UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Engagement et detachement dans le theatre religieux d'Henry de Montherlant. McAuley, Margaret Elizabeth 1968

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
831-UBC_1968_A8 M33.pdf [ 5.04MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 831-1.0104381.json
JSON-LD: 831-1.0104381-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 831-1.0104381-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 831-1.0104381-rdf.json
Turtle: 831-1.0104381-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 831-1.0104381-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 831-1.0104381-source.json
Full Text
831-1.0104381-fulltext.txt
Citation
831-1.0104381.ris

Full Text

ENGAGEMENT ET DETACHEMENT DANS LE THEATRE RELIGIEUX D'HENRY DE MONTHERLANT by M. ELIZABETH McAULEY B.A., University of B r i t i s h Columbia, 1965. A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS i n the Department of French We accept this thesis as conforming to the required standard THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA A p r i l , 1968. In p r e s e n t i n g t h i s t h e s i s i n p a r t i a l f u l f i l m e n t o f t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r an a d v a n c e d d e g r e e a t t h e U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a , I a g r e e t h a t t h e L i b r a r y s h a l l make i t f r e e l y a v a i l a b l e f o r r e f e r e n c e and S t u d y . I f u r t h e r a g r e e t h a t p e r m i s s i o n f o r e x t e n s i v e c o p y i n g o f t h i s t h e s i s f o r s c h o l a r l y p u r p o s e s may be g r a n t e d by t h e Head o f my D e p a r t m e n t o r by h ik r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s . I t i s u n d e r s t o o d t h a t c o p y i n g o r p u b l i c a t i o n o f t h i s t h e s i s f o r f i n a n c i a l g a i n s h a l l n o t be a l l o w e d w i t h o u t my w r i t t e n p e r m i s s i o n . D e p a r t m e n t o f The U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a V a n c o u v e r 8, Canada Date l ^ f c f f ABSTRACT If not i n st y l e at l e a s t i n the basic subject of his plays, Henry de Montherlant can be termed a thoroughly modern playwright for he, l i k e Samuel Beckett and Eugene Ionesco, deals with the dilemma facing twentieth-century man: that man i s nothing i n an i l l u s o r y world devoid of hope. Montherlant does not choose the vehicle of the "anti-theatre" chosen by Beckett and Ionesco to symbolize the f u t i l i t y of man's l i f e and aspirations but rather creates his plays within the framework of the s t y l e of the great c l a s s i c a l tragedies of seventeenth-century France. His i s a purely psychological theatre i n which a l l external action i s kept to a minimum in.order to permit a penetrating study of the mind and soul of the hero. Of the four plays chosen for comparison i n t h i s thesis, we f i n d that three take place i n periods other than the twentieth century. The sixteenth or seventeenth century back-ground does not detract from the p l i g h t of modern man, but rather magnifies the intense suffering of man throughout the ages as he struggles towards a deeper awareness of the s e l f and of the world surrounding him. By using men of heroic stature from these.bygone eras, Montherlant i s able to trans-cend the contemporary and thus prove that the quest for human values i s indeed eternal. Modern man faces the same search for s e l f i d e n t i t y as did medieval or Renaissance man; both must f i n d some way to brave a world of i l l u s i o n s and to r i s e above the uselessness of their own existence. This thesis i s an attempt to show how the Montherlantian hero combats the seeming f o l l y of the "condition humaine." Any study of Montherlant's theatre necessitates a close look at h i s idea of a protagonist. I t w i l l soon be rea l i z e d that a l l the heroes of his r e l i g i o u s theatre are superior beings; t h i s superiority i s not based on wealth or s o c i a l rank but rather on a contempt for mediocrity i n themselves, i n others, and i n the world about them. The desire for superior-i t y on the part of the hero i s revealed i n a constant need to reach beyond himself; he becomes, i n his own mind at least, a superman of the type created by Nietzsche. The Montherlantian hero i s very similar to a martyr for he i s completely under the influence of a genuine passion, i n this case, the passion of h i s own degree of supe r i o r i t y . Like the martyr, he i s driven by this passion to an uncompromising attitude because he refuses to accept any part of a society which appears to him to be mediocre. For thi s reason the heroes of Montherlant's C h r i s t i a n vein are almost a l l estranged from their time and compatriots. Throughout the r e l i g i o u s plays this t o t a l estrangement takes the form of lack of i v understanding and communication between the characters; a fear that any demonstration of understanding would only r e f l e c t a decrease i n the superior q u a l i t i e s of the hero. Montherlant's r e l i g i o u s theatre, l i k e his profane theatre, r e f l e c t s the author's constant search to surpass the hopelessness of human existence. No avenue i s l e f t unexplored and Montherlant through his heroes rejects a l l p o l i t i c a l , r e l i g i o u s , or philosophical "engagements." With the exception of the Cardinal d'Espagne, the r e l i g i o u s protagonist refuses to be a part of h i s p a r t i c u l a r order or rank because he feels that he i s superior to a l l other members of the group. His ro l e i n l i f e , as seen through h i s eyes, i s to achieve a perfec knowledge of the s e l f i n order to become a free person; i n t h i respect he i s an "etre engage" because he uses the world to hi s own advantage to obtain this goal of complete and t o t a l l i b e r t y . However, the more he engages i n th i s inquiry of s e l f knowledge, the more he becomes an "etre d_tache" because he i s unable to bear the mediocrity which he feels surrounds him. The more l u c i d the Montherlantian hero becomes, the more he ' r e a l i z e s the complete f u t i l i t y of human existence. This theme of extreme suffering and the penetrating l u c i d i t y of the hero can be traced from the f i r s t of Montherlant's plays u n t i l the l a s t . With each play the amount of suffering, the degree of l u c i d i t y , and the desire for t o t a l withdrawal from a hopeless V and absurd world are increased. The r e l i g i o u s plays magnify the i n f i n i t e s i m a l nature of man when compared with a supreme being. With each r e l i g i o u s hero, Montherlant presents a char-acter of increasing perception u n t i l he f i n a l l y creates l a reine Jeanne as a perfect p o r t r a i t of someone who has seen i n i t s entirety the nothingness of this world and who has herself become a part of this nothingness. Jeanne l a f o l l e i s the culmination of Montherlant's philosophy of "Service I n u t i l e " , a philosophy designed to aid a person to surpass the "neant" by means of an act which i s i n i t s e l f completely useless. Jeanne has come face to face with this "neant" and she accepts i t ; she has seen not only the vanity of human existence but also the f u t i l i t y of her own actions; she has stripped the world of a l l i t s i l l u s i o n s . Having accepted the "n£ant" so completely that she has become a part of i t , she nevertheless has surpassed the "neant" by means of an act which i s the supreme degree of f u t i l i t y . Although she has no i l l u s i o n s about anything i n this world, including her un f a i t h f u l husband, she g l o r i f i e s her husband although he i s not worth this i d o l i z a t i o n . Jeanne attains her freedom by means of this act which, becomes more be a u t i f u l as i t becomes t o t a l l y useless. The p o r t r a i t of l a reine Jeanne, as has been stated, i s the peak of Montherlantian philosophy, and the other r e l i g i o u s v i protagonists r e f l e c t the various l e v e l s of the art of attaining complete l i b e r t y . From the f i r s t r e l i g i o u s hero, the Maitre de Santiago, to the Cardinal d'Espagne the lure of the "neiant", of t h i s nothingness increases i n each character u n t i l the Cardinal i s f i n a l l y depicted as the symbol of the dilemma of man: despairing, he can neither believe i n himself nor i n what he has done throughout h i s l i f e . He sees the uselessness of i t a l l but he. lacks the courage to do the one thing which would l i b e r a t e him from the overwhelming power of t h i s nothingness; he i s unable to destroy what he has created, that i s , he cannot commit the most f u t i l e act of a l l , destroying what i s already nothing. Like men of every epoch, i n the l a s t analysis, he refuses to see himself as he r e a l l y i s . Of the f i v e r e l i g i o u s protagonists studied i n this thesis, a l l superior people, a l l to a c e r t a i n extent endowed with a remarkable l u c i d i t y , the reader learns only of the sure success of one hero, l a reine Jeanne, who i s able to survive i n a world devoid of a l l i l l u s i o n and hope. The philosophy of "Service I n u t i l e " i s indeed reserved for a very select few - for those who belong to "les gens de quality." ACKNOWLEDGEMENT I should l i k e to express my sincere thanks to Miss Marguerite Primeau for arousing my int e r e s t i n Twentieth Century French l i t e r a t u r e and for her unt i r i n g assistance i n the writing of this thesis. TABLE DES MATIERES Pages Introduction 1 Chapitre Premier Le theatre r e l i g i e u x 13 Chapitre II Syncretisme et alternance 28 Chapitre III La connaissance de soi-meme 52 Chapitre IV Le chevalier du neant 72 Conclusion Service I n u t i l e 93 Bibliographie 105 (Les notes se trouvent a l a f i n de chaque chapitre) INTRODUCTION Une 6tude de 1'oeuvre d'Henry de Montherlant n^cessite quelques d e t a i l s biographiques, car sa vie est l a c l e f a une vraie comprehension de son oeuvre. L'her6dit6, tout comme les evenements, y joue un role s i g n i f i c a t i f . L'influence de ses parents et de ses aieux s'etend partout dans sa vie, et done, dans son oeuvre elle-meme. Henry M i l l o n de Montherlant, ne a Paris l e 21 a v r i l , 1896, e t a i t l e f i l s de Joseph Mi l l o n de Montherlant et de Marguerite Camusat de Riancey. La fa m i l l e de Monsieur de Montherlant i t a i t d'origine espagnole, et c'est de son pere que Montherlant regut sa nature serieuse, orgueilleuse, sombre et arrogante. De sa mere, i l regut l a jo i e de vivre, un desir de bonheur. Une autre personne eut aussi une grande influence sur l a v i e d'Henry de Montherlant; c'est sa grand'mere maternelle. Selon J . N. Faure-Biguet: ...De l a gens qu'abrite 1'hotel,... c'est e l l e l a personnalite l a plus forte, sinon l a plus or i g i n a l e , et i l faut que nous l a connaissions, puisque c'est e l l e qui "dura" l e plus, puisque Montherlant, jusqu'a l'age de vingt-sept ans, v£cut sous son t o i t De sa grand'mere, Montherlant h e r i t a 1'Element exalte et 2 path_tique de sa nature. C'est e l l e qui l u i i n s p i r a , enfant, un int£ret dans l e Jans6nisme, i n t ^ r e t qui atteindra son point culminant avec sa piece, Port-Royal. Pendant sa jeunesse, Montherlant d£couvrit deux i n -fluences importantes hors de sa famil l e qui joueront chez l u i un ro l e s i g n i f i c a t i f : l'une fut un l i v r e , 1'autre son college. Le l i v r e 6tait Quo Vadis? de Sienkiewicz q u ' i l l u t pour la premiere f o i s en 1905. De ce l i v r e naquit sa passion pour 1*antiquity qui devait repr^senter pour l u i l a beauts et l a sensuality. Des l o r s , Montherlant s'int#ressera toujours aux choses romaines, a l a recherche du p l a i s i r , a l a grandeur. Comme l e d i t J . N. Faure-Biguet: ...L'amour des Romains pour les jeux des gladiateurs, ce sera 1'amour des corridas;... 1'amour de l a nudity, l e mepris pour les m£diocres, l a r _ v 6 r e n c e pour deux seuls philosophes, Pyrrhon et Anacreon, le d£tachement sup£rieur.... I l n'est pas question de parler l a d'une influence. Montherlant est enivr£ par ce l i v r e , parce que, ce q u ' i l y trouve, c'est lui-meme.2 A l'age de neuf ans, Henry de Montherlant a d£ja commence l a recherche de son moi. L*autre influence sur l e jeune Henry devait etre son 6cole, l e college Sainte-Croix ou i l devint £tudiant en 1910. La vie coll6giale fut pour Montherlant une revelation. II aima de tout son coeur l a vie de college, les Etudes, ses amis. Cette vie, cependant, fut terminer subitement a cause de son influence dans une society secrete qui s'appelait La 3 Famille: i l y exergait trop d'influence, selon les pretres de Sainte-Croix, i l fut done renvoy<§. Le souvenir de cette expul-sion est rest6 avec Montherlant toute sa vie et cette scene de jeunesse a s e r v i de base a sa piece La V i l l e dont l e prince  est un enfant. V o i l a d£ja l'epoque ou commencent pour Montherlant l a solitude et l ' e x i l . ^ Pendant l'ete de 1909, Henry de Montherlant f i t un voyage tres important dans les Pyrenees et dans l e nord de l'Espagne. C'est l a q u ' i l apprit l ' a r t de l a tauromachie. La tauromachie l u i reVSla son amour de l a violence. II aimait l e danger, l e risque qu'on court dans une arene. Dans son l i v r e , Montherlant, homme l i b r e , Michel Mohrt explique a i n s i les sentiments de Montherlant: Par l'exotisme des courses, l'etranget£ et l a morbidite du jeu, l a presence du danger, l e p l a i s i r de tuer, i l se donne 1'occasion de se prouver a soi-meme son courage. I l se l i b e r e par l e courage physique. 4 Ce courage physique ne sera qu'une fagon d'obtenir l a l i b e r t e , car Henry de Montherlant restera toujours a t t i r e par l a re-cherche de l a l i b e r t e . Trois elements sont done a l a base de l a formation du jeune Henry de Montherlant: l e l i v r e , Quo Vadis? de Sienkiewicz qui l u i donna sa passion pour 1'antiquity, l e college Sainte-Croix qui l u i donna sa passion pour l'ordre des personnes superieures et sa nostalgie de l a communaute, et l a tauromachie 4 qui deviendra un moyen de se libexer. Un quatrieme element l'a i d e r a a se connaitre davantage. Cet Element est l a guerre. Pendant l a premiere ann6e de l a guerre de 1914, Monther-lant demanda a plusieurs reprises a sa mere 1'autorisation de s'engager, mais e l l e l a l u i refusa car e l l e savait qu'elle a l l a i t mourir. Apres l a mort de sa mere en aout 1915, i l fut refuse^ par l'armee pour raison de sant6, mais au mois de septembre 1916, i l put s'engager. Pour l u i , l a guerre fut une autre etape dans l a connaissance de s o i . Comme au college, on y trouvait l'amitie et l a f r a t e r n i t e ; c ' e t a i t aussi une autre espece de l'ordre des hommes superieurs, des hommes c h o i s i s . A l a guerre une grande f r a t e r n i t e s ' 6 t a b l i t entre les soldats; un l i e n commun les rattache l'un a 1'autre. D'apres Michel Mohrt: La guerre, c'est un ordre de l'amiti6 et de l a v i r i l i t e . . . . Cette f r a t e r n i t y d'un "choix plus f o r t que l e sang," e l l e est aussi pour Montherlant, un moyen de l i b e r a t i o n . 5 La guerre est done pour Montherlant une occasion d'affirmer sa l i b e r t e . C'est une occasion de continuer l a recherche de l a connaissance de s o i . C'est une autre occasion de se r£aliser, car on vient a se connaitre en face du danger, de l a mort, et de l a peur. Apres l a guerre, Henry de Montherlant continua sa recherche de l a connaissance de s o i ; i l continua a se libexer. Avec l a mort de sa grand'mere, i l commenca ses voyages pour 5 trouver l e bonheur. On peut appeler cette p6riode de sa vie "a l a recherche du bonheur." Selon Pierre Brodin, "...Monther-lant concoit l a vie comme un nomadisme, qui l u i permettra de poursuivre l a s a t i s f a c t i o n d'un desir sans remede."^ Au cours de ses voyages en I t a l i e , en Espagne, au Maroc, en Algerie, en S i c i l e et aux l i e s Fortunees, Montherlant en vin t a se rendre compte que l e bonheur n' <§tait n i l e p l a i s i r sensuel, n i l a recherche de l a l i b e r t e n i l a connaissance de so i toutes seules. L'homme doit d'abord accepter son rol e dans l a vie, et c e l u i de Montherlant est d'etre E c r i v a i n . Grace a son oeuvre, Henry de Montherlant continuera a se l i b e r e r , a se connaitre. Pour 1'auteur, l a connaissance de soi mine a l a l i b e r t y , mais comment arriver a cette connaissance? Montherlant a cherche a se connaitre pendant toute sa vi e . A l'epoque ou i l accepta son rol e d'ecrivain, i l avait s u i v i bien des routes d i f f e r e n t e s . En 1930, i l e t a i t pret a ch o i s i r ou a rejeter les diverses philosophies de l a v i e . II se reconnaissait comme £tant un homme qui veut etre complet, un homme qui veut tout accepter. C'6tait a l u i de trouver sa morale, de se creer une philosophie qui pourrait s a t i s f a i r e son besoin de l i b e r t y . Henry de Montherlant se rend compte q u ' i l est un homme toujours en evolution. Le pere Barjon nous d i t que "sa vie n'est que l ' h i s t o i r e de ses metamorphoses.... Done, 6 Montherlant d o i t adopter une philosophie qui acceptera sa nature inconstante. Selon Henri Perruchot, "...ce que sent CMontherlantD, et ce q u ' i l veut, c'est l iberer tour a tour les d i f f b r e n t s aspects de sa personnalite." 8 Montherlant se decida a baser sa morale sur l a theorie de l'alternance et du syncre-tisme. Pour 1'auteur, du moins, cette pens£e raene a l a l i b e r t e car i l peut accepter tous les cotes de sa nature; aucune id£e ne domine. II accepte l e meilleur de tout; i l est v r a i a l u i -meme. La qual i t e predominante de 1'evolution d'Henry de Montherlant sera done l'alternance, car pendant toute sa vie i l continuera a c h o i s i r ce qui, pour l u i , repr^sente les meilleures id£es et les meilleurs ideaux. Tout ce qui est d'une haute qual i t e trouvera place dans sa morale. "Oui, tout l e monde a raison, toujours," d i t - i l . "Tout est v r a i , tout est bien." Michel Mohrt nous explique cette morale de 1'alternance: . . . i l n'y a pas de v e r i t e ; toutes les idees sont vraies parce qu'elles expriment toutes un aspect de l a nature; l e poete doit aimer tout, etre tout.... Acceptons l a vie et adorons-la.g Montherlant veut accepter l e paganisme et l a sensuality, et l e Christianisme et l'ascetisme. II aime les taureaux et en meme temps i l veut les tuer pour se montrer courageux. II aime 1*atmosphere f r a t e r n e l l e du college et de l a guerre, mais neanmoins i l a une s o i f inextinguible pour l a solitude et pour 7 l ' e x i l . Henry de Montherlant veut vivre totalement; i l veut a l l e r au bout de soi-meme. "Le drame de 1'ecrivain," d i t Michel Mohrt, "c'est l e drame du vivre et du non-vivre: on peut d i r e que Montherlant, toute sa vie, en a et£ obsede." 1 0 S i l'on 6tudie de pres cette theorie de l'alternance on vo i t que c'est une l u t t e entre 1'action et 1'inaction. Selon L u c i l l e Becker, "the l i f e of Montherlant has been an intimate blending of action and c o n t e m p l a t i o n . L e probleme de 1'action et de 1'inaction est a l a base de l a pensee d'Henry de Montherlant, et done, de l a pensee de tous ses h6ros, car chaque heros, s o i t dans ses romans, s o i t dans les pieces, porte en l u i une part i e de son cr^ateur. Nous avons d&ja d i t que Montherlant ne veut jamais renoncer a quoi que ce s o i t de l u i -meme. II veut etre heureux, s o u f f r i r , triompher, echouer, f a i r e l e bien, f a i r e l e mal, mais, en meme temps, i l veut se connaitre totalement et, pour Montherlant, l a route qui mene a une vraie connaissance de so i est c e l l e du d6tachement. Selon Montherlant, l e grand p6ch6 du monde est l a mediocrity; l e ro l e de chaque homme est done de s'elever au-dessus de l a bassesse. Pour Montherlant, l a chose e s s e n t i e l l e est l a hauteur, car par l a hauteur, l'homme atteindra l a qua l i t y . Dans sa recherche de l a hauteur, l'homme doit s ' e x i l e r . Dans son e x i l , i l commence a se connaitre davantage et, par consequent, i l commence a se l i b y r e r de toutes les 8 i l l u s i o n s de ce monde. L'homme est l i b r e quand i l v o i t l e monde comme un monde d ' i l l u s i o n s , et quand i l comprend que ses actes n'ont pas de sens pour les autres personnes. Les actions de l'homme n'ont de sens que s i e l l e s peuvent jouer un role dans l a recherche de s o i . Michel Mohrt exprime a i n s i l a pensee de Montherlant: L'homme l i b r e a d i t non a"la society. II l a meprise, parce q u ' i l a f a i t l e tour des hommes et des idees. II s a i t ce que cachent les "r£ussites" selon l e monde, i l s a i t l e p r i x q u ' i l faut payer l a g l o i r e et l a richesse. II s'est applique a diminuer sa "surface sociale" fuyant les importants et les importuns. II refuse de jouer l e jeu et se r e t i r e dans sa solitude morale et ma t ^ r i e l l e q u ' i l se trouve lui-meme.^3 Dans les pieces r e l i g i e u s e s d'Henry de Montherlant ce probleme de 1'action et de 1'inaction devient c e l u i de 1'engage-ment et du detachement. Dans sa premiere piece r e l i g i e u s e , Le  Maitre de Santiago (1947), dans La V i l l e dont l e prince est un  enfant (1951), dans Port-Royal (1954), et finalement dans Le  Cardinal d'Espagne (1960), l e lecteur est conscient d'une e f f o r t de l a part de chaque protagoniste pour combattre une vie qui l u i p a r a i t mediocre et i l l u s o i r e . Cette l u t t e entre 1'engagement et l e detachement est sans doute, une l u t t e p a r t i c u l i e r e au vingtieme s i e c l e . La question que l'homme du vingtieme s i e c l e et que l e heros de l a l i t t e r a t u r e contempor-aine doivent se poser est: "Comment vivre dans un monde qui est un monde rempli d ' i l l u s i o n s ? " Pour nous qui vivons au vingtieme 9 s i e c l e et pour l e heros moderne, i l y a deux choix. D'abord, nous pouvons nous engager ou nous lancer dans l a vie, y jouer un r o l e . Nous adoptons l a vue que l a societe vaut l a peine d'etre sauvee et nous essayons d'ameliorer cette society. Nous pouvons nous declarer vigoureusement contre l a guerre, contre l a pauvret§, contre l a cruaut6. Nous pouvons etre pour l a paix, pour l ' i g a l i t e , pour l a l i b e r t e . Le deuxieme choix est c e l u i du detachement. Nous pr£-f6rons alors oublier l e monde et toutes ses i l l u s i o n s . Puisque nous ne pouvons r i e n changer, i l y a l a tentation de tout d ^ t r u i r e . Pour Montherlant, l'acte qui est construction et l'acte qui est destruction sont tout a f a i t l a meme chose. Ces actions n'ont pas de s i g n i f i c a t i o n , car l'homme ne peut r i e n contre l a vanity de l a condition humaine, contre l e niant. La seule chose a f a i r e est de s'exiler de tout pour se trouver soi-meme. Les heros des pieces r e l i g i e u s e s de Montherlant sont p r i s par cette l u t t e entre l e detachement et 1'engagement. Comme chez Montherlant lui-meme, i l y a de 1'engagement et du detachement dans chaque heros. Comme Montherlant, Alvaro dans Le Maitre de Santiago, l'abb6 de Pradts dans La V i l l e , Cisneros dans Le Cardinal d'Espagne, Angilique dans Port-Royal, et l a reine Jeanne dans Le Cardinal d'Espagne se rendent compte, a des degres d i f f e r e n t s , de l a vanite de l a condition humaine. 10 Pour eux aussi, l e monde est i l l u s o i r e et tout ce qu'on f a i t est i n u t i l e . Cependant, les heros, comme leur cr£ateur, sentent que l e refuge l o i n de toutes ces i l l u s i o n s se trouve dans l a connaissance de s o i ; c'est a ce moment-la que l'auteur et ses h€ros renoncent a l a mediocrity g_n£rale pour se mettre a l a recherche de l a hauteur qui menera a l a qu a l i t e . Les h_ros de Montherlant sont disposes a s a c r i f i e r les sentiments, les desirs, et meme les vies des autres personnages pour atteindre ce q u ' i l s appellent leur purete, leur grandeur. Puisque les autres ne sont que des m_diocres, i l semble naturel de les s a c r i f i e r pour que l e heros puisse a l l e r "jusqu'au bout de soi-meme." Selon L u c i l l e Becker: The desire to go beyond and surpass oneself, a passion for purity, the w i l l to transpose l i f e to a higher plane and the pursuit of an ide a l , carrying with i t a f e e l i n g of elevation are common to a l l of Montherlant's plays.^ 4 Les h£ros de Montherlant s'engagent dans l a vie et s'en d£tachent presqu'en meme temps. Henri Perruchot declare que "Montherlant ne m_lange pas des vues diff e r e n t e s ; i l les l a i s s e en place l'une apres 1'autre, et les honore successivement." x 3 Nous avons vu que les h^ros de Montherlant se d^tachent de l a societe des midiocres et de toutes les i l l u s i o n s de ce monde. Dans leur e x i l , i l s s'engagent a se connaitre. I l s se mettent a l a recherche de l a hauteur. I l s s'engagent pour etre vrais envers eux-memes, mais 1'effort pour se connaitre qui est 11 I1engagement p a r t i c u l i e r aux h_ros de Montherlant mene encore au detachement. En atteignant leur but qui est l a hauteur, l e mepris des h£ros pour les autres devient plus f o r t et enfin ces h6ros se trouvent en face d'un vide ou i l s ne voient que trop clairement l e niant. Montherlant c r o i t que l'heroisme et l a noblesse sont des reponses a cette question de l a vanity de l a condition humaine. Nous verrons plus tard, cependant, que cette solution n'est pas tout a f a i t c e l l e de ses h£ros. Ceux-ci doivent braver l e neant avec l a morale de l a grandeur, mais nous ne sommes jamais surs s i cette morale peut durer contre l e nada. Les h6ros des pieces r e l i g i e u s e s peuvent-ils supporter l e f a i t que leur morale de l a grandeur devient l e nada en face d'un etre absolu? C'est ce que nous allons voir dans les chapitres suivants. 12 Notes sur 1'Introduction 1 J . N. Faure-Biguet, Les enfances de Montherlant, (Paris: L i b r a i r i e Plon, 1941), p. 11. 2 Ibid., pp, 20-21. 3 L u c i l l e Frackman Becker, The Plays of Henry de Montherlant, (Ann Arbor, Michigan: University Microfilms, 1958), p. 11. 4 Michel Mohrt, Montherlant, homme l i b r e , (Paris: Gallimard, 12 e edition, 1943), pp. 46-47. 5 Ibid., p. 77. 6 Pierre Brodin, Presences contemporaines, (2 tomes; 3 e Edition; P a r i s : Editions Debresse, 1956), I, p. 149. 7 Louis Barjon, Mondes d'ecrivains destinies d'hommes, (Paris: Casterman, 1960), p. 186. 8 Henri Perruchot, Montherlant, (9 e edition; P a r i s : Gallimard, 1959), p. 81. 9 Mohrt, op. c i t . , p. 111. 10 Ibid., pp. 115-116. 11 Becker, op. c i t . , p. 8. 12 Mohrt, op. c i t . , p. 114. 13 Ibid., p. 129. 14 Becker, op. c i t . , p. 19. 15 Perruchot, op. c i t . , p. 69. CHAPITRE PREMIER LE THEATRE RELIGIEUX Henry de Montherlant a trouve que l e theatre est un moyen des plus convenables pour exprimer ses pensees. Son but est d'etudier l e coeur et 1'esprit de l'homme dans les e f f o r t s que celui-ce f a i t pour se connaitre. D'apres Montherlant, l'homme est en contradiction constante avec les divers c o t i s de sa propre nature, aussi bien qu'avec les autres et avec l a societe dans laquelle i l v i t ; done, l e theatre l u i permet de presenter ses personnages dans des situations ou i l s sont engages dans un c o n f l i t de d£sirs et d'ideaux. Ce que Montherlant veut f a i r e , c'est de regarder en profondeur l'ame de l'homme; les autres personnages de ses pieces servent a accentuer l ' e t a t de l'ame ou l a pens£e inter-ieure de ses h£ros. Selon Michel de Saint-Pierre, "Montherlant {^s'occupej avant tout du coeur humain et peint les hommes dans leur verite.""'' Montherlant a concu l e theatre comme un theatre psycho-logique. Ce q u ' i l exprime dans ses pieces, ce sont les s e n t i -ments et les emotions de ses personnages. II y a peu d'action extirieure, et tout ce qui n'est pas essentiel est elimine. L'auteur lui-meme explique ses idees a i n s i : 14 Une piece de theatre ne m*int_resse que s i 1'action ext£rieure, reduite a l a plus grande s i m p l i c i t e , n'y est qu'un pr_texte a 1'exploration de l'homme;. s i l'auteur s'y est donn£ pour tache non d'imaginer et de construire m£caniquement une intrigue, mais d'exprimer avec l e maximum de ve_-it£, d' i n t e n s i t y et de profondeur un certain nombre de mouvements de 1'ame humaine. 2 Les pieces de Montherlant se composent d'une action int£rieure, d'une analyse psychologique, d'un c o n f l i t entre les personnages aussi bien qu'en eux-memes. Son theatre continue l a t r a d i t i o n du dix-septieme s i e c l e ou les grands comme Racine et Madame de La Fayette 6tudierent en profondeur et en detail les mouvements du coeur humain. La conception qu'a Montherlant d'un theatre psycholo-gique s ' a l l i e a son idee de l'homme sup£rieur. Chaque piece, ou de l a veine profane ou de l a veine r e l i g i e u s e , a comme h£ros un homme qui est a l a recherche de l a connaissance de s o i . Ce h^ros se rend compte q u ' i l se trouve dans un monde d'ou les valeurs transcendantes ont disparu; i l n'a done plus de raison d'etre. Pour combattre l a perte de ces valeurs, l e h£ros de Montherlant 6 t a b l i t sa propre raison d'etre qui comprend ses qualites sup£rieures. A ses yeux, l e heros devient l'homme sup^rieur. Le r o i Ferrante, par exemple, dans La Reine Morte, se rend compte qu'Inez aime profondement son f i l s Pedro, mais i l refuse de comprendre un t e l amour. Pour l u i , l e sentiment d'amour reVele l a faiblesse, done, l a mediocrity. Pour etre un individu sup£rieur, i l ne faut pas 15 etre dependant de quelqu'un ou de quelque chose. On ne v i t pas a cause d'une autre personne; on v i t pour soi-meme. L'action interieure des pieces derive du f a i t que l e heros ne f a i t pas d'efforts pour s'enrichir ou pour atteindre l e pouvoir physique. Chaque heros s a i t que ce q u ' i l cherche est en lui-meme. Les actions du heros et des autres person-nages servent de cadre pour marquer les etapes accomplies dans l a r e a l i s a t i o n de s o i . Les autres personnages font r e s s o r t i r les d£sirs et les c o n f l i t s du heros qui est en t r a i n de l u t t e r pour l a preservation de son moi; i l s font r e s s o r t i r l a l u c i d i t e du heros au moment ou i l v o i t l e monde dans toute sa verite, tout comme i l v o i t son ame dans toute sa nudite - une ame depouiliee de toutes ses i l l u s i o n s . Comme l e d i t L u c i l l e Becker: This l u c i d i n d i v i d u a l , having rejected a l l hope of immortal l i f e or of recompense i n th i s l i f e , having r e a l i z e d the vanity of a l l human things, must s t i l l go forward, must accomplish despite the absurdity of man's destiny.... The Montherlant hero i s com-p l e t e l y e g o t i s t i c a l . Responsible only to himself, he goes forward to meet his destiny, heedless of others. Whatever wrongs he may commit are j u s t i f i e d i f they serve him i n hi s quest for s e l f - r e a l i z a t i o n . 3 Dans son theatre, comme dans l a vie, Henry de Montherlant considere done que l a chose e s s e n t i e l l e est 1'exploration de l'homme et de l'ame de l'homme. L'oeuvre dramatique de Montherlant, qui est peut-etre l a p a r t i e de son oeuvre l a mieux connue, se compose de pieces 16 profanes et de pieces r e l i g i e u s e s ; c'est-a-dire de onze pieces sur un theme profane et de quatre pieces sur un theme chr^tien ou s p i r i t u e l . Montherlant lui-meme appelle cette double ten-dance sa veine profane et sa veine chr6tienne. II est, d'abord, assez frappant que Montherlant, qui d i t q u ' i l ne c r o i t pas en Dieu, s'efforce d'Ecrire un theatre religieux, mais ce theatre a double tendance ne sert qu 1a i l l u s t r e r l e f a i t que son auteur est un homme qui s ' i n t i r e s s e a tous les cot#s de sa nature. Ses drames profanes et r e l i g i e u x sont un autre aspect de sa morale de 1'alternance: i l faut accepter ce q u ' i l y a de meilleur partout. Henry de Montherlant donne une explication de ce double courant dans son oeuvre dramatique dans l a post-face au Maitre de Santiago: II y a dans mon oeuvre une veine chr£tienne et une veine "profane" (ou pis que profane), que je nourris alternativement, j ' a l l a i s d i r e simultankment, comme i l est juste, toute chose en ce monde miritant a l a f o i s l'assaut et l a defense....4 II est juste et logique que Montherlant base plusieurs de ses pieces sur l e s p i r i t u e l a cause de son profond interet pour tout ce qui touche l'ame humaine. Le catholicisme, t e l que concu par Montherlant, l u i sert de moyen pour depeindre un c o n f l i t dans lequel son hiros l u t t e pour s'Clever au-dessus de l a meciiocrite. En d'autres termes, Montherlant emploie l e catholicisme seulement comme source d ' i n s p i r a t i o n . L u c i l l e Becker l e constate: "...In Montherlant's "Catholic t r i l o g y " . . . 17 where, although his subjects are borrowed d i r e c t l y from the h i s t o r y of Catholicism, h i s characters progress and are moti-vated by purely earthly sentiments."^ La nature profane de Montherlant est beaucoup plus for t e que sa nature religieuse, mais n^anmoins ces deux cotes de son e s p r i t nous donnent deux aspects interessants dans son theatre; 1'aspect r e l i g i e u x et une vue profane de l a v i e . Ses meilleures pieces temoignent d'une influence r e l i g i e u s e certaine. Dans son theatre r e l i -gieux, l e c o n f l i t dans l'ame du hiros est une v e r i t a b l e l u t t e qui revele ce depouillement du coeur humain, cette nudite de l'ame mentionnee plus haut. La soeur Ang^lique, par exemple, s u i t une route qui l a mine de l a f o i au doute t o t a l ; e l l e se v o i t en face du n£ant. II faut noter que r i e n n'est cache dans l e theatre de Montherlant; tous l e s doutes, tous l e s sentiments les plus privfis sont exposes aux yeux du monde. Montherlant peut bien nous d i r e : "Dans mon theatre, j ' a i c r i e les hauts secrets qu'on ne peut d i r e qu'a voix basse."6 i Le theatre r e l i g i e u x de Montherlant se composent de quatre pieces dont l e s t r o i s premieres appartiennent a ce que 1'auteur appelle sa t r i l o g i e catholique. Dans les pieces de cette t r i l o g i e , Le Maitre de Santiago, La V i l l e dont le prince  est un enfant, et Port-Royal, se trouvent l'ordre de l a chevalerie, l'ordre du college et l'ordre du couvent. La quatrieme piece est Le Cardinal d'Espagne. De ces quatre 18 pieces, t r o i s ont l i e u au temps jadis - Le Maitre de Santiago et Le Cardinal d'Espagne appartiennent a 1'Espagne du seizieme s i e c l e , et Port Royal a l a France du dix-septieme s i e c l e . La  V i l l e dont l e prince et un enfant a l i e u dans l a France d'aujourd'hui. Deux influences importantes dans l a vie d"Henry de Montherlant jouent un role s i g n i f i c a t i f dans" son theatre r e l i -gieux, l'une est son d£sir d'appartenir a un ordre de gens choisis, et 1'autre, son d£sir de l a hauteur. Dans l a t r i -l o g i e catholique, nous voyons que les heros de ces pieces appartiennent a un ordre dont les membres ont ete c h o i s i s . Dans cet ordre, i l y a des sentiments profonds de f r a t e r n i t y et d'amitiy,- mais chaque heros, neanmoins, continue a s'£lever au-dessus de l a mediocrity en general, et d ' a i l l e u r s au-dessus des gens mediocres du groupe c h o i s i qui est dyja un groupe supyrieur. Le hyros a l'occasion de devenir l ' e t r e souverain. Dans les pieces qui ont l i e u dans l e passy, Montherlant montre, qu'a son avis, c'est le-passy qui a produit les hommes supyr-ieurs. Aux yeux de Montherlant et aussi aux yeux de ses heros, les hommes de l ' a n t i q u i t e et de l a Renaissance atteignirent l a hauteur et l a qua l i t y . Ces hommes ont trouve leur moi. Selon Robert Emmet Jones: Montherlant undoubtedly chose his heroes from e a r l i e r h i s t o r i c a l epochs because there the nobleman had his place i n society, and i f his heroes have renounced 19 that society i t i s only because they cannot tolerate the mediocrity which seems so apparent i n i t . _ Ce d£sir d' etre un elu, ce d<§sir d' atteindre l a quality appartiennent a tous les h^ros de Montherlant, profanes et Ch r e t i e n s . Les h£ros des deux veines sont semblables sous tous les rapports. Comme Montherlant lui-meme, l e hiros s 1occupe de l a connaissance de s o i ; par consequent, i l cherche a etre l i b r e . Son rol e dans l a vie est de trouver l a hauteur, l a q u a l i t _ , l a puret£. II l u t t e pour etre v r a i envers l u i -meme. I l c r o i t que s ' i l peutdevenir un homme superieur, i l pourra atteindre l a l u c i d i t y . C e l l e - c i l u i donnera l a capacity de voir l e monde comme i l l u s o i r e , et done, i l reconnaitra l a vanity de sa condition humaine. Avec cette connaissance l e hyros devient l i b r e ; c'est-a-dire qu'une connaissance profonde de soi et de tous les cotys de sa nature mene l e hyros a l a l i b e r t y , car i l peut accepter l e meilleur de tout. Le hyros de Montherlant trouve l a l i b e r t e parce q u ' i l est v r a i envers s o i . L u c i l l e Becker dyclare que: A l l the protagonists i n Montherlant's t h e a t r i c a l works, despite their multiple differences, belong to the same s p i r i t u a l family; a l l are struggling to re a l i z e what the Infante of La Reine Morte c a l l s the great things within themselves. This noble i d e a l . . . motivates a l l of Montherlant's p r i n c i p a l characters who, i n the course of their search for l i b e r t y and s e l f - r e a l i z a t i o n , scorn hypocrisy and s a c r i f i c e a l l manifestations of mediocrity.g A cause de son desir de superiority, l e hyros s'exile de l a society de son ypoque. Dans son e x i l , i l est s i absorby 20 par son moi q u ' i l n'a n i l a comprehension des autres person-nages, n i aucune communication avec eux. Quelquefois, lorsque l e heros essaie de comprendre un autre point de vue ou de communiquer ses propres idees, i l est s a i s i d'un sentiment de faiblesse, sentiment q u ' i l egalise avec c e l u i de l a mediocrite. Done, i l s'eloigne de tout rapport humain et rentre dans sa solitude pour regagner sa q u a l i t e . Ferrante et l a soeur Angelique sont s i absorbes par leur moi q u ' i l s ne peuvent avoir de rapport avec les autres personnages. Dans La Reine Morte, Ferrante se rend compte qu'Inez aime Pedro et 1'enfant auquel e l l e va donner naissance, mais i l n'est pas capable d'accepter son amour, parce qu'aux yeux du r o i , accepter cet amour s e r a i t se reveler f a i b l e devant sa cour. I l deviendrait un mediocre. Dans Port Royal, soeur Angelique, en face de l a persecution de de 1'archeveque, se trouve remplie de doutes. E l l e ne peut confesser l'inormite de ses peurs et de ses doutes a soeur Francoise, son amie, parce qu'elle reVelera sa faiblesse, et done, sa mecliocrite. E l l e comprend que l a persecution a rendu plus forte l a f o i de soeur Francoise, mais c'est contre l e caractere et l a personnalite de soeur Angelique de l u i demander de l' a i d e . E l l e s a i t qu'elle doi t suivre cette route de doutes toute seule pour rester une femme superieure; pour rester vraie envers elle-meme. Le h^ros lui-meme et ses desirs sont ses seules raisons 21 d'etre. Robert Emmet Jones exprime a i n s i les sentiments de tous les heros, profanes et Ch r e t i e n s , de Montherlant: A l l of the heroes of Montherlant are exiles because they are superior individuals who w i l l not adjust to or accept the society of which they are a part. Their outrageous sense of supe r i o r i t y to anything beyond themselves forbids them th i s adjustment.g Nous verrons plus tard que les heros de Montherlant sont victimes d'eux-memes, car i l s se sont tous trompes sur leur but dans l a v i e . Ce sentiment de defaite est meme plus marque dans les pieces re l i g i e u s e s p u i s q u ' i l y a une double de f a i t e : les protagonistes se trompent sur eux-memes, et i l s se trompent sur leur id£e de Dieu. A l a f i n de chaque piece re l i g i e u s e , i l y a une defaite totale car i l n'y a qu'abandon de l a part de Dieu; i l n'y a plus r i e n que l e neant. Dieu est absent. Les heros de Montherlant se trouvent dans un monde ou leur propre m£rite est, a leur avis, l a seule chose qui a i t de l a valeur. Leur passion de grandeur, de hauteur, est l e centre de leur univers; dans les pieces religieuses, ou Dieu devrait etre l e centre de tout, on retrouve cette obsession de l a quality, ce desir de devenir un etre sup£rieur, un aristocrate de l'ame. Le heros de l a veine chretienne est a l a recherche d'une vie plus eievee, mais cette v i e ne semble avoir r i e n a f a i r e avec Dieu. Le nom de Dieu n'est guere mentionne, car l e h^ros, avec l e sentiment q u ' i l a de sa propre superiorite, c r o i t q u ' i l peut atteindre ce niveau plus eieve par ses propres moyens. Ce que cherchent les h_ros du theatre r e l i g i e u x n'est pas l a grandeur de Dieu, mais leur propre grandeur; c'est l a connaissance de s o i qui reste importante, non pas l a vraie connaissance de Dieu. II y a dans tout l e theatre de Montherlant un manque d'amour frappant, mais cette absence est peut-etre plus remarquable encore dans son theatre r e l i g i e u x . II n'y a nulle part de charity n i d'amour envers les autres, n i envers Dieu. Nous avons deja d i t que Dieu semble absent et par consequent on ne v o i t aucune marque de son amour pour les hommes. S i l e nom de Dieu est mentionni, c'est dans l e sens de "juge" et de "maitre". Et comme l e juge doi t toujours etre apaise, 1'Ele-ment du s a c r i f i c e devient tres important dans ce theatre r e l i g i e u x . Le Dieu de Montherlant prend 1'aspect du J£hovah du Vieux Testament ou l'on s a c r i f i e ou les autres ou soi-meme pour obtenir l a faveur de Dieu et l a puret_, ce qui en derniere analyse, implique que c'est l e protagoniste qui est tout important. Avanttout, l e h_ros l u t t e pour sa superiority personnelle, meme en face de Dieu. Comme dans toutes les pieces de Montherlant, l'idee que se f a i t l e heros de son moi est l a seule chose importante; l a faveur de Dieu est une chose secondaire. Le heros ne pense a Dieu que comme moyen de s'eiever au-dessus de l a mediocrite, c'est-a-dire comme moyen 23 d'atteindre l a q u a l i t y . V o i l a l a faute de tous les h#ros pro-fanes de Montherlant; v o i l a aussi l e p6ch6 de tous ses h6ros Chretiens. L'egolsme colore l'ame et 1'esprit du protagoniste. Comme les h6ros profanes, les protagonistes Chretiens se d^tournent du monde et de leurs contemporains, mais plus important encore, i l s s'exilent de Dieu. Pour eux, l e nada devient une v i s i o n t e r r i b l e car i l s voient l a vanite de leur monde, de leur vie, et l a vanity de leurs actions en face d'un etre absolu et eternel. Soeur Ang6lique, dans Port-Royal, nous exprime ses sentiments l o r s q u ' e l l e se trouve en face du neant. "Pour moi j ' a i franchi les portes des t^nebres, avec une horreur que vous ne pouvez pas savoir et qui do i t n* etre sue de p e r s o n n e . T o u s les heros de Montherlant, profanes et r e l i g i e u x , 6chouent en tant qu'homme parce q u ' i l s t r a i t e n t avec dedain et mepris l e monde dans lequel i l s vivent aussi bien que les sentiments des autres. Les protagonistes Chretiens souffrent une double defaite car, dans leur recherche de l a connaissance de soi et dans leur egoisme, i l s oublient leur Dieu et leur r o l e dans l a vie en tant que chr£tiens. Robert Emmet Jones affirme que: Each Qhero3 refuses his world, perhaps mainly because his world has no place for him. Each i s too e g o t i s t i c a l to give others c r e d i t for the i r virtues and therefore none can l i v e up to h i s exigent standards.^ Absence de Dieu, manque d'amour de Dieu, manque de 24 c h a r i t _ : t a n t d'absences dans l e t h e a t r e r e l i g i e u x nous fra p p e n t . L ' o r g u e i l de chaque heros e x c l u t l a lumiere de l a grace et de 1'amour de Dieu; done, l e p r o t a g o n i s t e se v o i t comme i l veut e t r e vu, non pas comme i l e s t r£ellement. I I r e f u s e d'admettre q u ' i l a b e s o i n de c e t t e grace de Dieu pour a t t e i n d r e son but. I I a une c o n f i a n c e t o t a l e en lui-meme, et c e t t e a t t i t u d e sup£rieure r e V e l e l e heros c h r e t i e n comme et a n t un homme q u i ne s a u r a i t se j u s t i f i e r devant Dieu. Dans sa recherche de l ' a b s o l u , i l a t o u t a f a i t abandonne Dieu. Henry de Montherlant n'est pas ce qu'on a p p e l l e un auteur c a t h o l i q u e , car i l ne cherche pas a p r e s e n t e r une morale c a t h o l i q u e . I I veut e t u d i e r l e s sentiments des d i v e r s personnages dans des s i t u a t i o n s d i f f e r e n t e s . Un i n t e r e t marqu6 pour l e coeur ou pour l'ame raene, naturellement, a l'idee de l a r e l i g i o n , idee a b s t r a i t e comme c e l l e de l'ame. D'autre p a r t , nous retrouvons dans toute 1 ' h i s t o i r e de l'huma-nite un l i e n e ntre l e monde physique et l e monde s p i r i t u e l , e n tre l e corps e t l'ame. Ce que Montherlant veut f a i r e , c ' e s t montrer l e s e f f o r t s d'un homme q u i tend v e r s un absolu e t e r n e l . Ce que nous voyons dans chaque p r o t a g o n i s t e r e l i g i e u x c ' e s t nous-memes, nos l u t t e s avec n o t r e amour-propre et n o t r e o r g u e i l , e t nos doutes sur tout, sauf sur nos propres a c t e s . Montherlant e s t un homme du vingtieme s i e c l e q u i ne c r o i t pas en Dieu, mais q u i r e c o n n a i t tous l e s aspects de sa 25 nature, done, q u ' i l possede une ame. Puisque Montherlant accepte les divers cotes de sa nature, i l peut consid^rer sans d i f f i c u l t ^ , l'ame comme quelque chose de s p i r i t u e l aussi bien que comme quelque chose de cerebral, et i l l'etudie dans son aspect r e l i g i e u x . Dans toutes ses pieces, Montherlant d e c r i t les mouvements du coeur ou de l'ame; dans ses pieces religieuses, i l d e c r i t l e s mouvements des ames dans des milieux Chretiens ou d'apparence chretienne, et 1'aspect r e l i g i e u x sert de cadre a ces mouvements de l'ame. L'auteur s'interesse au theatre r e l i g i e u x parce q u ' i l partage un peu les sentiments de 1'univers catholique, mais surtout parce que l e theatre r e l i g i e u x reprS-sente pour l u i un moyen de continuer a etudier l'ame humaine en profondeur dans des circonstances d i f f e r e n t e s . Ses personnages r e l i g i e u x echouent comme heros C h r e t i e n s parce que Montherlant n'est pas capable de creer des personnages dont l e premier soin n'est pas d'etre un individu superieur a tout l e monde. I l s Echouent en tant que heros C h r e t i e n s , et aussi comme hommes puis q u ' i l s refusent de devenir une pa r t i e de l a societe; i l s n'acceptent aucune responsabilite envers les autres. Cependant, comme etres humains du vingtieme s i e c l e , les protagonistes de Montherlant ont une r£alit£ certaine. Nous pouvons dire que les h£ros, comme Montherlant lui-meme, tendent vers l e s p i r i t u e l , mais ne peuvent pas l e trouver a cause de l'id£e fausse q u ' i l s se font de leur humanite. Jean de Beer exprime 26 cette idee a i n s i : " S i nous disons que Montherlant est un es p r i t r e l i g i e u x qui n'a pas l a Foi, nous serons au bord d'une 12 verite 1 simple." S i nous disons que les protagonistes de Montherlant sont des esprits r e l i g i e u x qui n'ont pas l a Foi, ou qui ne comprennent pas l a Foi, nous serons "au bord d'une verite" simple." Notes sur l e Chapitre Premier 1 Michel de Saint-Pierre, Montherlant - bourreau de soi-meme, (Paris: Gallimard, 1949), pp. 68-69. 2 Henry de Montherlant, "Notes de theatre," dans Theatre, (Paris: Bibliotheque de l a Pleiade, 1965), p. 1101. 3 Becker, The Plays of Henry de Montherlant, pp. 172-173. 4 Henry de Montherlant, Le Maitre de Santiago, (Paris: Gallimard, 1947), p. 133. 5 Becker, op. c i t . , pp. 19-20. 6 Montherlant, "Notes de theatre," p. 1100. 7 Robert Emmet Jones, The Alienated Hero i n Modern French Drama, (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1962), p. 17. 8 Becker, op. c i t . , pp. 29-30. 9 Jones, op. c i t . , p. 17. 10 Henry de Montherlant, Port-Royal, (Paris: Gallimard, l e l i v r e de poche, 1954), p. 143. 11 Jones, op. c i t . , p. 25. 12 Jean de Beer, Montherlant, (Paris: Flammarion, 1963), p. 283. CHAPITRE II SYNCRETISME ET ALTERNANCE II y a dans l a vie et dans 1'oeuvre d'Henry de Montherlant un theme central; c'est l a recherche de l a l i b e r t y . L'auteur et ses h6ros sentent qu'une vraie connaissance de s o i menera a cette l i b e r t i ; done, i l s lutteront toute leur vie pour devenir des etres lucides. Pour atteindre l a l u c i d i t y et done l a l i b e r t e , les protagonistes et leur cr£ateur se rendent compte q u ' i l s doivent essayer d'etre des individus complets. I l s doivent se connaitre sous tous les aspects de l a vie; i l s doivent comprendre les divers cotes de leur nature. Montherlant se rend compte que l a qua l i t y preclominante de l'homme est sa nature contradictoire. En d'autres termes, l'homme est toujours en evolution, mais une Evolution qui ne va pas n^cessairement dans un seul sens. Notre auteur cherche un moyen de vivre qui l u i permettra de continuer son evolution personnelle, Evolution qui comprend 1'acceptation de tous les cot6s de sa nature. Henry de Montherlant a c h o i s i comme guide philosophique l a th^orie de l'alternance et du syncr^tisme. Avec cette philosophie i l peut accepter les meilleures id6es de tout; i l v o i t l a vie "sous tous ses aspects."1 On peut d i r e que l a 29 devise de Montherlant est: "Tout l e monde a raison toujours." Le syncretisme est pour Montherlant une acceptation des id<§es contradictoires, des id£es q u ' i l revele alternativement. Andre Marissel declare que: Prendre l e monde t e l q u ' i l est: c'est, par excel-lence, un imperatif montherlantien. Le prendre t e l q u ' i l est, 1 'adorer sous tous ses aspects - les meilleurs et les p i r e s . L'etre humain etant miroir du monde, i l ben£ficiera du meme es p r i t de tolerance ( l i e a 1 ' e s p r i t de consentement).... 2 Pour Montherlant, l a th^orie du syncretisme et de 1 'alternance mene a l a l i b e r t e de l ' i n d i v i d u parce q u ' i l n'est pas domine par une idee ou par une morale specifique. L'homme peut suivre tous les aspects de sa nature; i l peut etre v r a i envers lui-meme. Par l a l i b e r a t i o n graduelle de sa personna-l i t e , l'homme peut gagner 1 'unite de s o i : unite i n d i v i d u e l l e qui derive du f a i t que l'homme a e t a b l i une sorte d'unite avec l e monde. Michel Mohrt constate que: L'alternance, c'est l e principe du dualisme. La f o i et l e scepticisme; l'ame et l e corps; l e p l a i s i r et l'ascese; 1 'eloquence et l a concision; l a poesie et l e realisme; 1 'action et l a pensee; on trouve tout au long de l a vie et de 1' oeuvre de Montherlant 1 'opposition et 1 'union de deux principes. Homo  duplex, Montherlant est, a toujours ete hante par 1 'unite. Unite de l ' i n d i v i d u , unite du monde.3 Non pas seulement dans l a vie d'Henry de Montherlant, mais aussi partout dans son oeuvre, l a theorie du syncretisme et de 1 'alternance est l a regie d i r e c t i v e . Tous les prota-gonistes montherlantiens sont capables d'accepter leur nature 30 inconstante et d'et a b l i r une sorte d'unit§ dans leur v i e parce q u ' i l s ont tous l e meme but. I l s cherchent tous une profonde connaissance de s o i ; i l s cherchent l a grandeur et l a hauteur. Malatesta explique tres bien les sentiments de son createur quand i l d i t a Isotta: II ne s'agit pas seulement de "vivre, mais de vivre en etant et en paraissant tout ce qu'on est. Car on compose, et composant on n'abuse n i ne desarme personne: on en est pour sa fatigue. Et enfin vivre a i n s i n'est pas s u f f i s a n t : i l faut encore l e vivre avec g l o i r e . 4 En d'autres termes, on peut accepter tout alternativement parce que c'est un moyen de gagner l a l i b e r t e totale; c'est un moyen d ' a l l e r jusqu'au bout de soi-meme. Un des grands themes dans l e theatre r e l i g i e u x de Montherlant est l e c o n f l i t entre 1*engagement et l e detache-ment; entre 1'action et 1'inaction. On v o i t tout de suite l e role que joue cette philosophie du syncretisme et de l ' a l t e r -nance, car 1'engagement et l e detachement sont des id£es tout a f a i t oppos^es. Dans les pieces religieuses, les idees et les sentiments contradictoires sont exprim<§s alternativement et quelquefois, en meme temps. Les heros r e l i g i e u x se d£tachent des choses et des etres pour se consacrer a l a re-cherche de l a hauteur, a l a recherche de l a purete. Cependant, i l s sont p r i s par leur engagement p a r t i c u l i e r , c e l u i de l a connaissance de s o i . I l s s'engagent pour se connaitre; i l s se detachent comme moyen d'atteindre l a l i b e r t y t o t a l e . 31 Pierre de Boisdeffre explique a i n s i cette l u t t e entre 1'engage-ment et l e detachement: Le theatre de Montherlant mele curieusement une attitude de refus du monde exterieur, une sorte d'orgueil glace et un authentique e f f o r t d'appro-fondissement et de r e f l e x i o n . Au fond, nous ne savons pas ce que pense l e Maxtre de Santiago.5 Melange d'action et de contemplation: v o i l a l a base du theatre r e l i g i e u x d'Henry de Montherlant. On trouve dans les pieces religieuses, deux sortes d'etres engages. D'abord i l y a ceux qui par t i c i p e n t en se langant dans l a v i e . Puis i l y a ceux qui s'engagent d'une fagon beaucoup plus personnelle, qui lu t t e n t pour l a hauteur, pour l a superiority de s o i . Justes consequences de l a theorie du syncretisme et de l'alternance, ces deux formes d'engagement se trouvent dans tous les protagonistes, mais on s'apergoit que l'une est toujours plus forte que 1'autre. S i l'on commence par les personnages qui par t i c i p e n t a l a vie, l e nom du Cardinal d'Espagne vient imm<5di at ement a l ' e s p r i t . Le Cardinal Francisco Ximenez de Cisneros, archeveque de Tolede, primat des Espagnes, Grand Chancelier de C a s t i l l e , Grand Inquisiteur de C a s t i l l e et de Lion, regent de C a s t i l l e a l'age de 82 ans, d i f f e r e de l a plupart des heros montherlan-tiens . Le r o i Ferrante, l e Maitre de Santiago, l a reine Jeanne sont plus jeunes que l e Cardinal et i l s sont tous fatigues de l a v ie et de leur r o l e dans l a v i e . Le Cardinal, cependant, 32 v i t a cause de son pouvoir et de ses actes d'etat. Comme tous les heros de Montherlant, l'ame du Cardinal est d i v i s ^ e . Sa profession est c e l l e d'un homme d'Eglise; sa vocation, c e l l e d'un homme d'etat. V o i l a tout l e c o n f l i t de l a piece? Cisneros e s t - i l un homme de Dieu ou e s t - i l un homme politique? En d'autres termes, c'est l e probleme que pose l e choix entre une vie d'action et une vie contemplative. Montherlant exprime a i n s i ce probleme: Le probleme que j ' a i 6voqu6 principalement dans cette piece est c e l u i de 1'action et de 1'inaction, touche dans Service I n u t i l e des 1933, et plus tard dans l e Maitre de Santiago. II me semble q u ' i c i i l d6vore tout l e reste. Car i l n'y a pas de probleme plus essentiel pour l'homme que c e l u i de decider s i ses actes ont un sens ou n'en ont pas.g Des deux natures du Cardinal, sa nature p o l i t i q u e est beaucoup plus forte que sa nature r e l i g i e u s e . Le c o n f l i t s'eleve lorsque Cisneros se rappelle q u ' i l est d'abord un homme d'Eglise. Sans l e savoir, i l se sent coupable parce q u ' i l n'est plus r e l i g i e u x . Pour raffermir son cote religieux, i l porte 1'habit.de l'Ordre des Franciscains plutot que les vetements somptueux d'un card i n a l . Dans son coeur, i l voudrait etre un simple pretre, mais i l n'a pas l e courage de refuser les pouvoirs o f f e r t s par l e royaume. Montherlant declare dans sa postface au Cardinal d'Espagne que: .. .Cisneros, c'estD l'homme qui se trompe sur ce q u ' i l est.... Q C e s O u n e trag£die de l'aveugle-ment, comme Malatesta. ... Ce que chaque etire 33 o f f r e de plus exaltant a 1'amateur d'ames, c'est sa fagon de se mentir a soi-meme.7 Comme plusieurs heros de Montherlant, Cisneros est un homme qui se v o i t comme i l veut etre vu par l e monde. C'est l a reine, Jeanne, qui v o i t l e Cardinal t e l q u ' i l est vraiment. La reine dans sa f o l i e est plus lucide et plus sage que les autres personnages de l a piece. Quoique f o l l e , e l l e se rend compte de l a condition humaine et du f a i t que toutes les actions de l'homme sont i n u t i l e s . E l l e revele son propre univers au Cardinal, un univers de detachement et d'indifference absolus. E l l e parle de l ' i n i i t i l i t e de tous les actes l o r s q u ' e l l e d i t au Cardinal: Je parle au Cardinal d'Espagne, archeveque de Tolede, primat des Espagnes, regent et chancelier de C a s t i l l e , Grand Inquisiteur de C a s t i l l e et de Leon, qui n'est que poussiere comme son bouffon et comme nous tous.Q Dans un melange de f o l i e et de l u c i d i t y , l a reine continue son examen du Cardinal: Agir'. Toujours agir'. La maladie des actes. La bouffonnerie des actes. On l a i s s e les actes a. ceux qui ne sont capables de r i e n d*autre.g "Ceux qui ne sont capables de r i e n d'autre:" paroles qui i n t e n s i f i e n t l e c o n f l i t dans l'ame de Cisneros. II veut suivre l a v i e contemplative, mais i l ne l e veut pas suffisamment pour tourner l e dos a ses ambitions p o l i t i q u e s . Son destin est d'etre un pouvoir temporel et non pas un pouvoir s p i r i t u e l . Apres son audience avec l a reine, l e Cardinal se rend 34 compte combien i l cherche l e detachement des choses du monde. I l explique ses d£sirs a son neveu, Cardona: E l l e annule l'univers avec son nvepris... E l l e m'a f a i t b r i l l e r cette r e t r a i t e que plusieurs f o i s j ' a i p r i s e et plusieurs f o i s tente de prendre. Toute ma vie, j ' a i lutte pour ma solitude. Et i l continue: J ' a i v<§cu quatre-vingt-deux annees; j ' en a i existe neuf. C'est cela que m'a rappele l a reine, ah', s i cruellement. Oh', j ' a i ete recompense. J ' a i eu l e chapeau rouge pour avoir t r a h i Dieu.-^ Un desir de detachement, un desir de r e t r a i t e accablent Cisneros. Mais i l est aveugle au f a i t q u ' i l n'a pas l a force de quitter l a vie p o l i t i q u e . I l ne comprend pas q u ' i l v i t parce q u ' i l regne, parce q u ' i l a ce gout enorme du pouvoir. I l repete a Cardona son desir du detachement: "La passion de l a r e t r a i t e s'est jetee sur moi comme un acces de f i e v r e . " - ^ Cisneros a l a passion de l a r e t r a i t e , mais ce dont i l ne se rend pas compte c'est q u ' i l ne pourrait pas supporter une vie sans pouvoir. Le pouvoir est pour l e Cardinal sa raison d'etre. Si f o r t est cet amour inconscient du pouvoir, que l e Cardinal perd connaissance lorsque son neveu se venge en l u i proposant l a tentation "de devaster son oeuvre par sa mort, a f i n de pouvoir retrouver Dieu...."13 cisneros n'a pas l e courage de se jeter dans l e detachement complet pour trouver Dieu: i l n'a pas l e courage de decouvrir que tous ses actes, et done toute sa vie, n'ont aucun sens. Cisneros ne connait r i e n de l a vie 35 que l a p a r t i c i p a t i o n , que le pouvoir. Parce que l e pouvoir est sa raison d'etre, l e Cardinal meurt apres avoir recu l'ordre du r o i de se r e t i r e r dans son diocese, "Pour y prendre un repos s i nicessaire a votre v i e i l l e s s e , d i t l e r o i dans sa l e t t r e . V o i l a pourtant 1'occasion que Cisneros a cherch6e pendant toute sa vie; v o i l a l a solitude q u ' i l desire. Cependant l e Cardinal a c6d6 a sa tendance l a plus forte; i l a cedi a son gout du pouvoir. Comme l e Cardinal d'Espagne, l'abb6 de Pradts souffre du c o n f l i t entre ce q u ' i l est et ce q u ' i l veut etre. Chez Cisneros, i l y a un c o n f l i t entre 1'action et 1'inaction; chez l'abbi de Pradts, i l y a un c o n f l i t entre 1'amour q u ' i l devrait avoir pour Dieu et son amour pour Souplier.15 Et parce que l'abbe est aveugle en ce qui l e concerne, i l f a i t naitre une s6rie de s a c r i f i c e s . Montherlant lui-meme d i t que: "La V i l l e 1 c pourrait etre nomm6e une tragodie du s a c r i f i c e . " x C'est l'abbi, pourtant homme de Dieu, qui trouve l e s a c r i f i c e l e plus d i f f i c i l e . L'abb6 de Pradts s'engage dans l a vie des sentiments. Comme l a plupart des hommes, i l veut aimer et etre aime. Cisneros et l'abbi ont deux natures d i s t i n c t e s : leur nature r e l i g i e u s e et leur nature humaine. Autant que c e l l e du Cardinal, l a nature r e l i g i e u s e de l'abb6 joue un rol e secon-daire. La vie de Pradts tourne autour de son af f e c t i o n pour 36 1'eleve, Serge Souplier; cet eleve est l a raison d'etre de Pradts. Le c o n f l i t dans l'ame de l'abbe ne vient pas de 1'amour pour ce garcon, mais du f a i t q u ' i l ne peut pas gouverner cet amour qui l u i f a i t oublier Dieu. II n'est pas capable de se garder contre un sentiment de jalousie; i l veut etre l e seul maitre de Souplier. Georges Bordonove resume a i n s i l e c o n f l i t de l a piece: ...Le sujet de La V i l l e n'est point exactement l e renvoi d'un eleve, mais l e c o n f l i t Dieu-Affections humaines qui deehirent 1'abb§ de Pradts et f i n i t par corrompre sa f o i . Moins 1'amitie un peu trouble qui unit Sevrais au p e t i t Sandrier que l a jalousie de l'abbe. 1 7 C'est l a jalousie de 1'abb£ qui rend tres dangereux son amour pour Souplier. E l l e sert a i n t e n s i f i e r ses sentiments et a l u i f a i r e oublier q u ' i l est pretre. Aveugl6 par ses sentiments, i l c r o i t fermement que toutes ses actions sont valables pour protiger son influence sur l e jeune gargon et i l n'hesite pas a employer une ruse atroce pour garder Souplier sous sa seule a u t o r i t i . I l l e constate l o r s q u ' i l d i t a son Superieur: I l n'y a qu'une chose qui compte en ce monde; 1'affection qu'on a pour un etre; pas c e l l e q u ' i l vous porte, c e l l e qu'on a. Avoir une affection, c'est cela qui donne l e plus 1'idee de ce que doit etre l e c i e l . J'en avais une pour cet enf ant.-^g L'abbe de Pradts se trompe sur son role de pretre. I l ne veut pas mener une ame vers Dieu; i l veut amener un jeune garcon vers lui-meme pour prendre l a place de ses parents. II veut etre l e pere naturel plutot que l e pere s p i r i t u e l . C'est l e Superieur qui l u i explique son erreur: Vous avez aime une ame, cela est hors de doute, mais ne 1'avez-vous aimee qu 1a cause de son enveloppe charnelle qui avait de l a g e n t i l l e s s e et de l a grace?^g Comme Andre Sevrais, qui plus tot dans l a piece se v i t refuser l a permission de revoir son ami, Souplier, l'abbe ne peut revoir son ancien Sieve. Ce s a c r i f i c e est beaucoup plus d i f f i c i l e pour 1' abbe" que pour Sevrais parce que 1' amour de Sevrais est pur; c'est-a-dire, son amour n'a r i e n d'dgolste. L ' a f f e c t i o n de 1'abbe, cependant, est un amour Sgolste. Pour Pradts, Souplier represente une solution a un probleme personnel. I l c r o i t q u ' i l peut aimer Dieu a travers son amour d'une per-sonne, mais i l est tellement engage" dans sa propre passion q u ' i l oublie presque 1.'existence de Dieu. Jusqu 1 a ce q u ' i l puisse retrouver Dieu et son propre role comme pretre, i l ne peut que sentir, apres avoir accepte l'ordre de son superieur, l e poids enorme de son s a c r i f i c e : Toujours l e sacrifice'. Toujours c r o i r e q u ' i l n'y a generosite" que l a ou i l y a sacrifice'. Nous avons ete Sieves la-dedans, nous y eievons les autres. 2 o La p a r t i c i p a t i o n a l a vie mene au s a c r i f i c e de sa vie pour Cisneros, pour 1'abbe de Pradts, cela mene au s a c r i f i c e d'une aff e c t i o n humaine. II y a aussi une autre sorte d'engagement dans l e 38 theatre de Montherlant qui est depeint par l e Maxtre de Santiago et l a soeur Angelique. L'engagement p a r t i c u l i e r de ces protagonistes est leur e f f o r t pour se connaitre. Le sujet du Maxtre de Santiago et de Port-Royal est l e c o n f l i t qui s'ileve quand un personnage se ditache completement des autres et des choses pour atteindre l a connaissance de s o i . Cette l u t t e pour 1*elevation au-dessus de l a mediocrity gen£rale est l a cause du s a c r i f i c e de Mariana, l a f i l l e du Maitre de Santiago, et dans Port-Royal, de l a soeur Angelique elle-meme. Dans Le Maitre de Santiago, comme dans Port-Royal, l a lu t t e pour l a hauteur, pour l a grandeur fournit tout l ' i n t i r e t des pieces. L ' i n t i r e t p r i n c i p a l du Maitre vient de 1'etude psychologique d'un homme qui cherche a devenir un C h r e t i e n modele. L'ironie, c'est qu'Alvaro se v o i t comme i l veut etre vu, c'est-a-dire, comme un chr^tien p a r f a i t , mais, en eff e t , i l est sans doute l'homme l e moins p a r f a i t de l a piece. I l oublie l a premiere l o i du christianisme, c e l l e du veri t a b l e amour de Dieu qui comprend humility, et amour du prochain, aussi bien qu'union avec Dieu. Montherlant d y c r i t a i n s i son hyros espagnol: Je n'ai pas f a i t d'Alvaro un chretien modele, et i l est par instants une contrefacon du chrytien; presque un pharisien. I l reste en deca du christianisme. II sent avec force l e premier mouvement du christianisme, l a renonciation, l e Nadar i l sent peu le second, 1'union, l e Todo. 2^ Dans l e cas d'Alvaro, l a renonciation egale l e dytache-ment. C'est l ' a v i s du Maitre q u ' i l peut devenir un Chretien modele par l e detachement t o t a l . I l se detache de tout, non pas pour aimer Dieu davantage mais pour devenir une meilleure personne. II ne pense pas a Dieu, mais a lui-meme; c'est son propre orgueil qui l e f a i t l u t t e r pour etre l e plus pur des hommes. C'est 1'orgueil qui l u i f a i t d i r e a Bernal: "...Je suis l'homme que tous devraient e t r e . " 2 2 V o i l a l e pech£ d'Alvaro: i l ne l u t t e pas pour l a grandeur de l a condition humaine; i l ne l u t t e que pour l a grandeur du Maitre de Santiago. Parce q u ' i l est preoccupS par l a grandeur, i l a un manque t o t a l de charitS envers les autres. Alvaro n'a pas d'amour pour ceux qui ont besoin de l u i en tant qu'etre humain. II sent que "Tout etre humain est un obstacle pour qui tend a Dieu." Pis encore, i l ne possede aucun sentiment d1amour envers sa propre f i l l e . Entierement plong<§ dans sa recherche de l a hauteur, i l ne v o i t pas 1'orgueil qui corrompt toute sa vie, et done, i l peut declarer sans sentiment de c u l p a b i l i t y : L ' e f f o r t que je f a i s a i t , par charitS pour e l l e , pour pa r a i t r e m'interesser a cette vie s i Strangere a l a mienne, m'epuisait.24 Le Maitre de Santiago est s i engage dans sa propre g l o i r e q u ' i l ne peut r i e n donner de s o i : Sa "charite" n'est que mepris et detachement; e l l e l e d e l i v r e des hommes impurs; e l l e est l e pr i x de sa s o l i t u d e . 2 5 40 L*engagement du Maitre de Santiago est une l u t t e pour trouver l a hauteur; c ' e s t u n refus de l a communion avec Dieu et avec les. autres. Alvaro lui-meme constate sa pens£e et son espoir: "Et bien'. pexisse l'Espagne, pSrisse 1'univers*. Si je fa i s mon salut...tout est sauve et tout est accompli."26 Comme l e Maitre de Santiago, l a soeur AngSlique est a l a recherche de l a hauteur. Aussi orgueilleuse qu'Alvaro, e l l e se rend compte a l a f i n de l a piece que sa morale de l a grandeur est i n u t i l e en face du nSant; mais e l l e n'a r i e n d'autre pour 1'aider a supporter les "Tenebres". Le centre de 1'univers de l a soeur AngSlique n'est plus Dieu, n i l e JansSnisme; son moi est devenu l a seule chose importante. Port-Royal d i f f e r e du Maitre de Santiago, cependant, parce que l e doute l a tourmente; e l l e doute de son r o l e dans l a vie, e l l e doute de ses propres actions, et enfin, e l l e doute de 1'existence de Dieu. Alvaro ne souffre aucun doute; i l continue, sans hesitation, sa recherche de l a grandeur. L u c i l l e Becker exprime que: Only the Maitre de Santiago never questions his own actions, and the thought that a l l he has ever done may be completely vain does not enter his mind. He goes forward to his goal with complete confidence i n himself and i n the justness of his cause, c e r t a i n of attaining f i n a l happiness.27 Montherlant d S c r i t a i n s i l a route qu'Ang§lique s u i t dans l a piece: "La soeur Ang^lique s'achemine, d'un cours logique et prevu, vers les "Portes des Tenebres"" 2 8 Comme Alvaro, l a soeur Angelique est membr-e d'un groupe 41 supSrieur. E l l e appartient a Port-Royal, un couvent qui est reconnu comme etant supirieur a l a plupart des couvents. Membre de ce groupe, e l l e en est une des rel i g i e u s e s les plus puissantes, puisque non seulement e l l e a apporte au couvent une dot enorme, mais e l l e est aussi l a niece du "Grand Arnauld". D i j a presque l a r e l i g i e u s e l a plus importante au sens materiel, Angelique, neanmoins, continue sa recherche de sa propre grandeur. La base de son probleme est qu'elle manque de f o i . L' i n t e r e t de l a piece vient d'une etude psychologique qui revele l a grande peur d'Angelique en face de l a persecution du couvent. Wallace Fowlie explique a i n s i l e c o n f l i t dans l'ame de l a soeur Angelique: ...Soeur Angelique, a niece of " l e Grand Arnauld," one of the s p i r i t u a l directors of Port-Royal, undergoes a devastating experience of r e l i g i o u s doubt. It i s because of her that the play has been c a l l e d a tragedy of fear. ...Her suffering because of the imminent persecution i s i n r e a l i t y her suffering over her r e l i g i o u s doubts, which she feels are beginning to manifest themselves. 2g Effrayee par ses doutes, effrayee parce qu'elle a vu l e neant, l a soeur Angelique ne peut que demander a 1 *Archeveque: Monsieur, ne nous mettez pas dans ce vide. II y en a d'entre nous que Dieu q u i t t e r a i t , et qui se quitt e r a i e n t elles-memes; e l l e s tomberaient en poussiere. Vous ne savez pas ce que vous tentez-.^g Nous avons deja. vu que tous les protagonistes r e l i g i e u x de Montherlant sont des etres engages; mais en meme temps, ces personnages sont des etres detaches. Idee contradictoire, 42 mais idee qui a comme base l a morale du syncretisme et de 1'alternance. A cause de l a nature inconstante de l'homme, cette facon de vivre est tout a f a i t n a t urelle. Chez les heros reli g i e u x , sauf dans l e cas du Cardinal d'Espagne, l e detache-ment est l a nature l a plus f o r t e . Les heros montherlantiens s'engagent pour se connaitre, mais cet engagement mene au detachement, car chaque heros se v o i t comme un etre superieur a tout l e monde. Ce detachement prend plusieurs formes: detachement des choses, detachement des etres, detachement de l a vie elle-meme. On peut d i r e que l a soeur Angeiique, l'abbe de Pradts, Alvaro et l a reine Jeanne se detachent des choses de ce monde. II est juste que l a soeur et l'abbe se detachent des choses, car, i l s sont tous les deux consacres a Dieu. Mais l e detache-ment d'Alvaro et de l a reine nous frappe davantage. Alvaro se detache des choses tangibles car i l veut devenir l e plus pur des hommes. II regarde avec mepris 1'argent, l a nourriture et les vetements. II ne s'inquiete pas du tout des agrements de l a v i e . II est tellement detache des choses de ce monde q u ' i l peut d i r e sans hesitation: "Si Mariana et votre f i l s ont entre eux ce sentiment que vous dite s ; q u ' i l s se marient t e l s q u ' i l s sont. I l s seront pauvres, mais l e Christ leur lavera les p i e d s . " 3 1 Sa purete d'ame est l a seule chose importante. La reine Jeanne d i f f e r e dans les raisons de son 43 . detachement. E l l e se detache des choses parce qu'elle a vu l a vanit£ de l a condition humaine. Son detachement n'est pas l a renonciation chretienne d*Alvaro, mais l e refus n i h i l i s t e de jouer un r o l e dans l a v i e . E l l e a horreur de l a v i e . Pour e l l e l ' o u b l i est bon parce qu'elle ne veut plus agir. E l l e se rend compte de l a vanite de tous les actes. E l l e prend comme devise: "II faut toujours tout remettre au lendemain. Les 32 t r o i s quarts des choses s'arrangent d'elles-memes. Le detachement t o t a l de l a reine est sa solution au probleme de l a vanite de l a condition humaine. Pour trouver l a hauteur, pour proteger leur propre raison d'etre, tous l e s protagonistes rel i g i e u x , sauf l'abbe de Pradts, se detachent des etres. Ce detachement des etres est parfaitement naturel parce que tous les heros veulent devenir des etres superieurs; i l s veulent s'eiever au-dessus de l a mediocrite generale. Le Cardinal d'Espagne se detache des autres parce q u ' i l a beaucoup de pouvoir. Les autres sont jaloux de l u i , et l e cardinal veut garder sa p o s i t i o n d'auto-r i t e . Parce q u ' i l est entoure d'ennemis qui repetent sans cesse: "...Je donnerais un an de ma vie pour q u ' i l meure tout de suite, et q u ' i l souffre bien," l e cardinal se t i e n t a l ' e c a r t de tout rapport humain. Alvaro se detache des etres parce q u ' i l veut garder son ame pure. Son detachement semble cruel parce q u ' i l ne veut 44 avoir aucun contact avec sa f i l l e . Alvaro est s i orgueilleux q u ' i l c r o i t q u ' i l est sup^rieur a sa f i l l e meme. Rempli d'amour-propre, i l d i t : "Les attachements me deplaisent. Et puis, i l continue de parler a i n s i de sa f i l l e : Les enfants digradent. Nous ne nous voyions qu'aux repas, et de chacun de ces repas je sorta i s un peu diminue. Jeune f i l l e , sa vie est devenue quelque chose q u ' i l f a l l a i t prendre au s i r i e u x , et qui cependant ne m'interessait pas.2 5 Montherlant d i t lui-meme, qu'Alvaro n'a aucun sentiment de 1'amour de Dieu. La soeur Angelique c r o i t comme Alvaro, qu'elle est une personne superieure, superieure a presque toutes les r e l i -gieuses du couvent. A cause de ce sentiment, e l l e s'est d£tach#e des autres r e l i g i e u s e s pour s'Clever plus haut. Son detache-ment et sa solitude continuent meme lor s q u ' e l l e se rend compte qu'elle n'a plus l a f o i . Comment peut-elle confesser, e l l e , l a niece du Grand Arnauld, qu'elle a vue le neant? qu'elle a peur de l a persecution parce qu* e l l e a perdu toute f o i r e l i -gieuse? Remplie de doutes r e l i g i e u x et de doutes personnels, e l l e d o i t suivre une route "...que ses forces ne peuvent porter."36 La soeur Angelique ne r e c o i t aucun confort du f a i t qu'elle s'imagine etre superieure aux autres. L u c i l l e Becker declare que: Despite the exalted opinion she has always held of herself, she i s the only s i s t e r possessed of such overwhelming terror before the imminent 45 persecution that she succumbs to a fear which prevents her from praying and causes a loss of faith.27 La reine Jeanne d i f f e r e des autres protagonistes du theatre r e l i g i e u x parce qu'elle refuse categoriquement de jouer aucun r o l e dans l a vi e . E l l e se detache totalement des etres comme e l l e se dStache des choses et de l a vie elle-meme. Avec l a mort du r o i , son mari, l a reine a vu l e riiant; i l n'y aura plus pour e l l e n i bonheur, n i affection, n i r i e n d'autre. E l l e d i r a non a tout contact humain pour proteger l e souvenir de son mari. Ce souvenir est l a seule chose qui compte dans ce monde, dans ce monde ou tout est i n u t i l e . E l l e explique ses raisons au Cardinal: "La j o i e des autres me f a i t peur. ...Je demeurai immobile dans 1'ombre, couchee sur l e souvenir de c e l u i que j'aimais, comme une chienne sur l e tombeau de son maitre."38 Le souvenir d'un passS qu'elle g l o r i f i e et immortalise meme sans cause, devient l a seule raison d'etre de l a reine Jeanne. Plusieurs protagonistes r e l i g i e u x ne se detachent pas seulement des choses et des etres, mais de l a vie elle-meme. La reine Jeanne, l a soeur AngSlique, l e Maitre de Santiago et l'abb€ de Pradts, ont tous horreur de l a vie t e l l e q u ' i l s l a voient. Alvaro et AngSlique ont horreur de l a vie mediocre; i l s sont tous les deux a l a recherche de l a hauteur. Jeanne, cependant, a horreur de l a vie parce qu'elle a vu l a vanite de 46 toute action humaine. E l l e ne v o i t que l e neant, et done, son indifference est hasee sur une vue n i h i l i s t e du monde. Le detachement t o t a l de l a reine nous frappe lo r s q u ' e l l e d i t : Vous l'avez d i t vous-meme; i l y a deux mondes, l e monde de l a passion, et l e monde du r i e n : c'est tout. Aujourd'hui je suis du monde du r i e n . Je n'aime ri e n , je ne veux rien, je ne- r e s i s t e a r i e n . . . L*engagement t o t a l dans l e n£ant egale l e detachement t o t a l de l a v i e . Comme etre superieur, l a soeur Angelique, a horreur de l a vie mediocre, mais aussi a l a f i n de l a piece, e l l e a horreur de sa vie r e l i g i e u s e . Detachee du monde mediocre, Angelique se detache de l a vie r e l i g i e u s e a cause de sa perte de l a f o i . Etre lucide, e l l e a vu l a vanite de l a condition humaine et n i sa morale de l a grandeur de s o i , n i sa f o i f a i b l e ne peuvent 1'aider sur l a route du n6ant. La vie re l i g i e u s e n'est plus pour e l l e l a solution au probleme de l a v i e . Alvaro est un personnage moins complique que l a soeur Angelique. I l est sur de son but dans l a vie; i l veut etre l e plus pur des hommes. Le Maitre de Santiago a horreur de l a vie mediocre parce que tout ce qui est mediocre l'empeche de devenir un Chretien modele. Done, i l se detache totalement de tout ce qui est, a ses yeux, mediocre. Sa f i l l e est une par t i e de cette vie mediocre; done, e l l e est aussi rejetee. Pour Alvaro, sa f i l l e est un symbole de sa propre vie mediocre 47 avant sa l u t t e pour l a grandeur de s o i . Engage dans cette l u t t e , i l ne veut plus s'abaisser a cause de sa f i l l e : A i n s i , ce que je suis aux yeux de Dieu, ce que je suis a mes propres yeux, devrait etre compromis, devrait etre ruine a. cause de quelque chose qui n'existe que par un de mes instants de faiblesse'. Jamais'. 40 Rempli d'amour-propre, Alvaro n'est pas capable de sympathiser avec les mSdiocres. II ne peut avoir de sentiment d'amour pour sa f i l l e tant qu'elle ne 1'aide pas a atteindre l a purete. Henry de Montherlant expligue a i n s i l e caractere du Maitre: Quant a Alvaro, qu'est son amour de Dieu, sinon 1'amour pour 1'idSe q u ' i l se f a i t de soi?... L o r s q u ' i l aime enfin sa f i l l e , c'est encore a travers cette idee, c'est-a-dire a travers soi q u ' i l aime; i l 1 1aime du jour, et du jour seulement, qu'elle preserve sa purete a l u i . Alvaro est un conquerant degoute qui se prSfere a toute conquete .4^ Chez 1'abbS de Pradts, i l y a aussi une sorte de detachement; detachement de l a vie de pretre parce q u ' i l ne peut egaler son amour pour le jeune gargon, Souplier, a sa voca-t i o n de pretre. II est presque pret a renoncer a sa vie r e l i g i e u s e , parce q u ' i l ne peut accepter l e s a c r i f i c e q u 1 i l d o i t f a i r e . II c r i e au SupSrieur: "Mais non, vous n'allez pas me l'enlever quand i l est encore en vie'. II n'y a que l a mort qui a i t l e d r o i t de vous enlever ce qu'on aime ainsi."42 L'abbe de Pradts accepte enfin l e s a c r i f i c e de son eieve a cause de sa d i s c i p l i n e r e l i g i e u s e . II ne 1'accepte pas, comme Sevrais, par amour, mais par une d i s c i p l i n e rigoureuse de s o i . Au fond 48 de son coeur, l'abbe de Pradts est un homme qui veut refuser un monde ou i l y a un manque de tolerance pour un amour q u ' i l c r o i t pur. Ce que nous avons vu dans ce chapitre, c' est une etude psychologique des c o n f l i t s chez les heros r e l i g i e u x . Le con-f l i t central est c e l u i de 1'action ou de 1'inaction; de 1'en-gagement ou du detachement. Tous les protagonistes nous ont montre leurs natures inconstantes; i l s nous ont revele qu'"on ne peut juger un homme. Le meilleur est capable du pire, l e pi r e du meilleur. "La est l a v i e . " ^ Pour reveler tous les aspects de sa nature, Henry de Montherlant a p r i s comme morale 1'alternance et l e syncretisme. Parce que ses pieces sont des etudes psychologiques de l a nature humaine, ses personnages revelent aussi leurs divers points de vue. Dans les pieces religieuses, l a personnalite de chaque heros se d i v i s e entre 1'engagement et l e detachement. Tous occupes par leur propre raison d'etre, les heros em-ploie n t les deux methodes alternativement, et quelquefois en meme temps, dans l a recherche de l a connaissance de s o i . Comme pour Montherlant, l a morale du syncretisme et de l'alternance est necessaire aux protagonistes rel i g i e u x , car l'homme est un veri t a b l e noeud de questions et de contradictions. 49 Notes sur l e Chapitre II 1 Jacques de Laprade, Le theatre de Montherlant, (Paris: Editions Denoel, 1950), p. 54. 2 Andre Marissel, Montherlant, (Paris: Classiques du vingtieme s i e c l e , Editions Universitaires, 1966), p. 61. 3 Mohrt, Montherlant, homme l i b r e , p. 230. 4 Henry de Montherlant, Malatesta, (35 e edition; P a r i s : Gallimard, 1948), pp. 55-56. 5 Pierre de Boisdeffre, Metamorphose de l a l i t t e r a t u r e de Barres a Malraux, (Paris: Editions A l s a t i a , 1950), p. 317. 6 Henry de Montherlant, "Postface," Le Cardinal d'Espagne, (Paris: Gallimard, 1960), pp. 212-213. 7 Ibid., p. 213. 8 Montherlant, Le Cardinal d'Espagne, p. 119. 9 Ibid., p. 131. 10 Ibid., p. 162. 11 Ibid., p. 164. 12 Ibid., p. 168. 13 Ibid., p. 214. 14 Ibid., p. 205. 15 c_f. Dans Theatre, Ed i t i o n de l a Pleiade, 1954, on trouve l e nom de Soubrier dans La v i l l e dont le. prince est  un enfant. Dans l a 20 e e d i t i o n Gallimard de La v i l l e , on trouve l e nom de Souplier. 50 Dans Henry de Montherlant de Georges Bordonove (Paris, 2 e edition, 1958), on trouve l e nom de Sandrier. 16 Henry de Montherlant, La v i l l e dont l e prince est un enfant, (20 e edition; P a r i s : Gallimard, 1957), p. 11. 17 Georges Bordonove, Henry de Montherlant, (2 e edition; P a r i s : Classiques du vingtieme s i e c l e , Editions Universitaires, 1958), p. 80. 18 Montherlant, La v i l l e , p. 169. 19 Ibid., p. 179. 20 Ibid., p. 174. 21 Montherlant, Le Maitre de Santiago, p. 135. 22 Ibid., p. 77. 23 Ibid., p. 69. 24 Ibid., p. 71. 25 Laprade, Le theatre de Montherlant, pp. 83-84. 26 Le Maitre de Santiago, p. 129. 27 Becker, The Plays of Henry de Montherlant, p. 84. 28 Montherlant, "Preface," Port-Royal, p. 8. 29 Wallace Fowlie, Dionysus i n Paris, (London: Victor Gollancz Ltd., 1961), p. 107. 30 Port-Royal, p. 127. 31 Le Maitre de Santiago, p. 82. 32 Le Cardinal d'Espagne, p. 90. 33 Ibid., p. 16. 34 Le Maitre de Santiago, p. 67. 35 Ibid., p. 71. 36 Port-Royal, p. 128. 51 37 Becker, op. c i t . , p. 104. 38 Le Cardinal d'Espagne, p. 113. 39 Ibid., p. 132. 40 Le Maitre de Santiago, p. 76. 41 Montherlant, "Notes de theatre," Port-Royal, p. 150. 42 La v i l l e dont l e prince est un enfant, p. 167. 43 Laprade, op. c i t . , p. 162. CHAPITRE III LA CONNAISSANCE DE SOI-MEME Pour Henry de Montherlant et pour ses heros, une connaissance totale de soi est l a chose l a plus importante. Avec cette connaissance tous croient q u ' i l s atteindront l a l i b e r t y car i l s reconnaissent l a vanite de l a condition humaine; l e moi est l a seule chose qui compte dans cette v i e . Montherlant arrive a une connaissance de soi l o r s q u 1 i l peut l i b e r e r et done accepter tous les d i f f e r e n t s aspects de sa nature. II veut accepter l e meilleur des idSes et des idSaux pour se reconnaitre comme etre complet; aucune idee ne domine. De cette facon, Montherlant est v r a i a lui-meme et done i l est l i b r e , car pour Montherlant l a l i b e r t y vient lorsqu 1on peut s'accepter totalement soi-meme et accepter l e meilleur de tout. Les protagonistes r e l i g i e u x , cependant, d i f f e r e n t de leur cryateur. l i s refusent d*accepter l e meilleur de tout; i l s refusent de se rendre compte de l a valeur des idyes et des sentiments des autres. I l s n'acceptent qu'eux-memes. Comme Montherlant, chaque heros est a l a recherche de l a connaissance de s o i , mais cette connaissance est, pour l u i , une conception de sa propre s u p y r i o r i t e . Sur de cette supyriorite, l e hyros 53 mele a l a recherche de l a connaissance de s o i l a recherche de l a grandeur, de l a hauteur. Chaque p r o t a g o n i s t e e s t , au dSbut de sa recherche, un e t r e l u c i d e q u i se rend compte de l a v a n i t y de l a c o n d i t i o n humaine et du f a i t que sa v a l e u r p e r s o n n e l l e e s t l a s e u l e chose q u i compte dans un monde p r i v y de v a l e u r s t r a n s -cendantes. L a trageclie des p i e c e s r e l i g i e u s e s e s t que l e s hSros cherchent s u r t o u t l a hauteur. S i occupy par sa propre grandeur, et d£chir6 par sa nature i n c o n s t a n t e , l e hSros r e l i g i e u x n'accepte que l e cotS de sa p e r s o n n a l i t S q u i l e menera a l a q u a l i t y . I I a peur d'accepter ou de r e V ^ l e r l e cote mecliocre de sa nature q u i l ' e x i l e r a i t de l a grandeur car, pour l u i , l a s u p e r i o r i t y de son moi e s t l a se u l e chose q u i n'est pas i n u t i l e dans ce v a i n monde. Pendant sa recherche de l a connaissance de s o i , l e hyros perd sa l u c i d i t y p y n y t r a n t e p u i s q u ' i l r e f u s e de se v o i r t e l q u ' i l est? i l ne v o i t que ce q u ' i l veut v o i r , c ' e s t - a - d i r e , un homme s u p y r i e u r q u i n'a nullement b e s o i n des a u t r e s . I I r e f u s e d'avouer que sa nature e s t d i v i s y e par deux d y s i r s : c e l u i de l a s u p y r i o r i t y ou de l a grandeur q u i l e t i e n t a l ' y c a r t , e t c e l u i d ' e t r e comme l e s autres q u i malheureusement sont, a ses yeux, des mecliocres. P u i s q u ' i l c r o i t que l a gran-deur e s t l a s e u l e s o l u t i o n au probleme de l a v a n i t y de l a c o n d i t i o n humaine, chaque p r o t a g o n i s t e ne peut se v o i r t e l q u ' i l e s t , y g o l s t e comme Alva r o , e f f r a y y e comme l a soeur 5 4 Angelique, aveugles comme l e Cardinal d 1Espagne et l'abbi de Pradts. Dechire par sa double, nature, l e caractere du heros devient tres complexe. L u c i l l e Becker constate que: "Montherlant's heroic protagonists become less heroic, more complex through their faculty of imagining themselves to be other than they r e a l l y are.""'" Le heros r e l i g i e u x va d'un etre lucide qui comprend 1 ' i n u t i l i t y des actes humains a un etre qui se ment pour garder 1'idee exaltee de s o i . Dans sa recherche de l a connaissance de soi, Henry de Montherlant s'est engag§ dans tous les actes de l a vie pour se connaitre et done pour se l i b e r e r . Ses heros r e l i g i e u x ne s'engagent pas dans l a vie; tous, sauf l e Cardinal d'Espagne, se detachent de l a vie physique pour proteger leur superiority. I l s ne s'engagent que dans l a connaissance de s o i . Engage dans son propre univers, c'est-a-dire, occupy de ses propres problemes, l e protagoniste r e l i g i e u x refuse de jouer un role dans l a sociyte; i l refuse de s'intyresser au monde des autres. Homme lucide, l e hyros s'est deja rendu compte de l a vanity de l a condition humaine; i l s a i t que son moi est l a seule chose qui a i t de l a valeur dans ce monde. Le protagoniste r e l i g i e u x se v o i t comme un etre superieur aux autres. II veut comprendre avant tout les q u a l i t i s qui font de l u i un etre supirieur, et done, i l s'engage a l a recherche de s o i . Cepen-dant l e heros est s i f i e r de sa nature supyrieure q u ' i l ne peut 55 penser a r i e n d'autre, et i l s'engage en f i n de compte non pas a l a recherche de l a connaissance de soi, mais a l a recherche de l a grandeur ou de l a hauteur. Parce q u ' i l c r o i t q u ' i l cherche a se connaitre, l e heros r e l i g i e u x pense q u ' i l est v r a i envers lui-meme; i l c r o i t q u ' i l est v r a i envers Dieu. II se trompe car i l ne s'interesse n i a l a vraie connaissance de soi, n i a Dieu; i l ne s'interesse qu'a sa hauteur. La veine .chretienne de Montherlant est marquee par une absence de Dieu, car Dieu est oubli§ dans l a recherche de l a grandeur. Passionne pour cette recherche, et rempli d'orgueil, l e heros l u t t e pour s'elever au-dessus des autres. Son seul desir est de se detacher de tout ce qui est mediocre pour atteindre l a qualit§. Ce reve de l a quality et non pas de l a connaissance de soi devient son seul but. Pour l e heros montherlantien, l a grandeur ou l a quality mene a l a l i b e r t e parce que comme etre supyrieur a tout, i l ne depend n i de ce monde i n u t i l e , n i des gens mydiocres. II cherche a devenir un tout qui se complete lui-meme. Engagy dans cette recherche de l a hauteur, l e heros ne veut pas seulement se detacher de tout ce qui est mydiocre, mais se d i f a i r e de toute marque de mydiocrity en l u i . Convaincu que sa l i b e r t y personnelle depend de 1'acquisition de l a quality, l e protagoniste r e l i g i e u x est disposy a s'engager a tout, meme au s a c r i f i c e des autres personnages pour proteger sa 56 sup e r i o r i t y . I l se s a c r i f i e r a lui-meme pour garder son id#al de purete. AveuglS par son dSsir de l a grandeur, l e hSros ne se rend pas compte q u ' i l ne se v o i t pas comme i l est rSellement; i l ne se rend pas compte q u ' i l se ment a soi-meme. Chaque heros r e l i g i e u x c r o i t q u ' i l est "...l'homme que tous devraient etre." - II refuse d'admettre ses fautes car i l perdrait alors sa s u p e r i o r i t y . La seule chose q u ' i l puisse f a i r e pour garder sa s u p y r i o r i t y et pour atteindre cette idee de l a quality est de se detacher du monde et des autres; de se dytacher de tout ce qui peut l e corrompre. Bref, i l renonce a l a vie pour atteindre l a hauteur. La recherche de l a hauteur qui est 1'engagement p a r t i -c u l i e r du hyros r e l i g i e u x de Montherlant, mene done a un dytachement d y f i n i t i f de l a society, des autres, et meme de l a fa m i l l e . Chaque protagoniste s'engage a protyger sa supyriority et, a son avis, l a meilleure facon est de se r e t i r e r de tout ce qui est mediocre. Le heros cree un p e t i t monde a l u i ou i l peut continuer a l u t t e r pour l a quality, ou i l peut vivre sans s'adapter a une societe qui l u i parait mediocre et h o s t i l e . L u c i l l e Becker revele les raisons de ce detachement imposy a soi-meme: Set apart from common humanity, Montherlant's heroes must pursue their destiny i n a world apart. Solitude and e x i l e are their natural l o t i n l i f e , as a r e s u l t both of the i r own recognition of their exceptional 57 q u a l i t i e s and of the lack of comprehension accorded them by the rest of humanity.^ Comme tous les protagonistes religieux, l e Maitre de Santiago est a l a recherche de l a grandeur. Aveugle par cette notion de l a quality, Alvaro c r o i t fermement q u ' i l est a l a recherche d'une connaissance de soi a travers une connaissance de Dieu. Son but dans l a vie est de devenir le plus pur des Ch r e t i e n s . C'est un but admirable, mais non pas dans l e cas d'Alvaro car i l ne veut pas devenir pur pour aimer son createur davantage, mais pour s'aimer mieux soi-meme. Passionne pour l a sup ^ r i o r i t e , Alvaro contemple Dieu, non pas pour l e connaitre, et done pour devenir une meilleure personne, mais parce que Dieu est l e seul etre qui v a i l l e une pensee. Dieu, comme Alvaro lui-meme, est l e seul etre qui s o i t au-dessus de toute m i d i o c r i t i . Le Maitre de Santiago trouve l a mediocrite partout, dans l a society et dans sa fa m i l l e . Membre d'un ordre de chevalerie, Alvaro ne peut accepter l e f a i t que cet Ordre, comme l a plupart des ordres de chevalerie, a perdu beaucoup de son importance dans l a vie quotidienne des Espagnols. A son avis, l u i , Alvaro, est l e symbole de cette facon de vivre, et i l continue de vivre dans l e passe parce q u ' i l ne peut c r o i r e que l'Ordre a survicu a son u t i l i t e . Mai dispose a s'engager dans un monde mediocre, i l s'en r e t i r e pour protiger son propre honneur, un honneur que l u i seul possede. Detachement d'une 58 soci<§te qui est en t r a i n de tomber en ruine, detachement des mediocres, v o i l a sa solution pour garder pure sa superiorite. Robert Emmet Jones declare que: ...Alvaro i s completely i s o l a t e d from the outside world. The only thing which i s re a l to him i s , as h i s daughter Mariana says, what passes through his mind. He has refused his world because he finds i t to be a place where honour i s no longer respected.^ Entoure de mediocrite, Alvaro est neanmoins sur de sa propre superiorite et i l s*engage dans son p e t i t monde person-nel pour l u t t e r contre toute bassesse. Rien n 1 e x i s t e pour le Maitre de Santiago sauf son honneur et sa noblesse; n i l a societe n i l'humanite n'existent. C'est un homme qui doit d i r e non a tout pour garder intacte sa q u a l i t e : ...Je n'ai r i e n a f a i r e dans une temps ou l'honneur est puni, - ou l a generosite est punie, - ou l a charite est punie, - ou tout ce qui est grand est rabaisse et moque, - ou partout, au premier rang, j'apergois l e rebut, - ou partout l e triomphe du plus bete et du plus abject est assure. Le Maitre de Santiago refuse tout l i e n avec son epoque comme i l refuse tout rapport humain. Obsede par son reve de l a grandeur, i l est pret a rejeter sa f i l l e pour se proteger de toute mediocrite; de plus, i l s a c r i f i e r a Mariana a ses principes et a ses besoins. Le bonheur de sa f i l l e ne compte pour r i e n ; Alvaro lui-meme et sa l u t t e pour l a qualite sont les seules choses importantes. Le Maitre considere sa f i l l e comme un etre mediocre, et 59 done i l l a rneprise comme i l meprise toute mediocrity. A son avis, i l est juste de didaigner tout ce qui est bas et tout ce qui est f a i b l e ; a i n s i i l peut declarer sans sentiment de culpa-b i l i t e : "Tout etre humain est un obstacle pour qui tend a Dieu." S i preoccupe de sa recherche de ce q u ' i l c r o i t etre l a p u r e t i et qui n'est que l a recherche de l a grandeur, i l refuse de s'engager dans une vie mediocre pour rendre sa f i l l e heureuse. Son propre salut est, a son avis, beaucoup plus important, que l e bonheur de Mariana. II constate que: Pour chercher a etablier Mariana, i l aurait f a l l u que je me perdisse. En soucis de sociyte et en gaspillage de temps. Je ne 1 *ai pas voulu. J'a i pense- que Dieu me compterait d'avoir voulu ne pas me perdre, et q u ' i l pourvoirait lui-meme a cet etablissement... . 7 Alvaro ne peut aimer n i sa f i l l e , n i personne d'autre parce q u ' i l "ne tolere que l a p e r f e c t i o n . " 8 II contemple Dieu, non pas pour apprendre l a charity chrytienne, mais pour devenir un homme supirieur a tout autre homme. I l veut imiter l a perfection de Dieu, e'est-a-dire q u ' i l veut imiter l a grandeur du Seigneur, mais i l ne s'intyresse pas a 1'amour de Dieu pour les hommes. Pierre-Henri Simon exprime a i n s i l e veri t a b l e but du Maitre de Santiago: ...Car l a dyvotion d'Alvaro, ou l ' o r g u e i l joue un s i grand role, g l i s s e facilement de 1 "adoration du Cryateur au mepris de l a Cryature; et l a con-sideration de l a perfection de Dieu, d'ou i l pretend ne pas s o r t i r , l e conduit a rejeter dans le neant, tout ce a quoi les hommes attachent, et quelquefois avec raison, un pr i x ou une va l e u r . g 60 Don Alvaro est un homme qui ne voit que lui-meme, mais ce q u ' i l voit, c'est un faux p o r t r a i t ; i l v o i t un homme qui cherche a etre un C h r e t i e n p a r f a i t . En v e r i t e i l ne cherche pas l a charite de Dieu, mais l a grandeur de Dieu pour former sa propre grandeur. Mariana, cependant, comprend cette recherche comme une recherche de Dieu: II n'y a nulle a f f e c t i o n en mon pere. I l va d r o i t devant l u i . Son salut propre, et 1'Ordre, v o i l a sa voie:... Son indifference icrasante pour tout ce qui ne porte pas quelque marque sublime...Unum, Domine, "O mon Dieu'." une seule chose est neces-saire:...10 A cause de sa charity et de sa grande capacity d'amour, Mariana ne v o i t que l a bonte chez son pere. E l l e a raison l o r s q u ' e l l e d i t qu'une seule chose est necessaire pour son pere, mais cette chose n'est pas Dieu, c'est l a superiority de son moi qui est necessaire a Alvaro. Le Cardinal d'Espagne comme l e Maitre de Santiago est a l a recherche de soi, c'est-a-dire q u ' i l veut se r e a l i s e r . Tandis qu'Alvaro veut etre l e plus pur des Chretiens pour montrer sa superiority, Cisneros obtient sa grandeur par des actes p o l i t i q u e s . Les autres hyros r e l i g i e u x ne luttent que pour l a quality, mais Cisneros se ryvele comme ytant un homme qui est dychiry par sa double nature. Cisneros est un homme d i v i s i par un gout excessif du pouvoir et par une tentation assez forte de l a vie contemplative. A i n s i , l e Cardinal est incapable de se voir t e l q u ' i l est ryellement; i l c r o i t que 61 son desir de l a vie austere est sa nature predominante et i l refuse de se rendre compte q u ' i l ne v i t que parce q u ' i l regne. Montherlant lui-meme explique a i n s i l e caractere varie du Cardinal: ...Cisneros... a plusieurs faces: caudillo, moine, cardinal, l e t t r d , voire a 1'occasion chef de guerre. Et l e c o n f l i t entre deux de ses tendances, l e gout du pouvoir et le gout de l a contemplation est un des Elements de l a p i e c e . ^ Ces diverses faces l'empechent de se rendre.compte que son pouvoir p o l i t i q u e est devenu sa raison d'etre. Son desir de l a vie monastique 1'aveugle, et done, i l c r o i t sincerement qu' i l reste un homme de Dieu et qu' i l n' est homme d'Stat que pour aider son r o i . En d'autres termes, i l c r o i t q u ' i l est, avant tout, un homme s p i r i t u e l . A cause de cette croyance, Cisneros peut accepter sa nature p o l i t i q u e parce qu' i l est certa i n q u ' i l regne au nom de l ' E g l i s e pour l ' E g l i s e . Sans aucune hesitation, i l defend a i n s i ses actions: "Je sais tres bien ou je vais, et j ' a i des actes parce que l ' E g l i s e a besoin d'eux." 1 2 Le Cardinal d'Espagne n'a pas l a l u c i d i t e des autres protagonistes r e l i g i e u x . Alvaro, La Soeur Angeiique, et surtout l a reine Jeanne se rendent compte de l a vanite de l a condition humaine et que leurs actes n'ont aucun sens dans ce monde. I l s cherchent a se connaitre parce que pour eux, l a valeur personnelle est l a seule chose qui compte. Cisneros 62 cherche a se connaitre, c'est-a-dire q u ' i l cherche sa hauteur, a travers ses actes p o l i t i q u e s . Ces derniers sont sa vie; i l s l u i donnent l a g l o i r e et l e pouvoir. C'est l a reine Jeanne qui exaspere l e desir qu'a l e Cardinal de l a vie contemplative. C'est e l l e qui l u i revele ce qu'est une vie de renonciation et de detachement t o t a l . Cisneros a s o i f de cette vie, mais i l manque de courage pour se r e t i r e r de l a vie p o l i t i q u e . II est v r a i q u ' i l a s o i f de renonciation r e l i g i e u s e , mais i l a aussi une so i f inextinguible de grandeur. II a trouve l a hauteur a travers l a p o l i t i q u e , done, i l l u i est impossible d'abandonner cette facon de vivre qui l u i a donne l a g l o i r e . Fier de son influence, i l n'a pas l a force de detruire ce q u ' i l a construit pendant toutes ces annies. Cisneros ne peut s a c r i f i e r sa propre g l o i r e p o l i t i q u e a l a g l o i r e de Dieu parce q u ' i l n'est plus capable de penser a l a g l o i r e du Seigneur. II a tellement mele sa vie p o l i t i q u e a l a vie r e l i g i e u s e q u ' i l ne distingue plus l'une de 1'autre. I l ne se rend pas compte q u ' i l s'est detache de Dieu et que le pouvoir temporel est devenu son dieu. Au contraire, i l se connait comme homme qui ne regne que pour g l o r i f i e r l e Seigneur. " J' a i ete un C h r e t i e n et j ' a i ete un homme. J 1 a i f a i t tout ce que je pouvais f a i r e . " II ne peut voir ce q u ' i l est reellement; i l ne vo i t pas ce que vo i t l a reine l o r s q u ' e l l e l u i d i t : "Vous vous etes enfui vers des c l o i t r e s parce que 63 vous aimiez trop l e pouvoir.... Ce que vous avez aime par-dessus tout, c'est de gouverner; sinon, vous seriez reste t r a n q u i l l e . . . . m 1 4 Comme l e Maitre de Santiago, l a soeur Angelique se v o i t comme un etre superieur. Consciente de cette superiorite, e l l e consacre sa vie non pas tellement a Dieu, mais a l a l u t t e pour s'elever au-dessus de toute mediocrite. Sans doute devouee a Dieu au debut de sa vie r e l i g i e u s e , e l l e en vient presque a oublier Dieu pour ne penser qu'a ne pas deroger en tant que niece du Grand Arnauld. E l l e ne v o i t pas que sa f o i diminue. A ses propres yeux, l a soeur Angeiique est superieure aux autres r e l i g i e u s e s . Intelligente, puissante, riche, et ce qui est plus important, membre de l a famille l a plus cSlebre de Port-Royal, e l l e se detache des autres pour s'eiever au-dessus de toute bassesse. Sa vie tourne autour du f a i t qu'elle est un Arnauld. Toujours consciente de sa noblesse, Angeiique se l a f a i t rappeler aussi par sa tante, l a mere Agnes: Et l e courage, ma Soeur, a defaut de l a grace? Etes-vous une Arnauld? On d i t que les Arnauld n'estiment qu'eux-memes, et q u ' i l s s'admirent entre eux a l'exces. II n'y a pas de quoi vous admirer beaucoup dans ce moment-ci.-^^ A cause de sa naissance, e l l e d o i t se regarder comme le modele de l a communaute. On s'attend a ce qu'elle a i t l e courage d'affronter n* importe quelle tempete.. Aveugiee comme Alvaro et comme Cisneros, Angeiique qui s'est vue dans l e role d'une 64 r e l i g i e u s e p a r f a i t e , est rielleraent l a seule r e l i g i e u s e a manquer de f o i en face de l a persecution du couvent. En face de l a persecution, l a soeur Angelique reconnait sa peur et l e f a i t qu'elle manque de courage et e l l e l e confesse a sa tante: "Pardonnez-moi, ma mere, mais me v o i c i tout juste devant les Portes des Tenebres, et je crois en e f f e t q u ' i l ne me reste r i e n . " Remplie de doutes, Angelique se rend compte que sa morale de l a qual i t y ne l'aide pas; cependant, e l l e d o i t continuer sa recherche de l a grandeur pour garder secrete sa f a i b l e s s e . E l l e ne peut r i v e l e r ses doutes car ceux-ci r e f l e t e r a i e n t l a m ^ d i o c r i t i . En tant qu'etre lucide, Angilique a d i j a reconnu l a v a n i t i de l a condition humaine, et done comme Alvaro et Cisneros e l l e c r o i t que son moi est l a seule chose de valeur dans ce monde. Pour se proteger, l a soeur Angelique refuse de signer l e formulaire. E l l e refuse de signer non pas parce qu'elle c r o i t encore en Dieu, en sa r e l i g i o n , en son Ordre mais parce qu'elle veut garder sa hauteur, sa superiority. A ses yeux, e l l e atteindra l a qualite car e l l e deviendra heroine e t martyre; e l l e sera l a seule r e l i g i e u s e qui souffre pour une cause a laque l l e e l l e ne peut plus c r o i r e . L u c i l l e Becker exprime a i n s i les sentiments d'Angelique: Soeur Angelique i s heroic i n her refusal to sign the formulaire, doubly so because she knows that she w i l l be defeated. She has reached the point 65 where she doubts everything, including the truth of C h r i s t i a n i t y and the existence of God. Never-theless, she w i l l not sign. She enjoys suffering for a cause i n which she has ceased to believe.... However, t h i s heroism, which affords a b i t t e r , cruel i n t e r n a l s a t i s f a c t i o n , i s reserved for only a s e l e c t few, and AngSlique cautions Soeur Frangbise against martyrdom without f a i t h , which she must leave to more profound minds than her own.27 Au debut, r e l i g i e u s e pieuse et en meme temps f i e r e , l a soeur Angeiique devient un etre paralyse par sa terreur en face de ses doutes sur 1'existence de Dieu. Son seul recours est son orgueil et son amour propre qui l'aideront peut-etre a supporter une vie ou e l l e est depouillee de toutes ses croy-ances. Comme les autres protagonistes re l i g i e u x , l'abbe de Pradts refuse de se voir t e l q u ' i l est reellement. Selon l u i , i l est un pretre qui cherche a amener son Sieve a Dieu en l'aimant. En r S a l i t S , l'abbe n'est plus un homme s p i r i t u e l car i l ne pense pas a Dieu. Tout prSoccupS de cette a f f e c t i o n humaine, i l oublie son role r e l i g i e u x . L'abbS de Pradts con-sidere son amour de Souplier comme un amour pur parce q u ' i l c r o i t que c'est une fagon d'aimer davantage Dieu; i l ne v o i t pas que son amour est egolste. II n'aime pas ce gargon a l a maniere d'un professeur qui veut aider son Sieve a atteindre l a maturitS; i l l'aime d'une fagon humaine, c'est-a-dire q u ' i l l'aime comme pere plutot que comme pretre. A cause du vide q u ' i l ressent parce q u ' i l manque de f o i , i l donne son amour au 66 gargon pour combler son monde. Son Dieu est mort; Souplier devient l e substitut. Jeanne Eichelberger dans une l e t t r e a Montherlant d e f i n i t a i n s i cet amour de Pradts: " . . . i l aime humainement. C'est un spectacle dechirant, dramatique, et par instants t e r r i f i a n t , qu'un pretre qui n*accede pas au plan 1 8 surnaturel. Car cet homme de terre est un pretre." L'abbS de Pradts pense que c'est l u i qui seul peut aider l e gargon; selon l u i , i l comprend mieux l e caractere de 1*enfant. I l prend sur soi l e role des parents, et i l c r o i t sincerement que c'est l a charite qui l e guide dans son amour. II declare au SupSrieur: ...C'est parce q u ' i l e t a i t l e plus accable d'entre nos enfants que je 1'ai a c c u e i l l i - oui, je n' a i pas honte de l e d i r e - comme je n'en a i a c c u e i l l i aucun autre. J ' a i l'Evangile pour moi, i l me semble. Et l a charite pure et simple.-^g Mais i l est evident au SupSrieur que l ' i n t e r e t de l'abbe de Pradts pour Souplier n'est pas l ' i n t e r e t charitable d'un professeur ou d'un pretre, mais l ' i n t e r e t d'un homme qui cherche a aimer son eieve autant qu'un pere naturel. A cause de cet amour egolste, l'abbe ne peut voir q u ' i l s'interesse a l ' i n d i v i d u plutot qu'a l a vie morale de cet individu. Parce q u ' i l ne v o i t que l a purete de son amour - a ses yeux son amour n'a r i e n d'egolste -, l'abbe de Pradts se detache d'un monde qui n'acceptera pas cet amour. En f i n de compte, eioigne des consolations divines, "l'abbe de Pradts f a i t un s a c r i f i c e au-quel i l c r o i t sur l ' a u t e l d'un dieu auquel probablement i l ne c r o i t pas."^ Comme dans toutes les pieces re l i g i e u s e s , l a tragedie de La V i l l e vient du f a i t que l'abbe est aveugle sur son v e r i t a b l e moi? i l c r o i t q u ' i l se connait, mais sa connais-sance est unilate r a l e , car i l ne v o i t que ce q u ' i l veut v o i r . Nous avons vu que l a recherche de l a connaissance de soi est 1'engagement p a r t i c u l i e r de chaque heros r e l i g i e u x . De plus, ce desir de l a connaissance de soi est plutot un d i s i r de grandeur ou de qualit e personnelle. Tous des etres lucides,- les protagonistes sont aveugles neanmoins par cette obsession de l a hauteur qui c r o i t a mesure q u ' i l s se rendent compte de leurs qualites supirieures et de l a vanite de l a condition humaine. Conscient de sa propre superiority, l e heros ne v o i t que l a midiocrite autour de l u i , et son engage-ment pour l a grandeur mene non pas a 1'engagement dans l a vie et dans l a societe, mais au detachement du monde et des etres. Dans sa recherche de l a connaissance de so i , chaque protagoniste i n s i s t e sur ses q u a l i t i s superieures qui 1'aveug-lent de sorte q u ' i l ne peut pas voir toute sa nature. Sur q u ' i l est "l'homme que tous devraient etre," i l confond sa connaissance de sa propre superiority avec une connaissance totale de s o i . II va d'un etre lucide qui vo i t l e besoin d'une connaissance de soi a un homme qui ferme les yeux sur ses faiblesses et sur ses fautes. Ce q u ' i l v o i t c'est un 68 faux p o r t r a i t de lui-meme, mais l e heros, obsedi par son desir de l a grandeur, c r o i t q u ' i l se v o i t t e l q u ' i l est reellement. F i e r de sa superiority, chaque hiros veut l a proteger a tout p r i x . Le protagoniste r e l i g i e u x sent q u ' i l est entoure de mediocrity; n i l a sociyte, n i les gens qui composent cette s o c i y t y ne l e comprennent. Le heros refuse d'ameiiorer cette sociyte mediocre bien q u ' i l possede, a son avis, des qualitys superieures; i l c h o i s i t de se detacher de toute mydiocrity pour garder intacte sa grandeur. II ne sent aucune responsa-b i l i t y envers l a sociyty, envers les autres; i l ne sent de l a responsability que pour lui-meme. Cet egotisme mene a un mypris t o t a l des autres, et l e hyros est dispose a. tout s a c r i -f i e r , meme un membre de sa famille, ou un ami, pour protyger sa quality, c'est-a-dire pour proteger sa raison d'etre. On peut d i r e que l a devise du hyros montherlantien est: "C'est 2 1 • . . . done soi qu'on aime." L u c i l l e Becker exprime a i n s i ce s e n t i -ment de mypris: There can be no p i t y for mediocrity of any sort; i t must be s a c r i f i c e d . . . . Therefore, Montherlant's chosen characters are hard-hearted and completely lacking i n sympathy and mercy, t r a i t s which, together with gentleness, are considered marks of mediocrity.... Montherlant's heroes to prove the worth of their ideas, w i l l never re j e c t a course of action which they f i n d necessary, no matter how cruel i t may appear. 22 Chaque hyros montherlantien s u i t une route semblable qui mene a l a tragedie parce q u ' i l ne peut que se voir comme etre superieur, et done, i l ne peut s'adapter a son role dans 69 l a societe. II refuse de se compromettre, c'est-a-dire, d'abandonner l a croyance a sa grandeur, et i l c h o i s i t l ' e x i l comme l a seule solution a une vie qui l u i pa r a i t mediocre. 70 Notes sur l e Chapitre III 1 Becker, The Plays of Henry de Montherlant, p. 101. 2 Le Maitre de Santiago, p. 77. 3 Becker, op. c i t . , p. 56. 4 Jones, The Alienated Hero i n Modern French Drama, p. 6. 5 Le Maitre de Santiago, p. 48. 6 Ibid., p. 69. 7 Ibid., p. 68. 8 Ibid., p. 83. 9 Pierre-Henri Simon, Proces du heros, (Paris: Edition du Seuil, 1950), p-. 97. 10 Le Maitre de Santiago, p. 94. 11 "Postface," Le Cardinal d'Espagne, p. 215. 12 Le Cardinal d'Espagne, p. 19. 13 Ibid., p. 131. - 14 Ibid., pp. 126-127. 15 Port-Royal, p. 84. 16 Ibid., p. 85. 17 Becker, op. c i t . , p. 83. 18 Jeanne Eichelberger, "Lettre a H. de Montherlant," La v i l l e dont l e prince est un enfant, p. 243. 19 La v i l l e dont l e prince est un enfant, p. 171. 20 Eichelberger, op. c i t . , p. 247. 71 21 Marissel, Montherlant, p. 43. LE CHAPITRE IV LE CHEVALIER DU NEANT "L*oeuvre entiere de Montherlant, et non seulement son theatre, est placee sous l e signe de l ' e x i l , " d i t Georges Bordonove.1 Nous avons vu que l e besoin de se connaitre mene chaque protagoniste des pieces reli g i e u s e s a une vie de detachement et de solitude; en d'autres termes, l e heros s'exile de l a societe. En tant qu'exiles, Alvaro, Cisneros, l a Soeur Angelique, et l'abbe de Pradts r e f l e t e n t tous un manque de comprehension et de communication entre les hommes. I l s choisissent volontairement leur e x i l parce q u ' i l s preferent l a solitude a une vie entouree de mediocrite. Sur de sa propre s u p i r i o r i t e , chaque heros montherlantien n'a aucun d i s i r de comprendre les hommes, qui, a son avis, ne sont que des mediocres. Le protagoniste r e l i g i e u x renonce done a tout, sauf a l ' i d i e exaltee de son moi. Bien que tous les heros renoncent a une vie que leur semble mediocre et sans noblesse, i l s continuent a l u t t e r ou a s'engager pour l a g l o i r e personnelle. La reine Jeanne, cependant, o f f r e l e p o r t r a i t du renoncement t o t a l . Quoique f o l i e , e l l e a vu l a v a n i t i du monde et de tout ce qui compose 73 ce monde. E l l e n'a aucun espoir car e l l e s'est rendu compte de sa petitesse et de l a petitesse de toute 1'humanity. La vue desespSrSe qu'a l a reine de l a condition humaine et son i n -difference complete a tout rSvelent sa pensee n i h i l i s t e . Les autres protagonistes affirment aussi des attitudes n i h i l i s t e s l o r s q u ' i l s cherchent a s'elever au-dessus de toute mediocrite et a devenir des etres supSrieurs. Mais avec l a reine, Montherlant nous dSpeint une femme qui s'est plongSe dans l e nihilisme. E l l e sent l e nSant au fond de son ame; e l l e a s a i s i 1'essence des choses - i l n'y a nulle raison d'agir. Gabriel Matzneff exprime a i n s i ce sentiment du nada: Mais l a p e t i t e minority d'etres qui, comme Jeanne l a F o l l e , v o i t ce qui est, est tellement penStree de 1 * i n u t i l i t e de tous les actes des hommes q u ' i l l u i est impossible de lever seulement l e p e t i t doigt. Celui qui n'est pas aveuglS par l e v o i l e de Maya n'est plus capable de r i e n f a i r e que s'ytendre sur l e sol en attendant l a mort, et, s ' i l l u i arrive malgre cela d'agir, ce n'est jamais sans un ricanement de d e r i s i o n et un dysaveu muet.j Les autres hyros r e l i g i e u x d i f f e r e n t de l a reine Jeanne parce q u ' i l s s'accrochent a l a valeur de leur moi; l a connaissance de sa grandeur et de sa supyriority soutient chaque prota-goniste. Dans sa l u c i d i t y totale, Jeanne ne v o i t que l e nyant; e l l e est l e seul personnage qui s o i t capable de se moquer parce qu'elle s'est vue t e l l e qu'elle est reellement. Comme nous 1'avons deja vu, les protagonistes r e l i g i e u x sont des etres lucides qui se rendent compte de l a vanity de 74 l a condition humaine, mais qui, pour se preserver de l a mediocriti des autres mettent toute leur confiance en s o i . Chaque heros cherche a. etre comme l a reine Jeanne, c' est-a-dire q u ' i l voudrait etre capable de supporter l e neant sans terreur. Mais l e heros des pieces reli g i e u s e s a besoin de sa morale de l a q u a l i t i , morale q u ' i l d o i t suivre meme s i e l l e ne l'aide pas en face de l a vanity de sa propre existence. Dans son angoisse devant 1'absurdity de 1'existence de l'homme, l e protagoniste montherlantien soupire apres l a mort ou apres l ' o u b l i comme solution a une vie mediocre et basse ou i l n'y a nul espoir. Depuis des annyes, l e Maitre de Santiago se prypare a mourir parce qu'a ses yeux l a mort d'un chrytien p a r f a i t est l a seule reponse a une vie qui l u i semble midiocre et sans noblesse. S i f o r t est son mepris de l a vie qu'Alvaro se donne completement a l a contemplation de Dieu; contemplation qui l e mene sans q u ' i l l e sache a 1'adoration personnelle. Le Maitre de Santiago se v o i t comme un c h r i t i e n admirable qui a renonce au monde et a tous les conforts de l a vie pour 1*amour pur de Dieu. II ne peut pas comprendre q u ' i l a renonce a tout parce q u ' i l ne peut supporter 1 ' i n u t i l i t y de l a vie et des hommes. Gabriel Matzneff affirme que: "Ce qui est certain, c'est que l e christianisme du Maxtre de Santiago est orienty vers l a negation." 3 La f o i d'Alvaro est remarquable non pas pour sa 75 charitS envers l'humanite, mais pour sa durete. II n'y a n i tendresse, n i humilite dans l e christianisme d'Alvaro car i l ne g l o r i f i e pas Dieu l e f i l s , mais Dieu l e maitre. Henry de Montherlant exprime a i n s i les sentiments r e l i g i e u x d 1Alvaro: . . . i l reste en deca du christianisme. II sent avec force l e premier mouvement du christianisme, l a renonciation, l e Nada; i l sent peu l e second, 1'union, l e Todo. L'Islam impregne l'Espagne de cette epoque: l a r e l i g i o n d'Alvaro consiste presque toute, comme c e l l e des Mores (ou c e l l e de l'Ancien Testament) a re v i r e r 1 ' i n f i n i e distance de Dieu: A l l a h est grand. Mais 1'Incarnation? Mais l ' i n t i -mitS tendre avec un c r u c i f i e ? Mais "Emmanuel" ("Dieu avec nous")?^ Le detachement d'Alvaro n'est pas une renonciation chretienne, car un v r a i chrStien renonce a. l a vie pour s'attacher davantage a Dieu et a l'humanite de Dieu. Un chretien ne renonce pas au monde parce q u ' i l meprise les hommes, mais parce q u ' i l les aime tellement q u ' i l d o i t essayer de les aimer avec Dieu. La renonciation du Maitre de Santiago est une renonciation n i h i l i s t e du monde parce q u ' i l nie l a valeur de sa propre vie et de l a vie des autres. I l ne cherche Dieu que parce q u ' i l a horreur de l a vie, une vie q u ' i l trouve basse et sans qu a l i t e . Autant que l e Maitre de Santiago, l a reine Jeanne a horreur de l a vie; mais ce sentiment est beaucoup plus f o r t que c e l u i d'Alvaro. Alvaro a horreur de l a vie mediocre; l a reine a horreur de l a v i e . Le Maitre reconnait l a vanite de l a condition humaine, mais i l c r o i t neanmoins en sa propre 76 grandeur; l a reine reconnait, comme Alvaro, 1 ' i n u t i l i t y de l a vie, et de plus, e l l e se rend compte de l ' i n u t i l i t e de toutes ses propres actions. E l l e a vu l e neant et e l l e 1*accepte. E l l e a l e courage d'accepter ce niant parce qu'elle se soutient par l e souvenir de son mari. Avec l a mort du r o i , Jeanne a perce l a v a r i i t i de l a condition humaine; e l l e a vu l e monde et son moi t e l s q u ' i l s sont riellement, vides de sens et inf i n i t i s i m a u x en face du Nada. Lucide dans sa f o l i e , " l a Reine Jeanne s'exprime comme les mystiques de son temps. De tous les protagonistes, c'est Jeanne qui comprend mieux 1'amour pur et a l t r u i s t e du christianisme bien qu'elle s o i t l e seul personnage dans les pieces r e l i g i e u s e s a declarer que Dieu est l e Rien. Malgri. l a cruaute du r o i , l a reine est capable de 1'aimer parce qu'elle se rend compte que l ' e s s e n t i e l est-d*aimer plutot que d'etre aime. Jeanne exprime a i n s i ses sentiments envers 1'amour: Dans toute ma famille, et tout ce qui m'approche, et cela depuis que j'existe, je n'ai connu personne que moi qui aimat. J'en a i vu prendre des mines h o r r i f i i e s parce que j'avais b a i s i les pieds de mon r o i mort. C'est q u ' i l s n'avaient jamais aimi. II y a toujours deux mondes impenitrables l'un pour 1'autre.... Le monde de ceux qui aiment et l e monde de ceux qui n'aiment pas. Je suis du monde de ceux qui aiment, et ne suis meme que de ce monde-la.g En meme temps que l a reine revele son amour a l t r u i s t e , e l l e montre sa vue totalement n i h i l i s t e du monde, car c'est e l l e , de tous les heros rel i g i e u x , qui reconnait l a v a n i t i absolue 77 de l a condition humaine. E l l e meprise tout, l e monde, les hommes, et, a son avis, Dieu n'est que le. Rien. E l l e v o i t ses propres actes comme des actes vains et i n u t i l e s et e l l e s'apergoit de plus, que toute action l a plonge dans l a comedie. La reine refuse de vivre dans cette comedie, de jouer un role dans une societe absurde. E l l e v o i t que tout est i n u t i l e et que tout n'est r i e n en face de 1 ' i t e r n e l . La reine Jeanne meprise l e Cardinal parce q u ' i l a peur de voir ses actes p o l i -tiques comme des actes vains. E l l e se moque de sa g l o i r e p o l i t i q u e , de son desir de l a vie monastique, et de sa facon de se mentir. E l l e resume a i n s i toute l a vie de Cisneros: Le combat que vous avez mene'/ Mener un combat'. Lutter contre l e s hommes, c'est leur donner une existence q u ' i l s n'ont pas. Et puis, quoi qu'on y gagne, cela ne dure qu'un instant infime de cette eternite dont les pretres parlent mieux que personne. ...Vous croyez que je v i s l o i n de tout cela parce que je ne peux pas l e comprendre. Je vis l o i n de tout cela parce que je l e comprends trop bien....y A cause de sa grande l u c i d i t e , l a reine Jeanne peut supporter ce sentiment du niant, parce qu'elle se vo i t dans toute sa petitesse. Sa facon de vivre s o l i t a i r e , vetue de noir, ne r e f l e t e que son dedain de l a vie et de toute action. E l l e est devenue une pa r t i e de ce niant pour pouvoir supporter l e Rien. E l l e s'est lancee dans l'abime du nihilisme pour oublier l a t r a g i d i e de 1'existence humaine. E l l e a " f a i t l a morte" dans une vie qui n'a d ' a i l l e u r s aucun sens. La reine 78 d e c r i t au Cardinal 1'horreur de ce monde et l a vanite de tout acte: ...Quel est cet univers auquel on voudrait que je prenne part? Quand je l e regarde, mes genoux se fondent. Quelle est cette voix qui forme dans ma bouche des mots qui ne me concernent pas? Quel est cet homme qui me f a i t face et qui veut me persuader q u ' i l existe? Comment pouvez-vous c r o i r e a ce qui vous entoure, quand moi je n'y croi s pas, qui suis, p a r a i t - i l , en vie? Et vous voulez manier cela, jouer avec cela, dependre de cela? Et vous etes un i n t e l l i g e n t , et un Chretien'. A ces deux t i t r e s vous devriez f a i r e l e mort, comme je f a i s l a morte.g Jeanne a montre a. Cisneros une indifference aux choses tempo-r e l i e s qui est, en ve r i t e , un renoncement t o t a l . Le nihilisme de l a reine est une tentation enorme pour l e Cardinal parce que toute sa vie i l a cherche l a g l o i r e temporelle et l a s o l i -tude s p i r i t u e l l e . I l veut dedaigner tout sauf Dieu comme q " E l l e annule 1'univers avec son mepris." Tente par ce nihilisme, Cisneros c h o i s i r a - t - i l l e nSant ou l e pouvoir p o l i t i q u e ? Nous verrons plus tard s ' i l aura l e courage de se detruire pour se trouver. Le Maitre de Santiago a horreur d'une vie mediocre, mais i l est ce r t a i n q u ' i l peut s'eiever au-dessus de l ' i n u t i l i t e du monde par sa propre superiority, c'est-a-dire par l a valeur de s o i . La reine Jeanne cependant est plus lucide qu'Alvaro; e l l e reconnait l'absurdite du monde et de plus, l'absurdite de ses actions personnelles. E l l e est capable de voir l e n6ant et de 1'accepter; e l l e devient une pa r t i e de ce rien, c'est-a-79 d i r e qu'elle adopte une attitude completement n i h i l i s t e comme solution a une vie absurde. Comme Alvaro, l a soeur Angelique a horreur d'une vie mediocre; e l l e d i f f e r e neanmoins d'Alvaro parce qu'elle n'est plus certaine de sa propre facon de vivre. E l l e a des doutes sur sa f o i r e l i g i e u s e , et meme sur 1'existence de Dieu. Tour-mentie par ces doutes, l a soeur Angilique commence meme a douter de sa morale de l a qualite qui est l a morale de l a superiorite personnelle. Comment peut-elle etre l a seule r e l i -gieuse a manquer de f o i ? E l l e , une Arnauld, niece du grand Arnauld, directeur de Port-Royal'. Angelique a horreur de sa propre v i e parce qu'elle reconnait sa grande peur en face de l a persecution du couvent. E l l e s'est rendu compte que son s e n t i -ment de superiorite ne 1'aidera pas devant l e neant. Comme l a reine Jeanne, Angelique a vu l e niant; e l l e a reconnu 1'absurdite de l a vie et de toutes ses actions, mais contrairement a l a reine, l a soeur Angelique n' a pas l e courage de l a supporter. Jeanne brave l e neant par son i n -difference et par son renoncement t o t a l ; Angilique doit se soutenir en face de ce vide, en face de cet abandon de Dieu par sa morale de l a qu a l i t e . E l l e exprime a i n s i son sentiment du niant: "...ce grand silence d'aout. II y a un silence et un abandon, en aout, qui me figurent terriblement l e silence et 1'abandon de Dieu."'1"^ La soeur Angelique n'est pas capable 80 de se l i b e r e r du nada par 1'indifference, comme l a reine Jeanne, mais e l l e espere se l i b e r e r par sa morale de l a superio-r i t y . E l l e refuse de signer l e formulaire parce que ce refus deviendra son salut. C'est un exemple du "service i n u t i l e , " service qui devient d'autant plus beau q u ' i l est plus i n u t i l e . AngSlique enleve toute s i g n i f i c a t i o n a son refus pour se li b S r e r du pouvoir qu'a l e n6ant sur e l l e . Michel Mohrt explique que: ...Peu importe l e service: i l est toujours i n u t i l e pour l a societe, i n u t i l e pour sauver son ame, mais i l est u t i l e pour nous-memes car i l nous f o r t i f i e dans l'idee de notre l i b e r t e . . . . Mais ces amuse-ments, ce service a une condition: c'est de les vider de toute s i g n i f i c a t i o n morale ou metaphysique. A ce prix, on reste un homme l i b r e . La soeur Angeiique ne dependra n i de ce vain monde, n i du neant, s i e l l e peut continuer d'agir meme en reconnaissant que tous ses actes sont i n u t i l e s . E l l e peut se l i b e r e r parce que l a grandeur personnelle est l a chose l a plus absurde de tout. Le Cardinal d'Espagne d i f f e r e d'Alvaro, de l a reine et d'Angeiique, parce q u ' i l est engage dans tous les aspects de l a vie, surtout dans l a vie p o l i t i q u e . Cisneros ne possede pas l a l u c i d i t e des autres heros r e l i g i e u x ; i l refuse de re-connaitre sa nature dominante. Ce refus de se voir t e l q u ' i l est reellement est l a base de l a tragedie, car i l c r o i t etre a l a recherche d'une vie de solitude, depouilie de tout pouvoir temporel et p o l i t i q u e , lorsqu'en verite l e Cardinal ne pourrait vivre de cette facon. Homme d i v i s e entre sa personnalite r e l i g i e u s e et sa p e r s o n n a l i t i p o l i t i q u e , i l c r o i t , jusqu'a sa mort, en sa nature r e l i g i e u s e . Lorsque l a reine l u i demande comment i l peut accorder son v i f i n t i r e t aux choses du monde avec sa vie monastique, comment i l peut etre "Dieu et Cesar ensemble", Cisneros repond que "La grace de Dieu l'accorde." Le Cardinal veut c r o i r e que Dieu approuve sa double vocation. Parce que Cisneros manque de l a l u c i d i t e de l a reine Jeanne et de l a soeur Angelique, i l ne se rend pas compte de l a vanit<§ de l a condition humaine et i l pense que tous ses actes sont necessaires pour l ' E g l i s e et pour l e royaume. Le Cardinal n'a pas vu l e neant dans toute son intensite, et done, i l peut 1*oublier et continuer a cr o i r e que sa vie et ses actions ont un sens. Jeanne et Angelique voient l e neant a travers leur horreur de l a vie; pour e l l e s l a vie r i f l e t e l'absurdite de l a condition humaine. Cisneros connaitra l e Rien a travers l a reine, et une f o i s conscient de ce neant, i l sera tente de detruire tout ce q u ' i l a construit pendant des annees; c'est-a-dire, i l sera tente de cr o i r e que toute sa vie n'a n i sens n i valeur. Dans son entrevue avec l a reine, l e Cardinal voit une femme qui s'est detachee completement du monde et de l a vi e . E l l e ne pense qu'a une chose, l e souvenir qu'elle a garde de son mari. Jeanne revele a Cisneros 1 ' i n u t i l i t e des actes et surtout de sa propre vie a l u i . II commence a voir l'absurdite de tout; i l commence a etre "...Paralyse par l e sentiment 13 d u . . . r i d i c u l e . " Ce que l e Cardinal v o i t chez l a reine, c'est une femme qui a renonce" a. tout pour concentrer son attention sur l a seule chose qui compte pour e l l e , l e souvenir de son mari. E l l e a revele une vie de r e t r a i t e et de solitude t e l l e que Cisneros a desirSe toute sa v i e . I l veut d i r e non a tout comme l a reine a d£ja d i t non a. tout; i l veut voir l e neant ou l a vanitS de tout pour se dSvouer totalement a Dieu. Le Cardinal sent un attachement f o r t entre l u i et l a reine, car a son avis i l s sont a l a recherche de l a meme chose. I l d i t que: L*indifference aux choses de ce monde est toujours une chose sainte, et - meme quand Dieu en est absent - une chose essentiellement divine.... Ceux qui ont regard's ce qu'elle appelle l e r i e n et ce que j'appelle Dieu ont l e meme regard. Sur que sa nature r e l i g i e u s e est l a plus forte, l e Cardinal veut oublier totalement sa vie p o l i t i q u e ; i l veut detruire toute l a g l o i r e q u ' i l a obtenue pendant sa car r i e r e de chef d'Stat pour se donner a l a vie s o l i t a i r e de moine. Ce que Cisneros ne peut voir c'est que sa vie p o l i t i q u e est sa raison d'etre; i l n'a pas l e courage de plonger dans l'abime de 1'indifference a sa propre g l o i r e . Sa r e l i g i o n n'est pas c e l l e de l a contemplation mais c e l l e de 1'action. Le Cardinal veut renoncer a tout mais i l n'est pas capable d'accepter que 83 ses actes soient i n u t i l e s . A son avis, sa g l o i r e p o l i t i q u e est son assurance que son existence n'est pas vaine. Gabriel Matzneff d e c r i t a i n s i l e caractere de Cisneros: ...Cisneros, l u i , est double: i l aspire egalement au neant, mais i l continue de cr o i r e a son metier de chef d'Etat; i l aime 1'action e_t l a contem-p l a t i o n . ...En.1'Espagnol Cisneros se c o n c i l i e n t 1'ideal o r i e n t a l - e t l ' i d i a l occidental du Christ, l a r e t r a i t e et l a croisade. Le catholicisme est a c t i f et constructeur, 1'esprit d'orthodoxie est contemplatif et negateur. Cisneros est tout cela a l a f o i s . Pousse par son neveu, l e Cardinal contemple serieusement l a destruction de son oeuvre p o l i t i q u e ; pour l u i c'est une idee at t i r a n t e car i l peut se voir comme maitre de sa dest i n i e . Comme l e d i t Matzneff: ...Idee sublime et fascinante'. Etre a. l a f o i s l e createur et l'Erostrate, quelle destinee'. C'est un suicide bien plus complet que c e l u i de l'homme qui se contente de detruire son corps: detruire son oeuvre, c'est non seulement supprimer l e phinomene, mais aussi l'idee; c'est aneantir son posthumat, mesure agriable et prudente, eu igard a l a facon dont nous t r a i t e l e posterite.^g Mais a cause de son manque de courage, Cisneros l a i s s e passer 1'occasion de d i r i g e r son destin, car l e r o i l e depouille de son pouvoir p o l i t i q u e . Cisneros n'est plus maitre de son moi> i l est un r i e n dans un monde qui n'existe plus. C'est un role q u ' i l ne peut supporter et sa solution, est de mourir. Le Maitre de Santiago d i f f e r e du Cardinal d'Espagne parce q u ' i l veut sauver sa propre vie a tout p r i x . Alvaro ne v o i t pas 1 ' i n u t i l i t y de ses actes; i l ne v o i t que 1'absurdity 84 d'un monde mediocre. A son avis, i l est un homme superieur a tout autre homme, et pour continuer sa l u t t e pour une vie pure et p a r f a i t e i l s a c r i f i e r a meme sa f i l l e . Rien ne peut l'em-pecher dans sa recherche de l a grandeur personnelle. Alvaro est tout pret a s a c r i f i e r sa f i l l e , c'est-a-dire, a dStruire l e bonheur de Mariana pour protSger son honneur. Cet endurcisse-ment envers sa f i l l e vient de son r e j e t de l'humanite; tous les hommes et aussi sa f i l l e ne sont que des mediocres. Le Maitre de Santiago les meprise jusqu 1au moment ou i l s peuvent 1'aider a atteindre son but de l a hauteur. II ne peut aimer Mariana jusqu'a ce q u ' i l croie qu'elle s'est montrSe digne de son amour. "Aujourd'hui tu es n£e, puisqu'aujourd'hui j*apprends que tu es digne qu'on t'aime."! 7 Le christianisme d'Alvaro est un christianisme colore par une attitude n i h i l i s t e . C'est un christianisme du renonce-ment, non pas pour l a g l o i r e de Dieu, mais pour l a g l o i r e du Maitre de Santiago. Alvaro ne g l o r i f i e pas l e Seigneur; dans son orgueil, i l se g l o r i f i e lui-meme, en d'autres termes, i l ne g l o r i f i e r i e n . Le Maitre s'est deja rendu compte de l'absur-d i t e de l a condition humaine; ce q u ' i l ne vo i t pas c'est qu'aupres de Dieu, i l n'est r i e n . Pierre-Henri Simon explique a i n s i l a pensee n i h i l i s t e de Montherlant qui s'applique par-faitement a Alvaro: ...Certes, on n'aurait pas de peine a montrer que le vice profond de son esprit, son nihilisme 85 associe a son orgueil, 1'empechent d ' a l l e r tout a f a i t a l a grandeur tragique et l'arretent gSnSrale-ment au pathetique grandiose. ...Desespoir et orgueil dessechent...le coeur d'Alvaro et ne l u i l a i s s e n t que l a rhetorique de l a saintete.-^g Certain de sa superiority personnelle, l e Maitre de Santiago nie l e d r o i t de l'humanite au bonheur. Comme deux protago-nistes de l a veine profane de Montherlant, Georges Carrion et le r o i Ferrante, i l ne s'occupe jamais des sentiments des autres. La Reine Morte, F i l s de Personne et l e Maitre de  Santiago sont tous des drames de l a qualite humaine, et tous posent cette these: on a l e d r o i t de detruire tout ce qui ne f a i t p a r t i e de l a morale de l a hauteur humaine. Une t e l l e attitude, aux yeux de Robert Emmet Jones: " . . . i s e s s e n t i a l l y negative, for through their pessimistic views they ultimately deny the value of l i f e . " 1 ^ L'abbe de Pradts ne s'inquiete pas du tout de sa vie r e l i g i e u s e comme l e f a i t l e Cardinal d'Espagne qui c r o i t q u ' i l cherche avant tout l a vie monastique, ou comme l e Maitre de Santiago qui c r o i t q u ' i l veut devenir un saint pour l a g l o i r e de Dieu. L'abbe ressemble plutot a l a soeur Angeiique parce que, comme e l l e , i l manque de f o i , et i l l e s a i t . La solution d'Angeiique est de continuer a. refuser de signer l e formulaire, non pas parce qu'elle y c r o i t , mais pour se l i b e r e r du pouvoir du n6ant. La solution de l'abbe est d'abord d'aimer un de ses eieves; cet amour aide a remplir l e vide q u ' i l sent en 86 etant abandonni de Dieu. Mais l'abbe de Pradts d i f f e r e de l a soeur Angelique parce que sa l u c i d i t e a l u i n'est pas totale. I l est incapable de se voir t e l q u ' i l est reellement; un "homme qui a oublie Dieu et qui aime un etre humain, non pas pour l a g l o i r e du Seigneur mais pour s a t i s f a i r e ses propres besoins. L'abbe de Pradts v o i t son amour i g o i s t e comme un amour pur et s p i r i t u e l ; de plus i l se v o i t comme maitre du destin de Souplier car i l pense que l u i seul peut guider 1'enfant. L'amour de Pradts pour Souplier a donne un sens a sa vie autre-ment i n u t i l e et absurde. Lorsque l e Supirieur declare q u ' i l a f a i t p a r t i r Souplier, 1' abbe de Pradts se trouve v i s - a - v i s du neant. Sa vie n'a aucun sens parce q u ' i l a abandonne Dieu completement pour se donner a une aff e c t i o n humaine. I l ne v o i t Dieu nulle part; a son avis l e Seigneur est absent de cette ecole r e l i -gieuse et i l l e declare au Supirieur: "L'incroyance y est partout. Vous etes dupe de l a facade. ...L'incroyance non 20 seulement chez les Aleves, mais chez les professeurs." L'abbi de Pradts est tente de renoncer a son role de pretre et de refuser son s a c r i f i c e sacerdotal. En ve r i t e , i l a deja oublie son role de pretre l o r s q u ' i l s'est permis d'avoir une affe c t i o n autre que c e l l e du professeur pour 1'eleve. I l accepte enfin l e s a c r i f i c e non pas parce q u ' i l congoit " l e sacerdoce comme un absolu et perpetuel s a c r i f i c e " 2 1 mais parce q u ' i l doit 87 1'accepter pour se l i b e r e r du pouvoir du neant par un acte completement vain. Comme l a soeur Angeiique, i l espere depasser l'absurdite de l a condition humaine par une action qui est l'acte supreme de l a vanitS. S i nous comparons les divers protagonistes des pieces rel i g i e u s e s , nous voyons q u ' i l y a un theme qui se reproduit invariablement; c'est l e probleme de 1'action et de 1'inaction. Theme constant dans l a philosophie d'Henry de Montherlant c'est cependant l e sentiment du nihilisme qui pose l a question d'agir ou de ne pas agir. Comme etres lucides, les hSros monther-lantiens ont vu ou l a vanitS de l a condition humaine ou du moins l'absurdite d'une vie mediocre. En d'autres termes, les protagonistes se sont rendu compte q u ' i l n'y a aucune valeur transcendante ou q u ' i l s ne peuvent accepter l a morale des mediocres; comme etres supSrieurs, i l s doivent trouver une morale de l a qua l i t y . Chaque hSros doit se poser cette question: pourquoi agir s ' i l n'y a rien, s i tout est absurde? Le Maitre de Santiago, par exemple, agit parce q u ' i l se c r o i t supSrieur a tout autre homme, et done, i l n'est pas dispose a suivre une morale mediocre. II est a l a recherche d'une morale de l a qualite" humaine; i l agit pour s'Slever au-dessus de toute bassesse. Les autres protagonistes agissent d'une facon differente parce q u ' i l s sont peut-etre un peu plus complexes. Cisneros 88 continue a c r o i r e en ses actes po l i t i g u e s a cause de son desir inextinguible du pouvoir temporel. II a vu l e neant chez l a reine Jeanne; i l a vu sa vie de renoncement t o t a l , un moyen de v i v r e - q u ' i l cherche depuis des annees, mais son desir de cette solitude n'est pas assez f o r t . II n'a pas l e courage de se depouiller de toutes ses actions p o l i t i q u e s pour braver un monde ou r i e n n'a de valeur. Son engagement dans l a vie est l e seul moyen q u ' i l puisse supporter l e neant. La soeur Angelique et 1'abbi de Pradts continuent dans leurs roles r e s p e c t i f s de r e l i g i e u s e et de pretre pour se l i b e r e r . Chacun se s a c r i f i e vainement parce q u ' i l ne c r o i t plus en ce s a c r i f i c e . Tous les deux se presentent comme des incroyants devant un dieu auquel i l s ne croient plus; c'est un acte de supreme vanite. Cette action est leur facon de braver l e neant, c'est-a-dire de se l i b i r e r du pouvoir du neant. La reine Jeanne c h o i s i t de ne pas agir. Plus lucide que tous les autres protagonistes, e l l e a vu non seulement l a v a n i t i de l a condition humaine, mais aussi l a vanite de toutes ses actions aupres d'un etre absolu qui est pour e l l e l e neant. E l l e reconnait qu'elle est i n f i n i t i s i m a l e en face du Nada et que ses actes ne comptent pas. Dans un instant, au moment de l a mort de son mari, Jeanne a d e t r u i t toute sa vie, sauf l e souvenir de son r o i ; e l l e est entree completement dans le neant. La reine a reussi ou l e Cardinal, par exemple, a echoue. E l l e 89 s'est detruite; e l l e est a l a f o i s l a c r e a t r i c e et l'Erostrate. D*apres Gabriel Matzneff: "Les propos que t i e n t Jeanne l a F o l i e sont l a pointe supreme d'un neantisme qui, s i l'on est consequent, conduit rapidement, a l ' i n e r t i e cadaverique, voire au s u i c i d e . " 2 2 La reine a accept^ totalement l e Rien. La caracteristique pridominante de tous les protagonistes r e l i g i e u x est leur l u c i d i t e qui leur permet d'etre conscient du neant. Le Maitre de Santiago et l e Cardinal d'Espagne reconnaissent l a vanite de l a condition humaine, mais i l s mettent leur confiance dans leurs actes, c e l u i - c i parce q u ' i l n'a pas l e courage de d i t r u i r e son oeuvre p o l i t i q u e , parce q u ' i l n'a pas l e courage de vivre une vie sans aucune s i g n i f i -cation, c e l u i - l a parce q u ' i l c r o i t a sa propre superiorite. La reine Jeanne, l a plus lucide de tous, est l e seul personnage qui se l i b e r e du pouvoir du nihilisme par une acceptation totale du neant. E l l e est devenue une p a r t i e du niant parce qu'elle a eu l e courage de se detruire en face de toutes les i l l u s i o n s de ce monde. Le Rien n'a aucun pouvoir sur e l l e . L'abb<§ de Pradts et l a soeur Angelique surtout ont vu, comme Jeanne l a F o l i e , l'absurdite t o t a l e de l a condition humaine et l a vanite de leurs propres actes. I l s ne peuvent entrer dans l e neant autant que l a reine, et done, i l s con-tinuent a agir non pas parce q u ' i l s croient en l a grandeur de leurs actions mais parce q u ' i l s esperent q u ' i l s s'eleveront 90 au-dessus du nSant en accomplissant un acte qui est vain et absurde au supreme degre. Pour eux l a veri t a b l e grandeur est completement vaine. L u c i l l e Becker explique a i n s i l a decision de ces deux protagonistes: ...The heroism and n o b i l i t y extolled, by Montherlant are merely his answer to the anguish f e l t by modern man i n a universe deprived of a l l transcendent values. Recognizing that there i s no regard for man on this earth or i n another l i f e , he sets up as a raison d'etre the superior q u a l i t i e s which characterize his hero.... Recognizing that human existence i s e s s e n t i a l l y tragic, he nevertheless contends that l i f e must be l i v e d to the f u l l e s t . His hero, aware that a l l hope i s i l l u s o r y , cannot content himself with his despair, but must act i n order to f i n d deliverance.2 3 Chaque hSros r e l i g i e u x a vu o u d u moins est conscient du neant. I l reconnait son existence t r a n s i t o i r e et l a vanitS de toutes ses actions. Neanmoins, i l continue a agir, meme sachant que ses actions sont i n u t i l e s parce que l a ve r i t a b l e grandeur est completement vaine. Cette croyance en une action totalement absurde mene a l'idee du "service i n u t i l e " qui aidera l e heros a atteindre l a l i b e r t y absolue. L'occasion de vider un acte de toute s i g n i f i c a t i o n tout en 1'accomplissant est l e but de Montherlant et de ses heros. C'est leur seule fagon de dS-passer l e sentiment du nSant. 91 Notes sur l e Chapitre IV 1 Bordonove, Henry de Montherlant, p. 88. 2 Gabriel Matzneff, "Pessimisme et nihilisme chez Montherlant," La Table Ronde, (No. 155, novembre 1960), p. 219. 3 Ibid., p. 218. 4 "Postface," Le Maitre de Santiago, p. 135. 5 Andre Blanchet, La l i t t e r a t u r e et l e s p i r i t u e l , (tome 3; P a r i s : Aubier, Editions Montaigne, 1961) p. 254. 6 Le Cardinal d'Espagne, p. 112. 7 Ibid., p. 124. 8 Ibid., pp. 133-134. 9 Ibid., p. 162. 10 Port-Royal, pp. 7 2-7 3. 11 Mohrt, Montherlant, homme l i b r e , pp. 70-71. 12 Le Cardinal d'Espagne, p. 123. 13 Ibid., p. 156. 14 Ibid., pp. 166-167. 15 Matzneff, op. c i t . , p. 221. 16 Ibid., p. 222. 17 Le Maitre de Santiago, p. 122. 18 Pierre-Henri Simon, Temoins de l'homme, (3 e edition; P a r i s : L i b r a i r i e Armand Colin, 1955), p. 109. 19 Jones, The Alienated Hero i n Modern French Drama, p. 26. 92 20 La v i l l e dont l e prince est un enfant, pp. 173-174. 21 Ibid., p. 174. 22 Matzneff, op. c i t . , p. 220. 23 Becker, The Plays of Henry de Montherlant, pp. 172-173. CONCLUSION SERVICE INUTILE Nous avons vu que pour Henry de Montherlant l e probleme l e plus important chez l'homme est c e l u i de 1'action ou de 1'inaction, c'est-a-dire de 1'engagement ou du detachement. Dans les pieces r e l i g i e u s e s , tous les personnages s'efforcent de decouvrir s i leur actes ont un sens ou non. C'est a eux de decider s i leur vie a une certaine valeur. Dans l a postface du Cardinal d'Espagne, Montherlant parle a i n s i de 1'importance de ce probleme dans ses oeuvres p r i n c i p a l e s : "Le probleme que j ' a i evoque principalement dans cette piece est c e l u i de 1*action et de 1'inaction, touchi dans Service I n u t i l e des 1933, et plus tard dans l e Maitre de Santiago. I l me semble q u ' i c i i l divore tout l e reste.""1" Comme solution personnelle a ce probleme, Montherlant a base sa philosophie sur l a morale du "Service I n u t i l e " - philosophie qui l'aide a supporter une vie ou tous ses actes paraissent vains. Lucide comme tous ses protagonistes, Henry de Montherlant peut se voir t e l q u ' i l est et i l peut voir l e monde dans toute son absurdity. II n'a pas peur de voir que r i e n ne compte dans ce monde. Michel Mohrt explique que 94 Montherlant n'a pas besoin de l a morale "chretienne" parce q u ' i l peut substituer une morale personnelle qui se resume a i n s i : "Je n'ai que l'idee que je me f a i s de moi pour me soutenir sur l e s mers du neant." 2 Parce q u ' i l est lucide, Montherlant n'a pas besoin-du confort que fournit l a r e l i g i o n chretienne; car comme l'exprime encore Michel Mohrt,..."la l u c i d i t S , c'est de ne pas se confier a un espoir imbecile, bon tout au plus pour les f a i b l e s , pour les Chretiens." 3 Mais ce n'est pas assez d'etre lucide et de voir l a vanite de tout; Montherlant veut depasser l'absurdite du monde. V o i l a ou sa philosophie du "Service I n u t i l e " joue un r o l e . Selon Monther-lant tout est vanite et l e refuge de l'homme se trouve dans son moi. II discute en d e t a i l cette idee de l ' i n u t i l i t e de l a condition humaine dans son l i v r e Service In u t i l e, publie en 1935. Nous trouvons dans cette oeuvre l a base d'un systeme philosophique qui deviendra plus concis l o r s q u ' i l l'appliquera a l a vie de ses personnages theatraux. C'est une philosophie qui affirme 1'importance du moi plutot que les actes de l'homme; c'est une philosophie qui accentue 1'indifference de tout. Montherlant desire que: ...notre e s p r i t comprenne, approuve et contemple avec s a t i s f a c t i o n cette sublime Equivalence, dont l e dieu des Chretiens nous a donne une lueur quand i l a prononce: "Je d e t r u i r a i et j * e d i f i e r a i " , pour f a i r e entendre que ces deux actes sont i n d i f f e r e n t s , et que tous les phenomenes que les hommes jugent contradictoires, et sur lesquels i l s s'animent s i 95 cruellement, ne sont que des parcelles egales de sa v e r i t e . ^ Quoique l a vie s o i t un songe, quoique tous ses actes soient i n u t i l e s pour l a societe et pour son ame, l'homme doit continuer d'agir parce que c'est l a seule fagon "d'affirmer son independance a l'egard de l a nature..." 5; c'est-a-dire, c'est l a seule fagon d'atteindre l a l i b e r t y . S i l'on peut enlever toute s i g n i f i c a t i o n morale ou mitaphysique a nos actes, en d'autres termes, a notre service, on peut depasser 1'absur-d i t y de tout par une plus grande v a n i t i . Done, l'homme est l i b r e parce q u ' i l ne depend de r i e n dans ce monde. Cette philosophie du "Service I n u t i l e " est, comme l e d i t Michel Mohrt, "une morale de l a f i e r t e , qui n'attend nulle r e t r i b u t i o n dans ce monde ou dans un autre." 0 Chaque heros ne depend que de sa qual i t y ou de sa propre grandeur. L'opinion q u ' i l a de son moi est l a seule chose qui compte. Le heros est soutenu par sa hauteur personnelle, car " l a hauteur, c'est l a conscience de sa d i g n i t i , l e respect de s o i - m e m e . C e t t e morale du "Service I n u t i l e " est l e but de l a philosophie de Montherlant pour resoudre l e probleme de 1'action et de 1'inaction. C'est ce qui permet a chaque personnage r e l i g i e u x de supporter l e niant et d'atteindre l a l i b e r t e personnelle. Le protagoniste montherlantien refuse de se contenter du deses-poir quoiqu'il sache que tout est i l l u s o i r e et sans valeur; i l continue a agir pour s'il e v e r au-dessus de toute vanite. 96 Tous les heros montherlantiens partagent l a l u c i d i t e de leur crSateur en autant q u ' i l s sont des etres qui reconnaissent leur propre su p e r i o r i t y . Comme Henry de Montherlant, i l s suivent l a regie de l a hauteur personnelle. Par divers degrSs, chaque protagoniste reconnait ou l a mediocrite de tout ce qui l'entoure ou l a vanite absolue du monde et de ses actions. Ceux qui sont les plus lucides, c'est-a-dire, ceux qui voient l a vanite de l a condition humaine, cherchent a depasser cette condition par un acte qui ne vaut r i e n parce q u " i l est t o t a l e -ment absurde. I l s cherchent a vider leurs actes de toute s i g n i f i c a t i o n morale ou metaphysique. De cette fagon, i l s atteignent une l i b e r t e complete. Des cinq personnages principaux des pieces religieuses, i l n'y en a que deux qui possedent ou l a l u c i d i t e ou l e courage de suivre jusqu'au bout l a morale du "Service I n u t i l e " , et de ces deux l e lecteur ne v o i t que l a reussite d'un seul heros. Les autres protagonistes sont capables de voir leur propre superiorite en face de l a mediocrite des autres, mais i l s n'ont n i l e courage n i l a l u c i d i t e necessaires pour supporter l a vanite absolue de l a condition humaine. Le Maitre de Santiago est l e moins lucide de tous les heros. C'est l e seul qui n'ait aucun doute a l'egard de sa fagon de vivre et de ses actes. Certain de sa propre superiorite, i l est sur que tous ses actes sauveront son ame. II a confiance en lui-meme parce 97 q u ' i l c r o i t q u ' i l mene l a vie d'un Chretien p a r f a i t ; selon l u i , i l est l'homme et l e chrStien que tous devraient etre. Alvaro ne doute pas de ses actions car i l n'a pas vu l a vanite de tout. II ne v o i t que l a mediocrite" des autres et son seul desir est de s'Slever au-dessus des mediocres. Parce que l e Maitre de Santiago n'est pas assez lucide pour voir l e monde t e l q u ' i l est, c'est-a-dire, i l l u s o i r e et absurde, i l n'atteint jamais l a morale du "Service I n u t i l e " . Le Maitre ne peut reconnaitre l a vanite de son espoir - l ' e s -poir d'etre l e plus p a r f a i t des C h r e t i e n s ; i l ne peut r e j e t e r 1'espoir d'une vie immortelle pour un homme comme l u i . De plus, aux yeux de Montherlant, l e Maitre de Santiago n'attein-dra jamais l a liberte" parce q u ' i l d o i t dependre d'une morale autre que c e l l e de l a hauteur personnelle. Alvaro depend de sa f i l l e pour sa redemption; i l n'est pas l e propre instrument de son destin. Le Cardinal d'Espagne est un personnage beaucoup plus complexe qu'Alvaro car i l est plus lucide. Lorsque Cisneros v o i t l a reine Jeanne dans son Stat de detachement t o t a l , i l devient envieux de sa vie s o l i t a i r e ; i l cherche, comme e l l e , a se r e t i r e r completement de ce monde. Le but de Cisneros est d'oublier tout dans l e monde sauf Dieu; i l veut se donner au Seigneur comme l a reine s'est deja donnSe au souvenir de son mari. Le Cardinal exprime a i n s i son desir d'une vie de 98 solitude: . . . E l l e annule 1'univers avec son mepris... Comme e l l e m'a f a i t sentir qu'elle me jugeait vulgaire de vouloir intervenir dans les evenements'. Comme e l l e cherchait a m'humilier'. La reine a rouvert en moi cette p l a i e jamais fermie tout a f a i t , l a p l a i e d'une tentation inassouvie. E l l e m'a f a i t b r i l l e r cette r e t r a i t e que plusieurs f o i s j ' a i p r i s e et plusieurs f o i s t e n t i de prendre.g Mais quoiqu'il brule de vivre une vie ou i l o u b l i e r a i t les evenements po l i t i q u e s , et ou. i l ne f e r a i t r i e n que de penser a Dieu, Cisneros d o i t continuer dans son rol e de chef d ' i t a t . Car bien q u ' i l voie, a travers l a reine, l a vanite de l a con-d i t i o n humaine, i l ne possede pas l e courage de dire que sa vie p o l i t i q u e et que toutes ses actions p o l i t i q u e s n'ont aucun sens. Alvaro, en tant qu'Espagnol dur et intransigeant, aurait l e courage de supporter l a v a n i t i de l a condition humaine, mais i l n'a pas l a l u c i d i t e necessaire pour voir cette vanite. Cisneros, cependant, v o i t l'absurdite des actes mais i l manque de courage pour cesser d'agir. II refuse de se voir comme un homme qui a construit, pendant des annees, une vie qui ne compte pas. Comme Alvaro, l e Cardinal n'est plus 1'instrument de son destin, car c'est l e r o i qui l e mene a sa perte. Les actes p o l i t i q u e s de Cisneros ne comptent plus pour l e r o i ; aux yeux du r o i c'est Dieu seul qui pourrait ricompenser digne-ment les services q u ' i l a rendus a 1'Espagne.9 Le Cardinal, oublie par l e r o i comme lui-meme a oublie Dieu ne peut se 99 l i b e r e r par une action completement vaine; i l ne peut que mourir. L'abbe de Pradts est plus lucide que l e Maitre de Santiago et l e Cardinal d'Espagne. II ne simule pas un inte r e t a l a f o i chretienne bien q u ' i l s o i t assez lucide pour se rendre compte q u ' i l manque de f o i . De cette maniere, de Pradts ressemble a l a soeur Angeiique qui se rend compte aussi de son manque de f o i r e l i g i e u s e . Mais ces deux protagonistes d i f f e r e n t dans l a solution q u ' i l s apportent a ce probleme. Angeiique, plus lucide que l'abbe, continue a refuser de signer l e formulaire simplement pour se l i b e r e r du pouvoir du neant par un acte qui est completement vain. L'abbe de Pradts, cependant, c r o i t q u ' i l peut s'eiever au-dessus du neant, c'est-a-dire, donner un sens a sa vie par un amour pour un de ses eleves. De Pradts doit vivre une vie ou ses actes ont une valeur; i l n'a pas l e courage de supporter une vie qua est i n u t i l e et absurde. II doit essayer de remplir l e vide qui s u i t son abandon de Dieu. Bien que l'abbe se rende compte q u ' i l est un etre lucide et superieur, i l ne peut voir que pour etre un homme l i b r e i l ne doit dSpendre que de lui-meme, et de sa propre hauteur. V o i l a l a grande difference entre l u i et l a soeur Angeiique. Comme Alvaro et Cisneros, de Pradts ne prend pas en main son propre destin. C'est son SupSrieur qui d i r i g e sa destinSe, 100 car c'est l u i qui demande a l'abbe de s a c r i f i e r 1'enfant. Sans l e savoir, l e SupSrieur est 1'instrument de l a redemption de Pradts car en demandant ce s a c r i f i c e , i l oblige l'abbe a suivre l a route qui l e guidera a l a morale du "Service I n u t i l e . " De Pradts se l i b e r e a son insu par un acte qui est d'une plus grande vanite que l'absurdite de l a condition humaine. Ce s a c r i f i c e , "...auquel i l c r o i t sur l ' a u t e l d'un dieu auquel probablement i l ne c r o i t p a s " , 1 0 sera l a fagon par laquelle l'abbe de Pradts pourra dSpasser l'absurdite de l a condition humaine. C'est un acte de supreme i n u t i l i t e . Le caractere de l a soeur Angeiique et c e l u i de l a reine Jeanne representent dans l e theatre r e l i g i e u x d'Henry de Montherlant l e point culminant de l a morale du "Service I n u t i l e " . Chacune, douee d'une l u c i d i t e extraordinaire, est capable de voir clairement l a vanite totale du monde et 1 * i n u t i l i t e de ses actions dans ce monde. Toutes les deux cherchent a s'eiever au-dessus de leur condition humaine; Angeiique espere se l i b e r e r par sa morale de l a superiorite personnelle et Jeanne s'est deja liberSe par son indifference complete a tout. Ces deux expressions "espere" et "deja liberSe" marquent l a difference entre l a philosophie de Montherlant en 1954 et plus tard en 1960. Dans Port-Royal, Montherlant l a i s s e l e dernier r e s u l t a t au lecteur; c'est a l u i de decider s i l a morale de l a hauteur, c'est-a-dire, s i l a philosophie du 101 "Service I n u t i l e " sera l a bonne solution pour Angelique. Dans cette piece, l e lecteur f a i t l a connaissance d'une femme d'une l u c i d i t e itonnante qui se rend compte de 1'absurdity de l a condition humaine. Pour accentuer l a terreur que tout l e monde do i t eprouver l o r s q u ' i l s a i t que ses actes n'ont aucune valeur, Montherlant place sa victime en face d'un absolu, en face d'un etre eternel. Tourmentee de doutes, t e r r i f i e e par l e niant, Angelique se resout neanmoins a vaincre l e pouvoir du niant. E l l e essaiera de se l i b e r e r par l a grandeur person-n e l l e qui est l a chose l a plus vaine de tout. En d'autres termes, e l l e refusera de signer l e formulaire, non pas parce qu'elle c r o i t mais parce qu'elle ne c r o i t pas. E l l e n'aura pas de raison morale ou mitaphysique pour son refus; done, e l l e aura enleve toute s i g n i f i c a t i o n a son action. Par cet acte de supreme vanity, l a soeur Angelique espere atteindre l a l i b e r t i . L u c i l l e Frackman Becker exprime a i n s i l a solution d'Angilique: "She enjoys suffering for a cause i n which she has ceased to believe. Hers i s a perfect example of "Service I n u t i l e " , service which becomes more be a u t i f u l as i t becomes more useless. Avec l e personnage de l a reine Jeanne, Montherlant a at t e i n t l e point culminant non seulement de sa philosophie de l a vie mais aussi comme peintre d'un des meilleurs p o r t r a i t s du nihilisme. Chez l a reine, on v o i t un nihilisme complet -102 un detachement t o t a l du monde, des personnes, et de ses propres actions. Jeanne l a F o l l e est sans doute l e protagoniste l e plus lucide de tous les heros montherlantiens; e l l e v o i t l e monde et elle-meme t e l s q u ' i l s sont, c'est-a-dire sans aucune valeur. C'est e l l e qui a ete l a plus proche des tenebres du neant; et c'est sa reussite en face du Rien que Montherlant a c h o i s i de d e c r i r e . Jeanne est l'exemple p a r f a i t d'un partisan de l a philosophie montherlantienne; e l l e a pu se detacher d'un monde p l e i n d * i l l u s i o n s pour se devouer au seul acte qui a i t un sens pour e l l e . Le "Service I n u t i l e " de Jeanne qui l a l i b e r e du pouvoir du Rien, c'est l a g l o r i f i c a t i o n de son mari - acte d'une vanite supreme parce q u ' i l ne vaut pas l a peine d'etre g l o r i f i e . I l faut mentionner i c i que l ' i n f i d e i i t e du r o i ne semble avoir aucune importance aux yeux de l a reine. En e f f e t , ce qui compte c'est 1'amour qu'elle avait pour l u i . Le f a i t qu'elle connait les infideiites de son mari mais refuse d'y arreter sa pensee n'enleve r i e n a l'absurdite de cet acte. A l a f i n de Port-Royal, nous voyons l a soeur Angeiique en t r a i n de commencer son "Service I n u t i l e " pour se l i b e r e r du neant. Nous ne savons pas s i cette philosophie du "Service I n u t i l e " r e u s s i r a . Dans l e Cardinal d'Espagne nous voyons les ef f e t s de cette philosophie. Jeanne s'est deja. l i b e r e parce que l a g l o r i f i c a t i o n de son mari i n f i d e l e l u i permet de s'eiever au-dessus du pouvoir du Nada. E l l e ne depend que 103 d'elle-meme; e l l e n'a aucune i l l u s i o n ; e l l e n'a aucun espoir. E l l e a cree sa propre l i b e r t y . Dans cette etude nous avons vu que tous les heros r e l i -gieux, sauf l e Cardinal d'Espagne, se detachent ou de l a societe ou de leur communaute pour chercher l a hauteur. En meme temps q u ' i l s se detachent de l a vie, i l s s'engagent dans une connaissance de s o i . Plusieurs heros, Alvaro et Cisneros par exemple, refusent de se voir t e l s q u ' i l s sont; i l s refusent d*abandonner 1'espoir de leur propre g l o i r e . La soeur Angelique et l a reine Jeanne et, jusqu'a un cer t a i n point, l'abbe de Pradts, cependant, se rendent compte que leur morale de l a hauteur n'aura de sens que s ' i l s dependent d'eux-memes. Le hiros doi t savoir que sa noblesse et son heroisme est l a plus grande vanite de tout; i l s doivent accepter ce f a i t pour se l i b e r e r de toutes les i l l u s i o n s de ce monde absurde. En d'autres termes, l a philosophie du "Service I n u t i l e " est une philosophie d e p o u i l l i e d'espoir et d ' i l l u s i o n s . C'est une philosophie pour ceux qui sont i n t e l l i g e n t s , pour ceux qui sont lucides, pour ceux qui sont surs que n i leur vie n i leurs actes n'ont de sens et qui ont l e courage de supporter ce f a i t . Aux yeux de Montherlant, cette morale est done l i m i t i e a un p e t i t nombre de gens de q u a l i t e . 104 Notes sur l a Conclusion 1 "Postface," Le Cardinal d 1Espagne, pp. 212-213. 2 Mohrt, Montherlant, homme l i b r e , p. 212. 3 Ibid., p. 197. 4 Henry de Montherlant, Service i n u t i l e , (Paris: Gallimard, 1935), p. 125. 5 Ibid., p. 114. 6 Mohrt, op. c i t . , p. 213. 7 Ibid., p. 213. 8 Le Cardinal d'Espagne, p. 162. 9 Ibid., p. 205. 10 Jeanne Eichelberger, "Lettre a H. de Montherlant," p. 247. 11 Becker, The Plays of Henry de Montherlant, p. 83. BIBLIOGRAPHIE I. PIECES DE MONTHERLANT EH ORDRE CHRONOLOGIQUE 1929 - L ' E x i l , dans Theatre, Bibliotheque de l a Pleiade, 1954. 1942 - La Reine morte,' Gallimard, (Le l i v r e de poche), 1947. 1943 - F i l s de personne. The Macmillan Company, 1964. 1943 - Un Incompris, Bibliotheque de l a Pleiade, 1954. 1946 - Malatesta, Gallimard, 35 e edition, 1948. 1947 - Le Maitre de Santiago, Gallimard, 1947. 1949 - Demain i l fera jour, Gallimard, 28 e edition, 1949. 1949 - Pasiphae, Gallimard, 28 e edition, 1949. 1950 - Celles qu'on prend dans les bras, Bibliotheque de l a Pleiade, 1954. 1951 - La v i l l e dont l e prince est un enfant, Gallimard, 20 e edition, 1957. 1954 - Port-Royal, Gallimard, (Le l i v r e de poche), 1954. 1956 - Broceliande, dans Theatre, Bibliotheque de l a Pleiade, 1965. 1958 - Don Juan, Gallimard, 1958. 1960 - Le Cardinal d*Espagne, Gallimard, 1960. 1965 - La guerre c i v i l e , Gallimard, 1965. 106 I I . AUTRES OEUVRES DE MONTHERLANT UTILES DANS CETTE ETUDE Le songe, 1922, dans Romans et oeuvres de f i c t i o n non thSatrales, Bibliotheque de l a Pleiade, 1959. i Aux fontaines du desir, 1927, dans Romans et oeuvres de f i c t i o n  non theatrales, Bibliotheque de l a Pleiade, 1959. Service i n u t i l e , 1935, Gallimard, 1935. I I I . OUVRAGES ET ARTICLES CRITIQUES CONSULTES Alberes, R. M. B i l a n l i t t e r a i r e du vingtieme s i e c l e . Paris, Aubier, Editions Montaigne, 1962. Barjon, Louis. Mondes d'Ecrivains destinies d'hommes. Paris, Casterman, 1960. Becker, L u c i l l e Frackman. "Pessimism and N i h i l i s m i n the Plays of Henry de Montherlant", dans Yale French Studies, Spring-Summer 1962, pp. 88-91. . The Plays of Henry de Montherlant. Ann Arbor, Michigan, University Microfilms, 1958. Beer, Jean de. Montherlant. Paris, Flammarion, 1963. Berl, Emmanuel. "Journal d'un e c r i v a i n : Montherlant et l a l i b e r t S " , dans La Table Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 230-232. Blanchet, Andre. "Le Cardinal d'Espagne ou l e mystique manque", dans La l i t t e r a t u r e et l e s p i r i t u e l , tome 3, Paris, Aubier, Editions Montaigne, 1961. . "Le Port-Royal de Montherlant", dans La l i t t e r a t u r e et l e s p i r i t u e l , tome 2, Paris, Aubier, Editions Montaigne, 1960. Boisdeffre, Pierre de. Metamorphose de l a l i t t e r a t u r e de Barres a Malraux. Paris, Editions A l s a t i a , 1950. 107 Bordonove, Georges. Henry de Montherlant. Paris, Classiques du vingtieme s i e c l e , Editions Universitaires, 2 e Edition, 1958. Brodin, P i e r r e . Presences Contemporaines. Tome 1, Paris, Editions Debresse, 3 e edition, 1956. Brueziere, Maurice. "Montherlant et l e sport", dans La Table  Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 55-67. Cadieu, Martine. "Du cote de l a tendresse", dans La Table  Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 124-129. Caprier, C h r i s t i a n . "Au large de l a nuit", dans La Table Ronde, No. 155, novembre I960, pp. 130-134. Catalogne, Girard de. Les compagnos du s p i r i t u e l . Montreal, Editions de l'Arbre, 1945. Clouard, Henri. "Montherlant moraliste", dans La Table Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 208-213. Cognet, Louis. "Angelique de Saint Jean Arnauld", dans La Table  Ronde, No. 84, dicembre 1954, pp. 35-43. Cruickshank, John. Montherlant. London, Oliver and Boyd, 1964. Deon, Michel. "Montherlant voyageur", dans La Table Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 68-70. Descaves, Pi e r r e . "Montherlant, homme de theatre", dans La  Table Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 191-197. Faure-Biguet, J . N. Les enfances de Montherlant. Paris, L i b r a i r i e Plon, 1941. Fowlie, Wallace. Dionysus i n Par i s . London, Victor Gollancz Ltd., 1961. Gouhier, Henri. "La r e l i g i o n dans l e theatre d'Henri de Montherlant", dans La Table Ronde, No. 212, septembre 1965, pp. 5-11. Green, J u l i e n . "Port-Royal - tragedie des victimes", dans La Table Ronde, No. 84, decembre 1954, pp. 24-26. 108 Hatzfeld, Helmut. Trends and Styles i n Twentieth Century  French Lite r a t u r e. Washington, The Catholic University Press of America, 1966. Hobson, Harold. The French Theatre of Today. New York, B. Blom, 1965. Jobit, Pierre. "Les moments mystiques dans l e theatre de Montherlant", dans La Table Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 183-190. Jones, Robert Emmet. The Alienated Hero i n Modern French Drama. Athens, University of Georgia Press, 1962. Jouhet, Serge. "Avec cynisme et innocence", dans La Table  Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 121-123. Laprade, Jacques de. Le theatre de Montherlant. Paris, Editions Denoel, 1950. Lumley, Frederick. Trends i n Twentieth Century Drama. London, Ro c k l i f f , 1956. Marissel, Andre. Montherlant. Paris, Classiques du vingtieme s i e c l e . Editions Universitaires, 1966. Matzneff, Gabriel. "Pessimisme et nihilisme chez Montherlant", dans La Table Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 214-222. Meriel, Etienne. Henry de Montherlant. Paris, Editions de l a Nouvelle Revue Critique, 1936. Mohrt, Michel. "L'ordre de l a guerre", dans La Table Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 48-54. . Montherlant homme l i b r e . Paris, Gallimard, 12 e edition, 1943. Morreale, Gerald. An Introduction to the Theatre of Henry de  Montherlant. M. A. thesis, Department of Romance languages, The University of Rochester, 1951. Orcibal,"Jean. "Angelique de Saint-Jean devant les "portes de l a nuit", dans La Table Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 201-207. 109 Perruchot, Henri. Montherlant. Paris, Gallimard, 9 e edition, 1959. Quemeneur, Pie r r e . "Le fou et l e neant", dans La Table Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 198-200. Saint-Pierre, Michel de. Montherlant - bourreau de soi-meme. Paris, Gallimard, 1949. Saint-Robert, Philippe de. "Montherlant et l e catholicisme", dans La Table Ronde, No. 155, pp. 38-47. . "Montherlant ou l e voyage au bout du jour", dans La Table Ronde, No. 169, f e v r i e r 1962, pp. 16-20. Serant, Paul. "Note sur Montherlant moraliste", dans La Table  Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 157-165. Simon, Pierre-Henri. Proces du hSros. Paris, Editions du Seuil, 1950. . Temoins de l'homme. Paris, L i b r a i r i e Armand Colin, 3 e edition, 1955. . Theatre et destin. Paris, L i b r a i r i e Armand Colin, 1959. Touchard, Pierre-AimS. "Montherlant ou l e combat sans l a f o i " , dans La Table Ronde, No. 155, novembre 1960, pp. 223-229. IV. AUTRES OUVRAGES UTILES A CETTE ETUDE Copieston, Frederick. A History of Philosophy. Vol. 7, London, Burns and Oates Limited, 1963. Stumpf, Samuel Enoch. Socrates to Sartre: A History of Ph i l o -sophy . New York, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1966. T h i l l y , Frank. A History of Philosophy. New York, Henry Holt and Company, 3rd edition, 1958. 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.831.1-0104381/manifest

Comment

Related Items