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UBC Theses and Dissertations

Appraisal of Dr. Broom's top management game Gibberd, John Davidson 1970

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AN APPRAISAL OF DR. BROOM'S TOP MANAGEMENT GAME by JOHN DAVIDSON GIBBERD B. Comm, U n i v e r s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia, 1969 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IN THE FACULTY of COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION We accept t h i s t h e s i s as conforming to the requ i r e d standard THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA A p r i l 1970 In presenting th i s thes i s in pa r t i a l f u l f i lment of the requirements fo r an advanced degree at the Un ivers i ty of B r i t i s h Columbia, I agree that the L ibrary sha l l make i t f r ee l y ava i l ab le for reference and study. I fur ther agree tha permission for extensive copying of th i s thes i s for scho lar ly purposes may be granted by the Head of my Department or by his representat ives. It is understood that copying or pub l i ca t ion of th i s thes i s fo r f i nanc i a l gain sha l l not be allowed without my wr i t ten permiss ion. Department of The Univers i ty of B r i t i s h Columbia Vancouver 8, Canada Date J i & J 4 7 a ABSTRACT The objective of the thesis is to examine Dr. Broom's Top Management Game. The examination covers the realism of model input output relationships, the cost of an appli-cation, the design structure u t i l i z e d and the adequacy of the model presentation. Before the analysis is undertaken two analytical tools are developed. The f i r s t of these is a management game typology which provides a standardized, method for describing gaming models. The second tool is a two dimensional matrix which may be employed for design or analytical purposes. The rows of the matrix represent input for the current period and the columns output for the current period. In order to determine the f e a s i b i l i t y of converting The Broom Game, to modular design, the structure of a modular game is outline. Dr. Broom's Game, is an educational model which employs the computer to calculate the results for a period. Though the model is supposedly total enterprise the personnel function is absent. The marketing function of the model performs in a highly unrealistic manner. Also the production function is inadequate in that no attempt is made to break production into i t s component parts. The cost of an appli-cation is approximately two dollars. In the authors opinion i t is not feasible to convert the model to modular design. Finally the administrators' presentation was found to be inadequate. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE I. INTRODUCTION 1 Purpose 1 Importance 1 Outline of Remaining Chapters 2 Chapter II .. 2 Chapter III 2 Chapter IV 3 Limitations 3 Review of Management Games 3 Definition 4 History 4 Trends 5 Applications .... 5 Educational Value of Management Games ... 6 Administration 7 Costs of Management Gaming 7 II. CLASSIFICATION AND DESIGN 8 Classification 8 Objective 8 Typology 8 Design 1 2 Comment 1 2 Design Steps 1 2 Conceptual Framework 1 2 Objectives 1 3 i CHAPTER PAGE Structure 14 Computation 1 4 Scope 1 4 Input Output Relationships 1 5 Quantifying The Relationships and Setting Out The Algorithm , 2 1 Quantifying 2 1 Algorithm -. 2 2 Model Debugging 2 2 Steps 2 2 Checks 2 2 Information 2 3 Model Input Output 2 3 Administrators 1 Information 2 3 Participant Information 24 III. THE TOP MANAGEMENT GAME*. DESCRIPTION AND TESTS 2 5 Description 2 5 Typology 2 5 Matrix and Reference Notes 2 8 Tests 3 0 Realism of Model Input Output Relationships 30 Logistics 3 0 Marketing 3 0 Finance 3 1 Costs Incurred 3 1 i i CHAPTER PAGE Modular Design 3 3 Presentation 3 5 IV. TEST RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS 3 6 Input Output Relationships 3 6 Logistics 3 6 Marketing 3 8 Finance 44 Costs 46 Modularity 48 Presentation 49 Administrators * Information 49 Computer Program 49 Listing of Variables and Constants .... 49 I n i t i a l i z i n g Data 50 Participant Presentation 5 0 V. CONCLUDING COMMENTS 5 1 The Top Management Game 5 1 Method of Analysis 5 1 Games 5 1 BIBLIOGRAPHY APPENDIX I. Reference Notes 5 3 II. Computer Program Listing 84 IIII. I n i t i a l i z i n g Data 8 5 IV. Quarter Zero Output 8 7 i i i LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE I. A Management Game Typology 9 II. A Management Game Matrix l 6 a III. A Classification of The Top Management Game 2 6 IV. Matrix Analysis of The Top Management Game 29 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE PAGE I. Decision Stages in Game Employment 1 3 II. A Total Enterprise Model Modular Design 3 ^ iv CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION I. Purpose The objective of my thesis i s : A. To describe H. N. Broom's, The Top Management Garnet using analytical methods developed in the thesis; B. To determine the realism of model input, output relationships; C. To determine the approximate cost of an application of The Top Management Game; D. To determine i f model design is flexible enough to satisfy more than one class of application objective; E. To evaluate the presentation of, The Top Management  Game, from the viewpoint of the administrator and the participant; F. And to review the results of the analysis and to recommend improvements where necessary. II. Importance The management game is one of many tools which managers may draw upon for help in research, decision making and education. Attention in this study is concentrated on the 1 H.N. Broom, Business Policy and Strategic Action, Text and Cases (Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1 9 6 9 ) PP 5 3 5 - 5 8 3 ; H.N. Broom, Business Policy and Strategic  Action, Teacher's Manual (Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1 9 6 9 ) PP. 8 6 - 1 8 8 . - 2 -educational use of gaming. After the decision has been made to include a management game in an education program, the next problem is to select a game which matches the objectives of the intended application. Since this selection process is lik e l y to be performed many times, a standard type of analysis would prove useful. One such method of analysis is developed in the evaluation of, The Top Management Game. III. Outline of Remaining Chapters  Chapter II The intent of Chapter II is to provide a basis on which to formulate a set of c r i t e r i a with which i t is possible to perform the evaluation. A beginning point in any analysis is a description of the game under study. The classification scheme introduced in the f i r s t part of the chapter is an instrument to delineate management games. The stepwise design procedures of the second part of the chapter rely heavily on this typology. Special attention is given to the input, output matrix of design for i t w i l l later prove to be a useful descriptive and analytical tool. Chapter III The classification scheme set out earlier is enacted at the beginning of the chapter to provide a description of The Top Management Game. Following this the input, output relationships of the model are presented with the aid of the matrix analysis. The remainder of the chapter - 3 -discusses the tests to he applied to the model at hand. Chapter IV The task of the f i n a l chapter is to review the results of the tests, to point out areas of failure and to recom-mend improvements where necessary. The Chapter closes with comments on the method of analysis employed and on gaming in general. IV. Limitations From his involvement with an educational gaming model, the participant is expected to receive certain knowledge about the business system and/or to develop specified managerial s k i l l s . Therefore, an evaluation of: this type should include a test for measuring the attainment of these objectives. Because of the limited time available, no attempt was made to investigate the effectiveness of The Top Management Game in a formal learning situation. Again because of the time constraint, the method of anal-ysis employed here was not extended to evaluate other educational games, which would have proven the broad applicability of the method. V. Review of Management Games The report assumes the reader to have had previous experience in the management game area. For those who desire to review the main aspects of gaming, a brief - 4 -outline with suggested references is given below. Definition Management games are sequential decision making exercises, whose structures are based on either general business and economic principles or on an actual s i t u -ation and whose participants assume the role of a man-ager in the simulated system. 1. Greenlaw, Herron Rowdon, Business Simulation in Industrial and University Education, (Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1 9 6 2 ) Ch. 1 . 2 . Carson J., "Business Games: A Technique for Teaching Decision Making" Business Games Hand- book, Graham, Gray (American Management Associ-ation, 1 9 6 9 ) pp. 3 9 - ^ 6 . History Gaming dates back to 3 0 0 0 B.C. but i t has only been in the past fifteen years that i t has gained any promin-ence in the world of commerce. War games, operations research, role playing and cases are the foundations of management games. 3. Andrew Wilson, The Bomb and the Computer, (New York, New York, Delacorte Press, 1 9 6 8 ) pp 1 - 2 1 0 . 4 . Greenlaw, Herron, Rowdon, Business Simulation in Industrial and University Education (Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1 9 6 2 ) Ch. 1 . - 5 -5 . R. C. Muer, William T. Newell, Harold L. Pazer, Simulation in Business & Economics (Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1 9 6 9 ) PP. 1 7 9 - 2 1 3 . Trends Control System models based.on regression analysis and the technique of programmed play are two trends which point towards specific firm management games which w i l l include the total enterprise and the three levels of management. 6. R. Matessich, Simulation of the Firm Through A  Budget Computer Program (Homewood I l l i n o i s : Richard D. Irwin Inc., 1 9 6 4 ) 7 . George W. Gershefski, The Development and Appli-cation of a Corporate Financial Model (Oxford Ohio: The Planning Executive Institute, 1 9 6 8 ) 8. George W. Gershefski, Management Science, Vol. 1 6 No. 6, February 1 9 7 0 , pp 3 0 3 - 3 1 2 . 9 . Rodney H. Brady,"Computers in Top Level Decision Making", Harvard Business Review, Vol. n, July-August, pp. 6 7 - 7 6 . Applications The possible applications of management games are: A. as a tool in management education B. as an aid in the evaluation of policy, C. as an aid in selecting personnel D. as a device for creation of a data bank - 6 -E. as a tool to assist in the development of information systems F. and as a research tool for exploring manager-i a l behavior in the laboratory. 1 0 . J. A. B e l l , "A Simulation Model for Business Plan-ning", Operational Research Quarterly, Special Conference Issue, Vol. 2 0 , April i 9 6 0 , pp. 3 - 4 . 1 1 . Allen A. Z o l l , Dynamic Management Education, (Don Mills, Ontario, Addison Wesley Publishing Co., 1 9 6 9 ) . 1 2 . Martin Shubik, "Gaming: Cost and F a c i l i t i e s " , Management Science, Vol. 1 4 , No. 1 1 , July, 1 9 6 8 , pp. 6 2 9 - 6 6 0 . 1 3 . R. C. Muer, William T. Newell, Harold L. Pazer, Simulation in Business & Economics, (Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1 9 6 9 ) pp. 1 7 0 - 2 1 3 . 1 4 . J. R. Greene, Roger L. Sisson, fiynamic Management  Decision Games, (New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc., 1 9 5 9 ) PP. 2 - 6 . 1 5 . E. M. Babb, L. M. Eisgruder, Management Games for Teaching and Research, (Chicago, I l l i n o i s , Educat-ional Methods Inc., 1 9 6 6 ) . Educational Value of Games The argument on the educational value of games revolves around the laws of learning. - 1 -1 6 . E. M. Babb, L. M. Eisgruder, Management Games for  Teaching and Research, (Chicago, I l l i n o i s , Educat-ional Methods Inc., 1 9 6 6 ) pp. 1 5 - 1 1 3 . 1 7 . Larry F. Moore, "Business Games vs. Cases as Tools of Learning", Training and Development Journal, Vol. 2 1 , No. 1 0 , October 1 9 6 7 . 1 8 . Robert G. Grahm, Clifford F. Gray, Business Games  Handbook, (American Management Association, 1 9 6 9 ) pp. 1 9 - 2 8 . Administration Proper administration of a management game is just as important as selecting a well designed model which matches the objectives of the application. Briefing and critiquing are the two most important elements of proper administration. 1 9 . Greenlaw, Herron Rowdon, Business Simulation In  Industrial and- University Education, (Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1 9 6 2 ) Ch. 6. Costs of Management Gaming A game which is properly designed and matches the goals of the intended application may be rejected for use, i f i t s cost is prohibitive. The four main costs of gaming are: A. Construction 1. conceptual framework 2. programming 3. debugging 4. documentation - 8 -B. Running 1. calculation 2. data preparation and storage C. Administration 1. f a c i l i t i e s 2. administrative personnel 3. materials D. Participants Time Value 20. Martin Shubik, "Gaming: Cost and F a c i l i t i e s " , Management Science, Vol. 1 4 , No. 1 1 , July, 1 9 6 8 . Further reference to the topics of the outline are given in the bibliography. The aspects covered above are an integral part of the work of the next and following chapters. CHAPTER II CLASSIFICATION AND DESIGN Taken together the design procedures and typology of this Chapter give the understanding necessary to formulate the measures of assessment. The classification was devised after considering the possible objectives, structures, computational methods and scope of a model. I CLASSIFICATION Objective This mechanism is intended to be an i n i t i a l screening device and as such i t does not constitute an exhaustive appraisal. A more in depth approach follows under the heading of Design. Typology In order to avoid repetition an explanation of the breakdown is deferred u n t i l the next section. Table I A MANAGEMENT GAME TYPOLOGY I MODEL OBJECTIVES A t Applications: 1. education 2. research 3. evaluation - 9 -- 10 -B. Area of Organization Encompassed 1. total enterprise a) logistics b) finance c) marketing d) personnel 2. functional area a) logistics b) finance c) marketing d) personnel C. Levels of Management Exp l i c i t l y Recognized 1. top 2. Control 3. operating ' D. Basis for Model Relationships 1. general business and economic principles 2. specific organization STRUCTURE A. Competition 1. interactive model 2. non-interactive model B. Participant Structure 1. team 2. individual - 11 -C. Design F l e x i b i l i t y 1. modular 2. non-modular III COMPUTATION OF RESULTS A. Hand B. Computer IV SCOPE A. Degree of Complexity 1. basic a) required number of decisions limited b) amount of output from the model limited 2. complex a) required number of decisions extensive b) amount of output from the model extensive B. Model Outcomes 1. deterministic 2. stochastic C. Qualitative Factors 1. are included within the model 2. are introduced from outside the model. 3. are not considered. D. Exogenous Factors 1. are included 2. are not included - 12 -E. Time Considerations 1. length of time covered by a period in the model 2. intended number of periods of play. II DESIGN Comment Stages one and four of Figure I require a cost benefit analysis which is beyond the scope of the paper. The fore-going typology, the design procedures given below and the tests discussed in Chapter III do provide the techniques necessary for stages two, three, five and six. Design Steps The period which starts when the need for a new model: arises and ends when the model becomes a reality may be divided into four segments which are: A. Conceptual framework formulated B. Quantify the relationships and set out the algorithm C. Debug the model D. Information Emphasis here w i l l be upon the f i r s t two areas. A. Conceptual Framework. Definition of the model begins with a statement of goals, as is the correct procedure for the design of any system. From here each step of the frame-work considers the; :model in greater detail. - 1 3 -APPLICATION j4-fDESIGN A-NEW MODEL ^IMPROVE" MOST SUITABLE MODEL J£ES_ DECISION STAGES IN GAME EMPLOYMENT FIGURE I - i.4 -1. Objectives a) Is the model for research, educational or evalu-ation purposes? b) Is the model to encompass the total enterprise or just a functional area? c) If a functional area, is i t logistics, finance, marketing, or personnel? d) Does the model include the three levels of manage-ment, top, control and operating? e) Are model relationships, to be based on a real situation or on general business and economic principles ? 2. Structure a) Are there interactions between the organizations and between the organizations and the economy? b) Is the participant structure team or individual? A team structure is usually linked with a total enter-prise model and an individual structure is often found with a functional model. c) Will modular design be employed and thus increase model f l e x i b i l i t y ? 3. Computation a) Are the model calculations to be done by hand or by a computer? 4 . Scope a) What input decisions are required and what w i l l be - 15 -the model output? b) Are the outcomes of the model influenced by random elements? c) Is an attempt made to quantify qualitative factors? Are these qualitative factors built into the model structure or are they introduced as inputs during play? d) Are exogenous factors which influence the sections of the firm but are not determined by the firms actions, included in the game? e) What length of time does a period of play represent and what is the intended number of periods of >play? 5. Model Input Output Relationships a) The f i r s t step in specifying the input output relationships is to construct a matrix similar to that of Table II. In this matrix rows stand for input for a period and colums represent output for the period. (l) The f i r s t division of rows and columns takes place i f the organization structure of the model exp l i c i t l y recognizes more than one level or man-agement. This division is signified by blue in the Table. In the majority of games the designer ignores interactions between the three levels of management and in such instances there is no sub-division of the matrix. TABLE II MATRIX TO ANALIZE INPUT OUTPUT RELATIONSHIPS A. Levels of Management 1. top 2. control 3. operating B. Symbols M - marketing L - logistics F - finance P - personnel E - exogenous D - decision inputs 0 - output of previous periods and this period which are inputs to the model. - 16 -~7~AGL£ JT. A MANAGEMENT GAME MATRIX (2) Rows and columns are next subdivided into one or more of the following five areas: (a) marketing (b) logistics (c) finance (d) personnel (e) exogenous factors These functional divisions are indicated by green in the Table. Those areas included in the matrix correspond to the ones recognized in the model. Exogenous factors cover those events or conditions which take place in the game economy and affect the firm but are not influenced by the firm's actions within the model. Examples of these factors are the business index, strikes in the economy, or national disasters. (3) Under each of the five above classifications the rows are again broken into two groups. (a) decision inputs for the current period signified by orange in the Table. (b) model output from previous periods and the current period denoted by yellow in the Table. Under the heading of Decisions the designer l i s t s a l l those decisions he desires the participants to make. The output l i s t covers a l l factors desired as output - 1 8 -and as well should include the input decisions. This latter inclusion is done to f a c i l i t a t e the type of analysis put forth. (4) Under the column breakdown for the five areas the designer l i s t s the output he wishes from each of the recognized areas. This l i s t corresponds to the row output l i s t . However, these outputs are only for the current period. ) The second step of specifying the model input, output relationships involves the following procedures. The designer examines the intersection of each row and column and determines i f a proportional, limiting, competitive time or determining relationship exists between the two factors. If one of these relationships exists the designer notes this in the c e l l . The c e l l is l e f t blank i f no relationship is found to exist. The detailed procedures are: (l) At the intersection of a row decision input with the corresponding column output decision. a) These cells are used to specify i f there are any limits to be placed on a decision. For example a decision on advertising in each period must not go above or below a specified amount. b) If there are limits place a capital L in the c e l l . - 1 9 -(2) At the intersection of a row decision with a column output decision which does not correspond a) These cells are used to specify where the effects of two decisions must be proportional. b) If a proportional relationship is to exist place a capital P in the c e l l . (3) At the intersection of a row decision with a column output which is not a decision input. a) These cells are used to specify that a row  decision has a determining effect on a column  output. b) If the decision does have a determining effect place a capital D in the c e l l . c) These cells may also be used to indicate when competition exists between firms in an interactive model. This is inoted by a capital C. (4) At the intersection of a row output of a previous period with the corresponding column output of the current period. a) These cells are used to denote time relation-ships . b) If there exists a time relationship place a capital T in the c e l l . (5) At the intersection of a row output with a column output which do not correspond. a) These cells are used to specify where the effects of two outputs on a column output are proportional. - 20 -"b) If proportionality is to be maintained place a capital P in the c e l l . (6) The intersection of a row output of the previous period that does not correspond to a column output  decision. a) These cells are used to state i f the previous output has a determining effect on a current output. b) If such a relationship exists place a capital D in the c e l l . c) These cells may also be used to indicate com-petition between firms in an interactive model. This is indicated by a capital C in the c e l l . (7) Because some of the current period outputs are determined by other outputs of the current period i t is necessary to show this in the matrix. An example of this would be sales revenue which is determined in part by the current period sales orders. There are two ways in which these types of relationships may be indicated, either by adding more rows to the matrix or by considering row output as simultaneously being output of the previous period and output of the present, period. I prefer the latter scheme for i t reduces the size of the matrix considerably. There should be no d i f f i c u l t y in doing this since these relationships may be denoted with a different color than the others. (8) After completion of the above procedures the designer places a forty-five degree stroke through - 21 -those cells where no relationships are noted. The conceptual framework after completion provides a found-ation on which to build the detailed structure of the model. Each segment of the design procedures put forth here builds on the previous segment. This building block approach w i l l become more apparent in the next design seg-ment . B. Quantifying The Relationships and Setting Out the Algorithm Once i t has been determined where relationships exist between input and output i t is necessary to specify the actual relationships. This is the task of quantifying relationships. Each relationship w i l l have a reference note or notes corresponding to i t and the number of the note should be placed in the appropriate c e l l when the note is complete. 1. Quantifying The task here is to specify each reMionship of the matrix in algebraic terms. The complete set of specifications act as reference notes to the matrix. In order to give a logical sequence to the notes they should be divided into the functional areas recognized in the model. Cross-referencing each note to the matrix as i t is completed provides a safeguard that no .relationship desired in the model is excluded. - 22 -2. Algorithm a) The task of the designer at this point is to set the algebraic formulas in a logical order so that the output of the model may be easily computed. The order of the expressions w i l l not differ much from that of the reference notes. As an aid i t may prove helpful to flowchart the model. b) If the model is intended for the computer the designer must then have the program written. C. Model Debugging 1. Steps a) Play the game with a group that is knowledgable in the subject areas covered by the model. b) Evaluate the results against the checks mentioned below. c) If evidence of a failure in the model appears, improve i t where necessary and test again. 2. Checks a) Do the results approximate those of "reality"? b) Consider the ela s t i c i t y of model relationships, do they s t i f l e i nitiative? c) Are a l l correct actions rewarded? d) Are a l l incorrect actions penalized? e) Is i t possible to get a return for investing nothing? - 2 3 -Information 1. Model Input Output a) Input (l) It is now the task of the designer to draw up the necessary decision sheets. b) Output (1) What quantity of information w i l l the participant receive? ( 2 ) Will any of the feedback be distorted? ( 3 ) What w i l l be the format of the feedback? 2 . Administrators' Information a) The administrator requires an accurate descrip-tion of the game. b) This presentation should include: (1) Objectives of the model. ( 2 ) Structure. ( 3 ) A l i s t of the variables and constants. (4) A flowchart of the game. (5) Instructions on how to perform the neces-sary calculations or the steps necessary to set the model up for computer use. (6) Scope of the model. (7) A copy of game rules. (8) A sample of game input, output. (9) The data necessary to i n i t i a l i z e the game. (10) A description of the beginning situation. - 2 4 -3. Participant Information a) The value of participating in the exercise. b) A sample of the opening output. c) A written description of the opening situation. d) Rules (1) The decisions required ( 2 ) The number of periods of play and the length of time covered in the model by a period of play. (3) Constraints placed on decisions. ( 4 ) when decisions are required and the length of time given to make the decisions. e) A sample decision sheet with instruction on how to enter decisions. f) The c r i t e r i a on which the participants 1 perform-ance w i l l be evaluated. The stepwise design procedures have now been completed. The points discussed in the Chapter highlight the decisions necessary to design a model. This Chapter provides the information required to construct the tests to appraise, The Top Management Game. CHAPTER III THE TOP MANAGEMENT GAME DESCRIPTION AND TESTS The Top Management Game Is intended to he a supplemen-ta l learning tool to be used in conjunction with the text, Business Policy and Strategic Action, by Dr. Broom of Baylor Univeristy 2, I DESCRIPTION Typology The results of a comparison of, The Top Management Game with the typology of Chapter II are presented in TABLE III. It may be seen from the presentation that the Game is intended to be an educational tool to teach the participants the basic relationships that affect and take place in a business enterprise. At this stage of the analysis i t may be noted that the model already f a i l s in that i t is supposedly total enterprise yet the personnel function is absent. As the analysis progresses, one of the objectives is going to be to determine i f the model does represent the basic business and economic principles affecting a business organization. 2 H.N.Broom, Business Policy and Strategic Action, Text and Cases (Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1 9 6 9 ) . - 2 5 -- 26 -TABLE III A CLASSIFICATION OF THE TOP MANAGEMENT GAME I Objectives A. Applications 1. educational B. Area of Organization Encompassed 1. total enterprise a) logistics b) finance c) marketing C. Levels of Management Recognized 1. only one level - top management D. Basis for Model Relationships 1. general business and economic principles II. Structure A. Competition 1. interactive model with four firms per industry with no interactions between industries or an industry and the economy B. Participant Structure 1. team C. Design 2 . non-modular III Computation of Results A. Computer - 27 -IV Scope A. Complexity 1. basic. A l l four firms market the same product within five regions. Regions one, two, three and four are the home territories for firms one, two, three and four respectively and area five is common territory for a l l firms. A firm marketing i t s product in an area other than i t s home territory or the common area is considered to he operating in a foreign market. a) Each team makes the following decisions each period. 1) price for each area, five decisions 2) marketing spending for each area, five decisions. 3) research and development expenditure 4) bank loans negotiated 5) bonds sold 6) bonds bought back 7) capital stock sold 8) capital stock bought back 9) dividends 10) new plant investment 11) production spending b) The amount of output each team receives as feedback is limited. Information is not purposely distorted. Appendix IV contains - 2 8 -the sample output for quarter zero. B. Model Outcome 1. deterministic C. Qualitative Factors 1. are not considered D. Exogenous Factors 1. yes - the business index which increases eight to ten points per period to a high of 1.30 and decreases from the norm of 1.00 to a low of .70. E. Time. 1. a period in the model covers one quarter of a year 2 . the model is intended to be played for twelve periods. Matrix and Reference Notes The design procedures of Chapter II c a l l for the designer to f i r s t do the matrix analysis and then the detailed refer-ence notes. This procedure is reversed when analyzing an existing model-first the reference notes, then the matrix. The reference notes for the Broom Game are to be found in Appendix I. The results of the matrix analysis are found in TABLE IV. Notation devised in Chapter II is employed here. The color red; - denotes those cases where an output for the current period is influenced by another current period out-out. In doing the analysis I found the matrix helpful but I do believe i t s greatest benefit lies in the area of design. 29 The matrix i s enclosed in the pocket at the end ofl the thesis. - 30 -II TESTS Realism of Model Input, Output Relationships Logistics The reference notes and the matrix for The  Top Management Game bring out the fact that production out-put for a given firm for any quarter is determined by the inputs of production spending, research and development spending, the business index and plant investment. The objective is to analytically determine the effect of each one of these four inputs on production output. After this is done the results are judged on the basis of how well they represent the general business and economic principles affect-ing a business organization. If i t is found that there are discrepancies in the model in this area suggested improve-ments are given. Marketing It was found that the model output of sales orders per area for the whole industry were determined by each company's input of marketing spending, price, research and development spending and the input of the business index. Area industry sales orders are then divided on a competitive basis. In addition to analyzing the effect of each input on the output i t is necessary to investigate the manner in which orders are divided between the firms. Actual sales per firm per area are determined by an interface between the logistics and marketing functions. The total sales orders for each firm are compared to the sum of inventory on hand and production for the quarter. If - 31 -sales orders exceed available units actual sales equal this amount, otherwise actual sales per firm equal demand. A point to investigate here is the manner unfilled orders are treated. Finance The inputs of the financial function are reviewed to discover their effect upon the various outputs. Particular attention is given to the outputs of unit cost, investment in plant, depreciation, methods of finance and income taxes. One point to check for is the time lags involved in new plant investment. Again the results are judged for realism and suggested improvements are recom-mended where necessary. The judgements expressed here are my opinion and are based upon the understanding I have of business which stems from texts and lectures on business. Therefore since they are opinions they are open to argument. The defense I offer is that I have tried to apply common sense in making the judgements. Costs Incurred The costs incurred in gaming were outlined at the end of Chapter I. Design and development costs may be ignored by those who choose to use a game which is already devel-oped. The appropriate cost to consider in this case is the pricethat must be paid for the model. The, Broom Game, cost two dollars and f i f t y cents American for a source and - 3 2 -object deck . Also there is a cost attached to the pre-application analysis. It is my estimate that an analysis of, The Broom Game, using the methods developed here takes at least sixteen man hours. The Broom Game, was originally written in FORTRAN II for an I.B.M. 1 6 2 0 computer^. Therefore i t was necessary to convert the program for use on an I.B.M. 3 6 0 Model 6 7 computer. On this system the program was run under an I.B.M. FORTRAN IV G level compiler. The necessary program changes were: A. In FORTRAN IV executable statements must not extend beyond the seventy-second column of a card. It was necessary to reduce statement length for, The  Broom Game. B. It was necessary to set up a main program and sub-routines for the program. C. In setting up the sub-routines i t was necessary to rewrite the COMMON blocks. D. Finally i t was necessary to convert the program to the 36O/67 key punch code. This was done by a computer supplied program. In order to determine the approximate cost of an appli-3 H.N.Broom, Teacher's Manual: Business Policy and Stra-tegic Action (Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall-Inc., 1 9 6 9 ) Errata. 4 Ibid, page 1 1 7 -- 33 -cation, The Broom Game, w i l l be run a few times. Each run w i l l consist of one industry made up of four firms operating in a l l five areas. Modular Design A modular game is one that is constructed from stand-ardized blocks and which is suitable for a. wide variety of application objectives. The standardization blocks are called modules. To be modular a game should satisfy these requirements: A. It is a total enterprise model which is complex in scope. B. It i s a total enterprise model which is basic in scope. C. It is a functional model which is'complex in scope. D. It is a functional model which is basic in scope. A game which meets these specifications is illustrated in FIGURE II. The core of this model consists of eight compu-tation blocks which make up ten different games. This model requires twenty-nine modules whereas ten separate games would require forty-six modules. The absolute saving is less than seventeen modules because the same blocks of the separ-ate games would be smaller in size. But the savings are s t i l l substantial. It is possible that one model of this type could satisfy the complete demands of a business education program. It is obvious from the description of, The Broom Game, TO T A L ENTERPRISE BASIC LOGISTICS. COMPLlK TOTAL ENTERPRISE. BASIC MAIN PROGRAM s LOGISTICS < AASIC LOGISTIC S BASIC I MARKETING COMPLEX I LOGISTICS COMPLEX LOGISTICS BASIC MARKETING] COMPLEX MARKETING BASIC MARKETING COMPLEX MARKETING BASIC PERSONNEL COMPLEX PERSONNEL BASIC PERSONNEL COMPLEX 1' ? PERSONNEL BASIC NWWj$P* BASIC FINANCE COMPLEX J PERSONAM COMPLEX PERSONNEL /3ASIE FINANCE COM PI EX 7 t FINANCE BASIC J FINANCE COMPLEX FINANCL BASIC FINANCE B A S I C I N P U T B L O C K S M O D E L C L O C K S OUTPO r BLOCKS F I G U R E U : A TOTAL ENTEPRlSE /VjODc-Lj MOON EAR DESIGN - 3 5 -that i t is not modular. As a result the analysis shifts to determining the feasahility of changing i t to a modular model. However, no attempt is made to redesign the model. Presentation The Game presentation is f i r s t evaluated from the view-point of the administrator and then from that of the partic-ipant. The l i s t of model information requirements which appears in the Design section of Chapter II is used as a yardstick in the analysis. Finally i t was necessary to have a t r i a l run of the model to validate the accuracy of the i n i t i a l i z i n g data. CHAPTER IV TEST RESULTS AND CONCLUSION I INPUT, OUTPUT RELATIONSHIPS Logistics The inputs of production spending, research and devel-opment spending, business index and plant investment inter-act to give production output each period for each firm. The equations used in the analysis are a l l given in Appendix I. Substitute equations (8) and (9) into equation (11) to get UPRO(I) = SPRO(I) - (Z3 - ( F x EE(I) + e(l) x Z5 - PVS(I) x Z7 AN Z2 Z3 - (F x EE(I) + E(I) x Z6 - Z7 Z4 Set: Z3 - F x EE(l) + E(l) ffi = Y and PVS(I) = w Z2 UPRO(I) = 1_ SPRO (I) - (Y x Z5 + W x Z7) AW x Y x Z6 - Z7 Y x Zb - Z7 Business Index A decrease in the business index increases production by the reciprocal of the change in the index. A decreasing index results in increasing marginal returns in production and an increasing index results in decreasing marginal returns in production. Therefore the model assumes that during a,period of growing inflation a firm receives less value per dollar spent on production. This is. a - 36 -- 37 -reasonable assumption. In the case of decreasing levels of business activity the model assumes that a firm w i l l receive greater value per dollar spent on production as the rate of deflation increases. This latter assumption is unreasonable in that i t implies there is no floor level at which costs w i l l stop decreasing. . However, the error is not too serious for the administrator does not allow the index to f a l l below point seven zero. Research and Development Set: SPRO(I) x 1_ AN ~ UPRO (I) = A x 1 _ ( Z5 x Y ) ( W x Z7 ) Y x Zb - Z7 (Y x Zb - Z7) ~ (Y x Zb - Z7) Also from the Appendix I remember that Y = 1.06 - (.50 x EE(I) + E(I) 3b00 Research and development increases production by the increase in the reciprocal of a multiple of Y. Y increases as accumulated spending grows and as a result the reciprocal of a multiple of Y grows. The minimum value of Y is approx-imately point three six and would be obtained by spending the maximum allowable amount on research and development in each of the twelve periods. Y approaches this minimum impact number at a decreasing rate and each decrease in Y results in marginally greater returns in production. On closer examination of the formula i t is evident that this i n f l u -ence is in the thousands of units since production is - 38 -stated in thousands of units. At the same time as the increase takes place a certain proportion of the research and development effect is sub-tracted from total production. The amount is in the tens of units. The amount subtracted is equal to 3 x Y Y x 50 - b and i t increases as Y decreases. Plant Investment A percentage of plant investment is taken away from total production. The results of the reduc-tion is in the-thousand unit bracket. The amount equals W x Z7 _ PVS(I) x 6 _ l _ x P V S ( l ) Y x Zb - Z7 ~ bO ~ 10 50 x Y - b 50 x Y - b As the effect of research and development grows the reduction in production increases. This appears to represent the d i f f i c u l t i e s encountered in trying to produce at f u l l capa-city. If the production quantity calculated in the above formula is greater than plant capacity, production is set equal to capacity. This may occur i f participants have overestimated the per unit cost for the period. A short-coming in the model is the aggregate approach taken in the production area. No attempt is made to divide production into labor; equipment and raw materials. Marketing Function The inputs of marketing spending, research and devel-opment spending, the business index and price interact to determine product demand in each one of the five areas. f -- 3 9 -Substitute equations ( 3 1 ) , ( 2 6 ) and ( 2 ) into equation ( 3 2 ) to get: T(J,I) = AN x UH x (HI + SUMEE) x (AMI - (AN x P(l) x AM2))X ( E x f f l k 1 H2 SAJJ(I) SMIN(I) OR AN x UF x (HI + SUMEE) x (AMI - (AN x P(I) x AM2))X (R x AN) H2 SAJJ(I) SMIN(I) OR AN x U5 x (HI + SUMEE) x (AMI - (AN x P(l) x AM2);}.x(R x AN) H2 SAJJ(I) SMIN(I) UH, UF, and U5 are the consumer power factors for the home, foreign and common territories respectively. Marketing Spending The f i r s t point to note is what happens when a team's-marketing spending exceeds the maxi-mum allowable limit for a period. Accumulated marketing is f i r s t reduced in the firm's home territory and i f the excess amount exceeds accumulated spending in this area, the cumu-lative amount for the common region is next decreased. If excess marketing is greater than the sum of accumulated spending in both these markets no further substractions are done but an error message is printed. As a result of over-spending a team suffers a severe penalty, and in my opinion too severe. However no matter how heavy the penalty is the treatment of excess marketing by the model should be com-plete. I can see no justification to nullifying the market-ing influences in the home and common territories and not - 40 -touching that of the foreign territories. I do not believe that overspending can completely eradicate the effect of past decisions. Present and past marketing expenditures are both scaled in the current period. This contrasts the treatment of research and development spending where only past decisions are scaled in the present period. It is my opinion that current marketing w i l l have a greater effect than that assumed in the model. This may be corrected by removing the inner set of brackets in equation (24). To keep the model in balance i t may be necessary to increase the value of the scaling factor. Marketing impact for an area is determined in equation (26).. AL(I) = (AN x P(I) x AM2) This is the combined SAJJ(I) effect of accumulated marketing done by a l l firms in an area. The maximum possible value of AL(l) is two point zero which is the given value of AMI. What difference w i l l result in product demand between areas because of different amounts of marketing spending in each region? Set: M = SAJJ(I) Spending in the region with larger total. M - D = Marketing expenditures in area with smaller total of two regions. - 41 -The difference between the two AL(l) equals AMI - (AN x P(I) x AM2) - (AMI - (AN x P(I) x AM2)V M ' = D ~ M (AN x P(I) x AM2) + M x (AN x P(l) x AM2) = D x (AN x P(I) x AM2) M(M - D) This gives the difference in AL('I) due to Marketing d i f f e r -ences between two areas. The increment w i l l usually be in the thousand unit range. Price Price influence is determined by (R x AN) . It SMIN(I) can be seen that price and demand move inversely. Price may also have the largest influence of the four inputs. The minimum price depends on one firm in the area, which con-trasts the other inputs which are either area wide or industry. Research and Development The influence of research and development spending is determined by G = HI + SUMEE . H2 The minimum impact of this expenditure is two point zero five which is the given value of HI. SUMEE is the total scaled expenditures made by a l l firms in the industry. The influence of this variable varies directly with expenditures. Business Index Sales orders in an area increase as the index increases and decrease with the index also. The economic indicator also has a direct bearing in the price effect and an inverse bearing in the marketing influence. Total demand in an area is created by the business index, marketing research and development and price. Price - 42 -has the greatest influence followed by the business andex. The impact of research and development is greater than that of marketing which is questionable. I disagree with the large advantage given to a firm in its home territory. This preferred position stems from the area consumer power factors. The error would be acceptable i f i t was not for the way sales orders in an area are divided between firms. Division of Sales Orders The allocation of demand between firms is dealt with in equation (37) through (4l). The f i r s t step is to determine i f a firm's price for an area is ten per cent greater than the average price for the area. If a price does surpass this limit the firm receives no orders for that region. In my opinion this penalty is unrealistic. If the test is satisfied the :following equation calculates the firm's share of market. V(I,J) = (AL(J) v W 1 x (SAVE(J) . (W4 + G) TALAVE) W 1 ) X (S(I,J) ) " W 2 ) X (AN x W3) (1) (2) (3) Parts one and three w i l l be the same for each firm within an area. Therefore price - part two - does the dividing of orders. Each V(I,J) for an area is expressed as a per cent of the sum of the four V(I 3J)'s for the area. This percent-age is then multiplied against the corresponding T(I,J) to give the sales orders for that firm for that area. Thus as a result of the above calculation a firm which does a minimum amount of marketing in i t s home territory and - 43 -keeps research and development spending to a minimum w i l l receive the greatest share of the market as long as i t maintains the lowest price in the market. The one qualif-ication on this policy is that total sales orders for the region w i l l "be smaller i f the firm minimizes marketing. But this policy not only works in the home market i t works in a l l t e r r i t o r i e s . The advantage is greater in the home market because of the large home power consumer factor. In my opinion the model f a i l s here for i t seems highly unlikely that a firm's marketing efforts do not help i t in obtaining sales orders. The fact that research anddevelopment do not help in capturing sales also is unrealistic. I recommend the following changes. Multiply part one of the formula by AJJ(I,J) . The ratio represents accumulated SAJJ(I) marketing for a firm in an area over the total accumulated marketing for that market. Use of this modified formula w i l l maintain the advantage for the home firm. Multiply part three by EE(I) to allow research and development to SUMEE play i t s part in the division of orders. The two changes should improve the performance of the model. Another failure in the model is the treatment of back-logged orders. No attempt is made during a period to shift unfilled orders to a firm able to complete them. Nor is any attempt made to carry unfilled orders forward to the next period. To remedy this error i t is necessary to alter the computer program. - 44 -The marketing function as is cannot he considered to represent reality. The Game, should not be applied at least u n t i l the recommended changes are made to the division of sales orders. Finance The inputs and outputs of the finance function are con-siderable and as a result only the c r i t i c a l ones are reviewed. Depreciation The model considers depreciation to be a direct loss in available capacity rather than an accounting procedure for the allocation of plant investment to earned revenue over the economic l i f e of the investment. Capacity w i l l be reduced each quarter "by wear and tear but this is usually compensated for by maintenance expenditures. Obsoles-ence is usually compensated for by new plant investment. There is no provision for maintenance spending in the model. Depreciation in the model supposedly covers both the a l l o -cation of investment and maintenance. I recommend altering the program to include maintenance spending. Investment in New Plant As mentioned above new plant investment covers obsolesence, maintenance and expansion. The time lag of one quarter for construction seems too short and should "be expended to include at least two quarters. Also the model indicates that the addition of one unit of capacity costs the same as adding two thousand units of capacity. If participants do expand plant they must invest in at least seventeen units of capacity since the decision is expressed in thousands of dollars. - 45 -Cost The cost function appears to operate in an appro-priate manner. Cost per unit varies directly with the busi-ness index. A penalty is incurred for not producing to capacity and unit cost is reduced by research and develop-ment efforts. The minimum per unit cost with a given capa-city is obtained by producing at that capacity. Inventory is valued on the FIFO basis and no holding costs are assessed on inventory. Finally no administrative costs are explicitly recognized in the model. Bonds The players instructions given in the text state: one, that there is a five million dollar limit on bond sales in any one quarter; second, that a penalty is accrued for the forced sale of bonds when forcing a firm to have a positive cash balance; and third, that there is a limit of twenty million on bonds outstanding. No where in the program is there a test to check on the quarterly limit of bonds sold. I could find no penalty for the forced sale of bonds in the program. Finally i t is possible for outstanding bonds to exceed twenty million. The error occurs when trying to establish a positive cash balance for a firm by selling bonds. The computer program catches the mistake but the only result is an error message stating that bonds are oversold. The level of business activity is represented in the bond discount but not in the rate of interest. Capital Stock The reader should realize that i t is i l l e g a l for a company in Canada to- repurchase i t s own - 46 -capital stock. Game administrators may correct this by not allowing players the option of repurchasing. A more serious error is-the absence of stock issuance costs. Stock price always remains at par value and therefore there is no oppor-tunity for the market place to judge the companies perform-ance. However, this is reasonable structure for a basic "type game. Finally there is no penalty for the forced sale of stock as stated by the author. Bank Loans The bank loan operates as a method of short term financing in the absence of accounts payable. The bank loan discount is a constant and does not take into account changes in the business index. Dividends Dividends in a period are limited to one-half the previous quarters profit of a company. The author states that this is not included in the program but is to be checked by the administrator. Accounts Receivable Collections on account vary inversely with the business index. There appears to be no d i f f i c u l t i e s in this area. Taxes Income taxes are levied at the f l a t rate of forty-seven per cent. A graduated scale would be more appro-priate. Finally there is no provision loss carry forwards. II COSTS Costs The costs of running a program on the 3 6 0 / 6 7 system diff e r depending on the method of accessing the computer - 47 -the user chooses. This computer operates under the Michigan Terminal System - a time sharing system. Costs w i l l vary depending on the priority level chosen, the number of users on the system and the mode of access. Turn-around time may be reduced to a few minutes by employing the I.B.M. 2780 Remote Card Reader Printer Term-inal located in the St a t i s t i c a l Center at the University of British Columbia. The Broom Game, is best operated by storing the history and data constants in one f i l e and the object program in another f i l e . Then at the time of a run i t would only be necessary to read in the player decisions. The present program requires Input/output changes before the history and data constants for the next quarter may be read into a f i l e while the remaining output is printed. The Broom Game, was run for one industry of four firms operating in five markets. These runs employed the history data, constants and decisions necessary to obtain Quarter output. Appendix III contains the i n i t i a l i z i n g data. To obtain the results that the author presents I found i t neces-ary to change the value of the constant R from sixty three to sixty five and the value of the constant Z5 from three thousand to three. The Game, was run with the object program in one f i l e and a l l i n i t i a l i z i n g data in another f i l e and a l l output was in the form of hard cover. The approximate cost of a run using the Remote Read Write Terminal was two dollars and fifteen cents. A run - 48 -u t i l i z i n g the Front Desk Reader in the Computer Center and given and H priority cost one dollar and f i f t y seven cents. It must he remembered that these costs are for reading a l l input from a f i l e . The administrator must also consider the cost of keep-ing the object program on f i l e or magnetic tape. One other cost is that of key-punching the participant decisions. From this superficial survey i t appears that the costs of operation are not prohibitive. I l l MODULARITY Modularity It was stated in Chapter III that the Broom Model was not modular in design. A decision was made to determine the f e a s i b i l i t y of a change to a modular format. The answer is no, i t is not possible. The effort required to redesign the model.'would be better spent on a new game. Why? The f i r s t reason for the no answer is the absence of the personnel function. A look at production shows that i t is done on an aggregate basis. Labor and raw material inputs are not considered separately.. Such a division of inputs is a must in a modular game. Also accounts payable are not considered explicitly in the model* The above reasons plus the errors found in the model previously are the basis for the negative answer. - 4 9 -IV PRESENTATION Administrator Information Computer Program Though the program has to he con-verted to the I.B.M." 3 6 0 / 6 7 there are s t i l l absolute errors in the program. On page one hundred and eighty six of the Teacher's Manual^, the f i r s t format numbered ninety three is incorrect and there are three statements missing. The program should read: WORTH = CSTG(I) + SURP(l) OPEX = COSA(I) + SFRGT(I) + E(l) + SUMA$(l) + Z(l) + ALOBD(I) OPPR = SREV(I) - OPEX 92 FORMAT (16TH OPERATING PROGIT 2XF9.0,40X, 1 0 H ) An unnecessary format statement was included in the program on page one hundred and sixty three of the Manual. It i s : 4 FORMAT (I2,2I3,3F8.0.) Listing of Variables and Constants The author l i s t s variables and constants once grouped under the headings normally found on the income statement and the balance sheet and once alphabetically. It is possible to obtain an under-standing of the program from these l i s t i n g s . However I feel that in addition to these listings a presentation of the type found in Appendix I would make the model considerably easier to understand. 5 H.N.Broom, Teacher's Manual: Business Policy and Stra-tegic Action (Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1 9 6 9 ) p. 1 8 6 . - 50. -In i t i a l i z i n g Data The i n i t i a l i z i n g data is given in the grouped listings of variables and constants. It is presented in such a manner that i t is necessary to calculate the values of some variables. One can only make the suppos-it i o n that the author did this to force the administrator to work through the program calculations. As mentioned previously two mistakes were found in the i n i t i a l data. I believe that more is gained by a complete l i s t i n g of the opening data. The three areas discussed above are the main failings of the Administrator's Presentation. The remaining part of the presentation appears to be adequate. Participants Presentation The players' presentation i s quite adequate. In my opinion the outstanding feature is the attention given to the basis on which a participants' performance is evaluated. The examples given and the techniques of forecasting should be of benefit to the players. One error is the statement that a penalty is assessed on the forced sale of capital stock and bonds. No such penalty was found in the program. V CONCLUDING COMMENTS The Top Management Game It was found that the model was lacking in the market-ing and finance functions. The cost of an application is approximately two dollars. In my opinion i t would not he beneficial to convert the model to modular design. The Administrator's Presentation was found to be lacking. Those who intend to change the given values of constants should check that the relationships of the model remain in balance after the modification. Method of Analysis I:"found the matrix, reference note type of analysis put forth in the paper to be helpful in analyzing The Broom  Game. I believe this analytical device could be improved further summarizing the information given in the matrix. This could be accomplished by adding a table which t e l l s which of the matrix cells contains a relationship. The table could be cross referenced to the matrix by employing the a-y c e l l numbers. This would aid the reader in under-standing the model. I believe the benefits of the proposed analytical method would be greater when designing a game. Games The business gaming f i e l d is s t i l l young. Many models have been developed to f i t a variety of situations. A l i s t - 51 -- 52 -of existing models is given i n , Business Games Handbook^ Not enough effort appears to be put into the creation of games with modular design at this time. The result is that the l i s t of known models w i l l continue to expand rapidly. The goal of designers should now be to develop models with wider applicability. 6 R.Graham, C.Gray, Business Games Handbook, (American Management Association, 1 9 6 9 ) . BIBLIOGRAPHY Babb, E. M., Eisgrader, L. M. Management Games for Teaching  and Research. Chicago: Educational Methods Inc., 1966. B e l l , J.. A. "A Simulation Model for Business Planning, " Operational Research Quarterly, Vol. 2 0 , Special Confer-ence Issue, April 1969. Broom, H. N. Business Policy and Strategic Action, Text and Cases. Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1969. Broom, H. N. Business Policy and Strategic Action, Teacher's Manual. Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1 9 6 9 . Brady, Rodney H. "Computers in Top Level Decision Making," Harvard Business Review, Vol. N, July-August, pp 6 7 - 7 6 . . Buffa, E. Models for Production and Operations Management. New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc., 1966. Forrester, Jay W. Industrial Dynamics. Cambridge Massachu-setts: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1 9 6 2 . Gershefski, George W. The Development and Application of A  Corporate Financial Model. Oxford Ohio: The Planning Executives Institute, 1968. Gershefski, Geroge W. "Corporate Models The State of the Art," Editorial, Management Science, Vol. 1 6 , No. 6, February 1 9 7 0 . Graham, R., Gray, Cli f f o r d . Business Games Handbook. American Management Association, 1969. Greene, J. R., Sisson, Roger L. Dynamic Management Decision  Games. New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc., 1 9 5 9 . Greenlaw, Herron and Rawdon. Business Simulation in Indust-r i a l and University Education. Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1962. Harvey, A. "Factors Making for Implementation Success and Failure," Editorial., Management Science Vol. 1 6 , No. 6., February 1 9 7 0 . Herron, Lowell W. Executive Action Simulation.. Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., I960.. Mattessich, R. Simulation of the Firm Through a Budget Computer Program. Homewood I l l i n o i s : Richard D. Irwin Inc., 1 9 6 4 . Moore, Larry F. "Business Games vs. Cases As Tools of Learning," Training and Development Journal, Vol. 21, No. 10, October 1967. Muer, R. C , Newell, William T., Pazer, Harold. Simulation  In Business and Economics. Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1969. Pervis, Dennis W. The University of British Columbia User's  Manual. The I.B.M. 360 Model 67 Computer, September 196». Shubik, Martin. "Gaming Costs and F a c i l i t i e s , " Management  Science, Vol. 1 4 , No. 11, July 1 9 6 8 . Thorelli, Hans B., Graves, Robert L. International Operations  Simulation.- London: Collier MacMillan Ltd., 1964. Wilson, A. The Bomb and the Computer. New York: Delacortte Press, 1968. Zo l l , Allen A. fiynamic Management Education. Don Mills, Ontario: Addison Wesley Publishing Co., 1 9 6 9 . APPENDIX I Appendix I contains the reference notes which are cross referenced to the matrix of Chapter III. The notes were constructed from the computer program given in Appendix II. A l l formulas are written in Fortran II which should f a c i l -itate understanding of the model. At the beginning of the Appendix, an alphabetical l i s t i n g of a l l variables and constants is given. This l i s t i n g was taken from the, Teacher 1s Manual. ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF SYMBOLS1 AAAA(5) Amount spent for marketing, by areas, for entire industry (in M dollars). AINV1(4) Starting inventory for given firm and quarter (in M units) = AINV2(4) of previous quarter for given firm (per history data) AINV2(4) Ending inventory for given firm and quarter (in M units) AITP ( 4 ) Income tax paid by given firm for given quarter (in M dollars) AITRA Income tax ratio (rate paid, applicable to net profit before taxes) A J ( 4 , 5 ) Amount spent for marketing, by areas, in current quarter (by company decision) A J J ( 4 , 5 ) Cumulative marketing spending impact amount, in M dollars, by areas, in current quarter (this becomes necessary starting value thereof in the following quarter, read in from the history data) 1 H.N.Broom, Teacher's Manual: Business Policy and Stra-tegic Action (Englewood C l i f f s : Prentice Hall Inc., 1 9 6 9 ) , p. 1 0 9 - 1 1 5 . - 5 4 -AK Marketing adjustment factor AL(5) Industry cumulative marketing impact ratio, by areas ALAVE Average marketing impact area ratio ( a l l companies) AL0BD(4) Loss on "bad debts, in M Dollars, for current quarter ALUK Quarterly reduction ratio applicable to starting accounts receivable AMI AM Marketing scaling value AM2 Marketing sales sensitivity factor AN Business cycle index (stated in ratio form) ANPAT(4) Net profit after taxes, in M dollars (minus quantity, i f a net loss) ANPBT(4) Net profit before taxes, in M dollars (minus quantity, i f a net loss) -- for given firm and quarter ANPJ(4) New investment in plant during given quarter, by given firm, in M dollars ASSET Total assets, in M dollars, for given firm and quarter (used for second computation thereof) AUTH Total authorized capital stock, in M dollars (same for each company) AZ Calculated quantity used for the figuring of UC0L(4) and BRAT(4) BALNS Excess of DIF over company spending for marketing in home territory (where DIF is greater than zero), i f any (charged, in such case, to common territory spending--a reduction penalty) B1C0(4) Bond interest expense, in M dollars, for given company and quarter (paid in cash by i t s on the last day of the quarter) B6 Number of companies BEFOR I n i t i a l l y calculated value of bond flotation discount = BFD(4) stored pending forced sale upward revision thereof ( i f firm's planned operations, a;S such leave a negative value for cash on hand) - 55 -BFD(4) Bond flotation discount, in M dollars, paid by-firm on f i r s t day of given quarter, upon issue and/or sale of new bonds payable (an expense and a cash disbursement item) BF0R1 I n i t i a l l y calculated value of AITP(4), stored pending recalculation thereof after forced bond sales for attainment of a positive cash balance BLDT(4) Bank loan discount on f i r s t day of given quarter, applicable to currently negotiated bank loan, in M dollars, by given firm (a cash disburse-ment and an expense) BLN(4) Face value (in M dollars) of bank loan negoti-ated by given company on the f i r s t day of the given quarter--repayable in f u l l on f i r s t day of following quarter (a cash receipt and an account payable item) BLRP(4) Amount of bank loan paid off on f i r s t day of given quarter, by given firm, in M dollars (at face value of prior quarter's loan) B0R(4) Par value of bonds paid off in cash (in M dollars) by given company on the f i r s t day of the current quarter-by company decision BP01(4) Bonds Payable, in M dollars, for given firm at start of given quarter, at par = BP02(4) of prior quarter (per history data) BP02(4) Bonds Payable, in M dollars, for given firm at end of given quarter, at par BPS(4) Par value of bonds sold by given firm on the f i r s t day of the current quarter, in M dollars, repayable in f u l l 8 0 quarters later on f i r s t day of such quarter (but which can be bought "for the treasury" on the f i r s t day of any earlier quarter, in part or in f u l l , at par) BRAT(4) Current quarter bond flotation discount rate, any company CAP(4) Starting plant capacity to produce, in M units, by companies, for given quarter (applicable as of f i r s t day thereof and during the entire quarter CASH1(4) Starting cash, in M dollars, for given firm and quarter - 56 -CASH2(4) Ending cash, in M dollars, for given firm and quarter CDDD(4) Cash disbursements in M dollars, for given firm and quarter CINFL Net cash inflow, in M dollars, greater than or less than ) (used for f i r s t computation thereof) C0L1 Collection ratio, for given quarter, applicable to the sales of that quarter C0L2 Collection ratio, for given quarter, applicable to the starting balance of accounts receivable COLC Correction factor, current collections on receiv-ables, for given quarter C0SA(4) Cost of goods sold in current quarter, for given company, in M dollars C0ST(4) Unit cost of production during given quarter, for given company, in M dollars C0STB(4) Unit" cost of beginning inventory, in dollars and cents C0STC(4) Unit cost of production at capacity C0STL(4) Unit cost of production at 90$ of current pro-duction level C0STM(4) Unit cost of production at 110$ of current pro-duction level CSHIN Net cash inflow, in M dollars, greater than or less than 0 (used for second computation thereof) CSHR(4) Cash receipts in M dollars, for given firm and quarter CSSC(4) Capital stock sold for cash, at par value, in M dollars, by given firm, on the f i r s t 'day of the given quarter CSTG(4) Capital stock outstanding, at par value, in M dollars, for given firm, on the last day of the given quarter CST0(4) Capital stock outstanding, at par value, in M dollars, for given firm, on the f i r s t day of the given quarter - 57 -D6 Number of areas DIF Excess of company spending for marketing over the limiting value of 1,800 i f any (charged, i f less than home territory spending, to the l a t t e r — a reduction penalty--and, i f greater than home territory spending, such excess is entered as BALNS) DIFF Amount of subtraction item for correction of CASH2(4), with 1,000 then added thereto, after forced sale of bonds for restoration of a positive ending cash balance for the given firm DIVS(4) Dividends paid, in M dollars, by given company on last day of current quarter (a company decision) E ( 4 ) Amount spent for R & D in current quarter by given firm, in M dollars ( a company decision) EE ( 4 ) Cumulative R & D spending impact, in M dollars, for given firm and quarter (the prior quarter value is carried over the computer from i t s history data, for use in computing this value for the current quarter, by firms) EQUIT Total equities, in M dollars, for given firm and quarter (used for second computation thereof) EXEN Total expenses, in M dollars, for given firm and quarter (used for second computation thereof) F R & D adjustment factor FIN BFD(4) +B1C0(4) + BLDT(4), a first-step comput-ation value necessary because the net profit calculation is too long, otherwise, for one arithmetic s'tatement FINAN B1C0(4) + BLDT(4) + BLRP(4) + AITP(4) + DIVS(4) + REPST(4), a first-step computation value similar to FIN (f a c i l i t a t i n g the computation of cash disbursements) FR1 Freight cost, in dollars per unit shipped in the common territory FR2 Freight cost, in dollars per unit shipped in the 3 competing firms' home territory FR3 Freight cost, in dollars per unit shipped in a firm's home territory - 58 -FRGT(4,5) Freight cost per area, for given company and quarter, in M dollars G Industry cumulative R & D impact ratio (applied to a l l area total orders) HI R & D sales scaling value H2 R & D sales sensitivity factor IA Industry number IB Number of companies IC Quarter ID Number of areas IIA Card number for checking during READ IN IPR Value to test card order J Values to test card order JINX Calculation for checking card order JPR Values to test card order KPR Values for testing industry number LPR Values for testing quarter number M Company number for printout purposes N Number of output history card NOP No operation (meaning ignore the f i r s t value punched in the given cards, when used) 0000(5) Sume of orders by areas, in M units, for industry, in given.quarter P(5) Area normalizing factors PPPW • Basic bond flotation discount rate, any company PREV Name given to old value of B1C0 during recompu-tations connected with forced sale of bonds (for restoration of positive ending cash balance when firm's planned operations have yielded a negative ending cash) - 5 9 -PSWW Bank loan discount rate PVE(4) Ending plant value, in M dollars, for given firm and quarter PVS(4) Starting plant value, in M dollars, for given firm and quarter PWWW Interest rate applicable to bonds payable, a l l companies Q(5 ) Industry standard price impact ratio, applicable to a l l area total orders R Price sales sensitivity factor RRR1(4) Starting accounts receivables, in M dollars, for given firm and quarter = RRR2(4) of previous quarter (per history data) RRR2(4) Ending accounts receivable, in M dollars, for given firm in current quarter REPST(4) Capital stock purchased at par on open market, in M dollars, by given firm during given quarter S ( 4 , 5 ) Company prices, by areas SAJJ(5) Industry area sum of 4 company AJJ values, by areas, in current quarter SAL(4,5) Company sales, in M units, in given area during current quarter SAVE(5) Area average price — a l l companies SFRGT(4) Total freight cost, in M dollars, of given company in current quarter SMIN(5) Minimum price of any company in" a given area (i.e., minimum S ( 4 , 5 ) in area) SMPR(5) Sum of area prices, a l l firms, for obtaining average price per area SMSAL(4) Total sales of given company for current quarter (in M units) SMV(5) Industry sum of area-order-getting-power factors, by companies (i.e., 5 sums of V ( 4 , 5 ) values) SPR0(4) Production spending by given firm, in M dollars, for current quarter—ACTUAL - 6 o -SPR0C(4) Amount of production spending, in M dollars, required i f a firm were to produce at capa-city (note that this would equal SPR0(4) i f the firm selects to produce at capacity) SPR0L(4) Production spending, in M dollars, at 9/10 of actual spending level, for given firm and quarter SPR0M(4) Production spending, in M dollars, at 11/10 of actual spending level, for given firm and quarter SREV(4) Total company sales revenue, in M dollars, for current quarter SUMAA Industry total marketing spending, a l l areas, in M dollars, for current quarter SUMAJ(4) Company total marketing spending, a l l areas, in M dollars, for current quarter (1 such value per company) SUMAL Sum of 5 industry cumulative marketing impact area ratios (1 value for the industry) SUMEE Industry sum of four company EE values, in M dollars (cumulative R & D spending impact) SUM00 Industry sum of a l l sales orders, in M units, for current quarter (in a l l areas and firms) SUMWW Industry total sales, a l l areas and firms, in M dollars, for current quarter SUMY(4) Company sales orders in a l l areas for current quarter (in M units) SURP(4) Ending company surplus (in M dollars) T ( 4 , 5 ) Area sales orders, in M units (computed by areas, separately, for a l l companies) TASS Total assets, in M dollars, for given firm and quarter (used for f i r s t computation thereof) TEQU Total equities, in M dollars, for given firm and quarter (used for f i r s t computation thereof) TEST Total of starting inventory and units produced in current quarter, in thousands of units (as i n i t i a l l y established for use in loop testing) - 61 -TEXP Total expenses, in M dollars, for given firm and quarter (used for f i r s t computation thereof) TOT(4) Total of starting inventory and units produced in current quarter, in M units (second use thereof, for printout purposes) U"5 Area consumer power factor, common territory UF Area consumer power factor, foreign territory UH Area consumer power factor, home territory UC0L(4) Cash collected on accounts receivable, in M dollars, by given company, for given quarter UCST Unit cost, in dollars and cents, for inventory printout (a weighed average i f current quarter sales are less than' starting inventory, and equal to unit cost of current production otherwise) UPR0(4) Actual production in current quarter, by o companies, in M units UPR0L(4) Production in M units, given company and quarter that would have been attained i f operations had been at 9/10 of current quarter's actual production level UPR0M(4) Production in M units, given company and quarter, that wouldhave been attained i f operations had been at 11/10 of current quarter's actual production level V ( 4 , 5 ) Area-order-getting-power factors, by companies VINV(4) Value of ending inventory, in M dollars, for given firm and quarter VTNVB(4) Preceding quarter's ending inventory, given company and quarter, in M dollars ¥1 Share-of-market marketing impact sensitivity factor ¥ 2 Share-of-market price sensitivity factor ¥ 3 Share-of-market R & D sensitivity factor ¥ 4 Share-of-market scaling value - 62 -WORTH Sum of capital stock outstanding and surplus, in M dollars WWWW(5) Industry total sales in M dollars, by areas, for current quarter X I ( 4 ) R & D production impact factor (one value per company) X ( 4 , 5 ) Share of market ratios, by areas and companies (20 values per industry) Y ( 4 , 5 ) Sales orders of given company in given area, in M units, for current quarter ZZ Replacement value for UPR0(4) when cost of current capacity output must be ascertained = CAP(4) Zl Depreciation rate Z ( 4 ) Amount of depreciation for given company in current quarter, in M dollars Z2 M dollar investment required to create 1,000 units of capacity Z3 R & D production scaling value Z4 R & D production sensitivity factor Z5 Unit cost sensitivity factor #1 Z6 Unit cost sensitivity factor #2 Z7 Adjustment factor for company size Z8 Multiplier of UPR0(4) for output at 9/10 of current actual level Z9 Multiplier of UPR0(4) for output at 11/10 of current actual level ZZZ1 Cycle scaling value ZZZ2 Cycle sensitivity factor - 63 -PRODUCTION SPR0(I) I = l , - - , 4 . The amount decided upon by each firm to spend on production in each quarter. Test each decision to determine i f proposed spending is less than the minimum allowable amount of $ 4 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 IF(SPR0(I) - 4 5 0 0 ) 3 , 4 , 4 If production spending is less than $ 4 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 set i t equal to this amount SPR0(I) = 4.5OO E(l) I = l , - - , 4 . Research and development expenditures for each firm. A team decision. Test each of the E(l)'s to see i f i t is greater than the maximum allowable amount of $ 1 , 2 5 0 , 0 0 0 for a quarter. IF(E(I) - 1 2 5 0 ) 7 , 7 , 6 If the research and development expenditures for any firm for a quarter is greater than the limit set i t equal to this amount E(I) = 1 2 5 0 EE(I) I = l , - - , 4 . Accumulated research and development for each firm. Scale the previous EE(I) and then add current E ( l ) . This is done for each firm F = . 5 0 Research and development scaling factor EE(I) = F x EE(I) + E(I) - 64 -9* Xl(l) I = l , - - , 4 . Research and development production impact factor. Z3 = 1.06 Research and development scaling value Z4 = 3 , 6 0 0 Research and development production sensitivity factor X1(I) = Z3 - (EE(I)/Z4) 10. CAP(I) I = l , - - , 4 . Unit capacity of each firm's factory for the current quarter. PVS(I) = l , - - , 4 Dollar value of each plant at the start of the quarter Z2 = 6 0 Dollars of plant investment required to create a unit of capacity CAP(I) = PVS(I)/Z2 11. UPR0(I) I = l , - - , 4 . Number of units produced by a firm in a given period. AN = Business index Z5 = 3,000 Unit cost sensitivity factor No. 1. This value is incorrect and should read 3 . Z6 = 5 0 Unit cost sensitivity factor No. 2. Z7 = 6 Adjustment factor for company size. UPRO(I) = i((SPR0(l)/AN) - (X1(I) * Z5) - CAP (I) *' Z7)/ ((X1(I)* Z6) - Z7j UPRO(I) = FLOAT (INT (UPRO(l) + . 5 ) ) The calculated value of UPRO(I) is tested against capacity. If greater than capacity UPRO(I) is set equal to capacity. - 6 5 -MARKETING Creation of Demand 1 2 . A(J,I) J = 1 , — , 4 ; I = 1 , , 5 . The decision hy each firm to spend M dollars on marketing in the given quarter. 1 3 . SUMAJ(I) I = 1 , — 4 . Total marketing expenditures in a period for each company. 14. Test each SUMAJ(I) to determine i f i t exceeds the maximum limit of $ 1 , 8 0 0 , 0 0 0 . IF(SUMAJ(I) - 1 8 0 0 ) 2 4 , 2 4 ^ 1 5 1 5 . If greater than 1 , 8 0 0 , 0 0 0 determine the size of the excess. DIF = SUMAJ(I) - 1 8 0 0 1 6 . AJJ(J,I) J = 1 , — , 4 ; I = 1 , , 5 . Cumulative amounts of marketing from previous periods for each area. 1 7 . Test to see i f excess is greater than cumulative mar-keting in home area for that firm IF(DIF - AJJ(J,J) 1 8 , 1 8 , 1 9 1 8 . If excess is less than home territory cumulative marketing subtract the excess from this total. AJJ(J,J) = AJJ(J,J) - DIF GO TO 24 1 9 . If excess is greater than home territory cumulative marketing set AJJ(J,J) - 0 . - 66 -2 0 . Determine how much greater the excess is than home territory cumulative spending% BALNS = DIF - AJJ(J,J) 2 1 . Next subtract BALNS from cumulative marketing of common territory. 2 2 . Determine i f BALNS is greater than cumulative market-ing of common area. I F ( A J J ( J , 5 ) ) 2 3 . If BALNS is greater than total of common an error message is printed. 2 4 . Add current marketing for each area to the cumulative marketing for that area and then scale the total. AK = 6 0 Marketing adjustment factor AJJ(J,I) = AK * (AJJ(J,I) + AJ(J,I)) 2 5 . SAJJ(I) I = 1 , , 5 . The sum of cumulative marketing to date for each area. SAJJ(I) = SAJJ(I) + AJJ(J,I) 2 6 . AL(I) I = 1 , , 5 . Industry cumulative marketing impact ratio for each area. AMI = 2 0 Marketing sales scaling factor. A M 2 = 5 0 Marketing sales sensitivity factor. P(I) = 1 . 2 5 for foreign and home territories = 2 . 6 2 for common territory These are area normalizing factors AN = Business index - 6 7 -2 7 . S(J,l) J- = l , - - , 4 ; I = 1 , — , 5 . Price decision for each area for each firm. SMIN(I) Minimum price for each area SMIN(I) = S(1,I) DO 8 0 I = 1 , 5 DO 8 0 J = 1 , 4 IF(SMIN(I) - S(J,I)) 8 0 , 8 0 , 2 8 28SMIN(I) = S(I,J) 8 0 C 0 N T I N U E 2 8 . Q(I) = I = 1 , , 5 . Area price standard impact ratio. R = 6 3 Price sales sensitivity factor. The value of R should he 6 5 . Q(I) = (R* AN)/SMIN(I) 2 9 / EE(I) I = l , - - , 4 . Cumulative research and develop-ment expenditures for each firm. Use the same value here for EE(l) as calculated in note ( 8 ) . 3 0 . SUMEE Sum of four EE(I) values. DO 1 0 0 I = 1 , 4 1 0 0 SUMEZ = EE(I) + SUMEE 3 1 . G Industry research and development impact ratio. HI = 2.05 Research and development sales scaling value. H2 = 8 0 0 0 Research and development sales sensitivity factor. G = HI + SUMEE/H2 3 2 . T(J,I) J = 1 , — , 4 ; I = 1 , , 5 . Sales orders for each area. Each firm competes for the orders in an area. - 6 8 -UH = 7 5 Consumer power factor home area. U5 = 6 8 Consumer power factor common area. UF = 3 3 Consumer power factor foreign area. T(J,I) = AN * UH* G * AL(I) * Q(l) = AN * U5* G * AL(I) * Q(I) = AN * UF * G * AL(I) * Q(I) There are twenty values calculated altogether." The T(J,5) values for the common area are the same.- However in the other four regions this is not the case. The T(J,I) values for the foreign firms are equal hut the value for the home firm, is greater. The reason for this difference is the con-sumer power factor. DIVISION OF SALES ORDERS 3 3 . SMPR(I) I = 1 , 5 . Sum of four prices for each region of the industry. 3 4 . SAVE(I) I = 1 , , 5 Average price for each area. DO 8 7 I = 1 , 5 8 7 SAVE = SMPR(I)/4 3 5 . SUMAL Sum of area marketing impact ratios. DO 8 8 I = 1 , 5 8 8 SUMAL = AL(I) + SUMAL 3 6 . ALAVE Average of area marketing impact ratios. ALAVE = SUMAL/5 3 7 . Determine i f a company's price in an area is ten per - 6 9 -cent greater than area average price. W2 = 9 0 Share of market price sensitivity factor DO 8 9 I = 1 , 4 DO 8 9 J = 1 , 5 IF(SAVE(I)/S(I,J) - W2) 1 1 , 1 1 , 8 9 1 1 V(I,J) = 0 8 9 CONTINUE V(I,J) area order getting power factor. It is set equal to zero i f a firm's price is ten per cent or more greater than the average price for the area. 3 8 . If price was within the given limit V(I,J) is calcu-lated according to the following equation. ¥ 1 = 1 0 Share of market marketing impact sensitivity factor W3 = 1 0 0 0 0 Share of market research and devel-opment sensitivity factor W4 = 9 0 Share of market scaling value. V(I,J) = (AL(J)/ALAVE * Wl) * (SAVE(J)/S(I,J) - W2) * (W4 + G/(AN W3) 3 9 . SMV(J) J = 1 , - — , 5 . Sum of V(I,J)'s for each area. SMV(J) = SMV(J) + V(I,J) 40. X(I,J) Express V(I,J) as a per cent of sum of region V(I,J)'s. X(I,J) = V(I,J)/SMV(J) 4 1 . Y(I,J) I = 1 , — , 4 ; J = 1 , — , 5 . The actual sales - 70 -orders for each firm per region. DO 140 I = 1,4 DO 1 4 0 J = 1 , 5 Y(I,J) = X(I,J) * T(I,J) 1 4 0 Y(I,J) = FLOAT (INT(Y(I,J) + . 5 ) ) 42. SUMY(I) I = l , - - , 4 . The sum of sales orders for five areas for each firm. DO 9 0 I = 1 , 4 DO 9 0 J = 1 , 5 9 0 SUMY(I) = SUMY(I) + Y(I,J) 4 3 . Marketing interfaces with production to dete rmine actual sales. UPRO(I) I = l , - - , 4 . Production for a firm for period. AINVl(I) I = l , - - , 4 . The inventory at the begin= ning of a period for each firm. 4 4 . TEST The sum of beginning inventory plus production for the period for a firm. TEST = AINVI(I) + UPRO(l) 4 5 . Determine i f a company's sales orders are greater that TEST IF(SUMY(I) - TEST) 46,46,47 46. If sales orders are less than or equal to the available units, set actual sales for each area of the firm equal to sales orders for each area of the firm. - 7 1 -SAL(I,J) SAL(I,J) SMSAL(I) Actual sales orders per area per firm Y(I,J) I = 1 , — , 4 . Total actual sales for a firm. In this case SMSAL(I) equal total orders in the firm. 4 7 . If sales orders for the firm exceed available units reduce that firm's orders in each area by the ratio of available units to total required units. SAL(I,J) = ((AINVI(I) + UPR0(I)/SUMY(I) * Y(I,J) ) Total actual sales in this case equal the available units 48. AINV2(I) I = 1,—,4. Ending inventory for period for each firm. TEST = AINVI(I) + UPRO(I) Determine i f there is an ending inventory by comparing available units to total actual sales. 49. If the available units are less than actual sales orders set ending inventory equal to zero. 5 0 . If available units are greater than or equal to actual sales subtract total sales from available units to calculate ending inventory. AINV2(I) = AINVI(I) + UPRO(-I) - SMSAL(l) SMSAL(I) = AINV1 +• UPRO(I) IF(SMSAL(I) - TEST) 5 0 , 4 9 , 4 9 ZINV2(I) = 0 - 7 2 -FINANCE 5 1 . PVS(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . M dollar investment in plant at start of period. 5 2 . Z(l) I = 1 , — , 4 . Dollar amount of depreciation for each firm for the period. Zl = .04 Quarterly depreciation rate. Z(I) = Zl * PVS(I) 5 3 . PVE(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . M dollar investment in plant at the end of the quarter. ANPJ(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . Company decision to invest M dollars in new plant. PVE(I) = PVS(I) - Z(I) + ANPJ(I) Note: Depreciation and investment do not influence the avail-able capacity this period but rather that of the next quarter. 5 4 . COST(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . Unit cost of production for each firm for a given period and is expressed in dollars and cents. COST(I) = AN * ((X1(I) * (Z6 + Z5/UPR0(I) + ((CAP(I) - UPRO(I) /((UPRO(I) * Z7} 5 5 . VINVB(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . M dollar value of beginning inventory for the period. VINV(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . M dollar value of ending inven-tory for the period. - 7 3 -5 6 . Determine i f actual sales for the firm are less than beginning inventory. IF(SMSAL(I) - AINVl(I)) 5 8 , 5 7 , 5 7 5 7 . VINV(I) = (AINV2(I) x COST(I)) The value of ending inventory i f actual sales for the firm are greater than or equal to beginning inventory. 5 8 . VINV(I) = VINB(I) * (JLO - SMSAL(I)/AINV1(I) + UPRO(l) * COST(I) Value of ending inventory i f period sales are less than the beginning inventory for the firm. 5 9 . UCST Unit cost of ending inventory in dollars and cents. Test to see i f ending inventory is greater than period production. IF(AINV2(I) - UPRO(I) ) 6 0 , 6 0 , 6 1 6 0 . UCST = COST(I) Dollar and cents value of unit of ending inventory i f ending inventory is less than or equal to the quarter production. 6 1 . UCST = VINV(I)/AINV2(I) Dollar and cents value of an unit of ending i f ending inventory is greater than the quarterly production. This is the weighted' average of unit cost of beginning inventory and the unit cost of the quarterly production. 6 2 . SREV(I) I = 1,—,4. Sales revenues for each firm for a given period. It i s calculated by multiplying the - 7 4 -actual sales of each area by the price set for that area and then adding these products together for each firm. SREV(I) = SREV(I) + S(I,J) * SAL(I,J) FRGT(I,J) I = 1 , — , 4 ; J = l , - - , 5 . Freight cost for each area for each company. SFRGT(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . Total quarterly freight cost for each firm. FR1 = 3 Freight cost in dollars for each unit shipped to the common region. FR2 = 2 Freight cost in dollars for each unit shipped to the foreign territ o r i e s . FR1 = 1 Freight cost in dollars per unit shipped to the home market. DO 400 I = 1 , 4 DO 2 1 0 J = 1 , 5 IF(J-5), 3 0 0 , 3 1 0 , 3 1 0 3 0 0 IF(I-J-) 3 0 5 , 3 0 6 , 3 0 5 3 0 5 FRGT(I,J) = FR2 * SAL(I,J) Foreign Freight GO TO 3 0 7 3 0 6 FRGT(I,J) = FR3 * SAL(I,J) Home Freight GO TO 307 3 1 0 FRGT(I,J) = FR1 * SAL(I,J) Common Freight 3 0 7 SFRGT(I) = SFRGT(I) + FRGT(I,J) 2 1 0 CONTINUE 4 0 0 CONTINUE ALOBD(I) 1 = 1 , for the quarter. — , 4 . Loss on bad debts in M dollars Calculated ..on the starting accounts - 7 5 -receivable for the quarter. KRRl(I) I = l , - - , 4 . Starting accounts receivable for the quarter in M dollars. ALUR = .01 Reduction rate used for calculating loss on bad debts. ALOBD(I) = ALUR * RRRl(l) 6 5 . Test to see i f sales revenue is zero. IF(SREV(I) 6 5 , 6 5 , 6 6 UCOL(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . M dollars collected on accounts receivable for this quarter for each firm. This formula covers the situation where sales revenue equals zero. UCOL(I) = RRR1(I) - ALOBD(I) 6 6 a. AZ Is an adjustment multiplier" for collections on accounts receivable. AN Business index ZZZ1 = 1.00 Cycle scaling value ZZZ2 = 20 Cycle sensitivity factor AZ = ZZZ1 - AN - ZZZ1 ZZZ2 6 6 b . UCOL(I), 1=1,—,4. M dollars collected on receiv-ables this quarter. The formula covers the situation of a positive sales revenue. C0L1 = . 6 0 Collection ratio, applicable to sales of the quarter. C0L2 = .98 Collection ratio, applicable to starting accounts receivable. - 76 COLC = 40 Correction factor for collections on receivables. UCOL(I) = (C0L1 * SREV(I))+ (C0L2 * RRR1 (I) + COLC )* AZ 67. RRR2(I) I = 1,—,4. Ending accounts receivable for each firm for the period. RRR2(I) = RRR1(I) + SREV(l) * ALOBD(l) - UCOL(l) 68. REPST(I) I = 1,—,4. Decision to repurchase M dollars of a capital stock for a given firm. 69. Test to see i f repurchased capital stock exceeds the quarterly limit of $1,000,000. IF(REPST(I) - 1000) 997,997,995. 995 REPST(I) = 1000 70. BOR(I) I = 1,—,4. The decision to payoff M dollars of bonds this quarter. 71. Test the decision to payoff M dollars of bonds to see i f i t exceeds outstanding bonds and i f i t is greater than the period limit of $5,000,000. BP01(I) I = 1,— ,4. M dollars of bonds out-standing at the beginning of the quarter. DO 993 I = 1,4 IF(B0R(I) - BP01(I) ) 994,994,995 995 BOR(I) = BP01(I) 994 IF(B0R(I) - 5000) 993,993,992 992 BOR(I) = 5000 993 CONTINUE - 7 7 -72. CSTO(I) I = l , ~ - , 4 . M dollars of capital stock out-standing at par value. 7 3 . AUTH $22,000,000 authorized capital stock. 7 4 . Test to determine i f outstanding capital stock equals authorized capital stock. If i t does set capital stock sold this quarter equal to zero. CSSC(I) I = l , - - , 4 . Decision to s e l l M dollars of capital stock this quarter. DO 701 I = 1,4 IF (AUTH - CSTO(I)) 700,700,701 700 CSSC(I) =0 701 CONTINUE 7 5 . BLN(I) I = 1,—,4. Decision to negotiate a bank loan for M dollars this quarter. 7 6 . Test to determine i f the negotiated loan is greater than limit of $2,000,000. If i t is set the loan equal to the limit. DO 703 I = 1,4 IF (BLN(I))- 2000 703,704,704 704(BLN(I)) = 2000 7 0 3 CONTINUE 77. BP02(I) I = l , - - , 4 . Bonds payable in M dollars, for given firm at end of given quarter, at par. BPS(I) I = 1,—,4. Par value of bonds sold by a firm on the f i r s t day of a quarter. Repayable in eighty - 7 8 -quarters but are callable on the f i r s t day of any quarter. BP02(I) = BP01(I) + BPS(I) + BOR(I) 7 8 . The next job is to determine i f the bonds sold this quarter put the firm beyond i t s limit of $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 . DO 7 9 1 I = 1 , 4 IF(BPS(I) 7 9 1 , 7 9 1 , 7 0 8 7 0 8 IF(BP02(I) - 2 0 0 0 0 ) 7 9 1 , 7 9 1 , 7 0 9 7 0 9 BPS(I) = BPS(I) - (BP02(I) - 2 0 , 0 0 0 ) IF (BPS(I) ) 7 1 0 , 7 9 1 , 7 9 1 7 1 0 PRINT 9 1 0 , I 9 1 0 FORMAT 7 9 1 CONTINUE 7 9 . CSHR(I) I = l , - - , 4 . Cash receipts in M dollars for a given company CSHR(I) = UCOL(I) + CSSC(I) + BLN(I) + BPS(l) 8 0 . BRAT(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . Current quarter bond flotation discount rate any company. AZ Adjustment multiplier see note (65) PPPW = .0 8 basic bond flotation discount rate any company BRAT(I) = AZ * PPPW 8 1 . BFD(I). I = 1 , — , 4 . Discount on bond sale for given company for this quarter. BFD(I) = BRAT(I) * BPS(I) - 79 -82. BICO(I) I = 1,— , 4 . Interest expense on bonds out-standing for a given company at the end of any quarter. PWW = .015 quarterly interest rate BICO(I) = BP02(I) * PWWW 83. BLDT(I) I = 1,— , 4 . - Bank loan discount on f i r s t day of given quarter applied to the loan for the period. PSWW = .0175 bank loan discount rate BLDT(I) = BLN(I) * PSWW 84. SPROC(I) I = 1,— , 4 . Amount of production spending in M dollars, required i f a firm were to produce at capacity. SPROC(I) equals SPRO(I) i f the firm does produce at capacity. SPROC(I) = AN * (CAP(I) * (X1(I) * Z6 - Z7)+ (xl(l) * Z5 + CAP(I) * Z7) I4JPRO(I) - CAP(I) )85,930,85 930 SPRO(I) = SPROC(I) 85. COSA(I) I = 1,— , 4 . Cost of goods sold for a given firm. COSA(I) = VINVB(I) + SPRO(I) - VTNV(I) 86. FIN Costs of debt financing for a given quarter and firm. Note this is a f i r s t step calculation. FIN = BFD(I) + BICO(I) + BLDT(l) 87. ANPBT(I) I = 1,— , 4 . I n i t i a l calculation of net profit before taxes. It is necessary to recalculate profit before taxes i f the firm has a negative cash balance. - 8 0 -ANPBT(I) = SREV(I) - COSA - SFRGT(I) + E(l) + SUMAJ(l) + ALOBD(I) - FIN 8 8 . For tax purposes determine i f a net profit was earned. IF ANPBT(I) 8 9 , 8 9 , 9 1 8 9 . AITP(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . Income taxes on profits for this quarter. AITP(I) = 0 If no profit was earned. 9 0 . ANPAT(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . Profit after taxes for a given firm for the current period. If no profit was made set profit after taxes to profit before taxes. ANPAT(I) = ANPBT(I) 9 1 . If a profit was made calculate income taxes. AITRA = . 4 7 is the tax rate. AITP(I) = AITRA * ANPBT(I) 9 2 . Calculate profit after tax ANPAT(I) = ANPBT(I) - AITP(l) 9 3 . FINAN The f i r s t part of the calculation of cash dis-burs ements. FINAN = BICO(I) + BLDT(I) + BLRP(l) + AITP(l) +DIVS(I) + REPST(I) BLRP(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . Entire M dollars of bank loan of previous period paid off on the f i r s t day of the current quarter. DIVS(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . M dollars of dividends paid on the last day of the current quarter. - 8 1 -9 4 . CDDD(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . The second part of cash disburse-ments . CDDD(I) = SPRO(I) + SFRGT(I) + E(l) + SUMAJ(l) + ANPJ(I) + BOR(I) + BFD(I) + FINAN 9 5 . CASH2(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . M dollars cash balance at the end of the period. CASHl(I) I ='1,—,4. M dollars cash balance at the beginning of the period. CASH2(I) = CASHI(I) + CSHR(I) - CDDD(l) 9 6 . CSTG(I) I = 1 , — , 4 . Calculation of outstanding capital stock at the end of the quarter. CSTG(I) = CSTO(I) + CSSC(I) - REPST(l) 9 7 . It is necessary to test the ending cash balance to determine i f i t is negative. IF (CASH2(I) ) 9 8 , 1 0 1 , 1 0 1 9 8 . If the ending cash balance is negative, capital stock is sold f i r s t and then bonds. Since neither capital stock nor bonds are to be oversold i t is necessary to test i f they are at the limit. IF (AUTH - CSTG(I) ) 1 0 0 , 1 0 0 , 9 9 9 9 . If the ending cash balance is negative and capital stock is under limit then the following steps are followed. 9 7 9 IF(CASH2(I)) 9 8 0 , 1 0 1 , 1 0 1 9 8 0 IF( AUTH - CSTG(I)) 1 0 0 , 1 0 0 , 9 8 1 9 8 1 CSTG(I) = CSTG(I) + 1 0 0 0 - 8 2 -CSSC(I) = CSSC(I) + 1000 CASH2(I) = CASH2(I) + 1000 GO TO 9 7 9 100. The following.steps cover the forced sale of bonds. IF BP02(I) - 20000 982,101,101 9 8 2 BP02(I) = BP02(I) + 1000 BPS(I) = BPS(I) + 1000 BEFOR = BFD(I) AZ = ZZZ1 - (AN - ZZZ1)/ZZZ2 BRAT = AZ * PPPW BFD(l) = BPS(I) * BRAT PREV = BICO(I) BICO(I) = BP02(I) * PWWW BF0R1 = AITP(I) ANPBT(I) = ANPBT(I) - (BFD(l) - BEFOR) -(BICO(I) - PREV) CDDD(I) = CDDD(I) 4- (BFD(l) - BEFOR) + (BICO(l) -PREV) IF (ANPBT(I) ) 9 8 3 , 9 8 3 , 9 8 4 9 8 3 AITP(I) =0 ANPAT(I) = ANPBT(I) GO TO 9 8 6 9 8 4 AITP(I) = AITRA * ANPBT(I) ANPAT(I) = ANPBT(I) - AITP(l) 9 8 6 DIFF = BFD(l) - BEFOR + (BICO(l) - PREV) CASH2(I) = CASH2(I) - (AITP(l) - BEFOR) + 1000 - DIFF - 8 3 -CSHR(I) = CSHR(I) + 1000 IF CASH2(I) 100,101,101 101. CSTO(I) = CSTG(I) SURP(l) = SURP(I) + ANPAT(I) - DIVS(I) The opening surplus and capital stock balances, are c a l -culated for the next quarter. 102. DIV(I) I = 1,— ,4. Dividends paid by a firm. They are limited to one half the profits of the previous quarter. This is not checked by the computer but is instead the job of the administrator. - 84 -APPENDIX II Appendix II contains the computer program for The Top  Management Game. The l i s t i n g that appears here is operative for the I.B.M. 3 6 0 / 6 7 computer. The program contains the changes presented in Chapter III. In addition to these changes two statements were added to the program. Because the majority of totals contained in the output are stated in thousands i t was necessary to round off sales orders and production. The two statements are: UPRO(I) = FLOAT(INT(UPRO(I) + .5)) Y(I,J * FL0AT(INT(Y(I,J) + .5)) COMPILER MAIN 04-21-70 10: 20: 14 PAGE 0001 2,SMSAH4),SMV<5I,V{4,5),8P02(4),RRR2I 41,UPROL(4),UPROM<4),AL08DI 4] 3,B1C014),BFD(4) ,BLDT(4> ,C0STL14> ,C0STM*4) , GOSTC (4 ) , SROL (4 ) , SPROM i 4 4),SPR0L{4),SUMMW,SPR0C(4),AAAA<5),0000(5),SUMOO,WWWW(5),CSHRl4),BR 5AT<4),SUMAA,UC0L(4)*CASH2(4),ANPAT14),CDDDC4),COSA{4),FRGT(4,5) COMMON SFRGT(4},ANPBT(4),AITP<4) ,CSTG(4) READ HISTORY DATA CONSTANTS  READ<5,1) I B t l C f l A t l O 1 FORMAT(12, 313) READ(5,2) F, Hit H2 , AK, AMI» AM2, AN READ!5,2) P<1), P ( 2 ) , PI 3) * P(4), PI 5) , Rt Wl, W2 READ(5,2) Z l , Z2, Z3, Z4, Z5, Z6, Z7, W3 REAOt5,2) Z8, 19, COL1, COL2, COLO, ZZZ1, ZZZ2  READ!5,2) PPPW, PWWW, PSWW, FR1, FR2, FR3, AITRA READ{5,2) AUTH, W4, ALUR, UH, UF, U5 2 FGRMAT(7F10.0t F5.0) B6 = IB 06 = ID READS DATA FROM PAST QUARTER AND CHECKS INPUT ORDER  DO 10 I = 1, IB READ{5,3) I P R , J , I I A , A J J U , l ) , A J J i I , 2 ) , A j J I I , 3 ) , XAJJ(I,4),AJJtI,5) JPR = 0. 18 READ(5,3) I PR,J,1IA,PVS(I),AINV1(I),RRR1(I) , XEE< n,BPOHI),COSTB(I)  JPR = 1 21 READ! 5, 3) I PR , J , I IA ,CA SHU I J , SURP < I) , VI NV B {I > , XCSTOf I ttBLRPf I I 10 CONTINUE 3 FORMAT*12, 213, 8F8.0) 4 FORMAT( 12, 2I3t 3F8.0)  READ15,3) NOP,LPR,KPR 22 00 30 I = h IB READ<5,3) rPR,J,IIA,E{I),AJ(I,l),AJ< I , 2 ) , A J I I , 3) , XAJII,4),AJ(I,5) JPR = 3 23 READ15,3) 1 PR,J,I IA,S(I,1),S ( I»2),S ( 1,3),  XSU,4) ,SU,5) ,SPROU) 24 READ15,3) IPR,J,I IA,BLNCI ) ,BPS(13*CSSC(I),ANPJ(I)i XBOR(I),REPSTI I),DIVS( I) 30 CONTINUE GO TO 100 25 JINX = 3 * 1 + JPR + 4  GO TO 27 26 JINX = 2 * I + JPR + 12 27 PRINT 6, JINX COMPILER MAIN 04-21-70 10:20:14 PAGE 0002 C CARD IN WHICH ERROR OCCURS 6 FORMAT!31HINPUT CAROS IMPROPERLY ORDERED, 2X2 0HERR0R OCCURS IN CAR XDI3) C PRINT OUT DATA FOR ADMINISTRATOR  100 PRINT 4 l i IAt IG 41 FORMAT! 10X33 HA DM IN 1ST RAT OR S PRINTOUT PAGE ONE, 5X 8HINDUSTRY, I X4, 15X7HQUARTER14///) PRINT 42 42 FORMAT! 15X20HBEGIINNING AJJ VALUES)  PRINT 43 43 FORMAT!7HC0MPANY8X1HI,8X1H2 , 8X1H3 , 8X1 H4) DO 110 1=1,5 110 PRINT 44,1,AJJ(1,I),AJJ{2,1),AJJ(3,I), AJJ!4,I) 44 FORMAT!4H AREAI3,4F9.0) PRINT 45  45 FORMAT I//) C C TASK 1 RESEARCH AND MARKETING C CALCULATES CUMULATIVE R AND D IMPACT IN CURRENT QUARTER BY COMPAN SUMEE=0.0 DO 40 I = 1, IB  C TEST FOR AMOUNT? ON R AND D TO KEEP IT EQUAL OR LESS THAN 1250. IFtEC I) - 1250.) 999, 999* 998 998 E! I ) = 1250. C TEST REPURCHASED STOCK TO SEE IF EXCEEDS MAXIMUM OF $1000. 999 IF!REPSTCI) - 1000.) 997, 997, 996 C TESTS TO SEE IF BONDS REPURCHASED ARE LESS THAN BONDS OUTSTANDING C AT FIRST OF THIS PERIOD. 996 REPST!I) = 1000. 997 IFIBORU) - BP01II! I 994. 994, 995 C IF REPURCHASED BONDS ARE GREATER T*HAN OUTSTANDING BONDS, C SET REPURCHASED EQUAL TO OUTSTANDING. 995 BOR!I) = BP01UI  C TEST TO SEE IF BONOS REPURCHASED ARE GREATER THAN MAXIMUM ALLOWED C FOR ONE PERIOD !$5000.I 994 IF IBOR!I) - 5000.) 993, 993, 992 C IF GREATER THAN $5000., REDUCE TO $5000. 992 BOR1I) = 5000. C TEST TO SEE IF AMOUNT SPENT ON PRODUCTION IS LESS THAN $4500.  C FORCE COMPANY TO SPEND AT LEAST $4500. ON PRODUCTION 993 IFISPROU) - 4500. )991, 990, 990 991 SPRO< I) = 4500. .. . 990 SUMAJ!I) = 0. EE!I) = F * EE!I) + E!I) C CUMULATIVE R AND D TOTAL  40 SUMEE = SUMEE + EE!I) C CUMULATIVE INDUSTRY R AND 0 IMPACI RATIO G = HI + SUMEE/ H2 DO 50 J = 1, IB DO 50 I = 1, ID C ADDS ALL 5 AREA DECISIONS TOGETHER FOR EACH COMPANY GIVING 4 SUMS 50 SUMAJ(J) = SUMAJ!J) + AJ!J, I) CALL A CALL B COMPILER MAIN 04-21-70 10:20:14 PAGE 0003 CALL C CALL D CALL EEEE CALL FFFF  CALL GGGG CALL H CALL II CALL 12 CALL J J J J CALL K  CALL L CALL M CALL N STOP END ,Y REQUIREMENTS 000AA6 BYTES COMPILER A 04-21-70 10:20:45 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE A C OR BROOM S MANAGEMENT DECISION GAME (A) PART TWO COMMON AlTRA,AJJ(4,5),AK,ALUR,AMI,AM2,AN,AUTH,BLRP(4},COL1,C0L2,C0 1LCCST0C4) ,EE(4),F,FR1,FR2,FR3,H1 ,H2 , I A ,1 B, IC , ID,P(5),PPPW,PSHW,PW 2WW,R,SURP(4),UH,UF,U5,W1,W2,W3,W4,Z1,Z2,Z3,Z4,Z5,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9,ZZZ1, 3ZZZ2,Q(5) ,SAJJ(5>,G,B0R<4),BP0l(45),BPS(4),RRR1(4),AINV114), 4PVS(4),AJ(4,5),ANPJ(4),BLN(4),CASHl(4),E(4),S(4,5),SPRO(4) 5,SUMAJ(4) ,SMIN<5 ), FILL (59 ) , SMPR (5 ) , T ( 4, 5),AL(5),COSTB(4) COMMON CSSCC4),DIVS(4),REPST(4) COMMON VINVB(4),X1(4),X(4,5),ALAVE,B6,D6,AlNV2(4),PVE(4),VINV(4),C 1API4),C0STC4),SAL(4,5),SREV(4),SUMY(4),UPRO(4),Y(4,5),Z(4),SAVE(5) 2,SMSAL(4),SMV(5),Vl4,5),BP02(4),RRR2(4),UPROL(4),UPROMI4),ALOBDi4) 3,B1C0(4),BFD(4),BLDT(4),COSTL(4),COSTMI4),COSTC(4),SR0L(4),SPR0M(4 4) ,SPR0L<4),SUMMW,SPROC(4),AAAA(5),0000(5),SUMO0,WWWW(5),GSHR(4) , BR 5AT(4),SUMAA,UC0L(4),CASH2(4),ANPAT(4),CDDD(4),C0SA(4),FRGT(4,5) COMMON SFRGT(4),ANPBT(4),AITP(4),CSTG(4)  C CALCULATES CUMULATIVE AREA MARKETING M$ SPENT DO 601 = 1, ID SAJJ(I)= 0. DO 60 J= 1, IB C TEST TO SEE THAT THE MAXIMUM SPENT ON MARKETING PER COMPANY C DOES NOT EXCEED $1800.  IFISUMAJ(J) - 1800.) 60, 60, 980 C IF TOTAL MARKETING EXCEEDS $1800., FIND BY WHAT AMOUNT IT EXCEEDS. 980 DIF = SUMAJ(J) - 1800. IF(DIF - A J J ( J , J ) ) 960, 960, 950 C IF TOTAL MARKETING DIFFERENCE EXCEEDS $1800. C REDUCE THE HOME TERRITORY MARKETING BY THE EXCESS  960 A J J ( J , J ) = A J J U t J ) - DIF GO TO 60 C IF EXCESS SPENT ON MARKETING IS GREATER THAN AMOUNT SPENT IN HOME C TERRITORY, REDUCE AMOUNT SPENT IN COMMON TERRITORY AFTER TESTING T C TO BE SURE THIS REMAINING BALANCE DOES NOT EXCEED COMMON TERRITORY 950 BALNS = DIF - AJ J ( J , J )  930 AJJ(J,5) = AJJ(J,5) - BALNS A J J ( J , J ) = 0. C TEST TO SEE IF THE AMOUNT BY WHICH IT EXCEEDS IS MORE THAN C MARKETING SPENT IN THE HOME TERRITORY I F ( A J J ( J , 5 ) ) 940,60. 60 940 PRINT 920  920 FORMAT!40HEXCESS MARKETING GREATER THAN BOTH HOME , 111H AND COMMON) 60 A J J ( J . I ) = AK * (AJJfJf.D t A J ( J t H ) C TAKES EACH MARKETING BY CO BY AREA ADDS PREVIOUS CO AREA SUM C AND MULTIPLIES f#TAL BY MARKETING ADJUSTMENT FACTOR C FOR SAJJ NEED 5 VALUES FOR AREAS  DO 20 J = 1, ID. DO 20 I = 1, IB 20 SAJJ(J) = SAJJ(J) + A J J ( I , J ) C C CALCULATES INDUSTRY CUMULATIVE MARKETING IMPACT RATIO DO 70 I = 1, ID  SMIN( I ) = S( 1,1 ) 70 A L U ) = AMI - ((AN * P U ) * AM2) / SAJJ(I)) C FIND MINIMUM PRICE FOR EACH AREA COMPILER A 04-21-70 10:20:45 PAGE 0002 00 80 I = I t ID DO 80 J = 1, IB IF(SMINU) - S ( J i I ) } 80, 80, 28 28 SMINU) = S1J,I)  80 CONTINUE C CALCULATES INDUSTRY STANDARD PRICE IMPACT RATIO DO 90 I = 1, ID 90 Q(I) =(R * AN) / SMINII) C CALCULATES AREA TOTAL ORDERS DO 300 I = 1, ID  DO 300 J = It IB IF(1-5) 31, 32, 31 31 I F ( J - I) 33, 34, 33 34 T t J , I ) = AN * UH * G * A L U ) * Q(I) GO TO 300 32 TtJ,5) = AN * U5 * G * A L U ) » Q,( 1 ) GO TO 300 33 T!J,I) = AN * UF * G * AL(I) * QJI ) 300 SMPR<I) = 0, RETURN END Y REQUIREMENTS 000580 BYTES COMPILER B 04-21-70 10:21:11 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE 8 C PRINTOUT FOR THE ADMINISTRATOR AS A FOLLOW UP TO PART ONE (B) COMMON AITRA,AJJ{4,5),AK,ALUR,AMI,AM2,AN,AUTH,BLRP!4>,COL1,C0L2»C0 1LC,C STQ(4),EE(4),FtFRl,FR2,FR3,Hl,H2,IA y|6,IC,ID,P(5),PPPW,PSWW,PW 2WW,R,SURP(4),UH,UF,U5,W1,W2,W3,W4,Z1,Z2,Z3,Z4,Z5,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9,ZZZ1, 3ZZZ2,Q(5),SAJJ!5),GiB0R!4),BP01(45),BPS!4),RRRi(4),AINV1(4), 4PVSI4),AJ(4,5),ANPJ(4),BLN(4),CASH1(4),E(4) ,S<4,5),SPR0I4) 5,SUMAJI4) ,SM IN 15), FILL (59) ,SMPRI5),T< 4, 5) , AL I 5 ) , CO STB I 4) COMMON CSSC14),DIVSI4),REPST14) COMMON VINVB<4),X1I4),XI4,5),ALAVE,B6,D6,AINV2(4) , P VE ( 4) , VI NV (4) ,C 1AP(41,C0ST14),SAL(4,5),SREV(4),SUMY(4),UPRO(4),Y<4,5),Z(4)•SAVE(5) 2,SMSAL( 4) ,SMV( 5);»V(4,5) ,BP02I4) ,RRR2 (4) ,UPROL14),UPR0MI4),AL0BDI4) 3,81C0(4),BFD(4),BLDT14),COSTL(4),C0STM(4),COSTCI4),SROL(41,SPR0M(4 4),SPR0L!4),SUMWW,SPR0C<4),AAAA!5),000045),SUMOO,WWWW(5),CSHRI4),BR 5AT(4),SUMAA,UCOLI4),CASH214)»ANPATI4)*CDDD!4),C0SA{4),FRGT!4,5> COMMON SFRGTI4),ANPBT14),AITP(4),CSTG(4)  PRINT 46, SMINU), SMINI2), S MIN! 3 ) , SMINI4), SMINI5) 46 F0RMAT14HSMIN5X,5F9.0//) PRINT 47, Q l l ) , Q(2), Q(3), Q<4), Q<5) 47 FORMAT! 2HQ=3X, 5F12.8/) PRINT 48, PVSI1), PVSI2), PVS13), PVSI4) 48 FORMAT!3HPVS6X4F9.0/)  PRINT 1 1 FORMAT(10X6HPART A/) PRINT 3 3 FORMAT(5X14HB = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5X17HD ~ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5/) PRINT 4, F, HI, H2 4 FORMAT!5X3HF =F4.2, 2X3HH1=F5.2» 2Xt 3HH2=F6.0/) PRINT 9, AK 9 FORMAT! 5X, 4HAK =, F8.2/J PRINT 10, AMI 10 FORMAT(5X, 5HM1 = F8.2/) PRINT 11, AM2 11 FORMAT!5X, 5HM2 = F8.2/) PRINT 12, P ( l ) , P!2), P(3), P!4) , PI 51 12 FORMAT!5X4HP1 =F6.2,2X4HP2 =F6*2, 2X4HP3 =F6.2,2X4HP4 =F6.2, 2X4HP X5 =, 1F6.2//) PRINT 13 13 FORMAT 15X22HU FOR COMPANY AND AREA)  PRINT 14 14 FORMAT(7HC0MPANY, 7X1H1, 8X, 1H2, 8X, 1H3, 8X, 1H4) M = 1 PRINT 15, M, UH, UF, UF, UF 15 FORMAT {4HAREA, 12, 4X, F6.0, 3F9.0) M = 2 PR INT 15, M, UF, UH, UF, UF M = 3 PRINT 15, M, UF, UF, UH, UF M = 4 PR I NT 15, M, UF, UF, UF, UH M = 5 PRINT PRINT 15, M, U5, U5, U5, U5 200 200 FORMAT!//) COMPILER B 04-21-70 10:21: 11 PAGE 0002 B6 = IB 06 = ID PRINT 201, B6, 06, R , Wl 201 FORMAT!5X5X5HB6 = F6.0, 5X4HD6 =F6.0, 5X4HR = F6.0.5X4HW1 =F8.2/) PRINT 17, W2 17 FORMAT!5X5HW2 = F8.2/) PRINT 18, H3 18 FORMATC5X5HW3 = F8.0/) PRINT 19, W4 19 FORMAT! 5X5HW4 = F8.2) PRINT 202 202 FORMAT!79XIH+) PRINT 203 203 FORMAT!20X33HADMINISTRATOR S PRINTOUT PAGE TWO///) PRINT 20, Z l , Z2, Z3, Z4, 15 20 FORMAT !5X3HZ1=F6. 2, 2X3HZ2=F6.0,2 X3HZ3=F6 .2 , 2X3HZ4=F7. 0,2X3HZ 5=F7. XO//) PRINT 21, Z6 t Z7, Z8, Z9 21 FORMAT!5X3HZ6=F6.0,2X3HZ7=F6.0»2X3HZ8=F6.2,2X3HZ9=F6,2//) PRINT 22, ALUR, CQLl, C0L2, COLC 22 FORMAT I 5 X6H ALUR =F6.2, 2X6HCOL1 =F6.2,2X6HC0L2 =F6. 2 , 2 X6HC0LC =F6. X2/)  PRINT 23, Z Z Z l , ZZZ2 23 F0RMAT(5X6HZZZ1 =F4.0, 5X6HZZZ2 =F6.0/) 24 FORMAT (5X4HAUTH3X4F9«0/) PRINT 24, AUTH, AUTH, AUTH, AUTH PRINT 25, PSWW, PPPW, PWWW 25 FORMAT!5X6HPSWW =F8.4, 5X6HPPPW =F6.2, 5X6HPWWH = F6.3/)  PRINT 26, FR1, FR2, FR3, AI TRA 26 FORMAT!5X5HFR1 =F4.0, 5X5HFR2 =F4.0, 5X5HFR3 =F4.0, 5X7HAITRA =F6. X2///) PRINT 31 31 FORMAT16HPART 8/) PRINT 32, AN  32 FORMAT (5X4HAN =F6.2/) PRINT 14 PRINT 33, E ! l ) , E ( 2 ) , E ( 3 ) , EI4) 33 FORMAT!3X4HE = , 4F9.0/) PRINT 34, E E i l ) , EE!2), EE(3), EE(4) 34 FORMAT!3X, 5HEE = , 4F9.0/)  PRINT 35, G 35 FORMAT!3X4HG = , F12.8/) PRINT 14 PRINT 36, SUMAJ!1), SUMAJ!2) , SUMAJ13) , SUMAJ(4) 36 FORMAT 13X7HSUMJD = F6.0,3F9.0/) PRINT 14  DO 100 1 = 1 , 5 100 PRINT 38, It A J J i l , I ) , AJJ12,I), A J J ! 3 , I ) , AJJ(4,I) 38 FORMAT (3X3HJJD I3,4F9.2) PRINT 40 40 FORMAT!//) PRINT 39, A L U ) , AL!2), AL 1 3 ) , AL!4), AL 1 5 ) 39 FORMAT!4HAL1=F11.8,1X,4HAL2=F11.8,1X4HAL3=F11.8,1X4HAL4=Fl1.8,1X4H XAL5=, 1F11.8/) COMPILER B 04-21-70 10:21:11 PAGE 0003 PRINT 14 00 110 I = 1,5 110 PRINT 41, S ( 1 , I ) , S<2,I), S i 3 , I ) , S(4,I) 41 FORMAT 13X4HSD = 4F9.0) :  PRINT 40 RETURN END . . IRY REQUIREMENTS OOOCAC BYTES ; COMPILER C 04-21-70 10:21:44 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE C C PART TWO OF DIVIDED PROGRAM OR BROOM S MANAGEMENT GAME IC) COMMON AITRA,AJJ!4,5),AK,ALUR,AMI,AM2,AN,AUTH,BLRPI4),C0L1»C0L2?C0 lLC,CST0t4),EE(4);,F,FRl,FR2,FR3,Hl,H2,IA,IB,IC, ID,P!5),PPPW,PSWW,PW 2WW,R,SURP(4),UH,UF,U5,Wl,W2,W3,W4,Zl,Z2,Z3,Z4,Z5,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9,ZZZi, 3ZZZ2,QI5) ,SAJJ(5) ,G,B0R(4) ,8P0H45) ,BPS (4 ) , RRR1 (4 ) , AINV1 i4 ) , 4PVSI4), AJ (4,5),ANPJI4),BLN(4),CASH1I4) ,E(4) ,S!4,5),SPRO(4> 5,SUMAJ(4J,SMIN(5),FILL159),SMPR(5),T!4,5)» AL(5 I,COSTB(4) COMMON CSSCI 4),DIVSI4),REPST(4) COMMON VINVBI4),X1(4),X(4,5),ALAVE,B6,D6,AINV2I4),PVEI 4),VINV(4),C 1API4),eOSTl4),SALI4,5),SREV(4),SUMY(4 I,UPROI4),Y!4,5),Z{4),SAVEi 5) 2,SMSAH 4),SMV(5)»V(4f5),BP02!4),RRR2(4),UPROL14),UPR0M14),AL0BDI4) 3,BIC0I4),BFD(4),BLDTI4),C0STL I4),COSTM{4),GOSTC(4),SROLl4),SPR0MI4 4),SPRGLI4),SUMWW,SPR0CI4),AAAA(5),0000(5),SUMOO,WWWW(5),CSHR!4), BR 5AT(4),SUMAA,UC0L(4),CASH2(4),ANPAT{4),CDDD(4),COSA(4)»FRGTI4»5) COMMON SFRGTI4), ANPBT 14) , AITP ! 4 ),, CSTG! 4 ) DO 110 I = 1, ID SMVCI) = 0. DO 110 J = 1, IB 110 SMPR(I) = SMPR(I) + S{J,I) SUMAL = 0, DO 120 I = 1, 10  SAVE!I) = SMPR(I) / B6 120 SUMAL = SUMAL + AL(I) C PAGE 10 ALAVE = SUMAL / 06 C AREA ORDER GETTING POWER BY COMPANIES 00 130 I = 1, IB  00 130 J = 1, 10 IFISAVEIJ) / S(I,J) - W2) 29, 29, 31 29 V(I,J) = 0. GO TO 130 31 VII,J) = <AL< J)/ALAVE*W1 ) * i S AV E(J ) / S I I, J ) -W2) *IW4 + G./( AN * W3 X J J 130 SMV(J) = SMV(J) + V i I , J ) C AVERAGE MARKET IMPACT AREA RATIO C COMPANY SHARE OF MARKET RATIOS BY COMPANIES DO 140 1 = 1 , IB DO 140 J = 1, ID X(I,J) = VII,J) / SMV(J)  C COMPANY SALES BRDERS IN AREA Y(I,J) = ( XI I,J) ) * T( I , J ) 140 Y{ I, J )=FLOAT( INTIYI I, J I + .-5) 1 C DEPRECIATION M$ DO 150 I = 1, IB Z(I) ~ 21 * PVS( I ) PVEU) = IPVSII) - Z ( I ) ) + ANPJM) CAP! I) = PVSI II / Z2 XIII) = Z3 - I E E I I ) / Z4) UPR01I) = ISPROII) / AN - XIII) * Z5 - CAPU) * Z7) / .1X111! *Z6 -X 11) UPROd )=FL0AT(INT!UPR0iI) + .5) )  C TEST UNIT PRODUCTION AGAINST CAPACITY IF (UPRO! I) - CAPU)} 32, 32, 33 33 UPRO! I ) •= CAPU ) ; COMPILER C 04-21-70 10:2U44 PAGE 0002 C UNIT COST OF PRODUCTION 32 COSTU) = AN * < i X H I ) *(Z6 + 15/ UPROI I)))+1 (C AP( I )-UPRO< 11)/UPRGI XI )*Z7> > C TOTAL COST OF PRODUCTION  SUMYII) = 0. DO 150 J * I t 10 150 SUMYII) = SUMY(I) + Y d ,J) C UNIT COST AT ADDED OUTPUT LEVELS DO 160 I = If IB SREVi I ) = 0.  DO 170 J = 1, 10 TEST = AINVKI) + UPRO(I) C IF TOTAL COMPANY SALES GREATER THAN BEGINNING INVENTORY + PRODUCT IFISUMY(I) - TEST) 53, 53, 34 53 SAL(I,J) * Y ( I , J ) SMS A L U ) = SUM Yd II  GO TO 170 34 SALU,J) = U AINVKI) + UPROU))/ SUMY(I)) * Y U . J ) SMS AL I I) = AINVKI) + UPROt I) 170 CONTINUE C ENDING INVENTORY 1M UNITS) TEST = AINVKI) + UPROCI)  IFISMSAL(I) - TEST) 54, 35,35 35 AINV2U 1 = 0. GO TO 160 . .. . . 54 AI NV2< I ) = ATNVLM) + UPROtI) - SMS ALII) 160 CONTINUE C SALES REVENUE (M$)  DO 180 I = 1, IB DO 190 J = 1, ID 190 SREV(I) - SREV(I) + ( S A L ( T t J ) * S(I,J1) C VALUE OF ENDING INVENTORY IF(SMSALU) - A I N V K I ) ) 39, 37, 37 37 VINVCI) =AINV2(I) * COST!I )  GO TO 180 39 VINVU) = VINVBU) * (1.0 - S MS AL I I )/AINV 1 il ) ) + UPROt I) * CO ST I I ) 180 CONTINUE . RETURN END }RY REQUIREMENTS 0006E6 BYTES ; COMPILER 0 04-21-70 10:22:22 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE D C BAYLOR MANAGEMENT GAMES PART 10) COMMON AITRA, AJ J(4, 5 ) »AK,ALUR , AMI , AM2 ,AN, AUTH , BLRP1 4) , COL11C0L2 t CO 1LCCSTQI4) ,EEI4), F,FR1* FR2tFR3,HI,H2,IA,IB,IC, 1 0 , P i 5),PPPM,PSyW,PW 2WW,R,SURP(4),UH,UF,U5,Wl,W2,U3,W4,Z1,12,13,Z4,15,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9, t i l l , 3ZZZ2,Q!5),SAJJI5),G,BOR!43,BPOH45),BPS!4),RRR1(4),AINVH4), 4PVSI4),AJ(4,5),ANPJ<4),BLN(4),CAS HI{4),E{4),S{4,5),SPRO(4) 5,SUMAJC 4),SMIN< 5)»FILL!591,SMPRI5),TI4,5),AL<5),COSTB{4) COMMON CSSC(4),0lVSt4),REPST(4) COMMON VINVB{4),X1I4),X14f5) tALAVE,B6,06,AINV2(4),PVE(4),VINV(4),C 1API4),COST(43,SAL<4,5),SREV(4),SUMY 14),UPR0{4) ,Y<4,5),Z{4),SAVE(5) 2,SMSAL(4),SMV(5),V(4,5),BP02(4),RRR214),UPROL(4),UPROM{4),AL0BD(4) 3,B1C0(4),BFD(4),BLDT(4),CGSTH4),C0STM|4),C0STCC4),SROL(4),SPR0MJ4 4),SPR0L(4),SUMWW,SPR0C<4),AAAAI 5),0000153,SUMOO,wWWWl53,CSHRC 4),BR 5AT(4),SUMAA,UC0L(4),CASH2(43,ANPAT(4),COOD(4),COSA(4),FRGT(4,5) COMMON SFRGTC 41,ANPBT(4),AlTP 14),CSTG(4 )  DIMENSION T0T(4I DIMENSION CY(4) PRINT 42, S A V E l l l , SAVE!2)• SAVEC3), SAVEC4), SAVEI5) 42 FORMAT!5X10HSAVG ,5F9.0) PRINT 202 202 FORMAT!79X1H+Y  PR INT 204 204 FORMAT120X 35HADM INISTRATOR S PRINTOUT PAGE THREE// 3 PRINT 43 43 FORMAT!15X 8HT VALUES) PRINT 14 14 F0RMAT(7HCQMPANY,11X1H1,11X, 1H2,11X, 1H3,11X, lH4|  DO 120 1=1,5 120 PRINT 44, I, T i l , l i t T ( 2 , D , T I 3 , I ) , TI4..I1 44 FORMAT!4HAREAI3,5F12.4) PRINT 40 PRINT 45,ALAVE 45 FORMAT!5X6HALAVE=F12.8/)  PRINT 146 146 FORMAT!15X8HV VALUES) PRINT 14 DO 130 I = 1,5 130 PRINT 147 , 1,VI1 , 1 ),V!2,I ) ,VI3,I) ,V(4,I) 147 F0RMATI4HAREAI3,4F12.8)  PRINT 40 40 FORMAT!//) PR INT 148 148 FORMAT!15 X 8HX VALUES) PRINT 14 DO 140 I = 1,5  140 PRINT 147, It XI1»I), XI2,II, X l 3 , I ) , X!4,I) PRINT 40 PRINT 149 149 FORMAT*15X 8HY VALUES) DO 333 J = 1, 4 I F ( J - 4) 10, 11, 11  10 PRINT 335, J GO TO 13 335 FORMAT I/9HC0MPANY 14 ) ; COMPILER D 04-21-70 10:22:22 PAGE 0002 11 PRINT 29 PRINT 12 12 FORMAT1 20X 35HADM IN ISTRATOR S PRINTOUT PAGE FOUR //) PRINT 3 3 5 f J  13 DO 333 1 = 1 , 5 333 PRINT 147, I, Y1J, I) PRINT 40 PRINT 49, C A P i l ) , CAP!2), CAP13), CAP!4) 49 FORMAT!3HCAP 4X, 4F9.0/) PRINT 50, Z ( l ) , Z!2), Z13), Z(4)  50 FORMAT 12HZ=5X, 4F9.0/) PRINT 51, P V E ( l ) , PVE!2>, PVE!3)» PVE14) 51 FORMAT !4HPVE=3X 4F9.0/) PRINT 52, X l U ) , X H 2 ) , X113), X114) 52 F0RMAT14HX1 = 4F12.8/) PRINT 53, UPRO!1),UPROt2), UPRQ!3) , UPRO!4)  53 FORMAT14HUPR03X4F9.0/} PRINT 54, C0STI1), COST!2), C0ST13), C0ST!4) 54 FORMAT 14HC0ST3X4F 9.2/) PRINT 55, A I N V K I ) , AINV112) , AINV113), AINV114) 55 FORMAT!5HAINV 2X4F9.0/) 00 160 1=1,4  160 TOT! 11= AINVUI )+UPR01 I ) PRINT 56,T0T!1), TOT! 2) , TOT! 3), T0T14) 56 FORMAT 18HINV+U PRO F8.0,3F9.0/) PRINT 57, SUMY11), SUMY(2), SUMY!3), SUMY 14) 57 FORMAT 15HSUMY= 2X4F9.0/) PRINT 58,SMSAL1I), SMS AL12), SMSAL13), SMSAL14)  58 FORMAT I7HSMSAL = 4F9.0/) PRINT 59 59 FORMAT!15X10HSAL VALUES ) PRINT 14 DO 170 I = 1,5 170 PRINT 60, 1, SAL(1,I), SAL12,I), SAL<3,I), SAL14,I)  60 FORMAT!4HAREA 13, 4F12.0) PRINT 40 PRINT .61, AINV211), AlNV212),AlNV2(3), AINV214) 61 FORMAT!5HAINV23X4F9.0/) PRINT 62, SREVU), S REV 1 2) , SREV13), SREV14) 62 FORMAT!4HSREV 4X4F9.0/)  PRINT 63, VINVBU), VINV812), VINVB13), VINVB14) 63 FORMAT!5HVINVB2X4F9.0/) PRINT 64, V I N V l l ) , VINV1 2) , VINV(3) , VINVI4) 64 FORMAT14HVINV3X4F9.0/) PRINT 65, SURPlD, SURPI2), SURP (3) , SURP14) 65 FORMAT19HBEG. SURP F7.0,3F9.0/)  PRINT 29 29 F0RMAT179X1H+) RETURN END 3RY REQUIREMENTS 0Q0B08 BYTES ; COMPILER EEEE 04-21-70 10:23:17 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE EEEE C THIRD PART OF DIVIDED PROGRAM FOR DR. BROOM S MANAGEMENT GAME(E) COMMON AlTRA,AJJ(4,5),AK,ALUR,AMI,AM2,AN,AUTH,BLRP(4),C0L1,C0L2,CO 1LC,CST0(4),EE(4),F,FR1,FR2,FR3,H1,H2,IA , IB , IC , ID ,P(5),PPPw,PSWW,PW 2WW,R,SURP(4),UH,UF,U5 ,W1,W2,W3,W4,11,12,Z3,Z4,15,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9,ZZZ1, 3ZZZ2,Q( 5), SAJJ( 5),G,B0R{ 4) ,BP01(45) ,BPS(4) ,RRR114) ,AINV1C4) , 4PVS(4),AJ(4,5),ANPJ(4),BLN(4),CASH1(4 ), E ( 4) , S ( 4,5),SPR0(4) 5,SUMAJ(4),SMIN<5),FILL(59),SMPR{5),T(4,5),AL(5),COSTB(4) COMMON CSS0(4),DIVS(4),REPST( 4) COMMON VINVB(4) ,X1(4),X(4,5),ALAVE,B6,D6,AINV2 i4),PVE(4),VINVI 4),C IAP(4),C0ST(4),SAL(4,5),SREVC4),SUMY(4),UPR0{4),Y(4,5),Z(4),SAVE(5 ) 2,SMSAL(4),SMV(5),V(4,5),BP02*4>,RRR2(4),UPROL(4),UPROM( 4) ,AL0BD(4) 3,B1C0(4),BFD(4),BLDTI4),C0STLt4),C0STMI4),COSTC(4),SROL{4),SPROM i4 4),SPR0L(4),SUMWW,SPROC(4),AAAA{5),000015),SUMOO,WWWW{5),CSHR14),BR 5AT 14),SUMAA,UC0L(4),CASH2(4),ANPAT(4),CDDD14),COSAI4),FRGT14,5) COMMON SFRGT( 4) ,ANPBT(4) , Al TP (4),, CSTG i 4 )  C LOSS ON BAD DEBTS DO 200 I = I , IB AL0BD1 I ) = RRRHI) * ALUR AZ = ZZZ1 - C AN -ZZ ZD / ZZZ2 IFiSREV(I)) 1, 1, 2 1 UCOLCI) = RRR1(I) - ALOBD(I)  GO TO 3 2 UCOLCI) = CC0L1 * SREV(I)) + (C0L2 * RRR1I I) • COLC) * AZ 3 RRR2CI) = RRR1(1) + SREVCI) - ALOBD(I) - UCOL(I) IF(AUTH - CSTO(I)) 55, 55, 41 55 CSSCII) = 0. 41 IF (BLN( I ) t. 2000.) 42. 43, 43  43 BLN(I) = 2000. 42 BP02U) = 8 P 0 K I ) + B P S ( I ) — BORfI ) C TEST TO SEE IF SOLO ANY BONDS THIS QUARTER IF NOT, SKIP TEST IF (BPS! I) ) 44, 44, 45 45 IF(BP02(I) - 20000.) 44, 44, 46 46 BPS(I) = BPS(I) -(BP02II) -20000.)  IF(BPS(I)) 47, 44, 44 47 PRINT 90, I BPS(I) = 0 . 90 FORMAT!25HB0NDS OVERSOLD IN COMPANY 14) 44 CSHR(I) = UCOL(I) + CSSC( I ) + BLN(I) + BPS(I) C CURRENT QUARTER BOND DISCOUNT RATE  BRAT(I) = AZ * PPPW C DISCOUNT ON BOND SALE BF D < I) .= BPS! I) * BRA T.I U C C BOND INTEREST COST B1C0M) •- BP02CI) * PWWW  C C BANK LOAN DISCCUNT BLDT( I ) = PSWW * BLN( I ) C BANK LOAN REPAYMENT C UPROLCI) = Z8 * UPRO(I )  UPROM(I) = Z9 * UPRO( I ) SPR0L(I)=AN*(UPR0L(I)*(X1(I)*Z6-Z7)+(XI(I)*Z5+CAP(I)*Z 7)) SPROM(I)=AN*(UPROMII)*(XI(I)*Z6-Z7) + (XI 11)*Z5+CAP(I)*Z7)) ; COMPILER EEEE 04-21-70 10:23:17 PAGE 0002 SPROC( I ) = AN*1CAP{ I ) * I X l l I J *Z6-Z7)>(XII I)*Z5+CAP1I)*Z7) ) IFIUPROU) - CAP1I)) 49, 48, 49 48 SPRO(I) = SPROC U ) 49 COSTUI) = SPROLU) / UPR0L1I)  COSTMU) = S PROM II) / UPROM!I) C0STC1I) = SPROCII) / CAP(I) 200 CONTINUE SUMWW = 0. SUMOO = 0. DO 240 J = 1. ID  OOOO(J) = 0. WWWW1J) = 0. DO 280 1 = 1 , IB OOOO(J) = 0O001JI + Y( I . J ) 280 WwWWlJ) = WWWW1J) + SALM,J) SUMOO = SUMOO + OOOOlJ)  240 SUMWW = SUMWW + WWWW1J) SUMAA = 0. DO 250 J = I, ID AAAA(J) = 0. DO 260 I = If IB 260 AAAAU) = AAAAU) + AJ ! I , J) 250 SUMAA = SUMAA + AAAAU) RETURN END .. . . JRY REQUIREMENTS 000554 BYTES ; COMPILER FFFF 04-21-70 10:24:11 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE FFFF C ADMINISTRATOR S PRINTOUT TO BE PRINTED AFTER PART THREE !F) COMMON AITRA,AJ J( 4,5),AK,ALUR,AMI,AM2,AN,AUTH,BLRP(4),C0L1,C0L2,CO 1LC,CST0(4),EE(4),F,FR1,FR2,FR3,HI«H2,IA,IB,IC, ID,Pi5),PPPW,PSWW,PW 2WW,R,SURP(4),UH,UF,U5,W1,W2,W3,W4,Z1,12,Z3,Z4,Z5,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9,ZZZ1, 3ZZZ2,Q!5),SAJJi5), G, BORI 4 ) , BPO II 45), BPS! 4),RRRII4),AINVH4), 4PVS14),AJl4,5)»ANPJ!4),BLN(4),CAS HI 14),EI 4),S<4,5),SPRO<4> 5,SUMAJ1 4),SMINi5),FI LLC 59),SMPR!5)»T(4,5) ,AL15),C0STBI4) COMMON CSSC(4),DIVS(4),REPSTI4) COMMON VINVBI4) ,X114),X14,5),ALAVE* B6 ,D6,AINV2(4),PVE14),VINV14),C !AP(4),C0STi 4),SAL(4,5),SREVI4),SUMY(4),UPR0(4) ,Y*4,5),Z!4),SAVE!5I 2,SMSAL(4) ,SMV 15),V(4,5),BP02(4),RRR2(4),UPROL(41,UPROM<4),AL0BD(4) 3,B1C0(4) ,BFD(4) , B LD T (4) ,C0STL!4) , COST M (4) , COSTC (4 ) , SROL (4 ) , SPROM i 4 4),SPR0L(4),SUMWW,SPR0C(4),AAAA(5),0000(5),SUMOO,WWWW(5),CSHR(4),BR 5AT14),SUMAA,UC0L(4),CASH2(4),ANPAT(4),CDDDl4),COSA(4),FRGT(4,5) COMMON SFRGTt 4) ,ANPBT(4) ,AI TP (4),,CSTG(4) PRINT 1 1 FORMAT!25X31HADMINISTRATOR S PRINTOUT PAGE 5 // ) PRINT 2, R R R l ( l ) , RRR 1(2) , RRR 1(3) , RRR114) 2 FORMAT!5X5HRRRl=4F9.0/) PRINT 3, ALOBOU), AL0B0I2), AL0BDI3), AL0B0(4) 3 FORMAT(5X5HALOBP 4F9.0/)  PRINT 4, UCOL(l), UC0L!2), UC0U3), UC0L(4) 4 FORMAT!5X5HUCOL 4F9.0/) PRINT 5, RRR2I1), RRR2I2), RRR2I3I, RRR2I4) 5 FORMAT*5X5HRRR2 4F9.0/) PRINT 6, CST0I1), CST0I2), CST0!3>if CST0(4) 6 FORMAT (5X5HCST0 4F9.0/)  PRINT 8, REPSTI1), REPST!2), REPST(3), REPST(4) 8 FORMAT(5X5HREPST, 4F9.0/) PRINT 9, B L N ( l ) , BLN12), BLN!3), BLN!4) 9 FORMAT!5X5HBLN 4F9.0/) PRINT 10, BLDT(l), BLDT! 2 ) , BLDT! 31 , BLDT14) 10 FO:RMAT!5X5HBLDT=4F9.0/)  PRINT 11, BL R P ( l ) , BLRP(2), BLRP 13.) • BLRP(4) 11 FORMAT(5X5HBLRP=4F9.0/) PRINT 13, BRAT ! 1) , . BRAT!2 )., BRAT(3 ) , BRAT 14 ) 13 FORMAT!5X5HBRAT=, 4F12.8/) PRINT 15, BORU), B0RI2), B0RI3), B0R(4) 15 FORMAT I5X5HB0R= 4F9.0/)  PRINT 16, BP01I1), BP01I2), BPO 1(3), BP01I4) 16 F0RMAT(5X5HBP01=4F9.0/) PRINT 20, UPROL!1), UPROL(2), UPROL!3), UPR0LI4) 20 F0RMAT!11H*Z8)(UPR0) = , F8 .0, 3F9. 0/)• PRINT 21, UPROM(l), UPROM12), UPR0MI3), UPR0MI4) 21 F0RMAT!UH(Z9)(UPR0)=, F8.0,3F9.0/)  PRINT 22* CAP!1), CAP(2), CAP(3), CAp(4) 22 FORMAT!5X5HZZ= 4F9.0/) PRINT 23, SPROL(l), SPROL 12), SPROL!3), SPR0L!4) 23 FORMAT !12HSPROIB,C,Z8) F7.0t3F9.0/) PRINT 24, SPROMil), SPROMI2), SPR0MI3), SPR0MI4) 24 FORMAT 112HSPRO!B,C,Z9) F7.0,3F9.0/)  PRINT 25, SPR0CI1), SPR0CI2), SPR0CC3), SPR0C*4) 25 FORMAT! 12HSPR0!B,C,ZZ) F7.0,3F9.0/) RETURN 3 COMPILER FFFF 04-21-70 10:24:11 PAGE 0002 END DRY REQUIREMENTS 000640 BYTES J COMPILER GGGG 04-21-70 10:24:53 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE GGGG C ADMINISTRATOR S PRINTOUT TO BE PRINTED AFTER PART THREE TWO (XG) COMMON AlTRA, A J J ( 4 , 5),AK,ALUR ,AMI,AM2,AN,AUTH,BLRPC4),COL 1,COL2,CO 1LC,CST0(4),EE(4),F,FR1,FR2,FR3,H1,H2,I;A,IB,IC, ID, PC 5) ,PPPW,PSWW,PW 2WW,R,SURP(4),UH,UF,U5,W i ,W2 ,W3, W4, Z 1,Z2,Z3,Z4,Z5,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9,ZZZ1* 3ZZZ2,Q( 5) ,SAJJ( 51,G,B0R(4),BPG1(45) ,BPS(4),RRR1(4),AINVL(4), 4PVS(4), AJ(4,5 ),ANPJ< 4),BLN (4),CASH 1 (4) , E( 4» , S( 4,5 ) ,SPROC4) 5,SUMAJI4) ,SMIN(5) FILL (59) ,SMPRC5 ),T(4,5), ALC5 J, COSTS C 41 COMMON CSSC(4),DIVS(4),REPST< 4) COMMON VINVB(4),X1(4),X(4,5),ALAVE,B6,D6,AINV2(4),PVE(4),VINy(4),C 1AP(4),COST(4),SAL(4,5),SREV<4),SUMY(4),UPR0(4),Y14,5),Z(4),SAVE(5) 2,SMSAL C4),SMVC 5),V(4,5),BP02(4),RRR2(4) ,UPR0LC4),UPR0M(4),AL0BDC4) 3,B1C0(4),BFD(4),BLDT14),COSTL(4),COSTM(4),COSTC(4),SROLC4),SPROMC4 4),SPROL(4),SUMWW,SPROC(4),AAAA(5),0000*5),SUMOO,WWWW(5),CSHR(4),BR 5AT(4),SUMAA,UCOL(4),CASH2C4),ANPATC4),CDDD(4),C0SA(4),FRGT(4,5) COMMON SFRGT (4) , ANPBT (4) , AITP (4),, CSTGI4) PRINT 26, COS T L ( l ) , C0STL(2), COSTLC 3 ) , C0STL14) 26 FORMAT( 12HC0ST(B,C,Z8) 4F 9.4/) PRINT 27, COSTM(l), C0STM(2), COSTMI3), C0STM(4) 27 FORMAT( 12HC0ST(B,C,Z9) 4F 9.4/) PRINT 28, COSTC(l), COSTC (2), COSTCO), C0STC(4) 28 FQRMAT( 12HC0ST(B,C,ZZ) 4F 9.4 )  RETURN END DRY REQUIREMENTS 0001E8 BYTES G COMPILER H 04-21-70 10:25:39 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE H C FOURTH PART - I - OF 01 VIDEO BROOM PROGRAM IH) COMMON AITRA, AJJ14,5),AK,ALUR,AMI,AM2,AN,AUTH,BLRPI 4),C0L1,C0L2,CG 1LC,CST0(4),EE(4),F,FR1,FR2,FR3,HI,H2,1 A,IB,IC,ID,P(5),PPPW,PSWW,PW 2WW,R,SURP(4),UH,UF,U5,WI,W2,W3,W4,Z1,Z2,Z3,Z4,Z5,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9,ZZZL, 3ZZZ2,Q( 5) ,SAJJI5),G,B0R(4), BPO K 45) , BPS ( 4), RRR II 4) , AINV1C4) , 4PVSI4),AJ(4,5),ANPJ(4), BLN(4),CASH114),E(4),S<4,5),SPRO(4) 5,SUMAJ(4),SMIN(5),FILL!59),SMPRI5),T(4,5),AL<5),C0STB(4) COMMON CSSC(4),DIVS(4),REPST{4) COMMON VINVBI4),X1(4), X (4, 5) , AL AVE , B6 ,06 , Al NV2(4),PVEl4),V INV44),C 1AP(4),C0ST(4),SAL<4,51,SREVI 4),SUMY{4),UPROt4),YI4,5),Z14),SAVE(5) 2,SMSAL14),SMV<5>,V(4,5),BP02(4),RRR2(4),UPROL(4),UPROM(4),ALOBDt4) 3,81C0<4I,BFD<4) ,BLDT<4) ,C0STL(4) ,C0STM{4) , COSTC 14) , SROLf 41 , SPROM 14 4) ,S PROL(4),SUMWW,S PROCI4)» AAAA(5)»0000<5)»SUMOO,WWWWI 5),CSHRI4),BR 5ATI4) ,SUMAA,UC0LI4) ,CASH2(4) ,ANPAT(4) ,CDDD(4),COS A<4),FRGT(4,5) COMMON SFRGTt4),ANPBT(4),AITP(4),CSTG(4)  DO 400 1 = 1 , IB SFRGTII ) = 0. C FREIGHT COST PER AREA FOR GIVEN COMPANY DO 210 J = 1, ID C DIFFERENT CALCULATIONS OF THE AREA FREIGHT FORMULA I F U - 5) 44, 48, 48  44 IF(I - J) 45, 46, 45 45 FRGT(I,J) = FR2 * SAL(I,J) GO TO 47 . . . 46 FRGT(I,J) = FR3 * S A L f l t J ) GO TO 47 48 FRGT<I,J) = FR1 * SAL(I,J) 47 SFRGTl I ) = SFRGT(I) + FRGT(I,J) 210 CONTINUE 400 CONTINUE C NET PROFIT OR iLOSS SECTION DO 220 I = It IB C COST OF GOODS SOLD  COSA(I) = VINVB(I) + SPROI I) - VINVU) C HAVE TO DIVIDE THE NET PROFIT CALCULATION INTO TWO PARTS TOO LONG C FINANCIAL PART . FIN = BFD(I) + BICO(I) + BLDT(I) ANPBTI I ) = SREV 1 I ) -COS At I )-{S FRGT (I) + E1 I ) +SUM AJ t I ) +Z t I) +: ALOBD(D) -X FIN  IF IANPBTM)) 49, 49, 51 AITP(I) = 0. ANPAT(I ) = ANPB T(I) GO TO 220 AITP(I) = AlTRA * ANPBT(I) ANP AT(I) = ANPBT(I) - AITP(I)  220 CONTINUE RE TURN END 3RY REQUIREMENTS 0002DA BYTES S COMPILER II 04-21-70 10:26:15 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE II C MANAGEMENT GAMES PART I COMMON AITRA,AJJ(4,5),AK,ALUR,AM I , AM2 , AN, AUTH , B LRPI4),COL 1,C0L2 ,C0 1LC,CST0(4),EEI4),F,FR1,FR2 t FR3,HI,H2 , IA , IB , IC, ID, P < 5 ) ,PPPW,PSWW,PW 2WW,R,SURP(4),UH,UF,U5,W1,W2,W3,W4,Z1,Z2,Z3,Z4,Z5,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9,ZZZ1, 3ZZZ2,QI5> ,SAJJ{5 ),G,B0R(4 )» BPOI<45 ),BPS(4),RRR If 4), A I N V M 4) , 4PVSI4),AJ{4,5),ANPJ{4),BLN14I,CASH1(4) ,E<4> ,S(4,5),SPRO(4) 5,SUMAJI4),SMIN( 5),FILL! 59 J , SMPR { 5 ) , Tl 4, 5) , AL ( 51 ,COSTB ( 4) COMMON CSSCI4)»DlVS<4),REPST(4) COMMON VINVBI4),X1(4),X(4,5), ALAVE , B6 ,D6 , AINV2 14) , PVE < 4) , VINV <4 ) , C 1AP(4),C0ST<4),SAH4,5),SREVI4 ),SUMY(4),UPROI4),Y<4,5), Z t 4),SAVE(5) 2,SMSAL< 4),SMV{5),V(4,5),BP02(4),RRR2 i4),UPROL(4 I,UPROM(4),ALOBDl4) 3,B1C0( 4),BFD(4) ,BLDTl 4) ,C0STL<4) ,C0STM(4) ,C0STC<4) ,SR0LC4),SPR0M{4 4),SPROL(4),SUMWW,SPR0CI4),AAAAI5)«0000C 5 ) ,SUMOO,WWWWC5),CSHR< 41,BR 5ATI4),SUMAA,UC0L(4) ,CASH2I4),ANPAT(4),CDOD(4),COS A(4),FRGT(4,5) COMMON SFRGT(4),ANPBT(4),AITP(4),CSTG(4?  C CASH DISBURSEMENTS DO 220 I = 1, IB C HAVE TO BREAK DOWN THE DISBURSEMENTS INTO TWO PARTS FINAN = B1C0U) + BLDT C11 + BLRP(I) + AITP(I) • DIVS(I) + REPSTU) CDDDII)=SPRO(Il+SFRGTlI)+E(I)+SUMAJ<I)+ANPJ(I)+BOR(I)+BFD(I}+FINAN BLRPII) = BLN (I) C ENDING CASH BALANCE CASH2(I) = CASHKI) + C SHR ( I ) - CDDDI I) CSTG(I) = CSTOII) + CSSC(I) - REPST(I) 65 IF<CASH2(in 63 , 64, 64 63 IF (AUTH - CSTG(D) 67, 67» 69 69 CSTG(I) = CSTGCI) + 1000.  c s s c m = c s s c i i ) + IOOO. CSHR(I) = CSHR(I) + 1000. CASH2U) = C ASH2 ( I ) + 1000* GO TO 6 5 67 IFI8P02II) - 20000.168, 64, 64 68 BP021I) = BP02II) » 1000.  BPS( I) = BPS(IJ + 1000. BEFOR = BFD<I) AZ = ZZZ1 - IAN - ZZZU / ZZZ2 BRAT(I) = AZ * PPPW BFDII) = BPS I I) * BRAT(I) PREV = B l C O i l )  81 CO(I) - BP02I I) * PWWW C SETTING BF0R1 = TO PREVIOUS TAX BF0R1 = AITP(I) C SUBTRACTING JUST THE ADDITIONAL INTEREST AND DISCOUNT ANPBTII) = ANPBTII) - {BFD11) v BEFOR) - tBICOII) - PREV) C ADD TO CASH DISBURSEMENTS JUST ADDITIONAL INTEREST AND DISCOUNT CDDD(I) = CODD(I) + {BFD(I) - BEFOR) + (BICO(I) - PREV) IFi ANPBTiI))49, 49, 51 AITPl I) = 0. ANPATII) = ANPBT(I) GO TO 100 AITP(I) = AITRA * ANPBTII)  ANPAT(I) = ANPBT(I) - AITP(I) C SUBTRACT ADDITIONAL CASH PAID FOR TAXES, INTEREST, AND DISCOUNT C AND ADD CASH RECEIVED FROM SALE OF BONDS G COMPILER II 04-21-70 10:26:15 PAGE 0002 C CALCULATES AMOUNT TO BE SUBTRACTED FOR INT. AND DISCOUNT 100 DIFF = ( B F D m -i BEF0R1 (B1C0II) - PREVI CASH2( I )=CASH2t D-IAITPI I )-BFOR 1)+1000. - DIFF C INCREASE CASH RECEIPTS FOR THE BONDS  CSHRI I ) = CSHRC I) + 1000. C TEST FOR NEGATIVE CASH IFICASH2U )) 67, 64, 64 C END OF QUARTER CAPITAL STOCK OUTSTANDING 64 CSTOU) = CSTG(I) 56 SURPU) •= SURP(I) + ANPAT(I) - DIVSU)  C END OF COMPUTATION 220 CONTINUE RETURN END ORY REQUIREMENTS 0003B2 BYTES ; COMPILER 12 04-21-70 10:26:38 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE 12 C ADDITION TO PART I FOR ADDITIONAL PRINT OUT (I - 2) COMMON AITRA,AJJI4,5),AK,ALUR,AMI,AM2,AN,AUTH,BLRP(4),COL1,C0L2,CO 1LCCST0I4) ,EE(4),F, FR1, FR2, FR3, HI, H2, IA , IB , IC , ID »P C 5) , PPPW, PS WW, PW 2WW,R,SURPI4),UH,UF,U5,W1,W2,W3,W4,Zl,12,Z3,Z4,Z5,Z6,17,18,Z9,III1, 3ZZZ2,QI5),SAJJ(5),G,BOR(4),BPO1(45),BPS(4),RRR114),AlNVI(4), 4PVSI4),AJ(4,5),ANPJ!4),BLN!4),CASHl14),E(4),S(4,5),SPR0C4) 5,SUMAJ(4),SMIN(5),FILL!59),SMPR(5»,T(4,5),AL(5),C0STBI4t COMMON CSSC!4),DIVS!4),REPST(4) COMMON VINVBI4) ,X1(4),X(4,5),ALAVE,B6,06,AINV2I4),PVE! 4),VINV(4),C 1AP{4),COST(4)»SAL(4,5),SREV(4),SUMY<4),UPR0(4),Y(4,5)» Z14),S AVE(5) 2,SMSALI4),SMVI5),VI4,5),BP02(4),RRR2(4),UPROL(4),UPROM(4)*AL0BD(4) 3,B1C0(4),BFD(4),BLDT(4) ,C0STL(4),C0STM(4),COSTC141,SROL(4),SPROM<4 4),SPROL(4), SUMWW,SPROCC4),AAAAI5),000015),SUMOO,WWWW(5),CSHR(4),BR 5AT(4),SUMAA,UC0L(4),CASH2(4),ANPAT(4),CDDDI4),COSAI 4),FRGTI4,51 COMMON SFRGTt 4),ANPBT(4),AlTP(4),CSTG(4 )  PRINT 7, C S S C l D t CSSC ( 2), CSSCI3), CSSCI4) 7 FORMAT(5X5HCSSC 4F9.0/) 18 FORMAT! 5X5H81C0 = , 4F9.0/1 PRINT 19, CSHRfl), CSHRI2), C S HR (3 ) , CSHR(4) 19 FORMAT!5X5HCSHR=, 4F9.0/) PRINT 12, B P S ( l ) , BPS! 2), BPS! 3) , BPS(4)  12 FORMAT(5X5HBPS= 4F9.0/) PRINT 14, B F D ( l ) , BFD(2), 8FDI3), BFDI4) 14 FORMAT(5X5HBFD= 4F9.0/) PRINT 18, B l C O ( l ) , B1C0(2), B1C0I3), B1C0I4) PRINT 29 29 FORMAT ! 79XIH-*-)  C ADMINISTRATOR PRINTOUT PAGE SIX PRINT 1 1 FORMAT 120X31HADMINISTRATOR S PRINTOUT PAGE 6 / ) PRINT 17, B P 0 2 ( i ) , BP02C2), BP02I3), BP02I4) 17 FORMAT!5X5HBP02=4F9.0/) PRINT 2, CSTG!13, CSTG!2), CSTG!3), CSTG(4)  2 FORMAT!5X5HCSTG= 4F9.0/) PRINT 3 3 FORMAT (10X11HFRGT VALUES ) .. RETURN END ORY REQUIREMENTS 000364 BYTES G COMPILER J J J J 04-21-70 10:27:00 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE J J J J C PRINTOUT TO FOLLOW PART FOUR SECONO DIVISION DR BROOM PROGRAM «J) COMMON AITRA,AJJ(4,5),AK,ALUR,AMI,AM2,AN,AUTH,BLRP( 4),COL 1,C0L2,CC 1LC,CST0<4) ,EE(4?,F,FRi,FR2,FR3,Hl,H2 t I A, IB, IC , ID , PL5 ) , PPP W, PS WW , Ph 2WW,R,SURP(4),UH,UF,U5,W1,W2,W3,W4,Z1,Z2, Z3,Z4,Z5,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9,ZZZ1, 3ZZZ2,Q(5J,SAJJ(5),G,BOR(4),BPOl(45),BPS(4 >,RRR1(4),AINV11 4}, 4PVS(4),AJ(4,5),ANPJ(4)» BLN(4)»CASH1(4),E(4),S(4,5),SPR0(4) 5,SUMAJ(4) »SMIN(5),F ILL < 59 ) , S MPR ( 5 ) , T ( 4, 5) , AL ( 51, COSTB(4) COMMON C S SC ( 41»DI V S (4),RE P ST(4) COMMON VINVBI4) t X l ( 4 ) tX( 4, 5) , ALAVE , 86,06, AINV2I 4) ,P VE ( 4) , VI NV (4 ) ,C 1API4),C0ST(4),SAL(4,5),SREV(4),SUMY{4),UPRO14),Y<4,5),Z(4),SAVEI 5) 2,SMSALl4),SMV(5),VI4,5),BP02(4),RRR2*4),UPR0L(4I,UPR0M(4),AL0BDI4) 3,B1C0!4),BFD(4),BLOT 14),COSTL(4),COSTMI4),COSTC{4),SROL!4),SPR0M(4 4) ,SPR0L(4),SUMWW,SPROC14),AAAA(5),000015),SUMOO,WWWW15),CSHR(4),BR 5AT(4),SUMAA,UCOL(4),CASH2(4),ANPAT< 4) ,CDDD(4),C0SA(4),FRGT(4,5) COMMON SFRGTI4),ANPBT14),AITPI 4),CSTGC4)  PRINT 4 4 FORMAT(7HC0MPANY8X1H1, 8X1H2, 8X1H3, 8X1H4) 00 10 I = I t 5 10 PRINT 5, I, F R G T U f I ) , FRGT(2,I), FRGT(3,I), FRGT(4,I) 5 FORMAT (1X4HAREAI3,4F9.0 ) PRINT 7, SFRGT(l), SFRGT(2 ), SFRGT(3), SFRGT(4 ) 7 FORMATC/8HSFRGT = 4F9.0/) PRINT 8, COSA(l), C0SA12), C0SAI3), C0SAI4) . 8F0RMAT15X4HC0SA, F8.0f3F9.0/) PRINT 9, ANPBT(l), ANPB T(2), ANPBT(3), ANPBT(4) 9 FORMAT { 5X5HANPBT , F7.0,3F9.0/) PRINT 11, A I T P ( l ) , AITP(2), AITPI3), AITP(4)  11 FORMAT(5X4HAITP, F8.0,3F9.0/) PRINT 12, ANPATfl), ANPATI2), ANPATI3), ANPAT 14) 12 FORMAT! 5X5HANPAT F7.0,3F9.0/) PRINT 13, D I V S ( l ) , DIVSI2), DIVS(3 ) t 0IVS14) 13 FORMATI 5X4HDIiVS, F8.0,3F9.0/J PRINT 14, CASH 1(1), CASHU2), CASH 1(3), CASH1 ( 4)  14 FORMAT (5X5HCASH1, F7.0,3F9.0/) PRINT 15, CDDD(1), CDDD(2), CDDD13), CD00(4) 15 FORMAT (5X4HCDD0, F8.0» 3F9.0/) PRINT 16, CASH2(l)f CASH2(2), CASH2(3), CASH2(4) 16 FORMAT! 5X5HCASH2, F7.0,3F9.0/) PRINT 17, SURPCUt SURP(2), SURP(3), SURP(4)  17 FORMAT(8HEND.SURP, 4F9.0/) PRINT 18 18 FORMAT (10X15HORDERS BY AREAS) PRINT 19 19 FORMAT(5X4HAREA8X1H1, 8XIH2, 8X1H3, 8X1H4, 8X1H5) PRINT 20, 0000(1), 0000(2), 0000(3), 0000(4), 0000(5)  20 FORMAT( 6H0RDERS, 3X, 5F9.0/) PRINT 21, SUMOO 21 FORMAT(20X15HSUM OF ORDERS = F12.0/) RETURN END DRY REQUIREMENTS 00056C BYTES 3 COMPILER K 04-21-70 10:27:30 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE K C CONTINUED PRINTOUT TO FOLLOW FIRST PART FOUR II PRINTOUT (K) COMMON Al TRA* AJ J!4,5) »AK*ALUR » AMI »AM2 »AN» AUTH,BLRP14), COL 1, C0L2,CG 1LC,CST0(4),EE(4),F,FR 1, FR 2 ,FR 3,H 1 ,H 2 , IA , I B , IC * ID, P* 5),PPPW,PSWW,PW 2WW,R,SURP(4),UH,UF,U5,W1,W2,W3,W4,Z1,Z2,Z3,Z4,Z5,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9,ZZZ1, 3ZZZ2,Q!5),SAJJ(5),G,B0R(4),BP01(45),BPS(4 ) »RRR114)» AINV1(4)» 4PVS(4),AJ!4,5)»ANPJi4),BLN{4),CASH1I4),E! 4) ,S(4,5),SPR0!4) 5,SUMAJI4),SMIN(5),FILL(59),SMPR(5),T14,5),AL(5),COSTB(4) COMMON CSSC(4)»DIVS!4)»REPST(4) COMMON VINVB14) ,XU4),X14, 5), ALAVE,B6,Q6, AINV2! 4) ,PVE1 4) ,VINV(4) t C 1AP(4),C0ST(4),SAL(4,5),SREV14),SUMY(4),UPRO<4),YC4,5),Z!4),SAVE{5} 2,SMSAL(4),SMV!5),VI4,5),BP02<4),RRR2(4),UPROL(4),UPROM(4),AL0BD(4) 3,B1C0(4),BFD(4),BLDT(4),COSTL(4),COST M(4),COSTCI4),SROL(4),SPR0MC4 4),SPROL(4),SUMWW,SPR0C(4),AAAAI5),0000(5),SUMOO,WWWW(5),CSHRi4),BR 5 AT (4), SUMAA,UC0L(4) ,CASH2( 4) , ANPATI 4) ,CDDDU) ,C0SA(4) ,FRGT(4,5) COMMON SFRGT(4),ANPBT(4),A1TPI4),CSTG(4)  PRINT 22 22 FORMAT(10X, 14HSALES BY AREAS) PRINT 39 PRINT 23* WWWW(l), WWWW(2), WWWW(3), WWWW(4), WW«W(5) 23 FORMAT(5HSALES, 5X, 5F9.0/) PRINT 24, SUMWW  24 FORMAT!20X15HSUM OF SALES = F l l . O / l PRINT 25 25 FORMAT!10X, 18HMARKETING BY AREAS) PRINT 39 39 FORMAT!5X4HAREA8X1H1, 8X1H2, 8X1H3, 8X1H4, 8XIH5) PRINT 26, AAAAI 1), AAAAI2), AAAA! 3) , AAAAI4), AAAA(5)  26 FORMAT (11HMARKETING 5F9.0/) PRINT 27, SUMAA 27 FORMAT!20X18HSUM OF MARKETING = F9.0/) PRINT 28 28 FORMAT!7HC0MPANY2X13HT0TAL EXPENSE2XI1HCASH INFLOW, 12X11HT0T. ASSETS2X10HT0T.EQUITY, 2X, 9HSPR0 USEO)  DO 30 I = 1, 4 FIN = BFD(I) + B1C0II) + BLDT!I) TEXP = COSA(I) + SFRGTII) + EII) + SUMAJII) + I I I ) + ALOBD!I)+FIN CINFL = CSHRII) - CDDD(I) TASS = CASH2I I) + RRR2U) + VINV(I) + P V E i l ) TEQU = BLN! I) -»• BP021I) + CSTG! I) + SURPl I)  PRINT 29, I, TEXP, CINFL, TASS, TEQU, SPRO(I) 29 F0RMAT(3XI3, 3X5F12-0 ) 30 CONTINUE PRINT 66 66 FORMAT!79X1H+) PRINT 901  901 FORMAT! 41HEND ADMINISTRATOR S PART ONE PRESS START) RETURN END 10RY REQUIREMENTS 000478 BYTES G COMPILER L 04-2 1-70 10:27:53 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE L C I-FIFTH PART OF DIVIDED PROGRAM FOR CR BROOMS MANAGEMENT GAME (L) COMMON AITRA,AJJ{4,5),AK,ALUR,AMI,AM2,AN,AUTH,BLRP(4),C0L1,C0L2,CO 1LCCST014) ,EE14),F,FR1, FR2, FR3, HI ,H2, IA , I B , IC , ID ,P( 5) *PPPW, PS WW, PW 2WW,R,SURP14),UH,UF,U5»W1 *W2*W3,W4,Z1 ,Z2 ,Z3, Z4,Z5,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9,ZZZ1, 3ZZZ2,Qi 5),SAJJi 5),G,B0R< 4),BP01145),BPS(4),RRRIt4),AINV114), 4PV S 14) ,AJ14,5),ANPJ14),BLN14)» CAS HI14) , E t 4 ) , SI 4, 5) ,SPR0I4) 5,SUMAJC 4),SMIN15),FILL(59),SMPR(5),T(4,5),AL(5),COSTB(4) COMMON CSSC(4),DIVS14),REPST( 4) COMMON VINVB14) ,XU4),X(4,5),ALAVE,B6,D6,AINV2(4),PVE(4),VINV1 4),C 1AP14),COST!4)* SAL!4,5),SREV(4),SUMYI 4),UPRO(4),Y(4,5) ,Z14),SAVE15) 2,SMSAL!4),SMV!5),V14,5),BP0214),RRR214),UPROLt4),UPROM(4)»AL08D(4) 3,B1C0!4),BFDI4),BLDT(4),COSTL(4),COSTM14),COSTC(4),SROL(4),SPROM{4 41,SPROL(4),SUMWW,SPROC!4),AAAA(5),0000(5),SUMOO,WWWWI 5),CSHR(4),8R 5AT(4),SUMAA»UC0L(4),CASH2(4),ANPAT(4),GODD(4),COSAI4),FRGT(4,5) COMMON SFRGTI4),ANPBT(4),AlTP(4),CSTG(4 )  C PRINTOUTS OF STATEMENTS - COMPANY DATA ONLY FOR SALES ANALYSIS C SHOULD NOT THIS BE OUTER LOOP SO HAVE 4 SEPARATE OUTPUTS 00 230 IPR = 1, IB 1 = IPR PRINT 65 65 F O R M A T ( 1 4 X , 'BAYLOR TOP MNGT. GAME')  PRINT 2 2 FORMAT!///) PRINT 66, I, IA, IC 66 FORMAT (8HCOMPANY 12 ,15X6X8HINDUSTRY13,15X7HQUARTER13,///) PRINT 67 67 FORMAT(14HSALES ANALYSIS 34X24H(TOTALS ARE APPROXIMATE)/)  PRINT 68 68 FORMAT!22X1HIf9XIH2,9X1H3,9X1H4,9X1H57X5HT0TAL/) PRINT 69, Y ( I , 1 ) , Y d , 2 ) , Y d , 3 ) , Y ( I , 4 ) , Y d , 5 ) , SUMY( I ) 69 FORMAT(15H0RDERS (UNITS) F9.0, 5F10.0) SMSALII ) = SALI I, D + SALi 1,2) + SAM 1,31 + SAL(I,4) + SAL!I,5) PRINT 71 ,SAL( I, 1 ) ,SAL ( 1,2 ) , SAL(I,3), SAL(I,4), SAL(I,5), SMSALII) 71 FORMAT!15HSALES (UNITS) F9.0,5F10.0) PRINT 72, A J I I , 1 ) . AJ1I,2), AJ!I,3), A j i l , 4 ) , A J I I . 5 ) , SUMAJII) 72 FORMAT!15HMARKETING . F9.0, 5F10.0/) PRINT 73, SREV(I) 73 FORMAT 127HTOTAL REVENUE FROM SALES = ,35X,F 12. 0/////) C PRINT OUT SALES ANALYSIS BY 5 AREAS AND IN TOTAL  C !DATA FOR ALL 4 COMPANIES) C CALCULATES SUM OF ORDERS FOR EACH AREA WITH 4 COMPANIES IN EACH C TOTAL INCLUDES ALL ORDERS IN ALL AREAS PRINT 74, AN PR I NT 68 74 FORMAT(23HINDUSTRY SALES ANALYSIS* 10X17HBUSINESS INDEX = F6.2/) PRINT 69, 0000(1), 000012), 000013), 000014), 000015), SUMOO PRINT 71, WWWWtl), WWWW 12), WWWW 13)» WWWW14), WWWWI5), SUMWW C CALCULATES TOTAL MARKETING BY AREAS AND GRAND TOTAL PRINT 72, A A A A(1), AAAAI2), AAAA!3)» AAAA14), AAAA15), SUMAA PRINT 2 PRINT 10  10 FORMAT I23HINDUSTRY PRICE ANALYSIS/) DO 260 J = 1, IB 260 PRINT 62, J , SIJ , 1) *S!J•2),S!J,3),S! J,4),S1J , 5) G COMPILER L 04-21-70 10:27:53 PAGE 0002 62 FORMAT ( 12HPRICES, FIRMI3, F9.0, 4F10.0) PRINT 2 PRINT 101, IC 101 FORMAT(48HPR0DUCTION, CAPACITY, ANO INVENTORY, ANALYSIS ,  16HPERI00I 3) PRINT 10 2 102 FORMATU7X9H9/10 CUR.4X7HCURRENT 4X10H11/10 CUR.4X10HPLANT CAP.3X, 19HEN0. INV./J PRINT 103, UPROL(I), UPRO!I), UPROM(I), CAPII), AINV2U) 103 FORMAT! 17HQUANT ITY 1 M UNITS JF9.Q, FU.O, F14.0, F14.0, F12.0)  IF IAINV2UI) 202,202,200 200 IF (AINV2II) - UPRO(I)) 203, 203, 201 201 UCST = VINVU) / AINV2II) GO TO 204 202 UCST = 0.0 GO TQ 204 s  203 UCST = COST(B) 204 PRINT 104, COSTL(I), COST(I), CQSTM(I), COSTCU), UCST 104 FORMAT!12HUNIT COSTIS) 5XF9.2, F11.2, 2F14.2, F12.2) PRINT 105, SPROLm, SPR01I), SPROM!!), SPROC i I) , VlNV! I ) 105 FORMAT!14HT0TAL COST!M$) 3XF9.0, Fl1.0, 2F14.0, F12.0) PRINT 61  61 FORMAT I79X1H+) 230 CONTINUE RETURN END ORY REQUIREMENTS 000950 BYTES G COMPILER M 04-21-70 10:28:26 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE M C I I - FIFTH PART OF DIVIDED PROGRAM FOR DR BROOMS MANAGEMENT GAME1M) COMMON AITRA t AJJ(4,5),AK,ALUR,AMI,AM2,AN,AUTH,BLRP14),C0L1,C0L2,CO 1LCCST014),£E(4),F fFR1,FR2,FR3,H1,H2,IA,IB,IC,ID,Pi 5),PPPW,PSWW,PW 2WW,R,SURP14),UH,UF,U5,Wi,W2,W3,W4,Zl,Z2,Z3,Z4,Z5,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9,ZZZl, 3ZZZ2,Q15),SAJJ15),G,BOR14),BPO11 45) ,BPS{4),RRRU4),AINVU4), 4PVS14>,AJ14,5),ANPJI4),BLN14),CASH1(4),E(4),S14,5),SPR0(4) 5,SUMAJ(4),SMIN(5),FILL159),SMPR(5),T(4,5),ALI5)•COSTB(4) COMMON CSSC14),DIVS14),REPST1 4) COMMON VINVB14) ,X114) ,X14,5),ALAVE,B6,06,A INV2!4),PVE14),VINV14),C 1AP14),C0ST14),SAL14,5),SREV14),SUMY 14),UPRO(4),Y14,5),Z14),SAVE15) 2,SMSAL14),SMV15),V14,5),BP02(4),RRR214),UPR0L14),UPR0M14),AL0BD14) 3,B1C0(4),BFD14) ,BLDT{4),C0STL(4),COST M14),COSTC14),SROL14),SPROM14 4),SPR0L(4),SUMWW,SPROC14),AAAA15),000015),SUMOO,WWWW15), CSHR14),BR 5AT 14),SUMAA,UCOL14),CASH2(4),ANPAT14),CDDD14),COSA14),FRGTl4,5) COMMON SFRGT14),ANPBT14),AITP14),CSTGI4)  DO 100 1=1,IB PRINT 65 65 FORMAT1'1*,14X,*BAYLOR TOP MNGT. GAME, PG.-2») PRINT 2 PRINT 66, I t I A, IC 66 FORMAT 18HC0MPANY 12,15X6X8HINDUSTRYI3,15X7HQUARTERI3,///)  PRINT 75 75 F0RMAT115HPR0FIT AND LOSS,15X9HCASH FL0W15X13HBALANCE SHEET/) PRINT 2 2 FORMAT!///) PRINT 76, SREV(I), CASH11I), CASH21I) 76 FORMAT 118HSALES INCOME , F9.0, 3X14HBEG.CASH BAL. , F9.0, IX, 14HCASH8X,F10. 0) PRINT 77, C0SA1I), RRR2U) 77 FORMAT 115HC0ST OF GDS SLD, 3XF9.0, 3X14H , 10X, 18HA/C REC. 4XF10.0) PRINT 78, VINVU) 78 FORMAT 118 X9H , 27X9HI NVENTORY3XF10 . 0)  PRINT 79, CSHR1I), PVE11) 79 FORMAT 130X8HRECEIPTS 6XF9.0, 1X12HPLANT INVST.F10.0) ASSET = CASH21I) + RRR21I) + VINV(I) + PVE1I) PRINT 81, CDDD1I), ASSET 81 FORMAT (30X10HD1SBRSMNTS4XF9.0,1X10HT0T.ASSETS2XF10.0 ) PRINT 82  82 FORMAT 118X9H* * 1 2 X 1 2 H f • • • • » • • • • » * , 10X12H'«••••••••••/) CSHIN = CSHR1I) - CDDD1I) PRINT 83, SFRGT1I), CSHIN 83 FORMAT 17HFREIGHT, UXF9.0, 3X10HNET INFLOW, 4XF9.0) PRINT 84, Ei I) , BLN! I) 84 FORMAT 17HR AND D, UXF9.0, 3X, 12H10R OUTFLOW) 2X9H '» ' ' « » ' » \ 1 X , 11OHBANK L0ANS3XF9.0) PRINT 85, SUMAJ1I), BP021I) 85 FORMAT 19HMARKETING 9X, F9.0, 27X, 12HB0NDS PAYBL. 1XF9.0) PRINT 86, Z 1 I ) , CASH21I) 86 FORMAT!12HDEPREC IATI0N6X,F9.0,3X,13HEND.CASH BAL., 11XF9.0,13X10H" " " " " ) PRINT 87, AL0BD1I) 87 FORMAT!14HBA0 DEBTS LOSS4XF9.0,16X11H»••»•••»••») PRINT 88, CSTG1I) G COMPILER M 04-21-70 10s28:26 PAGE 0002 88 FORMAT (54X10HCAP.STOCK 3XF9.0) PRINT 89, SURP(I) 89 FORMAT!17X10H«»••»• * * * * 27X,7HSURPLUS6XF9.0> PRINT 91  91 FORMATI40X,27X10H««»»" f t««) WORTH = CSTGU) + SURP!I) 0PEX=COSA! I ) + SFRGTII I+ E I I ) + SUMAJl I}. + Z4I )+ALOBD< I > OPPR=SREV(I)-OP EX PRINT 92.0PPR 92 FORMAT! 16H0PERATING PROFI T2XF9. Q, 40X f 10H' " " • " • " ) '  EQUIT = WORTH + BLN! I) + 8P021I) PRINT 94, BFD1I), EQUIT 94 FORMAT! 17HB0ND FLOT DISC IX,F9.0,27X10HTOT.EQUITY3XF9.0) PRINT 95, B1C0II) 95 FORMAT!13HB0ND INTEREST5XF9.01 PRINT 96, BLDT! I) s  96 FORMAT 118HBANK LOAN DISCOUNT, F9.0) PRINT 97 97 FORMAT! 18 X10H ) FIN = BFD1I) + B1C01I) + BLDTI I) PR INT 97 EX EN= COS A! I ) +SFRGT (I ) +E( I ) +SUMAJ ( I)+Z! IKAL0BD1 I ) »F I N  PRINT 98, EXEN 98 FORMAT!14HT0T- OPER. EXP,4XF9.0) PRINT 107, ANPBT(I) 107 FORMAT!18HNET PROF. BEFR.TAX F9.0) PRINT 93, AITP1II 93 FORMAT (12HINC0ME TAX ES6X F9.0}  PRINT 99, ANPAT!I) 99 FORMAT!17HNET PROF.AFTR.TAX1XF9.0) PRINT 91 PRINT .1 1 FORMAT (40X39X1H+) 100 CONTINUE  RETURN END ORY REQUIREMENTS 000934 BYTES G COMPILER N 04-21-70 10:28:57 PAGE 0001 SUBROUTINE N C PART SIX OF TOP MANAGEMENT PROGRAM BY OR. BROOM IN) COMMON AlTRA,AJJ(4,5),AK,ALUR,AMI,AM2,AN,AUTH,BLRPC4),COL 1,C0L2,C0 1LC,CST0(4),EE(4),F,FR1,FR2,FR3,H1,H2,IA,IB,IC,ID,PI 5 ?,PPPW,PS WW, PM 2WH,R,SURP(4),UH,UF,U5,W1,W2,W3,W4,Z1,Z2,Z3,Z4,Z5,Z6,Z7,Z8,Z9,ZZZ1, 3ZZZ2,Q( 5) ,SAJJ( 5),G,BOR(4),BP01(45),BPS(4),RRR1(4),AlNV1(4), 4PVS(4),AJ(4,5),ANPJ(4),BLN(4),CASH1(4),E(4),S(4,5),SPROt4) 5,SUMAJ(4),SMIN(5),FILL(59),SMPR{5),T(4,5),AL(5),C0STB(4) COMMON CSSC(4),DIVS(4)»REPST(4) COMMON VINVB(4),X1(4),X(4.5),ALAVE,B6,06,AINV2(4),PVE(4),VINV(4),C 1AP{4) ,C0ST(4),SAL(4,5),SREV(4),SUMY(4),UPR0(4) ,Y(4,5) , Z ( 4) , SA VE ( 5) 2,SMSAL( 4) ,SMV<5) ,V(4,5) ,BPG2 (4 ) ,RRR2 (4 ) ,UPROL (4) ,UPROM(4 )., ALOBD! 4) 3,B1C0(4),BFD(43,BLDT(4),C0STL(4),C0STM(4) ,C0STC(4) , SROL (4) , SPR0MI4 4),SPROL(4),SUMWW,SPR0CI4),AAAA(5J,000045>,SUMOO,WWWW(5),CSHR(4),BR 5ATI4),SUMAA,UC0L(4),CASH2(4),ANPATI4),CDDD(4),C0SAI4J,FRGT(4,5) COMMON SFRGT(4),ANPBTl4},AITP(4),CSTG(4)  C CONSTANTS AND HISTORY DATA FOR NEXT QUARTER PRINT 106 106 FORMAT(* 1',40X,* CONST ANTS €HISTORY NEXT QTR *) N = 1 IC1 = IC + 1 PRINT 1, IB,IC1, IA, ID, N  1 FORMAT(12,313, 66X, 13) N = N + 1 PRINT 13, F, Hit H2, AK, AMI, AM2, N 13 FORMAT (6F10.2,17X 13) N = N + 1 PRINT 2, P ( l ) , P(2), P(3), P(4), P(5), R, Wl , W2 , N  2 FORMAT! 7F10. 2, F5.2, 15) N = N + I PRINT 15, Z l , Z2, Z3, Z4, Z5, 26, Z7, W3 , N 15 FORMAT(6F10.2,F8.2,F8.0,I4) N = N + I PRINT 3, Z8, Z9, C P U , C0L2, COLC, ZZZ1, ZZZ2, N  3 FORMATI7F10.2, 7X, 13) N = N + 1 PRINT 16, PPPW, PWWW, PSWW, FR1» FR2, FR3, AITRA , N 16 FORMAT(3F10.4, 4F10.2, 5X ,15) N = N + 1 PRINT 4, AUTH, W4, ALUR, UH, UF, U5 , N  4 FORMAT(6F10.2, 17X, 13) DO 310 1=1,IB J=0 N = N + 1 PRINT 5,I,J,IA, A J J ( I , 1 ) , A J J ( I , 2 ) , A J J ( I , 3 ) , A J J ( I , 4 ) , A J J ( I , 5 ) , XN 5 FORMAT ( 12, 213, 5F8.0, 29X, 13) N = N + 1 J=l PRI NT 6,I,J,I A,PV E( I),AINV2( I),RRR2(I),EE(I),BP02II), COST(I),N 6 F0RMATU2, 213, 6F8.0, 21X, 13) N = N + 1  J=2 310 PRINT 5 , I , J , IA,CASH2( II) , SURP(I), VINV(I), CSTO(I), BLRP(I) , N N = N + I G COMPILER N 04-21-70 10:28:57 PAGE 0002 PRINT 14,IC1, IA, N 14 FORMAT <2H 02 13,69X13) 258 PRINT 2 59 259 FORMAT (32H0ONT STOP NOW, IM JUST BEGINNING /)  PRINT 269 269 FORMAT!• REACHED END OF PROG» NO STOP? SEE STOP 999») RETURN END IORY REQUIREMENTS 0006B4 BYTES APPENDIX III The data given in the Appendix covers the constants, history and decisions necessary to calculate Quarter zero output. CONSTANTS IB = 4 P(2) =5 1.25 Z6 5 0 PSWW = . 0 1 7 5 IC = 0 P ( 3 ) = 1.25 Z7 = 6 FR1 3 IA = 1 P ( 4 ) = 1 . 2 5 ¥ 3 = 1 0 0 0 0 FR2 2 ID = 5 P ( 5 ) = 2.62 z 8 . 9 0 FR3 1 F = . 5 0 R 6 5 Z9 1.10 AITRA = . 4 7 HI = 2 . 0 5 Wl 1 0 C0L1 = . 6 0 AUTH = 2 2 0 0 0 H2 = 8 0 0 0 W2 = . 9 0 C0L2 = . 9 8 ¥ 4 = . 9 0 AK = . 6 0 Zl = . 0 4 C0LC 4 0 ALUR = . 0 1 AMI = 2 Z2 = 6 0 ZZZ1 = 1.00 UH = 7 5 AM2 = 5 0 Z3 = 1 . 0 8 4 6 ZZZ2 = 2 0 UF = 3 3 AN = 1.0 z 4 3 6 0 0 PPP¥ = . 0 8 U5 6 8 P(l)= 1.25 Z5 = 3 P¥¥¥ = . 0 1 5 - 8 5 -HISTORY The history is the same for each firm AJJ(I,J) = 200 AJJ(I,J) = 200 EE(I) 2 8 0 SURP(I) = 1 0 2 0 6 AJJ(I,J) = 4 0 PVS(I) = 1 5 6 0 0 BP01(I) = 0 VINVB(I) = 1 2 9 5 AJJ(I,J) = 4 0 AINVI(I) 5 5 COSTB(I) = 0 CSTO(I) = 1 7 0 0 0 AJJ(I,J) = 40 RRR1(I) = 7000 CASHI(I) = 3311 BLRP(I) = 0 DECISIONS The decisions are the same for each firm in Quarter zero. E(I) = 6 0 AJ(I,J) 270 S(I,J) = 6 0 ANPJ(I) = 6 2 4 AJ(I,J) = 290 S(I,J) = 6 0 SPRO(I) = 1 2 4 8 0 BOR(I) 0 AJ(I,J) = 8 0 S(I,J) 6 0 BLN(I) 0 REPST(I) = 0 AJ(I,J) = 8 8 0 S(I,J) 6 0 BPS(I) 0 DIVS(I) = 0 AJ(I,J) = 8 0 S(I,J) 6 0 CSSC(I) = 0 APPENDIX IV The Appendix contains the Quarter zero output for both the administrator and participants. The last page of out-put covers the history and constants required for period one. - 87 -iXECUTION TERMINATED .RUN GIB2 5=GIB3  iXECUTION BEGINS ADMINISTRATOR S PRINTOUT PAGE ONE INDUSTRY 1 QUARTER 0 BEGINNING AJJ VALUES COMPANY 1 2 3 4 ^REA I 200. 40. 40. 40. ^REA 2 40. 200 . 40. 40. ^REA 3 40. 40. 200. 40. ^REA 4 40. 40. 40. 200. kREA 5 200. 200. 200. 200. 5MIN 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 3= 1 .08333302 1.08333302 1.08333302 1. 08333302 1.08333 302 >vs 15600. 15600. 15600. 15600. PART A B = I t 2 t 3, 4 D = 1. 2, 3 t 4, 5 F =0 .50 Hl= 2.05 H2 = 8000. AK = 0.60 Ml = 2.00 M2 = 50.00 PI = 1.25 P2 = 1.25 P3 = 1.25 P4 = 1.25 P5 = 2.62 U FOR COMPANY AND AREA COMPANY 1 2 3 .4 AREA 1 75. 33. 33. 33. AREA 2 33. 75. 33. 33. AREA 3 33. 33. 75. 33. AREA 4 33. 33. 33 . 75. AREA 5 68. 68. 68. 68. 86 = 4. 06 5. R = 65. Wl = 10.00 W2 = 0.90 W3 = 10000. ADMINISTRATOR S PRINTOUT PAGE TWO Z l = 0.04 Z2= 60. Z3 = 1.08 Z4= 3600. Z5= 3. Z6 = 50. Z7= 6 . Z8 = 0.90 Z9= 1.10 ALUR = 0.01 C0L1 = 0.60 C0L2 = 0.98 COLC = 40. 00 ZZZ1 = 1. ZZZ2 = 20. AUTH 22000. 22000 22000 •» 22000. PSWW = 0.0175 PPPW = 0.08 PWWW = 0.015 FR 1 = 3. FR2 = 2. FR3 = 1. AITRA = 0.47 RT B AN = 1.00 IMPANY 1 2 3 4 E = 60 . 60 . 60. 60. EE = 200. 200. 200. 200. G = 2 . 1499986 6 5MPANY 1 2 3 4 SUMJD = 800. 800. 800. 800. IMPANY 1 2 3 4 JJD 1 294 .00 72.00 72 .00 72.00 JJD 2 72.00 294.00 72.00 72.00 JJD 3 72.00 72.00 294.00 72.00 JJD 4 72.00 72.00 72.00 294.00 JJD 5 282.00 282.00 282.00 282.00 .1= 1.87744999 AL2= 1.87744999 AL3= 1.87744999 AL4= 1.87744999 AL5= 1.8838644 DMPANY 1 2 3 4 SO = 60. 60. 60. 60. SD = 60. 60. 60 . 60. SO = 60. 60. 60. 60. SD = 60. 60. 60. 60. SD = 60. 60. 60. 60. SAVG 60. 60. 60. 60. 60 ADMINISTRATOR S PRINTOUT PAGE THREE T VALUES OMPANY 1 2 3 4 iREA 1 327,9666 144.3053 144.3053 144.3053 kREA 2 144.3053 327.9666 144.3053 144.3053 iRE A 3 144.3053 144.3053 327.9666 144.3053 kREA 4 144.3053 144.3053 144.3053 327.9666 WEA 5 298.3721 298.3721 298.3721 298.3721 ALAVE= 1.87873268 V VALUES OMPANY 1 2 3 4 WEA I 0.89960039 0.89960039 0.89960039 0.89960039 *REA 2 0.89960039 0.89960039 0.89960039 0.89960039 \REA 3 0.89960039 0.89960039 0.89960039 0.89960039 ^REA 4 0.89960039 0.89960039 0.89960039 0.89960039 ^RE A 5 0.90267372 0.90267372 0.90267372 0.90267372 X VALUES ;OMPANY 1 2 3 4 ^REA 1. 0.25000006 0.25000006 0.25000006 0.25000006 *REA 2 0.25000006 0.25000006 0.25000006 0.25000006 <\REA 3 0.25000006 0.25000006 0.25000006 0.25000006 ftREA 4 0.25000006 0.25000006 0.25000006 0.25000006 AREA 5 Q.25000000 0.25000000 0.25000000 0.25000000 Y VALUES COMPANY 1 AREA 1 82.00000000 AREA 2-36.00000000 AREA 3 36.00000000 AREA 4 36.00000000 AREA 5 75.00000000 COMPANY 2 AREA 1 36.00000000 AREA 2 82.00000000 AREA 3 36.00000000 AREA 4 36.00000000 AREA 5 75.00000000 COMPANY 3 AREA 1 36.00000000 AREA 2 36.00000000 AREA 3 82.00000000 AREA 4 36.00000000 AREA 5 75.00000000 ADMINISTRATOR S PRINTOUT PAGE FOUR O M P A N Y 4 i R E A 1 3 6 . 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 >REA 2 3 6 . 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 L R E A 3 3 6 . 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 i R E A 4 8 2 . 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 i R E A 5 7 5 . 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 A P 2 6 0 . 2 6 0 . 2 6 0 . 2 6 0 . 6 2 4 . 6 2 4 . 6 2 4 . 6 2 4 . » V E = 1 5 6 0 0 . 1 5 6 0 0 . 1 5 6 0 0 . 1 5 6 0 0 . ( 1 = 1 . 0 2 9 0 4 3 2 0 1 . 0 2 9 0 4 3 2 0 1 . 0 2 9 0 4 3 2 0 1 . 0 2 9 0 4 3 2 0 J P R O 2 4 0 . 2 4 0 . 2 4 0 . 2 4 0 . :OST 5 1 . 9 6 . . . 5 1 . 9 6 5 1 . 9 6 5 1 . 9 6 U N V 5 5 . 5 5 . 5 5 . 5 5 . f N V + U P R O 2 9 5 . 2 9 5 . 2 9 5 . 2 9 5 . S U M Y = 2 6 5 . 2 6 5 . 2 6 5 . 2 6 5 . 5 M S A L = 2 6 5 . 2 6 5 . 2 6 5 . 2 6 5 . S A L V A L U E S C O M P A N Y 1 2 3 4 XREA 1 8 2 . 3 6 . 3 . 6 . . 3 6 . A R E A 2 3 6 . 8 2 . 3 6 . 3 6 . A R E A 3 3 6 . 3 6 . 8 2 . 3 6 . A R E A 4 3 6 . 3 6 . 3 6 . 8 2 . A R E A 5 7 5 . 7 5 . 7 5 . 7 5 . A I N V 2 3 0 . 3 0 . 3 0 . 3 0 . S R E V 1 5 9 0 0 . 1 5 9 0 0 . 1 5 9 0 0 . 1 5 9 0 0 . V I . N V B . 1 2 9 5 . 1 2 9 5 . 1 2 9 5 . 1 2 9 5 . V I N V 1 5 5 9 . 1 5 5 9 . 1 5 5 9 . 1 5 5 9 . B E G . S U R P 1 0 2 0 6 . 1 0 2 0 6 . 1 0 2 0 6 . 1 0 2 0 6 . A D M I N I S T R A T O R ; S P R I N T O U T P A G E 5 R R R 1 = 7 0 0 0 . 7 0 0 0 . 7 0 0 0 . 7 0 0 0 . A L O B D 7 0 . 7 0 . 7 0 . 7 0 . U C O L 1 6 4 4 0 . 1 6 4 4 0 . 1 6 4 4 0 . 1 6 4 4 0 . RRR2 6390. 6390. 6390. 6390. CSTO 17000. 17000. 17000. 17000. REPST 0. 0. 0. 0. BLN CU 0~. 0. 0^ BLDT= 0. 0. 0. 0. BLRP= 0. 0. 0. 0. BRAT = 0.07999998 0.07999998 0.07999998 0.07999998 BOR= 0. 0. 0. 0. BP01= 0. 0. 0. 0. 1Z8)(UPRO)= 216. 216. 216. 216. (Z9MUPR0) = 264. 264. 264. 264. ZZ= 260. 260. 260. 260. 5PRO(B,C,Z8) 11381. 11381. 11381. 11381. SPRO(B,C,Z9) 13562. 13562. 13562. 13562. 5PR0(B,C,ZZ) 13381. 13381. 13381. 13381. :0ST(B,C» Z8) 52.6886 52.6886 52.6886 52.6886 C0STIB,C,Z9) 51.3729 51.3729 51.3729 51.3729 :0ST(B,C,ZZ) 51.4640 51.4640 51.4640 51.4640 CSSC 0. 0. 0. 04 CSHR= 16440. 16440. 16440. 16440. BPS= 0. 0. 0. 0. BFD= 0. 0. 0. 0* B1C0= 0. 0. 0. 0. ADMINISTRATOR S PRINTOUT PAGE 6 BP02= 0~^  0^  0~. OT CSTG= 17000. 17000. 17000. 17000. FRGT VALUES COMPANY 1 2 3 4^  AREA 1 82. 72. 72. 72. AREA 2 72. 82. 72. 72. AREA 3 72. 72. 82. 72. AREA 4 72. 72. 72. 82. AREA 5 225. 225. 225. 225. F R G T = 5 2 3 . 5 2 3 . 5 2 3 . 5 2 3 . COSA 1 2 2 1 6 . 1 2 2 1 6 . 1 2 2 1 6 . 1 2 2 1 6 . ANPBT 1 6 0 7 . 1 6 0 7 . 1 6 0 7 . 1 6 0 7 . A I T P 7 5 5 . 7 5 5 . 7 5 5 . 7 5 5 . ANPAT 8 5 2 . 8 5 2 . 8 5 2 . 8 5 2 . D I V S 0 . 0 . 0 . 0 . C A S H ! 3 3 1 1 . 3 3 1 1 . 3 3 1 1 . 3 3 1 1 . GOOD 1 5 2 4 2 . 1 5 2 4 2 . 1 5 2 4 2 . 1 5 2 4 2 . C A S H 2 4 5 0 9 . 4 5 0 9 . 4 5 0 9 . 4 5 0 9 . ;NO .SURP 1 1 0 5 8 . 1 1 0 5 8 . 1 1 0 5 8 . 1 1 0 5 8 . O R D E R S BY. A R E A S A R E A 1 2 3 4 5 )RDERS 1 9 0 . 1 9 0 . 1 9 0 . 1 9 0 . 3 0 0 . SUM O F ORDERS = 1 0 6 0 . S A L E S BY A R E A S A R E A 1 2 3 4 5 S A L E S 1 9 0 . 1 9 0 . 1 9 0 . 1 9 0 . 3 0 0 . SUM O F S A L E S = 1 0 6 0 . M A R K E T I N G BY A R E A S A R E A 1 2 3 4 5 M A R K E T I N G 5 3 0 . 5 3 0 . 5 3 0 5 3 0 . 1 0 8 0 . SUM O F M A R K E T I N G = 3 2 0 0 . rOMPANY T O T A L E X P E N S E C A S H INFLOW T O T . A S S E T S T O T . E Q U I T Y SPRO U S E D 1 1 4 2 9 3 . 1 1 9 8 . 2 8 0 5 8 . 2 8 0 5 8 . 1 2 4 8 0 . 2 1 4 2 9 3 . 1 1 9 8 . 2 8 0 5 8 . 2 8 0 5 8 . 1 2 4 8 0 . 3 1 4 2 9 3 . 1 1 9 8 . 2 8 0 5 8 . 2 8 0 5 8 . 1 2 4 8 0 . 4 1 4 2 9 3 . 1 1 9 8 . 2 8 0 5 8 . 2 8 0 5 8 . 1 2 4 8 0 . END A D M I N I S T R A T O R S PART ONE P R E S S S T A R T BAYLOR TOP MNGT. GAME OMPANY INDUSTRY QUARTER 0 ALES ANALYSIS (TOTALS ARE APPROXIMATE) 4 5 TOTAL IRDERS (UNITS) .ALES (UNITS) IARKETING 82. 82. 290. OTAL REVENUE FROM SALES = 36. 36. 80. 36. 36. 80. 36. 36. 80. 75. 75. 270. 265. 265. 800. 15900. INDUSTRY SALES ANALYSIS BUSINESS INDEX = 1.00 TOTAL 3RDERS (UNITS) 5ALES (UNITS) MARKETING  190, 190. 530. 190. 190. 530. 190. 190. 53 0. 190. 190. 530. 300. 300. 1080, 1060. 1060. 3200. INDUSTRY PRICE ANALYSIS 'RICES, FIRM 1 'RICES, FIRM 2 >RICES, FIRM 3 PRICES, FIRM 4 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60 . 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60, PRODUCTION, CAPACITY, AND INVENTORY, ANALYSIS PERIOD 0 9/10 CUR. CURRENT 11/10 CUR. PLANT CAP. END. INV, 3UANTI TY( M UNITS) 216. 240. JNIT COST($) 52.69 51.96 TOTAL. COST ( M S I . . 11381. 12480. 264. 51.37 13562. 260. 51 .46 13381. 30. 51.96 15 59. BAYLOR TOP MNGT. GAME OMPANY INDUSTRY 1 QUARTER 0 ;ALES ANALYSIS (TOTALS ARE APPROXIMATE) 4 5 TOTAL IRDERS (UNITS) ALES (UNITS) IARKETING 36. 36. 80. OTAL REVENUE FROM SALES = 82. 82. 290. 36, 36, 80. 36. 36. 80. 75. 75. 270. 265 , 265. 800, 15900, NOUSTRY SALES ANALYSIS BUSINESS INDEX = 1.00 TOTAL 3RDERS (UNITS) JALES (UNITS) IARKETING 190. 190 . 530, 190. 190. 530. 190. 190, 53 0. 190. 190. 530. 300. 300, 1080. 1060. 1060. 3200. NDUSTRY PRICE ANALYSIS >RICES, 'RICES, 'RICES, 'RICES, FIRM FIRM FIRM FIRM 1 2 3 4 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60, 60, 60, 60, 60 -j 60, 60. 60, •RODUCTION, CAPACITY, AND INVENTORY, ANALYSIS PERIOD 0 9/10 CUR. CURRENT 11/10 CUR. PLANT CAP. END. INV. 1UANTI TY IM UNITS) 216. 240. IN IT COST($) 52.69 51.96 OTAL COST(M$) 11381. 12480. 264. 51.37 13562. 260. 51.46 133 81. 30. 51 .96 1559. BAYLOR TOP MNGT. GAME OMPANY INDUSTRY QUARTER 0 iALES ANALYSIS (TOTALS ARE APPROXIMATE) 4 5 TOTAL IRDERS (UNITS) iALES (UNITS) IARKETING 36. 36. 80. 36. 36. 80. 82. 82, 290. 36. 36. 80. OTAL REVENUE FROM SALES 75. 75. 270. 265, 265. 800. 15900, INDUSTRY SALES ANALYSIS BUSINESS INDEX = 1.00 3R0ERS (UNITS) SALE S (UNITS) IARKETING  190. 190. 530. 190. 190. 530. 190. 190. 530, 190. 190. 530. 300. 300, 1080, TOTAL 1060. 1060. 3200. INDUSTRY PRICE ANALYSIS 'RICES, FIRM 1 60. >.RICE.St FIRM 2. 60. >RICES, FIRM 3 60. PRICES, FIRM 4 60. 60. 60. 60, 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60, 60. 60. 60. >R0DUCTI0N, CAPACITY, AND INVENTORY, ANALYSIS PERIOD 0 9/10 CUR. CURRENT 11/10 CUR. PLANT CAP. END. INV. 3UANTITY( M UNITS) 216. 240* JNIT COST($) 52.69 51.96 fOTAL COST(M$) 11381. 12480. 264. 51.37 13562. 260. 51 .46 133 81. 30. 51.96 1559. BAYLOR TOP MNGT. GAME OMPANY INDUSTRY QUARTER 0 iALES ANALYSIS (TOTALS ARE APPROXIMATE) 4 5 TOTAL IRDERS (UNITS) »ALES (UNITS) MARKETING 36. 36. 80. OTAL REVENUE FROM SALES = 36. 36. 80. 36. 36. 80. 82. 82. 290. 75. 75. 270. 265. 265, 800. 15900, INDUSTRY SALES ANALYSIS BUSINESS INDEX = 1 .00 3RDERS (UNITS) 5ALES (UNITS) IARKET ING 1 190. 190 . 530. 190. 190. 530. 190. 190. 530. 190. 190. 530. 300. 300. 1080. TOTAL 1060. 1060. 3200. NDUSTRY PRICE ANALYSIS >RICES» FIRM 1 >RICES» FIRM 2 •RICES, FIRM 3 >RICES, FIRM 4 60. 60 . 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60; 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60. 60-6 0. >RODUCTION, CAPACITY, AND INVENTORY, ANALYSIS PERIOD 0 9/10 CUR. CURRENT 11/10 CUR. PLANT CAP. END. INV 3UANTITY(M UNITS) 216. 240. JNIT COST($) 52.69 51.96 fOTAL COST(M$) 11381. 12480. 264. 51.37 13562. 260. 51 .46 13381. 30. 51.96 1559. BAYLOR TOP MNGT. GAME, PG.-2 OMPANY 1 INDUSTRY 1 QUARTER 0 ROFIT AND LOSS CASH FLOW BALANCE SHEET .ALES INCOME 15900. BEG.CASH BAL. 3311. CASH 4509. OST OF GDS SLD 12216. A/C REC. 6390. INVENTORY 1559 . RECEIPTS 16440. PLANT INVST. 15600. OISBRSMNTS 15242. TOT .ASSETS 28058. * t « • • • t • i H U M I l l l l t M l l l l l l i t i i REIGHT 523. NET INFLOW 1198. > AND 0 60. {OR OUTFLOW) i i i i i i i i i BANK LOANS 0. 1ARKET ING 800. BONDS PAYBL. 0. IEPRECIATION 624. END.CASH BAL. 4509. * t M l l l l l l IAD DEBTS LOSS 70. * I I I I I I I I I i CAP.STOCK 17000. t i n t < * t 11 SURPLUS 11058. JPERATI NG PROFIT 1607. t I I I I I I I I I IOND FLOT DISC. 0. TOT.EQUITY 28058. JOND. INTEREST 0. IANK LOAN DI SCOUNT 0. OT. OPER. EXP 14293. IET PROF. BEFR.TAX 1607. INCOME TAXES 755. (ET PROF. AFTR. TAX 852. • i i i i i i i i i BAYLOR TOP MNGT. GAME * PG.-2 COMPANY 2 INDUSTRY 1 QUARTER 0 >ROFIT AND LOSS CASH FLOW BALANCE SHEET iALES INCOME 15900. BEG.CASH BAL. 3311. CASH 4509. ;OST OF CDS SLD 12216. A/C REC. 6390. .INVENTORY 1559 . RECEIPTS 16440. PLANT INVST. 15600. DISBRSMNTS 15242. TOT .ASSETS 28058. t t * I M M I I M M I 1 t M • t M M M M • i i i :RE IGHT 5 23. NET INFLOW 1198. : AND D 60. (OR OUTFLOW) M M M M I BANK LOANS 0. 1ARKET ING 800. BONDS PAYBL. 0. ;EPREC IATION 624. END.CASH BAL. 4509. SAD DEBTS LOSS 70. t I I I M M I I • CAP.STOCK 17000. M M M M 1 1 SURPLUS 11058. 3PERATI NG PROFIT 1607. t M I M I M I IOND FLOT DI SC. 0. TOT.EQUITY 28058. 50ND INTEREST 0. JANK LOAN DISCOUNT 0 . •OT. OPER. EXP 14293. JET PROF. BEFR. TAX 1607. INCOME TAXES 755. JET PROF.AFTR.TAX 852. i * i i t t t i i i BAYLOR TOP MNGT. GAME, PG.-2 COMPANY 3 INDUSTRY 1 QUARTER 0 'ROFIT AND LOSS CA'SH FLOW BALANCE SHEET SALES INCOME 15900. BEG.CASH BAL. 3311. CASH 4509. :0ST OF GDS SLD 12216. A/C REC. 6390. INVENTORY 1559. RECEIPTS 16440. PLANT INVST. 15600. DISBRSMNTS 15242. TOT.ASSETS 28058. =REIGHT t AND 0 523. NET INFLOW 60. (OR OUTFLOW) MARKETING 3EPRECIATION $AD DEBTS LOSS 1198. «* '.» ' » ' ' 1 BANK LOANS 0. 800. 624, 70, END.CASH BAL BONDS PAYBL. 0. 4509. t - t i t f f l f t t i I I I I H I I M I CAP.STOCK 17000. SURPLUS 11058. I I I I H I I I I 3PERATING PROFIT 1607, JOND FLOT DISC. 0, MDND INTEREST 0. iANK LOAN DISCOUNT 0, i i i 11 11 i 11 TOT. EQUITY 28058. r0T. OPER. EXP 14293, vJET PROF. BEFR.TAX 1607, NCOME TAXES. . 755. JET PROF .AFTR.TAX 852, • I I I I I I I I I BAYLOR TOP MNGT . GAME* PG.-2 COMPANY 4 INO UST R Y 1 QUARTER 0 PROFIT AND LOSS CASH FLOW BALANCE SHEET SALES INCOME 15900. BEG.CASH BAL. 3311. CASH 4509. ;OST OF GDS SLD 12216. A/C REC. 6390. INVENTORY 1559. RECEIPTS 16440. PLANT INVST. 15600. DISBRSMNTS 15242. TOT.ASSETS 28058. i n • • t * i • t « i t 11 r u i n • t i i i * * * • t i t FREIGHT 523. NET INFLOW 1198. ! AND D 60. (OR OUTFLOW) f i l l I I I I ! BANK LOANS 0. 4ARKETING 800. BONDS PAYBL. 0. 3EPREC IATION 624. END.CASH BAL. 4509. • * n u n i i SAD DEBTS LOSS 70. i I I I I I I I I I • CAP.STOCK 17000. * • i • I I i i I I SURPLUS 11058. * * I I I I I I I I )P ERA TING PROFIT 1607. I I I I I I I I I 50ND FLOT DISC. 0. TOT. EQUI TY 28058. SOND INTEREST 0. *ANK LOAN DISCOUNT 0. rOT. OPER. EXP 14293. JET PROF. BEFR.TAX 1607. INCOME TAXES 755. JET PROF.AFTR.TAX 852. CONSTANTS SHI STORY NEXT QTR 1 1 5 0.50 2. 05 8000.00 0.60 2.00 50.00 1.25 1. 25 1.25 1.25 2.62 65.00 10.00 0.90 0.04 60. 00 1.08 3600.00 3.00 50 .00 6.00 10000. 0.90 1. 10 0.60 0.98 40.00 1 .00 20.00 0.0800 0.0150 0.0175 3.00 2.00 1.00 0.47 22000.00 0.90 0.01 75 .00 33.00 68.00 0 1 294. 72. 72. 72. 282. 1 1 15600. 30. 6390. 200. o. 52. 2 1 4509. 11058. 1559. 17000. 0. 1 0 1 72. 294. 72. 72. 282. I 1 1 15600. 30. 6390. 200. 0. 52. 1 2 1 4509. 11058. 1559. 17000. 0. 1 0 1 72. 72. 294. 72. 282. 1 1 1 15600. 30. 6390. 200. 0. 52. 1 2 1 4509. 11058. 1559. 17000. 0. 1 0 1 72. 72. 72. 294. 282. 1 1 1 15600. 30. 63 90. 200. 0. 52. 1 2 1 4509 . 110 58. 1559. 17000. 0. 1 1 1 2 ONT STOP NOW, IM JUST BEGINNING REACHED END OF PROG, NO STOP? SEE STOP 999 STOP 0 XECUTION TERMINATED SIG 7 A B L E I V M A T R / K A / V A L Y S I S OUTPUT ,..LUE<REN.T . QUAR 7 ER P R I C E A R E A ONE PR'lCE A R E A TWO P R I C E A R E A THfi.EE s Q PfilCl AK£A POUR PRICE AREA E l W£ MAR RE TING A R£A ONE A/I A R AE TING AREA TWO M A R K E T I N G A R E A TnA\£E MARAE TZAJG AREA POOR M A R K E T I N G AREA FIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT R>RICE AREA ONE P R I C E AREA TWO P R I C £ A fit. A T H R E E P R I C E A R E A POUR < CI 3 o g P R I C E A R E A PI\/E M A R A E TIA>G A R E A ONE M A R K E T I N G AREA TWO M A R A E T I H G A R E A THREE M A R A E TING A R E A EOt/R M A R A E T I N G A R EA P l V E R E S E A R C H A N D D E V E L O P M E N T SALES O R D E R S A R E A ONI S A L E S ORDERS A R E A T W O S A L E S O R D E R S A R £ A THREE SALES O R D E R S A R E A P O U R SALES O R D E R S A R E A F I V E AC TOAL SALES A R E A ONE ACTUAL SALES A R E A T W O A C TUAL SALES { A R £ A T H R E E ACTUAL SALES A P E A POUR ACTUAL SALES AREA PlVE PRO/JOC T I O N S P E N D I N G RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PRODUC 7I0AI SPENDING P E SEARCH A N D D E V E L O P M E N T AC TOAL PRCOUC TION INVENTORY I Ki P L A N T INVESTMENT D I V I D E N D S B O N D S SOLD GO AIDS 0GUG//T BACK CAPITAL STOCK SOLD CAPITAL STOCK REPURCHASED LOANS TAKEN PLANT INVESTMENT DEPRECIATION U N I T COST INVENTORY VALUE SALES REVENUE AREA ONE SALES REVENUE AREA TWO SALES REVENUE AREA THREE SALES REVENUE AREA POUR SALES REVENUE AREA PIVE FREIGHT EXPENSE HOME MARAE T_ FREIGHTE-XPENSE COMMON MARKET EXEIGHT EXPENSE F O R E I G N MARKETS A C C O U N T S P £ C E I V A 3 L E LOSS ON RAD PE&TS PCNDS SOUGHT SAC R BONDS 'SOLD CAPITAL STOCK SOLI? CAPITAL S70CAX ^PEPURCNASED . LOAMS' PA/P LOANS ' TAKEN . L.OAN DISCOUNT POND DISCOUNT /30A/D INTEREST COSf OP GOODS SOLD ' OPERATING INCOME 'INCOME RE FORE TAX INCOME TAXES INCOM£ AFTER TAXES R£ T A I N E P LEARNINGS DIVIOENPS Jk 91 CASR BALANCE RUSINASS INOEX BOS INESS INDEX 

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