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A survey of the problem choices of senior high school students Williams, David G. 1969

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i . A S U R V E Y OF THE P R O B L E M C H O I C E S OF S E N I O R H I G H SCHOOL STUDENTS b y D a v i d G . W i l l i a m s B . A . , U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a , 1 9 6 5 A T H E S I S S U B M I T T E D I N P A R T I A L F U L F I L M E N T OF THE R E Q U I R E M E N T S FOR THE DEGREE OF M A S T E R OF A R T S i n t h e F a c u l t y o f E d u c a t i o n We a c c e p t t h i s t h e s i s a s c o n f o r m i n g t o t h e r e q u i r e d s t a n d a r d THE U N I V E R S I T Y OF B R I T I S H C O L U M B I A M a r c h , 1 9 6 9 I n p r e s e n t i n g t h i s t h e s i s i n p a r t i a l f u l f i l m e n t o f t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r a n a d v a n c e d d e g r e e a t t h e U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a , I a g r e e t h a t t h e L i b r a r y s h a l l m a k e i t f r e e l y a v a i l a b l e f o r r e f e r e n c e a n d S t u d y . I f u r t h e r a g r e e t h a t p e r m i s s i o n f o r e x t e n s i v e c o p y i n g o f t h i s t h e s i s f o r s c h o l a r l y p u r p o s e s may b e g r a n t e d b y t h e H e a d o f my D e p a r t m e n t o r b y h i s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s . I t i s u n d e r s t o o d t h a t c o p y i n g o r p u b l i c a t i o n o f t h i s t h e s i s f o r f i n a n c i a l g a i n s h a l l n o t b e a l l o w e d w i t h o u t my w r i t t e n p e r m i s s i o n . D a v i d G . W i l l i a m s D e p a r t m e n t o f E d u c a t i o n T h e U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a V a n c o u v e r 8 , C a n a d a D a t e M a r c h 1 9 6 9 . \ v i . ABSTRACT The purpose of the study was twofold: to measure problems and needs of senior high school students as an aid to counsellors and guidance personnel in planning meaningful psychological services in the school, and to compare the problems and needs of students grouped according to school programme in order to determine i f there arersignificant differences between these groups in terms of problems and needs expressed by means of a problem inventory. A population of 574 high school students was selected, comprising the grade eleven classes: of two high schools in the area surrounding Vancouver. As each of the schools selected received.students from over a wide area, i t was assumed that social-economic-ability variables were randomized. The data was presented in a number of forms: 1) according to the intensity of the problem choices as expressed by the intensity scale of the Youth Inventory; 2) according to the percentage of students selecting each, problem; 3) by problem areas; 4) by arithmetic means; and 5) by profile charts. This presentation was repeated for: . 1 ) the entire population; 2) the entire male sample according to school programme sub-groups; and 3) the entire female sample according to school programme sub-groups. Analysis of variance was used to determine whether there were significant differences in problem choices between the eight problem areas for the entire population. The analysis of variance disclosed significant v i i . differences in five of the eight problem areas: Looking Ahead, About Myself, Getting Along with Others, Health, and Things in General. A Scheffe test for multiple comparisons between.means did not disclose any significant differences between the problem choices of the school programme sub-groups. Limitations in sample size in the Visual and Performing Arts, and the Community Services programme sub-groups can be considered a serious weakness of the study. The findings did tend to support the hypothesis, that students with similar sets of problems tend to be found in the same school programmes. i i i . TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE I . INTRODUCTION Statement of the Problem . 1 Importance of the Study "1 Hypothesis to be Tested 2 D e f i n i t i o n of Terms 3 I I . REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE 5 I I I . METHODS AND PROCEDURES 9 Pop u l a t i o n 9 The SRA Youth Inventory - Form S . • .11 Procedure 1^ A n a l y s i s of Data 15 IV. FINDINGS . . . 1 6 Problem Areas 16 Problem Choices . . . 18 An a l y s i s of Variance • 20-Further Comparisons of I n t e r e s t . . . . 24 V. CONCLUSIONS 2 8 VI. SUMMARY . -33 BIBLIOGRAPHY 3 6 APPENDIX A 39 The S.R.A. Youth Inventory - Form S 40 APPENDIX B 50 • Ranked Problem Choices f o r T o t a l P o p u l a t i o n 51 APPENDIX C 58 Problem Choices f o r School Programme Sub-Groups 59 APPENDIX D 76 P r o f i l e Charts 77 iv. LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 1. Population and sample distributions 10 2. Reliabilities of the SRA Youth Inventory -Form S, as reported in the SRA Youth Inventory Manual 13 3. Problem areas, ranked for: total population, total male sample, total female sample, and a nationwide sample of U.S. students 17 4. Selected problem choices of a sample of 574 high school students illustrating a need for vocational guidance 19 5. Selected problem choices of a sample of 574 high school students illustrating academic and personal problem choices . . . 30 6. Results of the analysis of variance between problem area scores of the various school programme sub-groups 21 7. Means, standard deviations, standard errors, and probabilities for problem area scores of the total population 22 8. Comparison of problem choice area means and standard deviations: 574 Canadian students versus 3,000 American students 25 9. Cross-cultural comparison of some "most serious problem" percentages of Canadian, American, West.German, and Indian students 27 v. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS ILLUSTRATION PAGE 1. The Science Research Associates Youth Inventory - Form S, f o r Grades 9-12 39 2. Problem choices of the t o t a l p o p u l a t i o n , ranked by i n t e n s i t y - v a l u e scores 50 3. Problem choices of the various s c h o o l programme sub-groups, ranked by i n t e n s i t y - v a l u e scores 58 4. Problem area p r o f i l e charts f o r the t o t a l p o p u l a t i o n and f o r the sTchool sub-samples 7'7 5. Problem area p r o f i l e charts f o r the nine s c h o o l programme sub-groups 89 1. CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Guiding the adolescent involves assisting him in making decisions about problems that confront him. Helping him to understand the problems of achieving independence, engagement and marriage, finding a job, and building a philosophy of li f e is an often difficult and demanding task. If counsellors and guidance personnel are to function effectively in helping students to develop adequate problem solving skills that will enable them to cope with the weight of personal and environmental pressures, then they must be fully aware of the problems of adolescents. Statement of the Problem The purpose of the study was to assess the problems and needs of high school students. What kinds of problems are of greatest concern and what are the frequencies with which they.occur? A secondary purpose was,to investigate the possibility of measurable differences in the problems felt by students enrolled in the various school programmes. i.e. Can we expect a student enrolling in the academic-technical school programme to indicate significant differences in problems and needs to a student enrolled in the Visual and Performing Arts school programme? Importance of the Study The study was undertaken in the hope that i t would reveal the areas and dimensions of student needs and problems as. indicated by a problem checklist. A further purpose was the possibility of revealing any relationship between students grouped in the various school programmes and specific sets of problems. 2. Data provided by the study was seen as valuable to the counsellor in the planning and implementation of group guidance programmes and individual counselling services. It was also hoped that the study would illustrate a need for further research, in this area that would provide a foundation for local guidance and/or counselling programmes more sensitive to the expressed needs and problems of today's student generation. Hypothesis To Be Tested The following hypotheses, were.formulated: . 1 ) That there will be a significant.relationship demonstrated between school programme choice and problem area expression as indicated by the SRA Youth. Inventory - Form S. 2) That students having selected the Academic-Technical school programme will exhibit significant differences in their problem choices to students having selected the Commercial, Industrial, Community Services, or the Visual and Performing Arts school programmes. D e f i n i t i o n o f T e r m s T h e f o l l o w i n g t e r m s u s e d t h r o u g h o u t t h e s t u d y a r e o u t l i n e d i n C u r r i c u l u m f o r B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a S e n i o r S e c o n d a r y S c h o o l s ( e d i t e d a n d p u b l i s h e d b y T h e B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a S c h o o l T r u s t e e s A s s o c i a t i o n ) : 1 ) S c h o o l P r o g r a m e - a c o u r s e o f s t u d i e s w h i c h a f f o r d s a s t u d e n t a c h o i c e o f f i v e o p t i o n s , e a c h o f w h i c h h a v e b e e n d e s i g n e d t o l e a d t o f u r t h e r t r a i n i n g a n d e m p l o y m e n t i n a g e n e r a l f i e l d r a t h e r t h a n i n a s p e c i f i c o c c u p a t i o n . 2) A c a d e m i c - T e c h n i c a l P r o g r a m m e - a c o u r s e o f s t u d i e s w h i c h l e a d s t o a u n i v e r s i t y o r a n i n s t i t u t e o f t e c h n o l o g y . A s t u d e n t m u s t s p e c i a l i z e w i t h i n t h e p r o g r a m m e b y c h o o s i n g a n a r t s o r h u m a n i t i e s , s c i e n c e , o r t h e h i c a l s p e c i a l t y , a n d e n r o l l i n g i n t h e c o u r s e s r e q u i r e d b y t h a t s p e c i a l t y . 3) C o m m e r c e P r o g r a m m e - a c o u r s e o f s t u d i e s w h i c h l e a d s t o e m p l o y -m e n t i n t h e c o m m e r c i a l - b u s i n e s s w o r l d . A s t u d e n t m u s t c h o o s e a s e c r e t a r i a l , c l e r i c a l , o r a n a c c o u n t i n g s p e c i a l t y w i t h i n t h e p r o g r a m m e , a n d . e n r o l l a c c o r d i n g l y . 4) I n d u s t r i a l P r o g r a m m e - a c o u r s e o f s t u d i e s w h i c h p r o v i d e s t h e s t u d e n t w i t h b a s i c s k i l l s i n s p e c i a l t y f i e l d s s u c h a s c o n s t r u c t i o n , m e c h a n i c s , e l e c t r i c i t y a n d e l e c t r o n i c s . I t i s i n t e n d e d t h a t t h e s t u d e n t s p e c i a l i z e l a t e r t h r o u g h a p p r e n t i c e s h i p t r a i n i n g o r t h r o u g h a d d i t i o n a l t r a i n i n g i n a r e g i o n a l v o c a t i o n a l s c h o o l . 5) C o m m u n i t y S e r v i c e s P r o g r a m m e - a c o u r s e o f s t u d i e s d e s i g n e d t o p r o v i d e f o r e m p l o y m e n t o f f u r t h e r v o c a t i o n a l s c h o o l t r a i n i n g i n a r a n g e , o f o c c u p a t i o n s i n v o l v i n g t h e p r e p a r a t i o n a n d s e r v i n g o f f o o d , t h e p r o v i s i o n o f s h e l t e r a n d t h e s e l e c t i o n , c o n s t r u c t i o n a n d w e a r i n g o f c l o t h e s . A s t u d e n t w i l l s e l e c t e i t h e r t h e f o o d s , t e x t i l e s o r h o m e a n d i n d u s t r i a l s e r v i c e s s p e c i a l t i e s . 6) V i s u a l a n d P e r f o r m i n g A r t s P r o g r a m m e - a c o u r s e o f s t u d i e s d e s i g n e d t o p r o v i d e a b a s i c e d u c a t i o n . l e a d i n g t o e i t h e r e m p l o y m e n t o r f u r t h e r t r a i n i n g i n t h e v i s u a l a n d p e r f o r m i n g a r t s , o r s a l e s , t e c h n i c a l a n d . d e s i g n f i e l d s a p p l y i n g t o a r t . I t i s e x p e c t e d t h a t t h e s t u d e n t w i l l ' s e e k a d v a n c e d t r a i n i n g i n v o c a t i o n a l s c h o o l s , a r t s c h o o l s , o r c o m m u n i t y c o l l e g e s . T h e t h r e e s p e c i a l t i e s w i t h i n t h i s f i e l d a r e a r t , m u s i c a n d t h e a t r e . • ' . 5 . C H A P T E R I I R E V I E W OF THE L I T E R A T U R E T h e . f u n d a m e n t a l g o a l o f c o u n s e l l i n g h a s b e e n d e s c r i b e d a s h e l p i n g a p e r s o n s o l v e a p r o b l e m . T h e m e t h o d b y w h i c h t h e c o u n s e l l o r s e e k s t o f a c i l i t a t e t h i s s o l u t i o n w i l l v a r y g r e a t l y b u t a common e l e m e n t w i l l u s u a l l y i n v o l v e e x t e r n a l c o m p a r i s o n s m a d e o n t h e b a s i s o f i n t e r n a l e v a l u a t i o n s . ( W i l l i a m s o n , 1 9 6 5 , p . 1 9 8 ) T o e n c o u r a g e t h i s , c o m p a r i s o n t h e c o u n s e l l o r m u s t p r o v i d e t h e s t u d e n t w i t h a d d i t i o n a l i n f o r m a t i o n t o c o m p l i m e n t t h e s e l f - i n f o r m a t i o n w h i c h t h e s t u d e n t m u s t l e a r n t o e v a l u a t e a n d u t i l i z e i n a r a t i o n a l a p p r o a c h t o w a r d c o p i n g w i t h t h e d i s c o n t i n u i t i e s w h i c h h e w i l l h a v e t o f a c e t h r o u g h o u t h i s l i f e . W i t h o u t s u c h a s s i s t a n c e a n d i n f o r m a t i o n , w h i c h i s t h e m a j o r j u s t i f i c a t i o n f o r g u i d a n c e s e r v i c e s w i t h i n t h e s c h o o l , a s t u d e n t may n e v e r l e a r n t o c o p e w i t h a n d u n d e r s t a n d t h e a m b i g u i t i e s a n d d e m a n d s o f a w o r l d w h e r e t h e a l t e r n a t i v e s o f c h o i c e a r e i n c r e a s i n g e v e n a s t h e v e r y d e f i n i t i o n s b e t w e e n t h e s e a l t e r n a t i v e s a r e b e c o m i n g i n c r e a s i n g l y b l u r r e d . . T h i s d i s c o n t i n u i t y a n d i t s r e s o l u t i o n s e e m s t o b e i n v o l v e d i n t h e p r o c e s s o f g r o w i n g u p - a p r o c e s s t h a t i s : f a c i l i t a t e d b y s e l f -k n o w l e d g e a n d a c c u r a t e e n v i r o n m e n t a l i n f o r m a t i o n , a n d y e t a p r o c e s s t h a t i s o n - g o i n g a n d s e l f - g e n e r a t i n g a s t h e p a s t b e c o m e s m o r e r e m o t e a n d m o r e d i f f i c u l t t o u n d e r s t a n d e v e n a s t h e f u t u r e b e c o m e s m o r e u n c e r t a i n . ( P a r s o n s , 1 9 6 2 , p . 9 7 ) T h i s s e a r c h f o r . d e f i n i t i o n a n d i n t e r n a l f r e e d o m i s a c r u c i a l p r o c e s s f o r man m u s t b e f r e e e v e n a s h e k n o w s t h a t h e n e v e r i s . Y o u t h , o f c o u r s e , i s l e f t t o i n t e r p r e t f o r i t s e l f , t o w e i g h t h e n o r m s o f a d u l t s o c i e t y w i t h a l l i t s r u l e s a n d d e m a n d s w h i l e a t t h e s a m e t i m e s t r i v i n g f o r t h e a u t o n o m o u s a c h i e v e m e n t o f t h e a c t i v e i n d i v i d u a l . ( P a r s o n s , 1 9 6 4 , p . 2 3 7 ) 6. The struggle for self-identity is often left to those who will not accept the status quo - a struggle that is conveyed through the medium of problem expression. The counsellor must involve himself in this struggle, he must be seen by the students as the member of the school staff who understands the problems adolescents face in becoming adults. (Stewart and Warnath, 1965, p. 103) If the counsellor has a role, i t is one of helping adolescents to recognize that they do have some control over their future, that the environment can be changed, and that there is significance in the school environment. Several authors have attempted to investigate this issue by means of a problem inventory. Fick (1952, p. .410) recommends use of the problem inventory as a means of guaging the range and depth of student's problems. Shumberg (1950, p. 354) also recommended the use of a problem inventory with high school students as a tool in guidance and a survey technique in curriculum planning. His conclusions were based on his study of 12,000 high school students in grades 9-12. Shumberg's efforts were duplicated by Taliana (1958, p. 167) in a restandardization of Shumberg's problem inventory. The kinds of personal problems which characterize adolescents who are socially acceptable as contrasted to the problems of those who are unacceptable to their age mates should provide some clues as. to how sociometric status might be promoted in school or out-of-schopl situations. Kuhlen and Bretsch (1947, p. 122) concluded that unaccepted children, both boys and girls, have more problems than the accepted -as measured by the Mooney Problem Checklist, which Is similar.to the SRA Youth Inventory.. Support.for this conclusion.comes from Smith and 7. Hudgins (1958, p. 303) in their article "The SRA Youth Inventory and Mental Health." Girls who were considered deviant enough, in behaviour to be sentenced to a juvenile residential home indicated average scores in a l l of the SRA Youth Inventory problem areas above the 50th percentile with peaks in problems about School, Home, and Self well above the 75th percentile. This tends.to lend support to the concurrent validity of such an inventory as a survey instrument since the girls were deviant by definition and were hypothesized to exhibit more problems than a normal population - which they did. The relationship between problem choice on the Youth. Inventory and school citizenship has been investigated. Pauley (1958, p. 207) compared the problem choices of pupils classed as good school citizens and pupils classed as poor school citizens and found significant differences in three problem areas: 1) School; 2) Person Adjustment; and 3) Home and Family problems. Pauley concludes with, " i t appears that behavior which results in a pupil being classed as a good or poor school citizen is associated with the pupil's efforts to find satis-factory solutions to personal adjustment problems, family problems., and school problems... and that the SRA Youth. Inventory has some usefulness as an instrument capable of differentiating "between good and.poor school citizens." The SRA Youth Inventory has. been used in a cross-cultural study of teenagers problems. A stratified sample of over 5,00.0 teenagers in school in the "United States, Peurto Rico, West Germany .and India were used with, forms of the SRA Youth Inventory adapted to each, culture. Remmers (1962) concluded: a) the measuring instrument is highly reliable. b) teenagers' self-perceived problems can be comparably measured across widely different cultures. c) ranking .of problem areas across cultures are highly similar. d) health problems are of least concern and post high school problems of most concern. e) the amount and intensity of worry varies greatly across cultures. The results of this survey may lend support to Kelly (1962) who charges that adults essentially dislike young people and that much of the current criticism of youth, is scapegoating on the part of parents. This scapegoating, Kelly insists, is particularly destructive because adolescents and younger children are really defenceless, against attack by adults. We would thus expect a high, response to an.item.such as statement #295 in the SRA.Youth Inventory, "Teenagers are often criticized unfairly." 9. CHAPTER III METHODS AND PROCEDURES Population Grade eleven students were selected for the study because they were readily available in their regular guidance classes and because these students had committed themselves to a choice of school programmes at the end of grade ten and thus could be divided into school programme sub-groups. The entire grade eleven class of the high schools selected was utilized in the study. In order to obtain as diversified a student population as possible, Lester Pearson High School in New Westminster and Carson Graham Senior High School in North Vancouver were selected: Lester Pearson being the only high school in the city of New Westminster and thus representative of every social class in a city of 100,0.00; Carson Graham enrolling students of various socio-economic backgrounds and academic abilities (from /vocational students to accellerated ''major work" students) throughout North. Vancouver, and thus somewhat represent-ative of a community of approximately 50,000 persons. The population and sample distribution for the 574 subjects is presented in table .1. This table also indicates the size and composition of each, of the sub-groups. TABLE 1 POPULATION AND SAMPLE DISTRIBUTIONS L e s t e r Schoo l Sex of T o t a l Pearson Carson Graham Programme Students P o p u l a t i o n Sample Sample (N = 574) (N = 280) (N = 294) A l l M 258 107 151 Programmes F 316 173 143 Academic- M 139 63 76 T e c h n i c a l F 170 121 49 Commercial M 30 17 13 F 107 37 70 I n d u s t r i a l M 79 22 57 Community M 6 3 3 S e r v i c e s F 34 12 22 V i s u a l & M 4 2 2 Performing F 5 3 2 A r t s 11. The SRA Youth Inventory - Form S The SRA Youth Inventory - Form S for grades 9-12 is a.needs and problems checklist designed for use with secondary school students. The manual states: The Youth Inventory has demonstrated its value both; as a survey instrument and as a counselling tool. Its main value lies in giving high school students an opportunity to express their interests and problems so that teachers, counsellors and school administrators may help the students overcome their difficulties and get'the most out of their educational opportunities. The original form (Form A) of this instrument was developed by having hundreds of students throughout the United States write essays on their problems. The content of these essays was analyzed for problems by the staff of the Purdue Opinion Panel. The results of other investigations were also used, as was a survey of the literature on teenage problems. The items finally selected were divided a priori into eight categories: My School. My Home and Family. Looking Ahead. Boy Meets Girl. About Myself. Health. Getting Along with Others,. Things in General. The items finally selected were administered as a preliminary inventory to approximately 15,000 students from high schools participating in the Purdue Opinion Panel. Form S is a revised and improved version of Form A - i t is not just a parallel form. In Form S, students are asked to indicate the intensity of the problem choice by marking one of three boxes, or by marking a circle when the item is of no concern. Reliabilities for each of the problem areas were computed using the method of internal consistancy. Hoyt's analysis of variance technique for weighted items was used. The internal consistancy coefficients reported in table 2 are based on a random sub-sample.of 300 cases drawn from the original sample of 3000. The results indicate that the Youth Inventory is a highly reliable instrument. The validity of the Inventory rests on its content: that the sample of items is comprehensive and representative, and that.it is in the student's best interest to express his "true feelings" honestly. :K. E. Clark had the following to say in his review of Form A of the Youth; Inventory in Buros' 4th Mental Measurements Yearbook: The reliabilities of the area scores, estimated by Kuder-Richardson methods:, seem high enough for individual use. For experimental or survey purposes.it is probably as good as any available device of its kind. Frank S. Freeman in the same issue of Buros states that "On the whole, this inventory appears to be one of the sounder instruments in its field." Robert Jacobs, in the "Public School Testing Project: First Report," p. 66-72, quoted by Freeman in Buros" 4th Mental Measurements  Yearbook, used the Youth Inventory in a.test-retest design. He used a small number (N ~ 48), retested after an interval of one month. The reliability coefficients ranged from .'.72 (Health) to .88 (My Home. and Family) with a median of .82. T A B L E 2 R E L I A B I L I T I E S OF THE Y O U T H I N V E N T O R Y - FORM S , AS R E P O R T E D I N THE S C I E N C E R E S E A R C H A S S O C I A T E S YOUTH I N V E N T O R Y M A N U A L . P r o b l e m A r e a R e l i a b i l i t y my s c h o o l . 9 0 a f t e r h i g h s c h o o l . 9 4 a b o u t m y s e l f . 9 4 g e t t i n g a l o n g w i t h o t h e r s . 9 5 my h o m e a n d f a m i l y . 9 5 b o y m e e t s g i r l . 9 4 h e a l t h , ' . 9 1 t h i n g s i n g e n e r a l . 9 6 1 4 . P r o c e d u r e T h e s u r v e y w a s c o n d u c t e d i n t h e S p r i n g o f 1 9 6 7 . T e a c h e r s o f g r a d e e l e v e n g u i d a n c e c l a s s e s a d m i n i s t e r e d t h e i n v e n t o r i e s i n t h e i r r e g u l a r g u i d a n c e p e r i o d s . F i v e s c h o o l d a y s w e r e r e q u i r e d t o c o m p l e t e t h e t e s t i n g p r o c e d u r e . N o p r o v i s i o n w a s m a d e t o a d m i n i s t e r t h e i n v e n t o r i e s t o s t u d e n t s w h o w e r e a b s e n t d u r i n g t h e t e s t p e r i o d . T i m e r e q u i r e d t o . c o m p l e t e t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y w a s 30 -^45 m i n u t e s . Names o r o t h e r i d e n t i f y i n g i n f o r m a t i o n w a s n o t r e q u i r e d , h o w e v e r s e x a n d a c a d e m i c p r o g r a m m e w e r e r e c o r d e d . V e r b a l i n s t r u c t i o n s w e r e m i n i m a l ; t h e s t u d e n t s w e r e m e r e l y , a d v i s e d t h a t t h e i n v e n t o r y w a s p a r t o f a r e s e a r c h p r o j e c t a n d t h e y w e r e t o a n s w e r t h e q u e s t i o n s h o n e s t l y a f t e r c a r e f u l l y r e a d i n g t h e i n s t r u c t i o n p a g e . T h e i n s t r u c t i o n p a g e ( s e e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y i n A p p e n d i x A ) r e q u i r e d s t u d e n t s ! t o r e a d e a c h , s t a t e m e n t c a r e f u l l y , a n d i f t h e s t a t e m e n t e x p r e s s e d s o m e t h i n g t h a t w a s a p r o b l e m t o t h e m , t h e y w e r e t o m a r k o n e o f t h e t h r e e b o x e s p r o v i d e d t o t h e r i g h t o f t h e s t a t e m e n t : i f i t w a s a s e r i o u s p r o b l e m t h e y w e r e t o m a r k , t h e b i g b o x , i f . i t w a s a m o d e r a t e p r o b l e m t h e y w e r e t o m a r k t h e m i d d l e b o x , a n d i f i t w a s a s m a l l o r o c c a s i o n a l p r o b l e m t h e y w e r e t o m a r k t h e s m a l l b o x ; b u t i f t h e s t a t e m e n t e x p r e s s e d s o m e t h i n g t h a t w a s n o t a p r o b l e m t o t h e m , t h e y w e r e t o m a r k t h e c i r c l e t o t h e r i g h t o f t h e s t a t e m e n t . Analysis of Data The inventories were scored according to the following pattern: one point i f the small box was marked, two points i f the middle box was marked, and three points i f the large box was marked. No points were granted i f the circle was marked. Each statement thus received a score that represented intensity of problem choice as well as frequency of problem choice. These raw scores were tabulated for each problem state-ment as well as for each problem area for 1) the entire population, 2) for the male and female samples, 3) for every school programme sub-group . The mean problem choice scores for the school programme sub-groups in each, of the problem choice areas were compared by means of analysis of variance to determine i f there were any significant differences between these problem areas. Results were accepted at the .05 level of confidence. A Schef fe^ . test was used in order to make multiple comparisons between the means of the school programme sub-groups to investigate any further differences in problem choices between the students enrolled in these programme sub-groups. A l l data for groups smaller than thirty is offered out of interest and should not be regarded with the same.confidence as data for the larger groups in the study. The relatively small number of students enrolled in school programmes such as Community Services, and Visual and Performing Arts makes adequate sampling a difficult task unless more schools are included in the sample. CHAPTER IV FINDINGS Problem Areas. After the problem checklists were scored, the problem areas were ranked according to the mean number of times they were chosen by the subjects. Table 3 shows the problem areas ranked . for the.total population, the.total male sample, and the total female sample respectively. 17. TABLE 3 PROBLEM AREAS TOTAL POPULATION RANKED FOR TOTAL MALE SAMPLE TOTAL FEMALE SAMLE NATIONWIDE SAMPLE OF 3000 U. S. STUDENTS (Remmers, Youth Problem Inventory Manual) Area Rank Rank Rank Rank Looking Ahead 1 1 4 1 About Myself 2 2 2 4 Ge t t i n g Along w i t h Others 3 4 1 2 My School 4 3 3 3 Things i n General 5 5 5 5 My Home and Family 6 6 6 6 Boy Meets G i r l 7 7 7 7 Health 8 8 8 8 18. P rob lem Ch oi ces Appendix B contains the individual problem choices ranked by intensity or degree of importance. The percentage of students in the population selecting the problem is also indicated, but this may not always be in keeping with the rank order as a greater percentage of students may select problem A over problem B, but at the same time they may consider problem B a greater or more important problem, thus problem B receives the higher rank. Similar ranking-rpercentage data for any of the sub-groups, either male or female, and for any of the five school programme areas may be obtained by reference to Appendix C. The following table, table 4, abstracted from Appendix B, illustrates^a need for adequate vocational guidance services at the senior high school level. 19. TABLE 4 SELECTED PROBLEM CHOICES OF A SAMPLE OF 574 HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS Percent Ques t ion S e l e c t i n g Each Rank Number Ques t ion Problem 1 2 I w i sh I knew how to study b e t t e r . 89.3% 2 41 How much a b i l i t y do I a c t u a l l y have? 87.2 4 59 What career s h a l l I pursue? 76.8 7 40 For what work am I bes t s u i t e d ? 74.9 8 123 ' I need to develop more s e l f - c o n f i d e n c e . 80.9 9 64 How do I go about f i n d i n g a job? 77.4 11 39 What s h a l l I do a f t e r h i g h school? 73.8 15 38 What are my r e a l i n t e r e s t s ? 77.2 18 69 I need some work exper ience . 73.9 19 67 For what k i n d of job shou ld I apply? 72.4 20 62 What are the o p p o r t u n i t i e s i n d i f f e r e n t f i e l d s ? 84.8 28 66 How can I prepare f o r a job i n t e r v i e w ? 69.7 35 68 How shou ld I ac t dur ing an i n t e r v i e w ? 69.7 37 70 what ' s expected of me on a job? 72.3 40 60 What t r a i n i n g do d i f f e r e n t voca t ions r equ i r e? 67.2 41 43 I need adv ice i n choosing courses . 69.2 46 65 I w i s h I cou ld w r i t e good l e t t e r s of a p p l i c a t i o n . 66.1 50 52 D i I have the a b i l i t y to do c o l l e g e work? 59.0 77 58 What v o c a t i o n a l f i e l d s are overcrowded? 57.9 79 771 What i s proper o f f i c e e t i q u e t t e ? 59.3 83 56 I want to l e a r n a t r a d e . .31.9 84 100 I would l i k e to d i scuss my pe r sona l problems w i t h someone. 57.1 94 101 I wonder i f I am normal i n the way my mind works . 53 .3 107 203 My parents a v o i d d i s c u s s i n g sex w i t h me. 48.6 118 55 What are some careers f o r g i r l s ? 59.0 132 15 I must s e l e c t a v o c a t i o n tha t doesn ' t r e q u i r e c o l l e g e . 41.5 141 54 How can I get app ren t i ce sh ip t r a i n i n g ? 42.7 154 110 I don ' t know what i s expected of me. 43.5 169 87 I don ' t see much fu ture f o r m y s e l f . 42.2 192 94 I ' m not ready f o r any job when I graduate . 37.4 20. While the sample size remains unsatisfactory, the data for the "minor" academic programmes such as Community Services, and Visual and Perf orming,..Arts . did exhibit the greatest deviation of a l l the sub-groups from the total population norms. Thus i t can be expected, and the data suggests this to be the case, that students in the.forgoing "minor" programmes will exhibit significantly greater problem choices than students in the major programmes. Analysis of Variance The significance of the differences of mean problem choices for the nine sub-groups was tested by means of the analysis of variance. From table 6 , i t can be seen that significance was obtained in five problem areas: Looking Ahead, About Myself, Getting Along with Others, Health, and Things in General. Table 7 indicates the means, standard deviations, standard errors, and probabilities for problem area scores of the:total population. T A B L E 6 R E S U L T S OF THE A N A L Y S I S OF V A R I A N C E BETWEEN P R O B L E M A R E A SCORES OF THE V A R I O U S SCHOOL PROGRAMME S U B - G R O U P S P r o b l e m A r e a Sum o f S q u a r e s d . f . M e a n S q u a r e F M y S c h o o l E r r o r ( w i t h i n ) L o o k i n g A h e a d E r r o r ( w i t h i n ) A b o u t M y s e l f E r r o r ( w i t h i n ) G e t t i n g A l o n g w i t h O t h e r s 1 6 4 1 . 0 5 7 3 2 0 5 . 1 2 . 6 2 7 6 . 8 5 1 9 , 8 7 3 0 7 5 3 2 . 8 2 6 8 5 . 2 E r r o r ( w i t h i n ) . 8 7 5 8 5 . My Home & F a m i l y E r r o r ( w i t h i n ) . 8 9 7 2 6 . B o y M e e t s G i r l E r r o r ( w i t h i n ) . 6 6 0 5 7 . H e a l t h E r r o r ( w i t h i n ) . 4 6 8 3 8 . T h i n g s i n G e n e r a l 1 1 1 8 1 . 0 E r r o r ( w i t h i n ) . 8 5 5 4 5 7 3 9 4 1 . 6 0 1 0 4 3 2 . 0 5 7 3 1 3 0 4 . 1 0 4 0 3 3 . 2 5 7 3 5 0 4 . 1 5 5 7 3 3 3 5 . 6 5 4 4 3 2 . 7 5 7 3 5 5 4 . 0 9 5 7 3 139 7 . 6 0 0 . 9 1 2 . 3 0 * 1 6 4 4 3 . 0 5 7 3 2 0 5 5 . 4 0 4 . 9 6 * 3 . 0 5 * 1 . 0 9 1 . 3 5 4 . 6 2 * 3 . 4 4 * * s i g n i f i c a n t a t t h e . 0 5 l e v e l o f . c o n f i d e n c e . 22. TABLE 7 MEANS, STANDARD DEVIATIONS, STANDARD ERRORS AND PROBABILITIES FOR PROBLEM AREA SCORES OF THE TOTAL POPULATION Standard Standard Problem Areas Means Deviations Error Prob. 1. My School 38.326 15.037 0.628 0.5116 2. Looking Ahead 43.927 20.412 0.852 0.0196 3. About Myself 41.023 20.917 0.873 0.0000 4. Getting Along with Others 40.847 20.984 0.876 0.0026 . 5. My Home & Family 30.666 21.497 0.897 0.3664 6. Boy Meets Girl 22.613 15.825 0.661 0.2167 7. Health 17.763 11.219 0.468 0.0001 8. Things in General 36.152 20.495 0.855 0.0010 Due to the possibility of significant differences existing between some pairs of means, i t was decided to use a Scheffe test for multiple comparisons between the.means of the sub-groups. Using: Where: k = no. of groups for p< .05 N = total no. of subjects in a l l groups Since this would be an a posteriori.test, i t was only applied to sub-group mean scores in the problem areas that had presented a significant F test score in the analysis of variance programme. (Ferguson, 1959, p. 295; Edwards, 1966, p. 154) The Scheffe test did not disclose any significant differences between pairs, of sub-group means. In view, of the overall significance demonstrated by the analysis of -variance, the Scheffe lack of significance between sub-groups may be due to limitations in the sub-group samples, lack of significant relationship between sub-group mean scores when they are considered as paired items, alone, or due to the conservative nature of the .Scheffe'. test. (Ker linger, 1966, p. 199) It seems relatively safe to,conclude at this, point that high, school.students will differ significantly in problem choice i f they are divided into sub-groups according to their school programmes. However, we cannot pair these sub-groups and expect any significant differences in problem choices. Thus while the overall hypothesis seems sound, i t is not meaningful within the limits of this study to make further comparisons between groups, ,of students assembled according to school programme. n o - k-1 N - N 24. Further Comparisons of Interest As Canadian norms are hot available, i t may be helpful.to compare the data to a nationwide U.S. sample of 3,000 high school students as compiled by Remmers in the Youth Inventory Manual. Such a comparison can be made either by reference to the following table (table 8) or to the profile charts in Appendix D. It is recommended that school counsellors compile their own norms i f this type of survey instrument is to be of value. Table 8 indicates considerable similarity between the problem choices of Canadian and American students. TABLE 8 COMPARISON OF PROBLEM CHOICE AREA MEANS AND STANDARD DEVIATIONS: 574 CANADIAN STUDENTS VERSUS 3,000 AMERICAN STUDENTS OF THE SRA YOUTH INVENTORY. Canadian Sample American Sample Standard Standard Problem Area Mean Deviation Mean Deviation Looking Ahead 43 .927 20 .412 50 .88 16 .96 Getting Along with Others 40 .847 20 .984 47 .00 26 .24 My School 38 .326 15 .037 39 .66 16 .96 About Myself 41 .023 20 .917 37 .55 21 .9.1. Things in General 36 .152 20 .495 . 32 .26 23 .27 My Home and Family 30 .666 21 .497 28 .22 23 .41 Boy Meets Girl 22 .613 15 .825 27 .31 19 .39 Health . 17 .763 11 .219 18 .40 13 .25 It is also of some interest to make a cross-cultural comparison between the results of this study and samples of high school students from the United States, Germany and India as reported by Remmers. (1962, p. 254) Table 9 following gives the results of the cross-cultural comparison. The percentages for the Canadian sample most closely approx-imates the percentages for the sample of students from India, and are quite far removed from the results reported for the American sample. These results may be disputed, especially in view of the contradiction presented by the previous comparison in table 8. If accepted, with some degree of skepticism, these results may suggest great pressures and demands confronting Canadian high school students: pressures exceeding those facing students in the affluent, stable society of the United States, and somewhat similar to those pressures confronting students in the subsistance, adolescent industrial society of India. Further cross-cultural comparisons shouQid be made with larger stratified samples in order to determine the relationships between student problems in various western nations. •21. TABLE 9 CROSS-CULTURAL COMPARISON OF SOME "MOST SERIOUS PROBLEM" PERCENTAGES OF CANADIAN, AMERICAN, GERMAN, AND INDIAN STUDENTS. Problem American M F German M F Indian M F Canadian M F I want to learn how to read better. 17 15 6 4 55 53 73 60 I wish loknew how to study better. 36 36 35 32 68 79 92 92 I wish I knew more about using the library. 4 8 27 28 50 70 47 50 I wish my teachers would give me, encouragement. 9 8 9 10 61 63 55 57 I wish I understood science better. 19 19 11 17 57 60 57 63 I worry about getting good grades. 25 23 33 42 58 65 86 92 I want to know more about what people do in college. 16 21 36 24 60 56 58 58 I wish I could afford college. 23 21 22 42 53 57 39 38 What career shall I pursue? 19 16 28 32 56 54 82 77 I feel guilty about things I've done.' 12 16 9 11 55 62 61 74 I want people to like me better. 20 20 5 8 69 65 74 82 I wish I could carry on a pleasant conversation. 16 15 15 15 69 65 67 75 I want to make new friends. 24 29 30 25 60 60 71 82 I need to develop more self-confidence. 22 28 18 28 62 69 76 86 I need to learn to be a "good sport" in games. 5 6 8 3 60. 57 28 35 It bothers me that some kids are left out of things. 18 2.7 19 23 50. 53 : 78 93 I wish I had a quiet place at. home where I could study. 12 16 16 11 62 65 44 47 I wish I could be of more help to my family. 16 17 24 24 65 71 63 75 Is there any way of eliminating slums? 10 15 22 25 55 58 64 82 How can I learn to use my leisure time wisely? 12 12 17 18 51 51 60 67 Means 16.7 18.0 24.5 2.1.0 58.8 61.7 63.8 69.3 N 1465 1527 283 21.7 289 81 258 316 CHAPTER V CONCLUSIONS The study was designed to evaluate the following hypotheses: 1) That there will be a significant relationship demonstrated between school programme choice and problem area expression as indicated by the SRA Youth Inventory - Form S. The analysis of variance indicated such a significant relationship between school programme choice and five of the eight problem areas: Looking Ahead, About Myself, Getting Along with Others, Health, and Things in General. 2) That students having selected the Academic-Technical school programme will exhibit significant differences in their problem choices to students having selected the Commercial, Industrial, Community Services, or the Visual and Performing Arts, school programmes... The Schef fe* Test failed to disclose any significant differences between pairs .of sub-group means . Thus'while overall significance was- obtained, significant differences between the sub-groups in the study were not evident -perhaps due to the inadequacies of sample sizes, or perhaps because such, differences do not indeed exist. Table 4 indicates that the use of tests such as. the Strong Vocational Interest Blank and the Kuder Personal Preference Record would be helpful in increasing the student's self-knowledge and thus rendering him more capable of making vocational and personal decisions. Teachers may f i n d value i n the feedback offered by table 5 , an abstract from the survey data. The expression of a f e l t i n a b i l i t y to study, lack of self-confindence and.self-knowledge, or a very r e a l concern f o r academic achievement i n a society that i s dedicated to achievement, often at the expense of scholarship or humanity, may encourage the teacher to examine his r e l a t i o n s h i p with hi s students, h i s objectives i n teaching, or even the very i d e a l s that he cannot help but i n c u l c a t e i n the young, w i l l i n g minds that often l i s t e n . 30. TABLE 5 SELECTED PROBLEM CHOICES OF A SAMPLE OF 574 HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS ILLUSTRATING ACADEMIC AND PERSONAL PROBLEM CHOICES. Rank Number Question Percent Selecting .Each Problem 1 2 I wish I knew how to study better. 89.3 2 41 How much ability do I actually have? 87.2 3 37 I worry about getting good grades.. 86.4 5 6 I wish I could be more calm when I recite in class. 80.2 7 40 I need to develop more self-confidence. 80.9 13 5 I need to learn how to prepare for tests. 84.3 . 14 31 I wish I understood mathematics better. 70.1 16 102 I worry about.tests. 79.1 34 13 I doubt the value of things I have to study in school 75.9 43 114 I'm afraid to speak up in class. 62.7 47 42 I would like to know more definitely how I am doing in my schoolwork. 69.5 59 35 I wish I understood science better. 57.9 68 18 I need some individual help with my courses. 68.7 74 1 I want to learn how to read better. 63.9 87 29 I need to learn how to spell better. 53.7 94 25 It would be better i f my teachers didn't play favourites. 54.4 95 14 My courses are too far removed from everyday l i f e . 62.7 98 10 I have too much homework. 58.9 116 26 I wish my teachers understood me better. 54.8 121 4 I have difficulty taking notes. 58.9 123 19 I wish my teachers would give me encouragement. 54.1 125 21 I wish my teachers made assignments more clear. 63.0 149 28 My teachers aren't interested in the things that interest me. 50.4 154 9 I dislike most of my courses. 45.9 155 24 I wish my teachers were warm and friendly people. 47.4 160 27 Class periods are not well organized. 51.5 181 22 I'd like my teachers to be more interested in me. 43.7 188 12 I wish I could quit school now. 32.1 226 23 I wish my teachers weren't so strict. 31.9 249 20 My teachers make fun of me. 17.0 F u r t h e r D i s c u s s i o n T h e s u r v e y l e n d s s u p p o r t t o K e l l y ' s c h a r g e t h a t t e e n a g e r s a r e c r i t i c i z e d e x c e s s i v e l y ( 1 9 6 2 ) s i n c e i t e m n u m b e r 2 9 5 , " T e e n a g e r s a r e o f t e n c r i t i c i z e d u n f a i r l y , " w a s c h o s e n b y 8 3 . 8 % o f t h e s t u d e n t s i n t h e t o t a l p o p u l a t i o n . T h e . v e r y f a c t t h a t s u c h a l a r g e p e r c e n t a g e o f t h e s t u d e n t s s u r v e y e d l o o k u p o n a d u l t c r i t i c i z m a s u n f a i r i s s i g n i f i c a n t . F u r t h e r r e s e a r c h s h o u l d b e d o n e o n p o s i t i o n i n g a n d s e r i a l o r d e r e f f e c t s i n p r o b l e m i n v e n t o r i e s . S i n c e p r o b l e m i t e m s w e r e g r o u p e d i n t h e i n v e n t o r y a c c o r d i n g t o p r o b l e m a r e a s , . i t i s q u i t e p o s s i b l e t h a t s t u d e n t s m a y f o r m a r e s p o n s e s e t t o w a r d t h e s e p r o b l e m a r e a s . T h e r e i s s o m e r e a s o n t o s u s p e c t r e s p o n s e s e t s s i n c e t h e f i r s t p r o b l e m a r e a i n t h e i n v e n t o r y " M y S c h o o l " r e c e i v e d 66% m o r e r e s p o n s e s t h a n t h e l a s t p r o b l e m a r e a , " T h i n g s i n G e n e r a l . " R e - a d m i n i s t r a t i o n o f a r a n d o m i z e d f o r m o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y w o u l d c o n f i r m t h e . c o n c e n t r a t i o n o f p r o b l e m c h o i c e s i n t h e S c h o o l a r e a . T h i s d i f f e r e n c e m a y a l s o b e d u e t o t h e e f f e c t s o f f a t i g u e o r b o r e d o m - b o t h o f w h i c h c o u l d b e o v e r c o m e i n a r a n d o m i z e d i n v e n t o r y . W a r r a n d K n a p p e r h a v e r e p o r t e d t h a t t h e n u m b e r o f a d j e c t i v e s m a r k e d o n a n A d j e c t i v e C h e c k L i s t t y p i c a l l y d r o p p e d b y u p t o 25% i n t h e s e c o n d h a l f o f t h e l i s t . T h e y r e l a t e d t h i s t o t h e d i f f e r e n t i a l a p p l i c a b i l i t y o f i t e m s o r t o l o s s o f i n t e r e s t o r a t t e n t i o n b y t h e s u b j e c t s . ( 1 9 6 7 , p . 1 9 1 ) T h i s s e r i a l p o s i t i o n e f f e c t d o e s n o t s e e m t o b e t o o i m p o r t a n t i n m o r e . c e n t r a l p o s i t i o n s . C r o n b a c h ( 1 9 4 6 , p . 4 7 5 ) h a s p o i n t e d o u t t h a t s u c h . r e s p o n s e s e t s a f f e c t t e s t r e l i a b i l i t y a n d v a l i d i t y . . . a n d t h a t h o m o g e n e o u s g r o u p s o f . i t e m s p e r m i t r e s p o n s e s e t s t o h a v e a g r e a t e r i n f l u e n c e . T h e b i a s i n t r o d u c e d b y . r e s p o n s e s e t s would make any comparative or inferential use of the Youth Inventory quite meaningless. This aspect of analysis was beyond the scope of this paper and remains in need of further research. CHAPTER VI SUMMARY The study set out to servey the problem choices of senior high school students and to determine i f any significant relationship existed between these problem choices and a student's choice of school programme. The SRA Youth Inventory -T- Form S, was used as the survey instrument. It was hoped that the survey would provide information useful to counsellors and guidance personnel. The hypotheses offered were that there will be a significant relationship between school programme choice and problem area expression as indicated by the SRA Youth Inventory, and that students having selected the Academic-Technical school programme will exhibit significant differences in their problem choices to students having selected the Commercial, Industrial, Community Services, or the Visual and Performing Arts school programmes. A review of the literature indicated that problem choice can be used to measure sociometric status, mental health, and school citizenship. Other .authors indicated the usefulness of a problem inventory as a tool in.guidance and a survey technique in curriculum planning. The population.consisted of -574 grade eleven students from two high schools in Metropolitan Vancouver. The Science Research Associates Youth Inventory - Form S was administered by school guidance teachers. Instructions were given on the first page of the booklet; additional V e r b a l instructions were minimal. The mean problem choice scores for the school programme sub-groups in each of the problem choice areas were compared by means of analysis-of variance to investigate the possibility of significant differences between these problem areas. A Scheffe test was also used in order to make multiple comparisons between the means of the school programme sub-groups. Problem areas and problem choices have been ranked for the total population and for each sub-group within the population. Problem area rank order for the total population was: 1) Looking Ahead; 2) About Myself; 3) Getting Along with Others; 4) My School; 5) Things in General; 6) My Home and Family; 7) Boy Meets Girl; and 8) Health. Vocational problems were seen as most important, indicating a strong need for vocational guidance. The analysis of variance between the problem area scores for the various school programme sub-groups disclosed significant differences in the following problem areas: 1) Looking Ahead; 2) About Myself; 3) Getting Along with Others; 4) Health; and 5) Things in.General. The Scheffe test failed to disclose any significant differences between pairs of sub-group means. The survey indicates a need for further research, into student problems with a more adequate sample. Investigation should include the possible advantage of a randomized inventory, and serial positioning effects. There is reason to believe that such research adds to a counsellor's knowledge of his students, and that this knowledge will assist the counsellor in planning and implementing relevant psychological services in the school. B I B L I O G R A P H Y B I B L I O G R A P H Y A d a m s , G . S . M e a s u r e m e r i t a n d E v a l u a t i o n i n E d u c a t i o n , P s y c h o l o g y a n d  G u i d a n c e . N e w Y o r k : H o l t , R i n e h a r t a n d W i n s t o n , 1 9 6 4 . B e r n h a r d t , R . S . " A d o l e s c e n t s n e e d u n d e r s t a n d i n g , " B u l l . I r i s t . C h i l d  S t u d . , T o r o n t o , 1 9 5 5 , 17 ( 2 ) p p . 5 - 8 . B l o c h e r , D . D e v e l o p m e n t a l C o u n s e l i n g . New Y o r k : R o n a l d P r e s s , 1 9 6 6 . . C o o l e y , W. W. a n d L o h n e s , P a u l R . M u l t i v a r i a t e P r o c e d u r e s f o r t h e  B e h a v i o r a l S c i e n c e s . N e w Y o r k : J o h n W i l e y & S o n s , 1 9 6 2 . C l a r k , K . E . " T h e S R A Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y , " i n B u r o s ' 4 t h M e n t a l M e a s u r e - m e r i t s Y e a r b o o k . C r o n b a c h , L . J . " R e s p o n s e s e t s a n d t e s t v a l i d i t y , " E d u c . p s y c h o l . M e a s m t . , 1 9 4 6 , 6 , p p . 4 7 5 - 4 9 4 . D o l l a r d , J . a n d M i l l e r , N . P e r s o n a l i t y a r i d P s y c h o t h e r a p y : Ar i a n a l y s i s i r i t e r m s o f l e a r n i n g , t h i n k i n g a r i d c u l t u r e . New Y o r k : M c G r a w - H i l l , 1 9 5 0 . D r u c k e r , A . J . a n d R e m m e r s ' , H . H . " A v a l i d a t i o n o f t h e S R A Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y , " J . A p p l . P s y c h o l . , 3 6 : p p . 1 8 6 - 1 8 7 , J e ' 5 2 . E d w a r d s , A . L . E x p e r i m e n t a l D e s i g r i i r i P s y c h o l o g i c a l R e s e a r c h . N e w Y o r k : H o l t , R i n e h a r t & W i n s t o n I n c . , 1 9 5 0 . F e r g u s o n , G . A . S t a t i s t i c a l A r i a l y s i s i r i P s y c h o l o g y a r i d E d u c a t i o n . N e w Y o r k : M c G r a w - H i l l , I n c . , 1 9 5 9 . F i c k , R . " T h e P r o b l e m C h e c k L i s t : A V a l u a b l e A p p r o a c h i r i C o u n s e l i n g , " O c c u p a t i o n s , 3 0 : p p . 4 1 0 - 1 2 , M r ' 5 2 . F r e e m a n , F r a n k S . " T h e S R A Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y , " i n B u r o s ' 4 t h M e n t a l M e a s u r e m e n t s Y e a r b o o k . G a r r e t t , H . E . S t a t i s t i c s i r i P s y c h o l o g y a r i d E d u c a t i o n . New Y o r k : D a v i d M c K a y , 1 9 5 8 . J a c o b s , R o b e r t . " P u b l i c S c h o o l T e s t i n g P r o j e c t : F i r s t R e p o r t , " p p . 6 6 - 7 2 , i n 1 9 4 8 F a l l T e s t i n g P r o g r a m i n I n d e p e n d e n t S c h o o l s a n d S u p p l e m e n t a r y S t u d i e s , q u o t e d i n B u r o s ' 4 t h M e n t a l M e a s u r e m e n t s Y e a r b o o k . K e l l y , E . C . I r i D e f e n s e o f Y o u t h . E n g l e w o o d C l i f f s , N . J . : P r e n t i c e -H a l l I n c . , 1 9 6 2 . K e r l i n g e r , F . N . F o u r i d a t i o r i s o f B e h a v i o r a l R e s e a r c h . New Y o r k : H o l t , R i n e h a r t & W i n s t o n I n c . , 1 9 6 6 . K i n g , P a u l L . " P s y c h o a n a l y t i c A d a p t a t i o n s , " i n S t e f f i r e , B . , T h e o r i e s o f C o u n s e l l i n g . New Y o r k : M c G r a w - H i l l C o . , 1 9 6 5 . 37. Kuhlen, R. G. and Bretsch, H. "Sociometric status and personal problems of adolescents," Sbciometry, 1947, 10, pp. 122-132. Mooney, R. L. "Surveying high school students' problems by means of a problem check l i s t , " Educ. Res. Bull., 1942, 21, pp. 57-69. Mouley, G. J. The Science of Educational Research. New York: American Book Co., 1963. Ojemann, R. "Understanding Adolescents," Children, 1954, 1, pp. 232-233. Paisios, J; P. and Remmers, H. H. "A Factor Analysis of the SRA Youth Inventory," J. Ed. Psychol., 46: pp. 25-30, Ja'55. Parsons, T. "Youth in the Context of American Society," in H. Borow (ed.) Man in a World at Work, Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1964, pp. 237-256. Parsons, T. "Youth in the Context of American Society," Daedalus, 91: pp. 97-123, Winter, 1962. Pauley, B. "Relationship between SRA Youth; Inventory Scores and School Citizenship," Pers bririe 1:arid Guid. J ., 37: pp. 207-211, N'58. Remmers, H. H. and Shumberg, B. "The Science Research. Associates Youth Inventory, Form S, Manual, 1960." Remmers, H. H. • "Cross-Cultural Studies of Teenagers Problems," J. of Ed. Psychol., LII, Dec. 1962, p. 255. Rube; P. "Is there a problem of adolescence?" Amer. J.: Psychother., 1955, 9, pp. 503-509. Scheffe, H. A. "A method for judging a l l possible contrasts in the analysis of variance," Biometrika, 1953, 40, pp. 87-104. Scheffe, H. A. The Arialysis of Variance. New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc., 1959. Shumberg, B. "The Development of a 'Youth: Inventory' for use in Guidance and Curriculum Planning," Abstract, Am. Psychol., 5: p. 354, J1'50. / Smith, L. M. and Hudgins, B. B. "The SRA Youth. Inventory and Mental Health," Persoririel arid Guid. J., 37: pp. 303-304, D'58. Spivak, M. L. "School problems reported by 7th and 9th grade children entering the same . j unior high'.school," J. Educ. Res . , 1957, 50, pp. 631-633. Stefflre, B. Theories of Counselling. New York: McGraw-Hill Co., 1965. Stoops, E. and Wahlquist, G. Principles arid Practices in Guidance. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1958. Taliana, L. E. "Youth's problems as they see them: A statistical analysis and restandardization of the SRA Youth Inventory," Dissertatiori Abstracts, 1958, 19, p. 167. Vance, F. L. "The SRA Youth Inventory - Form S," in Buros' 6th Merital Measufemerits Yearbook. Warnath, L. S. The Counsellor arid Society: A Cultural Approach. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1965. Warr, P. B. and Knapper,.C. "Negative Responses and.Serial Position Effects on the Adjective Check List," J. of Soc. Psychol., 1967, 73, pp. 191-197. Williamson, E. G. "Vocational Counselling: Trait-Factor Theory," p. 198 in Stefflre, B., Theories of Counselling, NewYork: McGraw-Hill Co.,.1965. APPENDIX A THE SCIENCE RESEARCH ASSOCIATES YOUTH INVENTORY - FORM S SRA YOUTH INVENTORY * FORM C GRADES 9-12 NAME MALE FEMALE GRADE SCHOOL DATE AGE YOUR SCHOOL PROGRAMME: ACADEMIC-TECHNICAL ; COMMERCIAL (check one) INDUSTRIAL ; COMMUNITY SERVICES VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS AGRICULTURE ; OCCUPATIONAL OTHER (specify) DIRECTIONS: The statements on the following pages are about matters that have bothered teen-agers a l l over the United States. You will recognize some of them as things that have been troubling you; others of them may apply to you, yet cause you no concern; s t i l l others may not apply to you at a l l . Read each statement in this questionnaire carefully. If i t expresses something that is a problem to you, mark one of the three boxes. If the statement does not express the way you feel, or i f i t does not apply to you, mark the circle. The statements look like this: I want to learn how to read better ... • • As you mark each statement, use the three boxes to show the way you feel about i t . If you feel that i t is one of your most serious F*vT 1—I problems, mark the big box l £ J L_J D If you feel that i t is a moderate problem for you, I j t—-i mark the middle box 'I I 12£J D If you feel that i t is a small - occasional - problem,! j .-—. mark the small box I I I 1 12 If the statement does not express the way you feel., j 1 •—. mark the circle I I LJ O This questionnaire is not a test, so do not hesitate to mark the state- \ ments frankly. Your answers will not affect your school grades in any way. Marking the statements should help you to understand your own feelings and problems better. Remember, make just one mark for each statement. MY SCHOOL 1. I w a n t t o l e a r n , h o w t o r e a d b e t t e r 2 . I w i s h I k n e w h o w t o s t u d y b e t t e r 3 . I w i s h I k n e w m o r e a b o u t u s i n g t h e l i b r a r y 4 . I h a v e • d i f f i c u l t y t a k i n g n o t e s 5 . I n e e d t o l e a r n h o w t o p r e p a r e f o r t e s t s 6 . I w i s h I c o u l d b e m o r e c a l m w h e n I r e c i t e i n c l a s s 7. I s p e n d t o o m u c h t i m e s t u d y i n g 8 . I w o u l d l i k e t o t a k e c o u r s e s t h a t a r e n o t o f f e r e d i n my s c h o o l 9 . I d i s l i k e m o s t o f my c o u r s e s 1 0 . I h a v e t o o m u c h h o m e w o r k 1 1 . I f e e l s l e e p y i n c l a s s e v e n w h e n I ' v e h a d e n o u g h s l e e p a t - n i g h t . , 1 2 . I w i s h I c o u l d q u i t s c h o o l now 1 3 . I d o u b t t h e v a l u e o f t h e t h i n g s I h a v e t o s t u d y i n s c h o o l . . . . 1 4 . My c o u r s e s a r e t o o f a r r e m o v e d f r o m e v e r y d a y l i f e 1 5 . I m u s t s e l e c t a v o c a t i o n t h a t d o e s n ' t r e q u i r e c o l l e g e 1 6 . I w o u l d l i k e t o g e t s o m e p r a c t i c a l w o r k e x p e r i e n c e 1 7 . I h a v e d i f f i c u l t y e x p r e s s i n g m y s e l f i n w r i t i n g 1 8 . I n e e d s o m e i n d i v i d u a l h e l p w i t h my c o u r s e s 1 9 . I w i s h my t e a c h e r s w o u l d g i v e me e n c o u r a g e m e n t 2 0 . My t e a c h e r s m a k e f u n o f me 2 1 . I w i s h my t e a c h e r s m a d e a s s i g n m e n t s m o r e c l e a r 2 2 . I ' d l i k e my t e a c h e r s t o b e m o r e i n t e r e s t e d i n m e . . . . . . 2 3 . I w i s h my t e a c h e r s w e r e n ' t s o s t r i c t 2 4 . I w i s h my t e a c h e r s w e r e w a r m a n d f r i e n d l y p e o p l e 2 5 . I t w o u l d b e b e t t e r i f my t e a c h e r s d i d n ' t p l a y , f a v o r i t e s 2 6 . I w i s h my t e a c h e r s u n d e r s t o o d me b e t t e r . . 2 7 . C l a s s p e r i o d s a r e n o t w e l l o r g a n i z e d 2 8 . My t e a c h e r s a r e n ' t i n t e r e s t e d i n t h e t h i n g s t h a t i n t e r e s t me 2 9 . I n e e d t o l e a r n h o w t o s p e l l b e t t e r 3 0 . I h a v e d i f f i c u l t y e x p r e s s i n g m y s e l f i n w o r d s 3 1 . I w i s h I u n d e r s t o o d m a t h e m a t i c s b e t t e r 3 2 . I w i s h I c o u l d t a k e p a r t i n e x t r a c u r r i c u l a r a c t i v i t i e s 3 3 . R i d i n g t h e s c h o o l b u s t a k e s t o o m u c h t i m e e a c h d a y 3 4 . I t c o s t s t o o m u c h f o r a l l t h e " e x t r a s " a t s c h o o l 35. . I w i s h I u n d e r s t o o d s c i e n c e b e t t e r 36. I w o u l d l i k e t o t a k e p a r t i n a t h l e t i c s 3 7 . I w o r r y a b o u t g e t t i n g g o o d g r a d e s A F T E R H I G H SCHOOL 38. W h a t a r e my r e a l i n t e r e s t s ? 39. W h a t s h a l l I d o a f t e r h i g h s c h o o l ? 40. F o r w h a t w o r k am I b e s t s u i t e d ? 4 1 . How m u c h a b i l i t y . d o I a c t u a l l y h a v e ? 42. I w o u l d l i k e t o k n o w m o r e d e f i n i t e l y h o w I am d o i n g i n my s c h o o l w o r k 43. I n e e d a d v i c e i n c h o o s i n g c o u r s e s 44. I w a n t t o k n o w m o r e a b o u t w h a t p e o p l e d o i n c o l l e g e 45. S h o u l d I g o t o c o l l e g e ? 46. W h a t a r e t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r c o l l e g e ? 47. How s h a l l I s e l e c t a c o l l e g e ? . . . 48. C a n I g e t i n t o t h e c o l l e g e o f my c h o i c e ? 49. I w i s h I c o u l d a f f o r d c o l l e g e 50. W h a t a r e s o m e w a y s o f f i n a n c i n g a c o l l e g e e d u c a t i o n ' 5 1 . How d o y o u m a k e a p p l i c a t i o n t o e n t e r c o l l e g e ? 52. D o I h a v e t h e a b i l i t y t o d o c o l l e g e w o r k ? 53. I w o u l d l i k e t o h a v e m o r e v o c a t i o n a l c o u r s e s 54. How c a n I g e t a p p r e n t i c e s h i p t r a i n i n g ? . . 55. W h a t a r e s o m e c a r e e r s f o r g i r l s ? 56. I w a n t t o l e a r n a t r a d e 57. W h a t c o u r s e s w i l l b e m o s t v a l u a b l e t o me l a t e r o n ? . 58. W h a t v o c a t i o n a l f i e l d s a r e o v e r c r o w d e d ? 59. W h a t c a r e e r s h a l l I p u r s u e ? . . . 60. W h a t t r a i n i n g d o d i f f e r e n t v o c a t i o n s r e q u i r e ? 61. How w i l l t h e d r a f t a f f e c t me? , 62. W h a t a r e t h e o p p o r t u n i t i e s i n d i f f e r e n t f i e l d s ? . . . . 63. W h a t j o b s a r e o p e n t o h i g h s c h o o l g r a d u a t e s ? 64. How d o I g o a b o u t f i n d i n g a j o b ? 65. I w i s h I c o u l d w r i t e g o o d l e t t e r s o f a p p l i c a t i o n . . . 66. How c a n I p r e p a r e f o r a j o b i n t e r v i e w ? 67. F o r w h a t k i n d o f j o b s h o u l d I a p p l y ? 68. How s h o u l d I a c t d u r i n g a n i n t e r v i e w ? 69. I n e e d s o m e w o r k e x p e r i e n c e 70. W h a t ' s e x p e c t e d o f me o n a j o b ? • • • • 71. W h a t i s p r o p e r o f f i c e e t i q u e t t e ? 12. Am I l i k e l y t o s u c c e e d i n t h e w o r k I d o w h e n I f i n i s h s c h o o l ? < 73. I n e e d h e l p i n p l a n n i n g f o r my m i l i t a r y s e r v i c e . . . . , ABOUT. M Y S E L F 74. I ' m e a s i l y e x c i t e d 75. I h a v e t r o u b l e k e e p i n g my t e m p e r 76. I w o r r y a b o u t l i t t l e t h i n g s 77. I ' m n e r v o u s 78. I c a n ' t s l e e p a t n i g h t 79. I c a n ' t h e l p d a y d r e a m i n g 80. I h a v e t h o u g h t s o f s u i c i d e 8 1 . I f e e l g u i l t y a b o u t t h i n g s I ' v e d o n e 82. I ' m n o t p o p u l a r w i t h ( b o y s ) ( g i r l s ) 83. I o f t e n f e e l l o n e s o m e 84. I f e e l " l o w " m u c h o f t h e t i m e 85. My f e e l i n g s a r e e a s i l y h u r t 86. I n e e d t o l e a r n n o t t o l e t p e o p l e p u s h me a r o u n d . . . 87. I d o n ' t s e e m u c h f u t u r e f o r m y s e l f 88. I o f t e n d o t h i n g s I l a t e r r e g r e t 89. P e o p l e d i s l i k e my r a c e o r n a t i o n a l i t y 90. I l a c k t h e d r i v e o t h e r s h a v e 9 1 . P e o p l e s t a r e a t me 92. I f e e l t h a t I ' m n o t w a n t e d 93. I h a v e a " c r u s h " o n a n o l d e r p e r s o n 94. I ' m n o t r e a d y f o r a n y j o b w h e n I g r a d u a t e 95. I h e s i t a t e t o t a k e r e s p o n s i b i l i t y 96. I f e e l t h a t I ' m n o t a s s m a r t a s o t h e r p e o p l e 97. I m u s t a l w a y s b e " o n t h e g o " 98. I p r e f e r t o b e a l o n e 99. I m u s t l e a r n t o " k e e p my h e a d " w h e n t h i n g s t o w r o n g 100. I w o u l d l i k e t o . d i s c u s s my p e r s o n a l p r o b l e m s w i t h s o m e o n e . . . . 101. I w o n d e r i f I am n o r m a l i n t h e w a y o f m i n d w o r k s . . . 102. I w o r r y a b o u t t e s t s 103. I f e e l t h a t I ' m d i f f e r e n t f r o m t h e o t h e r k i d s 104. I ' m t r y i n g t o g e t r i d o f a n u n d e s i r a b l e h a b i t 105. I ' m a f r a i d o f f a i l u r e o r h u m i l i a t i o n 1 0 6 . My n o s e I s u g l y 1 0 7 . I b i t e my n a i l s 1 0 8 . I c a n ' t h e l p f e e l i n g b a d w h e n I c a n ' t g e t my own w a y . . 1 0 9 . I d o n ' t k n o w w h y p e o p l e g e t a n g r y w i t h me 1 1 0 . I d o n ' t k n o w w h a t i s e x p e c t e d o f m e . 1 1 1 . I w i s h I c o u l d o v e r c o m e b e i n g c a r e l e s s 1 1 2 . I ' m a l w a y s t h i n k i n g u p a l i b i s 1 1 3 . I ' m a f r a i d o f m a k i n g m i s t a k e s 1 1 4 . I ' m a f r a i d t o s p e a k u p i n c l a s s 1 1 5 . I c a n ' t d o a n y t h i n g r i g h t 1 1 6 . I d o n ' t w a n t t o l e a v e h o m e f o r a j o b o r c o l l e g e . 1 1 7 . I t h i n k o t h e r p e o p l e g e t a l l t h e b r e a k s G E T T I N G ALONG WITH OTHERS 1 1 8 . I w a n t p e o p l e t o l i k e me b e t t e r 1 1 9 . I n e e d t o l e a r n h o w t o i n t r o d u c e p e o p l e p r o p e r l y 1 2 0 . I w i s h I c o u l d c a r r y o n a p l e a s a n t c o n v e r s a t i o n 1 2 1 . I n e e d t o l e a r n h o w t o t r e a t p e o p l e whom I d o n ' t l i k e . 1 2 2 . I w a n t t o m a k e n e w f r i e n d s 1 2 3 . I n e e d t o d e v e l o p m o r e s e l f - c o n f i d e n c e 1 2 4 . I n e e d t o b e m o r e t a c t f u l 1 2 5 . I w i s h I k n e w h o w t o d r o p a p e r s o n I n o l o n g e r w a n t f o r a f r i e n d 1 2 6 . I w a n t t o l e a i m h o w t o a c t o n f o r m a l o c c a s i o n s 1 2 7 . I ' m i l l a t e a s e a t s o c i a l a f f a i r s 1 2 8 . I w a n t t o l e a r n t o d a n c e 1 2 9 . I w a n t • t o f e e l i m p o r t a n t t o s o c i e t y o r t o my own g r o u p 1 3 0 . I w i s h I h a d t h i n g s t o t a l k a b o u t i n a g r o u p . 1 3 1 . I c a n ' t l i v e u p t o t h e i d e a l s s e t b y g r o u p s t o w h i c h I b e l o n g 1 3 2 . I n e e d t o l e a r n h o w t o k e e p f r o m b e i n g t o o a g g r e s s i v e . 1 3 3 . How m u c h i n i t i a t i v e s h o u l d I t a k e i n g e t t i n g i n v i t e d t o p a r t i e s o r d a n c e s ? 1 3 4 . I n e e d t o l e a r n t o b e a g o o d l i s t e n e r 1 3 5 . I n e e d t o l e a r n t o b e m o r e t o l e r a n t o f o t h e r p e o p l e ' s o p i n i o n s 1 3 6 . I n e e d t o l e a r n h o w t o p l a n a p a r t y . . . 1 3 7 . T h e r e a r e n ' t e n o u g h p l a c e s f o r w h o l e s o m e r e c r e a t i o n w h e r e I l i v e 1 3 8 . I n e e d t o l e a r n w h a t c l o t h e s t o w e a r o n d i f f e r e n t o c c a s i o n s 139. I g e t s t a g e f r i g h t w h e n I s p e a k b e f o r e a g r o u p 140. I ' d l i k e t o l e a r n p r o p e r t a b l e m a n n e r s 141. I n e e d t o l e a r n h o w t o g e t a l o n g w i t h p e o p l e my own a g e 142. I n e e d t o l e a r n t o b e a " g o o d s p o r t " i n g a m e s . 143. I ' m o f t e n l e f t o u t o f t h i n g s o t h e r k i d s d o 144. I n e e d t o l e a r n h o w t o s e l e c t t h e r i g h t c l o t h e s f o r my f i g u r e 145. I w i s h I k n e w h o w t o u s e c o s m e t i c s p r o p e r l y 146. I d o n ' t k n o w h o w m u c h o f my i n n e r f e e l i n g s t o r e v i e a l t o my f r i e n d s . 147. I n e e d t o l e a r n t o b e o n t i m e f o r a p p o i n t m e n t s 148. I n e e d t o l e a r n h o w t o o r d e r f o o d i n a r e s t a u r a n t 149. I n e e d t o l e a r n h o w t o w o r k b e t t e r w i t h o t h e r s 150. I ' d l i k e t o k n o w h o w t o b e c o m e a l e a d e r i n my g r o u p 151. I h a v e d i f f i c u l t y d e c i d i n g b e t w e e n my own s t a n d a r d s a n d t h o s e o f my c r o w d .152. I n e e d a p a r t - t i m e j o b . 153. I n e e d m o n e y f o r s o c i a l a f f a i r s . . . 154. I d o n ' t h a v e a ( g i r l ) ( b o y ) f r i e n d 155. I am n o t a t t r a c t i v e t o t h e o t h e r s e x 156. I c a n ' t s e e m t o l i v e u p t o t h e i d e a l s I h a v e s e t f o r m y s e l f . . . . 157. I ' m i n w i t h t h e w r o n g c r o w d 158. M a n y p e o p l e h a v e t h e w r o n g i d e a a b o u t me 159. T h e r e a r e t o o m a n y e x c l u s i v e l i t t l e g r o u p s i n o u r s c h o o l . . . . 160. I t b o t h e r s me t h a t s o m e k i d s a r e l e f t o u t o f t h i n g s MY HOME AND F A M I L Y 161. I w i s h I h a d a q u i e t p l a c e a t h o m e w h e r e I c o u l d s t u d y 162. I c a n ' t g e t a l o n g w i t h my b r o t h e r s a n d s i s t e r s 163. I w i s h o u r h o m e - l i f e w e r e m o r e p l e a s a n t 164. I f e e l t h a t I ' m a b u r d e n o n my p a r e n t s 165. I h a v e t o d o t o o m a n y c h o r e s a r o u n d t h e h o u s e 166. My a l l o w a n c e i s t o o s m a l l 167. I f e e l t h a t t h e r e ' s a b a r r i e r b e t w e e n me a n d my p a r e n t s 168. I c a n ' t d i s c u s s p e r s o n a l t h i n g s w i t h my p a r e n t s 169. I w i s h my f a t h e r w a s n ' t s o s t r i c t 170. I w i s h my m o t h e r w a s n ' t s o s t r i c t 171. I d o n ' t l i k e t o i n v i t e p e o p l e t o my home i+6. 172. I don't feel that I belong in the family 173. I am seldom consulted in family decisions 174. My parents play favorites 175. My parents are too strict about letting me use the family car 176. I get no encouragement at home 177. My parents don't usually respect my opinions 178. My parents don't trust me 179. My parents expect too much of me 180. I wish my parents would let me make more of my own decisions 181. I worry about my parents' problems ; 182. I wish I could be of more help to my family 183. Others don't approve of the person I'm dating 184. I have too many dates , 185. I wish I could get my parents to treat me like a grownup, 186. I wish I had my own room , 187. I wish my father had a higher-level job 188. I'm sometimes ashamed of my family 189. I wish I could gain the confidence of my parents 190. I want to get married soon 191. I feel like leaving home. , 192. I'm afraid to t e l l my parents when I've done something wrong 193. I feel disloyal because I don't share the views of my parents. 194. My parents are too strict about permitting me to date on school nights , 195. My family, is always worried about money 196. My parents often pry into my private affairs 197. My parents continually nag about studying 198. I wish our family, would do more things together.. , 199. My parents hate to'admit that I'm sometimes right 200. My parents are cold toward my friends... 201. My parents aren't interested in what I accomplish 202. My parents criticize me too much 203. My parents avoid discussing sex with me , BOY MEETS GIRL 204. I seldom have dates 205. I don't know how to ask for a date 206. There is no place to dance in the town where I live.... 207. I'm bashful about asking girls for dates 208. I don't know how to keep (boys) (girls) interested in me 209. I don't know what to do on a date 210. What are good manners on a date? 211. How do I refuse a date politely? 212. I'm bothered by dirty stories or vulgar talk 213. I wonder i f I am normal in my sexual development 214. I don't know how to break up with a person I have been dating without causing bad feelings. 215. Is there anything wrong with going places "stag"? 216. Is i t a l l right to accept "blind dates"? 217. Is drinking harmful? 218. Should I date a person of a different religion than mine? 219. How can I keep (boys) (girls) from taking me for granted? 220. Should I go steady? 221. Should I kiss my date the first time we go out together? 222. Must I neck to be popular? 223. I'm embarrassed in any discussion of sex 224. I wonder i f high school students should pet and make love , 225. I need an acceptable vocabulary to discuss sex , 226. I think about sex a good deal of the time 227. How far should high school students go in love relations? 228. I need more correct information about sex , 229. I don't understand how children are born 230. I have conflicting information about sexual matters..., 231. I want to know about venereal disease 232. What things should one consider in selecting a mate?.., 233. How long should people know each other before getting married? , 234. How can I prepare myself for marriage and family life?, 235. That things cause trouble in marriage? , HEALTH 236. I want to gain (or lose) weight 237. I want to l e a r n how to s e l e c t foods that w i l l do me the most good.. 238. I smoke too much 239. I am. c r i p p l e d (or have some other handicap) 240. I have t r o u b l e w i t h my menstrual periods 241. I'm concerned about improving my f i g u r e 242. I want to improve my posture and body b u i l d 243. My stomach i s upset e a s i l y 244. What can I do about bad breath? 245. Is smoking harmful? 246. What can I do about body odor? 247. I worry about my h e a l t h . 248. I don't get enough e x e r c i s e 249. I get t i r e d e a s i l y 250i I don't get enough sleep 251. I have no "pep" 252. My teeth need a t t e n t i o n 253. I have frequent headaches 254. I have frequent c o l d s . . . 255. I don't hear very w e l l . 256. My muscles are poorly developed 257. I have no a p p e t i t e 258. I want to get r i d of pimples . 259. I sometimes f e e l f a i n t 260. I wonder i f I am normal i n my energy and endurance 261. My eyes bother me THINGS IN GENERAL 262. I'm concerned w i t h what l i f e i s a l l about 263. I'm confused i n my r e l i g i o u s b e l i e f s 264. I'm bothered by thoughts of Heaven and H e l l . . . 265. I f e e l that I'm not l i v i n g up to my r e l i g i o n 266. I'm searching f o r something to b e l i e v e i n .267. How does one s e t standards of " r i g h t " and "wrong"? 268. I'm concerned about cheating 269. I'm having d i f f i c u l t y deciding what's important i n l i f e . . . . 49. 270; I ' m c o n f u s e d o n s o m e m o r a l q u e s t i o n s . . . , 2 7 1 . C a n I b e l i e v e t h e n e w s p a p e r s a n d r a d i o ? , 272. How c a n I h e l p g e t r i d o f i n t o l e r a n c e ? . , 273. H o w c a n I h e l p t o m a k e t h e w o r l d a b e t t e r p l a c e i n w h i c h t o l i v e ? 274. W h a t c a n I d o a b o u t t h e i n j u s t i c e a l l a r o u n d u s ? . , 275 i I ' m m i x e d up a b o u t w o r l d a f f a i r s . . , 276. I ' m w o r r i e d a b o u t t h e n e x t w a r , 277. I s t h e r e s o m e t h i n g I c a n d o a b o u t r a c e p r e j u d i c e ? , 278. I s t h e r e a n y w a y o f e l i m i n a t i n g s l u m s ? , 279. W h a t c a n I d o t o h e l p g e t b e t t e r g o v e r n m e n t ? 280. How c a n I l e a r n t o u s e my l e i s u r e t i m e w i s e l y ? . . . , 281. I h a v e d i f f i c u l t y b u d g e t i n g my t i m e 282. How c a n I l e a m t o g e t t h e m o s t f o r my m o n e y ? . . . . , 283. D o e s o n e h a v e t o t a k e a d v a n t a g e o f p e o p l e t o b e s u c c e s s f u l ? 284i W h a t c a n I c o n t r i b u t e t o c i v i l i z a t i o n ? 285. I ' m l o s i n g f a i t h i n r e l i g i o n 286. I n e e d t o d e v e l o p a s a t i s f a c t o r y p h i l o s o p h y o f l i f e . . . . 287. I c a n ' t d e c i d e w h e t h e r o r n o t m o n e y i s t h e m a j o r t h i n g t o w o r k f o r i n l i f e , 288. How c a n w e g e t h o n e s t g o v e r n m e n t ? 289. C a n I b e l i e v e a d v e r t i s i n g ? 290. W h a t i s e t e r n i t y ? 291. D o e s i t r e a l l y p a y t o B e h o n e s t ? . . . . . . . 292. I w o n d e r a b o u t t h e a f t e r - l i f e ; 293. I s i t w r o n g t o d e n y t h e e x i s t e n c e o f G o d ? 294. W h a t m a k e s p e o p l e s e l f i s h o r u n k i n d ? 295. T e e n - a g e r s a r e o f t e n c r i t i c i z e d u n f a i r l y 296. W h a t c a n I d o a b o u t j u v e n i l e d e l i n q u e n c y ? . . . . . . ******************************************** WHEN Y O U H A V E F I N I S H E D C H E C K I N G THE PROBLEMS I N T H I S B O O K L E T , GO B A C K AND C I R C L E THE B I G BOX FOR E A C H OF THE THREE PROBLEMS THAT Y O U WANT MOST TO S O L V E . T h e n , i f y o u h a v e a n y s p e c i a l p r o b l e m s t h a t a r e n o t l i s t e d i n t h i s b o o k l e t , w r i t e t h e m d o w n , e i t h e r o n t h i s p a g e o r o n t h e b a c k o f t h i s p a g e . MY S P E C I A L PROBLEMS APPENDIX B RANKED PROBLEM CHOICES TOTAL POPULATION . 5 1 . TOTAL SAMPLE: Male and Female N =574 Carson Graham and Lester Pearson Question Score Number of % of Rank Number Question Value Choices N 1 2 I wish I knew how to study better. 1139 525 89.3 2 41 How much ability do I actually have? 1113 513 87.2 3 37 I worry about getting good grades. 1089 508 86.4 4 59 What career shall I pursue? 1042 452 76.8 295 Teen-agers are often criticized unfairly. 1042 493 83.8 5 6 I wish I could be more calm when I recite in class. 1040 472 80.2 6 57 What courses will be most valuable to me later on? 1032 491 85.4 7 40 For what work am I best suited? 1010 441 74.9 8 123 I need to develop more self-confidence. 1002 476 80.9 9 64 72 How do I go about finding a job? Am I likely to succeed in the work I do 999 455 77.4 when I finish school? 999 466 79.2 10 63 What jobs are open to high school grads? 995 460 78.2 11 39 What shall I do after high school? 991 434 73.8 12 16 I would like to get some practical work experience. 973 499 84.8 160 It bothers me that some kids are left out of things. 973 490 83.3 13 5 I need to learn how to prepare for tests. 970 496 84.3 14 31 I wish I understood mathematics better. 961 424 72.1 15 38 What are my real interests? 945 454 77.2 16 102 I worry about tests. 925 465 79.1 17 152 I need a part-time job. 915 382 64.9 . 18 69 I need some work experience. 910 435 73.9 19 67 For what kind of job should I apply? 895 426 72.4 20 62 What are the opportunities in different fields? 872 499 84.8 21 139 I get stage fright when I speak before a group. 861 419 71.2 22 76 I worry about l i t t l e things. 858 451 76.7 23 262 I'm concerned with what life is a l l about. 856 220 37.4 24 236 I want to gain (or lose) weight. 855 411 69.8 25 122 I want to make new friends. 847 436 74.0 26 118 I want people to like me better.. 829 445 75.5 27 77 I'm nervous. 819 434 73.8 28 66 How can I prepare for a job interview? 817 440 74.7 29 277 Is there something I can do about race prejudice? 813 426 72.4 30 17 I have difficulty expressing myself in writing. 796 411 69.8 31 11 I feel sleepy in class even when I've had enough sleep at night. 788 433 73.6 32 242 I want to improve my posture and body build. 780 432 73.4 33 278 Is there any way of eliminating slums? 776 420 71.4 34 13 I doubt the value of things I have to study in school. 775 447 75.9 35 68 How should I act during an interview? 773 410 69.7 36 104 I'm trying to get rid of an undesirable habit. 768 385 79.4 37 70 What's expected of me on a job? 763 423 72.3 79 I can't help daydreaming. 763 416 70.7 52. Question Score Number of % of Rank Number Question Value Choices N 38 168 I can't discuss personal things with my parents. 760 378 64.3 39 181 I worry about my parents' problems. 757 401 68.2 40 60 What training do different vocations require? 752 395 67.2 41 43 I need advice in choosing courses. 751 407 69.2 42 120 I wish I could carry on a pleasant conversation. 747 405 68.9 43 114 I'm afraid to speak up in class. 741 369 62.7 153 I need money for social affairs. 741 363 61.7 44 74 I'm easily excited. 737 413 70.2 45 235 What things cause trouble in marriage? 4 730 393 66.8 46 65 I wish I could write good letters of application. 727 389 66.1 47 42 I would like to know more definitely how I am doing in my schoolwork. 724 409 69.5 85 My feelings are easily hurt. 724 397 67.4 48 269 I'm having difficulty deciding what's important in l i f e . 722 414 70.4 49 126 I want to learn how to act on formal occasions. 720 399 67.8 50 52 Do I have the ability to do college work? 718 353 59.0 51 182 I wish I could be of more help to my family. 714 395 67.2 52 274 What can I do about the injustice a l l around us? 713 398 67.7 53 273 How can I help to make the world a better place in which to live? 712 386 65.6 54 75 I have trouble keeping my temper. 708 407 69.2 55 276 I'm worried about the next war. 706 377 64.1 56 282 How can I learn to get the most for my money? 705 404 68.7 57 124 I need to be more tactful. 701 410 69.7 58 294 What makes people selfish or unkind? 696 387 65.8 59 35 I wish I understood science better. 695 341 57.9 60 ' 129 I want to feel important to society or to my own group. 686 395 67.2 61 113 I'm afraid of making mistakes. 681 409 69.5 62 88 I often do things I later regret. 678 406 69.0 63 97 I must always be "on the go". 675 373 63.4 64 146 I don't know how much of my inner feelings to reveal to my friends. 674 387 79.7 65 267 How does one set standards of "right" and "wrong"? 662 369 62.7 66 121 I need to learn how to treat people whom I don't like. 658 389 66.1 67 30 I have difficulty expressing myself in words. 651 398 67.7 68 18 I need some individual help with my courses. 647 410 69.7 241 I'm concerned about improving my figure. 647 318 54.1 69 105 237 I'm afraid of failure or humiliation. I want to learn how to select foods that will 639 404 68.7 do me the most good. 639 379 64.4 70 234 How can I prepare myself for marriage and family life? 637 364 61.9 71 81 I feel guilty about things I've done. 634 388 65.9 72 250 I don't get enough sleep. 633 343 58.2 73 292 I wonder about the after-life. 629 320 54.4 74 1 I want to learn how to read better. 627 376 63.9 75 127 I'm i l l at ease at social affairs. 626 369 62.7 76 44 I want to know more about what people do in college. 624 330 56.1 53. Question Rank Number Question Score Number of % of Value Choices N 77 58 What vocational fields are overcrowded? 620 341 57 .9 78 280 How can I learn to use my leisure time wisely? 618 364 61 .9 79 71 What is proper office etiquette? 617 355 59 .3 80 208 I don't know how to keep (boys) (girls) interested in me. 613 349 59 .3 281 I have difficulty budgeting my time. 613 361 61 .4 81 232 What things should one consider in selecting a mate? 612 345 58 .7 82 275 I'm mixed up about world affairs. 608 351 76 .5 83 56 I want to learn a trade. 605 318 31 .9 84 100 I would like to discuss my personal problems with someone. 600 336 57 .1 85 83 I often feel lonesome. 599 349 58.3 133 How much initiative should I take in getting invited to parties or dances? 599 310 52 .7 86 163 I wish our home-life were more pleasant. 595 298 50 .6 87 29 I need to learn how to spell better. 593 316 53 .7 88 270 I'm confused on some moral questions. 587 359 61 .1 89 130 I wish I had things to talk about in a group. 586 349 76 .2 90 167 I feel that there's a barrier between me and my parents. 584 310 52 .7 91 36 I would like to take part in athletics. 583 327 55 .6 284 What can I contribute to civilization? 583 340 57 .7 92 96 I feel that I'm not as smart as other people. 581 350 59 .5 93 296 What can I do about juvenile delinquency? 580 338 57 .4 94 25 It would be better i f my teachers didn't play favourites. 578 320 54 .4 101 I wonder i f I am normal in the way my mind works. 578 314 53 .3 95 14 My courses are too far removed from everyday li f e . 574 369 62 .7 96 286 I need to develop a satisfactory philosophy of l i f e . 573 331 56 .3 97 214 I don't know how to break up with a person I have been dating without causing bad feelings. 571 298 50 .6 98 10 192 I have too much homework. I'm afraid to t e l l my parents when I've done 569 347 58 .9 something wrong. 569 352 59 .8 99 135 I need to learn to be more tolerant of other people's opinions. 565 361 61 .4 100 8 I would like to take courses that are not offered in my school. 564 292 49 .6 287 I can't decide whether or not money is the major thing to work for in l i f e . 564 333 56 .6 101 291 Does i t really pay to be honest? 563 309 52 .5 102 258 I want to get rid of pimples. 561 349 58 .3 103 211 How do I refuse a date politely? 559 309 52 .5 104 107 I bite my nails. 558 255 43 .3 105 86 I need to learn not to let people push me around. 555 320 54 .4 106 34 219 It costs too much for a l l the "extras" at school. How can I keep (boys) (girls) from taking me for 554 321 54 .6 granted? 554 324 55 .1 107 203 My parents avoid discussing sex with me. 550 286 48 .6 108 158 Many people have the wrong idea about me. 545 334 56 .8 54. Question Score Number of % of lank Number Question Value • Choices N 109 290 What is eternity? 543 292 49.6 110 45 Should I go to college? 541 272 46.2 111 191 I feel like leaving home. 540 288 48.9 112 125 I wish I knew how to drop a person I no longer want for a friend. 538 299 50.7 113 53 I would like to have more vocational courses. 537 319 32.1 114 293 Is i t wrong to deny the existance of God? 535 275 46.8 115 90 I lack the drive others have. 534 346 58.8 116 26 I wish my teachers understood me better. 533 323 54.8 117 180 I wish my parents would let me make more of my own decisions. 531 291 49.4 118 55 What are some careers for girls? 523 253 59.0 119 233 How long should people know each other before getting married? I'm confused in my religious beliefs. 526 296 50.3 120 263 518 297 50.4 121 4 I have difficulty taking notes. 517 347 58.9 122 249 I get tired easily. 516 303 51.5 123 19 I wish my teachers would give me encouragement. 515 318 54.1 266 I'm searching for something to believe in. 515 278 47.2 124 204 I seldom have dates. 513 287 48.7 125 46 137 What are the requiremetns for college? There aren't enough places for wholesome 510 295 50.1 recreation where I live. 510 273 46.3 126 198 I wish our family would do more things together. 509 280 47.6 127 151 I have difficulty deciding between my own standards and those of my crowd. 508 297 50.4 128 197 My parents continually nag about studying. 507 290 49.3 129 150 I'd like to know how to become a leader in my group. 504 294 49.0 271 Can I believe the newspapers and radio? 504 322 54.7 130 156 I can't seem to live up to the ideals I have set for myself. 501 315 53.5 131 99 I must learn to "keep my head" when things go wrong. 499 318 54.1 132 15 I must select a vocation that doesn't require college. 498 244 41.5 32 I wish I could take part in extracurricular activities. 498 304 51.7 248 I don't get enough exercise. 498 315 53.5 133 161 I wish I had a quiet place at home where I could s tudy. 495 258 43.9 134 279 What can I do to help get. better government? 493 322 54.7 135 21 I wish my teachers made assignments more clear. 490 370. 63.0 136 95 227 I hesitate to take responsibility. How far should high school students go in love 486 315 53.5 relations? 486 294 49.0 137 199 My parents hate to admit that I'm sometimes right. 485 279 47.4 138 212 I'm bothered by dirty stories or vulgar talk. 481 294 49.0 139 285 I'm losing faith in religion. 480 261 44.4 140 119 I need to learn how to introduce people properly. 479 318 54.1 265 I feel that I'm not living up to my religion. 479 274 46.6 141 54 How can I get apprenticeship training? 477 251 42.7 142 111 I wish I could overcome being careless. 473 308 35.4 154 I don't have a (gir) (boy) friend. 473 236 40.1 185 I wish I could get my parents to treat me like a grownup. 473 284 48.2 55 Question Rank Number Question Score Number of % of Value Choices N 143 209 I don't know what to do on a date. 471 294 49.0 144 51 How do you make application to enter college? 469 266 45.2 84 I feel "low" much of the time. 469 297 50.4 145 288 How can we get honest government? 466 290 49.3 146 226 I think about sex a good deal of the time. 462 307 52.2 147 82 I'm not popular with (boys) (girls). 461 300 51.0 112 I'm always thinking up alibis. 461 311 52.9 148 272 How can I help get rid of intolerance? 456 297 50.2 149 28 My teachers aren't interested in the things that interest me. 452 297 50.4 136 I need to learn how to plan a party. 452 287 48.7 150 162 I can't get along with my brothers and sisters. 451 271 46.0 151 128 I want to learn to dance. 449 271 46.0 152 134 I need to learn to be a good listener. 448 285 48.4 153 283 Does one have to take advantage of people in order to be successful? 445 288 48.9 154 9 I dislike most of my courses. 443 270 45.9 110 I don't know what is expected of me. 443 256 43.5 155 48 Can I get into the college of my choice? 439 248 42.2 24 I wish my teachers were warm and friendly people. 439 279 47.4 156 78 I can't sleep at night. 434 251 42.7 143 I'm often left out of things other kids do. 434 293 48.8 157 171 I don't like to invite people to my home. 433 247 42.0 158 179 My parents expect too much of me. 432 284 48.2 159 103 I feel that I'm different from the other kids. 431 260 44.2 160 27 Class periods are not well organized. 427 303 51.5 161 47 How shall I select a college? 420 235 39.9 98 I prefer to be alone. 420 271 46.0 162 164 I feel that I'm a burden on my parents. 418 254 43.2 163 50 What are some ways of financing a college education? 417 238 40.5 164 261 My eyes bother me. 415 260 44.2 165 138 I need to learn what clothes to wear on different occasions. 413 281 47.7 166 196 My parents often pry into my private affairs. 410 247 42.0 167 215 Is there anything wrong with going places "stag"? 406 249 42.3 168 228 I need more correct information about sex. 405 282 47.9 169 87 I don't see much future for myself. 394 248 42.2 170 210 What are good manners on a date? 393 263 44.7 171 108 I can't help feeling bad when I can't get my own way. 392 300 51.0 172 49 I wish I could afford college. 390 219 37.2 173 155 I am not attractive to the other sex. 389 268 45.6 174 251 I have no "pep". 387 228 38.8 175 195 My family is always worried about money. 386 294 49.0 176 177 My parents don't usually respect my opinions. 383 227 38.6 177 178 My parents don't trust me. 384 222 37.7 178 289 Can I believe advertising? 382 275 46.8 179 247 I worry about my health. 381 265 45.0 180 264 I'm bothered by thoughts of Heaven and Hell. 380 238 40.5 181 22 I'd like my teachers to be more interested in me. 379 257 43.7' 141 I need to learn how to get along with people my own age. 379 255 43.3 56. Q u e s t i o n S c o r e N u m b e r o f % o f R a n k N u m b e r Q u e s t i o n V a l u e C h o i c e s N 182 2 0 2 'My- p a r e n t s * " c r i t i c i z e vine t o o m u c h . 3 7 7 2 4 8 4 2 . 2 2 6 0 I w o n d e r i f I ' m n o r m a l i n my e n e r g y a n d e n d u r a n c e . 3 7 7 2 4 2 4 1 . 1 1 8 3 149 I n e e d t o l e a r n how t o w o r k b e t t e r w i t h o t h e r s . 3 7 5 2 7 8 4 7 . 2 1 8 4 2 6 8 I ' m c o n c e r n e d a b o u t c h e a t i n g . 3 7 4 2 6 5 4 5 . 0 185 2 1 6 I s i t a l l r i g h t t o a c c e p t " b l i n d d a t e s " ? 3 6 5 2 5 2 4 2 . 8 186 2 2 0 S h o u l d I g o " s t e a d y " ? 3 6 3 2 1 2 3 6 . 0 187 2 2 4 I w o n d e r i f h i g h s c h o o l s t u d e n t s s h o u l d p e t a n d m a k e l o v e ? 359 2 2 5 3 8 . 3 1 8 8 12 I w i s h I c o u l d q u i t s c h o o l n o w . 3 5 6 189 3 2 . 1 189 189 I w i s h I c o u l d g a i n t h e c o n f i d e n c e o f my p a r e n t s . 3 5 5 2 1 1 3 5 . 9 190 1 1 7 I t h i n k o t h e r p e o p l e g e t a l l t h e b r e a k s . 3 5 2 2 4 7 4 2 . 0 191 2 1 7 I s d r i n k i n g h a r m f u l ? 351 2 1 6 3 5 . 7 192 9 4 I ' m n o t r e a d y f o r a n y j o b w h e n I g r a d u a t e . 3 4 9 2 2 0 3 7 . 4 1 9 3 2 1 3 I w o n d e r i f I am n o r m a l i n my s e x u a l d e v e l o p m e n t . 3 4 4 2 1 3 3 6 . 2 2 3 8 I s m o k e t o o m u c h . 3 4 4 1 7 4 2 9 . 6 1 9 4 2 2 1 S h o u l d I k i s s my d a t e t h e f i r s t t i m e we g o o u t t o g e t h e r ? 3 4 2 2 2 7 3 8 . 6 195 145 I w i s h I k n e w h o w t o u s e c o s m e t i c s p r o p e r l y . 3 4 0 2 0 6 3 5 . 0 196 1 7 3 I am s e l d o m c o n s u l t e d i n f a m i l y " d e c i s i o n s . 3 3 5 2 0 7 3 5 . 2 1 9 7 2 3 1 I w a n t t o k n o w a b o u t v e n e r e a l d i s e a s e . 3 3 4 2 1 9 3 7 . 2 1 9 8 2 5 2 My t e e t h n e e d a t t e n t i o n . 3 3 2 2 2 0 3 7 . 4 199 166 My a l l o w a n c e i s t o o s m a l l . 3 2 7 179 3 0 . 4 169 I w i s h my f a t h e r w a s n ' t s o s t r i c t . 3 2 7 180 3 0 . 6 2 0 0 1 7 4 My p a r e n t s p l a y f a v o u r i t e s . 326 1 8 0 3 0 . 6 201 176 I g e t n o e n c o u r a g e m e n t a t h o m e . 3 2 5 2 0 7 3 5 . 2 2 0 2 2 5 3 I h a v e f r e q u e n t h e a d a c h e s . 3 1 7 1 9 4 3 2 . 9 2 0 3 175 My p a r e n t s a r e t o o s t r i c t a b o u t l e t t i n g me u s e t h e f a m i l y c a r . 3 1 3 159 2 7 . 0 2 5 4 I h a v e f r e q u e n t c o l d s . 3 1 3 2 2 0 3 7 . 4 2 0 4 170 I w i s h my m o t h e r w a s n ' t s o s t r i c t . 3 1 1 1 9 4 3 2 . 9 2 0 5 1 4 4 I n e e d t o l e a r n h o w t o s e l e c t t h e r i g h t c l o t h e s f o r my f i g u r e . 3 0 7 2 0 4 3 4 . 7 206 132 I n e e d t o l e a r n h o w t o k e e p f r o m b e i n g t o o a g g r e s s i v e . 3 0 4 2 2 0 3 7 . 4 2 0 7 9 2 I f e e l t h a t I ' m n o t w a n t e d . 3 0 1 2 1 3 3 6 . 2 2 0 8 1 4 7 I n e e d t o l e a r n t o b e o n t i m e f o r a p p o i n t m e n t s . 2 9 9 196 3 3 . 2 209 140 I ' d l i k e t o l e a r n p r o p e r t a b l e m a n n e r s . 29 7 2 3 4 3 9 . 7 2 1 0 2 0 5 I d o n ' t k n o w h o w t o a s k f o r a d a t e . 296 166 2 8 . 2 211 131 I c a n ' t l i v e u p t o t h e i d e a l s s e t b y g r o u p s t o w h i c h I b e l o n g . 2 9 2 2 0 4 3 4 . 7 2 4 3 My s t o m a c h i s u p s e t e a s i l y . 2 9 2 190 3 2 . 3 2 1 2 1 8 7 I w i s h my f a t h e r h a d a h i g h e r - l e v e l j o b . 290 179 3 0 . 4 2 1 3 109 I d o n ' t k n o w w h y p e o p l e g e t a n g r y w i t h m e . 2 8 9 2 1 6 3 6 . 7 2 1 4 186 I w i s h I h a d my own r o o m . 2 8 7 130 2 2 . 1 2 1 5 1 4 8 I n e e d t o l e a r n h o w t o o r d e r f o o d i n a r e s t a u r a n t . 286 2 1 0 3 5 . 7 216 2 4 4 W h a t c a n I d o a b o u t b a d b r e a t h ? 2 8 4 2 0 8 3 5 . 4 2 1 7 115 I c a n ' t d o a n y t h i n g r i g h t . 2 8 3 2 1 3 3 6 . 2 1 9 4 My p a r e n t s a r e t o o s t r i c t a b o u t p e r m i t t i n g me t o d a t e o n s c h o o l n i g h t s . 2 8 3 160 2 7 . 2 2 1 8 2 1 7 I s d r i n k i n g h a r m f u l ? 2 8 2 2 1 6 3 5 . 7 219 1 8 8 I ' m s o m e t i m e s a s h a m e d o f my f a m i l y . 2 7 6 1 8 2 3 0 . 9 2 4 6 W h a t c a n I d o a b o u t b o d y o d o r ? 2 7 6 2 0 8 3 5 . 3 2 2 0 190 I w a n t t o g e t m a r r i e d s o o n . 2 7 5 151 2 5 . 7 2 2 1 2 4 5 I s s m o k i n g h a r m f u l ? 2 6 9 175 2 9 . 8 2 2 2 2 2 5 I n e e d a n a c c e p t a b l e v o c a b u l a r y t o d i s c u s s s e x . 2 6 5 1 9 7 3 3 . 4 57 lank Question Number Question S core Value Number of Choices % of N 223 172 I don't fee.1 that I belong in the family. 263 155 26.4 224 80 I have thoughts of suicide. 257 163 27.7 225 91 People stare at me. 249 169 28.7 226 23 I wish my teachers weren't so strict. 240 188 31.9 227 240 I have trouble with my menstrual periods. 236 140 23.8 228 106 My nose is ugly. 230 164 27.9 193 I feel disloyal because I don't share the views of my parents. 230 161 27.4 229 256 My muscles are poorly developed. 228 176 30.0 230 222 Must I neck to be popular? 227 148 25.2 231 142 I need to learn to be a "good sport" in games. 224 180 30.6 232 183 Others don't approve of the person I'm dating. 223 137 23.3 233 259 I sometimes feel faint. 220 156 26.6 234 201 My parents aren't interested in what I accomplish. 219 147 25.0 235 218 Should I date a person of a different religion than mine? . 215 140 23.8 236 93 I have a "crush" on an older person. 213 110 18.7 237 165 I have to do too many chores around the house. 205 148 25.2 238 116 I don't want to leave home for a job or college. 199 133 22.6 239 7 I spend too much time studying. 197 48 8.2 240 157 I'm in with the wrong crowd. 193 133 22.6 241 223 I'm embarrassed in any discussion of sex. 192 148 25.2 242 33 Riding the school bus takes too much time each day. 179 89 15.2 243 200 My parents are cold toward my friends. 178 116 19.7 244 230 I have conflicting information about sexual matters . 175 145 24.6 245 257 I have no appetite. 169 118 20.0 246 206 There is no place to dance in the town where I live . 146 97 16.5 247 255 I don't hear very well. 144 100 17.0 248 184 I have too many dates. 142 104 17.7 249 20 My teachers make fun of me. 126 100 17.0 250 239 I am crippled (or have some other handicap). 89 48 8.2 251 61 How will the draft affect me? 77 43 7.2 252 89 People dislike my race or nationality. 58 41 6.9 253 229 I don't understand how children are born. 55 46 7.8 254 73 I need help in planning for my military service. 50 32 5.4 APPENDIX C RANKED PROBLEM CHOICES by ACADEMIC PROGRAMME SUB-GROUPS TOTAL MALE SAMPLE; Carson Graham and L e s t e r Pearson 1. N = 258 Academic- Community T o t a l Sample T e c h n i c a l I n d u s t r i a l Commercial S e r v i c e s A l l Programmes Programme Programme Programme Programme N = 258 N = 139 N = 79 N = 30 N = 6 No. % Quest ion Score of ^ No. .Value Choices . ° . . . . s _ v N o . % s _ v N o . % s _ v N o . % s _ v N o . % V i s u a l and Per forming A r t s Programme N = 4 S-V No. 1 322 188 73.3 155 93 67.1 115 66 83.8 41 24 79.2 9 4 66.7 2 1 25 2 508 237 92 .4 277 128 92.2 161 74 93.9 57 28 92.4 11 6 100.0 2 1 25 3 163 127 47.3 78 61 43.9 53 44 55.9 27 18 59.4 4 3 50.0 1 1 "25 4 256 159 62.0 128 83 59.8 83 49 62.2 37 21 69.3 6 4 66.7 2 2 50 5 416 221 86.2 242 117 84.2 139 73 92 .7 22 24 79.2 8 4 66.7 5 3 75 6 377 190 74.1 206 102 73.4 117 59 74.9 42 24 79.2 7 3 50.0 5 2 50 7 67 55 21.6 37 30 21.6 22 18 22.9 5 4 13.2 3 3 50.0 0 0 0 8 236 125 49.7 115 61 43.9 79 41 52.1 32 18 59.4 7 4 66.7 3 1 25 9 215 122 48.5 123 73 52.6 51 29 36 .8 28 17 56.1 3 2 33.4 3 1 25 10 206 131 51.1 123 81 58.3 45 31 39.4 33 15 49.5 5 4 66 .7 0 0 0 11 350 189 73.7 178 100 72.0 110 58 73.7 49 24 79.2 8 5 83.4 5 2 50 12 168 86 33.5 78 41 29.5 66 34 44.4 24 11 36.3 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 353 198 77.2 187 106 76.3 112 61 77.4 44 24 79.2 7 4 66.7 3 3 75 14 274 169 65.9 176 101 72.7 63 44 55.9 32 21 69.3 2 2 33.4 1 1 25 15 240 114 44.4 60 35 25.6 106 49 62.2 61 24 79.2 10 5 83.4 3 1 25 16 396 175 76.0 192 105 75.6 144 62 78.7 48 22 72.6 9 4 66.7 3 2 50 17 370 190 74.1 193 102 73 .4 128 62 .78.7 37 21 69.3 9 4 66 .7 3 1 25 18 291 175 68.3 170 100 72.0 78 49 62.2 35 21 69.3 4 3 50.0 4 2 40 19 226 140 54.6 122 73 52.6 64 40 50.8 31 22 72.6 3 3 50.0 6 2 , 50 20 71 53 20.8 39 28 20.2 16 14 17 .8 12 8 26.4 2 2 33.4 2 1 25 21 199 133 51.9 103 68 49.2 58 41 52.1 26 16 52.8 7 5 83.4 5 3 75 22 160 108 42.1 88 60 43.2 40 27 34.3 23 16 52.8 3 3 50.0 6 2 50 23 109 81 31.6 60 45 32.4 28 20 25.4 17 12 39.6 2 2 33.4 2 2 50 24 187 115 44.6 92 58 41.8 58 35 44.4 25 16 52.8 6 4 66 .7 6 2 50 25 235 130 50.7 120 67 68.2 70 40 50 .8 36 18 59.4 2 2 33.4 7 3 75 26 254 149 58.1 146 85 6.1.2 74 41 52.1 27 19 62.7 2 2 33.4 5 2 50 27 190 133 51.9 108 .76 54.7 48 32 40.6 28 19 62.7 3 3 50.0 3 3 75 28 236 142 55.4 127 81 58.3 75 39 49.5 28 18 59.4 3 3 50.0 3 1 25 29 277 145 56.6 104 60 43.2 109 55 69.9 43 21 69.3 14 6 100.0 7 3 75 30 317 175 68 .3 171 108 77.8 102 54 68.6 35 18 59.4 7 4 66 .7 2 1 25 31 431 190 74.1 244 103 74.2 128 59 74.9 46 22 72.6 11 5 83.4 2 1 25 32 205 128 49.7 99 65 46.8 62 41 52.1 36 18 59.4 5 2 33.4 3 2 50 33 96 41 15.9 36 24 17.3 33 13 16.5 4 3 9.9 3 1 16.7 0 0 0 34 225 133 51.9 116 73 52.6 71 38 48.3 34 19. 62.7 2 2 33.4 2 1 25 2,-Total Sample All Programmes N = 258 Question No. Score Value No. of Choices % of N. Academi c-Technical Programme N = 139 Industrial Programme N = 79 Commercial Programme N = 30 Community Services Programme N = 6 S-V No. S-V No. S-V No. S-V No. Visual and Performing Arts Programme N = 4 S-V No. 35 287 .145 56.6 19.6 96 69.2 60 36 263 147 57.4 122 79 56.9 90 37 454 221 86.2 248 124 89.3 132 38 407 189 73.7 219 105 75.6 125 39 442 198 77.2 237 108 77.8 126 40 450 206 80.3 253 117 84.2 127 41 .479 228 88.4 264 127 91.5 139 42 296 175 68.3 152 88 63.4 73 43 357 186 72.5 197 104 74.9 85 44 288 148 57.8 208 103 74.2 39 45 255 131 51.1 183 90 64.9 36 46 259 143 55.8 178 101 72.7 42 47 202 110 42.9 143 80 57.6 128 48 202 116 45.0 141 84 60.5 25 49 175 100 39.0 129 72 51.8 24 50 182 105 40.9 135 77 55.4 25 51 227 126 48.9 168 95 68.5 35 52 339 164 64.0 232 109 78.5 65 53 251 151 58.9 91 64 46.1 112 54 243 127 49.3 68 42 30.2 117 55 29 17 6.6 11 6 4.3 10 56 290 155 60.4 94 59 42.5 138 57 472 219 85.4 248 120 86.4 153 58 289 155 60.4 126 71 51.1 104 59 472 211 82.3 288 120 86.4 137 60 318 166 64.8 141 77 55.4 123 61 58 29 11.3 31 17 12.2 20 62 399 201 78.4 223 114 82.1 104 63 444 206 80.3 203 105 75.6 154 64 402 192 74.9 197 103 74.2 136 65 309 168 65.5 143 81 58.3 115 66 316 187 72.9 153 102 73.4 113 67 353 175 68.3 171 93 67.1 120 68 300 165 64.4 151 87 62.6 101 69 347 180 70.2 172 95 68.5 120 70 308 182 71.0 148 95 68.5 110 31 39.4 24 14 46.2 6 3 50.0 1 1 25 45 57.2 42 19 62.7 7 3 50.0 2 1 25 65 82.6 57 25 82.5 9 4 66.7 8 3 75 58 73.7 43 20 66.0 17 5 83.4 3 1 25 59 74.9 61 24 79.2 12 5 83.4 6 2 50 61 77.4 57 . 23 75.9 10 4 66.7 3 1 25 67 85.1 59 26 85.8 13 6 100.0 4 2 50 54 68.6 48 27 89.1 7 3 50.0 6 3 75 52 66.0 60 23 75.9 12 6 100.0 3 1 25 22 27.9 33 18 59.4 6 4 66.7 2 1 25 23 29.2 31 15 49.5 5 3 50.0 0 0 0 23 29.2 29 16 52.8 3 2 33.4 1 1 25 19 24.1 20 10 33.0 3 1 16.7 0 0 0 18 22.9 24 13 42.9 2 1 16.7 0 0 0 17 21.6 22 11 36.3 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 21.6 22 11 36.3 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 25.4 21 10 33.0 3 1 16.7 0 0 0 35 34.4 35 16 52.8 7 4 66.7 0 0 0 60 76.2 40 22 72.6 6 4 66.7 2 1 25 58 73.7 41 19 62.7 13 6 100.0 4 2 50 6 7.6 8 5 16.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 67 85.1 43 23 75.9 11 4 66.7 4 2 50 68 86.4 54 24 79.2 11 5 83.4 6 2 50 55 69.9 47 23 75.9 8 4 66.7 4 2 50 58 73.7 29 26 85.8 14 5 83.4 4 2 50 62 78.7 48 24 79.2 6 3 50.0 0 0 0 9 11.4 6 2 6.7 0 0 0 1 1 25 55 69.9 54 24 79.2 11 5 83.4 7 3 75 68 86.4 69 25 82.5 12. 5 83.4 6 3 73 61 77.4 53 22 72.6 12 4 66.7 4 2 50 58 73.7 41 21 69.3 9 6 100.0 1 1 25 61 77.4 44 21 69.3 6 3 50.0 0 0 0 56 71.1 48 20 66.0 11 4 66.7 3 2 50 55 69.9 36 16 52.8 8 5 83.4 4 2 50 55 69.9 43 20 66.0 7 3 50.0 5 2 50 62 78.7 42 20 66.0 6 3 50.0 2 2 50 O N o 3 Total Sample A l l Programmes N = 258 Academic-Technical Programme N = 139 Industrial Programme N =79 Commercial Programme N = 30 Communi ty Services Programme N = 6 Visual and Performing Arts Programme N = 4 No. Question Score Of No. Value Choices % of . N. S-V No. % S-V No. . % S-V No. % S-V No. % S-V No. % 71 233 138 53.8 108 76 54.7 76 72 424 198 77.2 237 116 83.5 120 73 42 28 10.9 23 16 11.5 10 74 259 166 64.8 129 85 61.2 76 75 286 169 65.9 148 93 67.1 80 76 319 188 73.3 187 106 76.3 81 77 294 168 65.5 164 94 67.8 81 78 177 100 39.0 89 55 39.6 55 79 310 175 68.3 163 93 67.1 86 80 82 54 21.1 38 26 18.7 23 81 245 157 61.2 131 82 59.0 78 82 190 122 48.5 105 64 46.1 48 83 219 135 52.7 120 74 53.3 58 84 192 123 48.9 112 71 51.1 41 85 255 156 60.8 133 84 60.5 75 86 236 147 57.4 125 78 56.2 72 87 208 126 48.9 99 62 44.7 62 88 283 174 67.9 154 99 71.3 78 89 28 24 9.4 14 13 9.4 11 90 246 156 60.8 137 ' 87 58.3 65 91 85 63 24.6 34 24 17.3 28 92 103 77 30.0 56 43 30.9 26 93 43 24 9.4 17 9 6.4 19 94 136 84 32.3 69 46 33.1 35 95 232 140 54.6 124 85 61.2 63 96 230 144 56.2 115 75 54.0 68 97 297 165 64.4 151 90 64.9 94 98 199 124 49.3 107 64 46.1 53 99 167 122 48.5 85 64 46.1 52 100 183 117 45.4 96 68 49.2 48 101 229 132 51.5 133 80 57.6 60 102 350 188 73.3 200 103 74.2 103 103 182 108 42.1 113 64 46.1 36 104 309 160 62.4 163 85 61.2 91 105 307 173 67.5 181 102 73.4 74 106 81 60 23.4 41 31 22.3 23 45 57.2 35 20 66.0 9 4 66.7 5 3 75 54 68.6 53 22 72.6 11 5 83.4 3 2 50 8 10.2 4 2 6.7 5 2 33.4 0 0 0 51 64.8 41 24 79.2 7 5 83.4 6 2 50 47 59.7 41 22 72.6 8 4 66.7 9 3 75 44 55.9 39 23 75.9 6 3 50.0 6 2 50 48 60.9 37 20 66.0 4 3 50.0 8 3 75 26 33.0 25 15 49.5 3 2 33.4 5 2 50 51 64.8 51 26 85.8 5 3 50.0 5 2 50 14 17.8 14 10 33.0 4 3 50.0 3 1 25 50 63.5 28 19 62.7 6 4 66.7 2 2 50 34 43.2 31 19 62.7 5 4 66.7 1 1 25 38 48.3 35 19 62.7 3 3 50.0 3 1 25 28 35.6 33 19 62.7 3 3 50.0 3 2 50 43 54.6 39 24 79.2 3 3 50.0 5 2 50 44 55.9 28 18 59.4 8 5 83.4 3 2 50 39 49.5 35 18 59.4 8 5 83.4 4 2 50 47 59.7 36 19 62.7 10 6 100.0 5 3 75 8 10.2 2 2 6.7 0 0 0 1 1 25 44 55.9 36 20 66.0 4 3 50.0 4 2 50 22 27.9 21 15 49.5 1 1 16.7 1 1 25 19 24.1 18 12 39.6 1 1 16.7 2 2 50 11 13.9 3 2 6.7 1 1 16.7 3 1 25 22 27.9 24 11 36.3 5 3 50.0 3 2 50 40 50.8 35 21 69.3 5 3 50.0 5 3 75 42 53.3 39 21 69.3 6 4 66.7 2 2 50 49 62.2 44 22 72.6 4 2 33.4 4 2 50 37 46.9 30 18 59.4 5 3 50.0 4 2 50 36 45.7 18 16 52.8 4 3 50.0 8 3 75 30 38.1 24 13 42.9 6 3 50.0 9 3 75 34 43.2 23 12 39.6 6 3 50.0 7 3 75 57 72.4 34 21 69.3 6 3 50.0 7 4 100 24 30.4 27 16 52.8 2 2 33.4 4 2 50 48 60.9 35 19 62.7 13 . 5 83.4 7 3 75 44 55.9 43 22 72.6 4 3 50.0 5 2 50 18 22.8 11 8 26.4 5 2 33.4 1 1 25 ON H Total Sample All Programmes N =258 . Academic-Technical Programme N = 139 Industrial Programme N = 79 Commercial Programme N = 30 Community Services Programme N = 6 Visual and i Performing Art; Programme N = 4 Question No. Score Value No. of Choices % of N. S-V No. S-V No. % S-V No. S-V No. S-V No. 107 227 111 43.3 109 56 40.3 69 34 43.2 36 16 52.8 10 4 66.7 3 1 25 108 118 101 39.4 62 55 39.6 29 25 31.8 22 17 56.1 2 2 33.4 3 2 50 109 103 79 30.8 51 39 28.1 31 25 31.8 19 11 36.3 1 1 16.7 1 1 25 110 174 123 48.9 100 69 49.7 43 31 39.4 25 19 62.7 4 3 50.0 2 1 25 111 221 140 54.6 121 80 57.6 49 35 44.4 26 20 66.0 3 3 50.0 2 2 50 112 192 130 50.7 102 69 49.7 58 35 44.4 24 22 72.6 5 3 50.0 3 1 25 113 279 171 66.7 149 92 66.3 74 47 59.7 44 25 82.5 7 4 66.7 5 3 75 114 250 131 51.1 140 76 54.7 78 40 50.8 25 12 39.6 4 2 33.4 3 1 25 115 107 79 30.8 53 38 27.4 35 28 35.6 16 10 33.0 3 3 50.0 0 0 0 116 56 43 16.7 28 22 15.8 18 15 19.1 5 3 9.9 2 2 33.4 3 1 25 117 174 124 49.3 94 69 49.7 51 36 45.7 28 18 59.4 1 1 16.7 0 0 0 118 326 190 74.1 183 107 77.0 91 54 68.6 42 22 72.6 7 6 100.0 3 1 25 119 194 138 53.8 103 71 51.1 50 35 44.4 30 18 59.4 2 2 33.4 4 2 50 120 305 171 66.7 172 95 68.5 87 50 63.5 39 22 72.6 4 2 33.4 3 2 50 121 246 149 58.1 135 84 60.5 64 39 49.5 40 21 69.3 4 3 50.0 3 2 50 122 369 181 70.6 205 107 77.0 110 56 71.1 46 23 75.9 5 3 50.0 3 2 50 123 378 195 76.0 216 111 79.9 110 55 69.9 46 24 79.2 6 5 83.4 0 0 0 124 289 177 69.1 153 95 68.5 91 54 68.6 35 21 69.3 6 5 83.4 4 2 50 125 210 118 45.8 120 70 50.4 55 33 41.9 27 11 36.3 5 3 50.0 3 1 25 126 293 167 65.1 163 96 69.2 77 44 55.9 43 21 69.3 8 5 83.4 2 1 25 127 273 159 62.0 144 87 62.6 75 43 54.6 - 44 22 72.6 6 5 83.4 4 2 50 128 222 141 55.0 129 80 57.6 66 40 50.8 15 14 46.2 8 4 66.7 4 3 75 129 317 180 70.2 188 110 79.2 77 42 53.3 40 21 69.3 7 5 83.4 5 2 50 130 258 148 57.8 140 85 61.2 66 39 49.5 38 20 66.0 2 2 33.4 2 2 50 131 148 94 36.7 77 53 38.2 33 23 29.2 29 .14 46.2 5 2 33.4 4 2 50 132 124 98 38.2 67 52 37.4 30 24 30.4 20 15 49.5 2 2 33.4 5 3 75 133 218 131 51.1 117 73 52.6 65 40 50.8 30 15 49.5 3 2 33.4 3 1 25 134 216 135 52.7 110 73 52.6 62 40 50.8 37 18 59.4 3 2 33.4 4 2 50 135 227 147 57.4 108 74 53.3 63 43 54.6 42 23 75.9 8 4 66.7 6 3 75 136 163 111 43.3 101 61 43.9 36 32 40.6 19 14 46.2 3 2 33.4 4 2 50 137 202 113 44.1 113 64 46.1 52 29 36.8 34 18 59.4 3 2 33.4 0 0 0 138 166 114 44.5 99 66 47.5 41 29 36.8 22 16 52.8 3 2 33.4 1 1 25 139 312 170 66.3 176 89 64.2 84 43 54.6 39 22 72.6 9 5 83.4 4 1 25 140 118 94 36.7 66 56 40.3 31 22 27.9 16 13 42.9 4 2 33.4 1 1 25 141 138 92 35,9 76 51 36.7 36 25 31.8 20 12 39.6 4 3 50.0 2 1 25 142 91 72 28.1 53 40 28.8 25 21 26.7 9 8 26.4 3 2 33.4 1 1 25 143 176 124 49.3 99 69 49.7 45 36 45.7 29 16 52.8 2 2 33,4 1 1 25 Total Sample All Programmes N = 258 Academic-Technical Programme N = 139 Industrial Programme N = 79 Commercial Programme N = 30 Community Services Programme N = 6 Visual and Performing Art Programme N = 4 Question Score No. of % of No. Value Choices N. S-V No. % S-V No. . . . % . . . S-V No. % S-V No. % S-V No. % 144 65 43 16.7 36 22 15.8 22 15 19.1 4 4 13.2 3 2 33.4 0 0 0 145 10 8 3.1 2 2 1.4 7 5 6.4 1 1 3.3 0 0 0 0 0 0 146 216 141 55.0 134 84 60.5 54 36 45.7 21 16 52.8 5 4 66.7 2 1 25 147 107 75 68.3 53 37 27.0 37 25 31.8 15 11 36.3 2 2 33.4 0 0 0 148 111 84 32.7 57 41 39.5 36 28 35.6 14 12 39.6 3 2 33.4 1 1 25 149 146 110 42.9 84 63 45.4 37 28 35.6 18 14 46.2 5 3 50.0 2 2 50 150 237 137 53.4 133 79 56.9 53 33 41.9 34 20 66.0 5 4 66.7 2 1 25 151 216 129 50.3 124 73 52.6 50 31 39.4 33 20 66.0 7 4 66.7 2 1 25 152 366 158 61.6 197 87 62.6 123 49 62.2 38 19 62.7 5 2 33.4 3 1 25 153 342 163 63.6 177 86 61.9 118 53" 67.3 41 21 69.3 2 1 16.7 4 2 50 154 234 113 44.1 137 65 46.8 67 35 44.4 24 11 36.3 6 2 33.4 0 0 0 155 172 118 45.8 96 65 46.8 "52 36 45.7 20 14 46.2 4 3 50.0 0 0 0 156 219 141 55.0 129 82 59.0 55 38 48.3 26 15 49.5 8 5 83.4 1 1 25 157 107 72 28.1 55 41 39.5 37 22 27.9 9 7 23.1 3 1 16.7 3 1 25 158 274 164 63.9 150 88 63.3 71 47 59.7 38 23 75.9 10 4 66.7 5 2 50 159 278 144 56.2 137 73 52.6 73 39 49.5 51 25 82.5 12 5 83.4 5 2 50 160 369 200 78.0 215 116 83.5 100 55 69.9 36 22 72.6 12 4 66.7 6 3 7 5 ! 161 216 112 1 43.7 135 68 49.2 51 28 35.6 20 12 39.6 7 3 50.0 3 1 25J 162 199 120 46.8 109 69 49.7 63 36 45.7 22 12 39.6 3 1 16.7 2 2 50 163 257 134 52.3 150 79 56.9 78 41 57.1 19 10 33.0 4 2 33.4 6 2 50 164 194 119 46.2 97 60 43.2 62 41 57.1 25 14 46.2 4 2 33.4 6 2 50 165 75 58 22.6 40 34 24.9 26 17 21.6 6 6 19.8 3 1 16.7 0 0 0 166 131 71 27.7 77 39 28.1 48 24 30.4 16 8 26.4 0 0 0 0 0 0 167 234 131 51.1 138 78 56.2 61 31 39.4 26 17 56.1 5 3 50.0 4 2 50 168 320 170 66.3 179 93 67.1 102 54 68.6 34 19 62.7 3 3 50.0 2 1 25 169 124 74 28.9 74 45 32.4 31 19 24.1 15 8 26.4 4 2 33.4 0 0 0 170 127 84 32.3 68 47 33.8 36 21 26.7 18 12 39.6 5 3 50.0 0 0 0 171 207 117 45.4 110 64 46.1 67 38 48.3 28 13 42.9 2 2 33.4 0 0 0 172 130 76 29.7 82 46 43.1 32 21 26.7 13 7 23.1 3 2 33.4 0 0 0 173 156 97 37.8 82 50 36.0 45 28 35.6 28 18 59.4 1 1 16.7 0 0 0 174 123 69 26.9 73 40 28.8 38 23 29.2 10 5 16.5 2 1 16.7 0 0 0 175 182 90 35.1 97 50 36.0 56 26 33.0 26 13 42.9 3 1 16.7 0 0 0 176 150 96 37.4 81 54 38.9 40 23 29.2 25 16 52.8 3 2 33.4 1 1 25 177 189 110 42.9 103 59 42.5 52 31 39.4 30 18 59.4 4 2 33.4 0 0 o1 178 185 109 42.5 88 52 37.4 70 38 48.3 21 15 49.5 5 3 50.0 1 1 25! 179 213 134 52.3 132 82 59.0 48 32 40.6 29 18 59.4 4 2 33.4 0 0 °l 180 233 129 50.3 131 72 51.9 68 37 46.9 26 16 52.8 5 3 50.0 3 1 25 v r V ' .*6. Academic- Communi ty V i s u a l and T o t a l Sample T e c h n i c a l I n d u s t r i a l Commerical S e r v i c e s Performing Art A l l Programmes Programme Programme Programme Programme Programme N = 258 N = 139 N = 79 N = 30 N = 6 N = 4 No. Question Score of No. Value Choices % of . N. S-V No. :. % . S-V No. ....%.. . S-V No. % . .'. S-V No. % S-V No. % 181 283 167 65.1 172 98 70.7 70 42 53.3 28 20 66.0 10 6 100.0 3 1 25 182 263 161 62.8 139 87 62.6 70 44 55.9 40 24 79.2 8 4 66.7 6 2 183 79 53 20.8 39 24 17.3 31 22 27.9 7 4 13.2 1 1 16.7 1 1 25, 184 63 47 18.3- 29 25 18.0 24 14 17.8 5 4 13.2 3 3 50.0 2 1 25 185 203 122 47.6 108 65 46.8 64 37 46.9 21 14 46.2 6f 4 66.7 4 1 25 186 107 53 20.8 64 30 21.6 27 16 20^3 11 5 16.5 5 2 33.4 0 0 0 187 139 85 32.7 84 48 34.6 46 27 34.3 12 7 23.1 7 3 50.0 0 0 0 188 108 72 28.1 58 38 27.7 35 26 33.0 14 7 23.1 1 1 16.7 0 0 o1 189 160 95 37.1 93 57 41.0 47 26 33.0 14 9 29.7 4 2 33.4 2 1 A 190 61 41 15.9 23 18 13.0 25 18 22.9 10 4 13.2 0 0 - 0 3 1 25 191 231 129 50.3 128 70 50.4 72 41 57.1 25 13 42.9 5 4 66.7 1 1 25 192 236 149 58.1 133 84 60.5 70 43 54.6 24 17 56.1 5 3 50.0 4 2 50 193 94 74 28.9 52 37 27.0 29 20 25.4 12 11 36.3 4 4 66.7 4 2 194 112 68 26.5 61 38 27.7 36 23 29.2 11 5 16.5 4 2 33.4 0 0 o 195 88 121 47.2 103 63 45.4 59 38 48.3 28 15 49.5 4 3 50.0 4 2 50' 196 195 117 45.4 113 66 47.5 59 36 45.7 21 13 42.9 1 1 16.7 1 1 25 197 270 146 57.0 163 85 61.2 66 38 48.3 33 19 62.7 8 4 66.7 0 0 0 198 223 122 48.5 109 69 49.7 42 30 38.1 24 17 56.1 8 5 83.4 1 1 25 199 223 128 49.9 119 69 49.7 66 40 50.8 31 16 52.8 5 2 33.4 2 1 25 200 92 61 23.8 44 30 21.6 32 21 26.7 11 6 19 .8 4 3 50.0 1 1 25| 201 90 63 24.6 40 30 21.6 37 24 30.4 9 6 19.8 3 2 33.4 1 1 25 202 173 113 44.1 90 63 45.4 57 34 43.2 24 14 46.2 1 1 16.7 1 1 25 203 249 133 51.9 142 76 54.7 68 37 46.9 32 16 52.8 5 3 50.0 2 1 2i 204 247 135 52.7 141 75 54.0 69 39 49.5 29 16 52.8 7 4 66.7 1 1 205 240 130 50.7 157 83 59.7 61 35 44.4 15 9 29.7 7 3 50.0 0 0 0 206 73 47 18.3 43 29 20.9 25 15 19.1 4 2 6.7 1 1 16.7 0 0 1 q 207 277 143 55.8 175 91 67.8 72 36 45.7 21 11 36.3 8 4 66.7 1 1 25 208 296 157 61.2 167 87 62.6 97 52 • 66.0 23 12 39.6 8 5 83.4 1 1 25 209 217 128 49.9 131 69 49.7 59 32 40.6 17 13 42.9 10 4 66.7 0 0 d 210 164 106 41.3 . 93 61 43.9 50 32 40.6 18 11 36.3 3 2 33.4 0 0 0 211 162 95 37.1 90 56 40.3 51 27 34.3 15 9 29.7 4 2 33.4 2 1 25 212 124 89 34.7 68 52 37.4 41 25 31.8 9 8 26.4 4 3 50.0 2 1 25 213 121 82 32.0 82 57 41.0 23 16 20.3 13 7 23.1 1 1 16.7 2 1 25 214 194 109 42.5 98 56 40.3 67 36 45.7 21 13 42.9 5 3 50.0 3 1 25 215 182 100 39.0 99 53 38.1 50 30 38.1 27 15 49.5 3 1 16.7 3 1 25 216 135 103 40.2 72 58 41.7 36 28 35.6 23 15 49.5 1 1 16.7 3 1 2i 217 171 104 40 .6 96 62 44.6 40 22 27.9 27 16 52.8 5 3 50.0 3 1 25 Total Sample . Al l Programmes N = 258 Academic-Technlcal Programme N = 139 Industrial Programme N = 79 Commercial Programme N =30 ' Community Services Programme N = 6 ' 7. Visual and Performing Arts Programme | N = 4 : Question No. Score Value No. of Choices % of . . .N. . . S-V . .No. . . % . . . S-V . . No. . . . .% . . S-V No. . % S-V No. % . : . S-V No. o /, I 218 87 56 22.0 43 30 21.6 29 17 21.6 14 9 29.7 0 0 : 0 0 0 i 0 219 196 118 45.8 120 70 50.4 50 31 39.4 22 13 42.9 3 3 50.0 1 1 25 220 162 95 37.1 108 63 45.4 37 21 26.7 16 10 33.0 1 1 16.7 0 0 C 221 137 99 38.6 89 54 38.9 37 27 34.3 10 7 23.1 1 1 16.7 0 0 c 222 91 81 31.6 59 41 29.5 21 14 17.8 9 5 16.5 2 1 16.7 0 0 c 223 78 58 22.8 48 35 25.6 22 18 22.9 7 4 13.2 1 1 16.7 0 0 0 224 139 91 35.4 80 54 38.9 33 21 26.7 21 12 39.6 4 3 50.0 1 1 1 25 225 105 82 32.0 66 44 31.7 28 23 29.2 14 11 36.3 5 3 50.0 2 1 I 25 226 228 148 57.4 124 85 61.2 67 41 52.1 26 16 52.8 7 4 66.7 4 2 50 227 215 134 52.3 119 77 55.4 59 38 48.3 28 13 42.9 5 4 66.7 4 2 50 228 160 109 42.5 81 57 41.0 45 33 41.9 29 14 46.2 4 4 66.7 1 1 2' 229 23 22 8.6 12 11 7.9 8 8 10.2 3 3 9.9 0 0 0 0 0 0 230 60 53 20.8 33 31 22.3 19 16 20.3 7 5 16.5 0 0 0 1 1 25 231 133 87 33.9 72 53 38.2 27 22 27.9 10 9 29,. 7 2 2 33.4 2 1 25 232 234 133 51.9 136 79 56.9 57 32 40.6 33 18 59.4 8 4 66.7 0 0 (1 233 192 113 44.1 117 65 46.8 50 30 38.1 15 14 46.2 6 3 50.0 4 1 25' 234 258 139 54.2 150 81 58.3 63 36 45.7 31 17 56.1 8 3 50.0 6 2 50 235 296 156 60.6 181 92 66.2 66 41 " : 57.1 38 18 59.4 5 3 50.0 6 2 50 236 320 165 64.4 172 90 64.9 90 47 59.7 48 23 75.9 6 3 50.0 4 2 50 237 247 152 59.3 138 88 63.3 61 38 48.3 37 20 66.0 7 3 50.0 4 3 75 238 197 98 38.2 90 48 34.6 64 32 40.6 25 12 39.6 12 4 66.7 6 2 50 239 55 35 13.7 28 19 13.7 13 9 11.4 7 4 13.2 1 1 16.7 6 2 5(; 240 4 2 0.8 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 3.3 1 1 16.7 0 0 ( 241 92 49 19.1 44 25 18.0 23 11 13.9 20 11 36.3 5 2 33.4 0 0 (! 242 351 194 75.6 206 111 79.9 96 56 71.1 38 22 , 72.6 5 2 33.4 6 3 7i 243 76 55 21.6 35 27 19.4 26 19 24.1 12 7 23.1 1 1 16.7 2 1 25 244 106 84 32.7 59 49 35.3 28 24 30.4 15 9 29.7 3 1 16.7 1 1 25 245 135 85 33.1 62 42 40.2 48 26 33.0 18 14 46.2 2 1 16.7 5 5(j 246 , 107 87 33.9 60 49 35.3 31 26 33.0 14 10 33.0 1 1 16.7 1 1 2\ 247 163 114 44.1 92 64 46.1 41 30 38.1 25 17 56.1 3 2 33.4 2 1 2i 248 175 124 49.3 99 73 52.6 49 32 40.6 20 15' 47.5 5 2 33.4 2 5(; 249 180 109 42.5 92 61 43.9 50 32 40.6 24 13 42.9 3 2 33". 4 1 1 l\ 250 240 137 53.4 142 79 56.9 63 35 44.4 29 18 59.4 5 4 66.7 1 1 2\ 251 156 118 45.8 84 68 49.2 45 29 36.8 22 16 52.8 4 4 66.7 1 1 21 252 151 95 37.1 66 45 32.4 51 28 35.6 28 19 62.7 5 2 33.4 1 1 21 253 92 59 23.0 33 24 17.3 31 19 24.1 24 12 39.6 2 2 33.4 2 2 5 ( i 254 126 91 35.4 63 41 39.5 32 27 34.3 27 20 66.0 1 1 16.7 3 2 5(' ON 8. Academic- Community Visual and Total Sample Technical Industrial Commerical Services Performing Arts A l l Programmes Programme Programme Programme Programme Programme . N = 258 N = 139 N = 79 N = 30 N = 6 N = 4  No. % Question Score of of No. Value Choices N. S-V No. % . S-V No. % S-V No. % S-V No. % S-V No. % 255 50 34 13.3 24 17 12.2 16 12 15.2 6 2 6.7 3 2 33.4 1 1 25 256 140 103 40.2 84 62 44.6 32 24 30.4 20 15 49.5 4 2 33.4 0 0 0 257 69 51 20.0 37 29 20.9 22 15 19.1 6 5 16.5 1 1 16.7 3 1 25 258 244 152 59:3 161 96 69.2 63 39 49.5 14 13 42.9 4 3 50.0 2 1 25 259 70 52 20,. 4 35 26 18.7 24 19 24.1 11 7 23.1 0 0 0 0 0 0 260 146 94 36.7 89 55 39.6 35 23 29.2 20 14 46.2 0 0 0 3 2 50 261 155 102 39.8 79 55 39.6 42 26 33.0 25 17 56.1 2 1 16.7 7 3 75 262 342 183 71.4 200 106 76.3 86 4.7 59.7 43 24 79.2 7 3 50.0 6 3 75 263 172 1.12 43.7 96 68 49.2 36 25 31.8 30 14 46.2 6 3 50.0 4 2 50 264 151 97 37.8 79 53 38.2 39 26 33.0 21 13 42.9 6 3 50.0 6 2 50 265 183 109 42.5 98 62 44.6 4.7 29 36.8 28 14 46.2 7 3 50.0 3 1 25 266 192 107 41.7 116 65 46.8 35 22 27.9 31 16 52.8 4 2 33.4 6 2 50 267 251 147 57.4 143 86 61.9 54 36 45.7 47 21 69.3 5 3 50.0 2 1 25 268 153 I ' l l 43.3 93 63 45.4 35 28 35.6 21 16 52.8 2 2 33.4 2 2 50 269 319 185 72.2 174 105 75.6 86 51 64.8 47 23 75.9 10 5 83.4 2 1 25 270 239 148 57.4 132 83 59.7 61 39 49.5 39 21 69.3 6 3 50.0 1 1 25 271 241 148 57.4 144 88 63.3 64 37 46.9 26 18 59.4 5 3 50.0 2 2 50 272 205 131 51..1 128 80 57.6 46 33 4.1.9. 26 15 49.5 2 2 33.4 1 1 25 273 288 159 62.0 175 95 68.5 66 38 48.3 40 21 69.3 6 4 66.7 1 1 25 274 291 164 64.0 177 98 70.7 64 40 50.1 44 21 69.3 5 4 66.7 1 1 25 275 220 145 56.6 126 84 60.5 59 37 46.9 31 21 69.3 3 2 33.4 1 1 25 276 280 159 62.0 155 87 62.6 85 48 60.9 36 20 66.0 2 2 33.4 2 2 50 277 284 164 64.0 181 99 71.3 56 36 45.7 37 21 69 .3 7 5 83.4 3 3 75 278 285 165 64.4 170 98 70.7 68 41 52.1 38 20 66.0 8 5 83.4 1 1 25 279 247 151 58.9 145 88 63.3 56 35 44.4 36 23 75.9 8 4 66.7 2 1 25 280 266 154 60.1 158 90 64.9 68 41 57.1 35 19 62.7 4 3 50.0 1 1 25 281 245 147 57.0 150 90 64.9 58 36 45.7 31 17 56.1 4 3 50.0 2 1 25 282 293 172 67.1 149 89 64.2 85 54 68.6 50 24 79.2 6 3 50.0 3 2 50 283 223 141 55.0 122 80 57.6 53 34 43.2 42 23 75.9 5 3 50.0 1 1 25 284 256 147 57.0 145 88 63.3 66 34 43.2 35 18 59.4 5 4 66.7 5 3 75 285 228 126 48.9 130 72 51.8 57 35 44.4 30 14 46.2 8 4 66.7 3 1 25 286 275 153 59.7 166 93 67.1 55 33 41.9 43 21 69.3 8 5 83.4 3 1 25 287 273 157 61.2 160 95 68.5 63 37 46.9 39 20 66.0 7 3 50.0 4 2 50 288 256 143 55.8 154 84 60.5 57 35 44.4 36 19 62.7 8 4 66.7 1 1 25 289 190 137 53.4 103 79 56.9 54 33 41.9 28 21 69.3 4 3 50.0 1 1 25 290 237 124 49.3 139 70 50.4 57 32 40.6 32 18 59.4 4 2 33.4 5 2 50 291 275 151 58.6 149 86 61.9 79 43 54.6 38 18 59.4 7 3 50.0 2 1 25 ON ON 9 . A c a d e m i c - C o m m u n i t y V i s u a l a n d T o t a l S a m p l e T e c h n i c a l I n d u s t r i a l C o m m e r i c a l S e r v i c e s P e r f o r m i n g A r t s A l l P r o g r a m m e s P r o g r a m m e P r o g r a m m e P r o g r a m m e P r o g r a m m e P r o g r a m m e N = 2 5 8 N = 139 N = 79 N = 30 N = 6 N = 4 N o . % Q u e s t i o n S c o r e o f o f N o . V a l u e C h o i c e s N . S - V N o . % S - V N o . % S - V N o . % S - V N o . % S - V N o . % 2 9 2 2 5 2 1 2 8 4 9 . 9 1 4 4 7 5 5 4 . 0 66 32 4 0 . 6 30 16 5 2 . 8 6 3 5 0 . 0 6 2 50 2 9 3 2 2 3 1 2 1 4 7 . 2 1 1 3 6 3 4 5 . 4 6 5 35 4 4 . 4 3 4 1 8 5 9 . 4 7 3 5 0 . 0 4 2 50 2 9 4 2 5 2 149 5 8 . 1 145 87 6 2 . 6 61 3 8 4 8 . 3 39 19 6 2 . 7 5 3 5 0 . 0 2 2 50 2 9 5 4 7 5 2 1 6 8 4 . 3 2 6 4 1 2 3 8 8 . 6 1 3 2 6 1 7 7 . 4 6 7 2 6 8 5 . 8 9 4 6 6 . 7 3 2 5 0 2 9 6 2 3 6 1 3 5 4 8 . 5 1 3 8 79 5 6 . 9 5 7 3 3 4 1 . 9 3 5 1 8 5 9 . 4 5 4 6 6 . 7 1 1 2 5 ON TOTAL FEMALE SAMPLE: Carson Graham and Lester Pearson N = 316 Academic- Community Visual and Total Sample Technical Commercial Services Performing Arts A l l Programmes Programme Programme Programme Programme N = 316 N = 170 N = 107 N = 34 N = 5 No. % Question Score of of No. Value Choices N. S-V No. % S-V No. % S-V No. % S-V No. % 1 305 188 60.2 138 88 52.8 116 67 62.9 47 30 87.0 4 3 60 2 631 288 92.2 337 157 94.2 223 97 91.2 62 30 87.0 9 4 80 3 202 155 49.6 107 82 49.2 67 51 47.9 25 20 58.0 3 2 40 4 261 188 60.2 147 106 63.6 79 56 52.6 31 23 66.7 4 3 60 5 554 275 88.1 294 148 88.8 191 92 86.4 60 31 89.9 9 4 80 6 663 282 90.3 345 152 91.2 245 97 91.2 65 29 84.1 8 4 80 7 129 99 31.7 77 55 33.0 37 31 29.1 14 12 34.8 1 1 20 8 328 167 53.4 173 92 55.2 114 53 49.8 83 18 52.2 8 4 80 9 235 148 47.4 128 85 51.0 83 46 43.2 18 13 37.7 6 4 80 10 363 216 69.1 232 137 82.2 91 61 57.3 26 16 46.4 4 2 40 11 438 244 78.1 228 131 78.6 150 81 76.1 52 26 75.4 8 5 100 12 188 103 82.9 73 46 27.6 80 39 36.7 30 16 46.4 5 2 40 13 422 259 82.9 224 140 84.0 141 77 72.4 49 27 78.3 8 5 100 14 300 200 64.0 171 116 69.6 92 60 56.4 31 21 60.9 6 3 60 15 258 130 41.6 69 38 22.8 146 65 61.1 58 24 69 .6 5 3 60 16 577 304 97.3 283 148 88.8 237 95 89.3 60 26 75.4 7 5 100 17 426 221 70.7 197 110 66.0 172 83 78.0 51 25 72.5 6 3 60 18 356 211 67.5 215 124 74.4 103 63 59.2 32 21 60.9 6 3 60 19 289 178 56.9 158 94 56.4 99 62 58.3 28 19 55.1 4 3 60 20 55 47 14.3 25 22 13.2 22 17 15.9 7 7 20.3 1 1 20 21 291 238 76.2 145 121 72.6 107 70 65.8 35 24 69.6 4 3 60 22 219 149 47.7 112 79 47.4 75 49 46.1 29 17 49.3 5 4 80 23 131 107 34.3 71 61 36.6 44 32 30.1 15 12 34.8 3 2 40 24 252 164 52.4 138 89 53.4 87 51 47.9 33 21 60.9 4 3 60 25 343 190 60.8 170 100 60.0 128 66 62.0 38 20 58.0 7 4 80 26 279 174 55.7 147 92 55.2 93 59 55.4 3.7 22 63.8 2 1 20 27 237 170 . 54.4 123 93 55.8 79 53 49.8 29 21 60.9 6 3 60 28 216 155 49.6 94 82 49.2 82 48 45.1 36 23 66.7 4 2 40 29 316 171 54.7 146 83 49.8 119 60 56.4 48 25 72.5 3 3 60 30 334 223 71.3 215 118 70.8 168 78 73.3 43 23 66.7 8 4 80 31 530 234 74.9 348 143 85.8 133 67 62.9 41 20 58.0 8 4 80 32 293 176 56.3 162 97 58.2 104 59 55.4 24 17 49.3 3 3 60 33 83 48 14.6 36 21 12.6 28 16 15.0 17 9 26.1 2 2 40 34 329 188 60.2 145 91 54.6 129 67 62.9 45 25 72.5 10 5 100 35 408 196 62.8 278 133 79.8 98 45 42.3 26 14 40.6 6 4 80 £ Total Sample A l l Programmes N = 316 Academic-Technical Programme N =170 Commercial Programme N =107 Community Services Programme N = 34 Visual and Performing Arts Programme N = 5 Question No. Score Value No. of Choices % of N. S-V No, S-V No. S-V No. S-V No. 36 320 180 57.6 175 99 59.4 37 635 287 91.9 336 153 91.8 38 538 265 84.8 295 144 86.4 39 549 236 75.5 280 122 73.2 40 560 245 78.4 315 135 81.0 41 634 285 91.3 343 156 93.6 42 428 234 74.9 216 122 73.2 43 394 221 70.7 236 132 79.2 44 336 182 58.3 251 129 77.4 45 286 141 45.1 221 107 64,. 2 46 251 152 48.6 220 120 72.0 47 218 125 40.0 168 96 57.6 48 237 132 42.3 184 101 60.6 49 215 119 38.0 156 85 51.0 50 235 133 42.6 189 107 64.2 51 242 140 44.8 196 113 67.8 52 379 189 60.4 287 138 82.8 53 286 168 53.7 118 69 41.4 54 234 124 39.7 82 46 27.6 55 494 236 75.5 238 117 70.2 56 315 163 52.1 120 69 41.4 57 560 272 87.0 315 156 93.6 58 331 186 59.6 151 92 55.2 59 570 241 77.1 302 125 75.0 60 434 236 75.5 208 120 72.0 61 19 14 4.5 4 4 2.4 62 473 298 95.4 259 144 86.4 63 551 254 81.3 252 124 74.4 64 597 263 84.2 305 141 84.6 65 418 221 70.7 202 114 68.4 66 501 253 81.0 245 133 79.8 67 542 251 80.3 276 134 80.4 68 473 245 78.4 240 128 76.8 69 563 255 81.6 291 140 84.0 70 455 241 77.1 234 131 78.6 71 384 217 69.4 190 113 67.8 72 575 267 85.5 305 144 86.4 114 61 57.3 27 17 49.3 4 3 60 227 98 92.1 64 32 92.8 8 4 80 186 92 86.4 50 25 72.5 7 4 80 208 86 80.8 57 25 72.5 4 3 60 189 84 78.9 52 24 69.6 4 2 40 225 98 92.1 59 28 81.2 7 3 60 158 83 78.0 50 26 75.4 4 3 60 128 71 66.7 27 17 49.3 3 1 20 67 39 36.7 15 11 31.9 3 3 60 47 26 24.4 16 7 20.3 2 1 20 47 24 22.6 13 7 20.3 1 1 20 42 23 21.6 8 4 11.6 0 0 0 36 23 21.6 12 6 17.4 5 2 40 50 28 26.3 7 5 14.5 2 1 20 37 21 19.7 5 . 3 8.7 4 2 40 36 21 19.7 8 5 14.5 2 1 2Q 73 40 37.6 16 9 26.1 3 2 40 131 74 69.6 34 22 63.8 3 3 60 106 52 48.9 44 24 69.6 3 2 40 192 87 81.8 58 28 81.2 6 4 80 139 67 62.9 54 25 72.5 2 2 40 182 87 81.8 56 26 75.4 7 4 80 137 70 65.8 41 22 63.8 2 2 40 20.8 88 82.7 54 25 72.5 6 3 60 174 87 81.8 47 25 72.5 5 4 80 9 6 5.6 5 3 8.7 1 1 20 160 83 78.0 50 28 81.2 4 3 60 225 95 89.3 70 33 95.7 4 2 40 231 95 89.3 56 24 69.6 5 3 60 171 80 75.2 43 24 69.6 2 2 40 202 92 86; 4 49 25 72.5 5 3 60 205 89 83.7 56 24 69.6 5 4 80 189 90 84.6 40 24 69.6 4 3 60 216 90 84.6 55 24 69.6 1 1 20 179 86 80.8 38 21 60.9 4 3 60 167 86 80.8 23 15 43.5 4 3 60 218 92 86.4 45 28 81.2 7 3 60 Total Sample A l l Programmes N = 316 Academic-Technical Programme N =170 Commercial Programme N = 107 Community Services , Programme N = 34 • Visual and Performing Arts Programme N = 5 Question No. Score Value No. of Choices % of .N. S-V. No. S-V No. % . S-V No. S-V . . No. 73 8 4 1.3 0 0 0 5 2 1.9 3 1 2.9 0 0 0 74 478 247 79.0 251 131 78.6 170 87 8.1.8 53 26 75.4 4 3 60 75 422 238 76.2 229 134 • 80.4 141 75 70.5 48 26 75.4 4 3 60 76 539 263 84.1 288 142 85.2 188 91 85.5 54 26 75.4 9 4 80 77 525 266 85.1 292 153 91.8 180 85 79.9 48 25 72.5 5 3 60 78 259 151 48.3 135 79 47.4 94 55 51.7 28 15 43.5 2 2 40 79 453 241 77.1 238 131 78.6 160 82 77.1 46 24 69.6 9 4 80 80 175 109 34.9 84 53 31.8 65 39 36.7 22 14 40.6 4 3 60 81 389 231 73.9 205 132 79.2 140 73 68.6 39 22 63.8 5 4 80 82 271 178 56.9 160 103 61.8 86 57 53.6 20 14 40.6 5 4 80 83 380 214 68.5 211 119 71.4 124 71 66.7 38 20 58.0 7 4 80 84 277 174 55.7 149 96 57.6 95 58 54.5 27 16 46.4 6 4 80 85 469 241 77.1 250 136 80.4 167 79 74.3 43 22 63.8 9 4 80 86 319 173 55.3 172 96 57.6 119 60 56.4 21 14 40.6 7 3 60 87 186 122 39.0 93 67 40.2 70 41 44.2 18 11 31.9 5 3 60 88 395 232 74.3 221 135 81.0 135 73 68.6 35 21 60.9 4 3 60 89 30 17 5.4 14 9 5.4 8 6 5.6 3 2 5.8 0 0 0 90 288 190 60.9 157 106 .63.6 105 64 60.2 23 17 49.3 3 3 60 91 164 106 33.9 85 60 36.0 53 39 36.7 20 13 37.7 6 4 80 92 198 136 43.5 114 76 45.6 57 40 37.6 21 16 46.4 6 4 80 93 170 86 27.5 75 42 25.2 66 32 30.1 26 11 31.9 3 1 20 94 213 136 43.5 115 80 48.0 83 45 42.3 14 10 29.0 1 1 20 95 254 175 56.0 136 93 55.8 97 65 61.1 18 15 43.5 3 2 40 96 351 206 66.0 174 110 66.0 142 76 71.4 22 17 49.3 3 3 60 97 378 208 66.6 191 108 64.8 142 76 71.4 43 22 63.8 2 2 40 98 221 147 85.7 124 86 51.6 70 44 41.4 22 14 40.6 5 3 60 99 332 196 62.7 173 105 63.0 122 69 64.9 32 19 55.1 5 3 60 100 417 219 70.2 22.0 117 70.2 144 75 70.5 50 24 69.6 3 3 60 101 349 192 61.4 188 106 63.6 126 67 62.9 30 16 46.4 5 3 60 102 575 277 88.6 329 157 94.2 191 89 83.7 49 27 78.3 6 4 80 103 249 156 49.9 137 87 52.2 74 46 43.2 32 19 55.1 6 4 80 104 459 225 72.0 245 121 72.6 163 79 74.3 45 22 63.8 6 3 60 105 432 231 73.9 245 127 76.2 145 80 75.2 38 21 60.9 4 3 60 106 149 104 33.3 78 59 35.4 64 36 33.8 6 4 11.6 1 1 20 107 331 144 46.1 169 78 46.8 124 48 45.1 34 16 46.4 4 2 40 108 274 199 63.6 141 105 63,0 H I 73 68,-6 19 18 50.2 3 3 60 109 186 137 43.9 88 65 39.0 75 47 44.2 19 13 37.7 4 2 40 Total Sample A l l Programmes N = 316 Academic-Technical Programme N =170 Commercial Programme N = 10 7 Community Services Programme N = 34 Visual and Performing Arts Programme N = 5 Question No. Score Value No. of Choices % of N. S-V No. % S-V . No. S-V No. S-V No. 110 269 133 42.6 140 96 57.6 96 57 53.6 28 17 49.3 5 3 60 111 252 168 53.7 142 98 58.8 79 48 45.1 29 20 58.0 2 2 40 112 269 181 57.9 127 91 54.6 111 69 64.9 28 18 50.2 3 3 60 113 402 238 76.2 217 128 76.8 146 85 79.9 35 22 63.8 4 3 60 114 491 238 76.2 251 127 76.2 187 85 79.9 48 23 66.7 5 3 60 115 176 134 42.9 86 73 43.8 74 49 46.1 12 9 26.1 4 3 60 116 141 90 28.8 68 44 26.4 58 34 31.9 14 11 31.9 1 1 20 117 178 123 39.3 74 .59 35.4 76 49 46.1 17 14 40.6 1 1 20 118 493 255 81.6 161 139 83.4 175 86 80.8 50 26 75.4 7 4 80 119 285 180 57.6 156 99 59.4 92 58 54.5 35 21 60.9 2 2 40 120 442 234 74.9 250 129 77.4 151 82 77.1 35 19 55.1 6 4 80 121 412 240 76.8 225 127 76.2 138 76 71.4 42 23 66.7 7 4 80 122 478 255 81.6 281 137 82.2 189 88 82.7 50 25 72.5 8 5 100 123 624 271 86.4 346 151 90.6 215 98 92.1 56 28 81.2 7 4 80 124 412 233 74.3 225 131 78.6 141 76 71.4 41 23 66.7 5 3 60 125 328 181 57.9 174 94 56.4 116 64 60.2 32 19 55.1 6 4 80 126 427 232 74.0 241 129 77.4 133 75 70.5 44 23 66.7 9 5 100 127 353 210 67.2 292 112 67.2 121 74 69.6 36 20 58.0 4 4 '80 128 227 130 41.6 120 68 40.8 80 48 45.1 25 12 34.8 2 2 40 129 369 215 68.8 209 120 72.0 115 68 63.9 39 23 66.7 6 4 80 130 328 201 64.3 171 102 61.2 117 66 62.0 36 20 58.0 4 3 60 131 144 110 35.2 74 57 34.2 49 37 34.8 18 14 40.6 3 2 40 132 180 122 39.0 95 62 37.2 72 49 46.1 13 11 31.9 0 0 0 133 281 179 57.3 157 99 59.4 90 59 55.4 31 19 55.1 3 2 40 134 232 150 48.0 126 88 52.8 73 43 40.4 30 17 49.3 3 2 40 135 338 214 68.6 179 115 69.0 119 73 68.6 34 22 63.8 6 4 80 136 289 176 56.3 153 96 57.6 103 58 54.5 28 18 52.2 5 4 80 137 308 160 51.2 152 78 46.8 120 63 59.2 31 16 46.4 5 3 60 138 247 167 53.4 119 88 52.8 102 61 57.3 24 16 46.4 2 2 40 139 549 249 79.7 297 132 79.2 208 94 88.4 39 19 55.1 5 4 80 140 179 140 44.8 103 82 49.2 55 44 41.4 17 11 31.9 4 3 60 141 241 163 52.2 140 92 55.2 71 50 47.0 27 19 55.1 3 3 60 142 133 108 . 34.6 81 67 40.2 41 31 29.1 10 9 26.1 1 1 20 143 260 169 54.1 140 91 54.6 87 57 53.6 30 18 52.2 3 3 60 144 242 161 51.5 124 90 54.0 96 55 51.7 19 14 40.6 3 2 40 145 330 198 63.3 197 129 77.4 97 57 53.6 30 19 55.1 6 3 60 146 458 246 78.7 248 133 79.8 153 84 79.9 49 25 72.5 8 4 80 Total Sample A l l Programmes N = 316 Academic-Technical Programme N = 170 Commercial Programme N = 107 Community Seryices Programme N = 34 Visual and Performing Arts Programme N = 5 Question Score No. of % of No. Value Choices N. S-V No. % S-V No. . . . % . . . S-V No. % S-V No. % 147 192 121 38.7 107 67 40.2 56 38 35.7 21 12 34.8 8 4 80 148 175 126 40.3 103 70 42.0 51 40 37.6 19 14 40.6 2 2 40 149 229 168 53.7 136 97 58.2 66 52 48.9 23 15 43.5 4 4 80 150 267 157 50.2 156 90 54.0 84 50 47.0 24 15 43.5 3 2 40 151 282 168 53.8 154 92 55.2 100 59 55.4 28 17 49.3 0 0 0 152 549 224 71.7 306 130 78.0 190 73 68.6 48 19 55.1 5 2 40 153 399 200 64.0 210 109 65.4 140 67 62.9 44 21 60.9 5 3 60 154 239 123 39.4 140 75 45.0 71 41 38.5 16 6 17.4 2 1 20 155 217 150 48.0 133 94 56.4 58 39 36.7 23 14 40.6 3 3 60 156 282 174 55.7 145 94 56.4 97 46 43;2 33 20 58.0 7 4 80 157 86 61 19.5 43 33 19.8 31 19 17.9 11 8 23.2 1 1 20 158 271 170 54.4 140 84 50.6 86 58 54.5 40 24 69.6 5 4 80 159 488 226 72.3 272 128 16.8 154 72 67.7 54 23 66.7 8 3 60 160 604 290 92.8 332 162 97.2 205 96 90.2 57 28 81.2 10 4 80 161 279 146 46.7 162 79 47.4 84 48 45.1 29 16 46.4 4 3 60 162 252 151 48.3 142 85 51.0 78 47 44.2 27 17 49.3 5 2 40 163 338 164 52.5 180 86 51.6 104 52 48.9 50 24 69.6 4 2 40 164 224 135 43.2 113 72 43.2 76 44 41.4 32 16 46.4 3 3 .60 165 130 90 28.8 60 48 28.4 50 34 31.9 18 12 34,8 2 2 40 166 196 108 34.6 107 62 37.2 52 29 27.3 33 14 40.6 4 3 60 167 350 172 55.0 191 101 60.6 98 51 47.9 57 24 69.6 4 3 60 168 440 208 66.6 239 118 10.8 137 64 60.2 58 23 66.7 6 3 60 169 203 106 33.9 109 60 36.0 66 34 31.9 27 11 31.9 1 1 20 170 184 110 35.2 92 56 33.6 68 39 36.7 22 13 37.7 2 2 40 171 227 130 41.6 132 73 43.8 60 36 33.8 34 20 58.0 1 1 20 172 133 79 75.3 72 46 27.6 38 21 19.7 23 12 34.8 0 0 0 173 179 110 35.2 92 68 40.8 54 34 31.9 32 17 49.3 1 1 20 174 203 111 35.5 102 56 33.6 70 37 34.8 30 17 49.3 1 1 20 175 131 - 69 22.1 68 38 22.8 45 23 21.6 14 6 17.4 4 2 40 176 175 111 35.5 84 59 35.4 62 36 33.8 27 15 43.5 2 1 20 177 196 117 37.4 93 59 35.4 71 41 38.5 30 15 43.5 2 2 40 178 199 113 36.2 103 59 35.4 58 33 31.0 33 19 55.1 5 2 40 179 219 150 48.0 129 88 52.8 69 42 39.4 19 17 49.3 2 3 60 180 298 162 51.9 156 90 54.0 100 51 47.9 35 18 52.2 7 3 60 181 474 234 74.9 253 135 81.0 166 82 77.1 47 24 69.6 8 3 60 182 451 234 74.9 245 124 74.4 160 83 78.0 39 23 66.7 7 4 80 183 144 84 26.9 69 41 24.6 52 31 29.1 21 10 29.0 2 2 40 Academic- Community Visual and Total Sample Technical Commercial Services Performing Arts A l l Programmes Programme Programme Programme Programme N = 316 ' N = 170 N = 107 N = 34 N = 5 No. % Question Score of of No. Value Choices N. S-V No. % S-V No. % S-V No. % S-V No. % 184 79 57 18.2 39 27 16.2 27 22 20.7 13 8 23.2 0 0 0 185 270 162 51.8 145 95 57.0 78 42 39.4 43 22 63.8 4 3 60 186 180 77 24.7 97 43 25.8 72 29 27.3 11 5 14.5 0 0 0 187 151 94 30.1 79 50 30.0 54 31 29.1 18 13 37.7 0 0 0 188 168 110 35.2 89 56 33.6 53 36 33.8 24 16 46.4 2 2 40 189 195 116 37.1 108 65 39.0 65 38 33.8 18 12 34.8 4 3 60 190 214 110 35.2 65 35 21.0 102 55 51.7 44 19 55.1 3 1 20 191 309 159 50.9 134 74 44.4 119 59 55.4 53 24 69.6 3 2 40 192 333 203 65.0 175 111 66.6 111 64 60.2 43 25 72.5 4 3 60 193 136 87 27.9 52 38 22.8 44 29 27.3 28 18 52.2 2 2 40 194 171 92 29.4 71 41 24.6 66 38 35.7 30 11 31.9 4 2 40 195 298 173 55.4 143 83 49.8 109 64 60.2 41 22 63.8 5 4 80 196 215 130 41.6 109 65 39.0 67 42 39.4 35 20 58.0 4 3 60 197 237 144 46.1 130 80 48.0 71 42 39.4 32 19 55.1 4 3 60 198 286 158 50.6 147 82 49.2 99 55 • 51.7 36 19 55.1 4 2 40 199 262 151 48.3 128 76 45.6 90 52 48.9 39 20 58.0 5 3 60 200 86 55 17.6 44 24 14.4 23 17 15.9 17 12 34.8 2 2 40 201 129 84 26.9 67 45 27.0 40 25 23.5 21 13 37.7 1 1 20 202 . 204 125 40.0 115 73 43.8 63 36 33.8 24 15 43.5 2 1 20 203 302 153 49.0 160 85 51.0 96 46 43.2 44 20 58.0 2 2 40 204 266 152 48.6 168 95 57.0 76 46 43.2 20 9 26.1 2 2 40 205 56 36 11.5 30 21 12.6 22 12 11.3 4 3 8.7 0 0 0 206 73 50 16.0 43 31 18.6 26 15 14.1 3 3 8.7 1 1 20 207 5 3 0.9 0 0 0 2 1 0.9 3 2 5.8 0 0 0 208 317 192 61.4 195 118 70.8 92 55 51.7 27 16 46.4 3 3 60 209 254 166 53.1 152 100 60.0 77 52 48.9 23 12 34.8 2 2 40 210 -29 157 50.2 137 93 55.8 67 48 45.1 22 13 37.7 3 3 60 211 397 214 68.6 228 118 70.8 121 69 64.9 41 23 66.7 7 4 80 212 357 205 65.7 197 115 69.0 113 67 62.9 41 18 52.2 6 5 100 213 223 131 41.9 117 71 42.6 75 43 40.4 28 15 43.5 3 2 40 214 377 189 60.4 193 95 57.0 138 70 65.8 39 20 58.0 7 4 80 215 224 149 47.6 126 81 48.6 72 52 48.9 23 13 37.7 3 3 60 216 230 149 47.6 129 88 52.8 77 45 42.3 19 14 40.6 5 2 40 217 180 112 35.8 84 56 33.6 72 41 38.5 20 13 37.7 4 2 40 218 128 84 26.9 76 52 31.2 33 21 19.7 14 9 26.1 5 2 40 219 358 206 66.0 194 113 67.8 119 66 62.0 39 23 66.7 6 4 80 220 201 117 37.4 111 65 39.0 64 36 33.8 24 14 40.6 2 2 40 Academic- Community Visual and Total Sample -~ Technical Commercial Services Performing Arts A l l Programmes Programme Programme Programme Programme N = 316 N = 1 7 0 N = 1 0 7 N = 3 4 N = 5 No. % Question Score of of No. Value Choices N. S-V No. . % S-V No. . % S-V No. % S-V No. % 221 205 128 40.9 118 75 45.0 71 40 37.6 14 10 29.0 2 2 40 222 136 87 27.9 72 48 28.8 52 29 27.3 11 8 23.2 1 1 20 223 114 90 28.8 65 52 31.2 37 28 26.3 11 8 23.2 1 1 20 224 220 134 42.9 133 78 46.8 72 47 44.2 13 8 23.2 2 1 20 225 160 115 36.8 91 68 40.8 57 36 33.8 10 9 26.1 2 2 40 226 234 159 50.9 118 83 49.8 81 53 49.8 32 21 60.9 3 2 40 227 271 160 51.2 151 91 54.6 92 51 47.9 25 16 46.4 3 2 40 228 245 153 49.0 129 86 51.6 81 48 45.1 30 16 46.4 5 3 60 229 32 24 7.7 26 19 11.4 5 4 3.8 1 1 2.9 0 0 0 230 115 92 29.4 59 53 31.8 41 28 26.3 13 10 29.0 2 1 20 231 201 132 42.3 130 84 50.4 49 33 31.0 18 13 37.7 4 2 40 232 378 212 67.8 213 122 73.2 129 70 65 ,8 29 17 49.3 7 3 60 233 328 183 58.6 167 97 58.2 122 67 62.9 32 16 46.4 7 3 60 234 379 225 72.0 194 126 75.6 142 78 73.3 37 18 52.2 6 3 60 235 434 237 75.9 209 125 75.0 172 85 79.9 43 23 66.7 10 4 80 236 535 246 78.7 283 136 81.5 184 82 77.1 68 • 24 69.6 10 4 80 237 392 227 72.6 210 125 75.0 133 76 71.4 42 22 63.8 7 4 80 238 147 76 24.3 42 24 14.4 84 41 38.5 18 10 29.0 3 1 20 239 34 13 4.2 . 7 6 3.6 7 4 3.8 6 3 8.7 0 0 0 240 232 138 44.2 118 72 43.2 81 48 45.1 25 15 43.5 8 3 60 241 555 269 86.1 290 144 86.4 201 95 89.3 55 26 75.4 9 4 80 242 429 238 76.2 224 135 80.9 156 • 77 72.4 43 22 63.8 6 4 80 243 216 135 43.2 115 74 44.4 75 45 42.3 22 14 40.6 4 2 40 244 178 124 39.7 100 72 43.8 59 40 37.6 16 10 29.0 3 2 40 245 134 90 28.8 58 41 24.6 52 34 31.9 21 13 37.7 3 2 40 246 169 121 38.7 90 68 40.8 53 37 34.8 20 12 34.8 6 4 80 247 218 151 48.3 120 83 49.8 68 47 44.2 25 17 49 .3 5 4 80 248 323 191 61.0 182 105 63.0 110 67 62.9 22 14 40.6 9 5 100 249 336 194 62.0 169 95 57.0 122 73 68.6 38 22 63.8 7 4 80 250 393 206 66.0 217 113 67.8 131 68 63.9 39 22 63.8 6 3 60 251 231 110 35.2 129 76 45.6 72 44 41.4 25 17 49.3 5 3 60 252 181 125 40.0 85 61 36.6 71 47 44.2 22 14 40.6 3 3 60 253 225 134 42.9 104 65 39.0 85 48 45.1 30 18 52.2 6 3 60 254 187 129 41.3 95 71 42.6 67 41 38.5 22 14 40.6 3 3 60 255 94 66 21.1 53 40 24.0 28 17 15.9 11 8 23.2 2 1 20 256 88 73 23.4 62 48 28.8 18 17 15.9 7 6 17.4 1 1 20 257 100 67 21.4 47 33 19.8 34 22 20.7 18 11 31.9 1 1 20 Total Sample A l l Programmes. N = 316 Academic-Technical Programme N = 170 Commercial Programme N =107 Communi ty Services Programme N = 34 Visual and Performing Arts Programme N = 5 No. Question Score of No. Value Choices % of N. S-V No. S-V No. % . S-V No. S-V No. 258 317 197 63.0 198 121 72.6 89 56 52.6 27 17 49.3 3 3 60 259 150 134 42.9 82 59 35.4 39 26 24.4 23 15 43.5 6 4 80 260 231 148 47.3 131 83 49.8 77 47 44.2 19 15 43.5 4 3 60 261 260 158 50.6 132 79 47.4 91 55 51.7 32 20 58.0 5 4 80 262 514 260 83.2 304 146 87.6 153 86 80.8 48 24 69.6 9 4 80 263 346 185 59.1 216 116 69.6 96 52 48.9 29 15 43.5 5 2 40 264 229 141 45.1 132 79 47.4 76 47 44.2 20 14 40.6 1 1 20 265 296 165 52.7 183 98 58.8 84 50 47.0 25 15 43.5 4 2 40 266 323 171 54.7 188 91 54.6 91 47 44.2 41 22 63.8 3 2 40 267 411 222 71.0 240 125 75.0 129 74 69.6 38 20 58.0 4 3 60 268 221 154 59.3 143 99 59.4 51 35 32.9 22 17 49.3 5 3 60 269 403 229 73.3 230 129 77.4 129 73 68.6 36 23 66.7 8 4 80 270 348 211 67.5 206 124 74.4 106 63 59.2 30 20 58.0 6 4 80 271 263 174 55.7 150 98 58.8 87 58 54.5 23 17 49.3 3 1 20 272 251 166 53.1 161 103 61.8 59 42 39.4 24 16 46.4 7 5 100 273 424 227 72.6 263 133 79.8 113 67 62.9 41 23 66.7 7 4 80 274 422 234 ' 74.9 253 137 82.2 118 67 62.9 41 25 72.5 10 5 100 275 388 206 66.0 216 117 70.2 131 67 62.9 34 18 52.2 7 4 80 276 426 218 69.8 213 112 67.2 164 82 77.1 45 21 60.9 4 3 60 277 529 262 83.9 296 146 87.6 180 84 78.9 53 27 78.3 10 5 100 278 491 255 81.6 287 151 90.6 151 76 71.4 44 23 66.7 9 5 100 279 246 171 54.7 152 107 64.2 64 44 41.4 23 15 43.5 7 5 100 280 352 210 67.2 193 116 69.6 123 72 67.7 30 19 55.1 6 3 60 281 368 214 68.5 210 119 71.4 113 69 64.9 39 23 '66.7 6 3 60 282 412 232 74.3 221 128 76.8 146 77 72.4 39 23 66.7 6 4 80 283 222 147 47.1 135 87 52.2 70 48 45.1 17 12 34.8 0 0 0 284 327 293 93.8 192 112 67.2 102 61 57.3 26 16 46.4 7 4 80 285 252 135 43.2 130 73 44.4 86 44 41.4 30 15 43.5 6 3 60 286 298 178 57.0 181 106 63.6 86 51 47.9 27 18 52.2 4 3 60 287 291 176 56.3 161 100 60.0 105 59 55.4 19 13 37.7 6 4 80 288 210 147 47.1 131 87 52.2 55 42 39.4 20 15 43.5 4 3 60 289 192 . 138 44.2 114 81 48.6 54 38 35.7 19 16 46.4 5 3 60 290 306 168 53.7 184 99 59.4 82 47 44.2 33 18 52.2 7 4 80 291 288 168 53.7 177 102 61.2 87 49 46.1 20 14 40.6 4 3 60 292 375 192 61.3 203 104 62.4 129 66 62.0 40 20 58.0 3 2 40 293 312 154 49.3 166 88 .52.8 98 47 44.2 43 17 49.3 5 2 40 294 444 238 76.2 257 138 82.8 131 70 65.8 47 26 75.4 9 4 80 295 567 277 88.7 303 154 92.4 195 90 84.6 59 29 84.1 10 4 80 296 344 203 65.0 207 124 74.4 101 58 54.5 30 17 49.3 6 4 80 APPENDIX D PROFILE,CHARTS TOTAL SAMPLE'-: Lester Pearson and Carson Graham Males and Females PROFILE PERCENTILE AREA 1 School AREA 2 After AREA 3 Myself AREA 4 Others AREA 5 Home AREA 6 Boy-Girl AREA 7 Health AREA 8 General PERCENTILE H 95 I G 90 H 80 over 67 58-66 50-57 over 85 75-84 67-74 over 75 60-74 49-59 over 87 73-86 65-72 over 76 53-75 42-52 over 61 49-60 40-48 over 43 32-42 26-31 over 72 57-71 47-56 95 H I 90 G H 80 A V E R A G E 70 60 50 40 30 70 60 50 40 30 A V E R A G E L 0 W 20 10 21-25 14-20 25-33 11-24 14-18 6-13 18-25 9-17 5- 8 2- 4 6-10 1- 5 5- 7 1- 4 6-12 1- 5 20 10 L 0 W 0-13 0-10 0- 5 0- 8 0- 1 0 0 0 The norms values shown on this profile are based on a nationwide (U.S.) study of 3,000 students in grades 9-12. A fu l l description of the sample is given on page 12 of the Youth Inventory Manual. T O T A L P O P U L A T I O N : L e s t e r P e a r s o n a n d C a r s o n G r a h a m M a l e s P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 S c h o o l A R E A 2 A f t e r A R E A 3 M y s e l f A R E A 4 C i t h e r s A R E A 5 Home A R E A 6 . B o y - G i r l A R E A 7 H e a l t h A R E A 8 G e n e r a l P E R C E N T I L E H 9 5 I G 9 0 H 80 o v e r 6 7 5 8 - 6 6 5 0 - 5 7 o v e r 85 7 5 - 8 4 6 7 - 7 4 o v e r 75 6 0 - 7 4 4 9 - 5 9 o v e r 87 7 3 - 8 6 6 5 - 7 2 o v e r 76 5 3 - 7 5 4 2 - 5 2 o v e r 61 4 9 - 6 0 4 0 - 4 8 o v e r 4 3 3 2 - 4 2 2 6 - 3 1 o v e r 72 5 7 - 7 1 4 7 - 5 6 9 5 H I 9 0 G H 80 A V E R A G E 70 60 50 40 30 70 60 50 40 30 A V E R A G E L 0 W 20 10 2 1 - 2 5 1 4 - 2 0 2 5 - 3 3 1 1 - 2 4 1 4 - 1 8 6 - 1 3 1 8 - 2 5 9 - 1 7 5 - 8 2 - 4 6 - 1 0 1 - 5 5 - 7 1 - 4 6 - 1 2 1 - 5 20 10 L Q W 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 0 0 0 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . . ' T O T A L P O P U L A T I O N : L e s t e r P e a r s o n a n d C a r s o n G r a h a m F e m a l e s P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 S c h o o l A R E A 2 A f t e r A R E A 3 M y s e l f A R E A 4 O t h e r s A R E A 5 Home A R E A 6 B o y - G i r l A R E A 7 H e a l t h A R E A 8 G e n e r a l P E R C E N T I L E H 9 5 I G 9 0 H 80 o v e r 6 7 5 8 - 6 6 5 0 - 5 7 o v e r 85 7 5 - 8 4 6 7 - 7 4 o v e r 75 6 0 - 7 4 4 9 - 5 9 o v e r 8 7 7 3 - 8 6 6 5 - 7 2 o v e r 76 5 3 - 7 5 4 2 - 5 2 o v e r 61 4 9 - 6 0 4 0 - 4 8 o v e r 4 3 3 2 - 4 2 2 6 - 3 1 o v e r 72 5 7 - 7 1 4 7 - 5 6 9 5 H I 9 0 G H 8 0 A V E R A G E 70 6 0 50 40 30 70 6 0 50 40 30 A V E R A G E L 0 W 20 10 2 1 - 2 5 1 4 - 2 0 2 5 - 3 3 1 1 - 2 4 1 4 - 1 8 6 - 1 3 1 8 - 2 5 9 - 1 7 5 - 8 2 - 4 6 - 1 0 1 - 5 5 - 7 1 - 4 6 - 1 2 1 - 5 20 10 L 0 W 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . TOTAL SAMPLE: Lester Pearson and"Carson Grah Academic-Technical Programme Males PROFILE PERCENTILE AREA 1 AREA 2 AREA 3 AREA 4 AREA 5 AREA 6 AREA 7 AREA 8 PERCENTILE School After Myself Others Home Boy-Girl Health General H 95 over 67 over 85 over 75 over 87 over 76 over 61 over 43 over 72 95 H I - I G 90 58-66 75-84 60-74 73-86 53-75 49-60 32-42 57-71 90 G H H 80 50-57 67-74 49-59 65-72 42-52 40-48 26-31 47-56 80 A 70 44-49 60-66 . 42-48 57-64 33-39 20-25 40-46 70 A E 60 39-43 54-59 36-41 48-56 /24-30 X . 26-32 17-19 3>39 60 E A 50 35-218 49-53 3D-35 41-47'/ 18-23 2W$- \k-^Cb 26-32 50 A E 40 31-34 ^ T 2 ^ o ^ ^ 24-29 ^""3>4o 13-17 16-20 11-13 20-25 40 E 30 26-30 34-41 19-23 26-32 9-12 11-15 8-10 13-19 30 L 0 w 20 10 21-25 14-20 25-33 11-24 14-18 6-13 18-25 9-17 5- 8 2- 4 6-10 1- 5 5- 7 1- 4 6-12 1- 5 20 10 L 0 W 0-13 0-10 0- 5 0- 8 0- 1 0 0 0 The norms values shown on this profile are based on a nationwide (U.S.) study of 3,000 students in grades 9-12. A f u l l description of the sample is given on page 12 of the Youth Inventory Manua'l. - I Q T A L - S A M P L E : t e s t e r P e a r s o n a n d C a r s o n G r a h . A c a d e m i c - T e c h n i c a l P r o g r a m m e F e m a l e s P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 A R E A 2 A R E A 3 A R E A 4 A R E A 5 A R E A 6 A R E A 7 A R E A 8 P E R C E N T I L E S c h o o l A f t e r M y s e l f O t h e r s Home B o y - G i r l H e a l t h G e n e r a l H 95 o v e r 67 o v e r 85 o v e r 75 o v e r 87 o v e r 76 o v e r 61 o v e r 43 o v e r 72 95 H I I G 90 58-66 " 75-84 60-74 73-86 53-75 49-60 32-42 57-71 90 G H H 80 50-57 67-74 49-59 65-72 42-52 40-48 26-31 47-56 80 A 70 44-49 60-66 42/^ 68 57-64 3>sAl 33-39 2§r&r —40-46 70 ' A V V E 60 39-43 54-59 /36-41 \ 48-56 y 24-30 \ . 26-32 y 17-19 33-39 60 E R R A 50 35->3B 49-53/ 30-35 18-23 2N25 14-16 26-32 50 A G G E 40 31-34 24-29 33-40 13-17 16-20 11-13 20-25 40 E 30 26-30 34-41 19-23 26-32 9-12 11-15 8-10 13-19 30 L 20 21-25 25-33 14-18 18-25 5- 8 6-10 5- 7 6-12 20 L S 10 14-20 11-24 6-13 9-17 2- 4 1- 5 1- 4 1- 5 "> % 5 0-13 0-10 0- 5 0- 8 0- 1 0 0 0 5 -T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . T O T A L S A M P L E : L e s t e r P e a r s . o n ^ n d _ C a r s o n G r a h a m C o m m e r c i a l P r o g r a m m e M a l e s P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 A R E A 2 A R E A 3 A R E A 4 A R E A 5 A R E A 6 A R E A 7 A R E A 8 P E R C E N T I L E S c h o o l A f t e r M y s e l f O t h e r s Home B o y - G i r l H e a l t h ' G e n e r a l H 9 5 I G 9 0 H 80 o v e r 67 5 8 - 6 6 5 0 - 5 7 o v e r 85 7 5 - 8 4 6 7 - 7 4 o v e r 75 6 0 - 7 4 4 9 - 5 9 o v e r 87 7 3 - 8 6 6 5 - 7 2 o v e r 76 5 3 - 7 5 4 2 - 5 2 o v e r 61 4 9 - 6 0 4 0 - 4 8 o v e r 4 3 3 2 - 4 2 2 6 - 3 1 o v e r 72 5 7 - 7 1 4 7 - 5 6 9 5 H I 9 0 G H 80 A V E-R A G E 70 6 0 50 40 30 4 0 - 4 6 - 3 3 - 3 9 2 6 - 3 2 2 0 - 2 5 1 3 - 1 9 70 60 50 40 30 ' A V E R A G E L 0 W 20 10 2 1 - 2 5 1 4 - 2 0 2 5 - 3 3 1 1 - 2 4 1 4 - 1 8 6 - 1 3 1 8 - 2 5 9 - 1 7 5 - 8 2 - 4 6 - 1 0 1 - 5 5 - 7 1 - 4 6 - 1 2 1 - 5 20 10 L 0 W 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 0 0 0 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . TOTAL SAMPLE: Lester Pearson and Carson Graham Commercial Programme Females PROFILE PERCENTILE AREA 1 School AREA 2 After AREA 3 Myself AREA 4 Others AREA 5 Home AREA 6 Boy-Girl AREA 7 Health AREA 8 General PERCENTILE H 95 I G 90 H 80 over 67 58-66 50-57 over 85 75-84 67-74 over 75 60-74 49-59 over 87 73-86 65-72 over 76 53-75 42-52 oyer 61 49-60 40-48 over 43 32-42 26-31 over 72 57-71 47-56 95 H I 90 G H 80 A V E R A G E 70 60 50 40 30 70 60 50 40 30 ' A V E R A G E L 0 W 20 10 21-25 14-20 25-33 11-24 14-18 6-13 18-25 9-17 5- 8 2- 4 6-10 1- 5 5- 7 1- 4 6-12 1- 5 20 10 L Q W 0-13 0-10 0- 5 0- 8 0- 1 0 0 0 The norms values shown on this profile are based on a nationwide (U.S.) study of 3,000 students in grades 9-12. A f u l l description of the sample is given on page 12 of the Youth Inventory Manual. TOTAL SAMPLE: Lester Pearson and Carson I n d u s t r i a l Programme Males Graham PROFILE PERCENTILE AREA 1 AREA 2 AREA 3 AREA 4 AREA 5 AREA 6 AREA 7 AREA 8 PERCENTILE School A f t e r Myself Others Home Boy-Girl Health General H 95 over 67 over 85 over 75 over 87 over 76 over 61 over 43 over 72 95 H I . I G 90 58-66 75-84 60-74 73-86 53-75 49-60 32-42 57-71 90 G H H 80 50-57 67-74 49-59 65-72 42-52 40-48 26-31 47-56 80 A 70 44-49 60-66 42-48 5 7-64 31-41 33-39 20-25 40-46 70 ' A V V E 60 39-43 54-59 36-41 48-56 2J*3? 2 6 - 3 2 1 7 - 1 9 3 3 - 3 9 6 0 E A 50 35<38 49-53 P^^ 5-^  4 1 - 4 7 18-23^S. 21-25 14-16 26^32 50 A E 40 3 1 - 3 4 ^ v 42-48 24-29 ^^3>4o 13-17 1&-30 20-25 40 E 30 26-30 3V41 19-23 26-32 9-12 11-15 8-10 13-19 30 L 20 21-25 25-33 14-18 18-25 5- 8 6-10 5- 7 6-12 20 L ° 10 14-20 11-24 6-13 9-17 2- 4 1- 5 1- 4 1- 5 10 .Q. W w 5 0-13 0-10 0- 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 5 The norms values shown on th i s p r o f i l e are based on a nationwide (U.S.) study of 3,000 students i n grades 9-12. A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n of the sample i s given on page 12 of the Youth Inventory Manual. T O T A L S A M P L E : L e s t e r P e a r s o n a n d C a r s o n G r a h a m C o m m u n i t y S e r v i c e s P r o g r a m m e M a l e s P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 S c h o o l A R E A 2 A f t e r A R E A 3 M y s e l f A R E A 4 O t h e r s A R E A 5 Home A R E A 6 B o y - G i r l A R E A 7 H e a l t h A R E A 8 G e n e r a l P E R C E N T I L E H 9 5 I G 9 0 H 80 o v e r 6 7 „ o v e r 85 o v e r 75 o v e r 87 o v e r 76 o v e r 6 1 o v e r 4 3 o v e r 72 5 8 - 6 6 7 5 - 8 4 6 0 - 7 4 7 3 - 8 6 5 3 - 7 5 4 9 - 6 0 3 2 - 4 2 5 7 - 7 1 5 0 - 5 7 6 7 - 7 4 4 9 - 5 9 6 5 - 7 2 4 2 - 5 2 4 0 - 4 8 2 6 - 3 1 4 7 - 5 6 9 5 H I 9 0 G H 80 A V E R A G E 70 6 0 50 40 30 70 60 50 40 30 A V E R A G E L 0 W 2 0 10 2 1 - 2 5 1 4 - 2 0 2 5 - 3 3 1 1 - 2 4 1 4 - 1 8 6 - 1 3 1 8 - 2 5 9 - 1 7 5 - 8 2 - 4 6 - 1 0 1 - 5 5 - 7 1 - 4 6 - 1 2 1 - 5 20 10 L 0 W 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . T O T A L S A M P L E : L e s t e r P e a r s o n a n d C a r s o n ~ G r a r T a m " C o m m u n i t y S e r v i c e s P r o g r a m m e F e m a l e s 1 0 . P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 S c h o o l A R E A 2 A f t e r A R E A 3 M y s e l f A R E A 4 O t h e r s A R E A 5 Home . A R E A 6 B o y - G i r l A R E A 7 H e a l t h A R E A 8 G e n e r a l P E R C E N T I L E H 9 5 I G 9 0 H 80 o v e r 6 7 5 8 - 6 6 5 0 - 5 7 o v e r 85 7 5 - 8 4 6 7 - 7 4 o v e r 7 5 6 0 - 7 4 4 9 - 5 9 o v e r 87 7 3 - 8 6 6 5 - 7 2 o v e r 76 5 3 - 7 5 4 2 - 5 2 o v e r 61 4 9 - 6 0 4 0 - 4 8 o v e r 4 3 3 2 - 4 2 2 6 - 3 1 o v e r 72 5 7 - 7 1 4 7 - 5 6 9 5 H I 90 G H 80 A V E R A G E 70 6 0 50 40 30 70 60 50 40 30 A V E R A G E L 0 w 20 10 2 1 - 2 5 1 4 - 2 0 2 5 - 3 3 1 1 - 2 4 . 1 4 - 1 8 6 - 1 3 1 8 - 2 5 9 - 1 7 5 - 8 2 - 4 6 - 1 0 i - 5 5 - 7 1 - 4 6 - 1 2 1 - 5 20 10 L 0 W 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . TOTAL SMtPLE: L e s t e r P e a r s o n a n d C a r s o n G r a h a m V i s u a l a n d P e r f o r m i n g A r t s P r o g r a m m e M a l e s 11. P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 S c h o o l A R E A 2 A f t e r A R E A 3 M y s e l f A R E A 4 O t h e r s . A R E A 5 Home A R E A 6 B o y - G i r l A R E A 7 H e a l t h A R E A 8 G e n e r a l P E R C E N T I L E H 9 5 I G 9 0 H 80 o v e r 6 7 5 8 - 6 6 5 0 - 5 7 o v e r 85 7 5 - 8 4 6 7 - 7 4 o v e r 7 5 6 0 - 7 4 4 9 - 5 9 o v e r 87 7 3 - 8 6 6 5 - 7 2 o v e r 76 5 3 - 7 5 4 2 - 5 2 o v e r 61 4 9 - 6 0 4 0 - 4 8 o v e r 4 3 3 2 - 4 2 2 6 - 3 1 o v e r 72 5 7 - 7 1 4 7 - 5 6 9 5 H I 9 0 G H 80 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . rTOTAL-SAMPLE: Lester Pearson and Cars on Graham Visual and Performing Arts Programme Females 12, PROFILE PERCENTILE AREA 1 School AREA 2 After AREA 3 Myself AREA 4 Others AREA 5 Home AREA 6 Boy-Girl AREA 7 Health AREA 8 General PERCENTILE H 95 I G 90 H 80 over 67 58-66 50-57 over 85 75-84 67-74 over 75 60-74 49-59 over 87 73-86 65-72 over 76 53-75 42-52 over 61 49-60 40-48 over 43 32-42 26-31 over 72 57-71 47-56 95 H I 90 G H 80 0-13 0-10 0- 5 0- 8 0- 1 The norms values shown on this profile are based on a nationwide (U.S.) study of 3,000 students in grades 9-12. A fu l l description of the sample is given on page 12 of the Youth Inventory Manual. L E S T E R P E A R S O N : A c a d e m l - c - T e c h n i c a l P r o g r a m m e M a l e s • P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 S c h o o l A R E A 2 A f t e r A R E A 3 M y s e l f A R E A 4 O t h e r s . A R E A 5 Home A R E A 6 B o y - G i r l A R E A 7 H e a l t h A R E A 8 G e n e r a l P E R C E N T I L E H 9 5 o v e r 6 7 o v e r 85 o v e r 75 o v e r 87 o v e r 76 o v e r 61 o v e r 4 3 o v e r 72 9 5 H I I G 9 0 5 8 - 6 6 7 5 - 8 4 6 0 - 7 4 7 3 - 8 6 5 3 - 7 5 4 9 - 6 0 3 2 - 4 2 5 7 - 7 1 9 0 G H H 80 5 0 - 5 7 6 7 - 7 4 4 9 - 5 9 6 5 - 7 2 4 2 - 5 2 4 0 - 4 8 2 6 - 3 1 4 7 - 5 6 80 A 70 4 4 - 4 9 6 0 - 6 6 4 2 - 4 8 5 7 - 6 4 3 1 - 4 1 3 3 - 3 9 2 0 - 2 5 4 0 - 4 6 70 A V V E 6 0 3 9 - 4 3 5 4 - 5 9 3 6 - 4 1 4 8 - 5 6 24,-vJO 2 6 - 3 2 1 7 - 1 9 3 3 - 3 9 60 E R R A 50 3 5 ^ 3 8 4 9 - 5 3 3 0 ^ 0 5 4 1 - 4 7 y 1 8 - 2 3 14 16 — 2 6 — 3 2 50 A G G E 40 3 1 - 3 4 >s 4 2 - 4 8 y 2 4 - 2 9 3><0 1 3 - 1 7 1 6 - 2 0 1 1 - 1 3 2 0 - 2 5 40 E 30 2 6 - 3 0 3V<1 1 9 - 2 3 2 6 - 3 2 9 - 1 2 1 1 - 1 5 8 - 1 0 1 3 - 1 9 30 L 20 2 •» 2 1 - 2 5 1 4 - 2 0 2 5 - 3 3 1 1 - 2 4 1 4 - 1 8 6 - 1 3 1 8 - 2 5 9 - 1 7 5 - 8 2 - 4 6 - 1 0 1 - 5 5 - 7 1 - 4 6 - 1 2 1 - 5 20 L - 2 5 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 5 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . L E S T E R P E A R S O N - : A c a d e m i c - T e c h n i c a l P r o g r a m m e F e m a l e s 1 4 . P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 S c h o o l A R E A 2 A f t e r A R E A 3 M y s e l f A R E A 4 O t h e r s A R E A 5 Home A R E A 6 B o y - G i r l A R E A 7 H e a l t h A R E A 8 G e n e r a l P E R C E N T I L E H 9 5 I G 90 H 80 o v e r 6 7 5 8 - 6 6 5 0 - 5 7 o v e r 85 7 5 - 8 4 6 7 - 7 4 o v e r 75 6 0 - 7 4 4 9 - 5 9 o v e r 87 7 3 - 8 6 6 5 - 7 2 o v e r 76 5 3 - 7 5 4 2 - 5 2 o v e r 61 4 9 - 6 0 4 0 - 4 8 o v e r 4 3 3 2 - 4 2 2 6 - 3 1 o v e r 72 5 7 - 7 1 4 7 - 5 6 9 5 . H I 9 0 G H 80 A 70 4 4 - 4 9 6 0 - 6 6 V E 60 3 9 - 4 3 . 5 4 - 5 9 R A 50 3 5 - J 8 4 9 - 5 3 G E 40 3 1 - 3 4 30 2 6 - 3 0 3 4 - 4 1 L 20 2 1 - 2 5 2 5 - 3 3 0 W 10 1 4 - 2 0 1 1 - 2 4 4 0 - 4 6 • 4 3 - 4 9 2 6 - 3 2 2 0 - 2 5 1 3 - 1 9 70 60 5 0 40 30 A V E R A G E 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 1 4 - 1 8 6 - 1 3 0 - 5 1 8 - 2 5 9 - 1 7 0 - 8 5 - 8 2 - 4 0 - 1 6 - 1 0 1 - 5 0 5 - 7 1 - 4 0 6 - 1 2 1 - 5 0 20 10 L 0 W T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 , A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . o -LESTER PEARSON-: Commercial Programme M a l e s 15. P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 A R E A 2 . A R E A 3 A R E A 4 A R E A 5 A R E A 6 A R E A 7 A R E A 8 P E R C E N T I L E S c h o o l A f t e r M y s e l f O t h e r s Home B o y - G i r l H e a l t h G e n e r a l H 95 o v e r 67 o v e r 85 o v e r 75 o v e r 87 o v e r 76 o v e r 61 o v e r 43 o v e r 72 95 H I I G 90 58-66 75-84 60-74 73-86 53-75 49-60 32-42 57-71 90 G H H 80 50-57 67-74 49-59 65-72 42-52 40-48 26-31 47-56 80 A 70 44-49 60-66 42-48 57-64 31*41 33-39 20-25 4J1-46 70 A V V E 60 39-^3 54-59 36^41 48-56 / 2 4 - 3 0 \ 26-32 \yvf 33-39 60 E R R A 50 35-38 > s 49-53 / 30-35 \ , 4 1 - 4 7 / 18-23 \ 21 -25 y 14-16 26-32 50 A G G E 40 31-34 42^48 24-29 3 W 0 13-17 l V 2 0 11-13 20-25 40 E 30 26-30 34-41 19-23 26-32 9-12 11-15 8-10 13-19 30 L 20 21-25 25-33 14-18 18-25 5- 8 6-10 5- 7 6-12 20 L . «> 14-20 11-24 6-13 9-17 2- 4 1- 5 1- 4 1- 5 » w° 5 0-13 0-10 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 5 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3,000 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9-12. A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . vo H L E S T E R P E A R S O N : C o m m e r c i a l P r o g r a m m e -F e m a l e s 1 P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 A R E A 2 A R E A 3 A R E A 4 A R E A 5 A R E A 6 A R E A 7 A R E A 8 P E R C E N T I L E S c h o o l A f t e r M y s e l f O t h e r s H o m e B o y - G i r l H e a l t h G e n e r a l H 9 5 o v e r 6 7 o v e r 8 5 o v e r 75 o v e r 8 7 o v e r 76 o v e r 61 o v e r 4 3 o v e r 72 9 5 H I I G 9 0 5 8 - 6 6 7 5 - 8 4 6 0 - 7 4 7 3 - 8 6 5 3 - 7 5 4 9 - 6 0 3 2 - 4 2 5 7 - 7 1 9 0 G H H 80 5 0 - 5 7 6 7 - 7 4 4 9 - 5 9 6 5 - 7 2 4 2 - 5 2 4 0 - 4 8 2 6 - 3 1 4 7 - 5 6 80 A 70 4 4 - 4 9 6 0 - 6 6 4 2 * 4 8 5 7 - 6 4 3 1 - 4 1 3 3 - 3 9 2 0 - 2 5 4 0 - 4 6 70 A E 6 0 3 9 - 4 3 5 4 - 5 9 / 3 6 - 4 l \ 4 8 - 5 6 2 4 ^ 3 0 2 6 - 3 2 3 3 - 3 9 6 0 E R / \ / X . / R A 50 3 5 ^ 3 8 4 9 - 5 3 / 3 0 - 3 5 \ 4 1 - 4 7 / 1 8 - 2 3 \ ^ 2 1 - 2 5 / 1 4 - 1 6 50 A E 40 3 1 - 3 4 4 2 - 4 8 / 2 4 - 2 9 3 > < 0 1 3 - 1 7 i W o 1 1 - 1 3 2 0 - 2 5 40 E 30 2 6 - 3 0 3 ^ 4 1 1 9 - 2 3 2 6 - 3 2 9 - 1 2 1 1 - 1 5 8 - 1 0 1 3 - 1 9 30 L 20 2 1 - 2 5 2 5 - 3 3 1 4 - 1 8 1 8 - 2 5 5 - 8 6 - 1 0 5 - 7 6 - 1 2 20 L T°T 10 1 4 - 2 0 1 1 - 2 4 6 - 1 3 9 - 1 7 2 - 4 1 - 5 1 - 4 1 - 5 10 9. w w 5 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 5 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . L E S T E R P E A R S O N : I n d u s t r i a l P r o g r a m m e M a l e s 1 P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 S c h o o l A R E A 2 A f t e r A R E A 3 M y s e l f A R E A 4 . O t h e r s . A R E A 5 Home A R E A 6 B o y - G i r l A R E A 7 H e a l t h A R E A 8 G e n e r a l P E R C E N T I L E H 9 5 o v e r 6 7 o v e r 85 o v e r 7 5 o v e r 87 o v e r 76 o v e r 61 o v e r 4 3 o v e r 72 9 5 H I I G 9 0 5 8 - 6 6 7 5 - 8 4 6 0 - 7 4 7 3 - 8 6 5 3 - 7 5 4 9 - 6 0 3 2 - 4 2 5 7 - 7 1 9 0 G H • H 80 5 0 - 5 7 6 7 - 7 4 4 9 - 5 9 6 5 - 7 2 4 2 - 5 2 4 0 - 4 8 2 6 - 3 1 4 7 - 5 6 80 A 70 4 4 - 4 9 6 0 - 6 6 4 2 - 4 8 5 7 - 6 4 3 1 - 4 1 3 3 - 3 9 2 0 - 2 5 4 0 - 4 6 70 A V V E 6 0 3 9 ^ 4 3 5 4 - 5 9 3 6 - 4 1 4 8 - 5 6 2 4 ^ 3 0 2 6 - 3 2 1 7 - 1 9 3 3 - 3 9 60 E R R A 50 3 5 - 3 8 \ , 4 9 - 5 3 3Q. -35 4 1 - 4 7 y 1 8 - 2 3 " ~ ~ > r - 2 5 1 4 - 1 6 2 6 - 3 2 50 A G G E 40 3 1 - 3 4 2 4 - 2 9 " ^ J 3 - < 0 1 3 - 1 7 1 6 - 2 0 1 1 - 1 3 2 0 - 2 5 40 E 30 2 6 - 3 0 3 4 - 4 1 1 9 - 2 3 2 6 - 3 2 9 - 1 2 1 1 - 1 5 8 - 1 0 1 3 - 1 9 30 L 20 s -2 1 - 2 5 1 4 - 2 0 2 5 - 3 3 1 1 - 2 4 1 4 - 1 8 6 - 1 3 1 8 - 2 5 9 - 1 7 5 - 8 2 - 4 6 - 1 0 1 - 5 5 - 7 1 - 4 6 - 1 2 1 - 5 20 L 5 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 5 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . L E S T E R P E A R S O N : C o m m u n i t y S e r v i c e s P r o g r a m m e M a l e s 1 P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 A R E A 2 A R E A 3 A R E A 4 A R E A 5 A R E A 6 A R E A 7 A R E A 8 P E R C E N T I L E S c h o o l A f t e r M y s e l f O t h e r s Home B o y - G i r l H e a l t h G e n e r a l H 9 5 o v e r 6 7 o v e r 85 o v e r 75 o v e r 87 o v e r 76 o v e r 61 o v e r 4 3 o v e r 72 9 5 H I I G 9 0 . 5 8 - 6 6 7 5 - 8 4 6 0 - 7 4 7 3 - 8 6 5 3 - 7 5 4 9 - 6 0 3 2 - 4 2 5 7 - 7 1 9 0 G H H 80 5 0 - 5 7 6 7 - 7 4 4 9 - 5 9 6 5 - 7 2 4 2 - 5 2 4 0 - 4 8 2 6 - 3 1 4 7 - 5 6 80 A 70 4 4 - 4 9 60^d6 4 2 - 4 8 5 7 - 6 4 3J"*^L 3 3 - 3 9 2 0 - 2 5 4 0 - 4 6 70 A E 6 0 3 9 - 4 3 5 4 - 5 9 ^ ^ 3 ^ 4 1 4 8 - 5 6 yS 2 4 - 3 0 ^ ] r?-W^ 3 3 - 3 9 6 0 E A 50 35-^38 4 9 - 5 3 3 0 - 3 5 ^ " > t v < 7 1 8 - 2 3 2 1 - 2 5 1 4 - 1 6 2 6 - 3 2 50 A G G E 40 3 1 - 3 4 4 2 - 4 8 2 4 - 2 9 3 3 - 4 0 1 3 - 1 7 1 6 - 2 0 1 1 - 1 3 2 0 - 2 5 40 E 30 2 6 - 3 0 3 4 - 4 1 1 9 - 2 3 2 6 - 3 2 9 - 1 2 1 1 - 1 5 8 - 1 0 1 3 - 1 9 30 L 20 2 1 - 2 5 2 5 - 3 3 1 4 - 1 8 1 8 - 2 5 5 - 8 6 - 1 0 5 - 7 6 - 1 2 20 L ° 10 1 4 - 2 0 1 1 - 2 4 6 - 1 3 9 - 1 7 2 - 4 1 - 5 1 - 4 1 - 5 10 9. W W 5 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 5 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . L E S T E R P E A R S O N : C o m m u n i t y S e r v i c e s P r o g r a m m e F e m a l e s 1 P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 S c h o o l A R E A 2 A f t e r A R E A 3 M y s e l f A R E A 4 O t h e r s A R E A 5 Home A R E A 6 B o y - G i r l A R E A 7 H e a l t h A R E A 8 G e n e r a l P E R C E N T I L E L 0 W 20 10 2 1 - 2 5 1 4 - 2 0 2 5 - 3 3 1 1 - 2 4 1 4 - 1 8 6 - 1 3 1 8 - 2 5 9 - 1 7 5 - 8 2 - 4 6 - 1 0 1 - 5 5 - 7 1- 4 6 - 1 2 1 - 5 20 10 L 0 W 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . L E S T E R P E A R S O N : V i s u a l a n d P e r f o r m i n g A r t s P r o g r a m m e 20 M a l e s P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 S c h o o l A R E A 2 A f t e r A R E A 3 M y s e l f A R E A 4 O t h e r s A R E A 5 Home A R E A 6 B o y - G i r l A R E A 7 H e a l t h . A R E A 8 G e n e r a l P E R C E N T I L E H 95 o v e r 67 o v e r 85 o v e r 75 o v e r 87 o v e r 76 o v e r 61 o v e r 43 o v e r 72 95 H I v I G 90 58-66 75-84 60-74 73-86 53-75 49-60 32-42 57-71 90 G H H 80 50-57 67-74 49-59 65-72 42-52 40-48 26-31 47-56 80 A 70 44-49 60-66 42-48 57-64 31-41 33-39 20*25 40-46 70 A V V E 60 39-43 54-59 ; 36-41 48-56 24-30 26-32 33-39 60 E R R A 50 35-38 49-53 30-35 41-47 18x23 21-25 / 1 4 - 1 6 26^ -32 50 A G G E 40 31^34 42-48 24^ *29 33-40 y ^ 1 3 - l \ 16-20 / 11-13 20-25 40 E 30 26-30\ 34-41 /19-23 "^ 2^ --32 9-12 \ 11-15 / 8-10 13-19 30 L 20 S 10 21-25 14-20 25^33 11-24 14-18 6-13 18-25 9-17 5- 8 2- 4 6*10 1- 5 5- 7 1- 4 6-12 1- 5 20 L 5 0-13 0-10 0-5 0-8 0-1 0 0 0 5 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3,000 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . -L-ESTER-FEARSOtn Visual and Performing Arts Programme Females 21. PROFILE PERCENTILE AREA 1 School AREA 2 After AREA 3 Myself AREA 4 Others . AREA 5 . Home AREA 6 Boy-Girl AREA 7 Health AREA 8 General PERCENTILE H 95 over 67 over 85 over 75 over 87 over 76 over 61 over 43 over 72 95 H I I G 90 58-66 75-84 60-74 73-86 53-75 49-60 32-42 57-71 90 G H H 80 50-57 67-74 49-59 65-72 42-52 40-48 26-31 47-56 80 A 70 44-49 60-66 42-48 57-64 31-41 33-39 20-25 40-46 70 A V V E 60 39-43 54-59 36-41 48-56 24-30 26-32 17-745 33-39 60 E R R A 50 35-38 49-53 30-35 41-47 13*23 21-25 U-16 "^&-32 50 A G G E 40 31^ 34 42-48 2 4 ^ —ZZ-tfT 13-l\ 16-20 1 ' 11-13 20-25 40 E 30 26-30\ 34-41 /19-23 26-32 9-12 \ 11-15 / 8-10 13-19 30 L 20 S 10 21-25 14-20 \5-33r 11^ 24 14-18 6-13 18-25 9-17 5- 8 2- 4 6^ 10 1- 5 5- 7 1- 4 6-12 1- 5 20 L 0-13 0-10 0- 5 0- 8 0- 1 The norms values shown on this profile are based on a nationwide (U.S.) study of 3,000 students in grades 9-12. A f u l l description of the sample is given on page 12 of the Youth Inventory Manual. CARS ON G R A H A M : A c a d e m i c - T e c h n i c a l P r o g r a m m e M a l e s 22 P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 A R E A 2 A R E A 3 A R E A 4 A R E A 5 A R E A 6 A R E A 7 A R E A 8 P E R C E N T I L E S c h o o l A f t e r M y s e l f O t h e r s . Home B o y - G i r l H e a l t h G e n e r a l H 95 o v e r 67 v o v e r 85 o v e r 75 o v e r 87 o v e r 76 o v e r 61 o v e r A3 o v e r 72 95 H I I G 90 58-66 75-8A 60-7A 73-86 53-75 A9-60 32-A2 57-71 90 G H H 80 50-57 67-7A A9-59 65-72 A2-52 A0-A8 26-31 A7-56 80 A 70 AA-A9 60-66 A2-A8 57-64 31^ 41 33-39 20-25 40^ 46 70 A E 60 39-43 54-59 36-41 48-56 /l4-30 X. 26-32 17-19 y S 33-39 60 E A 50 35*Q8 49-53 30-35 41-47 / 18-23 2Tv£5 3-4-16 26-32 50 A E 40 31-34 24-29 ^~^3-H0 13-17 16-20 11-13 20-25 40 E 30 26-30 34-41 19-23 26-32 9-12 11-15 8-10 13-19 30 L 20 21-25 25-33 14-18 18-25 5- 8 6-10 5- 7 6-12 20 L T°7 10 14-20 11-24 6-13 9-17 2- 4 1- 5 1- 4 1- 5 10 Jj w w 5 0-13 0-10 0- 5 0-8 0-1 0 0 0 5 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3,000 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9-12. A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . CARSON G R A H A M : A c a d e m i c - T e c h n i c a l P r o g r a m m e F e m a l e s 2 3 . P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 A R E A 2 A R E A 3 A R E A 4 A R E A 5 A R E A 6 A R E A 7 A R E A 8 S c h o o l A f t e r M y s e l f O t h e r s . Home B o y - G i r l . H e a l t h G e n e r a l P E R C E N T I L E L 0 W 2 0 10 2 1 - 2 5 1 4 - 2 0 2 5 - 3 3 1 1 - 2 4 1 4 - 1 8 6 - 1 3 1 8 - 2 5 9 - 1 7 5 - 8 2 - 4 6 - 1 0 1 - 5 5 - 7 1 - 4 6 - 1 2 1 - 5 20 10 L Q W 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . CARSON G R A H A M : C o m m e r c i a l P r o g r a m m e M a l e P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 A R E A 2 A R E A 3 A R E A 4 A R E A 5 A R E A 6 A R E A 7 A R E A 8 P E R C E N T I L E S c h o o l A f t e r M y s e l f O t h e r s Home B o y - G i r l H e a l t h G e n e r a l L 0 W 20 10 2 1 - 2 5 1 4 - 2 0 2 5 - 3 3 1 1 - 2 4 1 4 - 1 8 6 - 1 3 1 8 - 2 5 9 - 1 7 5 - 8 2 - 4 6 - 1 0 1 - 5 5 - 7 1 - 4 6 - 1 2 1 - 5 20 10 L 0 w 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . CARSON G R A H A M : C o m m e r c i a l P r o g r a m m e F e m a l e s P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 A R E A 2 A R E A 3 A R E A 4 A R E A 5 A R E A 6 A R E A 7 A R E A 8 P E R C E N T I L E S c h o o l A f t e r M y s e l f O t h e r s . Home B o y - G i r l H e a l t h G e n e r a l H 9 5 o v e r .67 o v e r 85 o v e r 75 o v e r 87 o v e r 76 o v e r 61 o v e r 4 3 o v e r 72 9 5 H I I G 9 0 5 8 - 6 6 7 5 - 8 4 6 0 - 7 4 7 3 - 8 6 5 3 - 7 5 4 9 - 6 0 3 2 - 4 2 5 7 - 7 1 9 0 G H H 80 5 0 - 5 7 6 7 - 7 4 4 9 * 5 9 6 5 - 7 2 4 2 - 5 2 4 0 - 4 8 2 6 - 3 1 4 7 - 5 6 80 A 70 4 4 - 4 9 6 0 - 6 6 / 4 2 - 4 8 \ 5 7 - 6 4 3 1 * 4 1 3 3 - 3 9 29 ; a£-L 4 0 - 4 6 70 A V / \ / \ ^ ^ ^ ^ V E 6 0 3 9 ^ 4 3 5 4 - 5 9 / 3 6 - 4 1 \ 4 8 - 5 6 / 2 4 - 3 0 \ 2 6 - 3 2 / 1 7 - 1 9 3 > - 3 9 60 E R ^ ^ - ^ / \ / \ v 'yS R A 50 3 5 - 3 8 4 9 ~ 5 3 3 0 - 3 5 4lS-<7 1 8 - 2 3 2hjl5 1 4 - 1 6 2 6 - 3 2 50 A G G E 40 3 1 - 3 4 4 2 - 4 8 2 4 - 2 9 3 3 - 4 0 1 3 - 1 7 1 6 - 2 0 11-13 2 0 - 2 5 40 E 30 2 6 - 3 0 3 4 - 4 1 1 9 - 2 3 2 6 - 3 2 9 - 1 2 1 1 - 1 5 8 - 1 0 1 3 - 1 9 30 L 20 2 1 - 2 5 2 5 - 3 3 1 4 - 1 8 1 8 - 2 5 5 - 8 6 - 1 0 5 - 7 6 - 1 2 20 L r°T 10 1 4 - 2 0 1 1 - 2 4 6 - 1 3 9 - 1 7 2 - 4 1 - 5 1 - 4 1 - 5 10 9. W W 5 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 5 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . CARSON G R A H A M : I n d u s t r i a l P r o g r a m m e M a l e s P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 A R E A 2 A R E A 3 A R E A 4 A R E A 5 A R E A 6 A R E A 7 A R E A 8 P E R C E N T I L E S c h o o l A f t e r M y s e l f O t h e r s Home B o y - G i r l H e a l t h G e n e r a l H 9 5 o v e r 6 7 o v e r 85 o v e r 7 5 o v e r 87 o v e r 76 o v e r 61 o v e r 4 3 o v e r 72 9 5 H I I G 9 0 5 8 - 6 6 7 5 - 8 4 6 0 - 7 4 7 3 - 8 6 5 3 - 7 5 4 9 - 6 0 3 2 - 4 2 5 7 - 7 1 9 0 G H H 80 5 0 - 5 7 6 7 - 7 4 4 9 - 5 9 6 5 - 7 2 4 2 - 5 2 4 0 - 4 8 2 6 - 3 1 4 7 - 5 6 80 A 70 4 4 - 4 9 6 0 - 6 6 4 2 - 4 8 5 7 - 6 4 3 1 - 4 1 3 3 - 3 9 2 0 - 2 5 4 0 - 4 6 70 A V V E 6 0 3 9 - 4 3 5 4 - 5 9 3 6 - 4 1 4 8 - 5 6 24TV30 2 6 - 3 2 1 7 - 1 9 3 3 - 3 9 6 0 E R / \ R A 50 3 5 ^ 3 8 4 9 - 5 3 3 0 ^ 3 5 4 1 - 4 7 / \ 8 - 2 3 \ 2 1 - 2 5 1 4 - 1 6 2 6 ^ 3 2 50 A E 40 3 1 - 3 4 ^ . 4 2 - 4 8 2 4 - 2 9 3 3 - 4 0 / 1 3 - 1 7 16^-20 H - W " ^ 2 0 - 2 5 40 E 30 2 6 - 3 0 3V41 1 9 - 2 3 2 6 ^ 3 2 9 - 1 2 1 1 - 1 5 8 - 1 0 1 3 - 1 9 30 L 20 2 1 - 2 5 2 5 - 3 3 1 4 - 1 8 1 8 - 2 5 5 - 8 6 - 1 0 5 - 7 6 - 1 2 20 L T°T 10 1 4 - 2 0 1 1 - 2 4 6 - 1 3 9 - 1 7 2 - 4 1 - 5 1 - 4 1 - 5 10 ° W w 5 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 5 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . CARSON GRAHAM: C o m m u n i t y S e r v i c e s P r o g r a m m e M a l e P R O F I L E P E R C E N T I L E A R E A 1 A R E A 2 A R E A 3 A R E A 4 A R E A 5 A R E A 6 A R E A 7 A R E A 8 P E R C E N T I L E S c h o o l A f t e r M y s e l f O t h e r s Home B o y - G i r l H e a l t h G e n e r a l H 9 5 o v e r 6 7 o v e r 85 o v e r 75 o v e r 87 o v e r 76 o v e r 61 o v e r 4 3 o v e r 72 9 5 H I I G 9 0 5 8 - 6 6 75-84 6 0 - 7 4 7 3 - 8 6 5 3 - 7 5 4 9 - 6 0 3 2 - 4 2 5 7 - 7 1 90 G H H 80 5 0 - 5 7 6 7 - 7 4 4 9 - 5 9 6 5 - 7 2 4 2 - 5 2 4 0 - 4 8 2 6 - 3 1 4 7 - 5 6 80 A 70 4 4 - 4 9 6 0 - 6 6 4 2 - 4 8 5 7 - 6 4 3 1 - 4 1 3 3 - 3 9 2 0 - 2 5 4 0 - 4 6 70 A V V E 6 0 3 9 - 4 3 5 4 - 5 9 3 6 - 4 1 4 8 - 5 6 2 4 ^ 3 0 2 6 - 3 2 1 7 - 1 9 3 3 - 3 9 60 E R R A 50 3 5 - 3 8 4 9 - 5 3 3 0 * 3 5 4 1 - 4 7 / 1 8 - 2 3 > s 2 1 - 2 5 1 4 - 1 6 26^-32 50 A G G E 40 3 1 - ^ 4 4 2 - 4 8 / 2 4 - 2 9 \ s 3 3 - 4 0 / 1 3 - 1 7 loNx^O 11-13 / 2 0 - 2 5 40 E 30 2 6 - 3 0 \ 3 4 - 4 1 / 1 9 - 2 3 2 6 ^ 3 2 9 - 1 2 1 1 - 1 5 ~ ^ c V f 0 1 3 - 1 9 30 L 20 2 1 - 2 5 2 V 3 3 1 4 - 1 8 1 8 - 2 5 5 - 8 6 - 1 0 . 5 - 7 6 - 1 2 20 L S «>• 1 4 - 2 0 1 1 - 2 4 6 - 1 3 9 - 1 7 2 - 4 1 - 5 1 - 4 1 - 5 5 0 - 1 3 0 - 1 0 0 - 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 5 T h e n o r m s v a l u e s s h o w n o n t h i s p r o f i l e a r e b a s e d o n a n a t i o n w i d e ( U . S . ) s t u d y o f 3 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s i n g r a d e s 9 - 1 2 . A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n o f t h e s a m p l e i s g i v e n o n p a g e 12 o f t h e Y o u t h I n v e n t o r y M a n u a l . CARSON GRAHAM1 Community Services Programme Females. 28. PROFILE PERCENTILE AREA 1 AREA 2 AREA 3 AREA 4 AREA 5 AREA 6 AREA 7 AREA 8 PERCENTILE School A f t e r Mysel f Others Home B o y - G i r l Health General H 95 over 67 „ over 85 over 75 over 87 over 76 over 61 over 43 over 72 95 H I I G 90 58-66 75-84 60-74 73-86 53-75 49-60 32-42 57-71 90 G H H 80 50-57 67-74 49-59 65-72 42-52 40-48 26-31 47-56 80 A 70 44-49 60-66 42-48 57-64 31^ >41 33-39 20-25 40-46 70 A V V E 60 39^43 54-59 36,-s41 48-56 / 2 4 - 3 o \ 26-32 17^49 —34 -39 60 E R R A 50 3 5 - 3 8 \ 49-53 / 30-35 4 1 - 4 7 / 18-23 v2 1 - 2 5 y 14-16 26-32 50 A G G E 40 31-34 \ 4 2 - 4 8 / 24-29 3 3 ^0 13-17 1 W 0 11-13 20-25 40 E 30 26-30 3Vil 19-23 26-32 9-12 11-15 8-10 13-19 30 L 20 21-25 25-33 14-18 18-25 5- 8 6-10 5- 7 6-12 20 L s «>. 14-20 11-24 6-13 9-17 2- 4 1- 5 1- 4 1- 5 • » w 5 0-13 0-10 0- 5 0 - 8 0 - 1 0 0 0 5 The norms values shown on th i s p r o f i l e are based on a nationwide (U .S . ) study of 3,000 students i n grades 9-12. A f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n of the sample i s given on page 12 of the Youth Inventory Manual. H o -p-CARSON G R A H A M : . V i s u a l a n d P e r f o r m i n g A r t s P r o g r a m m e M a l e s PROFILE PERCENTILE AREA 1 School AREA 2 After AREA 3 Myself AREA 4 Others AREA 5 Home AREA 6 Boy-Girl AREA 7 Health AREA 8 General PERCENTILE 0-13 0-10 0- 5 0- 8 0- 1 The norms values shown on this profile are based on a nationwide (U.S.) study of 3,000 students in grades 9-12. A f u l l description of the sample is given on page 12 of the Youth Inventory Manual. CARSON GRAHAM: Visual and Performing Arts Programme Females PROFILE PERCENTILE AREA 1 AREA 2 AREA 3 AREA 4 AREA 5 AREA 6 AREA 7 AREA 8 PERCENTILE School After Myself Others.. Home Boy-Girl Health General H 95 over 67 v over 85 over 75 over 87 over 76 over 61 over 43 over 72 95 H I I G 90 58-66 75-84 60-74 73-86 53-75 49-60. 32M2 57-71 90 G H ^--""^ H 80 50-57 67-74 49r59 65-72 42-52. 40Hr8 26-31 47-56 80 A .70 44-49 60-66 /42-48 \ 57-64 31^4T - 33-39 20-25 40-46 70 A V / . \ / V E 60 39x43 54-59 - / 36-41 . \48-56 24-30 26-32 17-19 33-39 60 E R \ / \ / R A 50 35-38 49-53 / 30-35 4P-47 18-23 21-25 14-16 26-32 50 A G \ • ' / ' • • G E 40 . 31-34 \ 42-48 I 24-29 33-40 13-17 16-20 11-13 20-25 40 E 30 26-30 \ 34-41/ 19-23 26-32 9-12 11-15 8-10 13-19 30 L 20 21-25 2v5~/3 14-18 18-25 5- 8 6-10 5- 7 6-12 20 L T°7 10 14-20 11^ 24 6-13 9-17 2- 4 1- 5 1- 4 1- 5 10 9. W w 5 - 0-13 0-10 0-5 0-8 0-1 0 0 0 5 The norms values shown on this profile are based on a nationwide (U.S;) study of 3,000 students in grades 9-12. A fu l l description of the sample is given on page 12 of the Youth Inventory Manual. 

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