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Spark spectra of lead Lyall, Kenneth Russell 1965

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THE' SPARK SPECTRA OF LEAD  by  KENNETH RUSSELL LYALL B.Sc,  U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h Columbia, 1961  A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE  REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE i n the Department of PHYSICS  We accept t h i s  t h e s i s as conforming t o the  r e q u i r e d standard  THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA September, 1965  In p r e s e n t i n g  fulfilment  of  the requirements f o r an advanced degree at the U n i v e r s i t y  of  British  Columbia,  available  for  this  thesis  in p a r t i a l  I agree that the L i b r a r y s h a l l  r e f e r e n c e and s t u d y .  I f u r t h e r agree that  m i s s i o n f o r e x t e n s i v e copying o f t h i s purposes may be granted his  representatives,,  cation of t h i s  thesis  without my w r i t t e n  Department o f  -2^  thesis  for  freely per-  scholarly  by the Head of my Department o r by  It  i s understood that copying o r p u b l i -  for financial  gain shall  permission.  PHYSIC.<, .  The U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h Vancouver 8, Canada Date  make i t  Columbia  ^epTeMBeia  \ 3CS~.  not be allowed  ABSTRACT The  atomic and  i o n i c spectra  photographed i n the r e g i o n  between 350  a three meter normal i n c i d e n c e and  of lead have been A and  7680 A,  vacuum g r a t i n g  a H i l g e r large quartz-glass  using  spectrograph,  prism spectrograph.  Spec-  t r o s c o p i c sources used throughout t h i s r e g i o n were the electrodeless discharge,  and  the condensed spark i n helium.  Approximately 4075 lead l i n e s were measured, and 1006 Pb  have been c l a s s i f i e d  I I I , and  Pb  IV.  The  i n the s p e c t r a  Pb  of these,  of Pb I, Pb I I ,  IV a n a l y s i s has  been extended:  r e l a t i v e e n e r g i e s have been assigned t o e i g h t even and odd  l e v e l s a r i s i n g from the  S d ^ n s , np,  r a t i o n s , and  t e n t a t i v e values given  the 6s7s and  6s6d c o n f i g u r a t i o n s  c o r e - p o l a r i z a t i o n theory has 5g - nh  t r a n s i t i o n s of Pb  nd and  ng  configu-  t o s e v e r a l l e v e l s from  of the  5d®  been a p p l i e d  core.  to the  The observed  IV, g i v i n g a value f o r the  i o n i z a t i o n p o t e n t i a l of 341438  cm *. -  two  iii TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE ABSTRACT* .« » .. . . •• • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • * ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  ^/  . . . . vi  INTRODUCTION  1  EXPERIMENTAL  3  Spectrographs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3  E l e c t r o d e l e s s Discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3  Condensed Spark i n Helium .  4  . . . . .  Exposures  5  REDUCTION OF SPECTROGRAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9  G r a t i n g Spectrograms  9  Prism Spectrograms.  10  ANALYSIS OF RESULTS . The 5 d  Core of Pb IV  1 0  the  .12 ..........  12  Ionization limit  12  the ng s e r i e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13  the ns s e r i e s . . . . . . . . . . .  14  the nd s e r i e s  15  the np s e r i e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The 5 d  9  . .  16  . .  17  .  17  . . .  17  Core of Pb IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  the c o n f i g u r a t i o n the c o n f i g u r a t i o n s  5d^6s6p  . . . . . . . .  5d 6s7s and 5d 6s6d 9  9  SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER WORK. . . . TABLES OF CLASSIFIED WAVELENGTHS BIBLIOGRAPHY.  22 ,. .  24 55  LIST OF TABLES TABLE I. II.  PAGE The I o n i z a t i o n L i m i t of Pb IV from the 5g-nh Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . R e l a t i v e Term Values of the 5 d n g 10  of Pb IV III. IV. V.  VI. VII.  Configuration  ..........................  Observed Values of the 5 d n s  13  .........  15  Observed Doublet Separations of the 5 d n d s e r i e s i n Au I - l i k e S p e c t r a . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observed Doublet Separations of the 5 d n p s e r i e s  16  i n Au I - l i k e S p e c t r a  17  1 0  series  14  10  1 0  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Even Energy L e v e l s of Pb IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20  Odd Energy L e v e l s of Pb IV  21  ..............  VIII.  Classified  L i n e s of Pb I  24  IX.  Classified  L i n e s of Pb II .  28  X.  Classified  L i n e s of Pb I I I  XI.  Classified  L i n e s of Pb IV . . . . . ..  45  C l a s s i f i e d Lines I n v o l v i n g the Even Complex Core L e v e l s of Pb IV  51  XII.  ......  . . . . . . ..  33  iv  LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE  PAGE  1.  The E l e c t r o d e l e s s Discharge . . .  7  2.  The Spark i n Helium . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8  3.  I s o e l e c t r o n i c Comparison of the np S e r i e s i n Au I - l i k e S p e c t r a . . . . . . . . . . . .  18  vi  ACKNOWLEDGMENTS  I would  l i k e t o thank Dr. A. M. Crooker f o r h i s con-  t i n u i n g i n t e r e s t and generous a s s i s t a n c e throughout t h i s project.  Messrs. A. J . F r a s e r , W. J . M o r r i s o n , and J . Lees  have g i v e n valued t e c h n i c a l h e l p .  Most of the computer  programs used i n t h i s work have been developed o r improved by Mr. K. A. Dick.  1 INTRODUCTION Increased a c t i v i t y i n the a n a l y s i s of atomic s p e c t r a i n the l a s t decade has been due t o improved  spectrographic  techniques, e s p e c i a l l y i n the vacuum u l t r a v i o l e t , and t o the i n c r e a s e d speed and accuracy of data p r o c e s s i n g made p o s s i b l e by the a v a i l a b i l i t y of modern computers. has g r e a t l y s i m p l i f i e d  The d i g i t a l  computer  the r e d u c t i o n of spectrograms, and the  s e a r c h i n g o f wave number data f o r p o s s i b l e energy l e v e l s .  It  has a l s o made p r a c t i c a l , by numerical methods, many t h e o r e t i c a l c a l c u l a t i o n s b a s i c t o atomic s p e c t r o s c o p y .  However,  because o f the vast amount o f data and e f f o r t r e q u i r e d f o r the "complete" a n a l y s i s of even one atomic spectrum, progress has been slow. The a n a l y s i s of Pb IV has been untouched f o r almost t h i r t y years. 1935,  13  I n v e s t i g a t i o n s were made by S c h o e p f l e i n  and by Crawford, McLay, and Crooker i n 1936.  3  In the  r e g i o n below 1440 A, both o f these analyses were based on the wavelengths obtained by A r v i d s s o n i n 1932.  1  The r e s u l t s of  Crawford e t . a_l. are quoted by Moore, who opens her c h a p t e r on Pb IV w i t h the statement:  " F u r t h e r study o f the spectrum  i s needed. """"^ The purpose of t h i s experiment i s t o o b t a i n a more complete and a c c u r a t e l i s t  of lead wavelengths,  especially  below 2400 A, and t o extend the a n a l y s i s of the Pb IV spectrum. Over 4000 lead l i n e s have been photographed on a three meter vacuum s p e c t r o g r a p h and a q u a r t z - g l a s s prism s p e c t r o g r a p h ,  2 employing two s p e c t r o g r a p h i c s o u r c e s : charge and the condensed  the e l e c t r o d e l e s s  spark i n helium.  Relative  dis-  term  values have been assigned t o 25 l e v e l s of Pb IV, based on predictions  from s e r i e s e x t r a p o l a t i o n s ,  i s o e l e c t r o n i c sequence  comparisons, and the c o r e p o l a r i z a t i o n theory.  The methods  used and the r e s u l t s obtained i n t h i s a n a l y s i s  are o u t l i n e d  i n Tables I t o V I I .  A t o t a l of 322 l i n e s are now  classified  as t r a n s i t i o n s between 34 even and 34 odd l e v e l s o f the Pb IV spectrum.  A l l classified  lead l i n e s are l i s t e d  i n Tables VIII  t o X I I , w i t h the i n t e n s i t i e s observed by A r v i d s s o n i n c l u d e d f o r comparison. often  A r v i d s s o n ' s proposed l i n e e x c i t a t i o n s were  found t o be h i g h ; many l i n e s shown i n h i s l i s t s  e x h i b i t i n g Pb V c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s are here c l a s s i f i e d  as  i n Pb IV.  3 EXPERIMENTAL Spectrographs The  s p e c t r a between 350  A and  2440 A were photo-  graphed w i t h a l o c a l l y designed three meter normal  incidence  vacuum concave g r a t i n g spectrograph, having an angle of incidence  of 9°40' and  accepting  p l a t e s 2 i n . wide.  Bausch and  a plate holder The  A/mm.  of the s p e c t r o g r a p h , s l i g h t l y  length,  g r a t i n g , manufactured  Lomb, i s r u l e d w i t h 1200  p r o c a l d i s p e r s i o n of 2.77  30 i n . i n  by  lines/mm g i v i n g a r e c i -  The  normal o p e r a t i n g  pressure  l e s s than l y u o f mercury, i s  ob-  t a i n e d w i t h a Kinney KS-27 mechanical backing pump, w i t h a speed of 27  ft /min, 3  water b a f f l e and  and  a CEC  MC-500B o i l d i f f u s i o n pump w i t h  l i q u i d a i r trap.  A H i l g e r spectrograph i n t e r c h a n g e a b l e quartz and  g l a s s prisms was  the s p e c t r a between 2440 A and Electrodeless  (E478), L i t t r o w mounted, With used t o photograph  7680 A.  Discharge  A l l wavelengths shown i n the f o l l o w i n g t a b l e s , those used i n the a n a l y s i s of Pb  IV, were d e r i v e d  t r o d e l e s s d i s c h a r g e spectrograms. source c o n s i s t e d lead placed  a few  i n s i d e a s o l e n o i d of copper tubing  oven and  radio-frequency  the vaporized  fields  l i n e of the h i s t o r i c a l  The  from e l e c -  electrodeless  of a quartz tube c o n t a i n i n g  r u p t i v e high-frequency c u r r e n t . electric  The  tube was  discharge  grams of  carrying a  dis-  heated i n an  lead atoms e x c i t e d by  i n s i d e the s o l e n o i d  and  ( F i g . 1).  the An  out-  development of the e l e c t r o d e l e s s d i s -  4 charge i s g i v e n by Minnhagen.  9  The measured o s c i l l a t i o n frequency of the tank c i r c u i t was 2 mc/s.  The c a p a c i t a n c e bank was made up of e i g h t  S o l a r c a p a c i t o r s of 0.0025^^ each, c o n s t i t u t i n g a t o t a l  capa-  c i t a n c e of 0 . 0 0 5 ^ connected a c r o s s the 50 kv t r a n s f o r m e r . I t was found t h a t the most i n t e n s e d i s c h a r g e was obtained with the vapour p r e s s u r e i n the tube between 7 0 ^ and 80ju.. nace, drawing 17 amp.  The f u r -  at 208v ac, reached a temperature of  about 800 °C. Condensed Spark i n Helium The e l e c t r i c spark has long been i n use as a spec12  t r o s c o p i c source, and i s d i s c u s s e d as such by  S a w y e r a  treatment o f the phenomena o f spark d i s c h a r g e s i s g i v e n by K a i s e r and W a l l r a f f .  8  The spark i n helium was used  primarily  t o o b t a i n e x c i t a t i o n data i n o r d e r t o d i s t i n g u i s h between s p e c t r a l l i n e s o f d i f f e r e n t stages of i o n i z a t i o n .  The " p o l e  e f f e c t " was v i s i b l e on most of the l i n e s , p e r m i t t i n g s e p a r a t i o n o f the i o n i c s p e c t r a .  T h i s s e p a r a t i o n was based on a  study of the i n t e n s i t y d i s t r i b u t i o n s along the i n d i v i d u a l lines.  Although the number o f l i n e s obtained was much l e s s  than w i t h the e l e c t r o d e l e s s d i s c h a r g e , the i o n i c s p e c t r a up t o Pb V were developed w i t h c o n s i d e r a b l e i n t e n s i t y . In the simple spark source used i n t h i s  experiment  ( F i g . 2 ) , a l i t h i u m f l u o r i d e window separated the source tube from the vacuum s p e c t r o g r a p h .  Helium gas, at atmospheric  p r e s s u r e , flowed c o n t i n u a l l y through the tube.  The e l e c t r o d e s  5 were made of r o l l e d  lead s h e e t s , obtained from A l l i e d  Chemical  Canada L i m i t e d of Vancouver, and s a i d t o be 99.998% pure. Because of the low m e l t i n g p o i n t of l e a d , 372 d i f f i c u l t y was was  encountered  °C,  w i t h the e l e c t r o d e s m e l t i n g .  This  overcome by running the source one minute on, one minute  o f f , throughout  the exposures.  An attempt  t o operate the  source w i t h the l i t h i u m f l u o r i d e window removed and w i t h the helium i n the tube at 5 cm p r e s s u r e f a i l e d because the clogged w i t h s p l u t t e r e d lead almost l i n e s below 1180  immediately.  A, the lower wavelength  i n helium spectrogram  plate. low I n t e n s i t y  has been photographed,  spark  w i t h the spark  tube o p e r a t i n g at 3 cm p r e s s u r e , and without the f l u o r i d e window i n p l a c e .  Thus no  transmission l i m i t  of l i t h i u m f l u o r i d e , were recorded on t h i s However, very r e c e n t l y a second  slit  lithium  The d i f f i c u l t y d i s c u s s e d above  was  overcome by the use of very s m a l l lead e l e c t r o d e s , which g r e a t l y reduced  the mass o f lead thrown by the spark.  l i n e s , e x h i b i t i n g good pole e f f e c t , were observed 1200  A and  515 A.  110  lead  between  The e x c i t a t i o n c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s of these  l i n e s are i n agreement w i t h the c l a s s i f i c a t i o n s assigned below. Exposures The  apparatus was  arranged so that exposures  of  e i t h e r l i g h t source c o u l d be taken w i t h the prism s p e c t r o graph and the g r a t i n g s p e c t r o g r a p h s i m u l t a n e o u s l y , making i t p o s s i b l e f o r photographs  t o be taken over the whole s p e c t r a l  6 range under s i m i l a r o p e r a t i n g c o n d i t i o n s .  Exposure times on  the g r a t i n g s p e c t r o g r a p h were 12 and 45 minutes w i t h the e l e c t r o d e l e s s d i s c h a r g e and 5 and 20 minutes w i t h the spark i n helium.  The prism spectrograms f o r both sources were  exposed between 15 and 25 minutes.  I l f o r d Q2 p l a t e s ,  deve-  loped i n Johnson A z o l d e v e l o p e r f o r two minutes, were used f o r a l l photographs below 3500 A; spectrograms above t h i s wavelength were exposed on I l f o r d HP3 p l a t e s , developed i n A z o l f o r seven minutes.  7  .Transite electric furnace  .fused quartz tube .quartz window  .mica o o o o o o o o o o o o  o o o o o o o o o o o o /-copper  brass taper to fit vacuum spectrograph  solenoid  pump  (a)  HOv ac  <•  ^  solenoid  0.005^f  50kv  I  o  1  O spark gap  (b)  Figure I. (a)  The  Electrodeless  Source tube  (b)  Electric  Discharge circuit  8  Figure 2. (a)  Source  The tube  Spark (b)  in  Electric  Helium circuit  9 REDUCTION OF SPECTROGRAMS ATI spectrograms  were measured on a  Zeiss-Abbe  comparitor, m o d i f i e d t o accept 2 i n . by 12 i n . p l a t e s . R e l a t i v e l i n e i n t e n s i t i e s appearing i n the t a b l e s are based on measurements taken on a J a r r e l l - A s h 23-100 r e c o r d i n g m i c r o photometer.  F o r each l i n e , the d e n s i t y measurement g i v e n by  the microphotometer i s expressed  i n the t a b l e s as a number i n  a l o g a r i t h m i c s c a l e between 0 and 500. G r a t i n g Spectrograms No a d d i t i o n a l standard s p e c t r a were imposed on the g r a t i n g spectrograms.  In both the spark i n helium and the  e l e c t r o d e l e s s d i s c h a r g e s p e c t r a , a s u f f i c i e n t number of oxygen, carbon, n i t r o g e n and hydrogen l i n e s were present i n the vacuum r e g i o n t o serve as wavelength standards. lengths used  The waveg f o r these l i n e s were those g i v e n by E d l e n .  Lead wavelengths were c a l c u l a t e d , not by the d i r e c t 12 a p p l i c a t i o n of the g r a t i n g equation  (Sawyer  ) , but by the use  of a computer program which f i t s a l l the a v a i l a b l e standard wavelengths over, say, a 15 cm r e g i o n of the p l a t e t o a t h i r d degree p o l y n o m i a l .  As a s a f e t y measure, the program evaluates  the e r r o r i n f i t t i n g each standard t o the p o l y n o m i a l , d i s c a r d s any standards w i t h an e r r o r of more than twice the average e r r o r , and then r e c a l c u l a t e s the p o l y n o m i a l .  An advantage of  t h i s method o f c a l c u l a t i o n i s that the e f f e c t of an e r r o r i n measurement i s lessened or n u l l i f i e d ;  a l s o , the polynomial  10 w i l l t o some extent c o r r e c t f o r v a r i o u s d e v i a t i o n s of the d i s p e r s i o n from the g r a t i n g equation, such as those due d i s t o r t i o n s of the p l a t e caused  by the p l a t e c l i p s .  to  Tomkins  and Fred, d i s c u s s i n g a s i m i l a r computer program, s t a t e t h a t over a 25 cm  range a simple t h i r d degree polynomial r e p r o 16  duces the g r a t i n g equation t o w i t h i n 0.0001 A. Vacuum wave numbers, computed.from Edlen's d i s 5 p e r s i o n formula, 450  were p r i n t e d out by the computer.  l i n e s of second  list,  About  and h i g h e r orders were i d e n t i f i e d  and these values were used t o apply a f i n a l  i n the  correction  t o the wavelengths. The comparitor s e t t i n g on a narrow, symmetric tral  l i n e i s reproduceable  spec-  t o about 1^,, c o r r e s p o n d i n g t o a  wavelength p r e c i s i o n of ^ 0.003 A.  A maximum u n c e r t a i n t y of  measurement f o r a l l but very broad or hazy l i n e s i s 4^, g i v i n g a wavelength p r e c i s i o n of - 0.010 t o t 0.2  cm"  1  at 2400 A and t o t 6 c m  -1  A which at 400 A.  corresponds These  e s t i m a t e s , however, n e g l e c t a l l other sources of e r r o r , t i c u l a r l y i r r e g u l a r i t i e s i n the p l a t e h o l d e r , which may  parnot  be  Iron a r c l i n e s were used as wavelength standards  on  e n t i r e l y compensated f o r i n the r e d u c t i o n c a l c u l a t i o n s . Prism Spectrograms  the prism spectrograms  between 2400 A and  dards were used above 5500 A.  5500A; neon s t a n -  Wavelengths were c a l c u l a t e d  on  11 the d i g i t a l computer, u s i n g the Hartmann d i s p e r s i o n  formula:  where the constants /\> C., and oV .are c a l c u l a t e d from the com0  e  p a r i t o r measurements tk and wavelengths A o f three well-spaced standards over approximately 15 cm on the p l a t e . c o r r e c t i o n curve was then a p p l i e d manually  A Hartmann  t o these wave-  lengths. By i n s p e c t i o n o f the Hartmann c o r r e c t i o n curves the wave number u n c e r t a i n t y on the quartz and g l a s s prism s p e c t r o grams was estimated t o be always l e s s than 0,5 cm" . 1  12 ANALYSIS OF RESULTS Using the r e l a t i v e term values g i v e n by Moore 114  l i n e s have been c l a s s i f i e d  and 418  l i n e s i n Pb I I I .  r e v i s e these a n a l y s e s .  i n Pb I, 152  No attempt was  The  l i n e s i n Pb I I ,  made t o expand or t o  i n v e s t i g a t i o n of Pb V quoted by  14 Moore i s from S c h o e p f l e . a n a l y s i s i s not confirmed  I t was  and  t h a t much of t h i s  by the present data, and hence no  c l a s s i f i e d wavelength l i s t The  found  f o r Pb V i s i n c l u d e d i n t h i s  thesis,  remainder of t h i s c h a p t e r d e a l s w i t h the methods  r e s u l t s of the a n a l y s i s of Pb IV.  The theory u n d e r l y i n g  the c a l c u l a t i o n s and e x t r a p o l a t i o n s , which i s o u t l i n e d here, y 4 i s t r e a t e d f u l l y by E d l e n . The  5d  1 0  Core of Pb  IV  the i o n i z a t i o n l i m i t .  For non-penetrating  the d e v i a t i o n of the term value from the hydrogenic almost  e n t i r e l y due  value i s  t o the d i p o l e p o l a r i z a t i o n of the  core by the o u t e r e l e c t r o n . may  orbits,  atomic  This p o l a r i z a t i o n c o n t r i b u t i o n  be w r i t t e n :  A? where T , . i  - T-T*  s the hydrogenic  - At) '  P M )  term v a l u e ; the f u n c t i o n s  are d e f i n e d and t a b u l a t e d by E d l e n .  4  The  f a c t o r A should  approach a constant value f o r a given spectrum. observed  t r a n s i t l o n ^ b e t w e e n two c l a s s i f i e d  From the  non-penetrating  13 terms, /\ can be c a l c u l a t e d and the i o n i z a t i o n l i m i t EJL found :  CT  =  A  The  -  T '  =  T "  ( T  =•  ^  ~  H  '  4-  A„') -  ( V  4-A„")  C T B ' - T , ' )  a p p l i c a t i o n o f t h i s theory t o the 5g - 6h,  5g - 7h, and 5g - 8h t r a n s i t i o n s i n the Pb IV spectrum i s shown i n Table I . TABLE I The  I o n i z a t i o n L i m i t of Pb IV from the 5g - nh T r a n s i t i o n s A (z)  Transition  E  (cm ) -1  5g - 6h  1322.  341472.  5g - 7h  1293.  341450.  5g - 8h  1277.  341444.  From the l a s t column i n Table I the i o n i z a t i o n i s estimated t o be 341438 c m  - 1  - 5 cm ,  i o n i z a t i o n p o t e n t i a l of 42.32 v. of 341350 cm"  1  -1  limit  c o r r e s p o n d i n g t o an  T h i s compares with the value  g i v e n by S c h o e p f l e ,  1 3  and quoted  by Moore. A l l  c a l c u l a t i o n s and e x t r a p o l a t i o n s i n t h i s a n a l y s i s are based on the new v a l u e . the ng s e r i e s .  R e l a t i v e term values were p r e d i c t e d  f o r the 6g, 7g, and 8g l e v e l s a c c o r d i n g t o the p o l a r i z a t i o n theory, w i t h the p o l a r i z a t i o n parameter, A, s e t equal t o 1265  cm . -1  The p r e d i c t e d and observed  are shown i n Table I I .  values f o r these  levels  14 TABLE II R e l a t i v e Term Values of the 5 d n g C o n f i g u r a t i o n of Pb IV 1 0  Predicted Value (cm- )  Level 6g  1  Observed Value (cm- ) 1  *G  453.  292212.  292116. 305230.  7g  Z  G  303.  305303.  8g  2  G  210.  313794.  I t i s seen from Table f o r 6g and 7g are 73 cm"  1  than the p r e d i c t e d v a l u e s .  —  II t h a t the observed  and 104 c m  -1  values  lower, r e s p e c t i v e l y ,  This d i s c r e p a n c y may be due t o  h i g h e r order p o l a r i z a b i l i t y terms, or t o p e r t u r b a t i o n s ween these  bet-  l e v e l s and those a r i s i n g from the 5d^6s6d c o n f i g u -  ration. the ns s e r i e s .  The 9s and 10s l e v e l s were p r e d i c t e d  by e x t r a p o l a t i o n from the known members of the s e r i e s .  The  quantum d e f e c t & , used i n these e x t r a p o l a t i o n s , i s d e f i n e d by the r e l a t i o n : (n-<5)  a  where T K i s the absolute term v a l u e , Yi i s the p r i n c i p a l quantum number, and R i s the Rydberg constant. value 4 f o r the Pb IV spectrum.  has the  The observed r e l a t i v e term  values and quantum d e f e c t s of the ns s e r i e s are shown i n Table I I I .  15 TABLE I I I Observed Values of the S d ^ n s S e r i e s of Pb IV 7s  6s r e l a t i v e term value (cm-1) i  8s  0  185103.0  3.732  3.649  *10s  *9s  249634.5  280829.5  298434.0  3.618  3.611  3.627  * l e v e l s new ;in t h i s a n a l y s i s . the nd s e r i e s .  The c e n t e r s of g r a v i t y of the nd  doublets were e x t r a p o l a t e d from the known members of the s e r i e s , as above.  The doublet  s e p a r a t i o n s were p r e d i c t e d  from e x t r a p o l a t i o n s through the Au I i s o e l e c t r o n i c sequence a c c o r d i n g t o the r e g u l a r doublet  law, which g i v e s the s p i n -  o r b i t s e p a r a t i o n f o r one- e l e c t r o n s p e c t r a :  Where oc i s the Sommerfeld f i n e s t r u c t u r e c o n s t a n t ,  Z i s the  n u c l e a r charge, and H. and i . a r e the p r i n c i p a l and o r b i t a l quantum numbers.  The s c r e e n i n g constant S a r i s e s from the  s h i e l d i n g of the n u c l e a r charge by the i n n e r e l e c t r o n s , and i s expected t o be n e a r l y c o n s t a n t , Z  d e c r e a s i n g s l i g h t l y as  i n c r e a s e s and the s c r e e n i n g becomes l e s s  Table IV shows the observed doublet constants  effective.  s e p a r a t i o n s and s c r e e n i n g  f o r the c o n f i g u r a t i o n s 7d, 8d, and 9d.  16 TABLE IV Observed Doublet Separations of the 5 d n d S e r i e s i n Au I - l i k e Spectra l u  Au I 6d  separation (cm" )  82.  1  67.5  s 7d  separation (cm-1)  41.  *8d  separation (cm" )  36.  1  S *9d  separation (cm-1) s  TI I I I  Pb IV  560.  1314.  2258.  61.3 254.  68.0  s  Hg II  62.7  57.9 592.  55.5 1018.  59.6  57.5 487.  136.  67.3  63.6  26.  68.  67.2  65.0  —  59.5 264.  —  60.9  • l e v e l s new i n t h i s a n a l y s i s . the np s e r i e s .  The l e v e l s designated  161° and  22ii° by Crawford, McLay and Crooker have been i d e n t i f i e d as 7 p P ^ ° , and 7 p P i ° , as o r i g i n a l l y suggested by S m i t h . 2  2  1 5  1  T h i s i d e n t i f i c a t i o n and the assignment of the values cm"  and 264437. c m  -1  t o 8p  262494.  P^ ^ r e s p e c t i v e l y , are s t r o n g l y  supported by the i s o e l e c t r o n i c comparisons p l o t t e d i n F i g . 3, and  by the r e g u l a r doublet  constant  S , illustrated  law e x t r a p o l a t i o n s of the s c r e e n i n g  i n Table V.  17 TABLE V Observed Doublet Separations of t h e 5 d n p i n Au I - l i k e Spectra 10  6p  separation (cm- ) 1  5 7p  separation (cm- ) 1  S  *8p  separation (cm- ) 1  S  Series  TI I I I  Pb IV  9123  14813  21061  55.9  51.3  48.6  46.6  696  3672  5682  8064  62.1  54.4  52.3  50.8  305  853  _ _  1944  63.8  60.3  —  57.8  Au I  Hg II  3815  * l e v e l s new i n t h i s a n a l y s i s . The 5 d  9  Core of Pb IV the c o n f i g u r a t i o n 5d 6s6p. 9  Of the 23 odd l e v e l s  a r i s i n g from the 5d 6s6p c o n f i g u r a t i o n , 22 have been 9  l i s h e d p r e v i o u s l y by Schoepfle, Crooker.  estab-  and by Crawford, McLay, and  The remaining l e v e l , 6 4 I , can combine only w i t h 0  the ng terms and, by e x t r a p o l a t i o n from the c o r r e s p o n d i n g l e v e l s i n Au I and Hg I I , i s p r e d i c t e d  t o l i e between 5i|°  (188759 c m )  The r e l a t i v e term  -1  value  and 7 £ ° (193776 c m ) .  of 191197 cm"  - 1  2  1  f o r 6 4 ^ ° has been e s t a b l i s h e d from t r a n -  s i t i o n s w i t h 5g, 6g, and 7g.  This c l a s s i f i c a t i o n i s the only  one p o s s i b l e i n the r e g i o n u s i n g  l i n e s of s u i t a b l e i n t e n s i t y  and e x c i t a t i o n . The c o n f i g u r a t i o n s  5d 6s7s and 5d 6s6d.  have been t e n t a t i v e l y assigned  9  9  Values  t o the e i g h t even l e v e l s  Figure 3.  Isoelectronic Comparison of the in A u l - like Spectra  np series  19 a r i s i n g from the 5d 6s7s c o n f i g u r a t i o n , based 9  c a l c u l a t i o n s by Goode.^  on t h e o r e t i c a l  These new values are l i s t e d  VI, u s i n g the j _ j c o u p l i n g n o t a t i o n adopted  by Moore.  VI a l s o c o n t a i n s 7 new r e l a t i v e term values probably to the c o n f i g u r a t i o n 5d 6s6d. 9  r a t i o n are expected  Table belonging  The 35 l e v e l s of t h i s c o n f i g u -  t o l i e i n the same r e g i o n as the 5d 6s7s 9  l e v e l s , making i d e n t i f i c a t i o n extremely Classified  i n Table  difficult.  l i n e s b e l o n g i n g to t r a n s i t i o n s  involving  these 15 somewhat t e n t a t i v e l e v e l s are l i s t e d s e p a r a t e l y i n Table X I I .  20 TABLE VI Even Energy L e v e l s of Pb IV Configuration 5d 5d' 5d? 5d  6s 6s 6s 6d 7s  -6s 6s 6s 6d 5d'° 7s /0  2  2  /0  5d 5d 5d'° 5d'° 5d'°  6d 8s 7d 7d 5g  6d 8s 7d 7d 5g  5d  5g 9s 8d 8d 6g  5g 9s 8d 8d 6g  /0  /0  /0  *5d'° *5d'°  *5d *5d  /0  /0  l a t i v e Term lue (cm-1)  Designation  10s 9d 9d 7g 3  *5d 10s *5d'° 9d *5d'° 9d *5d 7g *5d 6s6d? /0  /0 9  2 2 2  S D D D S  1  2 2 Z 2  2 2 2 2 2  2 2 2  D S D D G G S D D G  ?i 2  2| if  3  t  2 2  S D *D G  2 2  2  1 if  2} if  Number of Combinations  0 101252. 122568. 184558.8 185103.0  13 22 22 17 11  186816.8 249634.5 250401.6 251419.5 270496.  10 10 16 15 5  270498. 280829.5 281112.5 281599.0 292116.0  6 9 14 4 9  298434.0 298452.0 298716.5 305230.0 280318.  6 8 7 6 9  *5d? 6s6d? *5d^6s> 7s^ *5dW6s^7s^> *5d i^6s<i7s/i *5dV 6s47s^  4 5 6 7 8  280656. 281448. 283125. 286443. 288436.  9 6 8 6 6  *5d* 6s6d? *5d 6s6d? *5d? 6s6d? • Sd* 6s6d? *5d^6s^7s^  9 10 11 12 13  289881. 290023. 297406. 298839. 303495.  8 8 11 8 5  *5d V6s^7s^  14 15 16 17  304505. 307168. 310867. 314207.  6 5 5 8  2  ?  2  9  *5d 6stc 7s^ 9  /ii  i  *5d? 6s6d?  z  * l e v e l s new i n t h i s a n a l y s i s  21 TABLE V I I Odd Energy L e v e l s of Pb IV Configuration  6p 6p 1° 2° 3°  5d'° 6p  5d  6p  /0  5d \6a/i6py 9  z  z  5d' 6s^6p^ Sd^es^p^ 2!t  R e l a t i v e Term value (cm )  Designation 2 2  -1  P° P°  Number of Combinations  76158. 97219. 166369. 172667. 173248.  8 11 9 5 7  175388. 188759. 191196.5 193776. 193855.  7 12 3 8 3  5d^6s^6p^ 5d^6s 6p/> •*5d'24 6s 6p/is. 5 d ^ 6 s ^6p /y  4° 5° 6° 7° 8°  5d 2%.6s^6p/^ 5d2^6s4.6p/^. 5dV&6s£6p/* sdV^s^p^ 5dVz >i. P>i  9° 10° 11° 12° 13°  193954. 194147. 197024. 200021. 201460.  7 6 16 9 10  5d^6sfc6p^ 5d'° 7p 5d'/§6s/ 6p/^ 5d /A2.6s^6p ^  14" 15° 7p 17° 18°  208524.0 209051.1 209788.4 210369.7 213519.2  11 20 12 10 13  5d^6s^6p/^ 5 d 7p 5d 6s^6p/^  19° 20° 21° 7p 2p< 23°  214842.1 214891.8 217216. 217851.9 219461.0  14 13 14 15 13  24° 25° 26° 27°  221716.1 231013. 232638. 235565. 262494.  9 10 15 16 2  264437. 292543. 305516. 313939.  7 .1 1 1  4  2  4  L  9  z  f  6s  6  2  7  /0  5d^6s*6.p/£  /0  8p  8p  *5d 5d'° 5d 5d  8p 6h 7h 8h  8p *P° 0 6 h ^H 2 7 h H° 1 8 h H°  *5d  /0  /0  /0  2p°  1* 4§,5§ 4*,5* 5*  * l e v e l s new i n t h i s a n a l y s i s  22  SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER WORK The present e x t e n s i o n of the Pb IV a n a l y s i s has been l i m i t e d i n some i n s t a n c e s by a lack of s u f f i c i e n t  infor-  mation t o separate u n r e a l or "chance c o i n c i d e n c e " energy l e v e l s from r e a l ones.  T h i s i n f o r m a t i o n may be provided  e i t h e r by t h e o r e t i c a l c a l c u l a t i o n s e n a b l i n g a more accurate p r e d i c t i o n o f the energy l e v e l s , e s p e c i a l l y those from the complex c o r e s , or by the accumulation experimental  data.  arising  of f u r t h e r  In p a r t i c u l a r , f u t u r e experimental work  should i n c l u d e attempts t o o b t a i n : (i)  h i g h e r i n t e n s i t y spectrograms i n the v i s i b l e  and near u l t r a v i o l e t  regions.  Of the 4075 lead l i n e s  measured i n t h i s work, only 565 are above 2500 A. (ii)  more complete e x c i t a t i o n data, p e r m i t t i n g  s e p a r a t i o n of i o n i c s p e c t r a .  Although  the pole e f f e c t e x h i b i t e d by the spark r e l i a b l e , these  l i n e s account  t o t a l number observed grams .  t h i s separation, using l i n e s has proved  very  f o r only 13 p e r cent of t h e  on the e l e c t r o d e l e s s d i s c h a r g e s p e c t r o -  Improved e x c i t a t i o n data c o u l d perhaps be obtained by  employing low e x c i t a t i o n sources such as the hollow or by experimenting  cathode,  w i t h the e l e c t r o d e l e s s d i s c h a r g e under  v a r i a b l e c o n d i t i o n s of vapour pressure and tank c i r c u i t parameters. Since none of the terms newly e s t a b l i s h e d In t h i s  23  a n a l y s i s are known e i t h e r i n TI I I I or i n B i V, the i s o e l e c t r o n i c e x t r a p o l a t i o n s are l e s s d e f i n i t i v e than they would be otherwise.  A f u r t h e r study of these two s p e c t r a , e s p e c i a l l y  TI I I I , would strengthen and c o n f i r m the present work, and be an i n v a l u a b l e a i d t o f u t u r e e x t e n s i o n s .  24 TABLE VIII Classified  L i n e s o f Pb I  Column A  Intensity  from e l e c t r o d e l e s s  Column B  Intensity  from spark i n helium  Doubly c l a s s i f i e d Intensity A B 2 40 1 0 2h  5  4 2h 0? 7h. 1  3 10  1 3hh 12BS? 2h? 4 1 40 4h 1 0? 20 2 0 7 10 10 2 4 50 5  20  50 10 30 30 40  3 3 40 7 7  discharge  line Classification  Wave number (cm" )  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  58940.6 58410.9 58272.9 58178.3 58029.4  1696.624 1712.010 1716.063 1718.854 1723.265  6p P 6p P 6p P, 6p P 6p P -  16s 12d 8d 13s lid  3  57689.5 57472.0 56942.1 56604.3 55720.4  1733.418 1739.978 1756.170 1766.649 1794.675  6p P 6D P 6p P 6p P 6p P  12s lOd lis 9d 10s  J p °  55705.3 55381.7 55157.9 54802.2 53510.5  1795.163 1805.649 1812.976 1824.743 1868.792  6p  53474.2 52499.2 51971.2 50863.1 50592.1  1870.062 1904.790 1924.143 1966.063 1976.595  6p 6p 6p 6p 6p  50210.8 50193.3 49866.4 49652.4 49625.9  1991.602 1992.299 2005.360 2014.000 2015.075  6p P, 6p P, 6p P, 6p P, 6P P, -  49440.0 49123.3 49116.9 48744.5 48732.6  2022.655 2035.693 2035.961 2051.516 2052.016  6p 6p 6p 6p 6p  1  2  3  D  2  3  0  2 3  z 3  0  2 3  0  -  2 3  0  3  2  A  2 J  0  2 3  0  2 3  Q  P 6p P 6p P 6p P, 6p P J  z  0  2 3  2  2 3  0  2 J  2  3  0  2 3  P,° D,° i n o 1  3  r  .  o  D,°  3  P;  3  3p o  10s 7d 8d 8s 3p2.o 9s 3p1o r  9s 3p o P P Td D,° 8s P P, - 13d D,° P , - 12d D ; 0  2 3  3  0  2 3  2  3  2 3  23  3  2J  2 3 2 3  23  23  2 3  P 7s P, - l i s P, - l i s P, 9d P - 19d Q  2 3  lid lid 12s lOd lOd  2 3  2 3  2 3  2  3  D ° D° P D,° D ° /  3  2  3  0  0  3  3  2  'P,° P,° >3p O o D°  3  r  3  2  J  D° /  25 TABLE VIII Intensity •A B 10 40 10 3 2 80  20 20 20  (Continued)  Wave number (cm" )  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  48707.0 48687.2 48668.6 48431.0 48231.0  2053.091 2053.929 2054.714 2064.793 2073.356  47867.6  2089.095  1  Classification 6p  47759.5  2093.824  2  47529.6 47469.1 47379.1  2103.951 2106.634 2110.634  2 100 150  20 50  47346.5 47339.4 47265.5  2112.091 2112.405 2115.710  0? 2? 20  10  47185.1 47039.1 46819.7  2119.315 2125.890 2135.851  9d  3  2  3  2  3  3  J  6p 6p r6p 6p 6p 6p 6p 6P 6p 6p 6p  3  6d P 3D' 14s P 12d P, P - 13s P - 13s 8d P/ ' D lid D; P ,r P, - l i d xlid P 8d D , P, 8d D P ,  2 3  f  2  23  2  23  2  30 10 3  -  8s P / 6p 6p 18d D; 6p P,- 7s P ; 6p2 P, - 14d D , L  3h?  P,  2 J  2  3  2  ?°  2 3  2  2  3  2  2  3  f  3  z  2  2  3  2  2  3  3  2  6p 6p  3  2  P,  3  2  6p  3  P  2 3  P  -  2  2  6p P 6p2 3 2  3  9  46796.5  2136.914 2137.931 2160.171 2170.661 2176.017 2176.227  6p 6pU 6p  40  46774.2 46292.6 46068.9 45955.5 45951.1  5 30 30 40  45876.9 45692.4 45656.6 45070.6 44680.9  2179.744 2188.548 2190.262 2218.743 2238.093  6p 6p 6p 6p 6p  44577.8 44508.2 44492.9  2243.271 2246.778 2247.550  6p  2 7 10 300B 0 100 7 15 100 50 400 100 40 500  20 150  40 150  20  10  44434.4  2250.507  150 1 250 200 400  50 5 100 30 200  44353.3 44283.1 42860.9 41848.8 41761.6  2254.623 2258.200 2333.129 2389.555 2394.547  2  3  T  8d 12s lOd lOd lOd  ?' 3 3  - lOd - lis 6d P 9d 6p P 6p P - 9d 2  3  P  2  3  3  D  /  3  D  /  0  2  2  P ,  3  2  2 3  D/° D°  F  3  3. P,  2  P,  3  2 3  Z  2 2 2 2 2  2  3  P  3  P ,  3  P ,  3  P ,  3  P , /  - 9d F ° - 9s P , - 9s P - 10s P , - 7d D, 3  2  3  3  3  D 2  6p P r6p P, 2  3  2  23  Up  2  3  P  2  6p  6p P 6p P , 6p P 6p P , 6p P  2  2  2  2  3  P  3  2  2  3  -  3  2  3  3  2  7d  8d 7d 8d 8d  D !  J  3  3  D , D .  3  F '  3  D '  8d - ^ F . 7d F. 9s P, 7d ^ D , 7d F 3  3  Z  2  C  3  -  3  3  26 TABLE VIII Intensity A B 200 3003006 100  30 80 150 100  (Continued)  Wave number (cm- )  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  41660.6 41619.8 41451.0 41161.7  2400.348 2402.704 2412.485 2429.441  1  Classification 6p P 6p P, 6P P 6p* 'D -  7d D 7s 'P, 7d * F 8s P,  8s P, 7s P 7s 'P, 6d D, 6d  2 3  2  2 J 2  3  Z  z  3  2  2  3  (I.A., a i r ) 3 5 5 20 15  10 30 30 20 80  40867.9 40370.1 38789.6 38249.7 38242.4  2446.17 2476.33 2577.24 2613.62 2614.12  6p P 6p V, 6p P 6p P, 6p^P, -  0 10 15 20 10  3  38037.7 37861.4 37539.4 35679.1 35411.3  2628.19 2640.42 2663.08 2801.93 2823-. 13  6p 6p 6p 6p 6p  35288.2 34793.7 29965.2 27982.3 27476.9  2832.98 2873.24 3336.25 3572.67 3638.38  6p P 6p P 6 S 6p ' D ^ 6p 'S -  60 100 30  2 3  /  z3  2 3  Z  2 S  P -  2  ' D  2 3  2  2 3  Z  2 3  Z  60  27467.8  3639.58  40 60 80  80 60 200  27140.5 26731.5 24637.2  3683.48 3739.84 4057.76  60 0 5 0 1  60  24610.9 24115.6 23985.9 21060.7 20073.0  4062.09 4145.52 4167.95 4746.84 4980.43  6  80 7 30 5 80  20  19973.4 19967.7 19642.8 19574.3 19220.0  5005.25 5006.70 5089.51 5107.31 5201.46  6 " 'S -  3  17563.5  5692.05  40 10 80  16957.9 16828.1 16657.8  5895.34 5940.80 6001.52  3  3  -  2  70  3  Z  2  40 30  30  3  8s 18d P - 7s 6d P P 6d  2 3  15 20 10 30 1  40  3  3  2  e  2 3  2  2  P  c  2  2  0  f6p 6p 6p 6p 6p L  2  7s 6d 20d 7s lis  'S - lis 7s P, P, 7s 7s ' D 7s P -  3  2  1 3  2 P  P,  3  P "*P, 3  C  -  4  7p D 6p* ' D 7p I D 7s "P °3  2  2  3  3  2  3  /  P  0  7s P °7s P,°7s P,°3  0  J  3  6p  r7s 7s 7s 7s 7s  2  3  ^Pc P  3  2  ; D  'S e  D  'P,  0  2  F  3  2 3  2 3  P,  3  P,  6d D 8d P 6d F 7d P 9p " ' D 3  3  3  3  7s 9p 9p 9p 8s  'P, P  J  3  P ^P P J  3  8d D 5f F 8p D 8p P 8p D 3  3  L  3  3  P °0  3  3  27 TABLE VIII  (Continued)  Wave number (cm- )  Wavelength (I.A.air)  25 25 30 10 5  16630.5 16499.2 16358.8 16034.3 14753.9  6011.39 6059.21 6111.24 6234.90 6775.99  5 10 20 200 25  14527.4 14506.0 14015.9 13830.6 13608.8  6881.63 6891.79 7132.77 7228.37 7346.16  13072.4  7647.60  Intensity B A  0  20  1  Classification 7s P ° 7s P,°3  /  3  7s  P:~  3  7s P ° 7p ^D, 3  /  8p D, 8p -*P 8p ^P, 8p P, 6d P,° 3  0  3  3  7p P, - lOd D° 7p P, - lOd "* 7p P , - l i s 3 p o 6P - 'D - 7s P ° 9d 3 o 7p P 3  3  3  2  3  3  2  /  z  3  Y  7  7p p - . , i 0 d 5  o  J  D ;  28 TABLE IX Classified Column A:  I n t e n s i t y from e l e c t r o d e l e s s d i  Column B:  I n t e n s i t y from spark i n helium  Column C:  I n t e n s i t y observed by A r v i d s s o n  *  A  L i n e s o f Pb I I  Doubly c l a s s i f i e d  Intensity B C  5 2 0 80 0  Wave number (cm- ) 1  0 7  3 20 10 50 15  4  line  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  C la s s i f i c a t i o n  118221.3 103390.2 101345.8 100427.3 99830.8  845.871 967.209 986.721 995.746 1001.694  6p 6p 6p * 6p 6p  98326.7 95255.2 95174.5 94285.6 93849.3  1017.018 1049.812 1050.701 1060.607 1065.538  6p 6p 6p 6p 6p  2  15d 8d P^°7s lid 12s  D,> D,^ S. D '*4 'S^  2  2  2 2  2  lOd D,$ 9d D ^ 9d D 7d ' D , A 10s S ^ 2  2  2  P -°-  2  2  120 100 80 150 50  5d 4 1 4bd 0  90589.2 90218.7 90110.0 89315.4 89181.1  1103.884 1108.418 1109.755 1119.628 1121.314  6p z 6p 2 6p 2p. 6p 6p  150 10 50 80 80  7 150 200 80  4 9 1  88249.4 87264.9 83082.1 81223.7 75098.7  1133.152 1145.936 1203.629 1231.168 1331.581  6p 6p 6p 6p 6p z-a?  6 p *P* 9s S? 6p D,> 7d D 8s S  80 100 120 50 100  100 60 300 15 80  8 4 8  74889.4 74166.0 69738.1 69000.4 66123.2  1335.302 1348.326 1433.935 1449.267 1512.329  6p 2 p , ° _ 6p p>i6p 6p 6p 2T\ 6  6p  6P - «P£ 6d D,^ 6p D ^ 6p *P  200R 250R 10 0 300R  200 200  59826.2 59450.3 59048.1 58161.5 57911.4  1671.508 1682.078 1693.536 1719.351 1726.777  6p 6p  6p ^P 7s ^  150  z  6p  2  ^  2  8d  D. D,u S^ z  8d 8s  z  zl  2  2  2  22  2  2  z  h  B  z  2  zit  2  2  22  7  2  /fi  2  2!i  T?, °  14p  2  6P 6p  !  6p 6p  2  2  y  I3p *P,jj 6p * P^ 2  29 TABLE IX (Continued) CCla lassification  Wave number (cm- )  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  56673.7 55659.6 54883.8 53130.2 52043.6  1764.487 1796.634 1822.030 1882.169 1921.467  6p 6p 6p 7s 6p  51997.8 51940.5 51398.1 50403.1 50054.2  1923.158 1925.280 1945.596 1984.006 1997.834  6p * 6p * 6p 7s 7s  5h 2h 2 4h 5  48556.7 48459.6 48025.9 47764.1 47110.1  2059.447 2063.577 2082.208 2093.625 2122.685  6d 6p 6p 6d 6p  2 30B ? 0 200 7  46991.4 46689.0 46513.3 46453.2 45917.5  2128.047 2141.833 2149.923 2152.704 2177.820  6d 6d 6p 6p* 6d  45821.3 45771.4 45572.2 45367.7 45182.1  2182.392 2184.769 2194.320 2204.213 2213.265  44994.2 44975.3 44846.6 44411.2 43836.8  2222.509 2223.445 2229.824 2251.685 2281.186  6d 7s 6d 6d 6d  43829.9 43763.3 43378.5 43191.0 43060.2  2281.548 2285.019 2305.288 2315.299 2322.330  6p % 6p 7p p"*_ 15d D 6P 10p P£ 14d 7p lip P,£ 6d  42981.5 42975.3 42438.9 42414.1 42206.0  2326.582 2326.918 2356.330 2357.707 2369.331  Intensity A B C 1? 300 300R 5 150  200 300  7 5 10 3 0  0  200 2 150 500R 80  5 400  5 2 20 50 10 5 Oh 1 4h 7 7 300 15B 80 300  10  10  1  2  12p 'P: 6d 6d D lip 6p *p< 2  S*-  2  If* 2  2 2  ' V  a  •13 f lOp 12f 10 p lOp  P,I  2  12f T ? ° 12p 9f -II f 9p 2P % 2  2 2  2  2  T>7-  k  6p 6d 7s 6p *P?* 6d 2  -7*8. 3  V  llf lOf 9p lip lOf  2  p£  8f 12p. 4 ^ 9p 7s 9f 12p 9p P ^ 12p 9f 2 TT J Hp 2  2  2  2  /%  2  2  2  6d v * 6d 2p c 7p 6p 6d 2  2  2  8f 8f 13d 7f 8f  2 ^  30 TABLE I X (Continued) Wave number (cm- )  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  1 5 40 7 7  42157.7 42043.1 41426.1 41405.5 41037.6  2372.044 2378.510 2413.938 2415.138 2436.791  7p 7p 7p 7p 7p  40  40961.9  2441.293  7p P,t  Intensity B C  A  1  Classification a  Pt14s \ P 7°- 18d D \ P 3 - 12d D^ P > - 16d D& Pg- 13s S ^ 2  2  2  t  2  2  2  2  2  2  2  15d  2  r  (I.A.air) 7 0 20 20 3  40 120 120  3 10 10 7 15  30  1 1 25 5 30  7  30 30 35  40 20 50  36789.3 34623.8 33906.4 33143.3 32063.5  2717.38 2887.34 2948.44 3016.32 3117.91  7s S^- 8p P , 6p *P^- 7f %t Z 6d D2>£- 6f F £ 6d D,*- 6 f *F ! 7p 9d D ^  31652.3 30660.4 30211.5 28964.2 28935.1  3158.42 3260.60 3309.05 3451.55 3455.02  6p 7p 7p 6p 7p  27396.6 27272.6 26917.8 26887.1 26406.1  3649.05 3665.65 3713.95 3718.20 3785.93  7p 6d 7p 7p 6p  3796.03 3827.39 3911.75 4152.71  7p P £-  9s S^  4242.06  6d D <  5f FX  2 40 2 0 7  20 40  26335.8 26120.0 25556.8 25456.8 24073.9  30 60 40  50 200 30  23566.8 23551.5 23398.6  4272.56  5  0  22976.4  4351.08  80 5 80 5 15  200  22791.7 22446.7 22331,5 21984.7 21937.5  4386.34  20  3927.11  4244.82  4453.74 4476.71 4547.33 4557.13  2  2  ;  2  2  3  2  2  2  D,v- 12p P,£ *PJ- 10s S* P/6p P ^ *P t- 6 f P£8d D,^ 2  22  2  2 2  22  2  2  2  Pl D ' ) ,PJ>JP/*P 2  l J  2  2(r 2  2  2 2  /V  6 p -*P u 8p 8p *PP, ,^ 8d 8d D 9s 9s Su S 5f F J * 2  t  2  2  z2  2  6 p P , - 12p PZ * 7p Pjtf- 8d!D K 8s S ^ - 12p P,£ a 2  2  2  Z  t  2  2  6p *D,,-  7f  z  2  /}  2  2  Z  A  2  r  6d D >, 5 f 2  2  F£  2  F  2  R  |  3  „r8s S , - l i p P / 2 * U f *F% 12d DL * 6p E ^ - 8f F f 2  2  22  2  z  6d D,>,2  z  5f F \ 2  Z  7d D - l l f F f 6p P 8p P , £ 8p ^ J - 15d D^ r6p B^9p P , £ 2  Z  2  />2  2f  2  2 < I  2  Z2  L  2  5 f F* 2  R  lid  31 TABLE IX (Continued) Classification  Wave number (cm" )  Wavelength (I.A.air)  21831.8 21816.7 21681.3 21537.9 21422.4  4579.19 4582.37 4610.98 4641.68 4666.70  5f *Fj- 8g 8g 5f F , £ 13p 7d ^D 8p P * - 14s llf 7d D j  21371.1 21340.0 20879.5 20671.4 19953.1  4677.91 4684.72 4788.05 4836.26 5010.35  7.d *T>  19864.8 19826.1 19799.0 19715.9 19700.6  5032.63 5042.44 5049.34 5070.64 5074.59  9f 7d 7p P^f- 7d 6p 6f Z 5f YX 7g 5f 7g  19675.2 19566.1 19557.5 19390.3 19362.2  5081.12 5109.45 5111.72 5155.77 5163.27  I2d D 6p D < 7'f *v 7f 6P p£ l i d 7p  18839.1 18625.3 18609.9 18291.8 18271.1  5306.62 5367.55 5372.00 5465.42 5471.59  7d ,D^-  18032.2 17824.7 17661.6 17333.6 16635.1  5544.10 5608.62 5660.44 5767.55 6009.71  16549.7 16230.1 16172.4  6040.75 6159.67 6181.66  30  16048.7  6229.33  60 15 300 200 10  15841.1 15337.5 15011.8 14722.4 14548.8  6310.97 6518.16 6659.58 6790.48 6871.50  A  Intensity B C  50 50 10 5 25 15 80 20 25 5 1 400 30 60 60 2 5 80 10 100 10 100 400 15 20  3  0  200 10  10 10 200  400 400 30 30 20  100 300  40 35 5  3  1  2  /4  2  2  r  lhr  6p D^6p D ^8s S ^ 5f 22 2  2  2  R ,o n  2 2  2  2  D  2%  2  G G l'.  Z  2  a  2  2 2  2  /f  2  2  6  p  9f 5f 5f lip lid  * 7dD/v8p P ^ 7p P °- 7d >2k 7s 7 7d 8f F £ 10d D^, 8p 8f ^ 7d 2  2  2  P  2  2  2  6p P, 8p P ^ 24 2  r p 6  L  100 40  10 f 9p LOp lOp i0d  2  8p 6p  f ^p  2 2  7p ioa  *D  2  4  9p P ^ P ^ lOd D,*, 9p B^2  2  2  8s S>9p P/° lis 8P 7p * 4 7s S A 7p *p£- 8s Z S ^ 10p .P,£ 2 2  2  2  P  2  7d D j2  r  32 TABLE IX (Continued)  A 100 90 25 200 50 50 80 60  Intensity B C  20  5  Classification  Wave number (cm-1)  Wavelength (I.A.air)  14254.8 14179.5 13910.4 13898.2 13240.1  7013.25 7050.50 7186.88 7193.22 7550.72  7d 8p 6p  13225.9 13098.9 13017.6  7558.83 7632.14 7679.78  7d  Z  8p  2  'DA2  P,/-  %\~  2  7f 9d D 6f *F,* 6f JF £ 2  3  9s S ^ 2  * 8p  D ; 2  12p  2  P ° > 2  7f F ^ 9d D ^ 9d % 2  R  P,>:-  2  2  33 TABLE X Classified  Lines  o f Pb I I I  Column A  Intensity  Column B  I n t e n s i t y from spark i n helium  Column C  I n t e n s i t y observed by A r v i d s s o n  * Note:  from e l e c t r o d e l e s s  Doubly c l a s s i f i e d  The odd l e v e l s at 227584. c m , 227807, cm" , 228039. c m , and 233820. cm- have been d e s i g nated 1 , 2 , 3 , and 4 respectively. -1  Intensity B C  0? 10 80 4 20 20 1 7 0 0 1 7 1 1 10  406  20 2 4 156  40 2 20 0 1 0  1  line  -1  A  discharge  Wave number (cm- ) 1  1 4 0 7 4  3  2 0 0 0 4? 1  k  1  1  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  Classif  209322.0 197314.4 184264.8 177186.6 174603.0  477.733 506.805 542.697 564.377 572.728  . 6s 6s 6s 6s 6s  171082.8 160804.8 156914.8 156812.1 154953.9  584.512 621.872 637.289 637.706 645.353  6s ' s 6p 3 p ° _ 6p o/ 6p 3p o6p 3p1 o-  153291.6 153114.5 151969.5 150855.9 142620.8  652.352 653.106 658.027 662.884 701.160  6p 9d 9d 6p 3p»Z 10s 6p 6p ;p °- 6g 8d 6p z -  141006.1 140359.8 139003.9 138912.1 137502.1  709.189 712.455 719.404 719.880 727.262  6p P ° , 6p 3p o 6p o 6 6p 3p o-  137210.9 137105.8 137009.2 135906.4 135610.7  728.805 729.364 729.878 735.801 737.405  6p 6p 6p 6p 6p  2  'S*'S„'s -  2  2  2  0  'S 0  z  2  D  —  .  /  r  8p 6p" 6p" 7p 6p"  X  % ° 'P. 'P° P.° 0  3  7p ^P, 8d D, 8d D 8d D, 9s S,  0  J  3  2  3  3  3  2  G.  y  3  0  r  —  P  P,°-P,°-  7d D, 9s S 8s 'So 7d 'D 8s S , 3  3  t  2  3  7d D 9d 'D in o 7d *D, ',P / U° - 10s ' S o S, 'P,°- 10s 3  3  2  2  3  34 TABLE X (Continued)  A  Wave number (cm- )  Intensity B c  3 30 5 4 7  1006  150 100 1506  7 200B 150  124221.1 123059.1 122610.9 107959.0 104058.3  805.016 812.618 815.588 926.277 961.000  6p P,°6p P / 6p P°6p >P 6p 'P°-  30  100427.3 99447.9 97045.9 96061.1 95340.7  995.746 1005.551 1030.441 1041.004 1048.870  ,2 3T ^ 6p' 6p 6p 6p % 6p -ap/- 6d ^D, J 7s S, - 7s' P / E 6s - ' S 0 - 6p 'P,  4 10 1 4 6  95032.1 93534.5 93387.2 93275.5 93053.9  1052.276 1069.125 1070.810 1072.093 1074.646  6p 6p 6p 6p 6p  2 5  92236.1 91043.1 90712.0 89686.9 89395.1  1084.174 1098.380 1102.390 1114.991 1118.629  7s S, 6p J?, 6p % 6 P: 6 P; '-  7s 6p ^P, 7s' P° 7s ^8, 7s 'S,  88538.3 87493.5 85833.0 85692.8 83738.8  1129.455 1142.942 1165.053 1166.960 1194.189  7s ' S 0 6p P°6p P °J 6p 3P,°7s S -  7s P° 6d 6p P 7s ^S, 4'  83092.8 82188.9 81935.1 79970.2 78940.5  1203.474 1216.709 1220.479 1250.466 1266.777  6p 6p 6d 6p 6p  6p* 7s' 4° 6d 6d  78459.7 78388.9 78160.6 77945.9 77781.2  1274.540 1275.691 1279.418 1282.941 1285.658  6p Pl6p P 6p P,°6p" P ° 6p* P°-  3 3  15 150 200 200 10  90 80 80 10? 46  6p ^P, - 8s 'S 6p P,°- 8s S 86 D, 6p 'P/ 9s 'S, 6p 'P; 6p ' P / - 7d  7 6 5  100 150 40  5 7 7 6 150 40  9 6  20  4  30  Classification  740.689 749.050 794.531 802.780 804.369  4 0 2 2  80 100 20 7 200  Wavelength (IoA.vac)  135009.5 133502.5 125860.4 124567.2 124321.1  2  5 30 20 15 10  100 7 40 100 80  1  6  0  3  3  3  3  3  3  /  6p 'S 7d D, 7d 7d D 8s 'S 2  0  3  3  2  3  2  P° P °P° -  2  0  J  y  3  3  D  'P,°  3  P,°  0  2  3  P  3  P  3  3  Z  'P,°P 'D P°P _°-  2 5  0  2  3  2  3  2 3  t  3  3  2  3  2 4  2  3  3  3  6p P, 6d *D 7s 'S, 6p 6d D/ 2  3  3  2  3  L  'D 'P^ 2  2  6d  <6p2 9d 9d  3 3  s  D, D D,  3  3T 5  D D  TABLE X Intensity B C  A 50 40 100 20  5 60  6  n  20 50 80 40 50  5 5  0 0  5  100 80 100 80S 100  80 3  150R 40 5 4 60  200  150R 60 10 1 40  100  6 0  20  5 7 0 7h  Wave number (cm )  Wavelength (1 A,vac)  77499 ..4 76534.2 76446.2 76374.7 75922,8  1290,333 1306.606 1308., 110 1309.333 1317.127  7s S, 7s S / 6p P o 2 6d 6d 'D -  75894,2 75697;6 75350,1 74655 >7 73798J6  1317.624 1321i045 1327.'139 1339,1483 1355^038  6d D 6d 'D 6p" P ° 7s S/ 7s 'S, -  72897,9 72854.5 72375,5 72150.3 71186.1  1371.781 1372.600 1381,684 1385,996 1404.769  6p P ° - 6d 'D 6d 'D 7s 'P/ •6p**P, - 2 1° 6p P 7s' 6P - Py  71097.2 70955.4 70137,3 70111.5 69880.4  1406.525 1409.336 1425.776 1426.300 1431.017  6p P 7s 'S 6d D,-6d D -. 6d B-  69475.3 69307.7 69173,2 69079.3 68849.2  1439,360 1442,'841 1445.646 1447/611 1452.449  6p 'P,°-  68692.7 67294.4 67108.9 66813,2  1455..759 1486.007 1490,115 1496,-709  6p" F / 6d f^D. 6p" P>'~6d , B ~  - 1  0  8  (Continued) Classification  4  3  3  3  3  2  300  3?  1497^777 1542.024 1553.035 1564.713 1565.196  3  2  3  50  63881.3 63233,2 63219.9 63140.8 62988.1  1565.404 1581,449 1581,782 1583.761 1587.602  4/ 6g  3  7s'  'P,"  1,  G  3  3  2  £  2  3  l  T  2  3  3  2  c  3  3  7S Sy 7s'- 'P, 1/ 3  C  Z  S  Z  Gp - %  -  2  6d 6d 6d  3  D/DB-  3  3  3  3  3  3  2 ° 6p^ P, 7s' 'P,° 7s J  r> ° 3 9 °  J  8g " % 7s' 'P/° S  5  8d  3  D  3  6p" P ° -  7s' 'P, 8d D  6p* P " 6p" P°6s - 'S 6p" F °6p" F / 6P - 'DV-  8p 'P,° 9s S 6p P,°. 7g % s 7g G 7s' *P,°.  6p"  7g 7g 3/ 5g 2°  i  z  3  3  0  2  0  3  3  2  5 20hh 100 3 100  0  2  2  66765,6 64849,8 64390.1 63909,5 63889,8  3  2 3  2  3  5 G 400 15  1,  7s' P° 6p P, 4  6p" F ° 3  2  Bp - P 6p" P ° 6p P 2  3  2  3  Z  2 3  2  0  3  Z  3  y  H  £  £  3  G G  4  3  G  3  3  3  36 TABLE X (Continued)  Wave number (em-1)  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  62961.0 62765.1 62591.3 62584.7 62548.9  1588.284 1593.242 1597.667 1597.833 1598.748  6d 6P ^P, 6d 6p 'P,°6d 'D -  62104.1 61359.9 61195.2 61101.6 61015.6  1610.199 1629.730 1634.116 1636.619 1638.925  6p 'P/°7p P / 7p 7p 3 p ° 7p P,°-  60937.5 60329.3 60163.3 60092.1 60036.8  1641.026 1657.568 1662.144 1664.112 1665.644  9d 7p P,°10s ',*<> 7p 7p *p,°- 10s '"So 6p •fp/ 6p 7p P ° - 10s 3s,  59923.1 59873.3 59235.4 58945.8 58838.0  1668.806 1670.195 1688.179 1696.475 1699.582  7s' 'P° 6p P, 7p P / ° - 10s S ; 7s S , 8p 'P; 6p" F / 9d 7s s t 8p *P °  58443.1 58287.5 58283.0 58261.4 58255.1  1711.065 1715.633 1715.766 1716.401 1716.587  6p 'P/°6p" F ° 6p" 6p" 6p"'  7s '•So 9d 7g 7g 7g  58110.2 57841.4 57495.6 57435.3 57037.2  1720.867 1728.867 1739.263 1741.090 1753.243  6p" 6p" P,°6p" P , ° 6d 6d  9d 9d 'l>Z 9d D 8p ?>° 8p 3 p °  50 7 lOh 2 4  56990.3 56967.4 56919.3 56895.0 56725.2  1754.684 1755.391 1756.874 1757.622 1762.885  6d 6p" F,°6d D J 7s 7s 3 S / -  12 70 300R  56643.0 56552.3 56545.4  1765.443 1768.275 1768.492  56509.6  1769.611  6p" P,°- 10s 'So 6f 6d 6d 6p 'P/°6p" 6g '' <V 6d D 6f 2.  A  Intensity B C  100 120 20 200R 7 100R 3 10 30 80 15 5 10 120 7  80 70  7  15  80 25 7 120 400R 20 1 1 0 0 30 1 150 0  30  3 200  7  80  Classification  2  2  3  d  6f  h°  6f 6d 6f  ° 1  3  C  Z  6d 9d  B 7g i 9d t ' 9d  2  5  G  D  3  2  3  0  23  3  3  3  3  3  Z  3  2  3  3  J  J  3  2  6f 10s 6f 8p 8p  %° P ?  3  o°  i p  3  3  2  r  37 TABLE X (Continued) Intensity B C  Wave number (cm- )  Wavelengt' (I.A„vac)  4 100 7 3 1  56421.2 56250.9 56074.3 55995.5 55889.9  1772.383 1777.751 1783.349 1785.857 1789.232  7p P ° 7p fP °7p 3p°-  12 100 20 30 50  55860.5 55529.6 55520.1 55260,8 55094.8  1790.174 1800.841 1801.148 1809.601 1815.052  6p" 6d 6d 7p 6d  40 7 4 200R 5  54931.2 54915.8 54837.8 54744.8 54367.1  1820.459 1820.968 1823.560 1826.658 1839.348  7p Pi- '- 10s -S, 7p 'P/9d D 9d D, 7p 'P?7s S 6p 'P,°6p" D 9d D;  3 7 7 7 4  54190.3 54062.2 53888.5 53824.5 53772.3  1845.348 1849.721 1855.683 1857.891 1859.693  6p"'D/- 9d D. 7p P °- 10s 'S 6 p P , - 8p 'P° 6g G,i 7p P°7p 'P,"- 10s S  4 0? 15 0 7  53489.7 53319.6 53194.8 53142.3 53049.3  1869.518 1875.483 1879.885 1881.739 1885.040  6p P - 8p 6p" F/9d 7s 'S 8p 6p" F / 9d 6p" 'D7- 10s  52220.0 51940.5 51874.0 51716.3 51594.1  1914.973 1925.280 1927.746 1933.624 1938.204  5f ?F °- 8g 6p" 'D/- 6g 6d D, 8p 'P~° 5f F,°8g ''G 5f F / - 8g ^Q,  51578.4 51544.7 51477.9 51393.3 51377.5  1938.797 1940.064 1942.580 1945.778 1946.376  5f F / 6p P, 6d D,6d D-  51121.7 51104.1 50997.6 50911.9 50856.4  1956.116 1956.788 1960.878 1964.176 1966.320  5f 5f 'F °6d D 6p" P°7p P,°-  A  40 5 10 40 80h  100  10 2  2 80 2h 20 4 40 15 100 2 40  2  1  Classification 3  2  2  7p P °~ 6d D 2  Z  3  3  9d 'D 9d D 3  9d D 9d D, 6f F / 3  2  3  7  F °6g G 6f F / D D=- 6f 'v; 9d 'D 'D - 8p P /  3  3  2  3  3  3  3  3  2  3  2  2  3  3  2  3  3  y  3  2  3  /  /  e  z3  3  3  3  2 d  3  y  P. 3  D  3  P/  3  0  3  D S, 3  2  3  3  3  3  3  3  3  2j  3  3  Z  6p  tp, -  z  3  3  2  3  3  8g 8p 8p 8p >P° 8p PS 3  8g 8g 8p 6g 8d  'fa /  2  38 TABLE X (Continued) Intensity B C  Wave number (cm" )  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  10 •7  50288.0 50225.6 50123.7 50029.3 49964.9  1988.545 1991.016 1995.062 1998.830 2001.405  7p 7p 7p 6p 6d  1 7 80 7 3  49616.9 49535.5 49375.1 49365.3 49261.2  2015.443 2018.753 2025.313 2025.716 2029.997  6p* 6d 6 p >D 6d 7s * S -  6f 8p P/° 2° 8p Po° 6p"  10 15 80 150 4  49151.2 49054.6 48829.4 48427.8 48271.5  2034.537 2038.544 2047.946 2064.931 2071,615  6p 6d 7p 7p 6p"  1° 8p 3po 9s 9s 8d ***  300 100 1 3 200  48263.8 48174.7 47951.7 47750.9 47614.5  2071.946 2075.780 2085.434 2094.202 2100.198  7p * 6p" 6p" 6p" 6p"  47554.1 47460.6 47453.8 47434.5 47427.5  2102.868 2107.012 2107.311 2108.170 2108.482  6p" P°6d <D 5f 5f 5f  7d 6p" 7g 7g 3 7g  47337.5 47321.4 47235.7 47211.5 47104.1  2112.488 2113.210 2117.044 2118.127 2122.956  6p" P/ 6p" 7s 6p 'p,°6p" *p°.  8d 'D 8d D * 6p" 6p* P 7d Da  46932.1 46905.7 46811.4 46783.4 46706.8  2130.738 2131.937 2136.232 2137,511 2141.016  5f F°6p" P °5f 5K5f F.°6p"  7g 7d 7g^G,, 7g 8d  46604.8 46338.1 46311.2 46308.7 45915.4  2145.700 2158.053 2159.304 2159.420 2177.917  6p" 8d 5f 7g 5f '*/- 7g G ; 6p 'D 7s' p ° 8d 7p J * 2 ~ 'Da  A 200 200 150  2006?  200  200 80 150 20 150 200 20 30 300 50 200 3 250h 2 3 2 200 150 150 7  15 3  80 2  1  Classification 8d 0/ 8d D 8d 6f 'F/ 8p 3n °  P°p °P°sp -  3 i  3  /  2  3  2  z  z  Z  y  'D -  2  2  3  P?-  r — F/0  J  <P;~ 3  3  F,°-  'P°F°-  3  Z  3  ;  0  3  3  Z  3  3  2  3  9s 9d 8d 9d 8d  A  < 2  J  3  A  3  3  2  2  39 T A B L E X (Continued)  Wave number (cm- )  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  300 40 200 150 80  45577.9 45434.6 45310.0 45284.8 45182.1  2194.047 2200.964 2207.020 2208.245 2213.265  7p z — 6d 6p" 7p P°* 7p 3 p Z° "  200 & ? 10 500 7  44962.8 44756.9 44744.3  2224.063 2234.291 2234.920  6p" 8d 9s 7s' P,° 7s'  A  Intensity B C  1  Classification  c  3  8d 6p'' 9s 8d 8d  ° 3  J  %  10  44544.0  2244.971  6d D,7p 'P,°6p" 7d D/7d  80 500 7 100 3  44502.1 44330.4 44304.8 44126.2 44103.8  2247.087 2255.787 2257.091 2266.229 2267.376  6p^ P 6p" -3F ° 6p" 47p I ~ 6p %~  8p 5g ' 5g 8d 8p  44098.8 44023.9 43913.2 43693.9 43649.1  2267.635 2271.493 2277.221 2288.650 2290.999  7d 7p • 1 6p *p,6p" 6p'' Fz ° -  7s' *P ° 8d 6p" 8d 5g  10  43535.3 43400.2 43399.1 43329.8 43321.6  2296.987 2304.136 2304.196 2307.882 2308.317  7s 6p" 6p" P°7d 7p  6p" 8d 8s 9h / , 3 9s  5  43298.9 42981.5 42729.1 42657.2 42643.2  2309.530 2326.582 2340.326 2344.269 2345.041  6p" 'D °* 6p" 7p 'P% 5f 6p" 3 p3 °_  10  42488.5 42311.7 42163.0 42160.8 41899.6  2353.575 2363.412 2371.747 2371.870 2386.659  5f 5f 7p 6p 6d  41886.8 41844.3 41731.4 41717.1 41612.2  2387.388 2389.814 2396.279 2397.096 2403.142  Gp  2  3  2 50 2006?  100 200 80 80 80 0 400 1 7 1506? 3 0 0 10 80 15 500 150 30 7 300 80  30  10 15 5 2  5 10  3  r  z  c  2  3  £  3  2  %°r  / z  f  l  %'  3  z  p  3  D  P,  _  " -  5f 5f .F,°6p 7p 3 p Z» " 3  2  J  G4S  Z  R  o  8d D, 8d 'Dz 9s 'S 9d 'D 8d 3  0  2  9d 9d 9s 8p 6p" 6p* 9d 9d 6p" 5g  Di  3 3  »z  S,  3  »z°  3  B°  3  D D, /p o  3 3  *3  2  3  40 TABLE X (Continued)  A  Intensity B C  Wave number (cm"" )  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  3  41540.5 41437.6 41418.8 41373.1 41195.7  2407.288 2413.269 2414.362 2417.029 2427.438  30 40 100 7 3  1  Classification 5f 6p" 'D/6d D 5f 'F/5f 'F/-  9d D 9s S 6p" D ° 9d D 9d D,  8h  3  2  2  3  /  3  2  3  3  3  (I.A.air) 1 3 7 15 5 60 3  100  40085.9 40060.1 39559.5 39442.1 39021.0  2493.89 2495.50 2527.08 2534.60 2561.95  7d D 5f F / -  39017.1 38969.6  2562.21 2565.33  6d 'D 5f ' F,°6p* 'St5f 6d D, -  5  3  3  5f F °5f F / 3  2  6g G 6g G  J f  3  3  7d  'D 2  2  '' 3YL° 3  6 g  3  /1 i G  7s'  3p/°  5f 6g 1° 6g 'At 6p" DJ°  2 30  30  38944.1 38921.7  2567.01 2568.49  5 3 15 7 1  10 10 7 10 2  37901.5 37890.7 36415.0 34857.1 34185.6  2637.63 2638.38 2745.31 2868.02 2924.35  * 6d D 5f F / 6p" D ° 6d 6 p 'D - 6f 'E, 6P fP, - 5f F,° 7s S', - 6p" 'P,  20 80 7 30 30  30 100 20 30  32977.1 32844.2 32755.2 32384.9 32363.7  3031.53 3043.79 3052.06 3086.96 3088.98  6d D,5f 6d D, 5f F ° 6p" D 9d D, 6d 'D 6p" 'P; 6d ^D,- 5f *F,°  15  10  32220.8  3102.69  7p P ° 7d D,-  3  3  2  3  3  0  z  2  80 0 70 1 35  80 100 40 30  32155.1 31945.3 31860.4  3109.03 3129.44 3137.78  31472.5 31331.8 31035.7 30886.6 30829.6  3176.46 3190.73 3221.17 3236.72 3242.70  3  2  3  0  3  3  3  2  3  3  2  2  3  3  15 1 80  3  5f F °3  3  6d 6d  i  D D J  3  2  7d 'D4/ 8d 5f ' F,° 5f  6d D 5f 6d D 3 5f * 5f ' F,°- 8d 8p 6p D 5f 6d D 5  3  3  2  y  2  3  a  F?°  3  41 TABLE X (Continued)  A  Intensity B C  Wave number (cm-1)  Wavelength ( I . A-..air)  Classification  50  60  30517.0  3275.92  3 40 40  30 20 20  30491.3 30486.0 30482.3  3278.68 3279.25 3279.64  7p 7d 2 6p' 7s 7p  u 'D,'S P„°-  7d D, 4° 3 8p P 2 6p" 'P, 3 7d D,  30 2 1 30 10  30 40 10  30318.2 29689.2 28834.5 28700.7 28319.5  3297.40 3367.26 3467.08 3483.24 3530.13  7p 8s s/~ 3 6P - P, 3 6p" P ; °0 7p ^P, -  76 5D, 1/o 6p" 7d 'D 8s 'S  40 40 60 50 7  20 30 30 30 7  28060.7 27875.3 27848.1 27822.7 27611.0  3562.68 3586.38 3589.89 3593.16 3620.71  6p" F°3 5f F / 5f 3F/3 7s S, 6p" F°-  7d 5g 3< 5g - vG j 6f 6p" '.D, 7d B,  27572.0 27537.5 27347.5 27229.9 27204.4  3625.84 3630.37 3655.60 3671.38 3674.83  6f F ° 6f 3*Fj-  30 20  27096.7 26975.3 26847.3 26811.4 26759.4  3689.43 3706.05 3723.71 3728.70 3735.94  7s 7p 3 p O 8s 7p 3 p ° _ 5f  20 30 40  26207.5 26120.0 26083.7 26024.3  3814.62 3827.39 3832.72 3841.48  7d 7p 6p 6d  7 0 40 60 7 60 15 2 35 60 0 40 60 80  30 60 30 10  3  l  0  3  3  2  3  3  3  5f F °-  z  n  G  3  A  3  8  S  sg  / , 3  G;  S  2  5f 5f  3  F°-  3£° 3  S  /  5g  3(  V  P;  7p 8s 7s' 8s 5g  D 'P, . 7d F • 5f F,° 'D,. 6p" 'D ° 7p P?- 7d -?D 3  2 0  2 3  2  2  3  0 .50 30 0 40 0 15 15 10 2  80 30 30 15 5 5  3° 7p 7d 7d 7p  25992.6 25939.1 25574.8 25376.4 25297.4  3846.16 3854.09 3908.99 3939.55 3951.86  7d 7s 7p 7p 6d  25118.5 24967.3 24800.0 24738.3 24517.8  3980.00 4004.11 4031.12 4041.18 4077.52  8p P ° - 9d D 6 p ^3 P 2 - 5f 3 F / 6p" P,°- 8s 'S 7d ' D, • 3a a 3T> O 7s S, 6p  DP °3  3  /  2  3  i  /  3  ~  3  3  *  p  o Z  D E>/  3  2  42 TABLE X (Continued) Intensity B  Wave number (cm- )  Wavelength 4081.69 4085.18 4094.50 4120.20 4128.02 4141.17  1  7 1 15 10 10  10 10  24492.8 24471.8 24416.1 24263.8 24217.9  20  10  24140.9  Classification  (IoA.air)  * 5g 'G^- 8h 8h '> E° 5g 7d D 7p 'P% 10s 'SQ 8p P°7p 'P/ - 7d ^D, 3  3  Z  2  5  6d 'D 6p" 'D °7s *S, 6p" D,°6p" 'D -  7p P2° 7d D 6p" F ° 8d D, 7d °D 7p 'P,° 9d 7s' / p o 9d 7s' 7g 3n o 6p" 6p" 7s P,° 7g  2  2  80 0 1  40  40 1 1 0 5  30  30 30 12 12 150  0 20  23903.2 23886.9 23691.8  4182.36 4185.22 4219.68  23398.6 23352.8 23144.7 23124.8 22976.4  4272.56 4280.95 4319.43 4323.14 4351.08  * 7s ' S 8p *P °7d D 8p 'P,°* 9s S , -  22762.8 22717.5 22475.1 22410.7 22392.2  4391.91 4400.66 4448.11 4460.91 4464.60  6f F ° 6d 'D 6p P, 9s 'S 6f  3  2  0  2  3  2  3  3  3  2  2 3  0  3  3  3  3  2  2  ;  \  3  S,°  3  150 200 0 80 10 30 300 80 1 400 250 250 80 100 40 100 80 1  60 5 100 50 50  22365.1 22219.6 22102.0 22032.0 21960.4  4470.00 4499.28 4523.21 4537.59 4552.38  6f % ? -  21925.3 21870.2 21750.0 21031.8 20998.1  4559.66 4571.16 4596.42 4753.37 4761.01  10s '-Sj, 7p P ° 8s S , 7p 'P° 6P P, 6p" F 6d D 7s S , - 7p P 7  20834.1 20817.2 20787.0 20711.6 20702.6  4798.48 4802.39 4809.35 4826.87 4828.95  7s S, 7s '-So 6p" D/- 7 ;v6p ' s , •  7p  20591.6 20462.8 20000.9  4854.98 4885.55 4998.38  6P - *P 6d D, 6d D,6p" D ° 6p " 'D °-  7p P ° 6p" 'D ° 6p" *F/ 9s S 8s S  7g 8s 'at 6d 'D,- 6p" 8p P ? - 10s 8d D 6p" D °>P °-  7p  T  3  3  3  2  2  3  3  2  23  3  3  5  2  3  3  3  3  P  2  2  T  3  3  3  2  30  19986.6  5001.94  2  epMp,  5g G 8s 8p 'P, 3  3  2  3  3  7  43 TABLE X (Continued) Intensity A B C 20 60 60 60 60  0 0  100 100 100 7 15  5 5 0  200 5 30 0 0  2  5 120 7 250 25  5 10  30  Classification  Wave number (cm-1)  Wavelength (I.A.air)  19981.9 19752.9 19737.8 19730.0 19450.7  5003.13 5061.13 5065.00 5067.03 5139.78  19256.5 19197.2 19033.4 18579,3 18291.8  5191.59 5207.65 5252.45 5380.84 5465.42  6d D 6d 'D 6p" ' P / 6d D, * 6p" D -  7p ' P , ° 7p ^P,° 7d 'D 7p P ° 5g G 3  18098.5 17787.6 17661.6 17620.7 17595.7  5523.80 5620.34 5660.44 5673.57 5681.62  6d D 6f F / * 6f 3F °6f 3F,°6f <F °-  7p  17584.2 17299.2 17157.8 17067.4 16677.7  5685.34 5779.00 5826.62 5857„49 5994.36  6f F ° 7s S 6d D, 6d D 6d *D -  9d D, 7p P , ° 6p" P,° 6p P£ 6p" ^ P / °  16543.0  6043.17  6d D, 8s S , 6d D 6p P , -  6p" F °  6d  *D 2  J  6d D, 3  P  6p* p£'3  0  3  Z  z  J  3  2  (  3  2  3  Z  2  3  2  A  0  3  3  3  Z  3  3  35 60 5 5 80 25 80 80 30 100 50 10 7 80  10  80 100 50 10 20  0  6p" 'Di 7h '' H° 7 y,° 7h ' H° 6p" ' P /  16062.3 15650.6 15531.7 15507.5 15413.6 15394.9 15385.0 15368.6 15133.3  6224.03 6387.75 6436.68 6446.73 6486.00 6493.87 6498.04 6504.97 6606.10  15031.2 14998.4 14959.6 14477.7 14397.3  6650.98 6665.52 6682.85 6905.29 6943.85  6d D,6f 8p P ; ° 9s S , 8p *P°-  14373.6 14329.0 14227.0 14198.0 14015.9  6955.29 6976.94 7026.96 7041.32 7132.77  6d 8p 8p  3  2  2  3  2  3  Z  3  :  P  3  2  °  9d D 9d D 9d D 9d 'D, 3  3  3  2  3  2  3  3  3  3  3  Z  3F  6f  Z  °  6p" F ° 7p P , ° 9h '' H° 9h ' ' V 3  Z  3  3  6g 6f F°6f F,°6f F°6f $F°6p" 'P°3  3  3  3  3  3  3  D j  -  6g ' * % 6g G 8s 'S '  s  3  3>t e  6p" 6g 8d 4zo 8d  3  F° 'D , D  J  6p" F ^f 8d D 8d D 8g '> c' 3  3  2  a  6p"  k-  ep^sf  44 TABLE X (Continued)  A 15 100 25 100 50 120 80  Intensity B C 7 20 30 7  Wave number (cm-1)  Wavelengt (I.A.air)  Classification  13984.6 13638.6 13517.2 13474.5 13251.2  7148.77 7330.11 7395.92 7419.40 7544.39  6d 5f 6d 7d  13157.3 13037.7  7598.23 7667.96  6d 7d  8g *> G  3°, 3  F/-  *D*  %~ 5  S  <3  -  D/-  7p 7d 7p 6f  7p 6f  *P/*  3 F  2  45 TABLE XI C l a s s i f i e d Lines Column A  I n t e n s i t y from e l e c t r o d e l e s s d i s c h a r g e  Column B  I n t e n s i t y from spark i n helium  Column C  I n t e n s i t y observed by A r v i d s s o n l  *  A  Doubly c l a s s i f i e d  15 90 0 1 100 100 100 120 15 80 20 20 1 406? 10  406? 10 30 10 50  0 5 7 15 5  line Classification  Wave number (cm-1)  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  231004.0 222267.7 217843.6 214835.2 210373.0  432.893 449.908 459.045 465.473 475.346  6s 6p 6s 6s 6s «5  209791.6 209048.2 204959.7 204679.9 201457.6  476.664 478.359 487.901 488.568 496.382  7p "P P° 6s S ^ 6s, Su- 15/^2. 6p P £ 8d D 6p 2P ^ 9s S 6s s £ - 13^  200016.9 194149.0 188764.5 183614,2 175390.5  499.958 515.068 529.761 544.620 570.156  6s S , - •12^ 6s S * - -10^° 2-c 6s S ^ 5,^ 2. 9s S> 6P 6s  174249.6 173480.6 163185.3 154200.4 153186.4  573.889 576.433 612.800 648.507 652.799  6p ^P°- 7d * D * 6p *p£- 8s S , 6s D t8p P ^ 7d 6p P , ^ 'a4 7d 6p P£'/4  656.083 744.515 761.125 797.014 830.117  6  7  152419.7 134315.6 131384.5 125468.4 120465.0  3 7 6 1  119446.8 118206.2 116595.0 115961.4 115227.1  837.192 845.979 857.670 862.356 867.851  Intensity B C  15 2 40 45 80B  o f Pb IV  3 0 6 7 7 8 8 9 5 4  2 2 2 3 2 5  2  25„° 10S Sy 7P * P £ Z  Q  i9^r  17. °  2  2  fc  z  2  2  /;  2  2  2  a  2  2  2  A  2 2  2  2  2  Z  <p„;-  P  6s  z  V>2l/-  2  6 s D/3 6s 22  2  8s '4 27^ 26 ,f 9d D 2  2  243.; 6  6s D 6s D^6 s D_^z 2  A  22 22  s  G o  ^  23 ^ 7p P ° 21z°, 8d D. 2  2  (!  2  46 TABLE XI (Continued)  A  Intensity B C  15 15 2 30 60 50 3 50 50 120  Wave number (cm )  Wavelength (I.A,vac)  114031.3 113639.2 113588.9 112995.9 112267.4  876.952 879.978 880.368 884.988: 890.731  6*f 8g " G ^ * 6s 2 'D-^- 20 £ 6s % 1%1 6 s D - 27,^ 6sz%>- 18; °  110070.6 109693.8 108946.0 108444.0 108400.1  908.508 911.629 917.886 922.135 922.509  6s  927.652 932.216 956.982 983.327 990.883  6s D 6s D ^-  -1  1 6 8 6 7 2 10  100 150 5 1 15  7 10 2  107799.1 107271.3 104495.1 101695.6 100920.1  50 20 1 4 400h  3 1 1 2 30  98770.2 98694.3 98430.2 98337.4 97216.9  1012.451 1013.230 1015.948 1016.907 1028.628  96992.1 96894.7 96706.2 95773.2 95283.8  1031.011 1032.048 1034.060 1044.133 1049.496  95093.0 94649.7 92841.9 92704.0 92602.9  1051.602 1056.527 1077.100 1078.702 1079.880  92524.3 92354.4 92276.4 91711.2 90953.4  1080.798 1082.785 1083.700 1090.379 1099.465  90340.0 89663.4 89599.7 88663.9 88646.3  1106.929 1115.282 1116.075 1127.854 1128.079  1 15 1 80 20 50 100 15 10 50 150&? 5 30 5? 100 25 80 250h 20 12  3? 3  2 0 2 3 0 1 2 7  Classification  3  2  2  r  2  2  /4  D,,-  26 £ 9d D 6p P > 7s s£ 6 s D£- 25^° 6p P*- 6d % 2  2  2  2  5,J-  2  A  2  2  2  2  2 2  2>£  2 2  2  •14 £ 9d D ^ 9d D ^ 3  2  2  2  7  g  2  <V*  6 s D^- 12,4° 12^- 9d D ± 9d D> 2  2  Z  Z  2  1  3«V  2  6s  2  6p  13/-  6s* z  §  9d 23  6s D 6s D^-  P / f l  z>i ,  2  2>  2 2  6s D^z  2  7p 21 /^ 8d D >. g  2  2  2  6s D^ 6s D ^2  2  r  z  2  2  6s 2  2l  83% 7^° 8d D ^2 19/4° 7g *G* '3^ Z  6s 6 s 2D, 2  4  20 £15^ 3  6p 7p 7p  7g G ^ 9d D ; 6d 9d D», 10s S 2  2  2>  2  2  PJ°-  2  P  47 TABLE XI (Continued) Intensity B A  C 0  200 50 60 10 150h  0 0  7 1  30  9  2h? 20 20 15? 0  40 1 7 10 2 7. 60 5 80 5 70 50 80 6 606 30 30 300R 20 4 15 100 100R 15 7  1 0  2 0  5  2 0  150  30 40  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  88083.4 88012.2 87885.8 87802.5 87510.0  1135.288 1136.206 1137.840 1138.920 1142.726  9d D/1 2 & - 7g G 2fz 7s S 6p P,£6 s D^- i 7 ^ 6s2 D^5y£  87342.1 87224.1 86485.0 84090.0 84037.1  1144.923 1146.471 1156.269 1189.202 1189.951  6p  83825.1 83592.4  1192.961 1196.281  -1  15 7 200 100 150  40  4 6  Classification  Wave number (cm )  2 2  a  2  2  2  2  6s  P£-  2  D  2  2  />r  6 s D^2  6d 7p  ^  2  11 £  8d D/fc 7d ^D/fc 2  2  9d D > 6g ^ G 10s S> 7g * G 8d D '  20 %  2  2  P  1 4  4  2  2  19A-  ^  /  i  83513.4 81092.3  1197.413 1233.163  80864.5 80582.5 79877.7 79653.8 79369.7  1236.636 1240.964 1251.914 1255.432 1259.927  7p 7p 6d  79333.4 79301.9 78990.5 78893.8 78754.2  1260.504 1261.003 1265.975 1267.526 1269.773  7s S 8p P ^ 6 7- 6g Q^ 23^ 9d 6s - D^- 13,* 2 sg- 7d D.  77935.8 77619.7 77454.4 77390.2 77227.4  1283.108 1288.332 1291.082 1292.153 1294.878  6d 6d V& 6s D„.7s 20^2-  76723.5 76646.0 76158.0 76030.9 75012.6  1303.382 1304.700 1313.060 1315.255 1333.110  74903.8 74454.5 74135.8 73473.4 72060.8  1335.046 1343.101 1348.876 1361.037 1387.716  12/^  ^  2  /4  9d S p,£ 10s S D 8P fPyf ' i - 8d D/^ 13^,- 9s S,„ 2  P °-  — ^ 2  2  2  2  2  %  2  f  2  2  2 2  3  2  22  7 * 8 ^  6s 4/^ 6s 6s  22 z  8p 8p  8p P ^ 6 G^T 2  2  g  5g 5g 6P 7d 7d  21a£ % D j  6g.  15,£  8d  2  2  r  * P £  2  2  G r*4 G.  ^  4 ,° •G„. 2  D^  48 TABLE XI (Continued) Wave number (cm-1)  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  71995.1 71778.0 71578.7 71412.9 71324.0  1388.984 1393.185 1397.064 1400.308 1402.053  71205.9 71040.8 70743.1 70460.0 70399.5  1404.378 1407.641 1413.565 1419.244 1420,465  6 s 2D^7p P / -  67419.8 66269.9 66190.3 66081.6 65987.1  1483.244 1508.981 1510.795 1513.281 1515.447  25^- 10s 8d D,4. 19& 6 s D>5,4° 9d ^ 9s 19/4-  65814.7 65115.4 63747.2 63261.0 62977.3  1519.416 1535.734 1568.695 1580.753 1587.874  26 \6s * ^ 7p 7p P , ^ 7p % ° -  1 4 100R 40 0?  62870.5 62660.9 61972.1 61652.3 61643.3  1590.572 1595.893 1613.629 1621.998 1622.237  27,£- 10s S , 7d 5g 8d D ^ 23 a 7d ^ 5/4-  25 150 1 2? 30  59476.1 56978.9 56627.7 56449.6 56255.0  1681.349 1755.036 1765.920 1771.493 1777.620  26^2-  1 200R 4 3h 4  55684.5 > 55605.3 55487.7 54395.3 53378.6  1795.830 1798.391 1802.202 1838.394 1873.410  9/420^ lO^ Il £  53282.1 52821.0 51398.1 51037.5 51006.1  1876.802 1893.186 1945.596 1959.342 1960.549  A  Intensity B  150R 20 100 150R 50 130 40 3 3 100 10 3 150R 20hh 12 2 200R 130 15 80  40 200 10 300 4  C  30  5  10 30  2 6  15  10  40  5  2 100  1  Classification 6s  2  6s  2  %>  r  9s S . 2  2  D ,lf  8d * b  7p 2  2  17y°-  17,/2^-  /4  rr ° 7 9s ^S. 8d D 4 9s S>5 6g G * 2(i  2  2  2  2  22  /  2  2  2  2  9d 8d D ^ 8d ^ 9s S ^ 2  2  2  2  A  6g 34. 5g G ^ 7d D ^ 7d D^ 7d D ^ Z  7z  ''k  9/410^-  0  2  2  2  Z  2  8s S 5g 34,44 8s S 7d D ^ 7d 2  :  2  2  2  2124- 5g * G 6 s ^Dy12° - 7d D 23>i6d D^- 27/42  2  2  2  0  i4  49 TABLE XI (Continued) Intensity A B C 200 40 2 0 300 300R 40 15 100 300R 200? 400R 15 300 0?  10  30 80 0  Wave number (cm- ) 1  Wavelength (I-.A. vac)  50680.2 50461.9 50101.3 49613.5 48941.9  1973.156 1981.694 1995.956 2015.579 2043.238  48780.4 48748.7 48472.7 48174.7 48079.6  2050.003 2051.339 2063.018 2075.780 2079.884  46454.5 46410.3 46033.8 45910.8 45545.3  2152.643 2154.692 2172.318 2178.138 2195.618 2209.346 2283.111 2302.076 2331.223 2360.250 2418.345  5 20 150 250 400  20  45262.3 43799.9 43439.0 42895.9 42368.4  400  0  41350.6  C1 as s i f i c a t i on 6s 2. 2 7s 25£13<4°24£6d  26 £ 2t  6d  8d 8s 7d  D,^  2  2  * S  4  D;  5g 27,*' 8d 8s 26 4  D / ^  2  2  6d  D  2  6p  2  /  A -  Ptf-  25^° 6s  D ^  2 2  27,g- 8d 7s S > - 2 5 ^ 27^8d  D ^  2  2  6s  27/12  2  D,£-  D , *  2  9s S -la\ z  14^ 15/£  Td 7d  IV/-  7d  K-  18g****  7d 8s 7d 8s 7d  20^-  7d 7d  2  y  D D  2  A  ;  (I.A.air) 40 5 2 20 5 7 3 10 80 80 60 25 80 7 30  10 0 50 50 30 7 30  40613.6 40583.9 40033.5 39846.4 37901;5  2461.49 2463.28 2497.16 2508.88 2637.63  36578.3 36528.3 35018.4 34903.0 34899.9  2733.05 2736.79 2854.80 2864.24 2864.50  6d  33568.2 33293.5 32749.8 32657.8 32645.3  2978.14 3002.71 3052.56 3061.17 3062.34  7p P,£- 7d D A 6d % 7p 7s * S > , 7p P / 6d 21 £ 6d ^ D ^ - 232^°  7p  Z  15^2-  17^7p  2  D  A  -  D  2  * S  ^  2  2  /  4  4  ^  D D.  24 ^ 3  Z  2  2  r  z  50 TABLE XI (Continued)  A  Intensity B C  25 1 30 70 25 2 25 25 10 80 25 7 25 5 100  10 40 2 5 5 20 5 15 20  80 7 30 250 400  25  200 10 0 5 25  15  80 25 60  2 5  Wave number (cm-1)  Wavelength (I.A.air)  Class i f i c a t i o n  32550.9 31959.1 31783.0 31035.7 30941.6  3071.22 3128.09 3145.43 3221.17 3230.96  30283.8 29739.2 29703.6 28960.7 28075.0  3301.15 3361.60 3365.62 3451.97 3560.87  7s S * 24^ 6d DA6d D^-  28025.7 25810.4 25349.0 25266.2 25229.6  3567.13 3873.31 3943.81 3956.74 3962.48  6d 6d 6p % 7s 6d D^-  24685.6 24492.8 23948.7 22235.0 22046.5  4049.80 4081.69 4174.42 4496.15 4534.60  21707.6 19390.3 18191.7 17765.3 16902.8  4605.39 5155.77 5495.47 5627.40 5914.55  14803.7 14036.0 13017.6  6753.23 7122.56 7679.78  7p * P £ 23^7p *P/£•* 6d H ^23 ^1  2  2  6d  z  Dfr-  7d D/£ 7d D^ 8s S 7p P 7d % ^ 2  Z  2  19/4  2  2  2  2  s  2  7s * 6d 7s 6d  7d  2  D> 2  ±  18.C 19/4 17^° 6s -D/fc 17,° 2  2  7P P*° 1 4  7p P , o D - 15^° S ^ - 15^° D^- 15/4° S^-  Z  L  2  /V  2 2  o  6d D y 14 ^ 25;,°- 7d D> 6d 26^2. 7d *D 6d ^D^- 13*,° 2  r  3  2  Z  8s 7d D/4* 7d 2  2 1  A  8p 2 V 8p P,^ 2  8p Pyfc* 2  51 TABLE XII C l a s s i f i e d L i n e s I n v o l v i n g the Even Complex Core L e v e l s of Pb IV Column A  I n t e n s i t y from e l e c t r o d e l e s s d i s c h a r g e  Column B  I n t e n s i t y from spark i n helium  Column C  I n t e n s i t y observed by A r v i d s s o n  *  A  Doubly c l a s s i f i e d  Intensity B C  Wave number (cm ) -1  1  line  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  Classification  7 6 2 0 2  200186.9 192809.3 131255.1 128107.0 125588.3  499.533 518.647 761.875 780.597 796.253  7 4 3 40 5  125448.7 124155.8 123653.4 123512.2 122067.7  797.138 805.440 808.712 809.637 819.218  1 2 2 0 2  120429.7 116756.7 113842.6 113392.4 113211.2  830.360 856.482 878.406 881.893 883.305  0 2 30 20 4  109407.4 109348.7 108781.1 107989.7 107737.3  914.015 914.505 919.277 926.014 928.184  13 °- 16,4 10^- •13 5 34  107481.5 107407.6 105156.5 105064.3 101815.5  930.392 931.033 950.964 951.798 982.169  1 1 £ 14,4 3^- *Z'<2. 15,4-17* 7 i°  20 15 20 4 5  2  8  1  6p 6p  P/4--  10, 3>- •14,4 V - 13^ 4  2  z  17 ^ IVz 10/4 2  lA-  9 24 8 4 2  17*4 6  %-  24  16/4 15 ^ 15 4 2  2  4  4  4/*£  4*4 62^  2  12 16,4 34.  52 TABLE XII (Continued) Intensity A B C 2 2 10 5 1  0  7 4 3 10 30  2  7 20 40  3  5  Wave number (cm" ) 1  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  101264.2 101120.0 101079.0 99315.7 98118.7  987.516 988.924 989.326 1006.890 1019.173  95876.3 95452.7 94745.9 94442.8 94365.3  1043.011 1047.639 1055.455 1058.841 1059.712  94136.1 93705.5 93650.3  1062.292 1067.173 1067.803  93001.1  1075.256  Classification 5  /4~ 10/4  5^  94  15,?-  17^ 15/>  7p  2  2  z  10/- 10/4 1 5 ^ •14/4. 23 £- 17 4 15 13^ 2  <"  17 °4  7p  2  6 2*2.  14^  18 £ 15 4 21z4? 16/>a. H 4- 10/£ z  2  2  70 10  1  92858.2 92490.1  1076.911 1081.197  10 80  0 3  92326.5 91414.0  1083.113 1093.925  0  90316.9 89169.2 88883.0 87594.9 86543.4  1107.212 1121.464 1125.075 1141.619 1155.489  14,4" -12 fe 9/424 1434= -II24 8345^4. 7£ 3/4  85320.0 84983.0 83947.3 83887.1 83633.3  1172.058 1176.705 1191.224 1192.079 1195.696  18 4- 12 4 13//- 7/^ 2O34- 1234 1 8 ^ •l"l2&  15 7 7 15 40  83295.2 82562.6 82514.0 81623.5 81568.5  1200.550 1211.202 1211.915 1225.137 1225.963  3/^ 19/4- llzfc 20 f 1 1 ^ 7p •12^ 26 £ 1724  4 2 2 15 30  81357.5 80829.7 80634.4 80191.0 79910.8  1229.143 1237.169 1240.165 1247.023 1251.395  llp>,92ft. 24 9/4" 7/4 24 £ 17^ 19/^ 1 5 ^ L  3  12 40 80 10 40 20 40 20 40 20  0  30  112^  82A 3  6  2  2  3  2  H24-  3  2  143415/>/ 12,^ 212414*>/  9 i 9 '^ 2  2  4  2>i  8 «i. 2  53 TABLE XII (Continued) Intensity B C  Wave number (cm )  Wavelength (I.A.vac)  Classification  79555.4 78641.7 76361.6 76072.3 75689.7  1256.986 1271.591 1309.558 1314.539 1321.184  7p P / £ H 2 A 27,%- 17^ 18^9^ 17,/- 7,^ 24^ -ll ^  74075.2 , 73491.5 72924.0  1349.980 1360.702 1371.290  4  72808.1  1373.474  15^- 6 ^ 24^-14,^ 14&J- 5 ^ 18 ^ 7/4 2Lj£- 10,^  5 10 7 7 7  71865.6 71266.2 71220.4 70561.3 70421.3  1391.487. 1403.190 1404.092 1417.208 1420.024  7 3 4 1 0  68974.9 68281.6 68231.7 68165.1 67928.8  1449.803 1464.523 1465.594 1467.026 1472.130  A 3 15 7 50 4 3 40 30  10  -1  2  z  2  2  2  26^°- 14/'^ 7p P/- 3,^ 21 J°8^ 23 <£ 10„ 23 * 9^ 2  2  2  2  2  2  23 <£ 84 19/*/. 6 ^ 20^2. 24^/ 9^ 27,,/- 1 3 ^ 18 >/ 5^ 2  2  2  50 1 5 30 2  67136.2 66799.5 66554.7 66200.0 65908.1  1489.510 1497.017 1502.523 1510.573 1517.264  18 £ 4 ^ I824- 3,^. 2 0 ^ 5 34 26 ^- -1234 21 ,/ 6 ^  2 2 6 4 10  65765.8 65474.7 64768.0 64230.4 63662.9  1520.548 1527.308 1543.971 1556.895 1570.773  20 £ 19,,/ 26 ;£  20 5 0 7 2  63439.8 63103.0 61841.4 55428.5 54458.6  1576.297 1584.710 1617.039 1804.128 1836.258  21&4& 7p P/J- 3,, 27/,/- l l t f i 24y°- 7,^ 27,,/- 10,^  2 5 2 1 2  53805.1 52870.7 49303.4 48017.1 47679.3  1858.559 1891.406 2028.258 2082.590 2097.344  26 </ 7„ 27,4°8^ 24,/- -3/^ 26 ^f 4^ 26 ^f 3,^  2  2  3  2  2  3  2  4^ 3^ 2  2  7p  23^.2  5^ 6 ^ 2  2  z  2  2  2  Z  54 TABLE XII (Continued)  A  20 100  Intensity B C  Wave number (cm-1)  Wavelength (I„A.vac)  45090.1 44752.5  2217.782 2234.512  Classification  27/427^"-  4  A 3/4  55 BIBLIOGRAPHY 1.  G. A r v i d s s o n , Ann.  2.  E. V. Condon and G. H. S h o r t l e y , The Theory of Atomic Spectra  3.  Physik [5] 12, 787  (Cambridge  (1932) .  U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , 1963).  M. F. Crawford, A. B. McLay, and A. M. Crooker, Proc. Roy.  Soc.  (London) A158,  no. 894, 455  (1937).  4.  B. Edlen, Handbuch der Physik 27, 80  5.  B. Edlen, J . Opt. Soc. Am.  6.  B. Edlen, Rep.  7.  D. Goode, unpublished m a t e r i a l  (1965).  8.  H. K a i s e r and A. W a l l r a f f , Ann.  Physik  9.  L. Minnhagen, J . Research N a t l . Bur. Standards 68C,  43, 339  (1964).  (1953).  Progr. Phys. 26, 181  (1963).  [p]  34_, 297  (1939). 237  (1964). 10.  C. E. Moore, Atomic Energy L e v e l s Volume III'; C i r c u l a r of the N a t l . Bur. Standards 467 P r i n t i n g O f f i c e , Washington,  11.  1958).  L. P a u l i n g and S. Goudsmit, The S t r u c t u r e of L i n e S p e c t r a (McGraw-Hill, New  12.  (U.S. Government  York,  1930).  R. A. Sawyer, Experimental Spectroscopy (Dover, New  York,  1963). 13.  G. K. S c h o e p f l e , Phys. Rev.  47, 232  (1935).  14.  G. K. S c h o e p f l e , Phys. Rev.  50, 538  (1936).  15.  S. Smith, Phys. Rev.  16.  F. S. Tomkins and M. Fred, App.  36, 1 (1930). O p t i c s 2, 715  (1963).  

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