in my brain. No, not for any-thing in the world will I touch this priceless, irreplaceable virginity that so few women can boast of possessing. 4 s^ KH44~W4wk-»W«rf¥. As for going to seek out the whores• that she called on in her low voice, as for haunting shady streets, woe to him who succumbs! A crown drops from your wallet at each spasm. And it infects your blood. I shall ask those sanctimonious knaves the monks how thev jnagage, They must know how to protect their souls and tl^ eir pence, while still enjoying what the instinctive dogs crave. '•[He yawns.] It would be a good thing to have a sleep, however short. [He settles in his c/ifrtrJ .In, t)u_s,cpnvenien|;  .solitude . • . tinc^/u/fsWge^ Scene V 'pperis"'qiaetJy. 'l:lie beggar ROMULUS comes in. He is 1 fbcarded and filthy, but he is haughty, like his name. On 2 tibiae, he walks around the chair. He strokes the ch%t... -/HIERONYMUS IS dreaming.]'Item . . . I own a house 3 with a ghost. . , , [Suppressed laughter from ROMULUS.] A bronze chest . . . in which gold pieces are breeding young. . . . A wife and her virginity . . . and the spiders that watch over it. . . . -[ROMULUS tries hard not to burst .out laughing.) I own . . . a stomach . . . and a gullet 4 ! ROMULUS lakes half a loaf, a roast pigeon, a bit of candle,-; and a stone flagon from his beggar's sack. * J • [ Romulus. Your health, dear and noble Hieronymus! Hieronymus [waking up, startled]. A dream? . . . Food? . .'tgght? . . . And a flagon for thirst? . . . Wonders-, of sleep! f .3. [He catches.sight of .ROMULUS.) It's you, ;mv beloved beggar, my affectionate rascal! [He- stands.] \ You arc graciousncss itself! My benefactor! Beggars are the. 6k ACT 1. SCENE IV - BEATS 3. TITLE: S i t t i n g On H i s Sex ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o c o n t r o l h i s d e s i r e w i t h t h e l o g i c o f i t s c o s t l i n e s s - t o s l e e p NOTE: Hieronymus' f i n a l p o s i t i o n i s n o t c o n s i s t e n t . Would he r e a l l y ask the monks? I f he d i d he c o u l d n o t succeed as a h y p r o c r i t e . I f he i s k i d d i n g h i m s e l f , he would n o t da r e t o make t h i s s u g g e s t i o n t o h i m s e l f . I s de Ghelderode j u s t u s i n g Hieronymus as a mouthpiece? ACT 1. SCENE V - HIERONYMUS. ROMULUS PURPOSE: t o b e g i n the f i r s t o b v i o u s i n c i d e n t i n t h e p l o t t o I n t r o d u c e a n o t h e r c o n s p i r a t o r t o a r o u s e c u r i o s i t y about t h e m y s t e r i o u s man, Armador ACTIONS: Romulus - t o i n d u c e Hieronymus t o see Armador Hieronymus - t o s c r u t i n i z e Romulus' p r o p o s a l DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Romulus - c o n t r o l l e d a n x i e t y (Romulus aims a t b e i n g c o o l , calm and c o l l e c t e d w i t h t h e appear-ance o f s u p p r e s s i n g e x c i t e m e n t . ) Hieronymus - s e n s u a l g r a t i t u d e , a p p r e h e n s i o n and cupid-i t y . CHARACTER DOMINANCE: Romulus dominates b u t he i s d e a l i n g w i t h an u n c e r t a i n a d v e r s a r y who c o u l d q u i c k l y u p s e t the p l a n . MOOD: A t e n s e e x p e c t a t i o n i s s e t by Romulus' i n i t i a l b e h a v i o u r . 65. ACT 1. SCENE V - HIERONYMUS. ROMULUS RHYTHMIC IMAGE: The s t a r t i n g o f a f i r e w h i c h i s made up o f good t i n d e r and l a r g e p i e c e s so t h a t once the t i n d e r i s gone the f i r e n e a r l y goes out b e f o r e c a t c h i n g on the l a r g e p i e c e s . SHAPE: An i n i t i a l p e r i o d o f i n t e n s e e x p e c t a t i o n and t e n s i o n i s f o l l o w e d by q u i c k moving merriment stopped suddenly by t h e b e g i n n i n g o f t h e l o n g b u i l d o f Romulus' s a l e s p i t c h w h i c h i n c l u d e s Hieronymus' a n x i o u s q u e s t i o n s . A f t e r a l o n g pause f o l l o w e d by s n i c k e r s w h i c h grow i n t o a wave o f g u f f a w s , Hieronymus c a p i t u l a t e s . STAGING: The n a t u r e of t h e i n i t i a l b u s i n e s s , s l e e p i n g and e a t i n g , t e n d s t o keep Hieronymus f i x e d i n h i s s e a t . Because he i s weaving a n e t , Romulus moves around Hieronymus who remains s t a t i o n a r y u n t i l he c a n s t a n d t h e t e n s i o n no l o n g e r . A t t h e s a l e s p i t c h , Hieronymus escapes from th e c h a i r b u t i s t r a p p e d between Romulus and h i s c h e s t . The scene s t a r t s s t a g e r i g h t and ends s t a g e l e f t . DIFFICULTIES: Why does Hieronymus know t h e beggar so w e l l ? C e r t a i n l y n o t f o r h i s money. Romulus must have i n f l u e n c e . He i s q u i t e open about h i s r o l e as p a r i s h spy and i n f o r m e r . From t h e scene i t appears t h a t the unknown man has been the s u b j e c t o f d i s c u s s i o n b e f o r e t o d a y . B o t h t h e s e men s h a r e the same a t t i t u d e toward money and t h e means o f g e t t i n g i t . A t r u s t has d e v e l o p e d as a r e s u l t . These p o i n t s a r e n o t c l e a r and must t h e r e f o r e be emphasized i n p l a y i n g t h e scene. MECHANICAL PROBLEMS: Romulus and t h e Monk must be v i s i b l e from..tall p a r t s o f the a u d i e n c e when t h e y a r e o u t s i d e t h e window. BEATS: 1. TITLE: Watching t h e V i c t i m ACTIONS: Romulus and t h e Monk - t o check t h a t Hieronymus i s a l o n e . Note: T h i s b e a t i s n o t i n t h e s c r i p t b u t i s i n s e r t e d t o c l a r i f y t h e r e l a t i o n s h i p between the Monk and Romulus and t o i n t e g r a t e t h e Monk's f i r s t v i s i t w i t h t h e p l o t a g a i n s t Hieronymus. 66. ACT 1. SCENE V - HIERONYMUS. ROMULUS BEATS: ( c o n t i n u e d ) 2. TITLE: C o u n t i n g the C h i c k e n s ACTIONS: Romulus - t o l e t go t o t h e p l e a s u r e o f t h e a n t i c i p a t e d g o l d 3. TITLE: ACTIONS: 4. TITLE: ACTIONS: NOTE: Dreaming Hieronymus ( t h e a c t o r ) - t o dream out l o u d Romulus - t o t r y t o make out what Hieronymus i s s a y i n g and t o r e p r e s s h i s urge t o l a u g h . S m a l l T a l k Hieronymus - t o s a t i s f y h i s a p p e t i t e f o r f o o d and good f e l l o w s h i p Romulus t o k i d Hieronymus a l o n g w h i l e l o o k i n g f o r an o pening t o t a l k about Armador. Romulus becomes uneasy a f t e r l o s i n g t h e advan-tage w h i c h h i s t r i c k e r y w i t h t h e f o o d has g i v e n him. Hieronymus askes d i s c o m f i t t i n g q u e s t i o n s which have t o be answered u n t i l a c l e a r p a t h t o easy c o n v e r s a t i o n a p p e a r s . Even on t h e p a t h Hieronymus appears f o r a moment t o know too much ("tomorrow?"). The s u r f b o a r d i s t i p p y f o r Romulus. Facing page 67 ' ' RED M A G I C • l l ' 1 only wellborn people I know, 'fhank you, Romulus. [He •cats gluttonously, and drinks from the neck of the bottle] You are'not plying your trade at the cathedral porch? Romuhis. Working every day wears me out. I came to talk to you. Hieronymus. This feast, is it the leftovers? • fcsr£ Romulus. I accept food, but I only keep money. I eat • according to my fancy at the inn. Hieronymus. Is charity doing well? ; . Romulus. Well enough. The parishioners who come out after the sermon have heard such terrifying revelations of the torments of hell that they make haste to throw aims for the forgiveness of their villainy. Fear is the lever of all charity. And then, I am skilled in my art! So much so, that if 1 put it into practice before you, you yourself ... Hieronymus. Do no such thing! Yes, yes, you are clever. I have a high opinion of you. You are a better man because you have become rich. ; Romulus. Less rich than you are today. • J-Jieronymus. Todays WJj at: about tomorrow? Romulus. Tomorrow?*it I wanted to, I should be richer than you, richer than the guilds, richer than the whole town. Hieronymus [laughing]. You need purging, Romulus.' The effluvia of springtime are stirring in your mind. The' sap is rising. Romulus. If that were the case, I would be staggering from port to starboard like a drunken sailor. But I am. standing unright in front of yq«|"'a?»'d I have only come " here to speak to you with wcil-considered words. However, we must stop all the hidden ears that there are in the walls. Hieronymus. You are bewildering me, my friend. What arc you saying?. j**iwi>^  •4ww»fe>i»^iwgA | i le clutches the chair.] Romulus [giving him his flask). Drink this brandy. Hieronymus [emptying it with one draught}. That warms. ' the cockles of your heart. Romulus. In future you can be warm like this always,, if' you. want. Hieronymus. I do want. : "Kolnulus [muTn^iJOus/jJjrYou times J have talked to you about an amazing character?, Yes, and you have never stopped thinking about him. . . . 67. ACT 1. SCENE V - BEATS 5. TITLE: G e t t i n g Down t o B r a s s Tacks ACTIONS: Romulus NOTE: 6. TITLE: - t o p r e p a r e Hieronymus f o r an i m p o r t a n t d i s c l o s u r e Hieronymus - t o b r a c e h i m s e l f . Hieronymus 1 r e a c t i o n seems too s t r o n g f o r such a vague i n s i n u a t i o n . They have t a l k e d about Armador b e f o r e as i s h i n t e d i n t h e n e x t b e a t . But i f t h i s i s n o t a new s u b j e c t , why a l l t h e c a u t i o n a p a r t from th e f a c t t h a t i t makes f o r suspense? A c t u a l l y Romulus' b e h a v i o u r under t h e c i r c u m s t a n c e s p o i n t s t o h i s b e i n g i n a r a t h e r s u s p e c t p o s i t i o n and so b e a r s out h i s u n u s u a l b e h a v i o u r a t t h e window. F u r t h e r , because the s u b j e c t i s n o t new t o e i t h e r o f them, i t can be a p o i n t of t e n s i o n between them a l l t h r o u g h the s m a l l t a l k i n w h i c h c a s e Hieronymus' r e a c t i o n i s e i t h e r p a r t l y f a k e d o r i s t h e r e s u l t of extreme a n t i c i p a t i o n . We can assume t h a t Hieronymus has n o t been easy t o persuade up t o now b u t , n e v e r t h e l e s s , i s a t t r a c t e d by the p r o p o s i t i o n . A l l Romulus' e l a b o r a t e p r e p a r a -t i o n s seem r a t h e r more f o r h i s own b e n e f i t t h a n an e f f e c t i v e means o f s o f t e n i n g up Hieronymus. A t l e a s t we l e a r n t h a t t h e p l o t t e r s b e l i e v e t h e way t o Hieronymus I s t h r o u g h h i s a p p e t i t e s . The S a l e s P i t c h ACTIONS: Romulus - t o persuade Hieronymus t o j o i n I n a d e a l w i t h Armador Hieronymus - t o l i s t e n and t o c o n t r o l h i s i m p u l s e s t o a g r e e . NOTE: Hieronymus f a l l s i n h i s a c t i o n and so c a p i t u -l a t e s . Because Romulus' argument i s r a t h e r o b s c u r e , th e s a l e s p i t c h must be e f f e c t i v e t h r o u g h tone o f v o i c e and a t t i t u d e . The sense o f charming a snake I s more i m p o r t a n t t h a n l o g i c . Facing page 68 U " " ' "' " M I C H E L D E ' G H E L D E R O D E [ACT Vi Well? . . . Where do the powerful people in this world] get their wealth.? From their labor? No! Do you ever work,'] inh.eritar.ee, murder, war, (speculation in merchandise? Is that everything? No. There is another way. Hieronymus. A diabolical way? Q&kfV.\c devil? . . . j Romulus. Don't be afraid. The devil only appears to> fools. What do you make of those rare forces in the uni-verse which are only taken and used by certain creatures in whom God has set the flame of genius? . . . There are very few of these creatures; but they do exist. Happy is he' who meets them and gains their friendship. . . . Hieronymus.pet to the point! _ Romulus. The prison I have talked to you about belongs to this category of sublime outcasts. He is immortal . . . unhappily. Hunted from one country to another, he found, shelter under my protection, and since I am protected by the monks, whom I serve as parish spy, he is protected by , the Church itself. He is staying in the loft where I"hang out, but he is pining in this refuge which, in his view, is a : prison. lie* wants to get to Muscovy, where he is awaited' at the Court. To do this he must repair his fortune as. quickly as possible. Let us help him, in silence. We shall; have our part, of it.<s' * ° Hieronymus. What about the risks? . . . And what, is-' this business going to cost? •' Romulus. What risks?,Give him a cellar to use as his laboratory. He has his apparatus with him. He will also :need to have . . '. [Worried.] Tell me, is your wife dis-; 'erect , . . obedient? £ ': , Hieronymus. You can take my word for that.£s«8<*auST): ; Romulus. Then all is well: . . . And in three days [he ^knocks on the chest] the sides of this eldest will burst open.. Hieronymus [excited].-'You are lying!. . What a won-, dcrful lic'.tST c^s) 0 ^ Romulus. Don't hide your happiness. . . . I'll go and !fetch the person. . . . Get the cellar ready. . i . Take, , care, here is your wife. 68 ACT 1. SCENE V I - HIERONYMUS. ROMULUS. SYBILLA PURPOSE: t o show t h a t Hieronymus i s p r e p a r e d a c t i v e l y t o c o -o p e r a t e t o c l a r i f y f u r t h e r t h e d i f f i c u l t y Hieronymus has i n c o n t r o l l i n g S y b i l l a t o h i n t t h a t S y b i l l a i s i n on t h e p l o t . ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o p r e p a r e S y b i l l a f o r t h e coming o f Armador by p u t t i n g h e r out o f a c t i o n S y b i l l a - t o f i g u r e o u t what has happened and f i t h e r s e l f t o i t (Romulus - t o l e t S y b i l l a know the s c o r e ) DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Hieronymus - smug s e l f s a t i s f a c t i o n 1 S y b i l l a - w a r i n e s s Romulus - w a r i n e s s CHARACTER DOMINANCE: Hieronymus - dominates b u t a t f i r s t i s n e a r l y u p s e t by S y b i l l a MOOD: As i n Scene V - Tense u n c e r t a i n t y RHYTHMIC IMAGE: I f t h e p r e v i o u s scene ends w i t h t h e f l a m e s b e g i n n i n g t o c a t c h t h e l a r g e p i e c e s o f wood, t h i s scene i s as i f some-one blows on t h e f l a m e s w i t h one good b r e a t h . SHAPE: A c o n c i l i a t o r y tone i s s h a t t e r e d by S y b i l l a ' s a c i d remark w h i c h b r i n g s a s h a r p r e p l y from Hieronymus and a s t r u g g l e t o c o n t r o l h i s f e e l i n g s . The n e x t c r i s i s o c c u r s when S y b i l l a d e c i d e s t o obey h i s command. A f t e r t h a t t h e scene ends on a n o t e o f c y n i c a l b a n t e r . Two s h o r t p e a ks. 69. ACT 1. SCENE V I - HIERONYMUS. ROMULUS. SYBILLA STAGING: Movement i s governed by t h e doors f o r S y b i l l a ' s e n t r a n c e and Hieronymus 1 e x i t . Romulus needs t o keep c l e a r so as t o appear t o have n o t h i n g t o do w i t h S y b i l l a , S y b i l l a must be a b l e t o t u r n h e r back on Romulus and Hieronymus when they t a l k , y e t h e r f a c e must be v i s i b l e t o t h e a u d i e n c e , DIFFICULTIES: From t h e p l o t p o i n t of v i e w S y b i l l a c o u l d come i n i n scene V l l when Romulus i s a l o n e , she c o u l d be made t o be dumb a t a n o t h e r t i m e . The scene s i m p l y a c c o m p l i s h e s t h i s a c t i o n w i t h i n c r e a s e d suspense because t h e r e l a t i o n -s h i p between S y b i l l a and Romulus i s n o t known. Hieronymus' f i r s t l i n e i s d i f f i c u l t t o j u s t i f y u n l e s s he i s t r y i n g t o work on h e r sympathy i n an e f f o r t t o be c o n c i l i a t o r y . I t i s an odd approach. A l s o Hieronymus' i d e a t h a t she s h o u l d be dumb comes out o f t h e b l u e . There s h o u l d be a moment when he i s seen t o t h i n k up t h e i d e a , f o l l o w e d by a r e a c t i o n o f s u r p r i s e from b o t h t h e o t h e r s . 1. TITLE: T a n g l i n g the S p i d e r ' s Weaving. ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o w i n over h i s w i f e by b e i n g an o b j e c t o f sympathy S y b i l l a - t o quash t h e sham Facing page 70 RED MAGIC 13 Hieronymus. Sybilla, look me in the face. I am in a: turmoil. 3 am not happy. j Sybilla. There is something like a glint of gold in yours ev 13c /es. Hieronymus. autJioriiy.]' In Tuturc you will not cniict! Come herel Do von understand? jSvi)ii..i,A nodi speak. You Ms.] She is [Willi will be duirjbj, dumb.JTslrall go down into the cellar, Romulus. You explain to Sybilla what she must know and what she mustn't know, then get.: to work Romulus, inestimable Romulus! i «c_goes out to t*M> «r>a»tf.{• ROMtiLvs and SYBILIA gaze at SCQiC Vii Ccicl'- other. their teetn begin to show. They laugh.' P i 1 Sybilla. Is he coming? (THEV ewe^ce) Romulus. You know, because your spine is shuddering. Sybilla. And Hieronymus? Rcn'fhrs. That's_a fine thijngtj^c^othejdr^about! 2~ S^THiou are d7in^ )."^ TTaTdocs it matter to you aTlong" as you have your burning lips and mouth? . . . I'.tn off. You arc beautiful, Sybilia . . . ugly and beautiful, accord-ing to the time of day. [He caresses her.] » J 3 He takes a dried fish fromjuisj^ then hejgcs. (YWLLA eats tne fish greedily. Scene viii Svbilla. Oh, let him come! . . . I shall eat hiin like this' 1 6sh.' * K (SITS) 2 . HIERONYMUS reappears s^mm^i. » L Hieronymus. Your mouth! It was moving! We're you eating? No? Then were you learning to be dumb, to chew up yourjWjr^ ?_ Y^ju^ : blindP?'.*?*You will have the reward of your obedience. ;You will have all that a woman desires, velvet, crystal, a • parrot, a lute ? £j&4«4«©km***»^ ^ . . . Yes, beloved you shall have love, a good housewife. . . Sshl . * . Busy your-: self like a good o se ife. . . . Where is your child? J&^Al'"''*' a " n u tbmg, c/hoJP. . . Wliat isMiappeuing' scene ix^o'int- ^ i r ' s a dream, it's stupendous, and I'm a dream 1 '.better off. If it's^eal . . . then I shall be liberal. I "shall .live like a gentleman. I shall visit courtesans. The good time will have come, the end.of hardship, fasting, calcula-, tion. *£wmUght-«trtktwtho--wmdoworThe room ifr'W6 tijhj 70. 2. TITLE: S i l e n c i n g t h e B l a b ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o curb her tongue S y b i l l a - t o a c q u i e s c e (Romulus t o a s s i s t S y b i l l a ) BEATS: 3. TITLE: P r e p a r i n g t h e House ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o complete t h e arrangements ACT 1. SCENE V l l - SYBILLA. ROMULUS PURPOSE: t o c l a r i f y t h e r e l a t i o n s h i p between S y b i l l a and Romulus and Armador ACTIONS: S y b i l l a - t o l i n k h e r s e l f up w i t h t h e p l o t t e r s a g a i n Romulus - t o c o n t r o l h i s p a s s i o n f o r h e r DOMINANT EMOTIONS: S y b i l l a - Joy, t h e n f e a r Romulus - l u s t DOMINANCE: f i r s t S y b i l l a t h e n Romulus MOOD: Sudden r e l i e f and freedom a r e q u i c k l y r e i n e d i n . SHAPE: Two sudden changes o c c u r , S y b i l l a ' s sudden r e l i e f and Romulus's u n e x p e c t e d t h r e a t . f o r Armador's a r r i v a l S y b i l l a and Romulus - t o w a i t f o r him t o l e a v e 71. ACT 1. SCENE V l l - SYBILLA. ROMULUS STAGING: They r u s h t o g e t h e r , dance and suddenly f r e e z e as Romulus i s u n a b l e t o c o n t r o l h i s d e s i r e s ; he comes c l o s e t o h e r and b r u t a l l y c a r e s s e s h er f a c e ; she snaps h i s mood w i t h a wrench f r e e . The f o o d b u s i n e s s and e x i t a r e c o n t r o l l e d by t h e f a c t t h a t t h e s a t c h e l i s on t h e t a b l e and by t h e do o r . DIFFICULTIES: Romulus* l u s t i s n e v e r b r o u g h t up a g a i n . The purpose of i t here would seem t o be t h a t i t c o n t r i b u t e s t o t h e s e x u a l u n d e r c u r r e n t i n t h e p l a y and t o t h e image o f S y b i l l a as v e r y a t t r a c t i v e and v e r y f r u s t r a t e d . S y b i l l a ' s f i r s t remark s u g g e s t s she d i d i n f a c t go t o mass. BEATS: When t h e Cats Away S y b i l l a - t o r e l i s h t h e p r o s p e c t s Romulus - t o r e a s s u r e h er 1. TITLE: ACTIONS: NOTE: Why does Romulus n o t g i v e h e r an answer about Hieronymus? C o u l d i t be t h a t t h e p l o t t e r s have been c o n s i d e r i n g m u r d e r i n g him o r does she n o t y e t know about t h e p l a n t o t u r n him ov e r t o t h e M a g i s t r a t e ? Perhaps Romulus i s a f r a i d t o t e l l t o o much w i t h o u t Armador t h e r e i n c a s e she sudde n l y has some sympathy f o r Hieronymus. 2. TITLE: S i t t i n g on t h e V o l c a n o ACTIONS: Romulus - t o r e l e a s e some o f t h e p r e s s u r e o f h i s d e s i r e s 3. TITLE: S y b i l l a - t o f e n d o f f Romulus F e e d i n g t h e D e p r i v e d ACTIONS: Romulus - t o s u b l i m a t e h i s s e x u a l d e s i r e by t a k i n g p i t y on S y b i l l a S y b i l l a - t o e a t 72. ACT 1. SCENE V l l l - SYBILLA AND HIERONYMUS PURPOSE: t o remove S y b i l l a I n p r e p a r a t i o n f o r Armador's e n t r a n c e - t r a n s i t i o n scene t o h i n t a t t h e coming r e v e r s a l i n Hieronymus' c h a r a c t e r t o f u r t h e r i l l u s t r a t e how e a s i l y and b l i n d l y Hieronymus k i d s h i m s e l f i n t o s e e i n g t h e w o r l d t h e way he wants i t t o be. ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o keep c o n t r o l o f S y b i l l a S y b i l l a - t o p a c i f y Hieronymus and escape DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Hieronymus - a r r o g a n t c o n f i d e n c e , magnanimity S y b i l l a - f e a r DOMINANCE OF CHARACTER: Hieronymus dominates MOOD: A moment o f f r e n z y i s f o l l o w e d q u i c k l y by a c r e e p i n g b i z a r r i t y . RHYTHMIC IMAGE: A b l o w t o r c h f u l l y opened i s shu t down t o a d u l l h eat s u p p r e s s e d . SHAPE: The v i o l e n c e o f S y b i l l a ' s hunger f o r f o o d and sex t h a t has momentarily been l e t l o o s e i s s q u e l c h e d by Hieronymus' e n t r a n c e w h i c h b e g i n s s h a r p l y b u t ends s m o o t h l y . The b e g i n n i n g o f a g r o w i n g u n d u l a t i n g s e n s u a l i t y r e a c h e s i t s f i r s t s m a l l peak h e r e , and c a r r i e s i n t o t h e n e x t s c e n e . STAGING: S y b i l l a i s b r o u g h t t o t h e f i r e p l a c e i n o r d e r t h a t she has somewhere t o throw t h e f i s h and i n o r d e r t o c l e a r the c e n t r e f o r Hieronymus' e n t r a n c e . Hieronymus t r a p s S y b i l l a down l e f t so t h a t he i s a b a r r i e r t o h e r e s c a p i n g up the s t a i r s . As she succeeds i n g e t t i n g by him he f o l l o w s h e r i n a p a r a l l e l move upstage below the r a i l i n g . 73. ACT 1. SCENE V l l l - SYBILLA AND HIERONYMUS ( c o n t i n u e d ) BEATS: 1. TITLE: L e t t i n g Go A C T I O N : S y b i l l a - t o r e v e l i n t h e thought o f Armador's r e t u r n and i n t h e t a s t e o f the f i s h 2. TITLE: Caught Bed-Handed ACTION: Hieronymus - t o e x p l a i n h e r chewing S y b i l l a - t o c o n c e a l h er m o u t h f u l NOTE: She s t a r t s by c o n c e a l i n g h e r chewing, b u t ends op e n l y chewing as h i s " e x p l a n a t i o n " p e r m i t s h er t o agree w i t h him 3. TITLE: P r o m i s e s ACTION: Hieronymus - t o r e t a i n and s t r e n g t h e n h i s c o n t r o l o v e r h e r w i t h b r i b e r y w h i l e e n j o y i n g h i s " s e c r e t " . S y b i l l a - t o escape from him ACT 1. SCENE I X - HIERONYMUS PURPOSE: t o r e v e a l t h e e x t e n t o f Hieronymus 1 f r u s t r a t e d d e s i r e s w h i c h he had c a l l e d v i r t u e s i n the Scene 1 t o show t h a t w h i l e t h e s e d e s i r e s a r e b e i n g e x p r e s s e d he i s s t i l l a f r a i d o f abandoning h i m s e l f t o them. ACTION: Hieronymus - t o i n d u l g e i n t h e a n t i c i p a t i o n o f t h e p h y s i c a l p l e a s u r e s made p o s s i b l e by u n l i m i t e d w e a l t h . DOMINANT EMOTIONS: L i b i d i n o u s n e s s tempered by f e a r MOOD: A f e e l i n g o f r i s i n g o b s c e n i t y from an a n t i c i p a t e d d i r t y j o k e b u i l d s . RHYTHMIC IMAGE: fl a m e s l i c k i n g ,at p i t c h 7k ACT 1. SCENE IX - HIERONYMUS (Continued) SHAPE: A f t e r a sudden o u t b u r s t o f r e l i e f a t b e i n g l e f t a l o n e , a d r o p f o l l o w s t o b e g i n a b u i l d up t o "monks". A sudden p u l l i n g I n o f horns precedes a q u i e t f r e n z y d u r i n g t h e s i l e n t t a l k i n g w h i c h ends i n a sense o f s a t i s f i e d r e l i e f . STAGING: To a s s i s t t h e sense t h a t Hieronymus i s c r e e p i n g o ut o f s i g h t , t h e s i l e n t t a l k i n g t a k e s p l a c e h u d d l e d n e a r t h e f i r e p l a c e . T h i s p o s i t i o n p r o v i d e s b a l a n c e d s t a g e d u r i n g t h e e n t r a n c e o f Armador and Romulus. BEATS: 1. TITLE: E x p l o r i n g t h e Consequences ACTION: Hieronymus - t o a s s e s s t h e p o s s i b i l i t i e s o f Armador's v i s i t and t o r e l i s h them Facing page 75 :l"4 MICHEL DE" G H E L D E R O D E " (A C T r And if I damage myj^aiva^ion, the monks . T • . . . Sshl . . . Where is the ghost? ... I shall speak so that no one can hear me.' [He moves his lips. His face, wears an expression of great joy.] There! I have said noth-. ing. I heard mvself saving nothing. What more should I jadtl?- . scene x '^loswvvscmne^ in from the street. He carries a black box,\ 1 and is ?*&>m$®> by the cold and haughty CAVALIER? ARMADOR, | Romulus. Come into the house of that upright man iHicronymus. lie*will not be ungenerous to yob. with either !help f'Lh^m^ahty^jMip-fti^ ftOMuti^) ; Hicrhnymuffibowiig]. My lord! May due thanks be 'irendcrcd to you! You do me honor. I am a good man . . . without a great deal in the way of possessions. I have only jthis house—which is yours, which you will make use of— iwithout wearing it unduly. The Cavalier Armador [haughtily]. I appreciate your •.compliment. We shall know little of each other. In three days I shall be gone. You must never recall what I did nor : how I did it, What has Romulus told you? Hieronymus. The essence of the matter, which I have,'; difficulty in believing even now I see you here. \ , Armrtdor [raising his voice]. You believe rne? | Hieronymus. No! ' i Armador: You don't believe me? Hieronymus. Yes! Armrtuor;_You .djMbfj^e^oj^u^wil^ ause.) 1 am the Cavalier Armador. [HIERONYMUS 2 bows.) Having told you my name, I have no more to tell you about who I am, where 1 come from, what I am doing.: Look at my profile.- Have you ever seen similar ones on' ancient coins, surrounded by ostentatious inscriptions? I tell you there is a circular inscription around my head,' 'wherein is set down my destiny; but it is not given to you' , to be able to read it. [To ROMULUS.] Beggar, tell him I. ; accept his help. He will be paid for it according to the rvalue of what I make—to the value of*? . . [catching ' sight of the bronze chest] the contents of this chest. j Hieronymus [scared]. You can penetrate this bronze with, your eyes? H • ' mm 75. ACT 1. SCENE IX - BEATS 2. TITLE: H i d i n g t h e S e c r e t ACTION: Hieronymus - t o r e l i e v e h i s d e s i r e s w h i l e c o n c e a l i n g them. ACT 1. SCENE X - HIERONYMUS. ARMADOR. ROMULUS, TLATER SYBILLA AND THE MONK) PURPOSE: t o i n t r o d u c e Armador and r e v e a l h i s charm and h i s hocus-pocus t o r e v e a l t h e f u l l e x t e n t o f the p l o t a g a i n s t Hieronymus t o show us t h e degree t o w h i c h Hieronymus has been b l i n d e d by h i s own a v a r i c e ACTION: Hieronymus - t o r e s i s t h i s own g r o w i n g b e l i e f i n Armador*s t a l e n t s Armador - t o tempt Hieronymus i n t o c omplete s u b s e r v i e n c e Romulus - t o h e l p Armador S y b i l l a - t o h e l p Armador DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Hieronymus - awe- f e a r and wonder ( t h i s scene emphasizes now one and now t h e o t h e r . ) Armador - u r g e n t composure w i t h f l a s h e s o f humour Romulus - f a s c i n a t i o n S y b i l l a - w a r i n e s s DOMINANT- CHARACTER: Armador dominates t h e e n t i r e scene. MOOD: S n i g g e r i n g e x u l t a t i o n f o l l o w s a n u n c e r t a i n w a r i n e s s and c u l m i n a t e s i n abandoned g l e e . RHYTHMIC IMAGE: S p a r k l e r s and roman c a n d l e s a r e c l i m a x e d w i t h a b u r s t i n g r o c k e t . 76 A C T l r S C E N E X - HIERONYMUS, ARMADOR, ROMULUS, ( L A T E R S Y B I L L A AND THE MONK) ( c o n t i n u e d ) S H A P E : A p e r i o d o f b r i e f , m u t u a l s n i f f i n g i s f o l l o w e d b y a t e n s e o b s e q u i o u s n e s s f r o m H i e r o n y m u s a n d h a u g h t i n e s s f r o m A r m a d o r w h i c h e n d s i n a c o n t e s t o f w i l l s w o n b y A r m a d o r u s i n g s m o o t h t a l k a n d a p p a r e n t m a g i c . W i t h S y b i l l a 1 s e n t r a n c e a new movemen t b e g i n s i n w h i c h A r m a d o r c i n c h e s h i s a u t h o r i t y b y t a k i n g c o n t r o l o v e r H i e r o n y m u s 1 w i f e a n d s i l e n c i n g H i e r o n y m u s w i t h a p r o m i s e o f m o n e y . F i n a l l y , A r m a d o r 1 s p o s i t i o n s e c u r e , h e t a k e s H i e r o n y m u s 1 m i n d o f f a n y q u e s t i o n i n g w i t h a r u s h o f o r d e r s a r r a n g i n g d e t a i l s a n d a n a c t o f l e g e r d e m a i n , a l l o f w h i c h s t u n H i e r o n y m u s i n t o s i l e n c e . T h e e n d o f t h e s c e n e b e g i n s w i t h a p a u s e w h i c h r u s h e s i n t o a c a s c a d e o f l a u g h t e r r e d o u b l e d w i t h t h e a p p e a r a n c e o f t h e M o n k . T h u s t h e r e i s a b u i l d f r o m b e g i n n i n g t o e n d w i t h f o u r m i n o r c l i m a x e s b e f o r e t h e f i n a l e x p l o s i o n w i t h t h e c u r t a i n . A s t h e l a s t s c e n e o f t h e a c t i t i s a l s o t h e c l i m a x , b e g i n n i n g h i g h a n d e n d i n g h i g h e r . S T A G I N G : T h e movement b a s e d o n A r m a d o r t a k i n g s t r o n g d e c i s i v e moves w i t h p e r i o d s o f s t i l l n e s s , a n d H i e r o n y m u s m o v i n g i n s h o r t , i n c r e a s i n g l y i n d e c i s i v e s p u r t s . H i e r o n y m u s i s l e f t i n c r e a s i n g l y i s o l a t e d d o w n s t a g e , h i s b a c k t o u s . A r m a d o r d o m i n a t e s f r o m t h e u p s t a g e f a c e - f r o n t p o s i t i o n o n t h e p l a t f o r m . O n c e A r m a d o r s t a r t s g i v i n g o r d e r s he-moves f r e e l y a l l o v e r t h e s t a g e a s H i e r o n y m u s makes i n e f f e c t i v e g e s t u r e s i n o n e s p o t . T h e c l i m a c t i c e m b r a c e i s u p c e n t r e l e f t , b a l a n c i n g a s t r o n g d i a g o n a l t o t h e M o n k ' s e n t r a n c e a t t h e d o o r . T h e l a y o u t o f t h e h o u s e i s a b a r r i e r i n t h i s s c e n e s i n c e t h e i n t e n t o f t h e i n t r u d e r s I s t o e s t a b l i s h t h e m s e l v e s I n t h e s t r o n g h o l d o f t h e c e l l a r . I n a l l t h e s u b s e q u e n t s c e n e s t h e c e l l a r d o o r i s a p o s i t i o n o f a d v a n t a g e f r o m w h i c h t o e n t e r t h e s c e n e s b u t h e r e g e t t i n g t o i t i s t h e p r o b l e m . D I F F I C U L T I E S : T h e m e a n i n g o f A r m a d o r ' s f i r s t l i n e s I s a m b i g u o u s . Why d o e s h e a s k w h a t R o m u l u s h a s t o l d H i e r o n y m u s a f t e r l a y i n g d o w n some c o n d i t i o n s ? T h e w o r d " c o m p l i m e n t " I s s t r a n g e -a t r a n s l a t i o n p r o b l e m ? So i s " Y o u d o u b t me , s o y o u w i l l b e l i e v e e v e n b e t t e r o f m e . " T h e w h o l e c o n v e r s a t i o n seems t o I n d i c a t e t h a t A r m a d o r h a s n o t f o u n d h i s f e e t i n t h i s s i t u a t i o n . 77. ACT 1. SCENE X - HIERONYMUS, ARMADOR, ROMULUS, (LATER SYBILLA AND THE MONK) (continued) DIFFICULTIES (continued) S y b i l l a ' s entrance needs to be s e t up so t h a t the audience can see from t h e i r s i g n a l s t h a t she and Armador are a c t i n g a c c o r d i n g to a p l a n , otherwise her acquiescence does not f i t our view o f her as r e v e a l e d i n p r e v i o u s scenes. MECHANICAL DIFFICULTIES: W i t h i n a few l i n e s Romulus must enter from the c e l l a r , S y b i l l a e x i t to i t and Armador remain near her u n t i l she does. A Jam i s c r e a t e d upstage f o r a few moments. BEATS: 1. TITLE: S n i f f i n g Each Other Out. ACTIONS: Hieronymus-to o f f e r h i s house Armador - t o accept h i s o f f e r w i t h c o n d i t i o n s Romulus - t o i n t r o d u c e Armador and watch NOTES: The c o n v e r s a t i o n i s c u r i o u s l y o b l i q u e . Armador and Hieronymus are b o t h speaking so as not to be embarrassed a t not y e t f i n d i n g t h e i r ground. Armador i s the f i r s t t o g a i n composure and so r u l e s the next b e a t . 2. TITLE: Overwhelming Hieronymus 1 ACTIONS: Armador - t o awe Hieronymus and so c o n t r o l him Hieronymus - t o master h i s astonishment a t Armador and h i s f e a r of Armador Romulus - to enjoy Armador's s k i l l NOTE: I n t h i s beat Armador takes f u l l command and puts on h i s a c t w i t h g r e a t e f f i c i e n c y . The sheer speed of h i s a c t i o n s prevents Hieronymus from r e c o v e r i n g h i s b a l a n c e . He i s out-punched i n a boxing r i n g . Facing page 78 RED MAGIC 15 Armador^ I cnn <jee through this bronze as I can see , through your forelicad bone, you-tivjeh'tnaa. [To ROMU-LUS.j|Carry »ny things into the cellar.) [He irifees hold of the miser's wrist.) If you betray inc, you will die, die a horrible i death, for I ngt only wield happiness with these hands, I • T t '• •-• • ': ' mm«m*fr&«kk&" [ROMULUS disappears with the black box.) I have touched a you. You are in rny powctpSHe last thlngFk must nave a servant, a pure creafmx,sM«SMa«a««8<^ Someone draws nearf A woman. I shall take her for servant. You have lost all right to her.H Hieronymus. My lord . . . ? Armador. Do not question nJel You will not leave this room and you will not try to find out what I am doing, Romulus will keep watch outside. Be content with the gold I shall give you without deigning to count it. • Hieronymus. H<?w much . . . more or less? Armador. Flow do I know? I expect, to make a thousand florins, I don't need more than a hundred to get abroad. The rest *.<s. . fS*«wft>5«*)«A^  Is this your wife? Yes, it's your wife. [SYBILLA stands /ix-' edly.) G**n@»h«*4>l You shall be my servant. You shall live with me in the celiac, and you shall carry out all my wishes*^  SYBILLA makes a sign of acquiescence. ROMULUS returns is it all Romulus. Ail is ready, Cavalier. Hieronymus. My lord . . . all of this ;reallyrcal? Armador [with irony). No, it is only a trick. Hieronymus. Fdon't believe you. It is true. I swear it, _ Armador. You reassure mcl [To SYBILLA.] Servantjjput down this dusty infant} Light a gentle fire in the cellar!, Yen, Romulus, watch the chimney and see if the birds' round about don't die? [ROMULUS goes out.) Hieronymus,: •fetch me holy water and six measures of best Burgundy. Wi: Hieronymus. At once. „?S ' Do I have to pay for the Armador. Herd [He rubs his sleeve and makes a coiir appear. He gives it to the jntler'.] i Hieronymus [astounded). You can already make money! 'from your sleeve? i Armador. I can do all sorts of other wonderful tilings. ' 1 U C I 3 (Pf&taps K'si ushes HL V head to fioor 78. ACT 1. SCENE X - BEATS 3. TITLE: Commandeering t h e Wife ACTIONS: Armador - t o appear t o overpower S y b i l l a w i t h magic so t h a t she w i l l n o t be blamed Hieronymus - t o p r o t e s t Armador 1s a c t i o n S y b i l l a - t o p r e t e n d t o be i n a t r a n c e under Armador*s power NOTE: Armador 1s t e c h n i q u e i s t o f o r c e a c o n s t a n t f l i p - f l o p i n Hieronymus* emotions so t h a t he becomes c o n f u s e d and weak from a l t e r n a t e a v a r i c e and o u t r a g e k-. TITLE: S e t t l i n g I n ACTIONS: Armador - t o t a k e charge Hieronymus- t o a d j u s t t o Armador's l e a d e r s h i p Romulus and S y b i l l a - t o p r e t e n d t o c a r r y out Armador's o r d e r s NOTE: T h i s b e a t sees a sudden m i l i t a r y e f f i c i e n c y f rom Armador mixed w i t h i r o n i c humour Facing page 79 .16 M I C H E L D E G H E L D E R O D E •HIKKONTMUS, hypnotized, t goes out [ACT III r L Q - 7 L Q - 8 n - •-,-1 j ARMADOR and SYBILIA gaze at each other for a long time, • then passionately rSsh into each other's arms. Armador. My virgin! ; Svhilla. Mv ghost! I hey hug each other savagely. THE MONK,**® pushed open the door, and he gazes on, concupiscently. Curtain. scene i 1 LQ -9 LQ -10 ACT TWO . . . '. SCENE—The same, cnre #w«s*v»«v j IliETtoNYMus. Tlicy have been down below, under my feet,1 since yesterday. A whole day.*. 9 . [He gels down on his. hands and knees and presses his ear to the floor.] Noticing,] ., . . What are they up to, if they are doing nothing? I; heard voices, in the night, as though litanies were being' .recited. Then there was a great uproar. There were devils,] frolicking about in the cellar. They were gnashing their I teeth, fighting, gasping. It was hideous. There must havel • been flames. And what if my house had been set on fire?! •'; . . [He gets ftp,] I have been irresponsible. Who is.this; •stranger, and what is he? Is he a Christian? Do I know' what this alchemist is doing, what, despicable materials he.-is contriving with, what witchcraft he perpetuates? . . . And' why does he want to get to Muscovy? 'gtfa«»mt • $h&>«ek»i&«^^ I have not dared to sleep. A thought has been nibbling wit! poor brain: is it possible to make been' hunting this chimera for centuries now. . . . WJ*tt; w^M<4**4*#fr»fift^ ^ During the night: I got it into my head that he was a man of evil intention,, who was putting on this cabalistic act in order to get him-: self into my house—and afterward, under the'cover of; darkness, to come out of his hiding place and kill me . , ,; rob rod Kill me, let that pass. But rob me! *. ;•'. [He takesI fright.] I have been killed! I have been robbed! Hcip!' i its sharp teeth at my gold? . . . People have; 79. ACT 1. SCENE X - BEATS 5. TITLE: Triumph ACTIONS: Armador and S y b i l l a - t o g i v e v e n t t o t h e i r e c s t a s y by embracing - t o i n c l u d e Romulus and t h e Monk NOTE: ACT 11. SCENE 1 PURPOSE: Romulus and the Monk - t o j o i n i n t h e c e l e b r a t i o n A pause becomes a g r o w i n g c h u c k l e as S y b i l l a emerges a f t e r w a t c h i n g Hieronymus l e a v e from n e a r c e l l a r d o o r . Armador sweeps S y b i l l a o f f her f e e t and Armador swings h e r around. Then they b o t h see t h a t Romulus and t h e Monk have come I n and they e x t e n d t h e i r downstage arms t o them as they a l l l e a n back and l a u g h . "My g h o s t " must be v e r y c l e a r . • HIERONYMUS t o e s t a b l i s h the time t o r e v e a l Hieronymus 1 s t a t e o f mind: h i s w a v e r i n g f a i t h , h i s a n x i e t y , h i s m a u d l i n s e l f - p i t y , h i s I n a b i l i t y t o a c t d e c i s i v e l y t o c r e a t e suspense because Hieronymus n e a r l y d i s c o v e r s the t r u t h w i t h h i s c o n t i n u a l q u e s t i o n i n g ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o s o l v e t h e many q u e s t i o n s c r e a t e d by Armador's appearance and b e h a v i o u r DOMINANT EMOTIONS: P e r p l e x i t y c o l o u r e d by e x a s p e r a t i o n , f e a r and mawklshness, MOOD: A t e n s e and weary f l u x o f t h e o u t l a n d i s h and t h e r i d i c u l o u s . RHYTHMIC IMAGE: a heap o f w h i t e ashes c o v e r i n g h o t c o a l s on wh i c h i s e r r a t i c a l l y s p r i n k l e d drops o f g a s o l i n e and wa t e r 80. ACT 1 1 . S C E N E 1 - HIERONYMUS S H A P E : T h e c u r t a i n o p e n s o n s i l e n c e a n d s t i l l n e s s b r o k e n a f t e r a p a u s e b y a s u d d e n o u t b u r s t f r o m H i e r o n y m u s w h i c h s t a r t s a s e r i e s o f i r r e g u l a r b u i l d s a n d t e n s e i n t e r l u d e s . T h e l i n e s " I h a v e b e e n r o b b e d " i s t h e g r e a t e s t o u t b u r s t w i t h "Why d i d n ' t I make a h o l e I n t h e f l o o r ? " a n d " I s h a l l d e s t r o y y o u l " L e s s h i g h p o i n t s . T h e s c e n e e n d s q u i e t l y w i t h H i e r o n y m u s m o r e r e l a x e d f o r h i s s p e a k i n g o u t a n d s e l f - p i t y . S T A G I N G : T h e l i n e s r e f e r r i n g t o t h e c e l l a r b e l o w s h o u l d b e p l a y e d u p s t a g e c n t h e p l a t f o r m w h i c h f o r m s t h e r o o f o f t h e c e l l a r . T h e l i n e s a b o u t r o b b i n g s h o u l d i n v o l v e t h e c h e s t . D I F F I C U L T I E S : T h e t i m e i s u n c l e a r . T a k e n one w a y , t h i s a c t c a n b e . s e e n t o r u n f r o m d a w n o f t h e s e c o n d d a y r i g h t t h r o u g h t o m i d n i g h t . S u c h a c o m p r e s s i o n i s t o o g r e a t . U s i n g l i g h t s t o p r o d u c e a l a t e a f t e r n o o n a n d e v e n i n g s e q u e n c e t h e l i n e s , b e i n g s u f f i c i e n t l y v a g u e , c a n f i t a m o r e b e l i e v -a b l e t i m e l a p s e . A d i f f i c u l t b a l a n c e m u s t b e s t r u c k b e t w e e n a n o b j e c t -i v i t y i n t h e a u d i e n c e w h i c h p e r m i t s h u m o u r , a n d a n i n v o l v e m e n t w h i c h makes h i s n e a r d i s c o v e r y o f t h e h o a x s u s p e n s e f u l . H e r e i s t h e f i r s t s c e n e i n w h i c h H i e r o n y m u s * c h a r a c t e r i s t i c i n a b i l i t y t o f o c u s o n a s i n g l e i d e a f r o m a s i n g l e p o i n t o f v i e w i s c l e a r l y s h o w n . B u t he d o e s b r u s h u p a g a i n s t t h e t r u t h a n d g i v e n t h e a b i l i t y t o c o n c e n t r a t e , he w o u l d h a v e d i s c o v e r e d i t . B E A T S : 1 . T I T L E : G r o p i n g f o r E x p l a n a t i o n s A C T I O N : H i e r o n y m u s - t o r e l i e v e t h e u n b e a r a b l e t e n s i o n f r o m i s o l a t i o n , f e a r , c u r i o s i t y a n d w a i t i n g Facing page 81 R E D M A G I C \DeU'rmhicdiy.] Shall I denounce him to the magistrate? No, Not that. . , . They would attest .Alchemists are 'liircd'p'oisoue^  to have to flee to Muscovy?*.'7! Q ^«*4~»»«i«-»-4^4^-^i««* »»«^i.iwr.;,l>iiiri> l«i^ .ihtt, widiiit"!'t"Wt"U»^ w0rt, ,tol.» tho-vwalW • '.lie sils.} How heavily the hours hang on rnel . . . And 'my wife doesn't come. I no longer have a wife. I<»>-hoiitii* j w^ .i»«»»to •«!»»? 11 c forbids .her to disclose what she sees, what she must do. All the pomp and circumstance of this :witchcraftl The ceremonial! AiMWWfaaHawovw Itnnwn»«ny j in««w>y»'>M:i« ' ib • itw MW«twtW)7 . . . She won't say anything.1 i'a hole in the floor? . . . It 'lioaxcd. I am at their mcrcv Why didn't I make ' is certain that I am being j '/oo&s at the babyPwhicn is lying oft^ SS3S*!|"'I ana not alone. Th^ s bit: of humanity was listening to rne, [He takes • hold, of it..} Sleep, little one! Take no notice of what is : happening; Men have unhealthy dreams. *«w«»*#M*««i»e>4s*^  When you grow up—.; iif you grow up—you will be rich; but never wonder where! ;the riches came from. Enjoy them stupidly! . . . From! itintc to time say to yourself that your father was tortured! land, that he did away.with his tranquillity for the hap-1 pines* of his kin! . . . [He ,outs the baby down.] Sleep,; k>x 1 shall destroy you! . . . [To himself.] Po-nofciwhiiM,'] 'Hieronymus. Be like your son, insensible and without com-1 • plaint. What is taking place had to be. It is solemn. It is] 81 ACT 1 1 . SCENE 1 - BEATS 2. TITLE: S e e k i n g a Refuge ACTION: Hieronymus - t o l o o k f o r s o l a c e i n "companionship", " p h i l a n t h r o p y " , and s e l f - p i t y . NOTE: The d o l l i s h a n d l e d i n a v e r y c o n t r a d i c t o r y f a s h i o n . I t i s a s e n s u a l r e a l i t y w h i c h i s f o r g o t t e n as Hieronymus f o c u s s e s on t h e images i t p r o d u c e s . A f t e r t h e s e r u n t h e i r c o u r s e , he r e p e a t s h i s i n t e r e s t i n t h e d o l l s t a r t i n g t h e p r o c e s s o v e r a g a i n . Facing page 62 18 MICHEL DE GHELDERODE ' [ A C T if grotesque. It is poignant. [He rub?, away a tear.) I am no doubt very happy . . . and I feel very miserable. (He- goes-to the window and obens it.URomulu-n-ti-us! Hcrel • '8 Scene ii voice of Romuius [in the street). Ws? I am not coming , _ 1 . in, , -^j^lvjnjssiOT Js_to keep watch. . [." . Th~e smoke 2 Hws "changed" color seven - tunes now. . . . Seven is the number. . . . The great work must be accomplished! Hieronymus [drawing back). You think so? Tell me!' . . . Don't tell me! • .c. You would say that you don't think so, and then yon would persuade me that, the other didn't know how to make gold. k<s)ii^fm>sm^d!^sii^4ms^. %m mm&&f&* If you don't think so, I do! Voice of Romulus. This* adventure has upset your under-1 standing. If I didn't believe it, would I have spent my whole day keeping watch on the crows, the smoke, the passers-by, the cats on the tiles, when begging is more profitable to me? You don't deserve what is happening to you, Hierony-mus. • : Hieronymus. I deserve it a hundred .times over, by my insomnia and my gripes. -. . . 1KMrfe=^w^s>4ft54«^;^_J^ r^^^^^^rm»~^4iki^^^^d^^^ . .TlormuhlsTT 3 TTave a presentiment oTth^TjestlurTrthTworst. . Voice of Romulus [laughing). That is because the best (gf and the worst arc going to happen. What do you know better and worse than gold? . . . I am going back to my , watch j". . . Close the win3ow.TTere is the monk, coming 4 at the trot.*. .E. Look out {ov^l^i^mm^»^dish4^^iep^. Scene iii' Hieronymus [closing r»ic window]. I he rascal! . . . He 1 has smclled it! Me has nosed out the gold from the dis-tance, the rogue! What is he coming here for? To stink up my room? [Distressed.] Or has he some revelation of (jyj^ £t_jsbejnK ^ bc!ow?J"They have vision's,; 2 ' these monks wTSo pretend "to be advTsed by the angels. . . . •Thcv have»»'tM'Owly"thw90J^ 'M? . Tribunals, torture cham-bers, the stake. . . . T4wyws^®8ii^^^ ' \>m&&&*&&»<!^ . . , later? [/'oyfu?/y.]*I:. ; sbali buy them all! 3 And the bishops . . . and even' - ! C Fopj^_jHj^W ~~Tie~rubsliis^ j, [rherc is a knock on the door. H."3i"fs] i Voice of The Monk. It is the suffering Church that is 82. ACT 11, SCENE 11 - HIERONYMUS. ROMULUS PURPOSE: t o show how t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s keep watch on e v e r y t h i n g and c o n t r o l o v e r Hieronymus. ( T h i s I s t h e second o f a s e r i e s o f scenes i n t h i s a c t d e s i g n e d t o e x p l o r e t h e p s y c h o l o g i c a l d i s i n t e g r a t i o n o f Hieronymus. By t h e end o f t h i s a c t Hieronymus i s q u i t e mad as w e l l as drunk and drugged.) ACTION: Hieronymus - t o r e a c h o u t f o r the s e c u r i t y o f companion-s h i p Bomulus - t o humour Hieronymus by eagerness and j o v i a l i t y DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Hieronymus - he wants t o s h a r e h i s m o r b i d i t y o f t h e p r e v i o u s scene b u t Bomulus' b e h a v i o u r f r i g h t e n s and annoys him Bomulus - f o r c e d j o v i a l i t y CHARACTER DOMINANCE: Bomulus dominates t h e scene. MOOD: The atmosphere o f t h e p r e v i o u s scene c o n t i n u e s w i t h s l i g h t added suspense from t h e p r e s e n c e o f a second smooth and dangerous c h a r a c t e r . Because Hieronymus i s o c c u p i e d . w i t h a n o t h e r p e r s o n , w e a r i n e s s from p a s s i n g t h e t i m e l e a v e s . BHYTHMIC IMAGE: The heap o f ashes from t h e p r e v i o u s scene has had pour e d on i t an a r e a o f smoothly b u r n i n g o i l b u t t h e p u f f s of steam c o n t i n u e . SHAPE: A p a r t from an h i a t u s i n the m i d d l e when Hieronymus s t a r t s t o become m a u d l i n , t h e r e i s l i t t l e r i s e o r f a l l i n t e n s i o n . DIFFICULTIES: T h i s i s n o t a p l o t scene and c a n n o t be j u s t i f i e d on p l o t grounds. The i n t e r e s t l i e s t h e r e f o r e i n t h e r e v e l a t i o n s o f Hieronymus' r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h one o f the c o n s p i r a t o r s a day l a t e r . 83. ACT 11. SCENE 11 - HIERONYMUS. ROMULUS ( c o n t i n u e d ) DIFFICULTIES ( c o n t i n u e d ) The l i n e o f Hieronymus' r e a s o n i n g i s a t b e s t u n c l e a r and a t w o r s t b r o k e n ; i t i s d i f f i c u l t f o r t h e a u d i e n c e t o f o l l o w . What i s i m p o r t a n t i s t h a t the s t a t e o f mind w h i c h produces such a t r a i n o f t h o u g h t i s c l e a r . Romulus' normalcy makes a good f o i l . BEATS: 1. TITLE: Demanding Company ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o c a l l Romulus o v e r t o t a l k Romulus - t o choose between the r i s k o f l e a v i n g h i s g u a r d p o s t and t h e r i s k o f Hieronymus becoming s u s p i c i o u s 2. TITLE: S u s t a i n i n g the Ruse ACTIONS: Romulus - t o keep Hieronymus's b e l i e f a l i v e Hieronymus - t o keep h i s head w h i l e s u s t a i n -i n g h i s b e l i e f NOTES: G r e a t e r suspense w i l l o c c u r i f we see Hieronymus q u e s t i o n i n g Romulus' a t i t t u d e w h i l e he does n o t q u e s t i o n t h e ' i f a c t s " . 3. TITLE: C h e e r i n g Him Up ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o g e t c o n s o l a t i o n f o r h i s unhappiness Romulus - t o c h e e r Hieronymus w i t h a j o k e k. TITLE: A Smoke S c r e e n ACTIONS: Romulus - ,to s u s t a i n t h e i l l u s i o n o f t h e Monk's d i s s o c i a t i o n w i t h t h e scheme 84 ACT 11. SCENE 111 - HIERONYMUS. THE MONK PURPOSE: t o i n c r e a s e the p r e s s u r e o f t e r r o r on Hieronymus t o p r o v i d e comic r e l i e f , i s more r i d i c u l o u s t h a n p a i n f u l g r o t e s q u e r i e ACTIONS: The Monk - t o i n c r e a s e Hieronymus' sense o f g u i l t and so weaken h i s a b i l i t y t o a c t a g a i n s t t h e p l o t t e r s because o f th e p e n a l t i e s o f h i s c o m p l i c i t y , and t o i n c r e a s e h i s f e a r o f d i s c o v e r y by h i n t i n g t h a t t h e monks know about h i s a c t i v i t i e s . Hieronymus - t o keep h i s composure DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Hieronymus - f e a r , s c o r n The Monk - sadism, h o t and c o l d CHARACTER DOMINANCE: The monk dominates MOOD: j o c u l a r p r e s s u r e , a d e a d l y t e a s i n g RHYTHMIC IMAGE: B l o w i n g on a gas fl a m e i n s h o r t b u r s t s . SHAPE: The peak o f the scene i s t h e attempt a t c o n f e s s i o n . I t i s a peak o f t e n s i o n r a t h e r t h a n one o f r a p i d exchange o r o f volume. The i n i t i a l speech by Hieronymus i s d i v i d e d i n t o t h r e e d i s t i n c t s e c t i o n s w h i c h b u i l d t o a t r i u m p h a l e n d i n g . The b a n t e r between the Monk and Hieronymus becomes more and more d e a d l y u n t i l t h e Monk t a k e s t h e he a t o f f w i t h " S t u p i d " . Another b u i l d o f t e n s i o n i s i n i t i a t e d by the Monk whi c h i s capped by t h e " c o n f e s s i o n " . A l o u d n o i s e ends the scene w i t h Hieronymus p r o t e s t i n g t h e s m e l l and t h e Monk l a u g h i n g u p r o a r i o u s l y . 85. ACT 11. SCENE 111 - HIERONYMUS. THE MONK STAGING: B a s i c a l l y Hieronymus I s s t a t i o n a r y and v u l n e r a b l e i n h i s c h a i r u n t i l he c a n be a r i n a c t i o n no l o n g e r . Then the monk f o l l o w s him and he r e t r e a t s . DIFFICULTIES: A g a i n the scene i s n o t e s s e n t i a l t o t h e p l o t b u t must be seen as a f u r t h e r e x p l o r a t i o n o f Hieronymus' breakdown. The r e a s o n f o r t h e Monk's l e a v i n g i s n o t c l e a r . I f he r e a l l y wanted a c o n f e s s i o n he would s t a y , so i t must be made c l e a r t h a t h a r rassment i s a l l he I s a f t e r . I n f a c t a c o n f e s s i o n would a c t u a l l y r e l i e v e Hieronymus and make him c a p a b l e o f a c t i o n . BEATS: 1. TITLE: ACTION: NOTE: 2. TITLE: ACTION: NOTE: 3. TITLE: ACTIONS: The R a s c a l Hieronymus - t o f i g u r e out why t h e Monk i s coming He i s v e r y shaken and e r r a t i c . Assuming t h e Worst Hieronymus - t o l o o k a t t h e consequences o f d i s c o v e r y Two s e p a r a t e e m o t i o n a l d i r e c t i o n s e x i s t i n t h i s b e a t , d e s p a i r and e x u l t a t i o n . G r e e t i n g s and S a l u t a t i o n s Hieronymus - t o d e s t r o y t h e Monk's p l e a s u r e w i t h sarcasm The Monk - t o g e t t h e most f u n out o f h i s own e n t r a n c e NOTE: Hieronymus must d i s a r m t h e Monk's mockery because i t c o u l d e a s i l y be t u r n e d a g a i n s t him. The Monk's g r e e t i n g i s l u g u b r i o u s . By u s i n g the ph r a s e " s u f f e r i n g Church", t h e Monk i s o b v i o u s l y o v e r p l a y i n g h i s p a r t . The comment "...-who knew what he was t a l k i n g about." i s an o b v i o u s , d e l i b e r a t e d e s e c r a t i o n o f a s a c r e d quote so t h a t i t s i n n e r meaning i s c a l l e d i n t o q u e s t i o n . t-acing page 8 6 . R E D M A G I C " 19 Ipaxsing by! . . . "Knock, and it shall be opened nnto you.'^ saici Our Lord—who knew what he was talking *— \j'he door o/)ens!)THE MONK comes in, laughing. SHcf-s oocn. Tiie Monk. G-ood dav, Master Hieronymus. How's your •health? Hieronymus [bittersweet]. Like that of the suffering LQ - 11 '•Church in person. . . . Good day. Father! . . . My health? . . . Ha! ... I arn radiant. I shall die a cen-tenarian! •_ 4 The" Monk [scnt<mt>ousIyJ^ R"cckkss man! Death comes: like a thief.6 Tmi : Hieronymus.Jlrivc the thief away! c . ' The'Monk. T;fkc heart! He is not coming in. . . . Rut: do you know that he will not come in tomorrow? There is; sudden death. lA&seJaJLHQ^ There is the wicked-' • • ncss «.>f,n^ i|hbors coveting property. There are epidemics.; A*i*ifSS»™*kl plagues. lw<wm»nvMU<low. And all mean death. Hieronymus [quaking], Wlfy are you delivering this speech to me®. . . to me, precisely? The Monk. Stupid! . . . It's the little salutary sermon that I whisper to all the parishioners. . . . \He fixes his 5 Tg<£«~^ seem anxioiisT*- , Hieronymus. No, no, no! ... I am cheerful, welly trtnt-, ^«ti. . . . Or if I appear anxious, it is #U» age, it is cares ; showing through. The Monk. Some remorse? Your hands are twitching. Hieronymus [rambling]. Yes. . . The result of a bad; night. . . . Because of the owls. ... It was cold. • | The Monk. You Watt-lit a fire against the cold? A»4h<*; ;. tMWfrO&W'IF? r t 0 o ! « **w«»Y iOOK$ MO) p(tocw»ro* H O N K ) I ; Hieronymus [stammering]. That is it .' t . yes .*,%! \ The Monk \i»km§4m-htmd], My son, do you not want I to make confession? , . #.* ! Hieronymus. Me? . . . What have I done? . . . Oh, i no. Father. 1 have nothing to confess to you.M • '. The Monk. And if, in fatherly fashion, I help you to • confess nothing? [He gazes into his eyes.] We monks re-86. ACT 11. SCENE 111 - BEATS 4. TITLE: E v o k i n g t h e Image o f Death ACTIONS: The Monk - t o f r i g h t e n Hieronymus w i t h a sermon on d e a t h Hieronymus - t o c o n t r o l h i s r i s i n g f e a r NOTE: T h i s b e a t i s a c l e a r example o f t h e Monk's "Heat on, heat o f f " t e c h n i q u e f o r s o f t e n i n g up h i s v i c t i m s . 5. TITLE: F o r c i n g a C o n f e s s i o n ACTIONS: The Monk - t o appear t o t r y t o h e l p Hieronymus i n h i s o b v i o u s s t r a i n Hieronymus - t o p r o t e s t h i s need f o r h e l p NOTE: The Monk e a s i l y a c c e p t s Hieronymus* postponement o f the c o n f e s s i o n , too e a s i l y i f he were g e n u i n e l y a f t e r one. At one p o i n t t h e Monk o v e r p l a y s h i s hand and b e g i n s t o g e t a c o n f e s s i o n . To s t o p i t he must do something, make a g e s t u r e , t o make Hieronymus annoyed - f o r i n s t a n c e by h u r t i n g Hieronymus' ego t h r o u g h a p p a r e n t i n d i f f e r e n c e -so t h a t Hieronymus w i l l s t o p . O t h e r w i s e Hieronymus' s t o p p i n g i s j u s t good l u c k . A c o n f e s s i o n here would a l t e r t h e p l o t and g i v e Hieronymus a s t r e n g t h t h e Monk does n o t want him t o have. The o t h e r a l t e r n a t i v e , t h a t the Monk knows f u l l w e l l t h a t Hieronymus w i l l n e v e r c o n f e s s i s r a t h e r weak c o n s i d e r i n g how much Hieronymus a c t u a l l y t r i e s . Facing page 8 7 20 MICHEL-DE GHELDERODE [ A C T It' ccive from God the faculty of reading souls like reading: books. g Hieronymus [regaining himself). It's a lie! . . . There is nothing written in my soul. P^^%^>mi^m-^i^¥^4t^» h«s»»Ifr.i>»my' >wewt»wi [He hesitates.) What I confess to you, Father, is that I am troubled. . . . My heart is veiled. . . . ; The Monk. I knew it. There.are very heavy secrets, that! one cannot entrust to men. Confessors arc not men: they-are sepulchers. J»w«4*$&w»*w»^ ^ -v*r^&mi . . . This night I had' a very clear vision that you were in danger. Come, I am; listening,'Mf sow. j - K M C £ j ^ MOAHV. eiie* i Hieronymus [very quietly). In the name of the Father! '. . - and of the Son . . . Mea culpa (%rfqf)[Fiercely.)1 Come back presently—when it is daike* . . . [He jokes.)1. I have a'story to tell you—no, a,comical nightmare. -W*k'' ya» n fflWrtt^Wwl. Presently! . You will find something, •to your profit in it. Yes, your monastery will reap its' benefit. ' j The Monk. As your son! will reap its. . . . Till cntlv! . scene iv LQ.~12 in their monastery. They sent him to me, and thev' [He obliges, laughing: ?P. I bless you! . derisively.) Hieronymus [holding his nose). Thank you'".'.". Go .. . . He has made a stink! . , , He has farted his benedic-; Hon! £. . . | The Monk [delighted], Alas, my contemptible body isj carj'ion. Ail my attentions are addressed to the soul.*". . ;S \Hej£es), "°™Yi7c7olrynln^^ . . . I am betrayed. , . . He wants me to confess^ . . ,; HamMHwdd it^Jaumf . . . I am going to call Romulus. . . . No. Tliis beggar is the-monks' friend. . . . The; monks know all. They did not want the Cavalier to makd gold are keeping watch on him, and keeping watch on me,at the! same time. . . . Tins is a good place here. . . . Tjhesej 87 6. TITLE: A S t i n k o f a B l e s s i n g ACTION: The Monk - t o e n j o y t h e s a d i s t i c p l e a s u r e o f f l a t u l e n c e and t o go Hieronymus - t o escape from t h e s m e l l ACT 1 1 . SCENE IV - HIERONYMUS. THEN ARMADOR PURPOSE: t o r e s t o r e b e l i e f t o Hieronymus. Lack o f p r o o f i s b e g i n n i n g t o make Hieronymus dangerous. t o remove Hieronymus so t h a t more can be l e a r n e d about t h e S y b i l l a - Armador r e l a t i o n s h i p t o i n t r o d u c e t h e n o t i o n o f Armador 1s i m m o r t a l i t y w h i c h becomes s i g n i f i c a n t l a t e r on I n t h e p l o t t o show degree t o w h i c h Hieronymus* b a l a n c e i s a f f e c t e d by g o l d and o t h e r I l l u s i o n s o f power ( t h e sword and i m m o r t a l i t y ) ACTIONS: Note: T h i s i s t h e f i r s t scene i n w h i c h Hieronymus* f e e l i n g s c o m p l e t e l y master h i s t h i n k i n g p r o c e s s e s . I n f a c t he s l i p s i n t o i n s a n i t y . When t h e p r e s s u r e o f d e s i r e s i s r e l i e v e d , he r e c o v e r s h i s b a l a n c e , though such r e c o v e r y i s l e s s and l e s s f r e q u e n t from here on. H i s a c t i o n s c a n n o t be d e s c r i b e d as " a c t i v e " d u r i n g p e r i o d s o f i n s a n i t y . They a r e a c t u a l l y p a s s i v e i n t h e sense t h a t he i s swept a l o n g w i t h t h e t i d e o f h i s f e e l i n g s . They a r e r e a c t i o n s w i t h o u t r e s t r a i n t . I f p r e v i o u s l y an a c t i o n has been d e s c r i b e d as " t o s u p p r e s s h i s f e a r " i t would i n i n s a n i t y be " t o be c a r r i e d away by h i s f e a r " . I f t h e s u p p r e s s i o n was u n s u c c e s s f u l o f c o u r s e t h e r e s u l t s would be s i m i l a r i n b o t h c a s e s except t h a t t h e way i n w h i c h t h e f e a r was r e l e a s e d would be d i f f e r e n t . The one i s l a c k o f c o n t r o l , t h e o t h e r an i n a b i l i t y t o c o n t r o l , Hieronymus - t o be r e c e p t i v e t o h i s d e s i r e s ( T h i s a c t i o n i s i n a sense t h e a c t o r ' s a c t i o n . ) Armador - t o r e a c q u i r e and i n c r e a s e h i s c o n t r o l o ver Hieronymus by p h y s i c a l t h r e a t , a p p e a l t o g u l l i b i l i t y , and t h e e n t i c e m e n t o f g o l d . DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Armador - amused contempt Hieronymus - a s t a t e o f v i o l e n c e o r I n t e n s i t y i n a l a r g e range o f emotions: f e a r , a v a r i c e , p r i d e , k i n e t i c s e n s a t i o n , e x u l t a t i o n and o b sequious g r a t i t u d e 88, ACT 1 1 . SCENE IV - HIERONYMUS. THEN ARMADOR (continued) CHARACTER DOMINANCE: Armador i s dominant from h i s entrance on. MOOD: B o i s t e r o u s a t times becomes v i o l e n t . RHYTHMIC IMAGE: A l a r g e and s l i g h t l y f r i g h t e n i n g b o n f i r e which, as i t s t a r t s w i t h a f l a r e up In the t i n d e r , makes us wonder I f I t can be c o n t r o l l e d . SHAPE: L e f t alone, Hieronymus works h i m s e l f up Into a paroxysm of f e a r , capping a steady b u i l d . Then, from a s t a t i c impotence he suddenly becomes a c t i v e , s e e k i n g to c o n t r o l the f e a r by mime. The mimed sword f i g h t reaches i t s peak on "I f l i n g " . A s h o r t p e r i o d of tense detumescence f o l l o w s (tense because we wait f o r Hieronymus to d i s c o v e r Armador) which i s suddenly broken by Hieronymus' s e e i n g Armador. Because Armador i s not f u l l y i n v o l v e d and so f i n d s the scene s l i g h t l y funny, h i s tongue l a s h i n g does not reach the h e i g h t of t e n s i o n t h a t the sword f i g h t does but i t appears to reach a h i g h e r climax. A new s e c t i o n begins r i s i n g , i n I n t e n s i t y u n t i l Hieronymus' e c s t a t i c prolonged o u t b u r s t which runs down l i k e a gramophone. A s m a l l wave of I r r i t a t i o n completes the scene as Armador i n s i s t s on obedience. In g e n e r a l , two l o n g b u i l d s occur w i t h b i g , s u s t a i n e d climaxes, the f i r s t based on c o n f l i c t and the second on e c s t a c y . The scene ends wi t h a s m a l l wave of c o n f l i c t . STAGING: Hieronymus' p e r i o d of i n n e r t u r m o i l b e f o r e he gets the sword i s r e l a t i v e l y s t a t i o n a r y and needs the s t r e n g t h of up c e n t r e placement from where he can a l s o r e f e r out the window to the Monk. The sword f i g h t i s determined by the p o s i t i o n of the sword as a s t a r t i n g p o i n t . Prom there he moves toward the c e l l a r door but i s d e f l e c t e d by h i s h a l l u c i n a t i o n . The f i g h t needs to end so t h a t Armador i s c l e a r l y v i s i b l e having entered from the c e l l a r door and so t h a t Hieronymus can have h i s back to Armador. Down r i g h t seems the obvious p l a c e . Armador can then t h r e a t e n him w i t h h i s back to the w a l l and r e l e a s e him to r e t u r n the sword by s t e p p i n g up stage, r i g h t of the t a b l e . The scene w i t h the c o i n r e q u i r e s much movement from Hieronymus and a s t r o n g f i x e d p o s i t i o n f o r Armador so t h a t he can be dominant. Armador produces the c o i n up c e n t r e on the p l a t f o r m , Hieronymus c l u t c h e s a t i t from the f l o o r l e v e l below Armador, i n t h i s way g i v i n g Armador the commanding p o s i t i o n . 89. ACT 11 f SCENE IV - HIERONYMUS, THEN ARMPQR (Continued) STAGING: (continued) Armador tosses the coin down l e f t where i t i s followed by a f r a n t i c Hieronymus as Armador takes up the strong stationary p o s i t i o n s i t t i n g on the down l e f t corner of the table. Hieronymus leaps and gyrates l e f t of Armador, rushes to the window to see the coin better, stopping and s t a r t i n g to b i t e and kiss i t , he crosses above the table to l e f t of Armador with a mock r i t u a l of bearing a host and goes on his knees to Armador. The whole adds up to a merry-go-round with Armador as the bemused axle. F i n a l l y Hieronymus moves upstage to include his chest and rooms, and returns to the window f o r another look at the coin i n preparation f o r the f i n a l moves when Hieronymus i s again driven down r i g h t and eventually out the door. DIFFICULTIES: Just as Hieronymus' actions are passive i n terms of his will-power, so too, the nature of the climaxes changes. Instead of b u i l d i n g to a climax i n the sense that a passion becomes stronger and stronger u n t i l i t over-whelms the character, the passion s t a r t s by being master and what we see i s an unrestrained running of Its course to exhaustion, instead of a regaining of control a f t e r an outburst. Armador's l i n e s are somewhat awkward. MECHANICAL PROBLEMS: Finding a tossed coin can be d i f f i c u l t , a coin should be planted beforehand. BEATS: 1. TITLE: ACTION: NOTE: Working Up His Fears Hieronymus - to brood over the f a c t that the Monk knows about Armador From "This beggar i s the monk's f r i e n d . . . " to "...above a l l , robbed!..." i s a long sustained b u i l d . Mansuetude means meekness, d o c i l i t y . Facing page 90 R E D M A G I C 21 2a monks ar..- abominable rogues. . . . Wl»y..«iw>uld I ..how ,scituj»li».i»iitl> r.yvotvt. to tiwrn? . . . [He is out of hreatli.]', Wntflh .<M»i>..foir. ttap.il . . , Once the gold is made, are they1 not going to rush in, rim straight to the cellar door, bawl-! . ing, "Evil! Evil!" and deliver me up alive to the inquisi-tors, who will seize the gold—both the gold and my carcass, which they will meekly burn with mansuetnde, not without: absolving and regaling their accomplice Romulus? ... I am sold, delivered up, lost, bumed.jdamned. . . .; .^liiL—L'il^bedj^ dtwwtatiinnl ... I shall unmask them! • ^ fll shall kick this pale cavalier and his trickery tools out ofjdoorsl I am master in my house! (Where is my sword?)-*. . . U M ' IM*«U>»A«»4^ . , . [He takes a sword down from the wall.) liM®*&ki*A .9A [He makes passes like a swords-man.} _Ah! . , ._OhI _.c\*. ijrf/ic cellar Soor lias opcned~: ARMADOR,*lumds Behind liis back and smiling, contem-. plates the scene.] I cleave hirn! ... I cut him in twain! . » . Back . . . bleed . . . die ... no quarter . . . charla-tan . . . suborner . . . sacrilegious . . . accursed . . . sneak ..... robber! . P. This is justice. . . . I slice you, coward! ... What? You arc immortal? You defy death? ... I stab you, intcrstab von, and counterstab voul . . . Ah!, Oh! " ' He is dead. . . . There he. ^Idl^liSlLilllSl, *££L2£Li2J!LL£!£^ ^ com7s~fblwSr3i nonchaianilyfiVh&ROXYMXis gives a cry of fright and lets his swfird fail.-He retreats, seeks to hide himself, and stain-• titers.) Ah, sire! ... I was doing fny exercise. ... I be-: long to the Old Order of Saint Michael. . . . How arc you, may I ask? 1 Armador [icily].. He is dead, . . . There he lies ' (He advances toward HIERONYMUS,] Fool! . . . Vulgar! '• creature! [He spits at HIERONYMUS.] At the very moment; And I fling your remains like old refuse! into the gutter. . . . Flai . . . lies. ... It serves him right! th brsng you a prodigious message, you are in imagina-tion killing me—me, your benefactor! If von had a'' less opaque skull, I would prove to you that the Cavalier Armador is invulnerable. He could not die, were he pierced by seven swords. I, just as you see me. have been hanged, shot, drowned, felled, even fastened to a gibbet, and I'buried, ... It is supernatural, unbelievable, isn't it? Ha Hiaoy.thing 9 0 . ACT 11. SCENE I V - BEATS 2. TITLE: K i c k i n g t h e C a v a l i e r Out ACTION: Hieronymus - t o d e s t r o y t h e a l c h e m i s t NOTE: There I s no o b v i o u s s h i f t f r o m r e a l i t y t o h a l l u c i n a t i o n ; b o t h a r e r e a l t o Hieronymus. 2 a . TITLE: Watching H i s Own Death ACTION: Armador - t o enjoy Hieronymus' i d i o c y NOTE: B e a t s 2 and 2a o f c o u r s e o v e r l a p . 3. TITLE: S u b j u g a t i n g t h e R e b e l ACTIONS: Armador - t o r e - e s t a b l i s h c o n t r o l o v e r Hieronymus Hieronymus- t o p l a c a t e Armador Faciftg page 91 22' MICHEL DE GHELDERODE [ A C T II! * . ft I MH>>IU 4in<>H}>ininoi3. f am neither alive nor dead; hut one; sees on our globe beings with human appearances who do not belong to humanity. They are dangerous and good-! naturcd—it all depends—and they possess the terrifying-power of meting out death to those who give offense to; them. 4 Hieronymus [on.his knees]. Sire! . . . Pardon! ... I; was wandering in my mind. ... I admire you. . . . You arc noble. . . . You are generous, ... I am only aiv earthworm. . ._, Let mc make amends for my effrontery. "{He st£in<r/s.]*S»*you cannot .die? Why, you are the riclrestj of men; skws*. you possess immortality!^^.s?Ye8j«4«4»«¥»! »«M*«»«iH*~©«M^^ You possess im-i 'mortality? . . . Share this possession, sire! ... 1 am so; afraid of death. . . . Sell mc the recipe. Armador. What would you do with it? Is it not enough that I give you gold? Hieronymus [bewildered]. Gold? . . '. He gives me gold? . . . Where is it, this gold? Show me! • D Armador [bringing his hands from behind his back and displaying a coin). Here! ® e('lRMfl0,^lS5Si;s Hieronymus [jumping about). Noel! Noel!' [He'seizes' the coin.] I want to touch it. . . . You have made this, siref Armador [disdainfully]. It is the first proof. Yes, the gold, is made. It is cooling in its.earthen mold. This piece is for you. (sns o n Taui-Cr @ Hieronymus [lyrical]. Oh, joyl . . . He has made gold: for me it has He is a god! [He tosses the coin.) It ig real," weight, it rings! [He kisses it] I love it. It is a sacred ho$t£ [He takes ARMADOR'S hands.] Lord Armador,' si am your slave.*R."^ ErL.5JI. would not be more affected - if .[Christ were to give me His holy cross! . . . There now, do ll not blaspheme in your honor? . . . [He dram back.) [•What? These is gold on your hands! Thu^ wiorj'UMm 4>n» 'hands of gold! . . , Give me your hands! Cut them offl: [•No. Keep them to work with again, rtxwo •cw»08t"i>nwii»,' ! ti»»?w»»>wi»imw"l»n»»hiTi 1 hwuto-ot fireffisf"? Let them' [work hard. ?J. • My chest is huge.*'?. . I• have empty. 1 rooms. . . ..What does it matter to vou, my friend, my B^gjves him sword G - H tooks at corn in light 91. ACT 11. SCENE IV - BEATS k, TITLE: The F i r s t C o i n ACTIONS: Armador - t o make Hieronymus amenable by d a z z l i n g him w i t h p r o o f o f t h e prom i s e d g o l d Hieronymus - t o be c a r r i e d away by t h e g o l d Facing page 92 RED MAGIC ''f»':»^M Are you sure that this coin will pass, ;tiiai no one will KUCSS its origin?(LOOKS fit COIN IN LIGHT) i Armador \annoyec •fcitcr? U«4^ w«i*««*»-J*« j. Arc you saying that I am a coujrjter^ ' • "fait 4»ti ^ h i i w o o h i ^ H i f t d A ^ C r O , run mTTjuy some Burgundy 5 to the inn. With tTTat. coin you wit 'wine. 9 Hieronymus. You had some yesterday. Have you drunk it already? raises) Armador. Obey I . . 1 What docs it matter to you, since LQ - 13 nothing is costing you anything, not even the gold without which nothing can be bought. 1 need this wine to finish my' work.c Hieronymus. Wine for your work? Armador. You do not need to understand. Get the wine • ,. . . and hide the excitement that is making your snout blaac. [rowans overt " J ^ Q C K S oo0R'f''rmSirl \ SQ ~ 7 1 lir.r.ONVMus "?r>cs out.\Left a/onc* ARMADOR goes to the ^^^^""^ehn^Tx^vsTom his pocket.^ind tries them in scene 1 • ike lock. The lid opens. SYBILLA comes in. She is disheveled and she staggers. She is visibly happy. Her eyes have violet •.rings round them. She has patches of gold on her cheeks, Sybilla. Armador, leave the chest. It is not time yet. Armador. I was trying the skeleton key. f . . [He clasps her in his arms.} Soon we shall have finished playing this i comedy. Tonight we shall run away. I Sybilla. Yes, I shall follow you along the roads, across f the plains, over the seas, as far as hell, which will bum less ilium your skin, the skin of a young devil. . ? , Come, f... . I need more loving, (sue PULLS HIM] G> "}. Armador. Aren't you weary? I have spent a whole day: Itcndcrly tearing you with my teeth and my claws. .[•Ah, if only I could forge myself i.woukl fmaily satisfy you! a priapus of bronze that Sybilla. I am broken as though I had been •wheel; but, my executioner, I am "TvIyT c^nia? still ft vfeu. I ut on the am was a j i>r;ppy, iwypyl . ; . M  life h s begun with y{ I thin white corpse that you quickened with your heat. You Iwcrc the voluptuous ghost that came to enchant my nights; [.as a lonely wife. . . . As a virgin, I wept. As a bitch, II [rejoice. . . . I am well revenged. . . . I am overflowing; 92. ACT 11. SCENE IV - BEATS 5. TITLE: S e n d i n g Him On An E r r a n d ACTIONS: Armador - t o g e t r i d of Hieronymus so t h a t he c a n l o o k a t the c h e s t Hieronymus - t o q u e l l t h e doubts t h a t r e t u r n once he has exhausted h i s r e a c t i o n I n Beat 4 NOTE: Hieronymus 1 a c t i o n i s from an i n f e r i o r t o a s u p e r i o r ; a t no time does he appear t o cause a r e a l problem f o r Armador; he i s an i r r i t a -t i o n . ACT 11. SCENE V - ARMADOR AND SYBILLA PURPOSE: t o c l a r i f y t h e r e l a t i o n s h i p between Armador and S y b i l l a t o e s t a b l i s h sympathy f o r t h e o n l y p e o p l e t o escape a l i v e t o i n t r o d u c e t h e l i f e f o r c e s o f sex, l o v e and y o u t h t o c o u n t e r t h e d e s s i c a t i n g d e a t h f o r c e o f a v a r i c e t o h i n t t h a t I n s p i t e o f the p r e s e n t p r o m i s e of y o u t h , i t c o n t a i n s t h e seeds o f i t s own c o r r u p t i o n ACTIONS: Armador - t o s u s t a i n h i s r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h S y b i l l a w h i l e r e c o v e r i n g h i s s e x u a l c a p a c i t i e s S y b i l l a - t o b r i n g Armador back t o bed, b u t f a i l i n g t h i s t o be n e a r him DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Armador - l o v e mixed w i t h a p p r e h e n s i o n and s a t i e t y S y b i l l a - s e x u a l d e s i r e and l o v e CHARACTER DOMINANCE: S y b i l l a t h e n Armador MOOD: d a r k l y r o m a n t i c RHYTHMIC IMAGE: g l o w i n g c o a l s 9 3 . ACT 11. SCENE V - ARMADOR AND SYBILLA ( c o n t i n u e d ) SHAPE: A f t e r a t e n s e , s t e a l t h y b e g i n n i n g as Armador t r i e s t h e l o c k e d door and t e s t s h i s key i n the c h e s t , S y b i l l a e n t e r s l a n g u i d l y . She i s s l o w t o speak and when she does she s t a r t l e s him e n d i n g t h e f i r s t p a r t o f the scene. A s m a l l c r i s i s d e v e l o p s as Armador ad m i t s he i s s e x u a l l y worn o u t . S y b i l l a s u b l i m a t e s her d e s i r e i n t o a q u i e t l y e c s t a t i c g r a t i t u d e w h i c h t a k e s the p r e s s u r e o f f Armador and ends w i t h m u t u a l l y happy embrace. The t h i r d p a r t o f t h e scene i n w h i c h Armador escapes from p r e s e n t t r o u b l e s i n t o a h o p e f u l p i c t u r e o f the f u t u r e , i s i n t e r r u p t e d by Hieronymus. STAGING: Armador must be by the c h e s t when S y b i l l a a p p e a r s . She w i s h e s t o d r a g him back t o t h e c e l l a r . They end t h e f i r s t p a r t up c e n t r e b r e a k i n g the l e v e l . P h y s i c a l d i s t a n c e opens between therm as she moves down r i g h t and he f o l l o w s down c e n t r e i n a l m o s t a dance movement. The c h e s t and f i r e p l a c e hob become u s e f u l as a s t a g i n g a r e a f o r Armador's l o n g speech so t h a t S y b i l l a c a n s i t , t h e g o l d can be n e a r , and Armador can s i t a t h e r f e e t , t h e whole o p p o s i t e the door t h r o u g h w h i c h Hieronymus w i l l e n t e r . DIFFICULTIES: T h i s scene i s c o m p l e t e l y d i f f e r e n t from t h e o t h e r s and i t s " r o s i n e s s " needs t o be emphasized. S y b i l l a ' s l i n e s i n p a r t i c u l a r a r e r a t h e r awkward and l i t e r a r y . A h i g h l e v e l o f s e x u a l i n t e n s i t y from S y b i l l a must be shown i n a v e r y s h o r t l e n g t h o f t i m e . Armador's l o n g unbroken speech needs v a r i e t y and b r e a k i n g up. BEATS: 1. TITLE: T e s t i n g the Key ACTION: Armador - t o make s u r e t h e c h e s t c a n be opened 2. TITLE: P r o p o s i n g One Too Many ACTIONS: S y b i l l a - t o b r i n g Armador back d o w n s t a i r s f o r some more sex Armador - t o r e f u s e S y b i l l a w i t h o u t a l i e n a t i n g her 9k, i ACT 11. SCENE V - ARMADOR AND SYBILLA ( c o n t i n u e d ) BEATS: ( c o n t i n u e d ) 3. TITLE: T r a n s f i g u r i n g the D e s i r e ACTIONS: S y b i l l a - t o d i v e r t h e r s e x u a l energy i n t o g r a t i t u d e Armador - t o enjoy h er p l e a s u r e Facing page 9 5 24 M I C H E L D E G H E L D E R O D E [ A C T J ! 4 with love and hatred, and the hvo are good for inc.* Armador, my; wizard, wh.at did yon do to bewitch melfc&Pijl )iiii.ti<»h>>a, Aniiadgr, Oh, that night were earns*!*? w &-^-"-SQ for sway , , , very far awav ... ; Sybilla. Where? Armador, Near the Western sea, in the town of bells, where we were both.of ns born; where, lad and girl, we< played on the quays; where the sails of the ships swelled'' up. , . . Do you remembcr?(s«£.sr«)With the gold we take"* with us we shall open a tavern where the men from Oster-land will come, and the English, and the Genoese, and the Levantines. There will be dicing SJM»», and we shall secretly sell virgins. It is a rich town, another Venice, where all the vessels from the open sea make land. And the shores :e&4««-ife*»f» endlessly echo with the throaty rattle of the • •orgy. Later, we shall have houses, fields, servants. No, I \ am not an adventurer, and if I followed the armies, if I-1 lived the inflamed life of the Flemish mercenaries, it was i because I was without love and without home, the saddest i of orphans. Now I have found you again. You have the j odor of birth. Your flesh is salt, like the sand of rny coun- j try. You have become beautiful in my hands, more precious j 'than gold. And what does the ruin of this baleful M man j . matter to me, when a look from you makes me like a child, ] and'makes me oblivious of my crimes? . . , [He takes her \ •in ajxmj^ ^ ^ ^ ^ J J ^ P not tcll_me that you )(jvc_jx}cj^^0^: "5 "(Yon arcj eTuml)) . . .. file "frees iiimselJ^'Tli'SiFJomeonc 1 - Q .sSSSwSilrStand absolutely still. *««TS T O O P £ F L °<6ST- M , 'sxurs i t , g .: ,SYint.LA arranees herself in ghostly fashion, her eves closed, scene vi 1 urea HIKRONYMUS enTers, Hieronymus. There are six the blue comet . , . the best of the purple wines dating from the time of I . . Ho! the coin was a good one. They, said to me, "By Saint Matthew, you can see well enough] I where the bags of crowns lie!" [He puts the bottles on the] ^A£^h~en~hevook~s aTTwu^eT^yrmTa? ? .C"Tcm? » H. j ;You arc like a wax candle. I Is she dead? ... In a j [trance? . . . Ilev, Cavalier, what have you done with her?| C - quick Kiss, laugh, sits 95* ACT 11. SCENE V - BEATS k, TITLE: J o i n i n g t h e S o u l s When t h e B o d i e s F a i l ACTIONS: Armador - t o come as c l o s e t o S y b i l l a as p o s s i b l e t h r o u g h memory, p l a n n i n g , w i s h i n g , a s s o c i a t i o n , t o u c h and s m e l l i e . e v e r y t h i n g e x c e p t t h e sex a c t f o r w h i c h he i s t e m p o r a r i l y impotent S y b i l l a - ( p a s s i v e a c t i o n ) t o p a r t i c i p a t e 5. TITLE: The R e t u r n i n g Husband ACTIONS: Armador - t o c o v e r up any i n c r i m i n a t i n g c l u e s S y b i l l a - t o a s s i s t Armador ACT 11. SCENE V I - HIERONYMUS. SYBILLA. ARMADOR FOR A WHILE PURPOSE: t o p r o v i d e a s u s p e n s e f u l o r d e a l t h r o u g h w h i c h t h e q u a s i -h e r o i n e must p a s s . Scene V has d e c i s i v e l y swung sympathy b e h i n d Armador and S y b i l l a e s p e c i a l l y S y b i l l a . Her s i t u a t i o n i s t h e most d e s p e r a t e , i n c r e a s i n g l y so because of Hieronymus 1 now o b v i o u s i n c i p i e n t madness. t o f u r t h e r expose Hieronymus' a v a r i c e and t o show him how d a n g e r o u s l y c l o s e t o t h e s u r f a c e h i s l i b i d o i s ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o f i n d out what has been g o i n g on d o w n s t a i r s S y b i l l a - t o c o n t r o l h e r r i s i n g r e v u l s i o n and f e a r by h i d i n g b e h i n d the c o n v e n i e n t r o l e o f dumbness g i v e n t o h e r by Hieronymus Armador - t o go and p r e p a r e a way o f f r e e i n g S y b i l l a from t h e s i t u a t i o n DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Hieronymus - g r e e d , c u r i o s i t y , l u s t S y b i l l a - f e a r , r e v u l s i o n Armador - t h e calm t h a t comes w h i l e c o n t r o l l i n g a t h r e a t e n i n g s i t u a t i o n CHARACTER DOMINANCE: Hieronymus dominates. 9 6 . ACT 1 1 f SCENE V I - HIERONYMUS.. SYBILLA. ARMADOR FOR A WHILE ( c o n t i n u e d ) MOOD: A r i s i n g suspense, t e n s i o n , and r e v u l s i o n f o l l o w s voyeu-r i s t i c c o n c u p i s c e n c e . RHYTHMIC IMAGE: a slow b u t e r r a t i c a l l y b u r n i n g f u s e n e a r l n g a l a r g e e x p l o s i v e charge SHAPE: The t e n s i o n o f Hieronymus 1 e n t r a n c e i s q u i c k l y r e d u c e d as i t becomes ap p a r e n t t h a t he i s g o i n g t o a c c e p t S y b i l l a 1 s p r e s e n c e w i t h o u t q u e s t i o n . From Armador's e x i t u n t i l h i s reapp e a r a n c e t h e t e n s i o n r i s e s and f a l l s i r r e g u l a r l y w i t h g r e a t v a r i e t y b u t w i t h an u n d e r l y i n g average i n c r e a s e . STAGING: Hieronymus must use t h e t a b l e t o p u t down h i s awkward l o a d and Armador must p i c k up h i s b o t t l e s from i t . S i n c e S y b i l l a c a n n o t be e x p e c t e d t o move, Hieronymus must c r o s s t o h e r t o examine h e r . Once a l o n e , Hieronymus by h i s g e n e r a l upstage p o s i t i o n e f f e c t i v e l y b l o c k s escape f o r S y b i l l a . She remains s t a t i o n a r y as he buzzes e r r a t i c a l l y around h e r . The e x p r e s s i o n on her f a c e i s i m p o r t a n t t o th e a u d i e n c e , She does n o t make eye c o n t a c t w i t h Hieronymus e x c e p t where i t i s o b v i o u s l y e f f e c t i v e . DIFFICULTIES: Armador i s o f f s t a g e t o o l o n g a time f o r what he i s d o i n g ; t h e r e f o r e t h e a u d i e n c e must n o t have t i m e t o q u e s t i o n h i s l o n g absence. Hieronymus' good s p i r i t s and h i s r e c e n t a s s o c i a t i o n w i t h t h e w o r l d have r e t u r n e d him a measure o f s a n i t y w h i c h n e v e r c o m p l e t e l y l e a v e s i n t h i s scene. Though d r i v e n by s t r o n g d e s i r e s , he n e v e r l o s e s h i s a b i l i t y t o c a l c u l a t e . MECHANICAL PROBLEMS: C a r r y i n g s i x b o t t l e s i s t r i c k y u n l e s s they have c o r d o r r a f i a h a n d l e s . 97. ACT 11, SCENE V I - HIERONYMUS, SYBILLA, ARMADQR, FOR A WHILE ( c o n t i n u e d ) BEATS: 1. TITLE: B r i n g i n g i n t h e Wine ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o b r i n g i n t h e wine and t o sh a r e h i s f e e l i n g about h i s a d v e n t u r e Armador - t o m a i n t a i n an a i r o f s u p e r i o r i t y S y b i l l a - t o be s t i l l and p r e t e n d n o t t o hear 2. TITLE: Q u e r y i n g Armador ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o f i n d out what i s wrong w i t h S y b i l l a Armador - t o a l l a y any s u s p i c i o n by h i s g e s t u r e o f s e l f - c o n f i d e n c e S y b i l l a - as b e f o r e Facing page 98 RED MAGIC 25 9 Pi ;. . . Have you killed lier? . . . [ARMADOR gives signs of > 'hnpctii<:ncc.j I beg your pardon. . . . AW»«6»>wf¥«w8*l. . . ,, !You were allowed. . . . All is well because the gold is igood. • . . I do not reproach you for anything. » 6 • • : Armador. I am~takiing thesFThree Tttisks for my work-. jKcep the others for youfself. Drink them. You may do that, 'no* that you are rich. (He goes hack to the cellar, armed '. with his 'botlics. [ ; 1 TluTr^ylmIs\walking around SYBILLA, examining her \irom all sides). Tell mc, wife, what have vou se?n? . , . ilWisat did he do? . . . The secret? . . . the gold? . . . D^id you help him? . . . The formulas? . . ..The rites? i. *. B. Spcakl . . . . I call on you to spcakl . . . Look, he ' is robbing me. . . . He will keep the greater part. . . ., .'How many coins has he made? . . .Make an estimate! j. . > A hundred? . . . . More? . . . W H ! you speak, good-; : wifcT T^SYBn.i.A indicates that she will rtbt.) No? •. . ..No?i• :. .'. [He raises his fm.\ j>he will not speak. . . . True.: :, , . She is dumb. . . . >io*w»«<MViy B-nnnoo. . . . Sybilla, • ; I cancel my order. . . . i1_iU«i«$»**ig»4«^  »tri'miiy«nti. . . [SYBIIXA looks al him with a hard express-' '.sion.] As well beat an ass. . . . Capable woman! . . , Be! ; dumb! . . , ^ «MMfa«*tme*i" if. a miua afxmaiwfm • fc'arqoi j hi^j^m^^m^,. . . . In that way you will never betray Wii'li tvi<ir^ ini»y.»ii>'>ll'<iu«>i«.lu)t in.waiw. As for your secret, I' | shall not ask you. . . . I make you a gift of \X?\ (-slI^ You; \ will end up by wliispcring it in your dreams, without. ; knowing it. . . ; You speak quite loudly at night. . . . I' | often eavesdrop on you, with my car to the wall. . . . You • laugh. . . . You pant, . . . You ramble. . . . You groan. . ! . . . It is comical! [He looks at her clo$eb/V*ln a shaky  '-voice.] All the same, I would like to know .•.KfWhat did. ™ lie 6urer~ydvi"To~^ T?~7~7T Wilni: have yoTTdoiie in that; 1 cellar, since yesterday, with this man who has such strange' : powers? . . . [Pause.) I am not jealous . . . bee, hec, hoc :. . . not jealous . . . nor a cuckold . . . hce, hce, hec] j . . . [Hissing.) But he has touched you. It is written on; fyour body. %m^mi«^^»^Ai^mA . ,°. There.. . . and. ! there ffrw vS8f&& face, yam neck, yam wrists) . . . [He sniffs at her.) Perhaps he ordered you to strip yourself ; naked, as on a witches' sabbath? . . . Yoe? •»•••.'Awwwl . . What does it matter vwhea 98. ACT I I , SCENE V I - BEATS 3. TITLE: L e a v i n g t h e F i e l d Secure ACTIONS: Armador - t o go d o w n s t a i r s t o g e t a c o i n NOTE: The "big q u e s t i o n i s why does he n o t t a k e S y b i l l a w i t h him, s i n c e i t s e r v e s no purpose t o l e a v e h e r , i t i s u n c o m f o r t a b l e f o r h e r , and she c a n n o t o f her own v o l i t i o n l e a v e s i n c e she, i n h e r r o l e , i s supposed t o obey o r d e r s . 4. TITLE: P u l l i n g T e e t h ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o c r o s s - e x a m i n e S y b i l l a S y b i l l a - t o r e f u s e t o r e s p o n d about g e n e r a l i t i e s 5. TITLE: Sex and G o l d ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o d e a l w i t h the image o f S y b i l l a c o n j u r e d up by t h e n o i s e s he has he a r d t h r o u g h the n i g h t and by the g i l t on her body S y b i l l a - t o b r a c e h e r s e l f a g a i n s t b e i n g overcome by r e v u l s i o n Facing page 9 9 ~Z«T M I C H E L D E G H E L D E R O D E ""[ACT U the gold is here? ... I see traces of it on your flesh?W)i Doubtless there is some on your breasts ... on your 'stomach ... on your thighs'! Fake off your dress! No! i. . . That is unnecessary. ®. . . Ho will twplowi'" moi . . .^You^could be all gold, arid it would still leave me scene vW^^^^^'^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^o^t'. \ steps are heard.} He is coming back. . . , lU&*&t&f&*mm£ ' • i • ARMADOR appears, holding a leather bag -which he swings, around. Sound of money. \ : Armador. Lisfen to these chimes! [MOLDS safe " B o v s newsi! Hieronymus [rejoicing]. Heavenly music! . . . More!; F. [He holds out his hands.] Give it to me! . ... It isj the fountainhead of life. . . . Redemption. . . . [H<?>-.tears the bag from ARMADOR'S hands.] Give it to me! m,.f .] 1 )xm rich! [Catching sight of SYBILLA.]t Go!_. . . Youj must not know what I possess. [SYBIILA ^ oes*our", likixat phantom.] Cavalier! . . . Tc Deurnf . . . How many; coins? ... Is it an installment?fTTT~Nbt enougrTTno;! 2 no, not enough. j Armador [arms folded]. Glutton! Not enough?'When I| make you the richest citizen in the town? Count it! j Hieronymus. h^m^4^^«^m«m^mk^ I shall count; lit tonight.' . . One only counts well at night. [He opens] his chest and throws the bag in.} It is not too much, stre.3 ;AS*4»4<*H»»M1*4«^^ , . . I.have given; ,you shelter. ... I have risked my skin and my salvation,! defied the law and the devil. . . . You have burned my] wood. . , . And furthermore, I have provided you with! a servant. . . & She is ill from it, pcj.or woman. . .'.]' [Fiercely.] What have you done with her?*Why are there', these patches of gold on her skin? „• . [{Such a'beautiful; .woman!). . .She will die of a mysterious illness. . . ,\ Tell me, do you think you have paid me for all this? I Armador [amused]. I have only drawn blood from your] wife. '. " » c ' • j Hieronymus [amazed]. Blood! . . . That costs nothing.! • '. . . Why? . . '•. ! Armador. Because the blood of virgins contains an essen- i tia! principle, without, which you cannot make gold. The \ people, with their common .sense, often say 'that gojd. is-i 99. ACT 11. SCENE V l l - HIERONYMUS. ARMADOR. SYBILLA BRIEFLY PURPOSE: t o complete the c o n s p i r a t o r s ' p l a n t o d i s a r m Hieronymus by making him f e e l omnipotent t o show the e x t e n t and degree o f i r r a t i o n a l i t y t o which Hieronymus' g r e e d l e a d s him toxshow t h e f i r s t c o l l a p s i n g o f Hieronymus' a s c e t i c i s m t h r o u g h the promise o f i n f i n i t e w e a l t h ACTIONS: Armador - t o p r o v i d e Hieronymus w i t h t h e a p p a r e n t answer t o a l l h i s d e s i r e s w i t h o u t a r o u s i n g h i s s u s p i c i o n Hieronymus - t o g e t as much as he c a n o u t of Armador S y b i l l a - t o escape from t h e scene o f a h o r r i b l e e x p e r i e n c e DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Hieronymus - g r e e d , s a t i s f a c t i o n , r e s t l e s s n e s s Armador - an ap p a r e n t i r r i t a t i o n and c o n f u s i o n t o s u i t h i s purposes c o v e r s an amused w a r i n e s s as he s u r v e y s the e f f e c t s o f h i s a c t i o n s . CHARACTER DOMINANCE: Armador and Hieronymus s h a r e t h e scene. MOOD: i r o n i c humour i s u n d e r c u t by g r i m c u n n i n g , s t e a l t h and i n s t a b i l i t y RHYTHMIC IMAGE: V a r i e d m a t e r i a l s a r e thrown on a p i l e o f hot c o a l s . I mmediately t h e f i n e , d r y p i e c e s f l a m e up and go o u t ; e r r a t i c f l a m e s and s p a r k s f o l l o w ; a t t i m e s t h e p i e c e s appear n o t t o b u r n , b u t f i n a l l y t h e b i g p i e c e s b u r s t i n t o f l a m e as t h e he a t r e l e a s e s g a s e s . SHAPE: Armador's e n t r a n c e c o m p l e t e l y d i v e r t s Hieronymus i n t o a s t a t e l i k e t h a t o f A c t 11, Scene l v , B e a t 4. W i t h t h e p r e s s u r e removed from h e r S y b i l l a c o l l a p s e s and l e a v e s . 100. ACT 11. SCENE VI1 - HIERONYMUS.ARMADOR.SYBILLA BRIEFLY ( c o n t i n u e d ) SHAPE: Hieronymus t o g e t more money, works up a t a n t r u m as a t h r e a t t o Armador who w i t h i n c r e a s i n g i r r i t a t i o n u n d e r c u t s Hieronymus 1 arguments and e v e n t u a l l y s t o p s him dead w i t h mention o f h i s " i m m o r t a l i t y " . F o r t h e r e s t o f the scene the two a r e a p p a r e n t l y the b e s t o f f r i e n d s . Becoming r e c k l e s s Hieronymus c l u m s i l y and v i o l e n t l y g i v e s way t o a l o n g s u p p r e s s e d d e s i r e t o d r i n k f r e e l y . He soon s t o p s , though, as Armador's f a k e d drunkeness opens up t h e p o s s i b i l i t i e s o f g a i n i n g i n f i n i t e w e a l t h and i m m o r t a l i t y . There i s a moment of t e n s i o n as Armador " l o s e s " t h e f o r m u l a t o Hieronymus and a s u s t a i n e d t e n s i o n as Hieronymus removes t h e s t o n e . Once s u c c e s s f u l , Hieronymus g i v e s way t o a r a p i d b u i l d o f p l e a s u r e a t h i s s u c c e s s topped by "Long l i v e Hieronymus!" and capped by Armador's r e p l y . The appearance o f t h e Monk makes Hieronymus f r e n e t i c p a r t i c u l a r l y as Armador l e a v e s l i k e m o l a s s e s . STAGING: I t i s i m p o r t a n t t h a t Armador has a moment t o c o m f o r t S y b i l l a b e f o r e she l e a v e s , a moment w h i c h Hieronymus must n o t see. T h e r e f o r e Hieronymus t a k e s t h e bag o f g o l d and s i t s f a c i n g downstage a f t e r o r d e r i n g S y b i l l a t o l e a v e . As she c r o s s e s t o t h e c e l l a r door she g r a s p s Armador f o r a moment of m o r a l s u p p o r t . As Hieronymus' tantrum i n c r e a s e s , Armador becomes more and more I n f o r m a l and a p p a r e n t l y a t ease; he s i t s l a n g u i d l y on t h e c h e s t l e a n i n g a g a i n s t the s t a i r r a i l . S i t t i n g on t h e c h e s t d r a m a t i z e s h i s c o n t r o l o v er Hieronymus' g o l d and hence o v e r Hieronymus. Hieronymus' movement around t h e c h e s t , away from and toward Armador, and up and down th e s t a i r s i s i n c r e a s i n g l y e r r a t i c and i n s e c u r e . When c o n f r o n t e d by Armador's d e f e a t i n g r e f e r e n c e t o i m m o r t a l i t y , he escapes t o t h e o t h e r s i d e o f th e s t a g e t o l i c k h i s wound and m u t t e r . An a b r u p t change o c c u r s as Armador s u g g e s t s a d r i n k . From h e r e on Armador remains s e a t e d c e n t r e s t a g e , a t h i s ease and i n complete c o n t r o l o v e r t h e scene. Hieronymus s i t s , r i s e s , and moves about. To show Armador's p l a y a c t i n g and i n c r e a s e t h e i r o n y , once o r t w i c e Armador must open h i s eyes and/or move h i s head t o l o o k a t Hieronymus when t h e l a t t e r i s n o t l o o k i n g a t him. F u r t h e r m o r e Armador must o b v i o u s l y c o -o p e r a t e w i t h Hieronymus by making i t easy f o r him t o s n a t c h t h e parchment and remove t h e c h a i n . To make Hieronymus' f a l l J u s t i f i e d a f t e r "Long l i v e Hieronymust" he s h o u l d s t a n d i n f r o n t o f t h e s t e p s , s t e p back i n t o them, and t r i p . DIFFICULTIES: Hieronymus must n o t appear merely t o be s t u p i d . Hieronymus' madness must glow c o n t i n u a l l y under the scene b u t r a r e l y b u r s t o u t . Y e t , he remains c u n n i n g . The scene c o u l d e a s i l y d e g e n e r a t e i n t o a f a r c e u n l e s s Armador i s v e r y 101. ACT 11. SCENE V l l - HIERONYMUS.ARMADOR.SYBILLA BRIEFLY, (continued) DIFFICULTIES (continued) careful in his handling Hieronymus, a handling made a l l the more d i f f i c u l t because of Hieronymus1 i n s t a b i l i t y . BEATS: 1. TITLE: Relieving the Beseiged. ACTIONS: Armador - to divert Hieronymus from Sybilla with the promised gold and to comfort Sybilla Hieronymus - to possess the gold exclusively Sybilla . - to recover from her drubbing 2. TITLE: Forcing the Issue ACTIONS: Hieronymus - to demand more gold by Justification and threats Armador - to control Hieronymus with a tale of magic NOTES: The whole subject of blood has a violent emotional effect on Hieronymus. Blood and gold are, of course, metaphorically linked. A l l Hieronymus' passion for his gold i s attached to his wife's blood. His own l i f e -blood i s gold. Facing page 102 " "" " ' "RED"MAG)C ' • 27 • made from blood. . , . Yes, your royal florins have your wife's blood in their alioy.^  # „ (OMNCUI we»s> cw C M M T ) : Hieronymus [moaning], Mtsererel She nas no more blood! . , . Mcr lovely blood! a Armador. Tile moon makes blood again in women. Be-sides, 1 made your virgin drink wine all the time, yi5'rtwrtrS^ Hieronymus. I had the presentiment that W>wa» a vampire! . . . You have drunk the blood. . . . She is ; going to die. . . . Pay me! . . . If not, I shall denounce . you, . . . And they will drive a stake into your grave and [it will pierce your heart. £ Armador [shrugs his shoulders]. Is that all? . Y^M a*» 'goiag. back to my laboratory, frmit'rio*' I am going to make : tgokl for my own use. £ : I Hieronymus. Not: with my wife's blood! . . . I forbid ; •you! . . . flow many coins? , . . How many? '<: Annfldor. As many as there is blood for. . . . Anger' .[yourself, my good man, howl, yell. . . . What do your; .•ducats matter to me? Am I not immortal? '; Hieronymus .[furiously]. True.' [Servilely.] Carry on, sire . ..but leave her alive . . . in appearance, at least, . . . Otherwise tj^ ere will be the burial and the service, and ex-; perssc, expense! . . . And set aside for me a little of this li'oicl which is costing me the blood of a beloved creature. -I Weil ~7mmIflbTrYc.s,A» Vou giv^TnMTT^ This i^  a 'memorable day, Hieronymus. You arc rich, are you not?. •Ciycmcadriiik.^ / \ Hieronymus. r nis wine would improve by keeping. . . .' [Yes, let us drink. . . . I have had so much excitement.; ! [He opens a flask and offers it to ARMADOR who drinks'. I from its neck.) Not. all of iti Is this the way you alchemists [ ! drink? . . . Cavalier, I drain this flask in your honor! [He [takes the flask from ARMADOR'S hands, and drinks in turn.] \ I Armador [drinking]. Make merry! . . . An it dwguiwi? . . ,\ [Drink! . , . Here you can wear a beatific smile. . . . Get; |soaked, Hieronymusl What? I am making you rich, and; [you seem dismayed? . . , Do you find the wine bitter? j i Hieronymus [taking the flask again]. Not at all I . . . Iti • j is a wine that makes you drunk-. , . I M&~gcttwi^ fuddled.; [. . . itwmm. tipsy.*.«? . ^ S*«fi-w owSS»iCavalier, how dear i)pu arc to me! I am.touched. . . . Ypu[ I get soaked, tool [He offerTSSipask.] I am standing treat.; 102 ACT 11. SCENE V l l - BEATS 3. TITLE: S o f t e n i n g up t h e V i c t i m ACTIONS: Armador - t o r e l a x Hieronymus w i t h wine and s o c i a b i l i t y Hieronymus - t o g i v e i n t o h i s s t r o n g d e s i r e f o r wine and j o v i a l i t y a g a i n s t t h e p r e s s u r e o f h i s h a b i t o f m i s e r l y a s c e t i c i s m NOTES: Hieronymus s h i f t s q u i c k l y between r e l u c t a n c e , e a g e r n e s s , p h y s i c a l r e a c t i o n t o t h e wine, m a u d l i n s e n t i m e n t a l i t y , e x c e s s g e n e r o s i t y and s e l f - p i t y . The change from p o v e r t y t o r i c h e s makes him i n c r e a s i n g l y u n s t a b l e . B o a s t i n g Hieronymus f a i l s t o d r a i n t h e f l a s k , and s p l u t t e r s , amusing Armador. However, he has drunk too much and f e e l s b i l i o u s p r o m p t i n g Armador 1s q u e s t i o n s . Facing page 103 28 M I C H E L ' D E G H E L D E R O D E [ A C T n save Almost all of my desires' are fulfilled. . . . All , one. . . . J Armador [still drinking, and pretending to get confused]} What a good wine. . . . It is like a wave of sunlight in; ,my guts. What are you saying? What wish can you still) give utterance to? You are rich. : Hieronvmus. I would like to be richer than rich. . . A To.be rich among the rich. , . . ykm>&m-*H^^ **«W . . . Listen. I arn not happy. I shall be when, in my; turn, I can make gold, like you. ! Armador [in a thick voice]. Really? . . . Is that all? Ask; your wife. She knows the procedure. She knows all.. . . .; U*>»tiwif.ty. . . . [He drinks.] Except the formula. I have! it oiime,^ (HOLPS IT BUO^Y F W M H.) j grapes! ., . . Oh! . . . Oh! . . . Is'this formula in Ara-bic, in Hebrew, or in honest Latin? . . . I do not speak; any of these tongues. i Armador [as though in a daze]. Beast! . '. . Look! . . .' +1H.C takes a square of parchment from his pocket, and 'nolds.it out.} Anv apothecary will decipher that for vou.; : HIKRONYMOS mtmlne for 'i mula and pockets it.} Give mej the parchment back. I will give you the furnace and the-reto! ts that are below. •! LQ-14 HIERONYMUS draws back. Hieronymus [sharply]. But . . . I have given it back; to you Thank you for the retorts. I shall not do: ianything with them, since you haven't given me the' [formula. ; ! Armador [drinking]. You want too much, my friend!! i. . .'"My-eyes are • giowmg~7fim. . . 7TJo~and" get" some"; [more flasks. . . . [He sits holding his forehead.} . [ Hieronymus. Why arc you holding your forehead? Are; iyou ill? . . . My friend? ' j ; Armador [stammering]. Tired . . . worn out . Wfleej [,' . , all the time . . . to Muscovy this time . , . my] 'enemies. . . . If I could sleep . . . Ah! . . . This im-l [mortality . . . what a burden! Q , . j I Hieronymus: Do you want me to relieve you of it . . A [out of kindness? . . . If I had immortality! . . , i~e*s* [gutting iutpnriwut . . . What is the good of possessing so? '•  much gold, if I must leave it? A A 103. ACT 11. SCENE VT1 - BEATS k. TITLE: G e t t i n g I n f i n i t e W e a l t h ACTIONS: Armador - t o make s u r e Hieronymus w i l l f e e l omnipotent by c r e a t i n g a moment i n h i s supposed drunkeness when he c a n a p p a r e n t l y be t r i c k e d out of t h e f o r m u l a by Hieronymus Hieronymus - t o g e t t h e f o r m u l a w i t h o u t appear-i n g t o have got i t . 5. TITLE: G e t t i n g I m m o r t a l i t y ACTIONS: Armador - t o make s u r e Hieronymus w i l l f e e l t h e omnipotence o f i m m o r t a l i t y by dr a w i n g a t t e n t i o n t o t h e s t o n e as a s o u r c e o f i m m o r t a l i t y and making i t easy f o r Hieronymus t o s t e a l i t by p r e t e n d i n g t o w i s h t o be f r e e from i t and p r e t e n d i n g t o f a l l a s l e e p from t h e wi n e . Hieronymus - t o s t e a l t he sto n e NOTE: Armador o b v i o u s l y e n j o y s h i s s u c c e s s i n t h i s and s u c c e e d i n g b e a t s . Facing page 104 RED MAGIC 29' •1*U Rest. SQ Armador [talking to himself], I would never have the strength to throw off the black stone, heavier than a mill-: stone, that I wear on my chest. . . . I shall not die . . . as long as I cannot find that strength. . . . Fabulous stone' . . . accursed . . . fatal . . . [He lays his head on the table) i Hieronymus. Black stone . . . on his. chest? . ?7\[He [wipes his forehead) Now I know.? . I^mmortality)-! . . 1 - ' - - ' M f c M M k . . . Are you asleep, my friend? , " Me hasn't the strength? . . . I have. I draw it from the wine. . . . What a fonnidable j deed 1 am going to accomplish. . . . Accursed stone . . . .fabulous . . , -fwtel. . . . My friend, there are beads of sweat on your brow. . . . You are hot, aren't you? . . »» Let mc see to you. . . . I will open your shirr?\"°vs.s^ \ [ARMADOR has fallen asleep. HIERONYMUS undoes ARMA-: DOR'S collar) This silver chain is in your way. . . . I shall Make it o f i f^ K n d here is the black stonel . fi. [He • weighs the chain and the stone in his hand) It-can't be ! worth much. But immortalitya.w?r.c1?o; hoi [He fastens the, I stone, around his neck and does up ARMADOR'S shirt.] The ; daring one gets from wine! Was it I who just did some-thing? No, it was someone else. . . . I have done nothing. Tomorrow I shall hardly remember it any more. . • . ffiks ~lS»iS£JrTTav^ ^ j. . . not anything! . . . [He laughs with joy) I am every-; ! thing. AH that you were! . . . It only needed a little drink.: i. . . You are despicable! . . . If I were to pull your nose, >ch? , . . You have been robjbed, yes, robbed as though, you had been waylaid in a forest. . . . Long live Hicrony-,. [mus! , ; ' Armador [suddenly standing u/^Long i^ve Hieronymus!! 1 . Hieronymus [falling seated on hiaiipliW Wft fright]) ; You are no longer drunk? j | Armador. It has gone. ;: . . What have I told you dur-: ; ing this brief drunkenness? ' ; Hieronymus. 1 shall try to remember, 17. . [T^ cr^  is- a\ \linock attlie dodf.^ 1 lidc! It is the monk. He was^ againstj ithe Anltac. POO « . _ - -: Armador. I am going.' The beggar's share is still to be'! •minted, and the gold for my journey. \fHIBRWWPJ | fc^ssWtesW.} I shall say good-by at dawn" Make good use* |of your fortune*.*/\nd give all the gold you.find scattered oni t 104. ACT 11. SCENE V l l - BEATS 6 0 TITLE: The Conqueror ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o e x u l t i n h i s accomplishment Armador - t o " r e c o v e r " h i s normal w i t s and t o "Pop"Hieronymus' b a l l o o n " 7. TITLE: Removing t h e E v i d e n c e ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o g e t r i d o f Armador as f a s t as p o s s i b l e Armador - t o t a k e h i s t i m e l e a v i n g Facing page 105 scene vm 1 30 MICHEL DE 'GHELDERODE' . [ACT n the flags of the cellar to the poor, in my name. [He goes j • Hieronymus. So be it! [He puts his fingers to his nose in the direction of the door through which AUMADOR has, gone, muhu f.'.n twm'.'ii, for niglit Utik gradually conn^durinp  file last conversation, fmarmis to often the doyr] Father! ill . '. ..•You, at last!6 I THE MONK enters.. ' The Monk. Wine? Who treated you? Wine at Hierony- j T 1 U J S ( S H U T S OOORJ $ [ Hieronymus [caught by surprise]. Yes. ... It was fori the two of us S. . Since you didn't come, I drank alone.! . .' ". I. am rich, you imdcrslandl ; The Monk. You must have drunk to dare to confess that i •tome.Cs'T*) Hieronymus. I haven't drunk , . . not enough. , . . I| was poor. . . . But I have suddenly come into a legacy. . . . [Insistent] I am very rich! The Monk. How talkative you are, my son. Why these confidences? Does your wine have such a violent effect? Let me taste it. (sMaltwo soma C O R K ) Hieronymus. I am not raving. Do you hear me,'monk?. ... 1 am incalculably rich. ... [Suddenly] Would youj like some gold? ; The Monk [without surprise]. Gold? No. My order, which is a very humble one, does not accept gold. ... If j you were to give me a little wine, rather? j Hieronymus [nervously]. You shall have gold and wine. 1 [He giv.es him Wwww^flask of wine.)[And if Fwcre to. mane my win, eh?vc,y ^  ( J W M ) ft ; The. Monk. lAn«ii> gomg to die! I shall run and get the, .holy oils! Do not forget the poor irwnks, my son. What a; [blow! Let rue drink this wine to recover mfself. [lie drinks \from the neck of the flask] Exquisite! 'IIlis venerable wine-! 'is a revelation to a Capuchin who only gets aqua pumpa<. :in his monastery. [He drinks] Hieronymus. A real monk! A dirty, tlogi I swear V O I M I M L ' in my will. . . . Ne. . . . I shall write a provision for you •. iat once, w •MY.wi__.«M(«nrs «^ MwTjp_w,i*«;_t«»r5 <**».<j •; The Monk. The notary will authenticate it before thet [magistrates. . . . Do it, for the love of God! . . . But no] frooncv in gold. . . . C H H H M , shrines, reliquaries, they are' • (HS. fe'srs our P V I R U . M O M t*ij Ro-ffe ftw, CAireot-aa) j 105 ACT 11, SCENE V l l l - HIERONYMUS. THE MONK PURPOSE: to g e t Hieronymus knocked o ut so t h a t t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s can r o b him t o p r o v i d e comic r e l i e f . T h i s i s n o t o f t h e b e l l y - l a u g h t y p e b u t r a t h e r a n attempt t o l e s s e n t h e p a i n i n what i s i n c r e a s i n g l y g r o t e s q u e . Changes a r e r u n g on t h e c o n d i t i o n o f Hieronymus and the Monk b u t , a p a r t f r om t h e i n t r o d u c e d d r u g g i n g , no harm i s done anyone u n t i l t h e end when Hieronymus i s t o t a l l y d e f e n s e l e s s . t o e x p l o r e t h e immediate e f f e c t s on Hieronymus o f h i s "omnipotence". H i s f i r s t i m p u l s e i s t o e x p l o r e h i s s u p e r i o r i t y by k e e p i n g i t t o h i m s e l f b u t making o t h e r s become p u p p e t s , t h a t i s by a p r a c t i c a l j o k e . t o b r i n g out t h e Monks s e n s u a l i t y i n h i s c r a v i n g f o r wine, and h i s h y p o c r i s y i n t h e t o t a l a c t i o n o f th e s c e n e . ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o g l o a t i n t h e s u p e r i o r i t y o f h i s r i c h n e s s by b o a s t i n g , a p p e a r i n g t o be generous, and d r i n k i n g The Monk - t o humour Hieronymus and enjoy t h e wine u n t i l he can g e t Hieronymus dead drunk o r d r u g him. DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Hieronymus - r e c k l e s s g i d d i n e s s ( f i r s t from h i s sense o f power and t h e n f r o m t h e drugged wine) The Monk - w a r i n e s s combined w i t h a d e s i r e f o r wine and a s l i g h t l y s a d i s t i c o b j e c t i v i t y about Hieronymus 1 d e l u s i o n s CHARACTER DOMINANCE: The Monk i n c r e a s i n g l y dominates Hieronymus. MOOD: E n f o r c e d g a i e t y a r i s e s from s e r i o u s games. RHYTHMIC IMAGE: A merry l i t t l e f i r e g i v e s o f f a bad s m e l l w h i c h i s s l o w l y dowsed w i t h wine u n t i l o n l y w i s p i s h smoke and steam r e m a i n . 106 ACT 11. SCENE V l l l - HIERONYMUS. THE MONK ( c o n t i n u e d ) SHAPE: The scene d i v i d e s i n two. The f i r s t p a r t b e g i n s t e n s e l y as the Monk appears s u s p i c i o u s b u t moves r a p i d l y i n t o a c o n v e r s a t i o n a t c r o s s purposes u n t i l t h e Monk d r i n k s . The making o f t h e w i l l i s v e r y r e l a x e d because of t h e Monk's a g r e e a b l e n e s s , b u t a t one p o i n t t h i s p a r t becomes t e n s e as he s u r r e p t i c i o u s l y drugs the wine. Hieronymus i s f u l l o f I r r i t a t i o n a f t e r t h e Monk's s t i n k . The second p a r t b e g i n s w i t h Hieronymus d r i n k i n g t h e drugged wine. Hieronymus s t r u g g l e s t o keep h i s b e a r i n g s t h r o u g h h i s i n c r e a s i n g c o n f u s i o n , w h i l e t h e Monk speaks a s o r t o f o b b l l g a t o w h i c h c o n t i n u e s u n t i l a f t e r Hieronymus passes o u t . STAGING: The Monk i s i n c o n t r o l and so f o r the most p a r t , remains s t a t i o n a r y , s e a t e d o r s t a n d i n g a t the t a b l e on w h i c h i s the wine. Hieronymus moves about, n e r v o u s l y g e s t u r i n g , g e t t i n g t h e c a n d l e r e a d y , p r e p a r i n g t h e w i l l , o p e ning the c h e s t , showing t h e g o l d . The moment f o r t h e d r u g g i n g a l s o c o v e r s t h e l i g h t i n g o f the c a n d l e as Hieronymus* back i s t o t h e a u d i e n c e and t o t h e Monk. I t i s n e c e s s a r y t h a t Hieronymus c o l l a p s e down r i g h t c e n t r e so t h a t t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s c a n be s e p a r a t e from him when he awakes l a t e r i n Scene V l l l , A f t e r Hieronymus' c o l l a p s e the Monk moves v e r y q u i c k l y , b u s t l i n g i n t o a c t i o n . DIFFICULTIES: I t must be a b s o l u t e l y c l e a r t o t h e a u d i e n c e what th e Monk i s d o i n g and w h i c h b o t t l e I s drugged and w h i c h i s n o t . W h i l e t h e scene i s a mad c a p e r , t h e a c t o r s must be e s p e c i a l l y c a r e f u l t o p l a y o n l y t h e i r a c t i o n s so t h a t the scene does n o t d e g e n e r a t e i n t o romp f o r i t s own sake; th e d a r k s i d e must c o n s t a n t l y show t h r o u g h . As w r i t t e n , t h e s c r i p t does n o t c a l l f o r d r u g s . However, Hieronymus does n o t have enough time t o g e t drunk enough t o pass o u t . Drugging a i d s b e l i e v a b i l l t y and I s I n c h a r a c t e r . MECHANICAL PROBLEMS: Candles were n o t l i t w i t h matches i n t h o s e days. Hieronymus must h i d e the p r o c e s s by s t a n d i n g i n f r o n t o f the c a n d l e . 107. 1. TITLE: ACTIONS: ACT 11. SCENE V l l l - HIERONYMUSrTHE MONK ( c o n t i n u e d ) BEATS: G r e e t i n g t h e Spy Hieronymus - t o e x p l a i n away t h e opened wine The Monk - t o knock Hieronymus o f f b a l a n c e l>y a p p e a r i n g d i s t r u s t f u l about t h e opened wine NOTE: The Monk i s v e r y a b r u p t and menacing b u t appears s a t i s f i e d and changes q u i c k l y t o a more p l e a s a n t manner, 2. TITLE: C r o s s - P u r p o s e s ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o imp r e s s t h e Monk w i t h h i s new w e a l t h The Monk - t o g e t p e r m i s s i o n t o d r i n k some wine NOTE: The Monk's c o n c e n t r a t i o n must n e v e r l e a v e t h e wine; he s m e l l s i t , f e e l s i t , devours I t w i t h h i s e yes. 3. TITLE: W i l l i n g t h e I m p o s s i b l e ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o impress t h e Monk w i t h h i s g e n e r o s i t y i n r e t u r n f o r a gu a r a n t e e o f P a r a d i s e w i t h a w i l l w h i c h w i l l n e v e r be v a l i d The Monk - t o p l a y a l o n g w i t h Hieronymus and g a i n a moment t o d r u g t h e wine Facing page 108 R E D M A G I C 311 ali right. . . , Wait! Leave us this house and its orchard.] L<_) - 15 'Nothing else. This suspect house that no one will ever buy,] •this haunted house built on a cemetery. We shall sanctify! ••this gruesome land where criminals are buried, and Jews,] - _ 'Mohammedans, and suicides. As for your gold, my son . . .j L Q . - l b niakc use of it . /Venjoy it. . Hieronymus. Mum*s.the word! s'lsl The house is yours' —which docs not mean that I am going to give up. the; ighost immediately, eh? I believe that I shall live to be very old, longer than the customary span of years. [He sits-**'; 'Ha t«hh<amd takes up his pen.] And in return? !!. . T/»e Monk. Twenty masses a year for eternity. ;'. Hieronymus. With music, of course? . . . Is eternity! long? '• •" I •; the Monk. Fairly. . . . And you will have the certainty! .of being [he sings) in paradisuml ,. A v.p VV«UIGN ' i Hieronymus. Agreed, by God! . . . I shall. nrrito» itj >down. . . . I, Master Hieronymus, quite clear-sighted,; isokmnly give to the Capuchins my house and the orchard,; on condition that they hoist me up to paradise. And I sign! . -it. Hieronymus, landowner. j 4 ; The Monk [taking t!te paper]. In the name of the order,; !thank you! [He laughs coarsely.) g • I Hieronymus [standing up and holding his nose). Pig!, ;. . . He makes the place stink! . . . Is that your thanks? The Monk. 1 cannot contain my pleasure. It is the same! [with all mv scntinicntsj'. . . "x*ouwer^alkTng abouTfTnS: 5 _legacy. Is it an important one? ! Hieronymus [uneag^.^l haven't valued it. [He gaofti..te; tlw e/iant, opcnsT^.fJnS^takes out. a bag of gold.) if this; 'good gold, my nuTnk? [He jingles the fc«g.j(c»fves M , W 6 6 0 U > > The Monk. Authentic, if. 1 believe my ears on the matter., . . . There's a good hundred florins. . . . . What good! works you are going to do! [He opens the bag and looks at' a coin.] 1 4 M M « # « # « » ^ ^ i that A'toottfn«1 witrwwi. Let us drink to vour fortunellTAK-S ; ' \ J>Rtl&6eo BOTTLE,felW6S IT TO H,? T5RKEV OTHER R>fi HMi&-?y^ • > Hieronymus. I drink, fHe drinks]i^W^^sh*fi^ff^\l\' •am hazy, with it. °.JB.FThis wine isi expens ivelJT. .¥011 \ j seemed to say that I could sin . . . more or less. Is drink-! •ling wine a sin? 1 'the Monk. Such a little one. I never drink anything else.] 108. ACT 11. SCENE V l l l - BEATS 4. TITLE: Oderous Thanks ACTIONS: t h e Monk - t o enj o y t h e s a d i s t i c p l e a s u r e o f f l a t u l e n c e 5. TITLE: Hieronymus-to a v o i d t h e s m e l l D r u g g i n g t h e V i c t i m ACTIONS: t h e Monk - t o g e t Hieronymus t o d r i n k t h e drugged wine by making t h e l e g a c y an excuse f o r a t o a s t 6. TITLE: Hieronymus- t o d i s p l a y h i s t r e a s u r e S i n k i n g i n t o O b l i v i o n ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o cope w i t h d i z z i n e s s and t h e doubts i t i n s p i r e s t h e Monk - t o humour Hieronymus and enj o y h i s c o l l a p s e NOTE: Hieronymus o f c o u r s e remains humourless; t h e Monk f i n d s i t i n c r e a s i n g l y f u n n y . Hieronymus s i n k s on h i s knees c l u t c h i n g t h e Monk and t h e n s i n k s on h i s back f a c i n g t h e c a n d l e on th e edge o f t h e t a b l e . Facing page 109 M I C H E L l)E G H E L D E R O D E •I .UI>|I ,ui r-l'; crony mus My, • body is swelling up.i'm afloat. T^S.8"A_h! I haven/t djm>k; :as mncli as tins in thirty years! [He stagger*.] Monk . . , I would like to know . . . if the clergy . . . ever trouble • themselves . . . to find out . . . the origins . . ..of the fortunes . . . of pious benefactors? The Monk: Such mean cares are far from us. [Senten-tiously.] Fortune comes to them from Providence. It is the reward-of virtue and labor. !. Hieronymus. Bravo! . * . That's exactly it. . . . I was ['thinking of.confessing. . . . It is unnecessary. . P. One[ [has these scruples. .... % ' • I The Monk. Oh, guileless heart! Bah! ij the Evil One:. iwcre to lodge here in person, I would belt him outside ! with blows from the holy scapular. . . . Hieronymus [drunk]. Long live the monksl . T. I want[. to embrace you. . 9 . You have a lovely puss. . . . - The Monk. Let us embrace in Jesus Christ, dear Hier-onymus. [They embrace. HIERONYMUS falls down.] Hieronymus. I'm giving way. . . . The room is going round. . . . The- floor is sinking. . . , Monk, you are ris-f u e BO! I t c O ftiL ' . hhngvt n ese eand les? j-ing to the ceib'ngPca*^ J^ Vho is ligi.m<5A. ' The Monk. Enjoy a roretastc of heaven experiencing <!rink, my . You are race. ? . . It will leave you. . f .Have a; son. [He forcibly introduces the flask into HIERONYMUS' mouth and pours it. HTEHONYMUS collapses.' face dowmvwd.] I thought, he was made of sterner stuff.  A capital wine, indeedinH*T runs to the ddbr leading to (he MeetJjRomuiuirWfl? runs to the cella r d.6% r.J. Arm ad or! &billa? J!J^Iie~7nreec^^ to-Scene ix--' toft and right!' SYBRXA is disheveled and half nahad. RO'MU-I • 1 r.os carries a lantern.) Praised be the Lord Bacchus! The: LQ -1.7 ;unstcp.vork beginslQ*" tu^^s ™ 6 .^ l*,?"*^  2 ' Romulus. V4t•<»!>««» the chest. . . . Coinc. [T/ie ' • j four of them, clearly lit up by the lantern, lean over the \ yawning chest.) I'll take back the bag of gold florins, real -; florins, that I loaned for the make-believe, (raws OUT enc) ; 1 Armador [holding out a similar bag]. And replace it with' \ this, which contains well-minted discs, but of gilded metal.1  : [This is done.] • . ...The Monk. Now. . . . We find in this chest eighty un--.,. * - O K kneels w R- passes Sw the lantern. 109 ACT 11. SCENE V l l l - BEATS 7. TITLE: G e t t i n g On W i t h I t ACTION: The Monk - t o c a l l t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s and ensure p r i v a c y by c l o s i n g t h e s h u t t e r s ACT 11. SCENE IX - ALL THE PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS PURPOSE: t o c l i m a x t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s ' p l o t by the r o b b e r y t o show t h e r e l e a s e d s e n s u a l i t y i n each p e r s o n as he f e e l s s e c u r e i n h i s s u c c e s s , Romulus i s t h e o n l y e x c e p t i o n . S y b i l l a , Armador* t h e Monk and Hieronymus each r e l a x i n t o a s t a t e of e r o t i c e x c i t e m e n t . ACTIONS: The Monk, Armador, S y b i l l a , Romulus - t o s t e a l the g o l d , s u b s t i t u t e g i l t , and c e l e b r a t e t h e i r s u c c e s s Hieronymus - t o r e c o v e r h i s senses and u n i t e w i t h h i s g o l d DOMINANT EMOTIONS: expanding s a t i s f a c t i o n , J u b i l a t i o n , r a s h n e s s s o b e r e d by a sudden f e a r o f d i s c o v e r y , c o n c u p i s c e n c e CHARACTER DOMINANCE: T h i s scene i s an ensemble a c t i o n , b u t Armador and Romulus a l t e r n a t e as l e a d e r s i n a n t i c i p a t i o n o f a l a t e r s t r u g g l e . MOOD: i n c r e a s i n g and dangerous abandon RHYTHMIC IMAGE: The b o n f i r e i s l i t , q u i c k l y c a t c h e s and b l a z e s r i o t o u s l y , i s dampened suddenly b u t r e k i n d l e s f i e r c e l y i n s e v e r a l p l a c e s . SHAPE: B e f o r e the c h e s t i s opened, t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s a r e s t e a l t h y and d a r t i n g , b u t once they c a t c h s i g h t o f t h e g o l d a low murmur o f wonder and d e l i g h t grows i n t o a r i o t o u s c e l e b r a t i o n as they r i t u a l i z e t h e i r r o b b e r y . S c r a m b l i n g c o n f u s i o n and ACT 11. SCENE IX - ALL THE.PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS (C o n t i n u e d ) SHAPE: ( c o n t i n u e d ) and dead q u i e t f o l l o w Hieronymus' s t i r r i n g s . Subdued, the c o n s p i r a t o r s b e g i n t o l o o k a t each o t h e r w i t h s t i r r -i n g d o u b t s , and they s t a r t t o s u b s t i t u t e t h e i r own wants f o r t h a t of the c o l l e c t i v e . Peace descends as S y b i l l a , Armador and t h e Monk d i s a p p e a r n o i s i l y d o w n s t a i r s and Romulus i s l e f t a l o n e w i t h Hieronymus. T e n s i o n r e t u r n s w i t h the h o r r i b l e and the r i d i c u l o u s as Hieronymus wakes and c r a w l s i n t o h i s c h e s t . STAGING: A s e r i e s of p i c t u r e s make up the scene. The f i r s t i s the e n c i r c l i n g o f the f a l l e n Hieronymus by the c o n s p i r a t o r s . The second I s the e n c i r c l i n g of the c h e s t . The t h i r d i s the n e a r l y d e s e r t e d s t a g e as t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s c r e e p out from t h e i r h i d i n g p l a c e s a f t e r Hieronymus has s t a r t l e d them. The f o u r t h i s dominated by Romulus g i v i n g i n s t r u c -t i o n up c e n t r e w h i l e an i r r i t a t e d Armador i s t e m p o r a r i l y e c l i p s e d down r i g h t and the Monk and S y b i l l a hover u n c e r t a i n l y l e f t . The l a s t i s an apparent r e c o n c i l i a t i o n up c e n t r e as the Monk embraces S y b i l l a , encouraged by Romulus and Armador. Romulus, a l o n e , s e t t l e s down t o d r i n k a t the t a b l e b u t i s q u i c k l y d i s p a t c h e d up c e n t r e i n t o h i d i n g as Hieronymus ro u s e s h i m s e l f . As t h e l i d c l o s e s on the c h e s t , Romulus c o n v u l s e d i n s i l e n t l a u g h t e r c r o s s e s t o the c h e s t . DIFFICULTIES: I t i s n e c e s s a r y t h a t the group t a k e i t s time w i t h each s e c t i o n , a l l o w i n g t h e moods t o grow, e s p e c i a l l y around the c h e s t i n wh i c h they have t h e i r f i r s t v i e w o f t h e t r e a s u r e . For the a u d i e n c e , i t i s d i f f i c u l t t o keep c l e a r e x a c t l y what i s happening around the c h e s t . Each bag and i t s d e s c r i p t i o n must be c l e a r . Hieronymus must n o t r u s h g e t t i n g i n t o the c h e s t . MECHANICAL PROBLEMS: To a v o i d d e l a y f i l l i n g t h e bag w i t h c o i n s , a t h i r d , l a r g e , f u l l bag i s a l r e a d y i n the c h e s t . 111. ACT 11. SCENE I X - ALL THE PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS ( c o n t i n u e d ) BEATS: C h e c k i n g t h e Body 1. TITLE: ACTIONS: 2. TITLE: ACTIONS: NOTE: Romulus, S y b i l l a and Armador - t o make s u r e t h e i r o b s t a c l e , Hieronymus i s overcome The Monk - t o r i t u a l i z e t h e conquest Robbing t h e Chest The C o n s p i r a t o r s - t o enjoy t h e s i g h t o f the g o l d and t a k e i t The b e a t s t a r t s w i t h s m a l l sounds o f awe and b u i l d s t h r o u g h c h u c k l e s t o a r o a r of enthu s i a s m w h i c h wakes Hieronymus. Facing page 112 "RED MAGIC l i ' questionable gold florins, the fortune of Master Hierony-mus. Let our eight hands cany them to their destiny. Sybilla. In this bag. Until we can share them out ac-' cording to our deserts. [The gold is thrown into the bag.]: 'Armador. And as all in this universe is nothing more than seeming, let us generously make good the loss by scattering eighty florins bearing the image of the ape— : the grand master of doubtful coinage. [He empties another bag into the chest.] Romulus. This is called the transmutation of metals. I have spoken! • . • ; 3 77,"j chesfis c'^e^^ggm f e HUifBONY\tust who has heard-the noise of the meta^ raises himself. Th"e four accomplices LQ - 18 . scatter into dark corners. • Hieronymus [falling again]. I am in a cave. . . . They; ore unloading gold. , . . My throat , . , wants to drink . , . water from a river . . . that carries gold nuggets. j . The Monk [hastening to htm]. Here is the river, my son.' [fie forces him to drink. Hiecuping from the drunken. i l i^L 9, (iH!) . THC qrwK n ' 4 \ Romutm. And now? . . . It is ^ mrn ol night. rou,; (Armador.and Sybilla, must wait till dawn to flee. 'Hie gates-lof the town are shut. The wagons that go to Bruges leave: at five o'clock. ... I shall watch the drunk from the; back of thc room. Take your amusement in the cellar. Mavc: iyou still some wine? (fo with them, mSnk. You have done, fwcll. You deserve some relaxation. p | 77ie Monk [reddening]. Lovely Sybilla, I want to poke, ;my brush in your flue. [He tries to hug her. SYBILLA {laughs'.] *0 ' ' i Armador, <Smm along, monk! Joyful offices ^ re ecle-'. [brated in thts^ psypfc. Yon will lose your salvation there. •, ! The Motifc.llost that when I was still a novice. [He goes out to t/ic c«^K] . ' 5 ' S~ylnlhY~[embracjng ARMADOR «n37rJrtfg^  iCome, my ghost! Let us make loVe until dawn, and let us' ipretend - we have all the abandonments, f . dinnwnbfed, | They go out io»4fo*iflfri. ROMULUS goes to station himself \ \ai thc ]^M^-M^m^». Laughter and ^talking dies away] SQ -10 tbc>'o)y, .Pause. |A /iaggcirJTTiEruoNYMuTnsey on his elbows!: «' ; • I-112. ACT 11. SCENE I X - BEATS 3. TITLE: S c r a m b l i n g t o Hide ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o s t r u g g l e t o wake f o r a moment the C o n s p i r a t o r s - t o r u s h t o h i d i n g p l a c e s t h e Monk - t o pour some more wine i n t o Hieronymus Note: There i s a moment o f d e a t h l y s i l e n c e as t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s become aware o f Hieronymus, f o l l o w e d by a c o n f u s e d s t r u g g l e as they become t a n g l e d i n each o t h e r i n t h e i r s c r a m b l e t o h i d e . The Monk i s n o t v e r y s u c c e s s f u l i n h i s attempt to h i d e and so t a c k l e s Hieronymus d i r e c t l y . 4. TITLE: I n t e r n a l C r a c k s ACTIONS: Romulus - t o o r g a n i z e t h e l a s t phase o f o p e r a t i o n s Armador - t o check on Hieronymus and f i g u r e out a way t o c o n t r o l Romulus the Monk- t o l e t go t o h i s l u s t f o r S y b i l l a S y b i l l a - t o cope w i t h t h e o f f e n s i v e monk 5. TITLE: S e t t l i n g Down t o Wait ACTIONS: Armador, S y b i l l a , t h e Monk - t o make t h e b e s t o f i t by g o i n g d o w n s t a i r s Romulus - t o s e t t l e h i m s e l f c o m f o r t a b l y f o r a v i g i l 6. TITLE: Making Love t o H i s G o l d ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o f i n d and embrace h i s g o l d Romulus - t o h i d e and t h e n t o t r y and b e l i e v e Hieronymus* i n c r e d i b l e b e h a v i o u r Facing page 113 M I C H E L D E G H E L D E R O D E LQ -19 LQ - 2 0 Hieronymus. Thirst I . . . Monkl . . . He has gone,; the rogue . . . with my will. . . . I have robbed you,! •jackal! . . . It scrvcsyou right. . . . I am immortal! [fie tries to get up, but falls back. He groans.] Rich . . . rich ,. . . and more, a magician, f. . Sleep . . , no .'. . not sleep when one is rich. . . . They might come. . . . [Hie-cuping, he drags himself toward liis chest.] I want you, my gold. , . . [He opens his chest and half plunges in.) I want to lie with you . . . my gold, . . . \With"difficulty, he hoists himself up and disappears into his chest. His voice can be heard:] How good it is . * . good . . .? good. . . . . r The chest closes on the miser. In the semidarkness ROMU-I IMS abandons himself to his noiseless, irrepressible laughter.] Curtain. i scene i 1 A C T T H R E E i LQ - 21 i •SQ - 11 LQ - 22 ^ C E N E —The seme. It. is night. The candle is shining.) LQ - 23 Nothing is seen, except an attentive shadow^ near the stair-l ^ • case. Twelve strikes in the distance, there are tre-] mendous snores that suddenly stop as the lid of the chest} opelis. I I ERONVMUS' head emerges. j HIERONYMUS. ^^m^m^^-^^-^dt. . . . What a grand; sleep! . . . i<>aht.ir. Wwitoimd. . . . Golden walls.: ', . , Golden darkness. . . . Golden silence. . . . I. too-am gold, and am shaped like a disc with my face in the. center, . . . 1 dreamed. . . . h^m^^^^^m^im^ • iwwi"iw» jiwfrtfr • iViw nwi»i|iR.rtWMi>i,iyti}i;><n* . . . 1 bought the! globe and all that covers it, oceans, mountains, empires,! peoples, and ruins. And the seasons, storms, and creation.] . . . That was a miscalculation, for I shall lose on it. when' Use end of the world comes. . . . M#i-ltA\*\\ buy thoiVnlo! lay.'Hiftniyt was dawrX"."".95) 1 was forgetting.! I bought Calvary , . . Jerusalem.. . . Mecca atidj 113. ACT 111. SCENE 1 «. HIERONYMUS PURPOSE: t o r e v e a l what happens t o Hieronymus once t h e checks of p o v e r t y and m o r t a l i t y have been removed t o s t u d y Hieronymus 1 madness i n w h i c h common sense i s l o s t b u t a g h a s t l y l o g i c r e m a i n s , a l o g i c u s e d t o J u s t i f y s u c c e s s i v e waves of r e l e a s e d s e n s u a l d e s i r e s t o remove Hieronymus from th e house so t h a t t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s c a n l e a v e t o c r e a t e a suspense r e s u l t i n g from t h e p r o b a b i l i t y o f h i s q u i c k r e t u r n ACTION: Hieronymus - t o s w e l l up h i s c o n s c i o u s n e s s so as t o g r a s p t h e e x t e n t o f h i s new freedom Romulus - t o h i d e DOMINANT EMOTIONS: wondrous s t u p e f a c t i o n , u n d e r l a i n by t h e i n c r e a s i n g p r e s s u r e o f r e l e a s e d s e n s u a l d e s i r e s , sudden f e a r s , and doubts MOOD: The scene moves from a p l e a s a n t a b s u r d i t y t o a h o r r i b l e v o l u p t u o u s n e s s RHYTHMIC IMAGE: th e l i g h t i n g o f a b l o w - t o r c h . (The q u i e t f l a m e s l i c k a t t h e t o r c h , h e a t i n g i t u n t i l a h i s s i n g , s p i t t i n g r o a r announces t h e s u p e r h e a t i n g J e t . ) SHAPE: U n t i l he remembers t h a t he i s a l o n e , Hieronymus goes t h r o u g h the e x p a n s i v e p r o c e s s of waking up t o a g r a n d w o r l d . A s o u r n e s s f o l l o w s as he t h i n k s o f t h e Monk. H i s d e s i r e s f o r d r i n k , f o o d , and power surge up u n t i l he s h o u t s . H i s own v i o l e n c e f r i g h t e n s him: h i s body and h i s house a r e s t r a n g e u n t i l he c a n f i n d a scapegoat i n t h e d o l l a t w h i c h he l a s h e s o u t . F e e l i n g r e l i e v e d , he p r e p a r e s t o l e a v e , f u l l o f a s s u r a n c e . B u t the n o i s e s from th e c e l l a r r e l e a s e h i s f i r s t c o n s c i o u s r e c o g n i t i o n o f f r e e d s e x u a l d e s i r e i n w h i c h he r e v e l s w i t h o u t r e s t r a i n t . The appearance o f t h e " g h o st" tempers h i s exuberance b u t does n o t change h i s mood. 114 ACT 111. SCENE 1 - HIERONYMUS ( c o n t i n u e d ) STAGING: W i t h a s i n g l e a c t o r many v a r i a n t b l o c k i n g s a r e p o s s i b l e . However, some p h y s i c a l f a c t s d e t e r m i n e movements, t h e c h e s t , b o t t l e s e t c . "Long l i v e Hieronymus" as a s h a r p h i g h p o i n t d e l i v e r e d from t h e t o p o f the t a b l e d r a m a t i z e s Hieronymus 1 sense o f omnipotence, and g e t t i n g down i s made easy by h i s subsequent f e a r s . The s t a b b e d d o l l needs t o be c l e a r l y seen a t the end o f t h e a c t and so i s b e s t l e f t s t u c k i n t h e t a b l e . To a v o i d r e p e a t i n g a l i s t e n i n g p o s i t i o n , Hieronymus l i s t e n s t o t h e n o i s e s i n the c e l l a r a t the door r a t h e r t h a n t h r o u g h t h e f l o o r . The peak o f s e x u a l abandon needs t o be t h r u s t i n t h e a u d i e n c e ' s l a p and so i s b e s t downstage a f t e r a move em p h a s i z i n g t h e b u i l d from u p s t a g e . The t a b l e c o r n e r can be l e a n e d a g a i n s t t o emphasize the i m a g i n a r y " c l u b -l i k e " o r gan. The c l o a k and h a t a r e p l a c e d so t h a t Hieronymus sees the "ghost" when he goes f o r them. Romulus'head must be v i s i b l e over t h e r a i l i n g . I n c r e a s -i n g l y t h e movement must g i v e the f e e l i n g t h a t the house i s t o o s m a l l t o c o n t a i n him. DIFFICULTIES: The same d i f f i c u l t i e s p r e s e n t i n t h e e a r l i e r s o l l l o q u y s a r e p r e s e n t h e r e , b u t t o a l e s s e r e x t e n t because t h e scene i s b i g g e r , c o n t a i n s more v a r i e t y , and i s more b i z a r r e . A t t a i n i n g enough s i c k e n i n g s e n s u a l i t y may be d i f f i c u l t as t h e a u d i e n c e w i l l t e n d t o " c u t o u t " . BEATS: 1. TITLE: G l o r i o u s World ACTION: Hieronymus - t o l u x u r i a t e i n h i s g o l d and h i s dreams of expanding p o s s i b i l i t y NOTE: Hieronymus i s h a l f awake t h r o u g h o u t t h i s b e a t . Facing page 115 " " RED MAGIC 35 ; Rome. . . . I possess the Mohammedan paradise and the • keys to the Christian heaven. . . .\\ITalfway ouT~oYlh~e~: 2 chest.] t should have had-a bed that wasn't so hard. My; forehead is ringing like a bell. The monk made me drunk [ on my own wine; but lie drank the greater part of it. I shall buy all the vineyards. 1 alone shall drink wine. - . . |. • ^ { • ^ r — i " ^ ^ ; ph«>ijr.<)i> tiia ilhmtririii.iO'ntijjhty. [He hoists himself out ofj • his chest.] What, brown, or black, or gray thoughts there! [are on my poor hcadl^ i^ lWwviftrha^MBod t» mc-oo owd [ ,f«itatra> Yesterday I was the timid "Tlieronymus with his; little economies. Tonight I find myself flung outside time' • and law. [He feels himself.} It's me. . . . And I am all; alone with mvself. . . . &s*Wi4*¥«M»^^ tit»»'Wili'<M»y'J'<uw'W"igonM.wi'Twcfy inwwiwwill bci inwnwaiay ' [iic scorches around him.) No one? They leave me, in spite j of my treasure. CapuchPn! Ungrateful wretch! He has run! •off with his will. He has gone to collect his monastic! •brethren together. . . . Frame the lying paper! This old:  ;house will have crumbled and all the monks will have been] [eaten by worms, when old Hieronymus is still laughing,; [and he will be the last to laugh! . . . Hngw't tho gawtla ' [mi»w.(rf, tUo^loth frdwn'anything? iS his panic, he has even \. \ forgotten to empty the bottle. 1 shall do it. [He drinks.}] sTbe peculiar thirst you get from drinking! My blood rowati hfw-elss^ f^ ^^ te-ewswffe Is it I, so temperate, who am ! . [bending 'my elbow? What a transformation in my sub-j, ; stance! Here 1 am, hungry' and thirsty; wanting to do] [things,- to speak out loud. We shall sec! I shall have fire-]; [works set off. I shall give feasts. I shall illuminate my! • [house. I shall command .the bagpipe to sound, and th»'j' ' • TWnait Umitjmtt, . .'. 1^ shall laugh contagious laughter j [that will win over the whole country. And the people will] 1 shout, "Down with misers! * . F . Long live Hieronymus] 115. ACT 111. SCENE 1 - BEATS 2. TITLE: Coming t o G r i p s w i t h H i m s e l f ACTION: Hieronymus - t o r e d i s c o v e r h i m s e l f NOTE: I n h i s u n s t a b l e c o n d i t i o n , t h i s r e d i s c o v e r y I s n o t a l o g i c a l o r temperate a c t i o n . Hieronymus f i r s t d i s c o v e r s t h a t he has a hangover w h i c h produces morbid t h o u g h t s and v i s i o n s o f f u t u r e drunkeness w i t h o u t s t i n t ; t h e n he f i n d s he i s a l o n e , a s t a t e he senses as f o r e b o d i n g b u t whi c h i s a g a i n b r u s h e d a s i d e w i t h t h e p l e a s u r e o f h i s p r a c t i c a l j o k e ; t h e n s u r p r i s e d a t t h e change i n h i m s e l f because o f h i s d r i n k i n g , he c u t s l o o s e w i t h a s e r i e s of v i s i o n s o f h i s power and i m p o r t a n c e . B o t h h i s p a s t i d e n t i t y and h i s new one must be p r e s e n t , a l t e r n a t i n g i n emphasis, u n t i l he throws o f f t h e o l d a t t h e end o f t h e b e a t . Facing page 116 36 M I C H E L D E G H E L D E R O D E [ A C T nf. thc philanthropist! '\eibtg*&&k&*4»y^^ yaui f A. Long life, Hieronymus! [He laughs.) What a| •good joke I'm playing on death! . , . What? [He listens.] > What quiet! it is as still as a spider's web.*. ? . [He-.shivers.) What is there to be afraid of? Tha. tpit»i«fc4h»: ig<^^44«Jt<^^^j»^ib^^»>w»»»gi»? [He ihrWw r/ic bottle, ' tfnfaa»] This-wine is playing havoc with my throat. •.?.•> iw~w»»-*<»ww**ai>«^ .I am heavy and light atjfhe same time.< My left "hand is frozen. My" right hand is $jLfeeHMy flesh' is alive!) [He Uiu±i~U*»-idi*+t^m*lsits cSrytfc]' Sf range mo-' merits! [lie rocks himself.) [1i aTii^ v^ itcTieH, even HvoiIgh~ "there is no one. (*TW WhoWW^uough the walls, the ccilirig. . , . There are eyes. [PoZirt'Iy.] I am doing nothing odd.l5Pc;Ky Watchers, you arc wasting your time. [He t catches sight of the c/ri/d.bHt is you who arc looking st-mc? You are not asleep? [Trnc\voii were born with your eyes open. You haven't got cycTid<57 ^^^^M^^^&ih&^^sh, ~"~ '*TjStop spy-: u?L{H? gets. *f..tii««n>f!uu him *cvtrod )%%mwtyv#i& ing! Your eyes arc red, What do I see in them  „ \up and comes closer to the child.] I can guess. You reveal; jyour mean little soul to inc. Coveted Y^^m^»f^¥^^m\ is*8~#»kk You assess your inheritance. ~H>^i«mm!A^^&\ |ofc.a hotloon. Parricide! No, my vicious little fellow, yon -will never inherit, for that would mean my dying, and that is impossible. [Mc takes-a kntft from tfffi dfiimt. m 4ht^ Uikl».i So I shall spare you your, life . . . thc life of a'-pauper that yours would be. I shall put an end to you. . . . Will you submit, like a dutiful child? [He thrusts the knife into the child's chest.) ~S2A&ifr&3iw^ iiip wtyitnamfa*. F. He is not bleeding? . . . What.an., cccjiior»ical child, keeping his blood for himself, ~" ' n"*~^ : i-~ r^^ wine? !»• gtoot owig*! I shall go to-the taverns. *. .&. i.an»«l>U; : »« .4m> that» . . . Wliat will people say? "Hieronymus is] |drinking! . . , ]4*mm*mm~+i*^l0mUl>^ • »<»&»• j aH^fcUw.»i.M.iI.or l^'Ctondi»g'»dtinli6J» . . . Yes, I have dared! 116. ACT 111. SCENE 1 - BEATS TITLE: D e s t r o y i n g t h e C o v e t e r s ACTION: Hieronymus - t o f i n d a way t o d e s t r o y h i s f e a r s NOTE: H i s r e c k l e s s n o i s i n e s s a t the end o f t h e l a s t h e a t b r o u g h t t o h i s a t t e n t i o n t h e s i l e n c e o f the room, and now b r i n g s on a wave o f f e a r s which he f i n a l l y c o n t r o l s by c o n c e n t r a t i n g them i n t h e d o l l and v i o l e n t l y k i l l i n g them t h e r e . TITLE: A r o u s i n g t h e B u l l ACTION: Hieronymus - t o s u r r e n d e r t o a l o n g s u p r e s s e d e r o t i c i s m NOTE: T h i s i s a l o n g b e a t w h i c h b e g i n s w i t h a t r a n s -i t i o n a l a c t i o n prompted by t h e empty b o t t l e . I n t h e p r o c e s s o f p u t t i n g h i s house i n o r d e r , he remembers t h e n o i s e s o f t h e p r e v i o u s day and f i n d s t h a t the t r u e and e x c i t i n g i n t e r -p r e t a t i o n o f them i s b e i n g f o r c e d upon him now t h a t he i s n o t b l i n d e d by t h e need t o i n t e r p r e t them as n o i s e s n e c e s s a r y f o r g o l d p r o d u c t i o n . He i s t e r r i f i e d and f a s c i n a t e d by t h e images c o n j u r e d up b e f o r e him, and he f i n a l l y w allows i n them, l e t t i n g go w i t h a w i l d dance and e x c e s s i v e images. T h i s i s t h e most s e n s u a l l y i n t e n s e and r e p u l s i v e b e a t i n t h e p l a y . Facing page 117 ; " " R E D MAGIC ' 37"' r ; [to^ eavc niy humble dwelling. [He hesitates.] Your duty, ' . chest, is to stay finnly put, m4^m^^(ipA^ii^m^mfS^» fC.-rvalicr, as for my wife, they fiave gold as I have. . . . So . ;they will not rob me. . . If I were certain that thev „|were asleep, [He glues his ear to the ft£Sf"an.d listens)) :Nothing! , . . Yes . . . a buzzing .' . . voices . . . whis-'j 'peririg. . . . Formulas Eh? . . . Someone is laugh-. SQ -12 ing. . . . A fine crystal laugh. [A woman's hysterical laughter is heard.] Is my wife laughing? Is it necessary to; laugh to breed gold? [He listens) She is speaking faster! ,. . -• faster. She is choking. [A moan is heard) Is she moan-ing? . Is it with pain?.. . . I*** with pleasure? , c . .' ''U&fr&mt-rt&ea&sg&sMlmL . . . What is being done to her? • [What do they do to women to draw these long animal;. • 'moans from them? . . . Are they standing up? Are they; lying on the ground? . . . And if they are lying, are their [bodies apart or together? . . . And if they are together, [aren't they one on top of the other? And moving? . . .: . i HM^***** ).AV'Sw'»»4<M4»gy"W^ ^ • • - i >L°*ix&!$>^^ [He' .g&te&ufy crimson) I do not know. I do not want to know. 1 This woman was not mofhing. [Moan.] I maintain that she :wasnot moaning! [Another moan.] I do not love this'; 'woman. She has contributed to my enrichment. I despise! • ihcr.. Have I not given her up, body and soul, toRthe[ stranger? That shows what little value I set on herW™>g Enjoy yourself, lecherous woman! Be melodious like an; alley pit. . . . . There are other women. . . . Troops of! ,them{e&BST?JI can buy entire harems. . . . Your head will! . [bristle with countless horns. A porcupine will not have asj [many epulis. I shall work away at fat women, very fat, with] the most meat possible, for my money. They will moan; better than you. The whole town will hear them bellowing! , ••. in their climaxes. And; the town will exclaim, "Listen,; :Hicronymus is copuiatinglfeffv Hurrah!l?W«j)The fine; ''fellow!" . . . I am sweating. [He is panting] This very] .nightV'^ tJjiI have deserved it. . . . My loins arc filled] [with live coals. My organ swells up hugely like a club that? . II shall use to threaten the whores. Who is armed like me? ;• , ;I want to exercise myself at once—with a sow, if necessary!] :S^fc^p»^ho wnact"b-ao»iwl»JywWMyNd Give mc the sins] of unchastity . . . the worst(®|p|)those that common! 117. ACT 1. SCENE 1 - BEATS 4. ( c o n t i n u e d ) Facing page 118 3S MICHEL DE GHELDERODE people cannot afford.ffAt last Jig sees the ghost, and draws' back.) I»bcg your jlardon, ghost. You were there? . . . i . . Do not reproach inc. You wiiuli l ha ilw»>)w*wiJ\ Listen too have committed sins. t«da~^ ftUw.k.iiyo^ -wUtoli Stay here. Watch over my treasure. You won't get: any,' gold, because you wouldn't know what to do with it. But I shall redeem your purgatory. Ah I For inc, it. will be the first time that I have made my way to the shady-! side streets. I am sinning in good faith. It is the call ofi nature. ,6. . One word more, ghost. Watch the-Cavalier! ... and my wife, Spy on them. Make a list of their most! precise gestures. You can go through ... I shall, have great satisfaction listening to yon recounting the> abominable sights. . . . Don't let yourself get excTtcd.j You, with your unreal person, couldn't go to thc gay ladies.; ;. . . You understand? *. .D. 3jm8^ *ai6«»te«$«s»^ ^ . . . l^am^jmi^ [He opens the chest and takes out a\ •coin.) With this golden florin I shall have ten well-trjed! whores. .•?. • Ho! . . . Tire monk will die with cnvy.j 4We puts on his hat, throws a cloak over his shoulders, and] goes to tha door.) fthoaH.i i i i> litUa-disGtatinni m »i »• jiJ* toa»fW»^)^44wy^^ [Me goes] SQ - 13 out and shuts thc door.-}- A N D LOCKS I T ) _____] Scene ii soon as he is alone, ROMULUS hursts into great laughter,[ 1 SQ -14 and still covered in his sheet, runs to the n i_ocKeo'n R " N I T O T M B ctL.enik joon P doortntm) Here! • © I Romulus. Hello! . . . Hey there, below! Noise of voices and footsteps. \ s The Monk [appearing, flushed and staggering). By thel .devil's buttocks! You are disturbing our cejernonies, ... ,| jBy God! She was lifting her petticoat up£*. S^sw M. TO • Romulus. Hieronymus has come in heat. He is on his; way to the trollops. . . . This is not in our plan. . . . The] -magistrate isn't due till dawn. [ The Monk. Armador and his servant girl mustn't haveJ [time to get away. . . . Risky! , . . Really risky! ... ,j iListen, Romulus. I'm afraid tnose two have an inkling.] ;They were slipping knowing glances to each other. Look"! out-for mischief.. « / •. • .-\ ! Romulus. Right! ... I shall go and warn the magis-1 Itrate.Q&'OM TOVWINOOW} . =.,'] (TV-118 . ACT 111. SCENE 1 - BEATS 5. TITLE: A c c e p t i n g t h e Ghost ACTION: Hieronymus - t o use the g h o s t as a spy, an e x t e n s i o n o f h i m s e l f NOTE: C o n t i n u i n g t h e a c t i o n begun a t t h e b e g i n n i n g o f Beat 4, Hieronymus i s suddenly f a c e d w i t h t h e f i g u r e c o v e r e d by t h e s h e e t . There i s a t e n s e moment f o r Bomulus i n w h i c h Hieronymus i s b a f f l e d , b u t he i s so u n b a l a n c e d , and so s u r e o f h i m s e l f t h a t t h e i d e a o f the g h o s t so much a p a r t o f h i s l i f e i n t h i s house, i s n o t q u e s t i o n e d once i t s t r i k e s him. The g h o s t becomes an a l l y and the r e l a t i o n s h i p a j o k i n g one. W i t h t h i s added p r o t e c t i o n a t home, he rushes c o n f i d e n t l y o u t t o new a d v e n t u r e s • ACT 111. SCENE 11 - THE CONSPIRATORS PURPOSE: t o r e v e a l the p l o t t i n g among t h e c o n s p i r a t o r s t o k i l l o f f Romulus i n p r e p a r a t i o n f o r the f i n a l scene t o r e v e a l Armador's c o l d b l o o d e d a b i l i t y t o a c t i n c o n t r a s t t o t h e squeamishness o f S y b i l l a and t h e Monk . t o r e v e a l the Monk's p e r f i d y ACTIONS: Romulus - t o f i n d a way o f e x p o s i n g Armador t o t h e law the Monk - t o keep a l i v e i n t h e f a c e of d i s i n t e g r a t i n g p l a n s Armador - t o keep a l i v e i n t h e f a c e o f t r e a c h e r y and t o i n c r e a s e h i s f o r t u n e S y b i l l a - t o a s s i s t Armador i n p r o t e c t i n g themselves DOMINANT EMOTIONS: A l l - w a r i n e s s and f e a r c o v e r e d o v e r w i t h j o c u l a r i t y CHARACTER DOMINANCE: Armador c o n t r o l s the scene. MOOD: t e n s e , t h r e a t e n i n g , moments of f o r c e d g a i e t y 119 ACT 111. SCENE 11 - THE CONSPIRATORS ( c o n t i n u e d ) RHYTHMIC IMAGE: a s p u t t e r i n g f u s e which a t ti m e s appears t o go out and a t t i m e s r a c e s ahead s e t t i n g o f f i n i t s c o u r s e an e x p l o s i o n w i t h o u t t o u c h i n g o f f t h e r e s t . . . y e t SHAPE: The sudden b u r s t s o f merriment from Romulus and the Monk t u r n r a p i d l y i n t o f e a r f u l , sudden p l a n n i n g w i t h no r e s o l u t i o n . The p a t t e r n i s r e p e a t e d as Armador e n t e r s e x p a n s i v e l y and as S y b i l l a and t h e Monk j e s t . Romulus' s u s p i c i o u s e x i t t o the c e l l a r s p a r k s a n o t h e r c o n s p i r a t o r -i a l huddle by Armador and S y b i l l a w i t h t h e Monk l i s t e n i n g . The d i v i d i n g up o f the g o l d i s sho t t h r o u g h w i t h i r o n i c meanings and s u s p i c i o u s g l a n c e s i n a m a t r i x o f h y p o c r i t i c a l comradeship. A sudden s o b e r i n g t e r r o r g r i p s S y b i l l a and t h e Monk a t Romulus' d e a t h , b u t i t i s f o l l o w e d by renewed h y p o c r i t i c a l j o v i a l i t y and r a p i d a c t i v i t y . Romulus checks t h e door t o d r a m a t i z e t h e f a c t t h a t I t i s l o c k e d . STAGING: The c o n f e r e n c e between Romulus and t h e Monk needs t o be a t some d i s t a n c e from t h e c e l l a r door b u t i n a p o s i t i o n so t h a t they c a n keep an eye on i t ; hence, i t t a k e s p l a c e down l e f t . Armador must c l e a r t h e c e l l a r door t o t h e r i g h t so t h a t S y b i l l a c a n e n t e r , be seen, and have a c l e a r v i e w t o t h e Monk. Bo t h Armador and S y b i l l a need t o c l e a r t h e way f o r Romulus t o e x i t ; t he d o l l p r o v i d e s an o p p o r t u n i t y f o r them t o move downstage and f o r Romulus t o e x i t . The d i v i s i o n of the money c a n b e s t t a k e p l a c e a t t h e t a b l e , Armador s e a t e d f o r s t r e n g t h and su r r o u n d e d by t h e o t h e r s . Because Romulus must be n e a r the window t h r o u g h w h i c h he i s g o i n g t o t r y t o escape, he has t o change p l a c e s w i t h S y b i l l a , a move which adds a r e s t l e s s q u a l i t y t o t h e o n l o o k e r s and p u t s S y b i l l a n e x t t o Armador where she would f e e l s a f e s t . The s t a b b i n g i s s e t up so t h a t t h e a c t u a l e n t r a n c e o f t h e b l a d e i n t o Romulus' body i s h i d d e n and Romulus body i s a c c e s s i b l e f o r easy d r a g g i n g t o t h e c h e s t . The r e s t o f the movement i s d e t e r m i n e d by t h e s e t l a y o u t . DIFFICULTIES: So many r a p i d r e v e l a t i o n s and c h a n g i n g o f s i d e s o c c u r t h a t g r e a t c l a r i t y i s n e c e s s a r y . 1 2 0 . A C T i l l . S C E N E 11 - THE CONSPIRATORS ( c o n t i n u e d ) M E C H A N I C A L D I F F I C U L T I E S : The s t a g i n g o f t h e s t a b b i n g a n d t h e d i s p o s i n g o f t h e c o r p s e a r e t r i c k y . B E A T S : 1. T I T L E : F u m b l i n g a C r i s i s A C T I O N S : R o m u l u s - t o a r r a n g e t o h e a d o f f A r m a d o r a n d S y b i l l a T h e M o n k - t o f i n d e x c u s e s t o s t o p R o m u l u s Facing page 121 R E D M A G I C " ft. 39; j The Monk. Not yet. Armador would understand.*. . .! And what about' rne? . . . Alone with them?6. . . I.j 'would be bled like a stuck pig. . . . B e quiet. They a r c ! coining up. Let us divide it up first.  Armador [appearing]?What? He has taken wing?oFvcry-_ thing is working out, I like that very much. Let us cut it short, friends. ; . SYBILLA appears. She is mistrustful. The Monk [to SYBILLA]. Sybilla, with your body of a succubus! . . . White frog! . . . I throb under my robe! Sybilla. You will take it off for mc, father nionk. . . . \To ARMADOR.] Look here!F. . . Hicroh'ymu's-lias killed" mv child .^ fS/ft draws him toward the front of the stage; then, in a low voice.] The monk let it out to mc in his lust-; ful delirium. There is a traitor with a Roman name. In  exchange, I have promised him my body, f * I a J a " 1 Komulus hmecwyj. Where is the real gold? If the rhiserj were to come b^tc^^j . • ; Sybilla [to A*>>tmiim). W e are all delivered tip to Justice. T/!t> Monk. Divide it up?L. . . I will give my share for iSvbil'a'* crunner W I T H T H S . S J ? & ; M I S c i _ o n * f?«o swoao L T I I . , 1 .. i.uywtu ^ » 'iyJn M}J W M . H E OUTS T » B M OIV THf . • ^^Anriiidor [coming back}. You win earn wry wunrly m torn' . . . Come here, comrades. [Hi.' I ah mi th» iM&4****lH*~i4*t*U# You see, I am already fitted out for., i the 'jounfey."[RoMULLis and THE MONK draw Mar to the: [light.] We are among honest folk. . , . Here are eighty! •;florins, taken from the chest. Twenty for Romulus, honest; Romulus. [He gives them.) Ten for the father—no morp; [since he has the will. [He gives them.] Fifty for me and the; [wench, who have well deserved them. And take heed that; 'ill-gotten gains always tlurae f^Hc pockets his gold and\ •laughs, showing his teeth} Now, let us forget o n e another!': • [I do not want to watch the downfall of the #J4 fellow] [whose ruin we have accomplished. The Flemish roads will! be pleasant under rnv feet, \ shall never again in tin's life! ;scc either vou.Ubeardea bei,s...^ . .w-^  .... ._ v . .'his ,Cbe*a«fecl lScgfar^ fo vou f^efle? rmwk^To! • the one his fleas, (to the other hisholy deeds/)'. . . Each j' :knowing what'he must do on car,th. . . . Good-b , v! Q .. "Romtii'us [animatedly). Already? Dawn is still far away,] and the miser is.in the hands of the women. In the name! 121. ACT 111.SCENE 11 - BEATS 2. TITLE: G e t t i n g On W i t h I t ACTIONS: Armador - t o o r g a n i z e t h e group 3. TITLE: P e n d i n g O f f t h e B r u t e ACTIONS: The Monk - t o make a pass a t S y b i l l a S y b i l l a - t o keep him a t h i s d i s t a n c e NOTE: I n h e r e f f o r t t o a v o i d t h e Monk S y b i l l a l o o k s around f o r a d i v e r s i o n and f i n d s i t i n t h e r a t h e r d i s t u r b i n g s i g h t o f t h e s t a b b e d d o l l . 4. TITLE: Warning Armador ACTIONS: S y b i l l a - t o warn Armador about Romulus and o f t h e d e a l w i t h t h e Monk 5. TITLE: D i v i d i n g t h e L o o t ACTIONS: Romulus - t o g e t t h e d i v i s i o n underway Armador - t o d i v i d e up the money and g a i n t ime t o p r e p a r e f o r some a c t i o n a g a i n s t Romulus S y b i l l a and The Monk- t o watch and s i z e up what i s happening 6. TITLE: S t a b b i n g t h e T r a i t o r ACTIONS: Romulus - t o c o v e r h i s l e a v i n g w i t h an excuse Armador «* t o s t o p Romulus' t r e a c h e r y by k i l l i n g him S y b i l l a and The Monk- t o cope w i t h t h e shock of the. k i l l i n g Facing page 1 2 2 UO M I C H E L D E GHELDERODE [ACT nrj | ! ;of brotherhood, let us stay. . . . Wait! . . . . I a m going: •to put'my gold in a safe place, and I shall come back with' more wine, [He goes toward the&f^T' ^  ! \ Armador [following him step by step]. Go, comrade!, , jAnd beware of scoundrels. A stab is soon given, [lie draws] s j/u's dagger and stabs R O M U L U S between the shoulders.]'. jOne hardly notices it. 8 • j \ Romulus [staggering]. They're killing mcl . . . It is; •cold! [He collapses to his fcnfes.j • Armador [laughing]. They're killing you? . . ..Where: arc the assailants, so that I can go and inform thc magis-trate? . . . Eh, Romulus? The beggar remains on his knees for a moment, rattling: in his throat, then he slumps to the floor'. SYBILLA laughs'' brutally. \ The Monk [frightened]. Cavalier . . . so good a spy! \ , . Armador [wiping his dagger]. Here he is a real ghost! . \ ~~y ' The Monk. It served Yiim right.TTT Sybilla, you re-' 'member thc terms? [He hugs her.] Little girl . . . I shall; ['cat you up. : Sybilla. Come along, since I promised you. You are not •angry, Armador? ! Armador. Go along! It is your reward, Capuchin. I must . ;busy myself with thc ghost and bury it. • ' f ; Sybilla [to T H E M O N K ] . Quick, then, in my room! [She '* '.runs up the stairs.) . . . '" ' The Monk [following her, panting). Oh, delight! . . .\). Quick, yes. . . . Very quick! . .F. I can't contain myself|,:^  any longer. . I" They disappear upstairs. j g Armador [drl^ing^ .; :bear no malice, you understand. You shall ha%'c a decentj ; . • burial. And a shroud. All the Christian things you don't! deserve, [He opens the chest and rams in the beggar's] body, which is still wrapped in its sheet.) I was forgetting.; L . . [He takes the dead man's' purse) Your fine gold .wouldn't be accepted as .currency in hell. [He doses the, }chcst.) Rot among the false gold, false manf frifa. .tjtww . •& last piece of work waits for me up,tbere, at the price of; I ten royal florins! [He disappears upstairs.) • •. j • scene iii \ Pause. The street, door opens with a crash. H I E R O N Y M U S 122. ACT 111. SCENE 11 - BEATS 7. TITLE: C l a i m i n g a Reward ACTIONS: the Monk - to ask f o r h i s payment and d e l i g h t i n i t s immediacy S y b i l l a - to c l e a r h i s request w i t h Armador Armador - to appear to agree 8. TITLE: H i d i n g the Corpse ACTIONS: Armador - to d i s p o s e of the body, s t r i p p i n g i t of v a l u e (both g o l d and moral worth) NOTE: Armador 1s a t t i t u d e i s one of amused contempt. 9. TITLE: G i r d i n g His L o i n s ACTIONS: Armador - to prepare h i m s e l f t o murder the Monk NOTE: Armador must p i c k up h i s j a c k e t , b a l d r i c and sword from the t a b l e where he l e f t i t i n beat 5« ACT 111. SCENE 111 - HIERONYMUS PURPOSE: to r e v e a l Hieronymus a t h i s lowest ebb, b ewildered, beaten, insane, f r i g h t e n e d , degenerate and robbed even of the d i g n i t y which m i s e r l i n e s s gave him. to r e v e a l a l s o t h a t even though crushed, he continues to b e l i e v e q u i t e without doubts i n h i s a c q u i r e d "powers" i n a s o r t of g l o r i o u s madness to r e v e a l t h a t Hieronymus i s completely i n c a p a b l e of c o r r e c t l y i n t e r p r e t i n g the events i n the world around him (Truth and f i c t i o n f o r him have become i n d i s t i n g u i s h a b l e . ) to r e t u r n Hieronymus to h i s house so t h a t he can be surrounded by evidence which condemns him to remove S y b i l l a and Armador ACTIONS: Hieronymus - to r e c o v e r from h i s n i g h t m a r i s h experience S y b i l l a and Armador - to escape without b e i n g d e t e c t e d DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Hieronymus - f e a r , then f e a r mixed w i t h growing but e r r a t i c s e l f - c o n f i d e n c e 123. ACT 111. SCENE 111 - HIERONYMUS ( c o n t i n u e d ) MOOD: f e v e r i s h b e w i l d e r m e n t RHYTHMIC IMAGE: g r a s s f i r e - t u f t s f l a r i n g up, q u i e t l i c k i n g s , sudden r u s h i n g tongues, a p p a r e n t d i s a p p e a r a n c e s , h i g h speed SHAPE: Hieronymus e n t e r s w i t h a c r a s h . He c a n b a r e l y speak. H i s b e w i l d e r e d q u e s t i o n s a c t as s h o r t f l a t pauses i n a r i s i n g t u r b u l e n c e . A f t e r a peak o f e x c e s s i v e s e l f -c o n f i d e n c e , t h e p a t t e r n s t a r t s a g a i n w i t h a f e e l i n g o f a t t a c k on h i s body. He r e t a l i a t e s i n a c r e s c e n d o o f t h r e a t s c a l l i n g upon h i s a s s i s t a n t s , t h e Monk, S y b i l l a , Armador, and t h e g h o s t t o b r i n g down d e s t r u c t i o n on h i s enemies. I n an a p p a r e n t answer t o h i s demands, Armador and S y b i l l a appear and e x i t . T h e i r l a u g h t e r d i s t u r b s him d e e p l y as s a n i t y n e a r l y r e t u r n s i n a moment of q u i e t , b u t soon he i s overwhelmed a g a i n . H i s c r o w d i n g f e a r s demand escape and c o n f e s s i o n i n a b u i l d t o t h e Monk's e n t r a n c e . STAGING: Hieronymus' g e s t u r e s r e - e n a c t h i s e x p e r i e n c e s . The door i s k e p t as a f o c a l p o i n t o f h i s f e a r s . He s i t s on t h e c h e s t d r a m a t i z i n g t h e sense of s e c u r i t y he g e t s from th e p r o x i m i t y o f h i s g o l d . Moving upstage he h u r l s h i s t h r e a t s a t t h e d o o r . He draws h i s sword a t t h e s c u f f l e u p s t a i r s and as Armador and S y b i l l a keep s h e e t s i n f r o n t o f them, they c r o s s and e x i t as he opens the d o o r . Hieronymus n e a r l y comes t o h i s senses s e a t e d on t h e s t o o l , b u t he i s soon i n m o t i o n a g a i n e n d i n g below t h e s t a i r r a i l i n g as the Monk e n t e r s . DIFFICULTIES: T h i s scene i s t h e most g r o t e s q u e i n t h e p l a y and a l s o t h e most i n t e n s e . Any o v e r p l a y i n g w i l l d e s t r o y i t ; i t must come about n a t u r a l l y as a r e s u l t o f what has gone b e f o r e . The sharp changes from r a v i n g t o n e a r l y l u c i d calm need t o be c l e a r and y e t b e l i e v a b l e . The dangers a r e w o o l l i n e s s and an u n r e l i e v e d t h r a s h i n g about. BEATS: 1. TITLE: R a i s i n g t h e Drawbridge ACTION: Hieronymus - t o l o c k out the demonic w o r l d Facing page 1 2 4 i R E D M A G I C . 4 1 ' criers, fceni double, out of breath, and without hat wafaafc. 2 | TJieronyiuus \in a hoarse voice j? Help! , . . There are' ; wasps tormcntine me. Stickv insects are running over rne.' •a* wort far una, There jwcre yirjers. wolves, brown owls. ftwwe ot lnthw mi\ lawatte, iwaawr^ fe^ SSi am afraid! . . . I am unclean! . . V hem wtie.ijiiiM8jijn>i!)> J I I I . W W J I M H nnn>nq tba nmtbrowwy. and tha wcttlWi I was the prev of slobbering gargoyles. I was beaten to a jelly. What did I do to these ribald creatures and their females? What witches' lair did I wander into? Us**4 . . . . '£>4im*-i&Jiivi'4*Hm^ . . . I paiu'and the old sweats in the taverns threw th<y tools in my path and .swore horriblv in German and Spanish! And the butchers: wanted .to pull down my breeches and cut my organ olfP: ,1 did nothing, said nothing! And the beggars were none- the' 'less frenzied. . . . With blows from their crutches.e^ .*? 'On rne, noble Hieronvrims! . . . And their bawling! . . , [Oh! Oh'^fup^rhey kicked me into the filth of thc gutter.. And rnimgy dogs siKlden^anpcarcd in blind alleys. They; 'bit me* And attic windowfcrpctiea. And bald and toothless 'creatures emptied their chamber pots cn my sku|l. People shouted, "Run him to earth! Arrest him!" Whyr'Thcv are >ors tne;r way hen •to uollaat iwd.hw «»att»> They want my gold. Help^  f . . Ii ' w ° U ' d rather ,Jgt lhcjn__ kiH me on mv chesr.ctfgsfl.. ;F7e7ccty.j 'YcVlnrleedT^ 'game of thcm.~7TT i have a magic breastplate, . . . Wliat have I to'fear? 1. _jyn)Jud<^^ <iif.Un»<>i»i» i>».>'»i<» Mawfr A.fillh> inntrnmtttuHnl It seems as: though I- have buboes, pustules, abscesses, growing on me;" There is a spiky plant growing in my belly, a hideous plant: •that is slowly'devouring mv organs, my liver, my entrails,; .my heartJ","'." TA"wayvvi'tli'TTrese" fdthy women! . . . I; •shall be chaste! . . . I shall have myself castrated, cut offj And I shall have my revenge. ili> mfluwirud IIM oanulo in nm nayi I want to abolish! il love in this kingdom. Do you hear me, monk?| ciose puvsi . Where-are you? f ? . Are you listening, you stinking; ><imto t9.'»»wai Tglio wn»«w»oid»iMoiiIioi 124 ACT 1 1 1 . SCENE 1 1 1 - BEATS 2. TITLE: B e g g i n g f o r U n d e r s t a n d i n g ACTION: Hieronymus - t o d r i v e o f f t h e overwhelming h a l l u c i n a t i o n s p e r s u i n g him NOTES: T h i s h e a t has two a l t e r n a t i n g a c t i o n s Hieronymus i s p o s s e s s e d ; h i s memories a r e as a l i v e as l i f e i t s e l f and he r e l i v e s each e v e n t . 3. TITLE: H o l d i n g t h e L i n e ACTION: Hieronymus - t o f i g h t o f f f e a r w i t h t h e power o f h i s w e a l t h and i m m o r t a l i t y NOTE: T h i s h e a t i s a calm i n the c e n t r e o f t h e sto r m . 4. TITLE: Drowning A g a i n ACTION: Hieronymus - t o s t r u g g l e w i t h t h e demons 5. TITLE: ACTION: G e t t i n g the Upper Hand Hieronymus - t o d r i v e o f f t h e f o r c e s w i t h anger and the a s s i s t a n c e of f r i e n d s NOTE: T h i s a c t i o n i s so s u c c e s s f u l t h a t Hieronymus f o r g e t s h i s f e a r s i n becoming i n t e r e s t e d i n the g h o s t ' s d i s a p p e a r a n c e and the n o i s e s u p s t a i r s . Facing page 125 42 MICHEL DE GHELDERODE [ A C T M \ i . m i w i how..}.... f.inr.it. ohouti . °, . And you, Svbu'la, come herd Go and inform the men of the law. '. ? . Armador, my good friend, hasten with your magic! Let it rain down! saltpeter and pilch on this evil crew! t-shoU.prnolwiw. who Tkrc you coming, monk? . . . Cavalier! . . . Wife! • . .! And you, ghost? . . . Coward! Me sleeps when his master! is in danger, [A mu^M^cry, then the noise of a struggle', '.are heard from<thove.\'MaMt^'coming. Ht wno Bi'MMja. Come; jlicre,. I command you! [lie takes down the sword.} Xtm[ itu»fto»nf'iii»n» »hohnwt> Y«i sq-17 [He dances with'. rage.] Are you coming? 7'iflo shadow.;, covered by ffli&"efc«<w, hurry down the stairs. H I E R O N Y M U S draws back. ••; ! Armador [disguising his voice]. Hieronymus, open the] 'door! . . ] ] Sybilla [disguising her voice]. So that we can run at your! •enemies, • .. j H i F K O N Y . M U s , trembling, opens the door. The pair rush out-] 'side and laugh without restraint. They disappear, but. they can be heard laughinji in the distance. . « n •^JL^O£jj..?>p.:ye.,.,'.> pyyu , -Hieronymus. Thank you! | ., . .' llTcy are~laughing at going •Ha! . Ha to s laughter n iv JlO is ! in tin '.Why are they laughing?! ny •enemies. . . . They are; enemies! [He laughs.} Ha! . . .; d^h»i»-^4h^dm^9^'Yi\cre were! lie second? (*'.TS? No. . . . There1, I am being rob ben? * ~ * H * >vp; of them! W!' •is only one ghost n t s house. •«S=4»S»* .The street is still dead.fThey.will not come. The butchers; / 125. ACT 111. SCENE 111 - BEATS 6. TITLE: Escaping ACTIONS: Armador and S y b i l l a - to f o o l Hieronymus and escape Hieronymus - to help the ghost beat back his enemies NOTE: For a few moments Hieronymus' indecision raises a question as to whether he w i l l recognize Armador and S y b i l l a . 7. TITLE: T e r r i b l e Doubts ACTION: Hieronuymus - to explain the discrepancies NOTE: Hieronymus arrives at the awful but correct explanation by accident, looks at i t quietly, but f a i l s to recognize i t before the fears , begin to s t i r again i n th i s moment of vacuum. 8 . TITLE: Deciding on an Action ACTION: Hieronymus - to look for ways of escaping future danger NOTE: This i s the "Let's get outa here" reaction which f a i l s because of the t i e to his possessions. Facing page 126 Kl:.D MAGIC 'I V [have lost track of inc. But the bawds will recognize me' [The whole town will know from their accursed tongues! •that I had gold. [Determinedly.] T shall go. I shall take; ' ;my fortune and leave the town. .[Faltering.] I ought-to take-•my house, . . . There are too many hnek.i. I shall go to-j* morrow. 1 shall put myself under the protection of the; monks. They will bear my confession. [Inspired.] I >?ii!fihjito>;. become a monk. At once! . . . Conic here, fat Father,. come and hear my confession! ' Scene i V Voice of 'I he Monk [upstairs). My confession! j 1 Hieronymus. I hear an echo. Is it the ghost moaning at: LQ -24 the door? *.c. . H>iiluiO"ho«w»tii.rflslw«H . . . No. It came1 from alxwe. Hello! [At the staircase.] Come down! . . .j Sybilla, wife, where are you? ] Voice of The Monk. Sybilla! . . . Her body! " j Hieronymus [furious]. Again? . . .• Aro . thoy«.'ia th»j mmU . . . You have got her body? . . . TUay.•wiUmwaw*j Stop your loathsome games. JTIIE M O N K appears above. His face is swollen. He clings] i TO eiNo Lc*N$ov*<to the handrail. He snorts. '• \ The Monk. My confession! • 1 : Hieronymus [joyfully]^ The monk! What next! Exactly,; my confession . . . The Monk [coming down painfully]. Damned! . . ,j Damned 1 © <s ' | Hieronymus. Damned? Me? You don't know a thingi; jabout it. . . . I repent. 9 0 E V ( J H j j The Monk. On her.'. . . Killed . . . the 4mmiti ] I Hieronymus. It was him! . . . I knew it! . . . Satan!; .. • • You say he was on her? You killed him? [Urn light* uff j T H E M O N K , who has got to the bottom of the stairs.] Who .atf« >»)»b? • *ffe is drunk . •. . dead drunk! . . . UiW^^«w«j*w^ . . . A fme state you r Ha, ha! a e in! The Monk [with a gasp]. Lust!(o* KwsesJ; Hieronymus. True! . . . It is despicable., Never again! j . Father, I am going to become a monk! i The Monfc [coding]. Hell! .•. . y . '" j Hicronvmus 'fiwSi^ away from him 1 and laughing hoarsely].' lira vol" . . . You have guzzled my wine! ;Ua iffiboing puniohod. He is,snoring. Stink at your pleasure 126, ACT 111. SCENE IV - HIERONYMUS.THE MONK PURPOSE: to get the Monk downstairs to die so that he w i l l be part of the evidence against Hieronymus to provide a reason why Hieronymus can believe that his enemies are overthrown (ie. the Monk has k i l l e d the Devil.) to provide a small period of r e l i e f through wry laughter and tranquility i n preparation for the climactic action ACTIONS: Hieronymus - to explain to himself why the Monk is behaving the way he is the Monk - to make confession as a f i n a l absolution DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Hieronymus - r e l i e f , disgust the Monk - fear CHARACTER DOMINANCE: Hieronymus dominates. MOOD: A feverish decay is followed by a tranquility announced by the fresh a i r . RHYTHMIC IMAGE: A blow torch i s turned off so that a small, quiet flame is l e f t . SHAPE: The mysterious voice of the Monk brings a crescendo of fury from Hieronymus un t i l the Monk appears i n a rush. A moment of confusion follows as they talk at cross-purposes. Hieronymus jabbers erratically over the Monk and f i n a l l y flings himself at the window for a long calming pause of fresh a i r . The rest of the scene i s weary and quiet. 1 2 7 . ACT 111. SCENE IV - HIERONYMUS. THE MONK ( c o n t i n u e d ) STAGING: The Monk's u n s t e a d i n e s s i s d r a m a t i z e d by h i s h a n g i n g o v e r t h e r a i l . The Monk's c o r p s e must be v i s i b l e , b u t n o t i n t h e way f o r t h e n e x t scene. Hieronymus k i c k s t h e Monk from u p s t a g e and b e h i n d so t h a t t h e " k i c k e d " a c t o r c a n f a k e a c o r p s e movement. The scene ends w i t h Hieronymus s e c u r e and t r a n q u i l i n h i s s e a t . DIFFICULTIES: I n t h e c o n f u s i o n , t h e d e a t h of the D e v i l must be made c l e a r . The f i n a l t r a n q u i l i t y must n o t be h u r r i e d , y e t n o t be h e l d so l o n g t h a t t h e a u d i e n c e f e e l s t h e p l a y has ended. MECHANICAL PROBLEMS: A t h r o w i n g r i g i s n e c e s s a r y so t h a t t h e s t o n e l a n d s p r e d i c t a b l y . BEATS: 1. TITLE: C a l l i n g F o r t h t h e S p e c t r e ACTIONS: Hieronymus the Monk 2. TITLE: S a l v a t i o n ACTIONS: t h e Monk - t o s e a r c h out t h e s o u r c e o f t h e v o i c e - t o g e t h e l p t o make c o n f e s s i o n i n s p i t e o f t h e p a i n Hieronymus- t o make h i s c o n f e s s i o n NOTE: Hieronymus does n o t l o o k f o r t h e welcome f a c t o f t h e D e v i l ' s death b u t i t s t o p s h i s a c t i o n . TITLE: R e v i l i n g the Sot ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o r e g a i n h i s s e l f r e s p e c t by r e j e c t i n g t h e Monk ( t h e Monk - even i n d e a t h t h e Monk blows d e r i s i o n i n h i s f a c e . ) NOTES: There i s a s a d i s t i c p l e a s u r e i n Hieronymus' a c t i o n . Facing page 128 M I C H E L D E G H E L D E R O D E [ A C T III ' I shall go and tell your superior. You will be taken back • ho your monastery processionally—accompanied by the j gibes of the populace. Ho.jho, ho! Let him stink! No, I <!on t want to become a m/mk. Regnlsiv c crew! [He gives LQ 2 5 the catrXlla. M'tha cirirknw.fi vend kicks.} .You.._will be damned. You will die in. _ s his nose.] "Pahf "i Q . A i H window and ofeens it. \tt is dawn. Pale turn several kicks.', Jou. will be da 'your f*: and your iiifh.fjTTc holds h "}He" rusTieT" • m ,No nightnwtw. I shall sleep. And at night I shall peace-, j fully make gold. I want to forget. Hieronymus, you must :not drink so much any more. fe~g*ww««*®~4A*»»«sfc»4* • tiftak»8~y8«»W>*&»4^ You dream that you go after women, that the populace becomes ~)rive these phantasrri^ jwavI {He " .indignant. Dr la scene v 1 SO - 18 SQ -19 tn. A^^Fi^ i howls.] Thcv ; flies A, clamor plundered! cent! Voice of the mus! . . . Boo! . , ^ Suddenly a windowjiane. tn the street. H I E R O N Y M O U S am being am inno-y are^ conyngl I am bcing^ attackedl I [He mm*# nis sword.] Have mc'rcyl I Crowd. Bool . . . Bool Boo! Hierony-Yelling. Blows on the door. Shattering of windows. Hieronymus. What are they shouting? My gold! * E I am being robbed. Be calm. I shall give you gold. Come here, you monks! Protect your benefactor! j SQ - 20 [The door is burst in. The shouts die down, but the crowd '•• continues to snarl. T H E MAGISTRATE appears. Lie is dressed, in black, and is followed by M E N AT ARMS. J 2 ] T7ie MagTstrate. Surrender yourself, Hieronymus. Give' , up your sword. 9 '' Q ' i Hieronymus [giving up his sword]. Thank' you. . . .] j ; tGood dav, sire. It is good of you to demand that the'rabble! ' Idisperse. Thank you.(foo»TOS5£S swoao-g; euP«Q,wHo wssigs rrbfi^H 3 I TTie~KTagisirate. Have you Been with the women tonight;-. .and did you pay them with this coin? [He shows a\* •• .. xciin.j . ' . Hieronymus. -Never. . . . Ask the ghost. . . ..the] 1 imonk -..-;4 : • \ -The Magistrate. Open the chcsil - • - . ^ | J ;-- ;•• \: Hieronymus [opening the cliest]. Is it necessary? [He] 128. ACT 111. SCENE IV - BEATS 4. TITLE: G a s p i n g f o r A i r ACTION: Hieronymus - t o l e t I n some f r e s h a i r by op e n i n g t h e window 5. TITLE: Peace ACTION: Hieronymus - t o r e l a x ACT 111. SCENE V - HIERONYMUS, MAGISTRATE, TWO GUARDS, TWO CORPSES  PURPOSE: t o r e s o l v e t h e p l o t w i t h t h e a r r e s t o f Hieronymus i n c i r c u m s t a n c e s w h i c h w i l l d e s t r o y him t o show t h a t Hieronymus r e a l l y does n o t u n d e r s t a n d what i s happening t o him to d r a m a t i z e t h e power of s o c i e t y i n t h e crowd, a power here a c t i n g as an agent o f N e m i s i s ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o save h i m s e l f from the crowd by r e l y i n g on t h e M a g i s t r a t e ' s p r o t e c t i o n M a g i s t r a t e - t o I n v e s t i g a t e t h e c o m p l a i n t s about Hieronymus and a c t a c c o r d i n g t o t h e e v i d e n c e . Guards - t o obey o r d e r s DOMINANT EMOTIONS: Hieronymus - f e a r , anger, contempt M a g i s t r a t e - s u s p i c i o n CHARACTER DOMINANCE: The M a g i s t r a t e d ominates. MOOD: the h y p n o t i c f e e l i n g o f suspense a t t h e approach o f i n e v i t a b l e v i o l e n c e , h y s t e r i a RHYTHMIC IMAGE: a house f i r e w h i c h s t a r t s w i t h spontaneous c o m b u s t i o n i n o i l y r a g s , f o l l o w e d by a p e r i o d i n w h i c h the s l o w e r wood c a t c h e s and e n d i n g w i t h a c o n f l a g r a t i o n 129. ACT 111, SCENE V - HIERONYMUS, MAGISTRATE, TWO GUARDS TWO CORPSES (Continued)  SHAPE: The r a p i d l y g r o w i n g n o i s e o f t h e crowd i n s p i r e s a s i m i l a r l y g r o w i n g p a n i c i n Hieronymus u n t i l t h e M a g i s t r a t e c o n f r o n t s him. As t h e M a g i s t r a t e p r e s s e s Hieronymus w i t h q u e s t i o n s , h i s new calm t u r n s t o a r i s i n g i n d i g n a t i o n w h i c h i s matched by a r i s i n g d i s g u s t on the p a r t o f t h e M a g i s t r a t e , c u l m i n a t i n g i n t h e s e i z u r e o f Hieronymus. A f t e r a s l i g h t pause as t h e M a g i s t r a t e goes t o t h e door, Hieronymus 1 r e a c t i o n b e g i n s t o t a k e e f f e c t and t h e p l a y ends w i t h r i s i n g p a n i c , s t r u g g l e and n o i s e . STAGING: The r o c k b r e a k i n g t h e g l a s s i n t h e window chases Hieronymus s t a g e l e f t f a c i n g t h e d o o r . Hieronymus i s p l a c e d on t h e p e r i p h e r y o f t h e a c t i o n , d r a m a t i z i n g t h e i n e f f e c t u a l ! t y o f h i s e x p l a n a t i o n s . To emphasize t h e e n d i n g , Hieronymus f i g h t s f r e e and sta n d s between t h e guards f o r h i s l a s t speech and I s dragged o f f i n a f i t o f w i l d l a u g h t e r l e a v i n g t h e M a g i s t r a t e h o l d i n g t h e bag o f g o l d and l o o k i n g a t t h e b o d i e s i n a t a b l e a u v i v a n t as t h e l i g h t s f a d e s l o w l y . DIFFICULTIES: The s i z e o f the s t a g e makes b l o c k i n g d i f f i c u l t . The f i n a l e x i t o f Hieronymus i s weakened by t h e p o s i t i o n o f t h e door. To be c o n v i n c i n g t h e crowd n o i s e has t o be o f h i g h q u a l i t y because i t must be d e a f e n i n g . MECHANICAL PROBLEMS: Moving Romulus' c o r p s e from t h e c h e s t i s d i f f i c u l t . BEATS: 1. TITLE: The A t t a c k ACTION: Hieronymus - t o c o n t r o l h i s p a n i c 2. TITLE: S u r r e n d e r i n g ACTION: M a g i s t r a t e - t o persuade Hieronymus t o g i v e up Hieronymus - t o a c c e p t t h e p r o t e c t i o n of t h e law Guards - t o p r e v e n t Hieronymus' escape 130. ACT 111. SCENE V - HIERONYMUS, MAGISTRATE, TWO GUARDS TWO CORPSES (Continued)  BEATS: ( c o n t i n u e d ) 3. TITLE: C r o s s - e x a m i n i n g ACTIONS: M a g i s t r a t e - t o c o l l e c t e v i d e n c e Hieronymus - t o c o - o p e r a t e w i t h the M a g i s t r a t e Guards - t o p r e v e n t Hieronymus 1 escape NOTE: I n Hieronymus' eyes, t h e M a g i s t r a t e makes h i s a c t i o n v e r y d i f f i c u l t by a t t a c k i n g h i s s e l f - r e s p e c t . Facing page 131 ' " R E D M A G I C ' "4'5j • draws bach.] The ghost is inside! '. , . LOOK! *.B. . He] wanted to rob me. He is caught.in the trap. [He jumps for] joy 1 What a aood trick' (TH* MA«*T*MW slww.* THa<su*ws! •i «c M E N AT A R M S tanc out R O M U L U S enshrouded body J and lay it down. . j ; The Magistrate. Is this gold yours? [He takes hold of a \ hrtim'f id fif coins1.] • - j Hieronymus. Mine alone. . . . Do not touch it, . . . j By what right .&. . ? ; i 77ie Magistrate. Tins monk, who has killed him? j Hieronymus. The monk? He is drunk. That isn't blood. I It's wine. * • J • * : The Magistrate. And this doll, stabbed with a knife? ] Hieronymus. I do not know. . . . Will *you speak to 1 rne with respect? You had better understand that I ami rich. ; _ '• 4 The Magistrate. Seize him! [ T T I ^ T S T A T ^ R M S lay hoTd~; of the miser) Sorcerer, counterfeiter, felon! . . . He is: ' SQ - 21 thrice guilty! [Going to the door.] People, I deliver him up ; to Justice.*. . , ! SQ - 2 2 ; The Crowd. Death! . . . The executioner! . . . Long' live the law! . . . Boo! . , . Boo! N j Hieronymus [arrogantly], I, do not understand. . . . Say j it again. . 'Death? .'. .(llie executioner?). [H^ frees\ [hiffiscifdjlt is better to laugh at it! [iTe laughs.] Ho, hoi' 5 T".'". 'jwaafrd^ ^^  living beings. I am the j 'chief. Bah! I am as great as the ernp^ rorT'. . V{Me die?); . . I shall buy Justice. . * . Ho, ho, ho! . Listen to) ]me! . . . I am like God. It is true! You do not know that/ !I am immortal, do you? . . . i He laughs heartily, lie is dragged away to the accompani-] SG; - 23 i JMBjotJh.?J^PJli^}^. iecT? of the crowd, ' .. • 6 i The Magistrate l o o k ^ a j j h e bodies; then he : i 1 f r e e z e s as he r a i s e s the bag of g o l d in h i s ] \ palm to look at it. The, c r o w d sustains arid \ i LQ - 26; fades with the lights. • • \ . \\ LQ - 27; L Q - 2 8 ; Curtain. 131. ACT 111. SCENE ..V-- BEATS 4. TITLE: A r r e s t i n g t h e C r i m i n a l ACTIONS: M a g i s t r a t e - t o o r d e r t h e a r r e s t o f Hieronymus and i n f o r m t h e p e o p l e Guards - t o h o l d Hieronymus Hieronymus - t o u n d e r s t a n d what i s happening 5. TITLE: F l i n g i n g Omnipotence i n T h e i r Faces ACTIONS: Hieronymus - t o p r o c l a i m h i s i n v i o l a b i l i t y and f i g h t o f f a r r e s t Guards - t o h u s t l e Hieronymus o f f t o e x e c u t i o n 6. TITLE: F i g u r i n g I t Out ACTION: M a g i s t r a t e - t o r e v i e w t h e e v i d e n c e 132. LIGHTING PLOT GENERAL AREAS: I n a d d i t i o n t o the s h e e t , s t a i r s and l a n d i n g , t h e whole f l o o r a r e a I s l i t , w i t h the p o s s i b l e e x c e p t i o n o f t h e extreme back w a l l . Each a r e a i s c r o s s - l i t Each a r e a i s s e p a r a t e l y dimmed, so t h a t a c t o r s 1 movement can be f o l l o w e d i n dim scenes and t h e movement o f c a n d l e s o r l a n t e r n s can be r e p r e s e n t e d . Two b a s i c g e l s a r e used f o r the c r o s s - l i g h t i n g : the l i g h t s aimed toward s t a g e r i g h t a r e p a l e c h o c o l a t e t o s i m u l a t e l i t shadows, and the l i g h t s aimed toward s t a g e l e f t a r e p a l e l a v e n d e r ( s u r p r i s e p i n k ) t o c o i n c i d e w i t h t h e l i g h t from the window. SPECIAL AREAS: A p a l e s t e e l - b l u e l i g h t s h i n e s t h r o u g h t h e up l e f t window a g a i n s t t h e back w a l l . T h i s l i g h t r e p r e s e n t s the dawn sun. P a l e s t e e l - b l u e l i g h t s s h i n e t h r o u g h t h e r i g h t window and down r i g h t door s e t h i g h up t o r e p r e s e n t d a y l i g h t . Two sraokey p i n k l i g h t s s h i n e t h r o u g h the r i g h t window and two t h r o u g h the down r i g h t d o o r . One o f each p a i r i s s e t t o c a s t a low beam on t h e l e f t w a l l . One o f each p a i r i s s e t t o c a s t a s i m i l a r beam h i g h e r up. The l i g h t t h r o u g h t h e window s h o u l d c a s t the window b a r s q u i t e c l e a r l y on the w a l l o p p o s i t e . These l i g h t s r e p r e s e n t two s t a g e s of s u n s e t . A dim r e d l i g h t remains permanently on i n t h e downstage end o f t h e c h e s t . The down r i g h t door needs a f r a m i n g l i g h t i n p a l e c h o c o l a t e . The t a b l e r e q u i r e s a c i r c u l a r l i g h t r e p r e s e n t i n g c a n d l e l i g h t , c r o s s - l i t , i n c l u d i n g the c h a i r and s t o o l , and g e l l e d l i k e t h e g e n e r a l a r e a s . A f a i n t wing l i g h t s h i n e s i n from t h e s t a i r c a s e o f f -s t a g e , g e l l e d i n p a l e c h o c o l a t e . A p r i m a r y r e d i r i s s p o t s h i n e s on t h e f l o o r , c e n t r e , i n f r o n t o f t h e main c u r t a i n . 133. LIGHTING PLOT ( c o n t i n u e d ) CUES: No. A c t Scene Purpose P r e s e t 1 1 House CURTAIN 1 1 7 8 P r e s e t 9 10 11 1 House 11 House C u r t a i n 11 T a b l e s p e c i a l on dim Round sp o t i n f r o n t o f c u r t a i n t o f u l l i n t e n seconds, h o l d f o r f i v e and t h e n out The t a b l e s p e c i a l and t h e g e n e r a l a r e a s r i s e i n p r o p o r t i o n u n t i l Hieronymus can be v i s i b l e anywhere t h a t he moves even though t h e s e t remains dim. The change i s i m p e r c e p t i b l e . Dawn l i g h t s b e g i n t o appear i m p e r c e p t i b l y t h r o u g h the windows. The s t a g e l e f t l i g h t i s f u l l and t h e s t a g e l e f t l i g h t s h a l f by 0 5 . i i B l a c k out ex c e p t f o r t h o s e l i g h t s i n Q4 when t h e c a n d l e i s e x t i n g u i s h e d . Immed-i a t e l y a dim l i g h t r e t u r n s t o t h o s e a r e a s w h i c h r e v e a l Hieronymus and S y b i l l a as she comes down t h e s t a i r s . i i As S y b i l l a opens f i r s t one and t h e n t h e o t h e r s h u t t e r , t h e g e n e r a l a r e a l i g h t s and d a y l i g h t l i g h t s come up t o h a l f and th e n t o f u l l . x B l a c k o u t . P u l l d a y l i g h t b e h i n d p r o s c e n i u m ; l a t e a f t e r n o o n , h i g h s u n s e t dim. P.0@H. t o complete f u l l d a y l i g h t i i i D u r i n g t h i s scene t h e l i g h t s b e g i n t o dim down as t h e a f t e r n o o n wears on. The h i g h s u n s e t l i g h t s i n c r e a s e . 134. LIGHTING PLOT - ( c o n t i n u e d ) CUES: ( c o n t i n u e d ) No, 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Act . 11 Scene Purpose i v 11 i v 11 v i i 11 11 v i i i v i i i 11 11 i x i x 11 i x CURTAIN House P r e s e t 111 21 House (SQ11) The dim begun on Q l l c o n t i n u e s r e v e a l -i n g t h e s u n l i g h t b e i n g c a s t on t h e s t a g e l e f t w a l l . The low s u n s e t l i g h t s b e g i n t o s u p p l i m e n t t h e h i g h s u n s e t l i g h t s . The dim begun i n Q l l has re a c h e d t h e p o i n t where a r o m a n t i c glow f i l l s t h e room. The h i g h s u n s e t l i g h t s f a d e i m p e r c e p t i b l y . T h i s l e v e l h e l d u n t i l Q.14, a l o n g , s u s t a i n e d s u n s e t . By 0,15 the l i g h t s a r e as dim as c a n be w h i l e s t i l l r e v e a l i n g t h e a c t o r s . Most o f t h e room i s i n d a r k n e s s , t h e a c t o r s b e i n g l i t by t h e glow t h r o u g h t h e window w h i c h a l s o f a d e s . As t h e c a n d l e i s l i t t h e a r e a up r i g h t g l o w s . As t h e c a n d l e i s b r o u g h t t o t h e t a b l e t h e glow i s b r o u g h t w i t h I t . The l a s t of the s u n s e t l e a v e s I m p e r c e p t i b l y and the g e n e r a l l e v e l o f the room i n c r e a s e s i m p e r c e p t i b l y enough t o a v o i d t i r i n g t h e a u d i e n c e ' s e y e s . A glow moves w i t h t h e l a n t e r n s and becomes e s p e c i a l l y b r i g h t a t t h e c h e s t . The l a n t e r n i s dowsed. B l a c k o u t . B e h i n d t h e pros c e n i u m t h e l i g h t s a r e s e t as i n Q18. 22 CURTAIN P.O.H. as needed t o r e s t o r e t h e l i g h t s as s e t i n QI8. 135. LIGHTING PLOT - (continued) CUES: (continued) No. Act. Scene Purpose 23 111 i Lights must adjust to follow the actor imperceptibly. 24 111 iv Dawn lights appear at the windows as in 0,4. They are f u l l by Q.25. 25 111 iv Like Q.6 except that the lights are not quite as bright. 26 111 v Fade to black out i n five seconds. 2? Curtain calls CURTAIN 28 House 136. SOUND PLOT LIVE SOUNDS: These a r e b e s t done by t h e a c t o r s . S t r u g g l e and F a l l Moans Laughs and T a l k i n g F o o t s t e p s Knocks a t the Door Poundings on t h e Door L o c k i n g Door (from o u t s i d e ) B r e a k i n g G l a s s C l i n k i n g B o t t l e s TAPED SOUNDS: These a r e b e s t as l o o p s , u s i n g two tape r e c o r d e r s . A l l t a p e d sounds emanate from s t a g e r i g h t . Church B e l l s R o o s t e r Crowing Angry Mob M u t t e r i n g Mob CUES: No. A c t Scene Notes S y b i l l a ' s Moans i n s e x u a l orgasm. Cock Crows i n the d i s t a n c e . Church B e l l s I n t h e d i s t a n c e s i g n i f y i n g t h e c a l l t o m a s s , c o n t i n u e u n t i l a f t e r S y b i l l a s t a r t s t a l k i n g and f a d e o u t . I n t h e m i d d l e o f them t h e Cock Crows a g a i n . 1 l i 2 l i i 3 l i i i* l i i i 5 l i i i 6 i i i i i 7 i i i v 8 n V 9 i i v i i 10 n i x 11 i n 1 L o c k i n g Door C l i n k i n g B o t t l e s and U n l o c k i n g Door Door-Knock L a u g h t e r and T a l k i n g d y i n g away i n c e l l a r C hurch B e l l s - M i d n i g h t Mass. 137. SOUND PLOT ( c o n t i n u e d ) CUES: ( c o n t i n u e d ) No. A c t . Scene Notes 12 I l l i L a u g h t e r and s e x u a l Moans t o s u i t d i a l o g u e . 13 111 i L o c k i n g Door Ik 111 i i V o i c e s i n basement 15 111 i i i U n l o c k i n g Door i n hurry-16 111 i i i S t r u g g l e , S t a b b i n g and P a l l from o f f l e f t 17 111 i i i F a d i n g L a u g h t e r 18 111 V G l a s s B r e a k i n g as s t o n e f l i e s t h r o u g h D i s t a n t sounds of Angry Mob r i s i n g i n volume 19 111 V Poundings on Door, B r e a k i n g G l a s s Angry Mob a t F u l l Volume 20 111 V Angry Mob q u i e t e n s t o M u t t e r i n g Mob as door opens 21 111 V Mob becomes n e a r l y s i l e n t 22 111 V Angry Mob r o a r s , t h e n drops a l i t t l e i n volume 23 111 V Angry Mob r i s e s as Hieronymus i s dragged o u t and f a d e s s l o w l y i n t o t h e d i s t a n c e i n time w i t h l i g h t s . 1 3 8 . PROPERTY PLOT GENERAL NOTE: The p l a y i s s e t i n the b e g i n n i n g o f t h e s i x t e e n t h c e n t u r y . A l l props must be s u i t a b l e f o r the t i m e . PERMANENT SET PROPS: T r e s t l e T a b l e S t o o l Wooden A r m c h a i r T a b l e C l o t h L a r g e M e t a l Bound Ch e s t - c o n t a i n s some l o o s e g o l d c o i n s and washers on s t r i n g s t o make t h e sounds of more c o i n s S i d e b o a r d Sword i n Scabbard - t o be hung on the w a l l P i c t u r e - o f f o o d from t h e " L a t e - B r e a k f a s t " p e r i o d o f Dutch p a i n t i n g ( T h i s i s one hundred y e a r s out of d a t e . However, de Ghelderode i s t o blame f o r t h e d i s c r e p a n c y . ) F a t Candle - two needed (one t a l l and one s h o r t ) Q u i l l Pen I n k Parchment Account Book C r o c k e r y - one cup, one p l a t e , one j u g Tray Matches S m a l l J a r o f Water Door C h a i n DECORATIVE PROPS: (Props b r o u g h t on the s e t ; o n l y f o r atmosphere) Cupboard A s s o r t e d C r o c k e r y Sacks ( f u l l and empty, on f l o o r and hung from beams) F i r e p l a c e T o o l s Hangings ( c u r t a i n s , maps, l i n e s ) S t o o l s Any i t e m w h i c h w i l l add t o a sense o f c l u t t e r and d i s u s e . MOVEABLE PROPS: (Props b r o u g h t on t h e s e t b u t n o t p a r t o f p e r s o n a l gear) C l o t h D o l l L a n t e r n Three L a r g e Bags o f G o l d (One p a i r and a n o t h e r , two f u l l , one o f t h e p a i r empty) Two S m a l l Bags o f G o l d ( B o t h f u l l ) S m a l l M a g i c i a n ' s Box S i x B o t t l e s o f Wine (thong o r r a f f i a h a n d l e s , c o r k s , and f i l l e d w i t h wine) 139. PROPERTY PLOT ( c o n t i n u e d ) PERSONAL PROPS: Hieronymus - Dagger Two L a r g e Keys G o l d C o i n Money Pouch Three G o l d C o i n s Pouch Dagger and Sheath (one s i d e o f dagger b l a d e b l o o d y ) H a n d k e r c h i e f Sword and B a l d r i c R i n g s Large Key Parchment Sheet B l a c k Stone on C h a i n N e c k l a c e Sheet Sheet V i a l o f Drug Sausage and S m a l l B o t t l e I n Pouch C r o s s on C h a i n o f S t r i n g Romulus - F i s h , S m a l l B o t t l e , and C h i c k e n D r u m s t i c k i n Sack Sheet M a g i s t r a t e - L a r g e C h a i n o f O f f i c e R i n g s Guards - S m a l l P i k e s PROPERTY LAYOUT: O f f - s t a g e l e f t - t h e D o l l , Two Sheets O f f - s t a g e R i g h t - A l l t h e r e s t n o t on t h e s t a g e as i n d i c a t e d below Permanent on-sta g e props (see DIAGRAM o p p o s i t e ) 1 T a b l e and C l o t h 2 S t o o l 3 C h a i r Chest 5 Sword and Scabbard (on w a l l ) 6 S i d e b o a r d 7 P i c t u r e (on w a l l ) 8 Matches 9 Parchment 10 Water J a r 11 T r a y 12 Hieronymus' C l o a k and Hat (on peg) Armador S y b i l l a The Monk 140 PROPERTY PLOT ( c o n t i n u e d ) PROPERTY LAYOUT ( c o n t i n u e d ) A c t 1 13 T a l l C andle ( l i t ) 14 P en 15 I n k 16 C r o c k e r y ( d i s h , j u g , cup) 17 Account Book A c t 11 18 S m a l l Bag o f G o l d 19 L a r g e Bag o f G o l d (one o f t h e p a i r , f u l l ) 20 L a r g e Candle on S i d e b o a r d ( n o t l i t ) A c t 111 21 S m a l l Candle ( l i t ) 141. COSTUME PLOT COSTUME CHANGES A c t Scene C h a r a c t e r ( f i r s t appearance and changes) 1 a l l Hieronymus - as i n costume s k e t c h b u t w i t h o u t c l o c k and h a t 1 I i Armador - f u l l y d r e s s e d as i n costume s k e t c h p l u s c l o a k , sword and sh e e t S y b i l l a - f i l m y u n d e r d r e s s o n l y as i n costume s k e t c h 1 ( A l l ) i i i t h e Monk - as i n costume s k e t c h - i n n e r p o c k e t u s e d f o r f o o d pouch i n t h i s scene 1 i v S y b i l l a - f u l l y d r e s s e d as i n costume s k e t c h and v e i l 1 ( A l l ) v Romulus - as i n costume s k e t c h I x Armador - w i t h o u t s h e e t I I i v Armador - i n s h i r t s l e e v e s and v e s t I I v S y b i l l a - as i n 1 i i I I I 1 Romulus - s h e e t added Hieronymus - p u t s on h a t and c l o a k t o e x i t 111 i i S y b i l l a - f u l l y d r e s s e d , d i s h e v e l l e d ( h u r r i e d l y p u t on) Armador - on second e n t r a n c e , c a r r i e s sword, b a l d r i c , d o u b l e t and c l o a k 111 i i i Hieronymus - e n t e r s w i t h o u t h a t , removes d i r t y c l o a k and l e a v e s i t on s t o o l (a second c l o a k i s n e c e s s a r y ) Armador and S y b i l l a - s h e e t s used t o e x i t 111 v M a g i s t r a t e and Guards - as i n costume s k e t c h Facing page 1 4 2 142. COSTUME SKETCH Hieronymus w i t h o u t Cape Facing page 143 143. COSTUME SKETCH Hieronymus'. w i t h Cape and Hat Facing page 144 144. COSTUME SKETCH Armador i n Complete Costume Facing page 145 145. COSTUME SKETCH S y b i l l a with O v e r d r e s s and Cape Facing page 146 146 COSTUME SKETCH S y b i l l a w i t h o u t O v e r d r e s s F a c i n g page 147 COSTUME SKETCH The Monk i n Complete Costume Facing page 148 148 3 COSTUME SKETCH Romulus i n Complete Costume Facing page 149 149. COSTUME SKETCH The M a g i s t r a t e i n Complete Costume 150. COSTUME SKETCH. A Guard i n Complete Costume 151. RENDERING OF THE.SET 152. PHOTOGRAPHS A. A c t 1, Scene i Hieronymus: What a f i n e p i e c e o f work I have j u s t done! B. A c t 1, Scene 1 Hieronymus: S h i n e on me, l i t t l e f l a m e , . . . Facing page 153 153. PHOTOGRAPHS A c t 1, Scene i v Hieronymus: Sweet c h i l d l A c t 11, Scene v Armador: You have the odour o f b i r t h . F a c i n g page 154 154. PHOTOGRAPHS A. A c t 11, Scene i x The Monk: P r a i s e d be t h e L o r d Bacchus! B. A c t 111, Scene v The M a g i s t r a t e : G i v e up y o u r sword. Facing page 155 ; ^ R E D M A G I C b y M i c h e l de G h e l d e r o d e t r a n s l a t e d b y G e o r g e H a u g e r CAST ( i n o r d e r o f a p p e a r a n c e ) H i e r o n y m u s . . . . . . . . . . D e r m o t H e n n e l l y . S y b i l l a . . „ . „ . E l i z a b e t h M u r p h y T h e M o n k , . . J o h n J o h n s t o n R o m u l u s , B r i a n P a i s l e y T h e C a v a l i e r A r m a d o r . . . L e o n D u b i n s k y T h e M a g i s t r a t e ,. . . P a u l M u s g r o v e M e n - a t - A r m s . . „ G e o r g e H e y m a n , G o r d o n K e m p l o n S C E N E H o u s e of H i e r o n y m u s , F l a n d e r s In o l d e n t i m e s A c t I: V e r y e a r l y m o r n i n g A c t I I : L a t e a f t e r n o o n / e v e n i n g n e x t d a y J A c t I I I : . L a t e r t h a t n i g h t T H E R E W I L L B E T W O I N T E R M I S S I O N S D i r e c t e d by M i c h a e l I r w i n i n p a r t i a l f u l -f i l l m e n t o f the r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r a n M . A . D e g r e e i n T h e a t r e . D e s i g n e d b y P e n n y W o l v e r t o n T h i s p l a y i s p r o d u c e d w i t h t h e s p e c i a l p e r m i s s i o n o f S a n u e l F r e n c h ( C a n a d a ) , L t d . P R O D U C T I O N S t a g e M a n a g e r S c e n e P a i n t i n g A d v i s o r L i g h t i n g E x e c u t i o n . . . P r o p e r t i e s . . . . . . . , S o u n d P r e p a r a t i o n S o u n d O p e r a t i o n . . , C o s t u m e M i s t r e s s . H o u s e M a n a g e r . . . , P u b l i c i t y . . . . . . „ . , . . . . . S u e G i b s o n D o n E l l i o t . . . L i o n e l L u k i n J o h n s t o n B a r t H u r s t . . . P e t e r S c h e l l . . . . G a r y R u p e r t • D o n n a M u m f o r d o . . . G e l i G r e e n . . M i c h a e l I r w i n K e n L i v i n g s t o n e I. e c h n i c a l D i r e c t i o n , S c e n e r y C o n s t r u c -t i o n , p r o p e r t i e s , C o s t u m e s , B o x O f f i c e T h e a t r e D e p a r t m e n t S t a f f O U R T H A N K S T O r i t h y F a l k , J o h n G r e g g , L i n d a R e a s b e c k V i !•. G l e n n L e w i s - F a c u l t y o f E d u c a t i o n nd:i C a v a c l a s - D a v i d T h o m p s o n S c h o o l T h e C o B . C . I h e S u n , T h e P r o v i n c e , T h e U b y s s e y V a n c o u v e r R a d i o a n d T . V . Stat ions 1 B o C « B u i l d i n g s a n d G r o u n d s A N O T E A B O U T T H E A U T H O R M i c h e l de G h e l d e r o d e ( 1 8 9 8 - 1 9 6 2 ) l i v e d in . B e l g i u m but: w r o t e i n F r e n c h . F i f t e e n ot h i s s i x t y o r m o r e p l a y s h a v e b e e n r e c e n t l y t r a n s l a t e d . G h e l d e r o d e w r o t e m o s t of h i s p l a y s b e t w e e n t h e G r e a t W a r s , bu t o n l y s i n c e , t h e 1 9 5 0 ' s has h e b e e n r c o g n i z e d , w i d e l y i n E u r o p e , a n d o n l y i n t h e 1 9 6 0 ' s i n A m e r i c a . 155. PROGRAM S e a l e d Facing page 156 R E D M A G I C b y M i c h e l de G h e l d e r o d e t r a n s l a t e d b y G e o r g e H a u g e r C A S T ( i n o r d e r of a p p e a r a n c e ) H i e r o n y m u s „ . . D e r m o t Hennelly S y b i l l a . . . . „ . E l i z a b e t h Murphy T h e M o n k J o h n J o h n s t o n R o m u l u s „ B r i a n P a i s l e y T h e C a v a l i e r A r m a d o r . . . . L e o n D u b i n s k y T h e M a g i s t r a t e P a u l Musgrove M e n - a t - A r m s . . „ G e o r g e Hey m a n G o r d o n K e m p t o a S C E N E H o u s e o f H i e r o n y m u s , F l a n d e r s I n o l d e n t i m e s A c t I : V e r y e a r l y m o r n i n g A c t II: L a t e a f t e r n o o n / e v e n i n g n e x t d a y A c t III: L a t e r t h a t n i g h t T H E R E W I L L B E T W O I N T E R M I S S I O N S D i r e c t e d b y M i c h a e l I r w i n i n p a r t i a l f u l -f i l l m e n t o f t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r a n M . A , . D e g r e e i n T h e a t r e . D e s i g n e d b y P e n n y W o l v e r t o n T h i s p l a y i s p r o d u c e d w i t h the s p e c i a l p e r m i s s i o n o f S a n u e l F r e n c h ( C a n a d a ) , L t d . P R O D U C T I O N S t a g e M a n a g e r S c e n e P a i n t i n g A d v i s o r Lighting E x e c u t i o n P r o p e r t i e s . . . . . . . S o u n d P r e p a r a t i o n S o u n d O p e r a t i o n . . C o s t u m e M i s t r e s s H o u s e M a n a g e r . . . P u b l i c i t y „ . . . S u e G i b s o n . . D o n E l l i o t L i o n e l L u k i n J o h n s t o n . . B a r t H u r s t P e t e r S c h e l l . G a r y R u p e r t • D o n n a M u m f o r d . . G e l i G r e e n M i c h a e l I r w i n K e n L i v i n g s t o n e T e c h n i c a l D i r e c t i o n , S c e n e r y C o n s t r u c -t i o n , p r o p e r t i e s , C o s t u m e s , B o x O f f i c e T h e a t r e D e p a r t m e n t S t a f f O U R T H A N K S T O C a t h y F a l k , J o h n G r e g g , L i n d a R e a s b e c k M r . G l e n n L e w i s - F a c u l t y o f E d u c a t i o n . L i n d a C a v a d a s - D a v i d T h o m p s o n School T h e C . B . C , T h e S u n , T h e P r o v i n c e , T h e U b y s s e y V a n c o u v e r R a d i o a n d T . V . Sta . t i .ons U . B . C B u i l d i n g s a n d G r o u n d s A N O T E A B O U T T H E A U T H O R M i c h e l de G h e l d e r o d e ( 1 8 9 8 - 1 9 6 2 ) l i v e d i n B e l g i u m bu t w r o t e i n F r e n c h . F i f t e e n o f h i s s i x t y o r m o r e p l a y s h a v e b e e n r e c e n t l y t r a n s l a t e d . G h e l d e r o d e w r o t e m o s t o f h i s p l a y s b e t w e e n the G r e a t Wars, b u t o n l y s i n c e t h e 1 9 5 0 ' s h a s h e b e e n r e c o g n i z e d w i d e l y i n E u r o p e , a n d o n l y i n t h e 1 9 6 0 ! s i n A m e r i c a . 156 PROGRAM U n s e a l e d Facing page 157 32*** The VANCOUVER SUN: ThuiyNoy. 3, 1966? RED MAGIC ,4 By DAVID WATMOUGH: • Sun Drama Critic *.'''.'-: Michel de Ghelderode, whose play Red Magic opened to a full house at the Frederic Wood' Theatre at UBC ' Wednesday might well be • described: as a Catholic primitive,.. '' : By this I certainly 'do riot wish! to imply that the Belgian play-J wright who died ..in- 1962 and whose reputation, is just begin-ning to percolate the English-speaking world was' either a; writer of pious tracts, for the stage or was devoid of dramatic infellignece or insight. . Reel Magic, which.presents us with the dilemmas of a medi-eval miser, Hieronymous, as he is' confronted and outwitted by those about him,, scathingly assails the. more inane aspects of the period and is*a n'eat piece of dramatic construction; NEVER SUBTLE -.'v: .Impiety is the hallmark of Ghelderode's religio'jrl1 preoccu pations, impiety; and" the cynical and secular aspects of a sacra "mental religion and outlook. And to evoke man's frailty cohabiting with his' more lofty aspirations — just as ih his rounded depiction of a''miser with all the well-known', attrib-f utes of the breed— the play--wright. has about' as • much subtlety, as a sledgehamrner. All' primary colors and with •the Rabelaisian-abandon of a Breughel painting, there is a refreshing absence- of' Gallic cleverness in the' Walloon "Bel-gian as he shows us Hierony mous being tricked by a flatu-lent monk, a light-fingered beg-gar and cuckolded by a Cava-j lier. ' Director Michael Irwin .wisely decided upon, a straight; no-nonsense approach and was well] 'served both by a robust andj ingenious set and some excellent p e r f o r m a n c e s by studentj STRONG PORf RAYAL Dermot Hennelly, in the sus tained and .gruelling role of Hieronymous, with its numerous spoken asides, in a-solo context was extraordinarily effective. As the Capuchin friar John Johnston proved suitably cleri-cal though a firmer control1 would have permitted morel The opportunity to see such! rarely-performed' plays as this/ — it was, in fact, the Canadian; premiere for Red Magic — deserves our gratitude. And considering the,youthful hands of those ' responsible for the 'production the results are more gratifying than some of-the s t y l i s t i c infelicities of j George Hauger's translation. ( k • i 5 157 «> NEWSPAPER REVIEW D a v i d Watmough . The Sun (There was no r e v i e w i n The P r o v i n c e ) ing page 158 Red Magician cast sexy spell, at Studio By JUDY BING Michel de Ghelderode be-lieved that life is magic: But it is not a contest be-tween the polarized1 smoral forces of black magic and white magic. . Life is red magic. "Red Magic" is the first play whose direction is ac-cepted as partial fulfillment of the requirements for a masters degrees in theatre at UBC, and its director Michael Irwin has mastered Ghelderode's idiom well. Set in medieval Flanders, it is the story of the wealthy Hieronymous Dermot Hen-nelly who is so avaricious he eats imaginary food and shows his wife a picture of fish and fruit to satisfy her hunger pangs. He has a chest of gold coins and his fondest dream is that they will multiply through impregnation of the coins engraved with female heads by the coins with male heads. Armador plots with the beggar Romulus, played to wicked perfection by Brian Paisley looking like a lech-erous satyr, Sybilla, Hier-onymous's frustrated virgin wife, voluptuously played by Elizabeth Murphy, and the fat monk, John Johns-ton, the most hilarious char-acter in the play. Death persists in Ghelder-ode's plays. He looked;, on the inevitability of death, his translator George Haug-ner tells us, neither as a grim terror nor as a happy release but as an intriguing fact. "Death? An adven-ture!" he once remarked. Death catches up with the plotters. Mortality mocks materialism for no amount of wealth can buy time. Ghelderode embraced the mysterious and the demon-ic. He doesn't pass moral judgments on his characters. His chief fault is that he allows mystery to degener-ate into obscurity. His choice of which char-acters to kill and which ones to let live has no ration-ale. Red Magic is erotic, often to the point of brutality. It abounds in images of copulation. Penny Wolver-ton's stage design is praise-worthy for its correspond-ingly mellow and physical stage Resign, and the use of sensuous velvets for costum-ing. / Red Magic continues to cast its spell tonight and Saturday at Freddy Wood Stu'dio, next to the Ponderosa, showing once more that it is possible to produce good theatre on campus without the usual heavy reliance on professionals. Friday, November 4, 1966 158. NEWSPAPER REVIEW Judy Bing . . . The Ubyssey BACK W R L L ! GROUND "~PLRN - "RED MFlGIC "BY MICHEL DE GHELDERODE '•FREDERIC WOOD STUDIO THEHTRE NOV. <Z~S, iSbb 'SEPT. 30, /9BB 'SCflLE: J'-/' ...:/• • -•DESIGNED BY:.PENNY WOLVB.RTON * PRtlUJN & Y' MiHRBl IRWIN. t r - i l mm] v M» STOCK DOOR v OPEUIM6 FflL IN *3 . t >0 I • 1 i 0 • I 1 1! I /1 / \/ \ / X A A / \ x 1 ...; r _ _ _ „ PLOTFSRM L L * . — T 1 7 * 1 1 I j 1 jroe/f ^oa« OP€NI&B f \ j 1 | • ! ! ! 1 Si o ! o *^ ,1 "o C W T W/V 000!? 1 a '* lb r i * 1 n o i i i i j i i i > 1 i RETURN FRONT . yVIMOOW UNIT cut DOWN mniL * OP'mem copm& STOCK WftLL C£LLf)X ... A 3 0#? - STOCK STOCK 0>«U OP "LEFT CORNER STOCK VUBLL FLATS - Lf) YOUT 5CRLB ft' flP.CH LVfkLL. - STOCK ARCH LPINDINC U/BLl. - CUT DOWN T I. STOCH WnLL i> FIK£PlflC£~ UNIT EXPLODED ISOMETRIC SHOWING SCT STRUCK INTO M w e m i e OMITS 5CffLBi"-l" BEAMS + POSTS SH0U/IN6 THE TRUE LEMGTHB *• HE1&HTS SCALE r-r LRYOUT -"RED MPt&lC" Br MICHtL DE GHELDERODE -FREDERIC LUOOO 5TU0/O THEATRE NOV. 2 - 5 , 1MB -SEPT. JO, 1966> '5Cf)LE: PlS SHOUJN •DESIGNED BY: PENNY UJDLVERTON -DRRUUN BY: MICHRF-L IRWitj 

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