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Simulation of an automobile service department Christie, John Macnichol 1971

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SIMULATION OF AN AUTOMOBILE SERVICE DEPARTMENT by JOHN MACNICHOL CHRISTIE B.M.E.,General Motors I n s t i t u t e , 1 9 7 0 • A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION i n the F a c u l t y o f COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION We accept t h i s t h e s i s as conforming t o the r e q u i r e d s t a n d a r d THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA August,1971 In p r e s e n t i n g t h i s t h e s i s i n p a r t i a l f u l f i l m e n t o f the r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r an advanced d e g r e e at the U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a , I a g r e e t h a t the l i b r a r y s h a l l make i t f r ? e l y a v a i l a b l e f o r r e f e r e n c e ?nd s t u d y . I f u r t h e r a g r e e t h a t p e r m i s s i o n f o r e x t e n s i v e c o p y i n g o f t h i s t h e s i s f o r s c h o l a r l y p u r p o s e s may be g r a n t e d by the Head o f my Department o r by h i s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s . I t i s u n d e r s t o o d t h a t c o p y i n g o r p u b l i c a t i o n o f t h i s t h e s i s f o r f i n a n c i a l g a i n s h a l l not be a l l o w e d w i t h o u t my w r i t t e n p e r m i s s i o n . Department o f Commerce and Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n The U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a Vancouver 8, Canada Date J u l y 3 0 , 1 9 7 1 To: My Fa t h e r Since General Motors i n i t i a t e d i t s automobile dealer franchise system i n about 1930, i t has had a vested i n t e r e s t i n the s u r v i v a l of those who have signed the 'Dealer Sales and Service Agreement*. Through i t s Motors Holdings dealers,General Motors makes a d i r e c t r e t a i l p r o f i t , and so i t s concern for them i s obviousj but they are a small proportion ( i . e . l e s s than 10 percent of a l l General Motors Dealers i n Canada), and i t s major concern i s to ensure that those p r i v a t e l y owned.GM franchised dealers remain i n business through both good and bad economic times, to bring i n the whole-sale revenue to the corporation through the sale of G.M. cars, trucks, parts, and accessories. Deducted from the Gross Sales Revenue of the Dealership, are the many factors i n the category c a l l e d Cost of Sales, to give the Gross P r o f i t . Two s i g n i f i -cant f a c t o r s i n the Cost of Sales category are the b u i l d -ing rent factor, and the employee s a l a r i e s . E f f i c i e n t management of each, independently and together, c o n t r i -butes g r e a t l y to the p r o f i t s of a business. I t has for a long time been a GM p o l i c y to encourage i t s f r a n -chised dealers to have i t s Service and Parts Department cover at l e a s t eighty percent of the t o t a l overhead of the business i n order to permit the Sales Department to operate competitively i n the new and used car markets. By i t s success i n those markets, increasing Service and Parts business i s generated. However, i f the customers are not s a t i s f i e d with the Service and Parts sales, they w i l l not return to buy new and used cars, so the Service and Parts departments are i n f a c t playing key ro l e s i n the growth and p r o f i t a b i l i t y of the automobile dealership. A b a s i c assumption i n t h i s t h e s i s i s that a service customer who obtains f a s t , low cost, q u a l i t y service i s a s a t i s f i e d one. Thus to capture service business, and as pointed out above, i n turn, new and used car sales, the dealer must concentrate h i s e f f o r t s on meeting each of the three requirements as best he can. His means of doing so i s to properly manage h i s employees and f a c i l i t i e s , and as the s i z e of h i s business increases, t h i s task becomes more and more complex The r e l a t i v e e f l e c t of a manpower plan and a f a c i l i t y plan i s d i f f i c u l t to assess, considering a l l of the possible i n t e r a c t i o n s a service customer's job may have with each; and so, at best i t has been an i n t u i t i v e judgement on the part of a General Motors Service Department advisor, or the dealership General and Service managers. The technique of computer simulation o f f e r s a better i n s i g h t i n t o the e f f e c t s of manpower and f a c i l i t y operating p o l i c i e s and changes i n those p o l i c i e s , by quantifying every basic element, and determining the i n t e r a c t i o n of every element with every other one, i n order to eliminate that i n t u i t i v e requirement of previous techniques. Computer simulation does not however make the f i n a l decision, but i f properly employed can be offered as a strong, new t o o l to back up those important decisions which must be made. This thesis could not have been successful without the assistance of Mr. F. G. Snow, Vancouver C i t y D i s t r i c t Sales Manager, Chevrolet-Oldsmobile D i v i s i o n s , General Motors of Canada Limited ; and Mr. G. H. B. Preston, General Manager, Preston Chevrolet-Oldsmobile. I thank Gary Snow f o r h i s arranging meetings and generous advice, and George Preston for h i s generosity, frankness and openness regarding the business, and e s p e c i a l l y h i s valuable time when often consulted by me. I also wish to extend my gratitude to Mr. Marc Hylands, General Service Manager; Mr. Gordon Cadman, Parts Department Manager; Mr. Tim Johnson, Service C o n t r o l l e r ; and Mr. Ron Morrison, Service Sales Manager, of Preston Chevrolet Oldsmobile Limited for t h e i r many assistances, sometimes during t h e i r most busy moments. For h i s contribution to t h i s t h e s i s both d i r e c t l y by h i s advice, and i n d i r e c t l y through h i s i n s t r u c t i o n to me i n Production Operations Research, I thank Professor H. C. Wilkinson at the University of B r i t i s h Columbia. Without the f i n a n c i a l assistance of the General Motors Graduate Student Fellowship, authorized by Mr . R. S. Withers, President of General Motors of Canada, i t would have been d i f f i c u l t indeed for me to have accomplish-ed the Master of Business Administration degree i n t h i r -teen months. With the cooperation of c e r t a i n people at General Motors of Canada i t was less d i f f i c u l t to have had some key things to the thesis happen, and so I thank Mr. Loyd Edwards, Manager of Service Merchandising, and Mr. R. R. Williams, Manager of Sales D i s t r i b u t i o n , f o r t h e i r generosity. I would e s p e c i a l l y l i k e to thank Russ Williams, through whose confidence i n and concern for me as an employee of General Motors, i t was possible to obtain the educational leave of absence, and the General Motors Graduate Student Fellowship, and continuous cooperation throughout the year. John M. C h r i s t i e LIST OF TABLES i x LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS X Chapter I INTRODUCTION 1 II SUMMARY 6 III CONCLUSION . . 15 Conclusions 16 Considerations for Future Study 24 IV DEVELOPMENT OF THE MODEL 26 A . Job Flow D i v i s i o n 26 1. A r r i v a l of Customers 28 2 . Get Parts 36 3. Seize F a c i l i t i e s 38 4. Process Job 46 5. Further Work 49 B. F a c i l i t y Control D i v i s i o n 49 V RESULTS OF THE SERVICE DEPARTMENT SIMULATION 51 A. V a l i d a t i o n of the Model ... 52 1. Logical V a l i d a t i o n 52 2. Operational V a l i d a t i o n 53 B. Results of th* 5 Simulation 59 1. Description of Experiments ....... 59 2. Results of the Simulation Experiments 62 VI ANALYSIS OF SIMULATION RESULTS . . 81 Experiment IB 84 Experiment 2B 85 Experiment 3B , 86 Experiment 4B 86 Experiment 5B 88 Experiment 6B 89 Experiment 7 .... 89 Experiment 8 90 Further Analysis 93 APPENDIX 98 1 D i s t r i b u t i o n of Job Types and Correspond-ing F l a t Rate Times 32 2 Primary-Secondary Job Correlations 33 3 P r o b a b i l i t y of Requiring Parts from Ware-house 36 4 Mean Number of Parts from Local Inventory.. 37 5 Man Assignment Order 40 6 E f f i c i e n c i e s of Men by General Job Category 41 7 Service Times and Measurement of Delay, Lateness A 65 B 6.6 8 Manpower Analysis A 68 B 69 9 F a c i l i t y Analysis A 71 B. 72 10 Cash Flow Analysis A 74 B 75 11 Summary of Computer Costs 79 12 Summary of Sales by General Job Type 80 Figure Page 1 Job Flow D i v i s i o n 27 2 Relative D a i l y A r r i v a l Rates 29 3 A r r i v a l Rates of Customers Throughout the Day 30 4 D i s t r i b u t i o n of Preferred Pick-up Times 35 5 Schematic of Bays and Equipment 43 6 A Graph of S t a t i s t i c a l S t a b i l i z a t i o n .. 54 7 t P r o f i t s Versus Promptness for a l l Experiments 83 8 P r o f i t s Versus Delivery Performance ... 92 9 P r o f i t Versus Labour Capacity Sold .... 94 10 Time to Obtain F a c i l i t i e s versus Delivery Performance 94 11 I n t e r r e l a t i o n s h i p s between Delay and P r o f i t Variables 96 The d e f i n i t i o n of "Service" one chooses to use varies according to from what sector of the economy he views i t . Webster's Seventh New C o l l e g i a t e Dictionary defines service as: for the manufacturers point of view, "performing any of the business functions a u x i l i a r y to production or d i s t r i b u t i o n " , for the r e t a i l e r s point of view as "supplying some public demand, s p e c i f i c a l l y providing maintenance and r e p a i r " , and for the consumer's point of view as "the act of serving as useful labour that does not produce a tangible commodity". As most businesses cater to consumer demand, the automobile industry being no exception, the consumer's d e f i n i t i o n of service i s the most important for a l l p a r t i e s . The automobile service department produces an intangible commodity, namely a change of state of a vehicle,* a s s o c i -ated with i t are the q u a l i t i e s such as promptness, cost, and extent of r e p a i r . Extent of r e p a i r i s a measure of the degree to which the state of a vehicle i s changed from unsatisfactory to s a t i s f a c t o r y and i n t h i s t h e s i s , that degree i s b u i l t into the e f f i c i e n c i e s of the attending mechanics ( i . e . the e f f i c i e n c y of a mechanic i s a measure of h i s a b i l i t y to s a t i s f a c t o r i l y repair a vehicle r e l a t i v e to the standard or f l a t rate time set by the automobile industry) . A l l jobs leave the shop completely repaired, so one intangible q u a l i t y of service, extent of repai r , has been separated from the others, promptness and cost, the two with which t h i s thesis i s most concerned. In t h i s thesis, promptness i s measured by the d i f -ference between the actual job completion time and the promised completion time. The thesis does not attempt to r e l a t e customer s a t i s f a c t i o n with service promptness (or d i s s a t i s f a c t i o n with lateness) except to assume that the r e l a t i o n s h i p between the two variables i s increasing and non-linear. The service intangible of cost i s expressed as p r o f i t to the business i n t h i s t h e s i s . Since the labour cost i s f i x e d ( i . e . a f l a t rate) for each job, such a t r a n s l a t i o n can le g i t i m a t e l y be made, and i s quite useful when reviewing r e s u l t s from the business manager's point of view. The thesis does not attempt to define the r e -l a t i o n s h i p between managers' s a t i s f a c t i o n and p r o f i t s however, but does assume that there i s an increasing non-l i n e a r r e l a t i o n s h i p between these two v a r i a b l e s . The objective of t h i s thesis i s to show the r e l a t i v e e f f e c t s of personnel and f a c i l i t y plans upon service promptness and business p r o f i t s at various l e v e l s of business a c t i v i t y . The r e s u l t s w i l l be presented i n the form of a short-run trade-off r e l a t i o n s h i p of p r o f i t s for promptness, which at another time can be combined with more accurately defined r e l a t i o n s h i p s between s a t i s f a c t i o n and p r o f i t s and promptness. Further studies should also consider and define the long run e f f e c t of p r o f i t and promptness trade-offs, as an i n -crease i n promptness can c e r t a i n l y be expected to r e s u l t i n increased revenue, thus p r o f i t s i n the long run. For the short run, t h i s e f f e c t i s considered n e g l i g i b l e . The method of atta i n i n g the objective stated above i s to develop and t e s t a working computer model of an e x i s t i n g Automobile Service department. To b u i l d a computer model, an e x i s t i n g GM Dealership Service Depart-ment was chosen,namely, Preston Chevrolet-Oldsmobile i n Langley, B r i t i s h Columbia, and data c o l l e c t i o n proceeded i n January, 1971. The dealership i s located f o r t y miles from the C i t y of Vancouver, B r i t i s h Columbia, and employs about f i f t y people i n the Sales, O f f i c e , Service, Body Shop, Service Station, and Parts Departments. The new and used car sales revenue i s approximately $2,000,000 per year, with service and parts revenue t o t a l l i n g about $500,000 per year. Mr. Preston's dealership was chosen because of i t s proximity to Vancouver however e x i s t i n g i n a d i s t i n c t l y separate market, because of i t s conven-ient size, and to a large degree because of the recommen-dation made by General Motors of Canada. Mr. Preston's future plan i s to relocate to an e n t i r e l y new s i t e , so the r e s u l t s of t h i s thesis might have some d i r e c t benefits to him. Computer simulation i s most e f f e c t i v e l y applied where there i s a flow of items (called transactions) through a network of decision c r i t e r i a ( c a l l e d a system). By e f f e c t i v e l y c o l l e c t i n g and condensing data to r e -present the flow of customer jobs ( i . e . transactdons) through the Service and Parts Departments ( i . e . the system) for a c e r t a i n length of time, a computer model i s created from which peri o d i c cummulative information may b e o b t a i n e d , A most important p o r t i o n of t h i s t h e s i s t h e * , i s t o dt.-ouribts th«=. computer model, and Lhe order of t h a t d e s c r i p t i o n i s t h e c h r o n o l o g i c a l order of the flow of customer s e r v i c e jobs through the s e r v i c e d e p a r t -ment. A b r i e f summary of the e n t i r e p r o j e c t i s c o n t a i n e d i n Chapter I I , a f t e r which Chapter I I I p r e s e n t s the c o n c l u s i o n s and recommendations of the t h e s i s . Chapter IV p r e s e n t s the d e t a i l e d development of the computer model, and Chapter V p r e s e n t s the r e s u l t s and Chapter VI, the a n a l y s i s of them. The Appendix i n c l u d e s computer flow c h a r t s , programs, t a b l e s of c o l l e c t e d data, and t a b l e s of computed d a t a . The s i m u l a t i o n p r o j e c t employed the G e n e r a l Purpose System S i m u l a t o r (GPS5/360) language, and u t i l i z e d the IBM System 3 60/Model 67 computer at the U n i v e r s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia. I I Summary Simulating a business might be likened to b u i l d i n g and t e s t i n g a model of a large ship. The purpose for which the ship i s b u i l t , i t s capacity, power, and the waters i n which i t must operate, a l l play a r o l e i n d e f i n i n g i t s physical c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . Likewise, the type of industry, the c a p i t a l invested, the cash ava i l a b l e , and the market i n which i t must function, define the p h y s i c a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s of a business. Whether or not the ship f l o a t s , or the business makes a p r o f i t depends upon the methods of the people who run i t . To b u i l d and t e s t a physical model of a ship requires d u p l i c a t i n g both the p h y s i c a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s and the methods of i t s operation, i n miniature. To b u i l d and t e s t a computer model of a business requires quantifying the physical c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s of i t , and programming the l o g i c of transactions within i t . The simulation of an Automobile Service Department i s the simulation of the flow of customer jobs through i t . Varying types of jobs (a q u a n t i f i a b l e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c ) a r r i v e at the shop for r e p a i r at varying rates (again, a q u a n t i f i a b l e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c ) throughout the day. Upon a r r i v a l , each job i s diagnosed, some even require work add i t i o n a l to the main problem, and an estimate of i t s cost, and when i t w i l l be completely repaired i s given to the customer, at which time he decides whether he w i l l wait there for i t , or return at a l a t e r time to pick i t up. Depending on the type of work to be done to a vehicle, a cer t a i n number of parts i s required. These parts might be obtained either from l o c a l inventory ( i n the same building) or from an outside supplier such as the manufacturer's warehouse. I f warehouse parts are needed, a truck must pick them up, and depending on the a v a i l -a b i l i t y of the truck and the distance to and from the ware-house, a considerable delay may be experienced. However, once those parts are obtained, or i f none were required from the warehouse, some may be needed from the l o c a l Parts Department of the dealership. I f so, a further delay may be encountered, depending on the number of people waiting t o be served by the parts attendant, and the number of parts each person d e s i r e s . With parts having been obtained, i t i s necessary to simultaneously have a mechanic or an apprentice, a place to work (a bay), and c e r t a i n p i e c e s of equipment (tools) . The a v a i l a b i l i t y of mechanics and apprentices i s deter-mined by what s h i f t s and what days they work, as well as whether or not they are already occupied with r e p a i r i n g other jobs. The a v a i l a b i l i t y of bays and equipment i s determined by the t i m e s during which the Service Depart-ment i s open for business, as well as the status of jobs u t i l i z i n g them. Once the three f a c i l i t i e s (men, bays, equipment) are simultaneously a v a i l a b l e , the mechanic, or apprentice may begin work. How long i t takes i s dependent upon h i s a b i l i t y to do the required type of work with s a t i s f a c t o r y q u a l i t y . A l l bays and h o i s t s are u t i l i z e d for the e n t i r e time the mechanic i s involved with the job, but other pieces of equipment, such as the brake drum lathe, the armature tester, the scope, e t c . may be u t i l i z e d for a lesser portion. A f t e r the work i s done the mechanics involved are credited with the f l a t rate time they have achieved, and the customer i s given d e l i v e r y of h i s repaired vehicle . The simulation program i s l i k e many, many i n v i s i b l e time-study men being i n the shop during the simulated time. I t c o l l e c t s considerable s t a t i s t i c s of i n t e r e s t to the analyst, the r e s u l t s of which are presented i n tables, s t a t i s t i c a l matrices, and bar graphs. The number of types of s t a t i s t i c s as well as the number of jobs, employees, and f a c i l i t i e s i n the shop at one time are the main fact o r s upon which the cost of c o l l e c t i n g s t a t i s t i c s (computing time) depends. By simulating the business for a length of time s u f f i c i e n t to give r e l i a b l e data, s t a t i s t i c s can be c o l l e c t e d , and compared to r e a l s t a t i s t i c s observed i n the actual shop to determine the v a l i d i t y of the simulation model. The model described i n t h i s thesis was accordingly v a l i d a t e d , and the important steps were then followed. Sixteen experiments were designed, executed, and studied. In each experiment, a variable of the business was changed to determine i t s e f f e c t upon the output s t a t i s t i c s of the simulation program. Output s t a t i s t i c s were categorized under, four headings: Service Times and Delay, Lateness; Manpower Analysis; F a c i l i t y Analysis; and Cash Flow Analysis. The po s i t i o n of each experiment was p l o t t e d on a coordinate plane, or graph, of Gross P r o f i t s versus Promptness of Delivery, so that the e f f e c t of a change of a variable upon each of those outcomes would be r e a d i l y apparent. The graph appears i n Figure 7 on page 83 . B r i e f l y , the r e s u l t s were theses a. To add a mechanic who i s one-hundred percent e f f i c i e n t i n a l l job categories when the business i s experiencing one hundred and twenty jobs a r r i v i n g per week, reduces the p r o f i t s by twelve percent and increases the prompt-ness of del i v e r y by forty-one percent. The reason for the reduction i n p r o f i t s i s the addition of the new mechanic' s pay to the cost of labour, and the reason fo r the improvement i n de l i v e r y i s the reduction i n time required to obtain men, bays, and equipment. b. By adding an apprentice rated at s i x t y - f i v e percent e f f i c i e n c y i n a l l job categories to the model already containing the new mechanic, a further twenty-eight percent reduction i n p r o f i t s , and f i f t y - f o u r percent improvement i n promptness of d e l i v e r y was experienced. P r o f i t s nevertheless remained above zero for a high l e v e l of business, but approached that point for a low l e v e l . The increased costs were due to the addition of the apprentice's salary to the cost of labour whereas the improvement i n d e l i v e r y was mainly due to a better a l l o c a t i o n of men to jobs. With more men than places i n which they might work, the amount of time a c t u a l l y worked out of that a v a i l a b l e for every mechanic was reduced. c. To add two new h o i s t s without the addition of the mechanic or the apprentice improves d e l i v e r y by seventy-three percent at a cost of about t h i r t e e n per-cent i n p r o f i t s . The improved service was derived from three sources: a decrease i n waiting time for equipment ( h o i s t s ) , a decrease i n Front End Service time (due to improved a b i l i t y of mechanics using better equipment on Hoist 5), and a better a l l o c a t i o n of men to jobs. The decrease i n p r o f i t s was e n t i r e l y due to the added cost of the new equipment. d. The addition of an expensive new e l e c t r o n i c scope had a detrimental e f f e c t upon both p r o f i t s (due to i t s cost) and promptness of d e l i v e r y . The decrease i n d e l i v e r y performance was due to a poorer a l l o c a t i o n of men t o jobs, s p e c i f i c a l l y to tune-up jobs. That i s , men who were assigned tune-up jobs could have been more e f f i c i e n t l y a l l ocated to others, but due to the timing of a r r i v a l , and the number of tune-up jobs, these men were selected. The e f f e c t upon p r o f i t s and promptness of adding the mechanic, apprentice, and h o i s t s simultaneously i s not the l i n e a r addition of the e f f e c t s of the addition of each,' i n d i v i d u a l l y . P r o f i t s do drop about f i f t y percent, with a corresponding increase i n promptness of d e l i v e r y of eighty-three percent. At a l e v e l of business equal to one hundred and twenty jobs per week, the e f f e c t of paying men every week, instead of every two weeks ( i . e . f l a t rate accummulated for one week; mechanic paid for f l a t rate or f o r t y hours whichever i s the higher) i s to increase the cost of labour by only seven d o l l a r s , an i n s i g n i f i c a n t amount. Being more pessimistic about the time of completing a job provides a better estimate of the actual completion time. For an estimation p o l i c y increase of s i x t y minutes, a decrease i n lateness amounting to seventy-eight minutes was achieved. h. By r a i s i n g the R e t a i l Labour Rate by 8.3% from $12.00 per hour to $13.00 per hour, an increase i n gross p r o f i t of 11.8% i s achieved, providing the increase i n labour rate does not decrease the number of jobs entering the shop. By considering only the r e s u l t s of experiments i n which men and/or f a c i l i t i e s were changed, or the a l l o c a -t i o n of men to jobs was improved, a consistent r e l a t i o n -ship as depicted i n Figure 8 on page 92, i s revealed. By measuring the slope of the l i n e which i s tangent to the curve at any point, an estimate i s made of the cost to the dealer for promptness of d e l i v e r y to customers, when h i s business i s defined at that point. That i s , the point 3B represents the state of the Preston Chevrolet Oldsmobile Service Department i n June 1971, at which time the cost over a three week period-to improve d e l i v e r y time by one minute i s approximately $4.67, or over a one year period, $77.50. • 14 There seems to be a very strong c o r r e l a t i o n between the time t o obtain f a c i l i t i e s and the promptness of d e l i v e r y , and between Gross P r o f i t s and Percent of Labour Capacity Sold, as depicted i n Figures 9 and 10 on page 94 The a n a l y s i s i s c a r r i e d further by including these figures along with Figure l i d i n Figure l l , showing the i n t e r -r e l a t i o n s h i p s of a l l the v a r i a b l e s . Thus, i t i s revealed that f o r d i f f e r i n g s i z e s of businesses, a d i f f e r e n t amount of labour sold per hour of a v a i l a b l e manpower i s required to give the same degree of service to customers. Or, to put i t another way, a small business must experience a l i g h t e r service demand load, thus lower p r o f i t s , than a larger business, i n order to service cars as f a s t . There i s no c o r r e l a t i o n between the number of men, bays, and pieces of equipment i n the shop, and the time to service a vehicle, once work begins on i t . A c o r r e l a t i o n however could be expected between the q u a l i t i e s of the men, bays, and pieces of equipment i f experiments had been performed to do so. One i n d i c a t o r of such a r e l a t i o n s h i p i s that there was a noticeable decline i n service time for Front End Repair work, when a new h o i s t , containing better front end equipment, was added. I l l Conclusion The Service Department of Preston-Chevrolet Olds-mobile i n Langley, B r i t i s h Columbia, was not simulated by computer, s o l e l y for the sake of simulation, but i t s purpose was manyfold. In no p a r t i c u l a r order of p r i o r i t y , those reasons were: a. In l i n e with the aims of the Program for the Master's Degree of Business Administration, i t was intended that the author would increase h i s knowledge i n the f i e l d of business management. b. The General Motors Graduate Student Fellowship, which the author received, required a the s i s be done p r e f e r -ably regarding the automobile industry, and so t h i s t h e s i s s a t i s f i e d that requirement. c. Simulating a p a r t i c u l a r e x i s t i n g service department of an Automobile Dealership would be of some d i r e c t benefit to the owner, i n that i t might provide some advice concerning the current state of the business, and some guidance for i t s future. cl. By developing a program '-'hich i s adaptable to simulat-ing other service shops with minimal change, a new t o o l might be developed for use by General Motors people to guide i t s dealers i n t h e i r business of s a t i s -fying the service demands of customers . e. By simulating a s i t u a t i o n not known to have been simu-lated before, an addition might be made to the body of knowledge known as Operations Research. f . A basis would be established for further study of the means of s a t i s f y i n g customers of Automobile Repair Shops. Upon acceptance of t h i s thesis by the U n i v e r s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia, the purposes described i n a. and b., above, w i l l have been accomplished. That the objectives set forth i n c , d., and e. are met at l e a s t i n part i s evident i n the following conclusions. 1. The addition of a night s h i f t by taking some men from the day s h i f t doubled the a v a i l a b i l i t y of f a c i l i t i e s with no increase i n manpower capacity, and at l i t t l e extra cost. A d d i t i o n a l l y , customers arr i v e d at le s s peaked rates (page30 ) over a longer time i n the day creating a smoother flow of work through the shop. Since no improve-ment i n parts a v a i l a b i l i t y was made^the greater number of jobs a r r i v i n g l a t e i n the day caused more to wait t i l l the following noon for parts from the warehouse, consequent-l y r a i s i n g the service time, and so the net e f f e c t upon the service time was n i l . 2. Many more people began coming to the shop having heard of the night service, and the increase i n business was about twenty percent. However, the increase i n time taken to repair jobs was 55%, and p r o f i t s rose by 120%. An average lateness of 276 minutes, including waiting over-night i n some cases, and completing only 26% of jobs on time required d r a s t i c measures, and so the Service Depart-ment purchased two e l e c t r i c h o i s t s , bringing lateness of d e l i v e r y down to 136 minutes, and p r o f i t s , too, to $2100 (per 3 week period). At t h i s point the experiments i n the th e s i s went beyond what had been done i n r e a l i t y , and simulated the addition of other f a c i l i t i e s . 3 . To have hired a mechanic instead of purchasing the two new h o i s t s would have cost the business more, and had le s s improvement upon d e l i v e r y time (figure 7 , page 83). In fact, i f business were to f a l l back to a low l e v e l (100 jobs per week) the cost burden of the mechanic r e l a t -ive to that of the new h o i s t s would not have been worth the improvement i n d e l i v e r y time. 4 . Assuming the business l e v e l w i l l remain high, due to continued operation of the night s h i f t , the addition of a new mechanic and a new apprentice as well as the new hoi s t s i s b e n e f i c i a l . That i s , despite a s i g n i f i c a n t decrease i n p r o f i t s , exceptional improvement i n d e l i v e r y to customers i s made, and t h i s i n i t s e l f should increase business to reclaim some of the l o s t p r o f i t . A small seasonal increase i n business could well be handled with no additional f a c i l i t i e s , and the p r o f i t increase would be s u b s t a n t i a l . 5. The e f f e c t upon promptness of d e l i v e r y by adding new men or f a c i l i t i e s i s not additive whereas the cost of doing so i s . (refer to page 88')'. In other words when d e l i v e r y performance i s bad, the cost of improving i t i s small, but as i t improves, the cost for an incremental increase gets larger, u n t i l the business s u f f e r s a f i n a n -c i a l l o s s . 6 . When adding f a c i l i t i e s , the a b i l i t i e s of the various employees as well as the nature of types of work i n the shop must be considered. Adding a new e l e c t r o n i c scope for tune-up jobs i n the subject shop caused a detrimental e f f e c t upon both p r o f i t s and promptness (refer to page 86), because the high frequency of such jobs u t i l i z e d some good mechanics who would be better allocated to doing other types of work. The problem was a p o l i c y one, and i f one, such as l i m i t i n g tune-ups to only one or two mechanics had been employed, the negative e f f e c t upon promptness would not have been so great. But why have two scopes when only one or two mechanics can use them, as quite often one or both men may be occupied with another type of job? The purchase of a new scope i s not recommended for two reasons; a. to do so without r e s t r i c t i n g some mechanics to doing only tune-ups would be c o s t l y and i n e f f e c t i v e . b. to do so after having added two h o i s t s and a new mechanic places the business i n a p o s i t i o n on the r i g h t end of the curve (Figure 7 , page 8 3 ) where the cost of ad d i t i o n a l improve-ment i n promptness of d e l i v e r y i s quite c o s t l y . If business improves somewhat, or i f a new scope i s developed which hastens the actual job pro-cessing time, then, i t s addition w i l l be of more s i g n i f i c a n t e f f e c t . 7. Since the simulation d i d not vary the weekly a r r i v a l rate of jobs i n the three weeks of simulated time, no conclusions can be drawn as to the cost of paying employees weekly or biweekly. 8. Being more pessimistic about the estimation of job completion time improves the estimate more than the amount of pessimism ( i . e . number of minutes l a t e r ) . For example, to estimate a job to be completed ninety minutes beyond f l a t rate time rather than t h i r t y minutes causes the l a t e -ness to be eighty minutes l e s s ; or twenty minutes better than the amount of pessimism (refer to page 90) . 9. Ignoring any negative e f f e c t s upon the number of vehicles coming i n for service, to r a i s e the r e t a i l labour rate by 8.3% from $12.00 to $13.00 per hour, and the mechanic's wage rate from $4.50 to $4.87 increases p r o f i t s to the business by 11.8%. (Refer to page 90) 10. There i s a d e f i n i t e c o r r e l a t i o n between p r o f i t s to the business, and promptness of d e l i v e r y to the customer (refer to page 91 ). In f a c t the r e l a t i o n s h i p , i n the short run, suggests that to increase promptness of d e l i v e r y (or decrease lateness) i t costs i n c r e a s i n g l y more for each a d d i t i o n a l unit of time. The graph i n Figure 8 describes the r e l a t i o n s h i p . 11. There i s almost a one to one r e l a t i o n s h i p between the time to obtain f a c i l i t i e s , and lateness of estimation (page 94). With parts r e t r i e v a l and mechanic applied time e s s e n t i a l l y constant i n a l l experiments, the only v a r i a b l e l e f t i s the time to obtain f a c i l i t i e s . The r e s u l t s of the simulation experiments suggest that the estimation p o l i c y employed by the subject service shop ( i . e . F l a t Rate time plus one h a l f hour) considers the parts time and the mechanic's time, but assumes there w i l l be no delay i n l i n i n g up f a c i l i t i e s . 12. There i s a strong c o r r e l a t i o n between the amount of manpower av a i l a b l e which i s a c t u a l l y applied ( i . e . percent of Labour Capacity Sold, page 94) and the gross p r o f i t s of the business. In fact at l e s s than s i x t y percent of the labour capacity sold the subject business s u f f e r s a f i n a n c i a l l o s s . At about ninety percent, p r o f i t s are maximum, and i t appears impossible to service more than ninety percent due to the f l u c t u a t i n g customer a r r i v a l r a t e leaving some employees unoccupied for short periods of time. . 13. The three r e l a t i o n s h i p s discussed i n points 10, 11, and 12 above suggest a fourth; that between Percent of Labour Capacity Sold, and the time taken to obtain f a c i l i t i e s (refer to page 96 ) . By further deduction i t becomes apparent that small businesses must suffer a lower percent of labour capacity sold, thus lower p r o f i t s , to provide the same d e l i v e r y performance as a larger business. The reason i s e n t i r e l y due to the f a c t that a larger business, although i t may u t i l i z e i t s f a c i l i t i e s the same amount of time as a smaller one, that which i s not u t i l i z e d leaves a larger variety, and thus a greater p r o b a b i l i t y of a job obtaining a l l necessary f a c i l i t i e s . Further, a larger business has the advantage of reducing the time i n which f a c i l i t i e s are u t i l i z e d for given jobs. By s p e c i a l i z i n g i n one type of re p a i r work, a mechanic's e f f i c i e n c y can become quite high, providing he has enough jobs to keep him busy. However, the smaller business must have less s p e c i a l i z a t i o n with i t s l i m i t e d manpower being required to service a fewer number of a l l types of troubles. The simulation program from which the r e s u l t s of t h i s t h e s i s were derived was written i n such a way that quantitative data from other service departments of other dealerships might e a s i l y be interchanged with that data describing the Preston Chevrolet-Oldsmobile Service Department. With t h i s i n mind and since the l o g i c of the program was proven v a l i d , and the conclusions mentioned i n points 1 to 13 above are well proven and s i g n i f i c a n t , the purpose set out i n section d. at the beginning of t h i s Chapter has been accomplished. The successful u t i l i z a t i o n of a computer simulation model i s s u f f i c i e n t contribution by one Master's Thesis to the f i e l d of study c a l l e d Operations Research. Considerations for Future Study The construction of the simulation model created a b a s i s for estimating the d i r e c t e f f e c t s of technical changes to the business, but d i d not, however, enable one to carry the study to the ultimate r e a l e f f e c t upon the s a t -i s f a c t i o n of the owner, employees and the customers of the business. Therefore, i t i s upon the basis of t h i s t h e s i s that the following studies should be undertaken: a. Determine the true r e l a t i o n s h i p between customer s a t i s -f a c t i o n and promptness of d e l i v e r y . b. Determine the true r e l a t i o n s h i p between the owner's (manager's) s a t i s f a c t i o n and h i s business p r o f i t s , as well as other factors important to him. c. Determine the r e l a t i o n s h i p between the p r i c e of labour, and parts; and the customer's willingness to pay i t . d. Determine to what degree incremental increases i n s a t i s f a c t i o n to consumers w i l l do to increase business i n the longer run. e. Determine what e f f e c t , i f any the amount of u t i l i z a t i o n of men ( i . e . time worked out of time avai l a b l e to work) has upon t h e i r e f f i c i e n c i e s i n various type* o f j o b s . By esta b l i s h i n g the above r e l a t i o n s h i p s , and i n -corporating them into the simulation model presented i n t h i s thesis, a more comprehensive study of optimizing the wants and needs of business owners, employees, customers, and the general public w i l l be permitted. IV. Development of the Model The computer model i s divided e s s e n t i a l l y i n t o two d i v i s i o n s , the Job Flow D i v i s i o n , and the F a c i l i t y Control D i v i s i o n . The purpose of the f i r s t i s to cause jobs (transactions) to arr i v e at the service department as per a given schedule, and proceed through the system according to l o g i c a l c r i t e r i a , and f i n a l l y e x i t with the required repair work having been done. The F a c i l i t y Control D i v i s i o n i s a set of l o g i c a l statements which control the a v a i l a b i l i t y of c e r t a i n f a c i l i t i e s (men, bays, equipment) as per employee s h i f t schedules and machine a v a i l a b i l i t y e t c . Each d i v i s i o n i s described separately i n t h i s section of the report, however i t . should be noted that each operates simultaneously i n the computer model. A copy of the GPSS program accomp-anied by a de t a i l e d explanation appears i n the appendix, beginning on page 99. A. Job Flow D i v i s i o n Figure 1 presents the conceptual flow chart of the Job Flow D i v i s i o n . The following paragraphs w i l l describe the operation of each.component. ARRIVAL GET: MEN BAYS EQUIPMENT EXIT Customer jobs a r r i v e at a given rate which varies by clay of the week and by hour of the day, and each job i s categorized as to type, so that appropriate men and f a c i l i t i e s w i l l be employed to process i t through the shop. a. Rate The rate of job a r r i v a l s was found to vary s i g n i f i -cantly by day of the week, and also, by hour of the day. I t i s true that the a r r i v a l rate also varies by week of the year, but.the simulation runs made i n t h i s project were short term ( i . e . one to s i x weeks) i n which the weekly v a r i a t i o n e f f e c t i s s l i g h t . The weekly a r r i v a l r a t e there-fore i s constant for each simulation run. i . D a i l y Rate. A study of repair orders written i n November 1970 was made to determine the r e l a t i v e a r r i v a l rates f o r days within the week, when a day s h i f t only was operating. The r e s u l t s of that study appear i n Figure 2 A s i m i l a r study of re p a i r orders written i n May 1971 when both <3ay and night s h i f t s were operating, proved i d e n t i c a l r e s u l t s . 40 A 30 «= % of Weekly 20 «, Rate 10 " Mon . Tues Wed Thur F r i Sat Figure 2 R e l a t i v e D a i l y A r r i v a l Rates i i . Hourly Rate. Service customers followed a d e f i n i t e pattern of a r r i v a l w i t h i n the day. The day of the week had l i t t l e e f f e c t upon t h i s a r r i v a l pattern, whereas the type of s h i f t plan followed by the Service Department did ( i . e . day s h i f t only versus day ^and night s h i f t ) . The r e s u l t s of two data c o l l e c t i o n s appear i n Figure 3 below i n a format s i m i l a r to Figure 2 . 30 25. J % of 2 0 D a i l y Rate 15 10 5 a .m EZ1 o o o o o o o o o o ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro * CO o I—t CN rH CM ro <tf rH r-4 H f i g . 3 a Day S h i f t Job A r r i v a l D i s t r i b u t i o n 25 20 *i % o f D a i l y Rate 15 10 5 o o o O O O O O O o o o o ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro • • • ft ft* • t ft* • ft • ft • CO cn O rH r-l rH CN rH rH (N ro in 00 oo p .in, f i g . 3 b Day S h i f t Job A r r i v a l D i s t r i b u t i o n Figure 3 A r r i v a l Rates of Customers Throughout the Day i . Primary Job Assignment. The number of d i f f e r e n t kinds of troubles a service customer may have i s almost i n f i n i t e , but each i n d i v i d u a l one can be c l a s s i f i e d under one of t h i r t y " S p e c i f i c Job Categories". Each category can further be c l a s s i f i e d under one of eight "General Job Types" . I t was found useful to have these two l e v e l s of job descriptions because many facets of the system were found to be re l a t e d to only the General Job Type, thus el i m i n a t i n g much tedious coding, and confusion. These job descriptions ignore the make, model, and year of vehicle, however these parameters are accommodated i n the s t a t i s t i c a l d i s t r i b u t i o n s of the a t t r i b u t e s of each job ( i . e . parts requirement, f l a t rate time> etc.) . The d i s -t r i b u t i o n of S p e c i f i c Job Categories i s given on Table 1 below. I t should be noted here that Lubrication Jobs except for *Packing Wheel Bearings' are handled by the service s t a t i o n and do not appear i n t h i s model except as follow up se r v i c e . Each job entering the shop i s assigned a f l a t rate service time as per i t s s p e c i f i c job category on a normal # General Type # S p e c i f i c Type % of a l l Types Mean P l a t Rate Time (Hr .) 1 L u b r i c a t i o n 1 Chassis Lube 2 O i l Change 3 O i l F i l t e r 4 Pack Wheel Bearings 5 Transmission-D i f f e r e n t i a l 0 0 0 .4 0 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 2 Brakes 3 Tune-up 4 E l e c t r i c a l 5 Front End 6 Drive-Line 6 Adjust 0 »2 7 Reline Drums 4.1 2.6 8 Master^Wheel Cylinder 0 1.2 9 Minor Tune-Up 15.7 1.5 10 Major Tune-Up .4 4.0 11 Carburetor 1.8 il 12 Battery .9 .6 13 S t a r t e r 1.8 1.2 14 Generator/Regulator 2.9 1.1 15 L i g h t s , Instrument 10.8 1.2 16 Alignment 7.2 2.0 17 Control Arms/Steering 3.2 1.2 18 Rebush/Overhaul .4 1.0 19 Clutch 1.8 3.2 20 Transmission 5.8 3.0 21 Rear A x l e / D i f f e r e n t i a l 3.9 4.0 22 O-Joint .4 .8 7 Chassis-Wheel 8 Maj or 23 Muffler-Pipes 24 Shocks 25 Frame 26 Tires-Wheel 27 Cooling-Radiator 28 Inspection 29 Ring Valve Job 30 Major Overhaul-Replacement 2.2 .7 .4 3.9 3.2 18.0 10.1 1.7 1.3 sublet 1.0 1.0 2.0 6.0 .4 15.0 Table 1 D i s t r i b u t i o n of Job Types and Corresponding F l a t Rate Times d i s t r i b u t i o n about the mean for the s p e c i f i c job indicated on T a b l e 1. i i . Second Job Assignment. Many jobs a r r i v i n g at the shop have p o t e n t i a l a d d i t i o n a l work to be done, and i t i s the good Service Sales Manager who w i l l s e l l t h i s secondary work whenever i t i s warranted. Twenty percent of a l l prim-ary jobs are given l u b r i c a t i o n service as secondary work. Other primary-secondary job c o r r e l a t i o n s are described on Table 2 below. (Note: r e f e r to Table 1 on page 32 for job code t r a n s l a t i o n ) . Job Primary Secondary P r o b a b i l i t y 16 8 13.4% . 18 9 13.8% 21 7 4.5% 23 11 14.7% 26 9 .7% 27 12 28.0% Table 2 Primary-Secondary Job Correlations The secondary job i s assigned to the customer job upon a r r i v a l , and i s considered along with the main r e p a i r work i n estimating the job completion time. The next chronological event to occur af t e r diagnosing ( i . e . assigning) the trouble i s to n o t i f y the customer when the e a r l i e s t possible time i s that the job could be completed. The general r u l e used i n the subject shop i s to add one-half hour to the f l a t rate time, and according to lunch breaks and s h i f t plans, project a completion time ( i . e . Projected Completion Time). A large portion of customers w i l l "wait" (70% to 80%) whereas the remainder w i l l arrange to return at a l a t e r time to pick up t h e i r v e h i c l e s . Those defined as "waiting" are those who (a) are p h y s i c a l l y i n the shop waiting, (b) request completion "As Soon As Possible*, (c) request to be phoned when the job i s finishe d , or (d) request d e l i v e r y of the repaired vehicle to t h e i r residence. Those customers who arrange to pick up t h e i r vehicle at a l a t e r time do so according to a " D i s t r i b u t i o n of Preferred Pick-Up Times", as described i n Figure 4 below. The nature of the d i s t r i b u t i o n i s dependent upon the type of s h i f t plan i n operation at the time so Figure 4 i s divided into subsections a. and b. I t i s assumed that customers w i l l prefer to pick up t h e i r repaired cars on the same day the job i s expected to be completed. 60 50 % of 40 customers picking 3° jobs up 20 10 1 I o o o o o O O O o O 6 O O O ro ro ro m ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro 00 CT> o rH (N rH CM ro in t-> 00 cn rH rH o f i g . 4 a, Day S h i f t Preferred Times % of customers picking jobs up 60 50 40 H 30 20 10 J o ro o ro o ro o ro O ro o ro o ro o ro o ro o ro O ro O ro o ro O ro o ro CO cn O rH rH rH rH rH CS ro <£> r- CO cn o rH f i g . 4b, Day & Night S h i f t Preferred Times Figure 4 D i s t r i b u t i o n of Preferred Pick up Times Before any men or f a c i l i t i e s are assigned to a p a r t i c u l a r job, the necessary parts must be obtained. F i r s t , i t must be determined whether any parts at a l l are required, then how many, and f i n a l l y whether or not any of those parts are i n l o c a l inventory, or at the manufacturer (or other supplier) warehouse. a. How Many Parts Required? F i r s t , there i s a d e f i n i t e p r o b a b i l i t y for each General Job Type of req u i r i n g parts from the warehouse. These p r o b a b i l i t i e s are l i s t e d i n Table 3, below. General Type P r o b a b i l i t y of Requiring Warehouse Parts 1 Lubr i c a t i o n 0% 2 Brakes 48.4% 3 Tune-Up 16.7% 4 E l e c t r i c a l 15.3% 5 Front End 0% 6 Drive Line 21.1% 7 Chassis-Wheel 14.2% 8 Major •* 19.4% Table 3 P r o b a b i l i t y of Requiring Parts from Warehouse Second, there are a certa i n number o f parts required from l o c a l inventory, depending on General Job Type. The quantities are l i s t e d i n Table 4, below. I t should be pointed out that the l o c a l inventory parts quantities were found to be normally d i s t r i b u t e d about the means l i s t e d i n Table 4, a n d these p r o b a b i l i t y d i s t r i b u t i o n s are incorporated i n the computer program. General Job Type Mean No. of Parts from Local Inventory  1 : Lubrication 0 2 Brakes 5 3 Tune-Up 5 4 E l e c t r i c a l 6 5 Front-End 1 6 Drive-Line 15 7 Chassis-Wheel 4 8 Major 15 Table 4 Mean Number of Parts from Local Inventory b. Wait for Parts. To obtain l o c a l inventory parts, i t i s a simple matter of joi n i n g the queue at the parts attendant's desk and waiting fox- s e r v i c e . The mean service time there was found to be t w o minutes per part required (normally-distributed) . There are two attendants, one for day s h i f t and one for night, and each w i l l pass on to the other the remaining parts requests at the end of h i s s h i f t . Obtaining parts from the warehouse, or other external suppliers, i s not such a simple task. The only method for obtaining these parts i s v i a the parts pick-up truck, which t r a v e l s to the Vancouver warehouse twice a day, leaving at 9:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The mean return t r i p time i s 184 minutes. A l l warehouse parts requests needn't be given to the truck d r i v e r p r i o r to h i s de-parture, however, but they can be phoned to the warehouse u n t i l 9:45 a.m. for the f i r s t t r i p and u n t i l 3:45 p.m. for the second t r i p so that the warehouse personnel can have the parts ready for the driver to pickup on h i s a r r i v a l there . 3. Seize F a c i l i t i e s : Having had the parts requirement s a t i s f i e d the job must then f i n d three types of f a c i l i t i e s simultaneously a v a i l a b l e to service i t . These f a c i l i t i e s are: Men, Bays, and Equipment. The f a c i l i t i e s are described i n the following paragraphs i n the order i n which they are mentioned above, but i t must be remembered that a l l three must be simultaneously ava i l a b l e i n order to begin pro-cessing the job. a. Assign Men. Two methods of man assignment are a v a i l a b l e i n the model, namely single and double assignment. In most cases the 'single' method i s used, however i t i s conceiv-able that one would double men on high p r i o r i t y (rush) jobs and possibly i n the case of very slack business. Men can be assigned to jobs i n any order desired, within General Job Type, and i n i n i t i a l computer runs, the order chosen was 'best man a v a i l a b l e ' . I t i s conceiv-able that the Service Department Manager would l i k e to assign men to jobs at which they are not 'best' so that they may become better through the experience. This a l t e r n a t i v e i s e n t i r e l y possible i n the simulation model. Table 5 below shows the order i n which men are picked to service c e r t a i n jobs: Genera.1 Job Category (Ref. Table 1 for de s c r i p t i v e name) Man Assignment Choice 8 F i r s t 12 8 Second 13 4 8 9 7 6 4 8 Third 14 7 6 5 3 9 6 7 Fourth 2 5 8 9 8 8 3 F i f t h 6 7 6' 5 3 2 Sixth 5 2 3 7 5 5 Seventh 3* 3 7 3 2 Eighth 9 9 2 2 9 •Employee Codes: 2 Roy 8 Ted 3 Norm ** 9 Brian ** 4 George 12 Gas Station Attendent #1 5 Egon 13 Gas Station Attendent #2 6 Nick 14 Gas Station Attendent #3 7 Dennis ** Apprentices Table 5 Man Assignment Order Where an employee number does not appear i n a General Job Category column i n Table 5 above, that employee w i l l never be assigned to such a job. For the purpose of determining the a b i l i t y of men to do each job r e l a t i v e to the f l a t rate time associated with each, the following procedure was followed: for each mechanic and apprentice, for each General Job Type, the actual time taken and the f l a t rate time were compared to develop e f f i c i e n c y ratings for each man for each job. The formula for t h i s c a l c u l a t i o n appears below: E f f i c i e n c y = F l a t Rate Time Mechanic Actual Time (1) The r e s u l t s of the e f f i c i e n c y c a l c u l a t i o n s for each man appear i n Table 6 below. 1 General Job Category Mechanic Lube Brks. Tune E l e c . F r t . Drive Chassis Major U P End 2 Roy 81 50 38 101 75 83 96 3 Norm * 100 50 42 75 83 103 100 4 George 109 111 111 137 134 115 5 Egon 72 74 92 89 86 85 6 Nick 74 104 86 115 120 7 Dennis 105 68 38 83 88 141 108 8 Ted 145 108 88 100 119 115 9 Brian * 60 50 100 50 100 62 * Apprentice ; a l l others f u l l y q u a l i f i e d automobile mechanics. Table 6 E f f i c i e n c i e s of men by General Job Category A zero e f f i c i e n c y r a t i n g r e s u l t e d from t h e r e being no data av a i l a b l e t o make the c a l c u l a t i o n , the reason being that those men had never done those jobs i n the time i n t e r v a l of data c o l l e c t i o n . Consequently they would not be assigned to a job for which they have a zero r a t i n g . b. Assign Bays. Many jobs can be accommodated i n j u s t about any one of the s i x mechanical service department bays, however there are a few which must meet the following r e s t r i c t i o n s (a shop layout schematic follows for c l a r i f i c a t i o n , Figure 5): General Job Type Bays Which Can be Used 1 Lubrication Gas Station #7, #8 2 Brakes A l l Mech. Service Dept. Bays 3 Tune-up A l l Mech. Serv. Dept. except #6 4 E l e c t r i c a l A l l Mech. Serv. Dept. except #6 5 Front End Bay #6 only 6 Drive Line Bays #3 and #4 only 7 Chassis-Wheel A l l Mech. Service Dept. Bays 8 Ma j or Bays #3 and #4 only Parts Dept. Bay #1 Bay #7 Hoist #3 Bay #8 GAS STATION CONTROL TOWER Bay #2 Bay #3 Hoist#l Bay #4 Hoist#2 Bay #5 MECHANICAL SERVICE DEPT. Portable, or Non-Bay-Occupying Equipment: #51 Brake Drum Lathe #52 Scope #53 Valve Grind Machine #54 Armature Tester, Lathe #55 Battery Tester #56 Charging C i r c u i t Tester #57 Brake Bleeder #61 Parts Pickup Truck Bay #6 FrontEnd Machine I Possible j I I j A d d i t i o n a l ! B a y ! L ! Where a choice of bays i s avai l a b l e , the bay c l o s e s t t o the parts desk i s assigned f i r s t . There may be an occasion when two bays must be occupied simultaneously, as when a large truck must be brought i n t o the shop. The current layout of the subject dealer's shop does not permit such an event, but prov i s i o n has been made i n the model to accommodate a layout m o d i f i -cation and subsequent simulation of simultaneous occupation of bays (see Figure 5 , "possible a d d i t i o n a l bay") . • c. Assign Equipment. Equipment i n t h i s report i s defined as any f a c i l i t y other than men or bays, which i f not a v a i l a b l e w i l l delay a job from being processed. They might better be c a l l e d • c r i t i c a l equipment', but the single term, equipment, i s used i n t h i s t h e s i s for s i m p l i c i t y . Those pieces of equipment s a t i s f y i n g the above d e f i n i t i o n are: F a c i l i t y # Description 51 Brake Drum Lathe 52 Scope 53 Valve Grind Machine F a c i l i t y # * Description 54 Armature Tester, Lathe 55 Battery Tester 56 Charging C i r c u i t Tester 57 Brake Bleeder 58 H o i s t - i n Service Bay 3 59 J o i s t - i n Service Bay 4 60 Front End Machine-in Service Bay 6 61 Warehouse Parts Pick--up Truck 62 H o i s t - i n Gas Station Bay 7 63 H o i s t - i n Gas Station Bay 8 One or two pieces of equipment may be assigned to a job simultaneously according to job type, and w i l l remain seized by that job for a length of time, again dependent upon job type. The equipment requirements are l i s t e d below: . General Job Type Equipment Necessary ( F a c i l i t y #) 1 #62 or #63 2 #57 (25%), #51 (75%) 3 #52 4 (#54 (50%), #52 (50%)) and #56 General Job Type Equipment Necessary ( F a c i l i t y #)^  5 #60 6 #58 or #59 7 none 8 #58 or#59 Equipment numbered 51 to 57 are u t i l i z e d approxi-mately twenty percent of the mechanic's time on a job, whereas the remaining pieces, excluding the truck of course, are u t i l i z e d the t o t a l portion of mechanic's time, however, any portion of mechanic's time, for any job type may be s p e c i f i e d , and simulated. 4. Process Job: Now that a l l f a c i l i t y requirements are met, the job should begin the processing phase of i t s passage through the service department. The process time i s depen-dent upon the following f a c t o r s : a. F l a t rate time of S p e c i f i c Job Category. b. Double or Single Man Assignment method. c. S k i l l of mechanic(s) i n General Job Type. d. Work Schedules of assigned mechanics ( i . e . lunch break, holidays and day or night s h i f t . ) At t h i s point, i t should be noted that the f l a t rate time does include a small amount of time for obtain-ing parts (approximately 15% of process time) which, during the processing of the job, are found to be required and i t i s important to understand that the assigned mechanic must spend that time to get the parts, therefore i t i s r e a l l y unapplied paid-for-mechanic time, and c o s t l y to the business. The process time i s calculated by the following equation:(refer to equation 1): a. Single Man Assignment (2) Process Time = F l a t Rate Time (normally distributed) Mechanic Rating or b. Double Man Assignment (3) Process Time = F l a t Rate Time (norm, dis t ) Mech (A) Rating + Mech (B) Rating At c e r t a i n points during the processing of a job the assigned mechanic(s) may be taken from the job, and pro-cessing suspended. Examples of such i n t e r r u p t i o n s are lunch break, end of s h i f t , holiday, e t c . I f a job can be com-pleted p r i o r to the end of a s h i f t , there i s no problem, • 48 i t w i l l proceed to completion "simply. However, i f the job W i l l extend beyond the end of a day s h i f t , three things might occur: a. i f there i s no night s h i f t , and the assigned man i s working the following day, the job w i l l be suspended only for the night s h i f t and resumed the following day by the o r i g i n a l mechanic. or b. i f there i s no night s h i f t , and the assigned mechanic w i l l not be working the following day, the o r i g i n a l mechanic w i l l work on the job u n t i l the end of the day s h i f t , at which time the balance of f l a t rate time i s calculated, the job i s suspended u n t i l the next day, and then i t i s assigned a new man to bring i t to completion. or c. i f there i s a night s h i f t , the o r i g i n a l mech-anic w i l l work on the job u n t i l the end of the day s h i f t , and turn i t over to a night s h i f t mechanic who w i l l complete i t according to h i s e f f i c i e n c y r a t i n g and work schedule. 5. Further Work: Cert a i n s p e c i f i c jobs have secondary work to be done (as per an e a r l i e r section), and those affected are reprocessed for that work to be completed. B. F a c i l i t y Control D i v i s i o n The main purpose of the f a c i l i t y c ontrol d i v i s i o n i s to make f a c i l i t i e s ( i . e . men, bays, and equipment) avail a b l e when they are scheduled to be, and to "pre-empt them otherwise. For example, a mechanic working day s h i f t on Monday would be avail a b l e to work from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., but would be pre-empted from 12:00 to 12:30 p.m. (lunch break) and from 5:00 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. (night s h i f t ) . The con t r o l d i v i s i o n works on a twelve day (two week) cycle which i s the minimum length of time required to permit an al t e r n a t i n g d a i l y work schedule. That i s , for a man to swing from working Monday through Friday to working Tuesday through Saturday requires two weeks, or twelve days to do so. Consequently, the computer program u t i l i z e s a 63 (no. of f a c i l i t i e s ) by twelve matrix to describe the a v a i l a b i l i t y of a l l f a c i l i t ies f o r each day of the two week c y c l e . Each element of the matrix contains a one d i g i t code, as f o l l o w s ; Code F a c i l i t y i s a v a i l a b l e 0 regular day s h i f t 1 never on that day 2 regular night s h i f t 3 a l l day and night 4 gas s t a t i o n dayshift 2. Pick-Up Truck Controls A: separate section i s required to describe the control of the truck, as i t s a v a i l a b i l i t y i s d i s t i n c t l y d i f f e r e n t from that of other f a c i l i t i e s . F i r s t l y , a small program i s required to simulate the truck t r a v e l -l i n g from the service department of the dealership to the Vancouver warehouse and back twice a day, getting parts not obtainable from l o c a l inventory, as well as r e p l e n i s h -ing l o c a l inventory, and secondly a routine i s established to insure that the truck i s not a v a i l a b l e on Saturdays, since the Vancouver warehouse i s not open on that day. V. Results of the Service Department Sirwlation , For a computer simulation to be of value to anyone, i t must be both v a l i d , and f e a s i b l e . To be v a l i d , the operational l o g i c i n the model must be representative of the r u l e s of practice i n the shop, and the resultant s t a t i s t i c s must be s i m i l a r to those which might be c o l l e c t e d under i d e n t i c a l i n i t i a l conditions i n the ' r e a l ' (vs. simulated) Service Department. S t a t i s t i c s should only be observed after the model has achieved a s t a b i l i z a t i o n point; that i s when s u f f i c i e n t references have been made to the various p r o b a b i l i t y d i s t r i b u t i o n s to cause minimal deviations i n s t a t i s t i c s as a r e s u l t of increased simulation times, v a l i d a t i o n of the model, because of i t s importance i n evaluating the r e s u l t s , i s therefore the f i r s t of four sections i n t h i s Chapter. The following two sections are devoted, respectively, to presenting the r e s u l t s of ex-periments, and to analysing those r e s u l t s . To be f e a s i b l e , the time involved i n computation by the Central Processing Unit (CPU) to achieve stable r e s u l t s must be short enough to permit a s u f f i c i e n t number of experiments to be done with the' resources (CPU time) a v a i l a b l e . The fouith section of t h i s Chapter ^roviGes some information about the cost of simulation for assistance to dealership and manufacturer managers to evaluate i t as a t o o l for making decisions . A. V a l i d a t i o n of the Model 1. L o g i c a l V a l i d a t i o n : Chapter IV, and Appendix A i n more d e t a i l , are written s p e c i f i c a l l y to describe the l o g i c used i n creating the simulation model. On A p r i l 19, 1971, the content of those writings was presented to key personnel involved i n the project, namely Mr. G. H. B. Preston, General Manager; Mr. Mark Hylands, Service Manager; and Mr. G. Cadman, Parts Department Manager of Preston Chevrolet-Oldsmobile Limited; and Mr. F. G. Snow, Vancouver C i t y D i s t r i c t Sales Manager (Chevrolet and Oldsmobile), and Mr. E r i c Schatroff, D i s t r i c t Service Manager of General Motors of Canada. The r e s u l t of that meeting was an approval of the design of the simu-l a t i o n model, and so, upon that basis as well as a r e f l e c t i o n upon the previous Chapter the reader i s i n a p o s i t i o n to formulate h i s own opinion as to the v a l i d i t y of the l o g i c employed. 2. Operational V a l i d a t i o n : By causing customers to i n t e r a c t with the f a c i l i t i e s i n the shop v i a the l o g i c previously approved, i t i s ex-pected that reasonable s t a t i s t i c s w i l l be apparent, a f t e r a s t a b i l i z a t i o n period. To prove these s t a t i s t i c s s i m i l a r to actual observed s t a t i s t i c s therefore serves as second proof of the v a l i d i t y of the l o g i c , and so, the model. a. S t a b i l i z a t i o n Period A most i n f l u e n t i a l factor i n the day to day operation of the Service Department, i s the nature of jobs a r r i v i n g there. The loads on the f a c i l i t i e s of the business are mainly dependent upon the parts and labour requirements of each type of job. S t a b i l i t y of the model can therefore be determined by measuring the s t a b i l i t y of the parts and labour revenue by General Job Type as a percent of t o t a l revenue. That i s , when the portion of t o t a l parts and labor sales of each of the eight General Job Types ceases to vary s i g n i f i c a n t l y with increased simulation time, then a stable state has been reached. Below appears a graph of parts and labour sales for three job types for various lengths of simulation. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Weeks of Simulation In reviewing the s t a t i s t i c s i n Figure 6 , a very good st<i!jiiizatioii of the factors i l l u s t r a t e d i s evident af t e r nine weeks of simulated time. However, the associated cost f o r such a degree of s t a b i l i z a t i o n i s p r o h i b i t i v e i f many experiments are to be run. With the resources a v a i l a b l e for t h i s t h e s i s , and considering the r e s u l t i n g small deviation from the stable state, three weeks was selected as an adequate simulation l i m i t . b. S t a t i s t i c a l V a l i d a t i o n In order to properly compare simulated r e s u l t s to observed data, i t i s necessary to e s t a b l i s h s i m i l a r i n i t i a l conditions. The standard experiment was designed to simulate a period of time occurring from A p r i l 13 to A p r i l 30, 1971. The i n i t i a l conditions set i n that run were the following: The Standard Simulation Run i) Technical Conditions 1. Men: There were s i x mechanics, two apprentices, two parts attendants, and three gas s t a t i o n attend-ants on duty, of which three, one mechanic, one apprentice, and one parts attendant were on night s h i f t . 2. Bays: There were s i x Service Department Bays and two Gas Station Bays, each department having two h o i s t s , and one h o i s t , r e s p e c t i v e l y . 3. Equipment: The following equipment was a v a i l a b l e for use i n the shop (plus h o i s t s , described above): #51 brake drum lathe #52 scope #53 valve grind machine #54 armature te s t e r , lathe #55 battery tester #56 charging c i r c u i t tester #57 brake bleeder #60 front-end machine #61 parts pick up truck- making two t r i p s per day. i i ) P o l i c y Conditions 1. The Business Level was one hundred and twenty ' r e a l ' job a r r i v a l s per week, causing the shop to be oper-ating at f u l l capacity. This f i g u r e was deflated from actual counts of job a r r i v a l s because, i n the simulation, only jobs taking time and contributing q to parts sales were considered, whereas i n r e a l i t y , there were other jobs reported such as 'cancelled jobs', 'courtesy jobs' etc., having no e f f e c t . * 2. The S h i f t Plan i n operation was a day s h i f t , s i x days a week, and a night s h i f t f i v e days a week. * 3 . Assignment of Men followed the 'single man assignment per job' r u l e . * 4 . Single Bay Assignment per job was the r u l e for bay s e l e c t i o n . 5 . Job Completion Time was estimated on the basis of f l a t rate time plus one-half hour, i n accordance with s h i f t plan i n t e r r u p t i o n s . * 6. Parts A v a i l a b i l i t y was determined by the pro-b a b i l i t i e s for each general job type l i s t e d i n Table 3 on page 36. * 7. Payment of Labour was based on a weekly accumu-l a t i o n of f l a t r a t e time, or f o r t y hours, which-ever were the l a r g e r . * Conditions held constant for the main experiments as described i n l a t e r pages. Further d e t a i l s regarding the s p e c i f i c conditions of t h i s standard run may be obtained by r e f e r r i n g back to Chapter IV, or ahead to Appendix A (e.g. re: Men, r e f e r to the " S k i l l Matrix 1, on page 41) . Due to the d i f f i c u l t y i n c o l l e c t i n g data comparable to that r e s u l t i n g from the simulation, a verbal opinion was sought from the Service Department Manager, Mr. Marc Hylands. Mr. Hylands stated that the following figures are quite representative of the actual c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s of his employees during the simulated period ( i . e . A p r i l 13 -24, 1971): From the r e s u l t s of Experiments Standard Bj Employee Roy Norm George Egon Nick Dennis Ted Brian % of time applied (a) 87 91 92 88 85 90 92 91 % E f f i c i e n c y When Working (b)  91 72 123 77 107 88 111 74 Product (a)x(b) .79 .65 1.13 ,68 .91 .79 1.02 .67 Note: I f the product of the two percents above i s greater than 1.0, the employee i s being credited with more f l a t rate hours than the guaranteed hours of pay for the same period. B. Results of the Simulation The previous analysis proves the simulation model s u f f i c i e n t l y v a l i d for experimentation upon i t , so now the task i s to determine the r e s u l t s of s i g n i f i c a n t a l t e r -ations i n both t e c h n i c a l , and p o l i c y conditions. This section w i l l f i r s t l y describe the experiments conducted, and secondly, present t h e i r r e s u l t s . 1. Description of Experiments: The Standard Experiment i s often r e f e r r e d to, as i t i s the basis for comparing the r e l a t i v e e f f e c t of changing each condition. The d e s c r i p t i o n of that run was presented i n the S t a t i s t i c a l V a l i d a t i o n Section, beginning on page 55. Two l e v e l s of business were chosen for each of the main experiments. a. Experiment 1 (One Mechanic Added) A mechanic, named B i l l , rated at one-hundred percent e f f i c i e n c y for each general type of job was added to the night s h i f t , at an hourly rate of $4.50. Having four l e s s people than bays u t i l i z e d on the night s h i f t , there was no need for additional room for t h i s man to work i n . He was rated at one hundred percent ( i . e . capable of doing a job i n f l a t r a t e time) i n each job category for s i m p l i c i t y i n t h e equipment, leaving the experimentation of the i n s t a l l a t i o n o f a s p e c i a l i s t mechanic for a l a t e r time. Two l e v e l s of business were simulated, s p e c i f i c a l l y 100, and 1 20 a r r i v a l s per week. b. Experiment 2 (One Mechanic and One Apprentice Added) An apprentice, named Harry, was added to the f i r s t experimental model ( i . e . the Standard Model plus the new mechanic, B i l l ) for Experiment 2. He was i n s t a l l e d on the day s h i f t at s i x t y - f i v e percent e f f i c i e n c y i n a l l job categories and paid $2.93 per hour (65% of $4.50). One of Harry's f i v e working days of the week was planned to occur when the other day s h i f t apprentice, Norm, was not there, so that only four out of s i x days a week there would be one more man than bays i n which they might work ( i . e . 7 men, 6 bays). A l l other conditions were i d e n t i c a l to Experiment One, including the two d i s t i n c t business l e v e l s . c. Experiment 3 (Addition of Two Hoists) Hoist number f i v e was added to Bay 6 to complement the Front End Machine, and Hoist number four was i n s t a l l e d into Gas S t a t i o n Bay 2 fox - Lubrication jobs . By the addition o f t h e new h o i s t i n Bay 6 i n conjunction with the front end r e p a i r equipment, a s i g n i f i c a n t increase (30%) i n mechanics' a b i l i t i e s to repair front end jobs was estimated. The e f f i c i e n c i e s of a l l employees capable of doing such work were correspondingly increased. Each h o i s t was available a l l hours of shop open time. Mechanic B i l l , and Apprentice, Harry, were eliminated from the model so that the only difference between t h i s experiment and the Standard Simulation Model was the existence of two more h o i s t s . Two separate business l e v e l s were again simulated. d. Experiment 4 (Addition of Two Hoists and One Scope) To the conditions of Experiment 3, a new E l e c t r o n i c Scope was added. No s i g n i f i c a n t increase i n mechanics' a b i l i t y to process Tune-Up jobs was expected, however, the delay involved i n obtaining theequipment was expected to be s i g n i f i c a n t l y reduced ( i . e . two tune-up jobs could now be handled at once, whereas formerly, one had to wait for the other because of i t s need for the one, single scope). Two l e v e l s of business were simulated. e. Experiment 5 (Addition of One Mechanic, One Apprentice, and Two Hoists) This experiment simply added the conditions of Experiment 3 to Experiment 2. f . Experiment 6 (Addition of One Mechanic, One Apprentice, Two Hoists, and One Scope) T h i s experiment added the conditions of Experiment 4 to Experiment 2, simulating the addition of a l l new f a c i l i t i e s (men and equipment) simultaneously, at two business l e v e l s . 2. Results of the Simulation Experiments The r e s u l t s of the simulation experiments are pre-sented i n two forms i n t h i s t h e s i s . F i r s t , the summary r e s u l t s are presented on the following tables, each of which i s described below. Second, the key tables, data matrices, and bar graphs from the computer printouts for each experiment are located i n Appendix B, accompanied by a b r i e f d e s c r i p t i o n of each . The purpose of t h i s section of the th e s i s i s merely to present the r e s u l t s ; analysis i s l e f t e n t i r e l y to the next Chapter. Therefore, the following paragraphs simply describe the following tablas of s t a t i s t i c s which i n the analysis section are r e f e r r e d to frequently. Some general comments are worthy of mention before the s p e c i f i c s of the tables are described. Each table consists of two subsections, a. and b., one for each l e v e l of business simulated. Also, the top f i v e rows of each t a b l e are devoted to describing the experiment for which r e s u l t s are tabulated i n the rows below. The Standard (A) experiment consisted of simulating the model as described e a r l i e r i n t h i s Chapter. An 'X' i n the row designated by "a) Mechanic, B i l l " s i g n i f i e s that the r e s u l t s presented i n the rows below are those of a simulation of the standard model with the addition of Mechanic, B i l l . The addition of Apprentice, Harry, i s denoted by an 'X' i n the corresponding row, and so on for Hoists 4 and 5 and Scope 2. Hoist 4, by the way i s a four-post e l e c t r i c h o i s t costing $2000.00, located i n the Gas Station i n Bay #8, for s e r v i c i n g l u b r i c a t i o n jobs, however unlike the new h o i s t of s i m i l a r design i n the Service Department Bay #6, i t s cost i s not charged d i r e c t l y to the Service Department, but rather i n d i r e c t l y through the transfer p r i c e of labour ( i . e . Customer" Labour Rate l e s s ten per-cent) . The numbers i n the rows corresponding to 'e) New P o l i c y ' r e f e r to the following p o l i c i e s : 1. The estimation of Job Completion time i s based on the f l a t rate plus ninety (instead of t h i r t y ) minutes. 2. Employees are paid every two weeks, instead of every one. 3. The r e t a i l p r i c e of labour i s $13.00 per hour. Table 7 Service Times and Measurement of Delay, Lateness The purpose of t h i s table i s to give the key s t a t i s t i c s regarding customer s a t i s f a c t i o n for each experiment. In order to show the reason for a change i n the lateness of completion of jobs, the average delay for each of the eight general types of jobs i s print e d . This average delay includes the time taken to obtain parts, to obtain required f a c i l i t i e s , and to be serviced. The section below breaks the average time for a l l jobs (THRU) down int o i t s components, namely, the time to obtain parts (PART), the time to obtain f a c i l i t i e s (FACL), and the time to service jobs (SERV); each of which i s then expressed as a percent of THRU. Table 7 A Service Times and Measurement of Delay, Lateness Business Level i s 100 Jobs per Week Experiment StdA 1A 2A 3A 4A 5A 6A ADDITION OF (x i f so) a) Mechanic, B i l l X X X X b) Apprentice, Harry X x X c) Hoists 4,5 x X X d) Scope 2 • x x e) New Policy Total LUBE 66 58 68 65 69 74 73 Service BRAKE 512 415 350 201 245 349 422 Time TUNE-UP 347 288 277 337 367 283 278 by ELEC. 325 153 219 272 285 164 166 General FRONT END 419 284 252 327 335 196 216 Job DRIVE 470 440 412 412 460 444 408 Type CHASSIS 307 .215 223 255 288 231 235 (Minutes) MAJOR 659 497 610 628 652 526 577 PART* 82 79 88 69 75 89 85 FACL* 189 91 88 • 139 166 71 85 SERV* 139 132 137 139 136 136 134 THRU 410 302 313 347 377 296 304 PART %* 20% 26% 28% 20% 20% 30% 28% FACL %* 46% 28% 26% 40% 42% 24% 26% SERV %* 34% 44% 44% 40% 36% 46% 44% %. Completed on Time 36% 50% 50% 43% 46% 60% 58% % 3 hours late (or less) 68% 79% 75% 66% 67% 80% 77% Average Lateness 181 84 81 136 163 69 81 * Adjusted for re-entry to Queue by partially completed, or Secondary Jobs. Table 7 B Service Times and Measurement of Delay, Lateness Business Level i s 120 Jobs per Week StdB IB 2B 3B 4B 5B 6B 7 8 ADDITION 0FJ(X i f so) a) Mechanic, B i l l X X X X b) Apprentice, Harry X X X c) Hoists 4,5 X X X X X X d) Scope 2 X X e) New policy : 1,2 3 LUBE 48 52 58 52 53 74 50 75 52 BRAKE 367 324 227 283 411 258 271 236 283 TUNE-UP 392 :. . 385 263 269 392 241 217 299 269 ELEC . 403 345 191 292 379 240 241 312 292 FRONT END 546 297 267 389 506 196 190 290 389 DRIVE 643 567 401 510 395 356 417 449 510 CHASSIS 326 255 236 281 289 203 241 256 281 MAJOR 999 730 535 542 614 475 465 527 542 PART* 48 62 53 71 58 49 68 74 71 FACL* 290 184 94 156 222 88 79 135 156 SERV* 145 139 148 128 132 137 136 128 128 THRU 483 385 295 355 • 412 274 283 337 355 , PART %* 10% 16% 18% 20% 14% 18% 24% 22% 20% FACL %* 58% 46% 30% 42% 52% 30% 26% 38% 42% SERV %* 30% 36% 50% 3 £r)o 32% 50% 48% 38% 36% % Completed on Time 26% 37% 46% 42% 32% 52% 52% 52% 42% % 3 hours late (or less) 49% 69% 79% 67% 58% 80% 79% 77% 67% Average Lateness 276 162 73 136 191 48 68 58 136 • * Adjusted for re-entry to queue by p a r t i a l l y completed, or secondary jobs. Policy 1 = Job Completion i f F. R. + 90 minutes, 2= Pay every 2 week.3, 3 = Customer Labour Rate is $13.00/hour. Three measures of lateness, or conversely, prompt-ness, are given i n the l a s t three l i n e s of Table 7 . The f i r s t shows how many jobs were completed on or before the time at which they were promised to be ready for the customer (% completed on time). The next row indicates the percent of jobs completed three hours l a t e , or le s s , including those completed on time (% 3 hours, or l e s s , late) . The l a s t l i n e i s the average time i n minutes that job completion time exceeds promised d e l i v e r y time. Table 8 Manpower Analysis The Manpower Analysis table on page 68 i l l u s t r a t e s three c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s about each mechanic and apprentice employed by the service department, for each simulation, and as well, on the bottom l i n e shows the t o t a l Service Department labour cost for each experiment. The following c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s about each employee are i l l u s t r a t e d ? a) the percent of time a c t u a l l y worked while i n the shop, on duty. b) the e f f i c i e n c y with which the employee performed while a c t u a l l y working. This i s a r e s u l t of h i s doing each job with the e f f i c i e n c y r a t i n g found i n the employee Table 8 A Manpower Analysis - Business Level = 100 jobs per week Experiment StdA 1A 2A 3A 4A 5A 6A Addition of (X i f so) a) Mechanic, B i l l X X X X b) Apprentice, Harry X X X X c) Hoists 4,5 X X X X d) Scope 2 X X e) New Policy Roy a* % 80 74 64 68 69 50 63 kt % 90 75 90 99 105 130 95 c** $ 540 540 • 540 540 540 540 540 ' Norm a % 75 40 52 76 74 49 53 (Apprentice) b % 77 76 85 78 86 80 89 c $ 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 George a % 83 81 78 84 79 74 73 b % 120 138 124 110 121 120 122 c $ 557 605 543 540 550 540 541 Egon s % 69 54 57 73 67 55 45 b % 88 89 84 73 88 76 93 c $ 540 540 540 540 540 540 540 Nick a % 69 65 64 71 69 61 58 b % 114 113 111 117 121 116 119 c $ 540 540 540 540 540 540 540 Dennis a % 79 75 65 67 73 70 69 b % 89 106 115 99 90 97 108 c $ 540 540 540 540 540 540 540 Ted a % 76 58 66 74 70 64 61 b % 123 132 104 112 107 116 119 c $ 543 540 540 540 540 540 540 Brian a % 71 49 50 66 65 55 49 (Apprentice) b % 81 81 71 89 81 81 86 c $ 270 270 270 270 270 270 270 B i l l a % - 46 49 - - 53 48 b % - 105 116 - . - 106 110 c $ - 540 540 - - 540 540 Harry a % - • - 29 - - 30 34 (Apprentice) b % - - 75 - - 85 87 c $ - - 348 - - 348 348 Total Service Labour Cost 3932 4511 4797 3909 3919 4797 4798 * Worked % of time available. -J % efficiency when working. ** 3 week pay per policy ln effect Table 8B Manpower Analysis - Business Level = 120 jobs per week Experiment StdB IB 2B 3B 4B 5B 6B 7B 8B Addition of (x i f so) a) Mechanic, B i l l X X X X b) Apprentice , Harry X X X c) Hoists 4,5 X X X X X X d) Scope 2 X X e) New policy 1,2 3 Roy a % 87 79 73 83 82 63 69 78 83 b % 91 96 88 94 101 101 108 89 94 c % ' 540 540 540 540 560 540 540 540 582 Norm a % 91 77 62 85 87 66 70 82 85 (Apprentice) b % 72 75 85 98 90 95 94 100 98 c $ 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 402 438 George a % 92 88 80 86 89 84 78 84 86 b % 123 124 128 127 128 120 124 145 127 c ? 606 . 592 573 603 613 556 540 603 652 Egon a % . 88 79 66 73 82 66 64 67 73 b % 77 90 90 86 92 86 86 94 86 c ? 540 540 540 540 540 540 540 540 582 Nick a % 85 79 70 73 74 66 77 71 73 b % 107 107 s 103 107 107 96 107 116 107 c $ 543 540 540 540 540 540 540 540 582 Dennis a * 90 85 74 83 89 73 69 83 83 b % 88 95 90 111 84 112 114 101 111 c $ 540 540 540 547 540 543 540 540 590 Ted a % 92 77 65 83 85 64 60 78 83 b % 111 113 129 111 113 111 114 112 111 c $ 569 540 540 540 441 540 540 540 582 Brian a % 91 65 63 69 75 50 47 74 69 (Apprentice) b % 74 64 84 87 82 94 83 88 87 c $ 270 270 270 270 270 270 270 270 291 B i l l a % 68 70 - - 63 58 - -b % - 101 97 - - 121 109 - -c $ - 540 540 - - 540 540 - -Harry a % - - 41 - - 55 40 - -(Apprentice) b % - - 78 - - 58 70 - -c $ -. -• 348 - - 348 348 - -Total Labour Cost 4004 4498 4827 3979 4013 4816 4797 3972 4296 Policy 1 » Job completion time is F. R. plus 90 minj 2 = Pay every 2 weeks. 3 = Customer Labour Rate is 13.00/hour. •a s k i l l matrix for that job. The s k i l l matrix for each experiment i s printed i n Appendix B. c) the employee's pay to the end of the simulation, that i s , three weeks. I f , for a given mechanic such as George, h i s three weeks of pay exceeds 120 times h i s hourly rate, then he has been credited for more . than 40 hours per week of f l a t rate time, and paid a corresponding bonus. Each man's pay for each exp e r i -ment i s added to give the T o t a l Service Labour Cost on the bottom l i n e of the t a b l e . Table 9 F a c i l i t y Analysis The f a c i l i t y a nalysis table, on page 71, simply presents the u t i l i z a t i o n of each bay, s p e c i a l pieces of equipment, h o i s t s , and the truck. The ' u t i l i z a t i o n ' i s the percent of time a c t i v e l y employed i n se r v i c i n g a cust omer while available for performing such s e r v i c e . Bays 7 and 8 and Hoists 3 and 4 are available from 8s30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. every day of every simulated week. The truck, however, i s available only f i v e days a week from 8:30 a.m to 5:00 p.m. The remaining equipment i s avail a b l e during both day and night s h i f t , every day. Table 9 A F a c i l i t y Analysis - Business Level i s 100 jobs/week (Percent of available time utilized) Experiment StdA 1A 2A 3A 4A 5A 6A Addition of (X i f so) a) Mechanic, B i l l X X X X b) Apprentice, Harry X X X c) Hoists 4,5 X X X X d) Scope 2 X X e) New Policy Bay 1 61 v 55 53 61 58 55 53 Bay 2 39 38 45 40 43 39 41 Service Bay 3 55 50 56 60 57 53 52 Bay 4 52 39 44 38 40 40 42 Department Bay 5 14 18 11 16 15 17 13 Bay 6 39 33 33 30 29 34 35 Gas Bay 7 14 13 14 12 13 11 12 Station Bay 8 - - - 2 2 1 1 Brake Drum Lathe 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Scope 1 9 9 8 10 9 9 7 Valve Grind Machine 7 5 6 7 8 8 8 Armature Tester 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 Battery Tester 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 Charging Circuit Tester 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 Brake Bleeder (.3) (.1) ( .2) ( .1) (.4) (.4) (.4) Hoist 1 (Bay 3) 61 48 54 51 49 53 51 Hoist 2 (Bay 4) 33 29 38 31 29 32 28 Front End Machine 24 23 21 11 15 11 10 Truck 64 65 64 60 60 60 65 Hoist 3 (Bay 7) 10 10 11 9 10 8 9 Hoist 4 (Bay 8) - - . - 1 1 1 1 Hoist 5(Bay 6) - - - 19 24 20 23 Scope 2 1 1 Table F a c i l i t y Analysis - Business Level is 120 jobs/week (Percent of available time utilized) Experiment StdB IB 2B 3B 4B 5B 6B 7 8 Addition of (X i f so) a) Mechanic, B i l l X X X X b) Apprentice, Harry X X X c) Hoists 4,5 X X X X X X d) Scope 2 X X e) New Policy 1,2 3 Bay 1 68 66 70 62 65 66 65 69 62 . Bay 2 52 43 50 43 48 46 49 46 43 Bay 3 -;• 71 67 62 57 69 59 66 64 57 Bay 4 52 62 52 42 36 44 41 32 42 Bay 5 23 24 23 20 21 . 26 17 18 20 Bav 6 40 33 43 42 41 36 38 38 42 Bay 7 17 15 13 14 12 13 12 13 Bay 8 - - - 2 2 4 3 3 2 Brake Drum Lathe 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 Scope 1 11 12 9 9 9 10 10 10 9 Valve Grind Machine 7 9 6 8 7 6 6 7 8 Armature Tester 3 2 3 3 2 3 1 3 3 Battery Tester 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 2 Charging Circuit Tester 4 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Brake Bleeder 1 1 1 (.4) (.2) (.2) 1 (.1) (.4) Hoist 1 (Bay 3) 60 57 54 52 56 51 47 53 52 Hoist 2 (Bay 4) 40 45 40 35 30 33 32 32 35 Front End Machine 30 24 27 18 15 15 13 16 18 Truck 60 61 63 65 63 66 64 68 65 Hoist 3 (Bay 7) 13 11 11 10 11 10 10 9 10 Hoist 4 (Bay 8) - - 1 1 2 1 2 1 Hoist 5 (Bay 6) - - - 29 27 34 30 22 29 Scope 2 3 1 Policy 1 •= Job Completion i s F.R. plus 90 min., 2 = pay every 2 weeks, 3 = Customer Labour Rate i s $13.00 per hour. Table 10 Cash Flow Analysis Table 10 shows the cash flow for each simulation experiment. The f i r s t three l i n e s describe the income, the next six, the expense, the next, the Net Cash Increase, or for s i m p l i c i t y i n t h i s thesis, the Gross P r o f i t , and the l a s t a measure of the u t i l i z a t i o n of t o t a l labour capacity. Each l i n e i s described separately below. R e t a i l Labour Sales. This l i n e records the sum of labour sales for every customer repair order. That i s , the f l a t rate f o r each job m u l t i p l i e d by the current R e t a i l Labour Rate (normally $12.00) i s added to t h i s f i g u r e upon entry of the job into the shop. Service Parts Sales. On t h i s l i n e i s recorded the t o t a l of parts sales due to service jobs, during the simulated time period. R e c a l l i n g Chapter IV, for each type of job there i s a mean (normally distributed) number of parts required. Therefore, for each job, the number of required parts times the average price per part ($2.81, calculated from the estimated number of parts sold and the t o t a l parts sales i n 1970 at Preston Chevrolet Oldsmobile Limited) gives the sale ofparts, and i s added int o the Service Parts Sales. Table 10A Cash Flow Analysis - Business Level i s 100 Jobs per week. Experiment StdA 1A 2A 3A 4A 5A 6A Addition of a) Mechanic, B i l l X X X X b) Apprentice, Harry X X X c) Hoists 4,5 X X X X d) Scope 2 X X e) Hew Policy R e t a i l Labour Sales 8750 8716 8888 8649 8939 8785 8765 Service Parts Sales 3105 3161 2875 2805 3031 2963 3184 Total Sales 11855 11877 11763 11454 11970 11748 11949 Transfer Labour Cost 1472 1475 1403 1324 1460 1242 1407 Service Labour Cost 3932 4511 4797 3909 3919 4797 4798 Service Parts Cost 2277 2296 2094 2040 2198 2154 2314 Base Fixed Overhead 3096 3096 3096 3096 3096 3096 3096 Additional Overhead* 156 426 156 426 T o t a l Cost 10777 11378 11390 10765 11099 11445 12141 Net Cash Increase (Gross Profit) 1078 499 373 929 871 303 -192 Labour Capacity 729 728 741 721 745 732 730 Sold** 960 1080 1200 960 960 1080 1200 76% 67% 62% 75% 78% 68% 61% * Based on payment for additional f a c i l i t i e s over a one year period, i . e . 1 Hoist @ 2600/50 = $42/week. 1 Scope @ 4500/50 =» $90/week. ** Hours of Flat Rate Labour Sold Man Hours Available. Table 10B Cash Flow A n a l y s i s - Business Level i s 120 Job3/week Experiment StdB IB 2B 3B 4B 5B 6B 7 8 A d d i t i o n o f : a) Mechanic, B i l l X X X X b) Apprentice, Harry X X X c) Hoists 4, 5 X X X X X X d) Scope 2 X X e) New p o l i c y * 1.2 3 R e t a i l Labour Sales 10231 10315 10023 9927 10119 9940 9926 10008 10751 Service Parts Sales 3311 3476 . 3432 3373 3670 3550 3776 3477 3373 T o t a l Sales 13542 13791- ' 13455 13300 13785 13490 13702 13485 14124 Trans f e r Cost of Labour 1642 1573 1548 1513 1585 1707 1673 1527 1641 Service Labour Cost 4004 4498 4827 3979 4013 4816 4797 3972 4296 Service Parts Cost 2410 2526 2494 2458 2666 2578 2740 2524 2458 Base Fixed Overhead 3096 3096 3096 3096 3096 3096 3096 3096 3096 A d d i t i o n a l Overhead 156 426 156 426 156 156 T o t a l Cost 11152 11693 11965 11202 12026 12353 12732 11275 11647 Net Cash Increase (Gross P r o f i t ) 2390 2098 1490 2098 1999 1137 970 2210 2477 Labour Capacity 852 B60 835 827 843 828 827 834 827 Sold** 960 1080 1200 960 960 1080 1200 960 960 89% 80% 70% 86% 88% 77% 69% 87% 86% * P o l i c y 1 = Job Completion i f F. R. + 90 minutes 2 •= Pay every 2 weeks 3 =• Customer Labour Rate i s $13.00/hour ** Hours of F l a t Rate Labour Sold Man Hours A v a i l a b l e T o t a l Sales. The T o t a l Sales figure simply i s the addition of the two l i n e s above. -Transfer Cost of Labour. To t r e a t the Service Department as a p r o f i t center, i t i s necessary to charge a l l outside labour at the transfer price, which i s r e t a i l less ten percent. Consequently, a l l services performed by the day and night s h i f t parts attendants, as well as the Gas S t a t i o n attendants cost the Service Department $10.80 per hour when the R e t a i l Labour rate i s $12.00 per hour . The i n t e n t i o n of charging t h i s p r i c e i s p r i m a r i l y to a s s i s t i n paying the overhead of the outside departments, j u s t as any other customer would have to do, consequently, permitting them also to be treated as p r o f i t centers. The cost of additional equipment i n the outside depart-ments i s not, therefore, charged d i r e c t l y to the Service Department on a pro-rata basis as i s the cost for new equipment i n the Service Department, but rather, i s included i n the transfer cost of labour. Service Labour Cost • The Service Labour cost i s the sum of a l l pay to a l l personnel i n the Service Department for the simulation period. Parts Cost. Similar to the service Parts Sales, the Parte Cost i s an accumulation of a l l parts sales for a l l jobs, based on the average cost per part being $2.06. Base Fixed Overhead. The fixed overhead expense i s c a l c u -lated from the average weekly overhead allocated to the subject Service Department i n f i s c a l 1970, thus i t includes Add i t i o n a l Overhead. To be r e a l i s t i c , one would plan to pay for new equipment over a one year (50 week) period, so the cost of new equipment i n the Service Department i s charged to that department at o n e - f i f t i e t h of the r e t a i l p r ice plus tax, per week. The prices, including tax of the two addit i o n a l pieces of equipment are shown below: a) Four post e l e c t r i c h o i s t , with f r o n t end adjustment equipment—$2600.00, thus $52.00 per week. b) E l e c t r o n i c Scope—$4500.00, thus $90.00 per week. Total Cost. The Tot a l Cost, or expense, to the Service Department i s the sum of the f i v e l i n e s above i t . 1. 2. 3 . Insurance Mortgage Salari e s of Administration Net Cash Increase (Gross P r o f i t ) • The Gross P r o f i t i s the dif f e r e n c e between To t a l Sales and Total Costs. Labour Capacity Sold. The Labour Capacity Sold i s expres-sed both as a r a t i o of: Hours of F l a t Rate Labour Sold , Man Hours Available and also as a percent. Table i l Summary of Computer Costs Table 11 on page 79 l i s t s the sixteen simulation experiments and th e i r associated costs. The Central Pro-cessing Unit (CPU) time i s the time i t took to assemble the GPSS program, execute i t , and tabulate data. The CPU cost i s a charge to the author's computing account approximately equal to the r e t a i l cost of time sharing i n a comparable system. The L, or Low, p r i o r i t y s i g n i f i e s the job was run at night, thus reducing the cost by twenty percent. Table 12 Summary of Sales by General Job Type The simulation of job a r r i v a l s alone, excluding a t -tending to t h e i r repair, reveals that after one hundred days of simulation, or approximately four months, the Labour and Parts Sales contribution by job type i s as presented on Table 12. Table 11 Summary of Computer Cost3 Experiment Length of CPU Time CPU Cost Priority , Simulation  Standard A 2 weeks* 3.8 min. $28.01 B Standard B 3 weeks 7.5 min. $29.19 L 1A 3 weeks 4.0 min. $19.22 L IB 3 weeks 6.0 min. $24.83 L 2A 3 weeks 4.0 min. $19.39 L 2B 3 weeks 4.5 min. $20.38 L 3A 3 weeks 4.8 min. $21.14 L 3B 3 weeks 5.4 min. $23.14 L 4A 3 weeks 5.1 min. $22.23 L , 4B 3 weeks 6.4 min. $25.88 . L 5A 3 weeks 4.3 min. $19.87 L 6A 3 weeks 4.0 min. $18.96 L 6B 3 weeks 4.3 min. $19.92' L 7 4 weeks ** 7.4 min. $30.31 L 8 3 weeks 5.4 min. $23.12 L * Results extrapolated to 3 weeks. ** Results interpolated for 3 weeks. Table 12 Summary of Sales by General Job Type General Job Type $ Labour Sales 1st Job 2nd Job T o t a l Parts % Sales % Lub r i c a t i o n Brakes Tune Up E l e c t r i c a l Front End \ Drive-Line Chassis Major 1,170 5,381 3,947 4,771 8,329 10,775 13,390 2,129 189 61 97 0 0 0 2,129 4.2 1,359 2.7 0 0 630 3.7 5,442 10.8 2,240 13.2 4,044 8.0 4,771 . 9.4 8,329 16.5 10,775 21.4 13,390 26.6 2,496 14.7 238 1.4 4,326 25.5 2,794 16.5 4,200 24.8 To t a l 47,763 2,476 50,239 100.0 16,924 100.0 As simulation projects go, there are often many times more s t a t i s t i c s produced than needed. The previous Chapter summarized the key s t a t i s t i c s from each of sixteen experiments, and presented them i n a format which enabled easy comparison. Appendix B beginning on page 149 i s the source from which that data was condensed. For the purpose of analysis, however, i t i s necessary to further condense t h i s data, and look at i t i n terms mentioned i n the i n t r o -duction to the t h e s i s . So, every experiment i s evaluated as to i t s Gross P r o f i t and Average Lateness of Delivery, and then plotted on a graph, Figure 7 on page 83 , having those two parameters for the 'Y' and 'X' axes, r e s p e c t i v e l y . The t h i r d parameter, quality, was, i n every experiment, assumed to be s a t i s f a c t o r y , because each man performed each job according to h i s a b i l i t y (the time i t takes him) to do such work s a t i s f a c t o r i l y . At no time was job processing time speeded up to overcome a back-log of work. Thus, the measures of p r o f i t and promptness are those required to na i n t a i n s a t i s f a c t o r y q u a l i t y under d i f f e r i n g t e c h n i c a l , or management p o l i c y conditions. The underlying assumptions i n t h i s analysis are the following: 1) Quality of Service remains s a t i s f a c t o r y i n a l l experiments. 2) Employees work at the same e f f i c i e n c y regardless of work load. 3) In the short run, there i s no s i g n i f i c a n t increase i n business due to an improvement i n service to customers. 4) There i s no decrease i n the number of jobs a r r i v i n g due to an increase i n R e t a i l Labour Rate. 5) On the graph, Figure 7, a move up and to the r i g h t i s preferred to up only, to the r i g h t only, or to down and/or to the l e f t . In other words, i t i s preferred that the business make both a p r o f i t and an improvement i n service, to doing only one or the other, or to making a loss, and/or a decrease i n s e r v i c e . Following the arrows on Figure 7 i s the same as observing changing the business from the state defined on th e t a i l to the state defined on the t i p , and the new p r o f i t and promptness can be noted. F i r s t , i t i s worthwhile to i d e n t i f y a few reference points on the graph. The point indicated by STDA represents what the state of the business would Ixdve been pr i o r to April 12, 1971 i f a low l e v e l cf business (100 jobs per week) had existed, with a night s h i f t working. The state defined at the point STDB i s that i n which the business existed on A p r i l 12, subsequent to s t a r t i n g a night s h i f t with an accompanying twenty percent increase i n business (to 120 jobs per week). The Service Department then moved to the state defined at point 3B with the addition of two new h o i s t s on about June 1, 1971. The order i n which the analysis w i l l follow i s the same as the order i n which the r e s u l t s of the experiments are presented, concentrating most of the discussion on the experiments involving the higher l e v e l of business. Experiment IB. By adding Mechanic, B i l l , at $4.50 per hour, p r o f i t s dropped 12% while promptness of d e l i v e r y increased 41%. This improvement i n service was due mainly to a decrease i n time (from 290 minutes to 184) jobs were spending waiting for necessary men. B i l l ' s main contribution was i n servicing 30% of the Front End jobs, permitting a better a l l o c a t i o n of the remaining mechanics to other jobs. As a consequence, however, George was credited with l e s s f l a t rate time, and was paid l e s s . This of course reduced the increase i n labour cost to less than B i l l ' s t o t a l pay. The change i n the u t i l i z a t i o n of equipment was i n s i g n i f i c a n t . Experiment 2B. By bringing i n another person, namely an apprentice, Harry, p r o f i t s were further decreased by 28% and promptness of d e l i v e r y increased by 54% to $1490 and . 73 minutes, r e s p e c t i v e l y . Harry, too, created a better a l l o c a t i o n of men to jobs by h i s doing mostly e l e c t r i c a l and chassis types of work. The e f f i c i e n c i e s of each man while a c t u a l l y working increased due to the better a l l o c a t i o n of men, and so there was a considerable decrease i n service time. However, with seven men now working on day s h i f t and only s i x bays i n which to work, someone was always l e f t with nothing to do, and so a noticeable de-crease i n percentage of a v a i l a b l e time applied i s evident for everyone. With a high l e v e l of business the contributions of both B i l l and Harry are quite noticeable, and a good p r o f i t i s maintained, however, by such an increase i n manpower capacity there i s a corresponding s u s c e p t i b i l i t y to loss i n the event of a decrease i n business. V i s u a l inspection of the graph i n figure 7 t e l l s immediately that during a low business l e v e l , a higher percentage drop i n p r o f i t s for a lower increase i n promptness of d e l i v e r y occurs than i n the esse for a higher business l e v e l . Experiment 3B. Regardless of the l e v e l of business, the addition of two e l e c t r i c h o i s t s , one i n the Gas Station, and one i n Bay 6 of the Service Department reduces the average lateness of d e l i v e r y from 276 to about 78 minutes, or 73%. The main contribution i s made through these h o i s t s being available, thus, the time to obtain the required f a c i l i t i e s was reduced from 290 minutes to 156 minutes, but a s i g n i f i c a n t decrease i n service time i s also noted, (from 145 minutes to 128 minutes) due to the front end mechanics• improved e f f i c i e n c y with the new front end machine (an i n t e g r a l part of the h o i s t i n Bay #6). The addition of Hoists 4 and 5 also seems quite safe economically i n the case of a lower l e v e l of business. Experiment 4B• Contrary to what one would expect, the i n s t a l l a t i o n of another e l e c t r o n i c scope i s not b e n e f i c i a l . As the graph i n figure 7 c l e a r l y shows, the i n s t a l l a t i o n of the scope causes a negative e f f e c t on both p r o f i t s and promptness of d e l i v e r y . This e f f e c t i s due to a poorer a l l o c a t i o n of men, mainly to Tune-Up Jobs. P r i o r to having t h i s piece of equipment, while jobs were waiting for the scope to become available, one of the three good tune-up mechanics (George, Ted, or Nick) would also become a v a i l -able, and work would be done with high e f f i c i e n c y . How-ever with no delay i n obtaining a scope ( i . e . with the addition of a new one) the best avai l a b l e mechanic quite often was not one of the above three, but rather, Norm, who i s only f i f t y percent e f f i c i e n t i n doing Tune-Ups. -The figures below help to c l a r i f y the above explanation. Employee Tune-Up # Jobs Processed E f f i c i e n c y Exp. 3B Exp. 4B Roy 50 9 6 Norm 50 10 14 George 111 11 10 Egon 74 14 12 Nick 104 15 21 Dennis 68 13 13 Ted 108 13 12 Brian 50 4 8 A l l of those who show an increase i n the number of tune-ups performed are least e f f i c i e n t i n that category, so men are c e r t a i n l y improperly a l l o c a t e d ; suggesting only, that when i n s t a l l i n g a new scope, considerable attention should be given to deciding who should use i t . Experiment 5B. Comparing the s h i f t of state from STD B to 3B to that .from 2B to 5B reveals a s i g n i f i c a n t difference, which i s not at f i r s t expected since both are the r e s u l t s of adding the same two h o i s t s . The difference arises from unequal s t a r t i n g points. Unlike the former, the l a t t e r had two more personnel employed, namely B i l l and Harry. Although the reduction i n gross p r o f i t i s almost i d e n t i c a l $292 versus $353, respectively) the diff e r e n c e i n reduction of lateness i s considerable (140 minutes versus 25 minutes, r e s p e c t i v e l y ) . That one should expect an equal change suggests he assumes that the e f f e c t on promptness of d e l i v e r y by the addition of men and f a c i l i t i e s i s a d d i t i v e . The simulation r e s u l t s prove t h i s assumption f a l s e , for i f i t were true, the time to obtain f a c i l i t i e s would be expected to be -40 minutes i n experiment 5B ( i . e . the decrease i n FACL i n experiment 3B, 134 minutes taken from FACL of 2B, 94 minutes, would r e s u l t i n a negative expected value of FACL for experiment 5B, -40 minutes) . To state the analysis more c l e a r l y , i t i s c e r t a i n that the time to obtain f a c i l i t i e s w i l l never be l e s s than zero, and further, there i s a very low p r o b a b i l i t y that f a c i l i t i e s can be obtained i n t h i r t y minutes or l e s s , under the i n i t i a l conditions previously stated. In-creasing the number of men and f a c i l i t i e s decreases the p r o b a b i l i t y of waiting a long time for them, but not a d d i t i v e l y . Experiment 6B. After having added two new men and two new h o i s t s , the addition of a new scope has no b e n e f i c i a l e f f e c t . In fact i t s e f f e c t i s negative, for the same r e a -sons as stated i n the discussion regarding Experiment 4B. Experiment 7. Two new p o l i c i e s were simulated i n E x p e r i -ment 7. The f i r s t , paying employees on a two week rather than a one week basis was only s l i g h t l y b e n e f i c i a l to p r o f i t s . The decrease i n labour costs was a mere $7.00 because Dennis was paid $540 instead of the $547 earned under the one week pay p o l i c y . The s l i g h t increase i n p r o f i t s was mostly due to a higher volume of labour sales i n the same time period. This i s a r e s u l t of a small deviation i n executing the GPSS programme, when r e f e r -encing random number generators for the various p r o b a b i l i t y d i s t r i b u t i o n s (functions) employed. By being more pessimistic i n estimating job completion time, more people are serviced better, providing they accept the pessimistic time as r e a d i l y as they accept a more o p t i m i s t i c one. By estimating the completion time to be ninety minutes instead of t h i r t y minutes plus the f l a t r a t e time, ten percent more jobs are completed on time (52% vs 42%), ten percent more are les s than three hours la t e (77% versus 67%) and the average lateness i s reduced from 136 minutes to 58 minutes, a diffe r e n c e s l i g h t l y more than the difference i n estimation (78 minutes vs. 60 minutes). Experiment 8. Ignoring the negative e f f e c t on the number of customers a r r i v i n g , due to an increase i n the R e t a i l Labour Rate, there i s no expected d i f f e r e n c e i n the oper-a t i o n a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s of the business. However, an increase i n Gross P r o f i t s i s expected, and the r e s u l t s , from Table 10B are l i s t e d below: ©$12/Hour @$13/Hour % T n c r e R e t a i l Labour Sales $ 9,927 $10,751 8.3% Service Parts Sales 3,373 3, 373 0.0% Tota l Sales 13,300 14,124 6.2% Transfer Cost of Labour 1,513 1, 641 8.3% Service Labour Cost 3,979 4,296 8.3% Service Parts Cost 2,458 2,458 0.0% Base Fixed Overhead 3,096 3,096 0 .0% Add i t i o n a l Overhead 156 156 0.0% To t a l Cost 11,202 11,647 3.9% Gross P r o f i t 2,098 2,477 11.8% R e t a i l Labour Rate 12 .00 13 .00 8.3% Figure 8 on the following page i s taken from figure 7 on page.83. The points defined by states in.which a machine or man was not an addition ( i . e . experiment 7 and 8), or where men were not better allocated to jobs (experi-ment 4) were ignored, and a curve was f i t t e d to the res t , giving an approximation of the r e l a t i o n s h i p , at each l e v e l of business, between p r o f i t s and promptness. By measuring the slope of the tangent to the curve at any given point, an estimate can be made of the cost of $ 2800-1 2400 -I 3 Week 2000 Gross Profits 1600 12001 800 400 STD B 260 240 220 200 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 Promptness of Delivery (Minutes Late) Figure 8 Profits versus Delivery Performance promptness to the Service Department whose state i s defined by that point. For example, the slope of the tangent to the curve at point 3B gives the three week cost to the subject Service Department to obtain a one day improvement i n d e l i v e r y . That cost i s $4.55 for three weeks, or $77.50 for one year. Further A n a l y s i s . Beyond studying one experiment r e l a t i v e to another, i t i s important to look at the whole set of experiments as one,.and make some useful observations. The f i r s t observation i s the r e l a t i o n s h i p between Gross P r o f i t s and Labour Capacity Sold, and the second i s the r e l a t i o n s h i p between Lateness and the time required to obtain necessary f a c i l i t i e s . A simple way to determine the existence, and sub-sequently the nature, of a r e l a t i o n s h i p between two v a r i -ables i s to plot t h e i r values on a two dimensional coordin-ate plane. Figure 9 shows the r e l a t i o n s h i p between Gross P r o f i t s and Labour capacity sold, and Figure 10 shows the r e l a t i o n s h i p between the time to obtain f a c i l i t i e s and average lateness. In Figure 11 the above three r e l a t i o n s h i p s are shown together, i l l u s t r a t i n g a fourth r e l a t i o n s h i p , that between the time required to obtain f a c i l i t i e s , and the percent of labour capacity s o l d . I t i s i n t e r e s t i n g to note, f o r the same percent of labour capacity sold, i t takes l e s s time to obtain the required men, bays and equipment for a higher l e v e l of business than a lower one. An example might well explain t h i s phenomenon. Consider a very large business with many men, bays and pieces of equipment, s e l l i n g eighty percent of i t s labour capacity; and then consider a smaller business with only a few men, bays, and pieces of equipment, s e l l i n g also eighty percent of i t s labour capacity. The labour reserve i s the remaining twenty percent of capacity, and for the larger business, t h i s percentage i s somewhat larger i n absolute terms, and contains a larger v a r i e t y of s k i l l s , thus creating a lower p r o b a b i l i t y for an a r r i v i n g job to obtain the necessary s k i l l s . I t follows then that the time to obtain the required men ( s k i l l s ) , bays, or equipment w i l l be somewhat less for a larger business at the same percent of labour capacity sales than for a smaller b u s i -ness. From another viewpoint, for a small business to give Figure 11 Interrelationships between Delay and P r o f i t Variables an equal l e v e l of s e r v i c e , i t must have more a v a i l a b l e man hours per hour o f la b o u r s o l d , and consequently, a lower p r o f i t , than a l a r g e one. P e r u s a l of o t h e r s t a t i s t i c s i n T a b l e s 7-10 serves t o r e v e a l no s i g n i f i c a n t c o r r e l a t i o n s ; however, i t i s worth-while t o note t h a t t h e r e i s an absence o f any c o r r e l a t i o n between the a c t u a l s e r v i c i n g ( i . e . mechanic's a p p l i e d t i m e ) , and the number of men, bays or p i e c e s of equipment employed. Consequently, once a job i s being attended t o b y the r e q u i r e d f a c i l i t i e s , f u r t h e r d e l a y s are independent of the s i z e of the b u s i n e s s ( i . e . p r o v i d i n g b o t h b u s i n e s s e s work the same s h i f t p l a n s ) . BIBLIOGRAPHY Genera3. Motors of Canada Limited, Service P o l i c i e s and Procedures Manual, G. M. Oshawa, Ontario, March 31, 1970. International Business Machines, General Purpose Simu-l a t i o n System/360 OS and DOS Version 2 user's Manual, IBM Corp., Technical Publications Depart-ment, White Pl a i n s , N. Y., revised 11/14/1969. R. C. Meier, W. T. Newell, H. L. Pazer? Simulation i n Business and Economics, Prentice H a l l , Inc., Englewood C l i f f s , New Jersey, 1969. R. C. Shook and H. J . Highland, P r o b a b i l i t y Models with Business Applications, Richard D. I r v i n , Inc., Homewood, I l l i n o i s , June, 1969. APPENDIX Appendix A Detailed Description of the GPS5 Simulation Program for the University of B r i t i s h Columbia IBM 360/67 (MTS) Time Sharing System The following appendix i s included for three reasons. F i r s t l y , i t w i l l provide a basis for the reader to evaluate the computer model i n considerably more d e t a i l than the description i n Chapter IV permitted. Secondly, t h i s appendix w i l l be of much assistance to the researcher i f further development of the model i s to be undertaken. T h i r d -l y , by locating a l l of the operational d e t a i l s i n one spot i n the appendix i t i s convenient, without damaging the rest of the thesis, to remove them so that copies of the thesis can be d i s t r i b u t e d without fear of the program being copied by unauthorized persons. The description of the program proceeds i n exactly the same sequence as the program i s written, beginning on page 125 of t h i s appendix. To a s s i s t the reader coordinate t h i s narrative with the sequence of statements i n the pro-gram similar headings for important sections are used i n each. The program l i s t e d i n t h i s appendix, beginning on page 12[3is the computer rr.ouei for Experiment 1, the standard or base model. This appendix assumes the reader bears some knowledge of the GPS5 language, otherwise another volume of the thesis would be required to adequately describe every operational step. The reader i s ref e r r e d to the "General Purpose Simulation System/360 OS and DOS Version 2 User's Manual" (IBM publ i c a t i o n #SH20-0694-0), or a la t e r publication on GPS5, with which GPSS (4) i s e n t i r e l y compatible. P r i n c i p l e s of the Program For one to understand the d e t a i l s of the simulation program used i n t h i s thesis, i t i s important to f i r s t have an understanding of the basic p r i n c i p l e s used. The follow-ing discussion i l l u s t r a t e s how each facet of the model i s simulated: (a) Customer jobs are GPSS 'Transactions' each having 46 f u l l word parameters. A parameter i s simply a storage space for information regarding the s p e c i f i c job, and i t accompanies that job wherever i t may go. The Transaction i s analagous to the Customer Repair Order with spaces (parameters) for recording information pertinent to i t (e.g. time of" a r r i v a l , s p e c i f i c type of job, general job, f l a r rate time, mechanic usea, bay used, parts required, etc.) (b) Men, Bays, and Equipment are GPSS f a c i l i t i e s . Each i s a v a i l a b l e for being seized by a transaction unless preempted by a s p e c i a l transaction ( i . e . a f a c i l i t y s h i f t preemptor) which controls the s h i f t plan of the f a c i l i t y . (c) Operating Plan, or S h i f t Plan. Each minute of a simulated day i s a single GPSS time u n i t . There are 1020 time u n i t s i n each day (two eight hour s h i f t s , 960 minutes; plus two thirty-minute lunch breaks, 60 minutes; equals 1020 minutes per day). There are six working days i n a week (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday) . Each mechanic works f i v e of the six days per week according to a plan described i n Matrix 7. A. D e f i n i t i o n of Tables, Variables, Functions, and Matrices These cards, at the beginning of the program, define the s t a t i s t i c a l tables, the variables, the functional r e -lat i o n s h i p s , and the matrices used i n many places (quite often i n more than one place each) i n the program, so, to maintain a l o g i c a l flow, the des c r i p t i o n w i l l occur at each point of use. B. Set Up Daily and Weekly A r r i v a l Rates Approximately ten cards are used here to e s t a b l i s h the weekly a r r i v a l rate i n Savevalue 3 (a constant for each simulation run), and to place a new value i n t o Savevalue 23 each simulated day by the use of Variable 17 which i n turn uses Function 1, the "Day of Week A r r i v a l D i s t r i b u t i o n . " C. Program Control Section This section performs the following tasks: 1. i t establishes the maximum simulation time l i m i t , i n Savevalue 2. 2 . i t establishes whether or not a night s h i f t i s operating, i n Savevalue 25. 3. i t keeps track of the two week period number, i n Savevalue 24. 4. i t causes an 'event* to occur every single unit of time so that Test blocks i n other portions of the program which question time, w i l l do so to the nearest s i n g l e unit of time ( i . e . one minute). The 'event' i s merely a single transaction advancing one unit of time every minute of simulated time. D. Time Keeper Section I t i s useful l a t e r i n the program to know the number of working minutes l e f t i n the day as the simulation progresses. Each morning t h i s value i s set at 480 ( i f day s h i f t only) or 960 ( i f day and night s h i f t ) i n Savevalue 6, and i s decremented by one every time a working minute elapses, ( i . e . I t i s not decremented when the t h i r t y minute lunch break elapses, because t h i s i s not applied time.) E. Start Scheduling A r r i v a l Rate Every hour of every simulated day, t h i s section establishes the i n t e r - a r r i v a l time of customers. The i n t e r - a r r i v a l time i s computed from the a r r i v a l rate, as per the general equations 60 minutes - # jobs = I.A. (min.) per job hour hour The a r r i v a l rate depends upon the day of the week, the s h i f t plan i n operation, and the hour of the day. The d a i l y a r r i v a l rate has already been established i n Savevalue 23 i n a previous section of th** program. The houriy a r r i v a l rate depends on whether or not there i s night service, and s o } Function 29 (Day S h i f t Time Slot Percent D i s t r i b u -tion) and Function 26 (Night S h i f t Time S l o t D i s t r i b u t i o n ) are incorporated (refer to Chapter IV, page 30). GPSS rounds o f f a l l c a l c u l a t i o n s to the nearest whole unit, so i t i s possible that an i n t e r a r r i v a l time of l e s s than one time unit (rounded to zero) would be c a l c u -lated, creating an i n f i n i t e a r r i v a l rate? and consequently, a safeguard i s included i n t h i s section to ensure that no i n t e r a r r i v a l time i s calculated to be less than four time units ( i . e . maximum of f i f t e e n jobs a r r i v i n g per hour). In the subject shop, no more than f i f t e e n were ever observed to have arrived i n les s than one hour. An i n t e r a r r i v a l period of greater than s i x t y minutes ( i . e . a r r i v a l rate less than one car per hour) could also be calculated by the program, and i t was feared (by the nature of the GENERATE block) that t h i s would cause some interference with job a r r i v a l s i n the following hour, so a maximum i n t e r a r r i v a l time of s i x t y minutes was set for each hour the shop was open for business. The i n t e r -a r r i v a l time i s stored i n Savevalue number four. F. Generate Job A r r i v a l s This section of the program generates the trans-actions which are the customer jobs, and i t i s by far the longest and most important. The Generate block determines that jobs w i l l a r r i v e every X4 (Savevalue 4) minutes as established i n the previous section, and that each w i l l be assigned f o r t y - s i x fullword parameters. Before any job begins processing, c e r t a i n preliminaries must be taken care of: 1. jobs not a r r i v i n g during working hours are delayed u n t i l the shop doors are open. Customers are not considered arrived u n t i l they have passed through t h i s procedure, i n accordance with r e a l i t y . 2. F i r s t and Second jobs are assigned ( i . e . diagnosed). Now the job has entered the shop (Queue 40) and i t i s assigned one of t h i r t y s p e c i f i c troubles as per the p r o b a b i l i t y d i s t r i b u t i o n described by Function 4. The numeric code (1 to 30) for t h i s trouble i s placed i n Parameter 2 of the transaction. The General Job Category (numeric code 1 to 8), a function of the s p e c i f i c type, i s then placed i n Parameter 3 v i a Function 3. The f l a t rate time for the f i r s t job i s calc u l a t e d from Variable 58 and then placed into Parameter 19 of the transaction. The f l a t rate time i s a function of S p e c i f i c Job Category (each of which has a mean time) and i s normally d i s t r i b u t e d about the mean. The time of entering the shop i s placed i n Parameter 46, for l a t e r use i n determining job completion time. The second 'trouble* i s assigned (diagnosed) at the block "ASK" (#96). That i s , twenty percent are assigned l u b r i c a t i o n service as a secondary job. The remainder go to a section which assigns secondary jobs as per c o r r e l a t i o n studies made. The p r o b a b i l i t y of a second job being done i s assigned to Parameter 24 per Function 25 ( i . e . r e l a t i n g f i r s t s p e c i f i c job to p r o b a b i l i t y of a second job), and the actual s p e c i f i c second job i s assigned to Parameter 41 per Function 27 ( i . e . r e l a t i n g f i r s t job to second j o b ) . The f l a t r a t e time for the secondary job i s then placed i n Parameter 40 per Variable 79 (similar to the procedure for the f i r s t job f l a t rate assignment.) A section now follows which tabulates various information about the entering job, namely: i) the r e t a i l labour sales per f i r s t general job type, i i ) the r e t a i l labor sales per second general job type, and i i i ) the t o t a l labour sales per general job type ( i plus i i ) . The next t a s k i s to assign a Promised Completion Time for the job. F i r s t l y , i t i s necessary to c a l c u l a t e the Estimated Completion Time, and t h i s i s based upon a p o l i c y of estimating "one-half hour plus f l a t rate time," i n l i n e with s h i f t operating plans. For example, i f a job arrived at 11:00 a.m. r e q u i r i n g 2.4 hours of f l a t rate work be done, the estimated completion time would be: 11:00 a.m. plus: a) 2.4 hours b) .5 hour (estimation policy) c) .5 hour (lunch break occurs before job completion) Thus, estimated job completion i s 2:24 p.m. To e s t a b l i s h the promised completion time i t f i r s t must be determined whether the customer i) waits for h i s car, or i i ) w i l l return at h i s convenience to pick i t up. Between seventy and eighty percent ( i . e . i t depends s l i g h t l y on s h i f t plan i n operation) w i l l wait i n the shop so the promised completion time i s given the same value as the estimated completion time. The remainder return at a l a t e r time according to Function (13 or 14), which r e l a t e s pick-up time to estimated completion time. I t i s assumed that a l l customers would pick up t h e i r vehicles on the same day they are rep a i r e d . The 'Promised Completion Time' (estimated completion time i n case i , and pick-up time i n case i i ) i s placed i n Parameter 44 to be compared to the 'Actual Completion Time' at the end of job processing, ( i . e . end of f i r s t and second jobs) Get P a r t s . The f i r s t step i n processing a vehicle r e p a i r order i s to obtain the necessary parts. The number of parts required i s a function of the General Job Type (normal d i s t r i b u t i o n about a mean for each) as expressed i n Variable 45, and t h i s value i s placed into Parameter 4 of the transaction (synonymous to job, or repair order). At t h i s point, the Parts Sales and Parts Costs are tabulated for the weekly operating statement, and for the Summary of Sales by General Job Type. At t h i s point, Major Frame repair jobs, which are always sublet, are terminated, thus not considered further i n the simulation. Whether or not parts can be obtained from l o c a l inventory depends upon the state of that inventory. A l l parts contained i n the l o c a l inventory can be c l a s s i f i e d by use for one or more of the eight General Job Types, thus, the p r o b a b i l i t y of the r e -quired' parts being i n l o c a l inventory i s a function of the General Type of the repair order. This r e l a t i o n -ship i s expressed by Function 18 and the p r o b a b i l i t y of parts being l o c a l l y a vailable i s assigned to Parameter 23. a) Get Parts from Warehouse. Those jobs r e q u i r i n g parts from the General Motors Warehouse (or other outside supplier i n Vancouver) follow t h i s procedure i f the current time i s before 10:45 a.m., the warehouse can be phoned and the part picked up by the truck, which may or may not already be on i t s way there. After 10:45 a.m. the ware-house cannot pick the part and have i t ready for the truck, so i t w i l l be picked up on the afternoon t r i p . i f the current time i s after 10:45, but before 3:45 p.m., the warehouse (as i n case i above) can be phoned and the part picked up. A f t e r 3:45, jobs requiring warehouse parts must wait for the truck to return from the f i r s t t r i p the following day. This delay i s e s p e c i a l l y noticeable when a night s h i f t i s operating, since a l l jobs processed by that s h i f t do come i n a f t e r 3:45 p.m., and i f req u i r i n g warehouse parts, must wait a whole tight-hour s h i f t or more. Thus going to a night s h i f t operation would require more dependence upon l o c a l inven-tory and less upon the warehouse i n order to process jobs forthwith. I t should be noted here that a l a t e r section of the program simulates the behaviour of the parts pick up truck ( i . e . "Truck Travel Routine"). Warehouse parts having been obtained, there may now be a requirement for further parts from l o c a l inventory, and so the job proceeds to the next section of the program. b) Get Parts From Stock. Jobs queue ( l i n e up) at the parts desk for service by the on-duty Parts Attendant ( i . e . F a c i l i t y #10 on Day S h i f t , #11 on Night S h i f t ) , and t h e i r extent of delay i s a function of i) the number of jobs waiting and being served ahead of them; i i ) the number of parts required for the job. Service time i s a normal d i s t r i b u t i o n about a mean of two minutes per part, times the number of required parts) . I f obtaining the parts occurs near the end of a s h i f t , a provision i s made to hand over the balance of the service time to the next s h i f t attendent at p r e c i s e l y the end of the s h i f t . 5 . Get Men, Bays, and Equipment. A l l parts having been obtained, i t i s now r e q u i s i t e to simultaneously obtain the necessary men (mechanics, apprentices), space (bays), and equipment (hoists, front end machine, charging c i r c u i t tester, etc.) Consequently, the following section of the program i s divided i n t o three d i s t i n c t subsections, 'Get Men for Job', "Get Bays for Job', and 'Get Equipment for Job'„ The time i n -volved i n using these f a c i l i t i e s i s treated i n a l a t e r section t i t l e d 'Process Job*. Boolean Variables are used for each General Job Type to t e s t for f a c i l i t y a v a i l a b i l i t y . The contents of each Boolean Variable d i f f e r i n accordance to the equipment requirements. When a Boolean Variable i s found to equal one, then i t i s known that the required f a c -i l i t i e s are available, and i t i s the task of the follow-ing three sections to determine t h e i r i d e n t i t y and seize them, afte r which job processing begins . a) Get Men For Job. F i r s t the program determines whether a single or double man assignment i s to be made, and second, i t picks the best man or combin-ation of men available by t e s t i n g men for a v a i l -a b i l i t y , sequentially from row to row ( i . e . f i r s t choice to l a s t choice) i n the appropriate General Job Column of the 'Man Selection Matrix*, Halfword Matrix number 1. Once the available man (men) i s found, he i s seized, and the program goes on to locate the a v a i l a b l e bay (5). b) Get Bays for Job. In obtaining a suitable work space (bay) the job f i r s t looks for a p a r t i c u l a r one, i f necessary, or a preferred one i f there i s a choice. An example of the former case i s a Front End Alignment job, which can only be done i n Bay 6. A Tune-Up job i s an example of the l a t t e r since i t can be done i n any bay ( i . e . Tune-Up equipment, or t o o l s , are portable). Another example of the l a t t e r i s the Drive Line r e p a i r job, which must u t i l i z e a h o i s t , thus i t i s l i m i t e d to Bays 3 and 4 (in the Standard Simulation model). The program examines the bays i n Halfword Matrix 4 for a v a i l a b i l i t y sequentially, s t a r t i n g from the f i r s t choice, row 1, to l a s t choice, row 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6, i n the I n -appropriate column for the General Type of the subject job. Where more than one bay i s a v a i l a b l e , the one nearest the parts desk and control tower i s picked ( i . e . the lowest numbered bay) . Get Equipment For Job. Now that the mechanic and the work space are available, i t i s necessary to obtain the required tools to repair the v e h i c l e . The p a r t i c u l a r t o o l s , of course," depend upon the type of work to be done, and i t might be pointed out here that only tools c r i t i c a l to the job are con-sidered. That i s , only tools which, i f not a v a i l -able, would hold up job processing; and so the need for hammers, wrenches, screwdrivers, e t c . i s ignored. Selecting tools might have followed a s i m i l a r routine to that of s e l e c t i n g men and bays ( i . e . using a matrix), but due to the special requirements for each type of job, a separate routine for each general type was l e s s cumbersome, and so, u t i l i z e d . The reader w i l l therefore f i n d eight sub-sections i n the equipment s e l e c t i o n program, each dealing with a p a r t i c u l a r job category. i ) Get Equipment for Lubrication Jobs. The only equipment c r i t i c a l to the l u b r i c a t i o n type of job i s a h o i s t . Two h o i s t s are located i n the Gas Station building mainly for such s e r v i c e . I f the f i r s t h o i s t ( f a c i l i t y 62) i s busy, then the second ( f a c i l i t y 63) i s selected. i i ) Get Equipment for Brake Jobs. Two pieces of equipment may be used for brake jobs, namely the Brake Drum Lathe, #51, or the Brake Bleeder, t #57. Twenty-five percent of a l l break jobs use the brake bleeder while the remainder require the l a the. i i i ) Get Equipment for Tune-Up Jobs. A l l tune-up jobs require a scope for t e s t i n g the e l e c t r i c a l c i r c u i t and making adjustments to i t . Thus, the a v a i l a b i l i t y of the scope i s tested i n t h i s set of i n s t r u c t i o n s . iv) Get Equipment for E l e c t r i c a l Jobs. Requisite for processing e l e c t r i c a l jobs are the following pieces of equipment? the Armature Tester and "sU.>? 116 Lathe, #54: the Battery tester, #55; the Charging C i r c u i t t ester, #56; and the scope, #52. A l l such jobs require two pieces of equipment. Half need the Armature tester as well as either the battery tester or the charging c i r c u i t t e s ter, while the other h a l f require the scope as well as eithe r the battery tester or the charging c i r c u i t tester . y) Get Equipment for Front End Jobs. The equipment necessary for front end jobs i s simply the Front End Machine, #60, located i n Service Bay #6. When that machine i s free, then work can begin. vi) Get Equipment for Drive Line Jobs. Drive Line jobs are those associated with r e p a i r s to d i f f e r -e n t i a l , wheels, transmission, etc., a l l of which require the use of a h o i s t for a l l or part of the time. Thus, the required pieces of equip-ment are Hoist 1, #59 i n Service Bay 3, or Hoist 2, #59 i n Service Bay 4. v i i ) Get Equipment f o r Chassis Jobs. F i f t y percent of Chassis jobs need a h o i s t , and i n such cases, either Hoist 1 or Hoist 2 w i l l s u f f i c e . v i i i ) Get Equipment for Major Jobs. Twenty-five percent of Major jobs need a h o i s t only, so Hoists 1 and 2 are inspected for a v a i l a b i l i t y for those few. The remainder, seventy-five percent, however require either h o i s t as well as the Valve Grind Machine, #53. ix) Seize Equipment U n t i l Finished. Equipment having been obtained, i t i s then u t i l i z e d for a percentage of the mechanic's time applied to the job. A table of percent of applied time for each piece of equipment for each general job type i s found i n Halfword Matrix 6. Process Job A l l necessary f a c i l i t i e s now being 'seized* by the subject job, i t i s now possible to begin work. The reader i s referred to Block 'AAW' i n the program. The s p e c i f i c s of t h i s part of the program are l e f t to the reader to decipher i f he so desires, but for the purposes of t h i s appendix, a narrative proceeding i n a s i m i l a r order to that of the program i s presented. I f the job i s ready for processing p r i o r to three minutes before the end of the s h i f t (day or night), and considering whether or not the lunch break w i l l i n t e r f e r e with work, i t i s determined whether the job can or cannot be completed p r i o r to the end of the s h i f t . I f so, the job proceeds, and upon completion, a l l f a c i l i t i e s are 'Released' v i a the routine beginning at Block 'JAF', and the mechanic i s credited for h i s f l a t rate time applied. In the releasing phase, one or two men, and one or two bays w i l l be released, depending upon whether the o r i g i n a l man and/or bay assignment was single or double. I f , however, the processing time, based on the mechanic's s k i l l , c a r r i e s over to the next s h i f t (provid ing of course that there i s a next s h i f t ) , the assigned mechanic i s credited only with a part of the f l a t rate time of the job, proportional to h i s contribution toward completion of i t . The job i s worked on u n t i l the end of the s h i f t , a l l f a c i l i t i e s released at Block 'JAA', and then i t returns (with high p r i o r i t y ) to obtain the r e -quired f a c i l i t i e s at the beginning of the next s h i f t ( i . e . , back to "Get Men, Bays and Equipment"). The new amount of f l a t rate time to be applied has now been de-cremented by the amount applied by the previous mechanic, and so the job goes through t h i s processing loop u n t i l f i n i s h e d . Upon.completion of the f i r s t , or primary, job, i t i s determined whether or not a second one i s to be done. I f so, the job proceeds to the section t i t l e d "Return Cars for Addit i o n a l Work", but i f not, the job i s t e r -minated from the system (leaves the shop) at which time the 'Actual Job Completion Time' i s compared to the 'Estimated Job Completion Time' (tabulated i n Table 5), and to the 'Promised Completion Time' (tabulated i n Table 10) . Return Cars for Additional Work The section of the program beginning at Block *ASK4* simply adjusts some parameters back to zero for pro-cessing the second job, and tra n s f e r s the d e s c r i p t i o n of the second job from Parameters 40 and 41 i n t o Para-meters 2 and 19 r e s p e c t i v e l y ( i . e . S p e c i f i c Job Type, and F l a t Rate Time). The job then returns to get parts for the secondary work, at Block 'NBA* with a high p r i o r i t y so that i t w i l l be served ahead of new f i r s t job a r r i v a l s . E a r l i e r i n t h i s Appendix, i t was stated that ' F a c i l i t y S h i f t Preemptor' transactions are used to regulate the time for which each f a c i l i t y i s a v a i l a b l e . The program section from Block ABS to VCA simply creates a set of transactions each having a parameter 1 value equal to a f a c i l i t y number. Thus twenty personnel transactions (numbered 1 to 20), nine bay transactions (numbered 21 to 29), and twenty equip-ment transactions (numbered 51 to 70) are created. 1. F a c i l i t y S h i f t Preemptor 1 Each simulated day the transactions created i n the previous section go through a set of statements, the path of each determined by the code i n Matrix 7. A d e s c r i p t i o n of each code follows: Code Time Preempted Time Available 0 1st lunch and a l l night Day S h i f t s h i f t 1 Day and Night S h i f t n i l 2 A l l Day and 2nd lunch Night S h i f t 3 n i l Day & Night S h i f t 9:00 p.m. to end of Night S h i f t Gas Station Day S h i f t (8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.) Pay Man at the End of Each Week Each man i s paid at the end of each week according to h i s hourly pay rate as well as to h i s accumulated cr e d i t e d f l a t r a t e . So that the simulation treats the Service Department as a d i s t i n c t p r o f i t centre, thus i n c u r r i n g only expenses due to f a c i l i t i e s i t employs, the Parts Attendants and Gas Station Attendants are paid only for the amount of t h e i r time serving jobs from the Service Department at a transfer price of labour equal to $10.80 ( i . e . the R e t a i l p r i c e of labour l e s s 10%). The same time each man i s paid (recorded i n Row 9 of Matrix 8), an equal amount i s added to the 'Cost of Labour' (Row 4, Matrix 9). The employee payment p o l i c y simulated i n the standard model i s to pay each week for f o r t y hours or for the week's accumulated f l a t rate,whichever i s the l a r g e r . Thus, the payment p o l i c y i s purely incentive, and i n no way punitive . F u l l y rated mechanics are paid at $4.50 per hour v/ith apprentices paid from f i f t y to e i g h t y - f i v e percent of that r a t e . H Truck Travel Routine The Earts Pick-up Truck, f a c i l i t y 61, i s simulated i n t h i s section of the program. One hour after, the shop i s open i n the morning, the truck leaves for the warehouse (or other suppliers), s e t t i n g Savevalue 8 equal to 2 ( i . e . truck i s 'away'), and i s gone for a mean time of 184 minutes, normally d i s t r i b u t e d . Upon i t s return Savevalue 8 i s made to be 3, s i g n i f y i n g to a l l jobs waiting for parts from the warehouse, that the truck i s 'back'. I f i t s return i s after 3:00 p.m., the truck w i l l not attempt another t r i p i n t o town, and rather w i l l wait u n t i l 9:30 a.m. the follow-ing day. However, i f i t ar r i v e s back before 3:00 p.m., i t w i l l make another t r i p to the warehouse, again taking a mean of 184 minutes, normally d i s t r i b u t e d . I• C a l c u l a t i o n of F a c i l i t y U t i l i z a t i o n s Despite the heading of t h i s section, i t s function i s more than what i t says. I t i s however, a pure c a l c u l a t i o n routine, and each c a l c u l a t i o n i s outlined below: Matrix 8, Row 1? To t a l Simulated time: 6120 i s added at the end of each simulated week. Matrix 8, Row 3; To t a l Time Available for Work; the difference between Row 1 and Row 2 (accumulated during simulation) i s c a l c u l a t e d at the end of each week. Matrix 8, Row 5? Actual F a c i l i t y U t i l i z a t i o n ? calculated b y d i v i d i n g Actual Time Worked, Row 4, by T o t a l Time Available, Row 3. Matrix 8, Row 10? Overall E f f i c i e n c y ? the mechanic's over-a l l a b i l i t y r e l a t i v e to h i s applied f l a t rate time i s calculated by d i v i d i n g Accumulated F l a t Rate Time, Row 7, by Total Time U t i l i z e d by F a c i l i t y , Row 4. Savevalue 13? THRU% i s set at 100%. Savevalue 10, PART% i s the percent of t o t a l delay i n the shop that getting parts takes, whether or not parts are required ( i . e . including zero e n t r i e s i n Queue PART) . This figure i s adjusted for equal number of e n t r i e s i n PART and THRU by: T o t a l Entries i n PART less Current Contents PART x 100% T o t a l Entries THRU less Current Contents THRU) x Average time per transaction THRU. Savevalue 11, FACL% i s the percent of t o t a l delay per job for which waiting for the necessary f a c i l i t i e s accounts. I t too, i s adjusted for equal e n t r i e s by a formula s i m i l a r to the above, su b s t i t u t i n g FACL for PART. The need for t h i s adjustment a r i s e s from the many jobs which get p a r t i a l l y completed on one s h i f t and return to get new f a c i l i t i e s on the next s h i f t , thus i n f l a t i n g the 'Total E n t r i e s ' figure and consequently d e f l a t i n g the average time per transaction to obtain f a c i l i t i e s (FACL) . Savevalue 12, SERV% i s the percent of t o t a l delay time per job during which mechanics are a c t u a l l y working on i t . I t i s the difference between THRD% and the sum of PART% and FACL%. Matrix 9, Row 7, C o l . 1; The cumulative f i x e d overhead expense i s determined by adding $1032 each week. Matrix 9, Row 9, C o l . ly The t o t a l cost to the Service Department i s calculated at the end of each week by adding Row 4, T o t a l Labour Costs, plus Row 5, T o t a l Parts Costs, plus Row 7, T o t a l Fixed Costs. Matrix 9, Row 10, C o l . ly The Gross P r o f i t for the Service Department i s calculated each week by subtracting Row 9, T o t a l Costs, from Row 3, T o t a l Revenue. R( S NO. TTbt 63 UNIVERSITY OF B C COMPUTING CENTRE M T S I A M 1 2 0 ) 1 1 : 0 6 : 3 7 07-14-71 > £ £ « » » « « * * < > » * * » » * * « « THIS JOB SUBMITTED THROUGH FRONT DESK READER * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *SIG CHR1 P=400 T=25M » < L •.ST_S !„Gr;ON_WA_S: 0 0 : 4 8 : 3 6 0 7 - 1 4 - 7 1 USER "CHRI" SIGNED CN AT iRUN » G P S 5 P A R * S I Z E » C EXECUTION EEGINS 1 1 : 0 8 : 4 0 ON 0 7 - 1 4 - 7 1 * G P S S V - O S V E R S I O N * * * * IBM PROGRAM PRODUCT 5734-XS2 (V lM l ) * * * STATEMENT REALLOCATE X A C , 3 0 0 , B L O , 7 0 0 , F A C , 1 0 0 , S T O , 2 0 , Q U E , 7 0 , L O G , 1 0 0 HE ALLOCATE T A B , 6 0 , F U N , 6 0 , V A R , 1 5 0 , F S V , 5 0 . H S V , 5 0 . C H A , 2 0 REALLOCATE COM,60000 N U M U T R 1 2 3 O UJ i— Y— V- < < —I cC 3 ^ cu « * « # « LL' — j J Z < u, iu Z — X ^ i c ^ m LU CJ C O U J < —< >— X Uj 3 U . X I U,- h LU O < a: c a " H o: U J - Z Q . < > - O L <Q^3 n. Z O O irt v*. < H o CC UL Z t- < O li.- i - >. < j -> >- < a: C oo Q (I: u. _ v: t- L U a c 'OJ i ^ T ; I: UJ c UJ J UJ UL 3- r-r- ~ Z LO < u. u, a D 3 O 1 < I V 1/1 ul i/l 10 X X X * # tt # » » Xi O r-i M ro m X X X in o —• CM M ^ 1 ( ^ 1 X X X X o o •£} O O O m ro c o 0 o m ro 1 l > > m 4 - ir. r--t <• *J" >t O LA w UJ z z * z — UL cr LL rA + + O CM > LA 3 LA O 3 D LL Z 3 Z <- u. z LL CO •*- u. + CM NJ- •tt z LA 3 IA L A s0 u. 0 z CM + Z LL Z z 3 Z a. u. u. LL + + + Si- r> fl a* ft Z •C CM LA LL CM Z *c D LA vO vC + u_ 3 Z O lO LO Z + z LL. 3 3 tD r-J u. CO LO Z z D •— 3 CM # •ft u. LL LL Z + z 3 r- + + + LL Z CM <5 CVJ L A LO + + LL 3 CM LT •.A CM LA r— + Z 3 3 3 2^ 3 OO u. z Z z z z Z Z Z CM LU u_ LL LL LL LL LL LL u. 3 _J V + —* + + + fl + Z CC * o •K- O •0 LL < o O O rj C\l D + LU - - z • LU z z (Tl cn z UJ LU LL LL z Z LL CM < z z + z~ - + •f 3 > Z - LO - J/ Z LL CM —I 75 3- CM ~D lA + LL Z + > CM CM > Z ro m Z + < ro rC > LL > ra u. «• cc u. CM LU r c + 2> (A + CM 3 * «• m «- « ,-r». •p-Z m 3 o o o o 3 0 c r> U-u. Z 3 Z z -» a LL LL C U •r LU u_ a* LL lU UJ LL CM # LL + CM z Z z + z z + rA rO + U . rv -* <• CM •"\J CM D ^ o o o 3 c c D r> 3 3 Z CM CM fM z CM CM Z Z z z Z Z LL > > > LL :> > u_ LL IL LL u, LL a t— LU tu UJ LU UJ LU lU LU UJ U J U J LU Z _J _J _J _j - i _J _J _J _J _J CC cn 21 CD CP a ; Cl cc CD u_ < < - 5 < < < < < < < LL.-: < < I cc cu 1 ^ 1^  O i> (C H . » * » * « * * « » » D E F I N I T ION OF ARITHMETIC VARIABLES * VARIABLE MH7( « 3 2 , V* 21 + MH71 "33 , V42 ) 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 23 ~24~ 25 26 27 23 _2_2_ 30 31 32 34 3? 36 37 3e 40 41 42 44 45 46 48 4 9 50 5_l VARIABLE^ FVARIABLE VARIABLE VARIABLE VAkIABLE _VAR IAHLE_ FVARIABLE VARIABLE VARIABLE VARIABLE VARIABLE _FVAKIABLE. ~FVARI ABLE VARIA3LE VARI ABLE FVARIABLE FVAR<I ABLE VAR IABLE _ "VARIABLE VARIABLE VARIABLE VARIABLE VARIA3LE VARIABLE VARIABLE V AR I A BL E VARIABLE VARIABLE VARIABLE VARIABLE FVARIABLE VARIABLE VARIABLE FV ARIABL E VARIABLE VARIABLE VAR I A BL E VARIABLE VARIABLE VARIABLE V A RI ABLE VARIABLE MH7< *32f1)+MH71*33,1) ( (MH3(V36,*3J) *P6/100) P19-V3 ( (CL-11910201+1 TIME OF DAY ( (V9 -1)3121+1 DAY OF WEEK P4 -P5 NUVBER PARTS FR LOCAL INVENTORY SERVICE TIME AT PARTS COUNTER ( K 2 * V 7 « F N 2 4 ) (Cl/10201+1 V36/100 V36J100 P N l ' l O O O GEN P.N 000 TO 1000 I 1Q0*FN24*P19/MH3<V36, « 3 ) ) CALC SERV TIME < 1 0 0 * F N 2 4 * P 1 9 / I M H 3 ( V 1 0 , * 3 ) + M H 3 ( V 1 1 , » 3 ) ) ) OBL S T V38/100 V3 83 100 (FN1*X3/1000) ( ( .XH6I V4 6 , *3 ) « F N 2 4 * P 6 ) / 100) K3? _ ' F 1 0 » F l 1 K510- IV5+P8) -P18 K0-V25 (K.510-V51-P18 TIME APPLIED ON FIRST SHIFT 10 OR 11 BUSY? TIME LEFT IN SHIFT AFTER JOB K1020- t V5+P8I-P18 KO-V28 TIME LEFT IN SHIFT AFTER JOB ( K 1 C 2 0 - V 5 ) - P 1 8 V5*P6-K5 1C+P 18 K0-V31 P6 + V5-K1020+P18 K0-V34 MH1 I*20,"3) TIME APPLIED ON FIRST SHIFT TIME OVER ON DAY SHIFT TIME OVER ON NIGHT SHIFT l ( M H 3 l * 3 2 » * 3 ) + *H3t*33,*3))*P6>/100 MH4(*2L,*3) K6 (6000/1FN29*X23)) V6 + K1 K2 F.M6*FN24 PI 1-K50 P3+K 30 1021-V5 1X2*10201-1 X 3 + I NUM3ER OF PARTS RE 0 PER JOB CUEUE NO- GEN. CATEGORY 52 VARIABLE X2*1020 53 VARIABLE KX8( 1 t * 1)-MX8( 2 , *1 ) 54 FVARIABLE I (FR*1*KXB 11.* 1) )/ 10001-KX8I2 ,*1) 5 5 ' FVARIABLE I<MX3(4,*1)/MXB(3,*1!1*1000) 56 FVARIABLE (P4*231/100) PARTS SALES _5.7 f V A St 1 A BL E (J PI .<? + P401*12/60 I LA 80UR CHARGE TN DOLLARS  56 FVAf IAHLE I F N 7*f>0*F H 24) ASSIGNED FLAT RATE IN MINUTES 59 VARIABLE l'X9 { 1, 1 1 +MX9 ( 2 , 1 ) TOTAL SALES AO FVARIABLE (P4*206/100) PARTS COST 61 FVARIABLE (M.xa ( 7, *1 1 *1000/MX8( 4,*1) ) OVERALL EFFICIENCY 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 65 67 63 69 70 71 72 73 74 7 5 76 77 73 79 SO s l _ 32 83 34 S5 R6 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 100 101 102 103 10'» _Lfi5_ 1 06 107 103 109 110 J U L . 1 12 113 114 115 H O j ; s "0 I T o ' x m < m H- « c m v i z i r- < H o */> — O 3 •"•"> ' ~J CJ *• < CC OJ < r— m I O u_ •<*• • r- L U ~ - • CO < x : K a; : u. v. * - o — • r— a- —-«• . — C L r- i m rn >- --- ~-• *x •— w t >- ffi K l r*i <r * i u j |a * + < cC r\ - D ^ m : c x x C C cr. x < < —I C L X K • X 3f s — rn - o x X - - o ar s > o — l * -o *v 0- . — * - col— o* c> Cv - IO w ^  — CC jfM O, O-• re CC > c c » -*> "3 I ) r- O . i/> Lu • U_ </> S O celcc X I I -> i 11 U J I J I O >- J— <j-> va CJ'O D LO • X LU ^  \ r— - J C O < c ! o u. * l-U-< r-:_i CL . o : O < < Q: t— C_ .U_ LU V> . V) iSl fo o cr . D —. - * —. > < CT CT tr • u - - -. o m ^ in o o o K M M 5 1 LO C LA I - J • j o. a o. • 3 C L c Q - ( U - < < < I >>>->-: < < < < . cr a <\J # * rv rO : « •» •» <: j-o # * < I -Ci C C — ^ <""W X X x X X X ; e a. s. ?_ s: n •j — X — — ) U . H «C ^  cr *• t>-cx NT O OJ W\ • , o> o, * CL C L < _ < < . X CL Li- ' s: •»*• v . + O O : — | I . n i 1 1 - ft .-x o • 1 - < , < < oi a u. : — •*» j O L_> O i r - - o o • . x — — - 21 — ;~ UJ UJ LU LU LU LU LU UJ —' _J_J_i —J —I UJ LU < < M » - ^ - ( — • — < < ~ ~ X cc CL cc a: — — a: < < «i }< < <t cn cc < < > > > ; > > > < < > > u . u - u . u . u . u _ > > UJ i LU I —t!_j -Uv UJ UJ _J|-J . JJIU' >,* ir\ > aj aj + + X > > u~> x — — > a. • o cr > * • o o O f "> - (M — ' o o x x x . s: x. « \ v.- I O O 1 — w x x a; x • OD N v. N \ ' I S O IT> O I f~- LT* o CT : « «• # » ft ; O —* (Si <N OJ f n fi « n n , X X x x : ice CC C ; CQ _j tr ir; ; <i ,< < < < co -l <l c£ cc a' cc cc ct • < - 4 > ; > > > > « A a; < •< < > > > U..U. U J U J U J L U _ ( J „ ; lU, _ J L-n m ai - J CCl < < < 31 I < — CL- it — \.C a. < <i < ct < > > > - 4 > LU IL U. > L U L U L U I D L U U J L U U J — ' - J —J —J CC _J cC CC iT. C D CO 0^  CC t < c: - i <ij--i < «x < < C L tt: CL ct: • ii' *ii .v. a: > < > > > > > > > > > : U - > L L . U . U _ L L , L L U - U . L L U . 1 2 <*• * > U J r j o m j v j C "s. ( > NT ' - r CO (M : x c -« LJ ) < ~> c • CO h H ) CC -t O <I "s. f j < a. ft -LO [ I x Ui-» CM -N. • vf- C L »-* • j c3 O *"* : <i ^ •• Z oj U J • m cr oj » O OJ » o OJ CM a. *** CO i n iA to 3 -T » ! - U . O l\ [<1 -J" 1A •Of -O »o "° 'O -o * tt) CT O »-« Oj'i-r\ vf <T> ^ 3 r- A3 r— co co oo ro a; oj co co O J ca ^ M f A s r i A - O r - c c c r o o o c L r c ^ ^ L > C ' ' V ' C 7 ' t r c r ' V A . . 3 8 8 , 1 5 / . 4 6 0 , 1 6 / . 4 9 2 , 1 7 / ; 4 9 5 , 1 8 / . 5 1 4 , 1 9 / . 5 7 1 , 2 0 / . 6 1 1 , 2 1 / . 6 1 5 , 2 2 / . 6 3 6 , 2 3 . 6 4 3 , 2 4 / . 6 4 6 , 2 5 / . 6 6 6 , 2 6 / . 7 1 9 , 2 7 / . 8 9 7 , 2 8 / . 9 9 8 , 2 9 / 1 . 0 , 3 0 5 FUNCTION P.N1.C24 KEG EXPO ARR DIST 0 , 0 / . 1 , . 1 0 4 / . 2 , . 2 2 2 / . 3 , . 3 5 5 / . 4 , . 5 0 9 / . 5 , . 6 9 / . 6 , . 9 1 5 / . 7 , 1 . 2 / . 7 5 , 1.38 J , . 6 /_. 84, 1 .8 3/-.88, 2. 12/. 9 , 2. 3 / . 92, 2. 5 2 / . 9 4 , 2 . 8 1 / . 9 5 , 2 . 9 9 / . 96 , 3 . 2  . 9 7 , 3 . 5 / . 9 8 , 3 . 9 / . 9 9 , 4 . 6 / . 9 9 5 , 5 . 3 / . 9 9 8 , 6 . 2 / . 9 9 9 , 7 / . 9 9 9 T , 8 AVG PARTS RFO PER JOB MEAN FLAT RATE OF EACH JOB - 2 / 9 , 1 . 5 / 1 0 , 4 . 0 / 1 1 , . 7 / 1 2 , . 6 6 FUNCTION P3 .08 1 , 0 / 2 , 5 / 3 , 5 / 4 , 6 / 5 , 1 / 6 , 1 5 / 7 , 4 / 8 , 1 5 7 FUNCTION P2,030 1 , . 5 / 2 , . 5 / 3 , . 5 / 4 , . 5 / 5 , . 5 / 6 , . 2 / 7 , 2 . 6 / 8 , _13 , J . 2 / l 4 , 1.1 /15j_1.2/ 16j 2 . 0/17 , 1 . 2 / 1 8 , 1. 0 / 1 9 , 3 . 2 / 2 0, 3. 0/21 , 4 . 0 / 2 2 , . 8 2 3 , 1 . 7 / 2 4 , 1 . 3 / 2 5 , 1 . 0 / 2 6 , 1 .0/2 7 , 1 . 0 / 2 8 , 2 . 0 / 2 9 , 6 . 0 / 3 0 , 1 5 . 0 8 FUNCTION R N l , 0 6 PU TIKE ARR BEF 1200 . 1 4 8 , 2 1 0 / . 198, 3 3 0 / . 2 4 8 , 3 9 0 / . 3 2 5 , 4 5 0 / . 4 0 6 , 4 8 0 / 1 . 0 , 5 1 0 9 FUNCTION RNI,05 PU TIME ARK BEF 200 . 0 5 8 , 3 3 0 / . U 6 , 39 0 / . 2 0 9 , 4 5 0 / . 302 • 4 8 0 / 1 . 0 , 5 1 0 __10 FUNCTION _ PN1.04 PR OR PU ARR REF 300  .062 , 3 9 0 / . 160, 450/7260, ~ . 8 0 / 1 . 11 FUNCTION RN1.D3 . 1 0 5 , 4 5 0 / . 2 1 1 , 4 8 0 / 1 . 0 , 5 1 0 12 FUNCTION RNl ,02 . 1 1 0 , 4 8 0 / 1 . 0 , 5 1 0 13 _ £ U N C T I O N _ V72.E6 i l O PU TIME ARR BEF 400 PU TIME ARR REF 500 PROB FN PER COMPL ET. TIME 210, FN1/S3 0, FN9/39G, f7N 1 0 / 4 5 0 , F N ! 1/480,FN 12/510,K510 14 FUNCTION V72.E13 N-S PROB FN COMP TIME 30, FN30/210,FN31/270,FN32/330,FN33/390.FN34/450,FN35/4BO,FN36 510 ,FN 37/570 , FN38/630,FN 39/690,FN40/810, 810/1020,K1020 15 FUNCTION P4 1,030 MEAN F R SEC JOB I . . 5 / 2 , . 5 / 3 , . 5 / 4 , . 5 / 5 . . 6 / 6 , . 2 / 7 , 2. 6/8, 1 . 2 / 9 , 1 . 5 / 1 0 , 4 . Q / l 1 , . 7 / 1 2 , . 6 173 1 74 175 176 1 77 178 179 180 181 182 IB3 184 185 1 .36 IB 7 _1.?S_ 1 89 190 191 192 193 1 94 1 9 5 196 197 193 199 200 13 , 1 . 2 / 1 4 , 1 . 1/15, 1 . 2 / 1 6 , 2 . 0 / 1 7 , 1 . 2 / 1 8 , 1 . 0 / 1 9 , 3 . 2 / 2 0 , 3. 0 / 2 1 , 4 . 0 / 2 2 , . 8 2 3 . 1 . 7 / 2 4 , 1. 3/2 5 , 1 . 0/2 6 , 1 . 0 / 2 7 , 1 .0/2 8 , 2 . 0 / 2 9 , 6 . 0 / 3 0 , 15 .0 16 FUNCTION P l , E 3 s 9 , V 6 6 / 1 4 , V 8 0 / 2 0 , V 6 6 17 FUNCTION P I . E 3 9 , V 6 7 / 14_, V 60 / 20.V6 7  CHARGE LABOUR TO SERV OEPT CHARGE FR LABOR TO SERV OEPT 13 FUNCTION P3.D8 PROB REO WHSE PARTS 1, 999/2 , 5 1 6 / 3 , 8 3 3 / 4 , 8 4 7 / 5 , 9 9 9 / 6 , 7 8 9 / 7 , 8 5 8 / 8 , 8 0 6 19 FUNCTION P41.030 SEC SPEC JOB TO GEN JOB FN 1 , 1 / 2 , 1 / 3 , 1 / 4 , 1 / 5 , 1 / 6 , 2 / 7 , 2 / 8 , 2 / 9 , 3 / 1 0 . 3 / 1 1 , 3 / 1 2 , 4 / 1 3 , 4 / 1 4 , 4 / 1 5 , 4 1 6 , 5 / 1 7 , 5 / 1 8 , 5 / 1 9 , 6 / 2 0 , 6 / 2 1 , 6 / 2 2 , 6 / 2 3 , 7 / 2 4 , 7 / 2 5 , 7 / 2 6 , 7 / 2 7 , 7 / 2 8 , 7 JS)?-liOip- , 20 FUNCTION X24.D3 MIN TIME PAID FOR IN PAY PERIOO 0. 2 4 0 0 / 1 , 2 4 0 0 / 2 , 4 8 0 0 21 FUNCTION P l , E 9 ESTAB EMPLOY PAY RATE 1, V 1 0 3 / 2 , V S a / 3 , V 9 9 / 8 , V 9 3 / 9 , V 1 0 0 / 1 4 , V 1 0 2 / 1 5 , V 9 8 / 1 6 , V 1 0 1 / 2 0 , V 9 8 24 FUNCTION PN3.C25 STANDARD NORMAL DISTRIBUTION 0 . ,0 . / . 0 0 3 , . CB/.006 2_,_. 16 /_._0_12 2 . . 2 5 / . 0228, . 3 3 / . 0 4 0 1 , . 4 1 / . 0 6 6 3 , . 50 •066, .58/ .1587, .67/ .2266, .75/ .3085, .83/ .4013, .91/ .500,1 .0/ .5987,1 .08 .691 5, 1 . 16/.7734, 1.24/.84 1 3, 1.3 3/. 8944, 1.41/. 9332, 1. 50/. 9599,1.53 .9772, 1.66/.9373, 1.75/.9938, 1. 83/.9970,1.91/1.GO,2.00 25 FUNCTION *2,D30 PROB OF RE3 FURTHER WORK 1,C/2,0/3,0/4,C/5,0/6.0/7,0/8,0/9,0/10,0/11,0/12 ,0/13,0 J 4 , 0 / 1_5, 0/ 16 j 1 34/ 17, 0/18, 13B/19, 0/20,0/21 ,45/2 2, 0/23.1 47  24,0/2 5,0/26.7/2 7.280/23,0/29,0/30 ,0 26 FUNCTION v 5 , o i 3 NIGHT SHIFT TIME SLOT OISTRIB 59,2 6.7/1 19, 13.8/ 179,3.35/239, 5 .75/299,6.62/359, 8. 65/419,10.95 201 2 02 203 2 04 2C5 2 0.-. 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 21B 219 2 20 221 222 223 _Z24_ 225 226 227 ro VO f HJ f 479 , 5 . 7 5 / 5 3 9 , 6 . 3 4 / 5 9 9 , 2 . 9 8/6 5 9 , 3 . 1 7 / 7 1 9 , 1 . 1 5 / 1 0 2 0 , - 4 ) 27 FUNCTION P2.D6 FST JOB SEC JOB CORRELATION 229 1 6 , 8 / 1 8 . 9 / 2 1 , 7 / 2 3 , 1 1 / 2 6 ,9/2 7,12 230 28 FUNCTION RN1.C2 EQUAL PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION 231 0 . 0 , 0 . 0 / 1 . C , 2 . 0 232 ) > 29 FUNC i ION ' V5 .010 OAY SHIFT TIME SLOT PCENT OIST 2 3.-i 5 9 , 3 0 . 9 / H 9 , 9 . 9 / 179. 1 3 . 2 / 2 3 9 , 6 . 6 / 2 9 9 , 5 . 9 / 3 5 9 , 12. 5 / 4 1 9 , 7 . 7 / 4 7 9 , 1 1 . 2 2 34 5 3 9 , 2. 1 /1 020 , 0 . 3 235 30 FUNCTION PN1.012 236 .100 , 3 0 / . 183 , 2 1 0 / . 220, 2 7 0 / . 2 9 3 , 3 3 0 / . 3 6 6 , 3 9 0 / . 4 5 2 , 4 5 0 / . 5 5 0 , 4 8 0 / . 8 9 0 , 5 1 0 237 - 9 1 5 ,570/.4<, 0 ,63 0 / . 95 0 , 6 9 0 / 1 . 0 , 8 1 0 23<1 31 FUNCTION R N l , O i l 2 39 .032 ,2 1 0 / . 123, 2 7 0 / . 2 20, 3 3 0 / . 300, 3 9 0 / . 39 7, «,5 0 / . 50 7, 4 S 0 / . 876 , 510 240 . 9 0 5 , 5 7 0 / . 9 3 0 , 6 3 0 / . 9 4 5 . 6 9 0 / 1 . 0 , 8 1 0 , 241 32 FUNCTION R N l , 010 242 .048 , 2 7 0 / . 1 4 9 , 3 3 0 / . 2 3 9 , 3 9 0 / . 3 4 4 . 4 5 0 / . 4 6 2 , 4 8 0 / . B 6 6 , 5 1 0 / . 8 9 5 , 5 7 0 24 3 . 9 24 , 6 3 0 / . 94 0, 60 0/1- 0,31 0 2 44 33 FUNCTION KN1.09 245 . 1 0 9 . 3 3 0 / . 2 0 3 , 3 9 0 / . 3 1 2 , 4 5 0 / . 4 3 8 , 4 8 0 / . 8 6 0 , 5 1 0 / . 8 9 0 , 5 7 0 / . 9 2 2 , 6 3 0 246 . 9 3 6 , 6 9 0 / 1 . 0 , B I O 247 3* FUNCTION P N l . D B 243 . 105 , 3 9 0 / - 2 2 8 , 4 5 0 / . 3 6 9 , 4 8 0 / . 8 4 4 , 5 1 0 / . 8 7 9 , 5 7 0 / . 9 1 4 , 6 3 0 / . 9 3 0 , 6 9 0 249 1 .0 ,B IO 250 35 FUNCTION R N l , 07 251 . 1 3 7 , 4 5 0 / . 2 9 5 , 4 8 0 / . S 2 6 , 5 1 0 / . 8 6 5 , 5 7 0 / . 9 0 4 , 6 3 0 / . 9 2 3 , 6 9 0 / 1 . 0 , 8 1 0 252 36 FUNCTION R N l , 0 6 253 .132 ,4 30/ .79 2 , 5 1 0 / . P - 4 0 , 5 7 0 / . 3 8 5 , 6 3 0 / . 9 0 9 , 6 9 0 / 1 . 0 , 8 1 0 251, 37 FUNCTION PHI ,05 255 . 7 60 , 5 1 0 / . 80 7, 5 7 0 / . 86*,, 6 3 0 / . 890, 690/ 1 . 0 , 810 2 56 33 FUNCT ION RNl , Q4 • 257 .222 , 5 7 0 / . 4 4 5 , 6 3 0 / . 5 5 5 , 6 9 0 / 1 . 0 , 3 1 0 258 39 FUNCTION R N l , 03 25"? . 286 , 6 3 0 / . 5 7 2 , 6 9 0 / 1 . 0 , 6 1 0 2 60 40 FUNCTION R N l , 0 2 261 -200 , 6 9 0 / 1 - 0 , 8 1 0 26 2 263 * 264 » * * * « » 4 a * » D E F I N n IGNS OF MATRICES 265 * - 266 1 MATRIX H ,ZG ,8 267 3 .MAT R I X H , 2 0 , 8 2_6H 4 .MATRIX H , 6 , B 26-? ; 5 MATRIX H, 2 0 , 9 2 70 \ 6 MATRIX H , 2 0 , 8 271 1 7 MATRIX H . 7 0 , 1 2 272 • 8 MATRIX X , 1 0 . 7 0 273 i 9 TR I X X, 10,1 ; 274 I 10 MATRIX X , 8 , 9 275 i ' INITIAL MH1( 1, 1 ), 12/MHK 2, 1) , 13/MHlI 3 , 1) , 14/MHK 4 - 1 0 , 1) , 0 276 1 INITIAL f-Hl ( 1,2) , 3/MHI (2 ,2 ) ,4/MH.l ( 3 , 2 ) ,7/MHl ( 4 , 2) , 3 277 ' . - INITIAL KH 1( 5, 2) , 15 276 j INITIAL • M h l < 6 , 2 ) , 2 / M H l < 7 , 2 ) , 6 / M H i ( 8 , 2 > , 5 / * H l l 9 , 2 > , 16 270 i f - 1 INI T i A L MH1(J0,2)_,9 : 2 80 [ V^J "TfTtf'lAL FH'U f , 3)",4 281 i O i I'.; T ! AL r.r.l ( 2 , 3 ) ,8 2-12 ! INITIAL KHl l 3,3) , 6 / ; « l < 4 , 3 ) ,15 283 I INITIAL MHK 5, 3 ) , 5/MH U 6, 3) , 7 284 I I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I AL I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L :NI T l _ A L _ I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I TI A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I U I TJ_A L_ I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N l TI A L I N 1 T I A L _ I NIT TAL I N l T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L K H 1 I 7 , 3 ) K H 1 ( 8 , 3 ) M H K 9 , 3 ) M i l l , * ] K H 1 (_ 3 ,_4 ) HH 1 ( 4 , 4 ) M H H 5 , 4 ) M H 1 ( 3 , 4 1 K H 1 I 1 , 5 ) H H l ( 2 , 5 ) •J^LLUJLS). MH 11 5 , 5 ) H H K 7 , 5 ) C H 1 ( 3 , 6 ) M H K 4 , 6 ) M H K 6 , 6 ) M H K 8 , 6 ) M H 1 ( 1 0 , 6 C H I ( 1 , 7 ) MH 1 ( 2 , 7 ) M K 1 ( 6 , 7 ) MH 1 ( 7 , 7 ) _ M H 1 ( 8 , 7 ) K H K 1 0 , 7 H H K 1 , 8 ) H H K 3 , 8 ) M H K 4 . 8 ) H H K 5 , 8 ) H H K 7 , 8 ) , 1 6 , 2 , 3 / M H l ( 1 0 , 3 ) , 9 , 4 / M H H 2 , 4 ) , 9 , 1 5 , 5 , 8 / M H K 6 , 4 ) , 6 / H H l ( 7 , 4 ) , 1 6 , 3 / M H K 9 , 4 ) , 7 / M H K 1 0 , 4 ) , 2 , 2 , 1 5 , 7 / M H 1 ( 4 , 5 ) , 3 , 1 6 / M H K 6 , 5 ) , 9 , 0 / M H 1 ( 8 , 5 ) , 0 / K H K 1 , 6 ) , 4 / M H K 2 , 6 1 , 6 , 9 , 3 / M H l ( 5 , 6 ) , 1 5 , 5 / M H K 7 , 6 ) , 7 , 3 / M H 1 ( 9 , 6 ) , 2 ) , 1 6 , 7 , 4 / M H K 3 , 7 ) , 6 / M H l ( 4 , 7 ) , 8 / M H i ( 5 , 7 ) , 3 , 1 5 , 5 ' ?• / M U L i i J U * 1,9"" , 4 / M H l ( 2 , 8 ) , 8 , 7 , 3 / K H K 5 , 8 ) , 1 5 , 1 5 / M H 1 ( 6 , 8 ) , 2 l">-2 3 5 2 8 6 2 3 7 2 8 8 ? 3 9 2 9 0 2 9 1 2 9 2 2 9 3 2 9 4 2 9 5 2 9 6 2 9 7 2 9 8 2 9 9 3 0 0 3 0 1 3 0 2 3 0 3 3 0 4 3 0 r ' 3 0 6 _ 3 0 7 _ 3 0 3 3 0 9 3 10 3 1 1 3 1 2 3 1 3 _ I N I T I A L . I N I T I A L . I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I_AL_ I N I T I A L I.N IT I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I.'.i T ! . ' . ! ._ I N I T J A L I N I T I A L I N : T l A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L 1 N j T_I_A L_ I N V t I AL I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I TI A L I N I T I A L_ I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L I N I T I A L K H 1 ( 3 , 8 ) , 1 6 K H 3 I 1 2 , 1 1 , ) 0 C / K H 3 ( 1 3 , 1 ) , ) 0 0 / M H 3 ( 1 4 , 1 ) , 1 0 0 / M H 3 ( 2 , 2 ) , 8 1 M H 3 1 3 , 2 ) , 1 0 0 / M H 3 I 4 , 2 ) , 1 0 9 / M H 3 I 5 , 2 ) , f 2 / M H 3 l 6 , 2 ) , 7 4 M H 3 ( 7 , 2 1 , 1 0 5 / M H 3 ( S , 2 ) , 1 4 5 / M H 3 I 9 , 2 ) , 6 0 / M . H 3 ( 2 , 3 ) , 5 0 M H 3 ! 3 , i I , 5 9 / M H 3 I 4 , 3 ) , 1 1 1 / M K 3 ( 5 , 3 ) , 7 4 / Mi 13 ( 6 , 3 ) , 1 0 4 _ M H 3 ( 1, 3 )_, 6?l / M H 3 ( _ 8 » _ 3 > 1 1 0 8 / M H 3 ( _ 9 , 3 J l 5 0 / M H 3 ( 2 , 4 _ L , 3 8 M H 3 ( 3,<T) ^ 4 2 / " M H 3 ( 4 , 4 ) , 1 1 1 / M H 3 ( 5 , 4 ) , 9 2 / M H 3 ( 6 , 4 1 , 3 6 M H 3 ( 7 , 4 ) , 3 a / M h 3 ( 8 , 4 ) , 8 8 / M H 3 ( 9 , 4 ) , 1 0 0 / M H 3 ( 2 , 5 I , 1 0 1 K H 3 ( 3 , 5 ) , 7 5 / N H 3 ( 7 , 5 ) , 8 3 / M H 3 ( 9 , 5 ) , 5 0 / M . H 3 I 2 , 6 ) , 7 5 M H 3 ( 3 , 6 ) , 3 3 / M H 3 < 4 , 6 ) , 1 3 7 / M H 3 ( 5 , 6 ) , 8 9 / M H 3 < 6 , 6 ) , 1 1 5 M H 3 ( 7 , 6 ) , . ° 8 / M . H 3 ( 8 , 6 ) , 1 0 0 / M H 3 1 9 , 6 ) , 1 0 0 / M H 3 I 2 , 7 ) , 8 3 _ M H 3 ( 3 , 7 ) , 1 0 3 / M H 3 ( 4 , 7 ) , 1 3 4 / M H 3 ( 5 , 7 ) , 3 6 / M H 3 ( 6 , 7 ) , 1 2 0 MM 3( 7 , 7 ) , 1 4 1 / M H 3 1 8 , 7 ) , 1 1 9 / M H 3 I 9 , 7 ) , 6 2 / M H 3 ( 2 , 3 ) , 9 6 M H 3 ( 3 , a ) , 1 0 0 / M H 3 ( 4 , 8 ) , U 5 / K H 3 I 5 , 8 ) , 8 5 / M H 3 ( 7 , 8 ) , 1 0 8 <V<H 3 ( 3 , 3 ) , 1 1 5 M H 3 ( 1 5 , 2 - H ) , K l CO * * M H 3 ( 1 6 , 2 - 8 ) , X 6 5 * * K H M I j l l , 2 7 / M H 4 ( 2 , l ) , 2 8 / M I I 4 ( 3 , 1 ) . 2 9 / M H 4 ( 1 , 2 - 4 1 , 2 1 M H 4 ( 2 . 2 M H 4 ( 5 , 2 -MH 4 ( 2 , 6 ) MH/,( 6 , 3 -M H 4 ( 3 , 6 ) J ^ 1 4 < l , J ) K H 4 { 4 , 7 ) H H 4 ( 1 , 8 ) H H 6 ( 1 - 7 , M H 6 ( 1 5 , 1 4 ) , 2 2 / M H 4 ( 3 , 2 - 4 ) , 2 5 / M H 4 ( 4 , 2 - 4 ) , 2 3 4 ) , 2 4 / M H 4 ( 6 , 2 ) , 2 6 / M H 4 ( 1 , 5 ) , 2 6 / M H 4 l 1 , 6 ) , 2 3 2 4 4 ) , 2 6 , 2 6 , ? 1 / KH 4 ( 2 , 7 ) , 2 2 / M H 4 ( 3 , 7 ) , 2 3 2 4 / M H 4 I 5 , 7 ) , 2 5 / M H 4 1 6 , 7 1 , 2 6 , 2 3 / M H 4 ( 2 , 8 ) , 2 4 / M H 4 ( 3 , 8 ) , 2 6 1 - 8 ) , 2 C / M H 6 ( 8 - 1 4 , 1 - 8 ) , 1 0 0 - 8 1 , 2 0 / M H 6 ( 1 6 - 2 0 , 1 - 8 ) , 1 0 0 3 1 4 3 1 5 3 1 4 3 1 7 3 1 8 3 2 0 3 2 1 3 2 2 3 2 3 3 2 4 3 2 6 3 2 7 3 2 8 3 2 9 3 3 0 3 3 1 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 5 3 3 6 3 3 3 3 3 9 3 4 0 3 4 1 IN IT I AL MH7< 2t 6 -7) , 1/MH7I 3,6) , 1/MH7I 3-6,121,1 342 INITIAL MH7(4 -5,1) ,1/MH7(6-9,6),1/MH717,7),1 3*3 INITIAL KH7( 3-9, 12) , 1 344 INITIAL M H 7 ( 3 , l - 5),2 / M H 7(3 , 7 - l l),2 345 V 1 NITIAL MH7 ( 8 , 1-5) ,2 /MH718 , 7 - U ) ,2 3 46 ? IN ITIAL' MH7( 9, 1 -5) ,2/MH7( 8 ,7 -111,2 347 INITIAL « H 7 ( l l , 1 - 1 2 ) , Z 343 INITIAL MH7( 1 2 - 1 4 , 1 - 1 2 ) ,4/[',H7(27-29,l-12),4 349 IN ITIAL MH71 15, 1-5 ), 2/MH7( 1 5 , 7 - 1 1 ) ,2 3 50 INITIAL MH7(15 ,61 ,1/MH7(15 ,121 ,1 351 INITIAL MH7( 16,11 ,1/*H7< 16,2-6) , 0 352 INITIAL MH7(16,71,1/M.H7116,3-121 ,0 363 I NI TIAL M H 7 ( 1 7 - 2 0 , 1 - 1 2 1 , 1 364 INITIAL MH7( 2 1 - 2 6 , 1-121 , 3/MH71 51-60,1-12) , 3 355 I NIT IAL M H 7 ( 6 1 , 6 ) , 1 / M H 7 I 6 1 , 1 2 ) ,1 3 56 INITIAL MH7(62,1-12),4 357 INITIAL MH7( 63 , 1-12) , 1 3 53 INITIAL MH 7 ( 6 4 - 7 0 , 1-12 ),1 359 3 60 * 361 L UP. 01 EOU i , y 362 LUB02 EOU 2 ,0 363 LUB03 ECU 3 , 0 3 44 LUC. 04 FOU 4, Q 3 65 LUB05 ECU 5,0 3 66 6RKC6 f CU 6 , Q 367 3PXC7 ECU 7 , 0 363 ERK03 EOU 8,Q 3 69 TUN 09 EOU 9 , 0 3 70 TUN 10 ECU 1C,Q 371 TUNl l EOU 11,Q 372 E IE 12 EOU 1 2 , 0 .373 ELE 13 EOU 13,Q 374 FLE14 ECU 1 4 , 0 375 c LE 15 EOU 1 5 , 0 3 76 FRT 16 EQU 16,0 377 FRT 17 EQU 1 7 , 0 373 FRT 18 EQU 1 8 , 0 379 ORV 19 EQU 19,Q 3 30 0RV20 EOU 2 0 , 0 381 DRV21 EQU 2 1 , 0 33? DRV 2 2 ECU 22,0 3 S3 CHA23 F.QU 23 ,Q 3 34 CHA24 ECU 24 ,Q 3 35 . C--A2 5 EOU 2 5 , 0 336 C H.A 26 e c u 26 , 0 3 87 CHA27 EOU 2 7 , 0 3 33 CHA23 ECU 28 , Q 339 MJR29 EOU 2 9 , 0 3 90 MJR30 ECU 30,Q 391 LUBE ECU 31 ,Q 392 B^AK EOU 32 ,Q 393 TI.'NE ECU 3 3 , 0 3 9 4 EL EC ECU 3 4 , 0 395 FRON EQU 3 5 , 0 3 96 CRIV EQU 36 , Q 397 CHAS EQU 37 ,Q 3 98 < o ro (• MAJR LPTS THRU WARE PART EQU EQU ECU EQU FOU 38 ,Q 3 9 , 0 40,Q 41 ,0 4 2 , 0 399 4C0 401 4C2 403 i 1 i j 1 FACL EQU 43tQ 4 04 PAR Tt EOU 10 ,H 405 j FACL? ECU 11,H 4 06 ! SERV? EQU 12,H 407 1 THRU? EQU 13,H 4 08 1 P.r;Y EQU 2,F 4 09 NORM EQU 3, F 410 i GEO ECU 4 , F 411 i ECO.'J EQU 5, F 4 12 ! MCK EQU 6 , F '•13 I D c ' - N EOu 7 . F 4 14 i TED ECU 8, F 4 I 5 ! EP I EQU 9 , F 4 16 PAR TD ECU 10,F 417 j PAP. TN EQU 11 ,F 418 GAS1 ECU 12 ,F 4 19 i GAS2 EQU 13,F 4 20 CAS 3 FOU 14,F 421 e i L L EQU 15 ,F 422 i HARRY EOU 16 ,F 4 23 i BAY 1 EQU 2 1 , F '•24 BAY2 EQU 22 ,F 425 j BAY 3 ECU 23 ,F 4 26 1 ' 1 3 AY 4 FOU 2 4 , F '•27 BAY5 EQU 25 ,F 42 3 <*. i BAY 6 EQU 26 ,F 429 1 BAY 7 EOU 27 , F 4 30 1 BAY 3 EQU 2 3 , F • 431 RAY 9 EQU 2 9 , F 4 32 i EPK.LA ECU 5 1 , F 4 33 SCPE1 ECU 52 ,F 434 j VALVE EOU 52 ,F 4 35 j A T •- S T EQU 54 , F 4 36 ) BT6ST ECU 55 ,F 437 • i CCTST ECU 56, F 438 1 5»:'-iiL EQU 57 ,F 439 I HE. I SI ECU 53 ,F 4 4 Q j H01S2 EOU 59 , F 44 1 j f 7EDM EOU 60 ,r 442 t TRUCK EQU 61 ,F 443 1 HOIS3 EOU 6 2 , F 4 44 i HO r 3 4 EOU 63 ,F 4 4 5 HO I S5 EQU 6 4 , F 446 I SCPE2 ECU 6 5 , F 447 i * 448 ; 449 ! 1 GENERATE • , , 1 4 50 I 2 SVL5 SAVEVALUE 5.K1 451 3 SVL7 SAVEVALUE 23 .V17 DAILY JOB ARRIVAL RATE 442 I 4 ADVANCE 1020 453 I 5 TEST E X 5 , K 6 , S V L 6 454 i ft TRANSFER , S V L 5 4 55 I J f 7 SVL6 SAVEVALUE 456 8 TRANSFER , S V L 7 457 » 453 « 459 •> 9 GENERATE , L . , , 1 460 { 10 AAA ADVANCE 1 AN EVENT OCCURS EVERY 1 MINUTE 461 \ 11 TRANSFER r AAA MAKE DAY OF WEEK BE MONDAY 462 * 463 12 GENERATE . 1 . 1 4 64 13 ADVANCE 1 4 65 14 DIG GATE Nl 64 ,DLE 4 66 15 DLF ASSIGN l * , K l 467 16 HSAVEVALUE 3 , » 1 , 5 , V 9 7 , H 468 17 TEST E P I , K 2 0 . D L F 4 69 13 DLE ASSIGN 1, KO 4 7C 19 ADVANCE 61 20 471 20 TRANSFER ,OLG 4 72 473 * INITIALIZE HOURLY PAY RATES 4 74 21 GENERATE . . ,1 4 75 22 SAVEVALUE 32,V98 476 23 JBB ASS IGN L+ .K l 4 77 24 MSAVFVALUE 8 , 6 , * 1 , F N 2 1 473 25 TEST L » 1 T K 20 r J BA 4 79 26 TRANSFER . JBB 4 30 27 J8A TERM NATE 431 * 4 32 KEEPER SECTION 4H3 * 434 435 23 GENERATE . . . 1 4 So 29 hAE TEST E X25.K1.HAA 4 .'37 30 SAVEVALUE 6 .K480 4 83 31 TRANSFER ,HA3 4S9 . 32 HAA SAVEVALUE 6.K960 490 33 HAB ADVANCE 1 491 34 SAVEVALUE 6 - . K 1 492 35 TEST E V5 ,K210,HA6 493 36 ADVANCE 30 494 37 HAC ADVANCE 1 495 3 8 SAVEVALUE 6 - . K 1 4 96 39 TEST E V5 .K510.HAC 497 40 TEST E X25.K1,HAO 498 41 ADVANCE 510 499 4 2 TRANSFER , MAC 500 43 HAD ADVANCE 1 501 44 SAVEVALUE 6 - , K 1 502 4 5 TEST E V5 ,K72C t HAD 503 4 6 ADVANCE 30 504 47 HAF ADVANCE 1 505 48 SAVEVALUE 6 - . K 1 506 49 TEST E V5 ,K1020,HAF 507 50 TRANSFER ,HAE 503 509 510 » * » t * < . « * „ * S T A R T SCHEDULING ARRIVAL RATE 511 512 •~ o 51 52 53 54 55 55 57 58 59 60 _61_ 62 6 3 64 65 66 _67_ 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 GEN GNN GUN GIN GCN SCO GENERATE TEST E ASS IGN TEST LE _ASS IGN TEST G ' TEST GE SAVEVALUE TRANSFER SAVEVALUE _ADVANCE TRANSFER SAVEVALUE ADVANCE TRANSFER ASSIGN TF5T „LE t , , 1 X25,K1,GAN 1 , V4 1 Pl,K3.GNN _1.,_K4 Pl , K 6 0 , S C 0 V5iK510,GI N 4, V49 ,G0N 4 .K60 X4 GPN CAC GA0 GAS ASSIGN TEST G TEST GE SAVEVALUE ADVANCE __TR A NS F E_R SAVEVALUE A0VANCE TRANSFER SAVEVALUE ADVANCE TRANSFER TGEN 4,P1 60 ,GEN 1, V78 _P 1 , K3.GPN 1TK4 P1.K60.GA8 V5,X720,GAC 4,V49 V49 _,GAN 4, K60 X4 iGAN 4, P l 60 T G A N  513 514 515 516 6 18 6 19 620 521 5 22 JL2 3_ 5 24 5 25 526 5 27 528 _5 79_ 6 30 531 6 32 5 33 5 34 536 5 37 5 38 5 39 540 541 80 « » « » * * « « 4 » G E N E R A T E JOB A R R I V A L S * * # * GENERATE X 4 , , , , , 4 6 , F START JOB ARRIVALS LINE UP ARRIVALS WITH SHOP OPEN TINE 542 643 544 5 45 546 547 BI 32 83 84 £5 _ p -6_ 3 7 S3 39 90 91 92 93 9 5 9 6 97 _ 93 99 100 101 F A B FAD F A C F A F TEST GE TEST LE ADVANCE TRANSFER TEST I -JFS.TJ-..? TRANSFER ADVANCE TRANSFER TEST LE TRANSFER TEST OE V 5 . K 2 1 0 , FAA V5,K240 ,FAB V74 t F AA X2 5.K1 ,FAC J^5,K_5J_0_,FA_0_ , F AA V4 9 , FAA V5 , K 7 2 0 , F A F , FAA V S , K 7 5 0 , F A G FAC * ^ * FAA AAF TRANSFER »F A A ADVANCE V75 « ? ASSIGN FIRST AND SECOND JOBS CUEUE 40 ASN ASK ADVANCE _A S S I GN AS S I GN ASSIGN ASSIGN TRANSFER 1 _2j.LN.4_ DELAY TO. LINE UP WITH PRIORITY 3, FN3 19 ,V58 4 6 , C l •200.ASK1.ASK2 ASSIGN F R TIME (MIN) 543 649 5 50 661 552 553 554 5 55 656 667 556 669 560 561 662 663 564 565 566 567 568 569 -7 4 n 1-4 3 r 102 ASK.2 ASSIGN 41,K2 5 70 103 TRANSFER ,ASK3 571 1.)'/ A SKI ASSIGN 24.FN25 5 72 105 TRANSFER .*24,ASK5,RET 573 100 RET ASSIGN 41,FN27 574 I 107 ASK 3 ASSIGN 40.V79 575 108 ASKS MS AVE VALUE 9+, 1 ,1 ,V 57 576 109 MSAVEVALUE 1 0 + , 1 , * 3 , V 8 1 FST JOB LAB SALES/GEN JOB 5 77 110 M SAVE VAL UE 10 + , 3 , * 3 . V 8 1 F ST JOB LAB TO TOTAL LAB/GE N JR 5 73 111 MSAVEVALUE I0+, 2 , FN19.V82 SEC JOB LAB SALE S TO GEN JOB 579 11? MSAVEVALUE 10+,3,FN19,V82 SEC JOB LAB TO TOTAL LAB 5 8 0 113 MSAVEVALUE 1 0 , 6 , * 3 , V 8 3 TOTAL SALES / GEN JOB 5 8 1 l i t MSAVEVALUE 10+, 1 , 9 , V S 1 TOTAL 1ST JOB LAB SALES 532 115 K SAVE VALUE 10+,3 ,9 ,V31 TOTAL 2ND JOB LAB SALES 583 116 MSAVEVALUE 1C+, 2,9,VB2 TUTAL LABOUR SALES 5 8 4 117 H. SAVEVALUE 10 + , 3 , 9 , V 8 2 TOT AL PARTS SAL ES 5 8 S 1 18 M SAVEVAL UC 1 0 , 5 , 9 , V 9 3 GRAND TOTAL SEV DEPT SALES 5 - 1 6 « # * * * ASSIGN J O B COMPLETION TIME 5 3 7 119 ASSIGN 38,V70 583 123 TEST GE X6 ,l> 3B, XNF XT 5 S O 12 1 TEST LE V 5 , K 2 l O , X A A S o n ' 1 2 2 TE ST G V71 ,K210.XAA 591 1 2 3 ASS i GM 3 9 + , X 3 0 6 ) 2 12 4 XAA TEST E X25 , K l ,XAF 5 9 3 125 XAO ASSIGN 39+ , f . l 594 126 ASSIGN 39 <-, P3 8 5 9 5 127 TRANSFER ,SAC 596 ' j 126 XAf TEST GE V5.K750.XAB 597 i 129 TRANSFER ,XA0 5 9 3 f 130 XAI3 TEST G V71,K720,XAD 5 9 9 ) 13 1 XAE ASSIGN 39+,X30 6 0 0 f 1 3 ? TRANS FER , X A L ) 5 0 1 i 133 XNE XT TEST LE V5.K210.XNA 6 0 2 134 ASSIGN 39+,K30 603 1 3 5 XNA TEST E X25, K l , XNB 604 1 3 6 ASSIGN 39+.K510 6 0 5 137 TRANSFER , XAO 6 0 6 13S XNB TEST G V5.K720 .XAE 6 0 7 139 TRANSFER , X A O 6 0 8 * * * * * ASSIGN J O B PICK UP TIME 6 0 9 140 SAC TEST E X 2 5 , K l ,SAD 6 1 0 1'- 1 TRANSFER . 7 2 0 . S A F , S A E 6 1 1 1 4 P SAP ASS I O N 44.PN13 6 1 2 l ' - 3 S"C ' A S S I 0 K 4 2 ,V73 613 14 - TRANSFER , N B A 6 1 4 14 5 SA£ ASSIGN 42, ' 3 9 615 1 •.( ASSIGN 4 4 , 7 7 2 6 1 6 1 •• 7 TRANSFER , N B A 6 1 7 1 4 3 SAD TRANSFER • 754,SAH,SAE 5 1 8 149 SAH ASS IGN 4 4 . F N 1 4 6 1 9 1 5 0 TRANSFER ,SAG 620 1 5 ". NBA QUEUE *2 621 1 5 2 QUEUE V48 h 2 2 QUEUE 42 IS Q U E U E FOR ALL J03S ALL PARTS 623 153 QUEUE 42 6 2 4 154 ASSIGN 4.V45 625 15.'- MSAV£ VALUE 9+,2,1,V56 6 2 6 o i J 156 MSAVEVALUE 9 + , 5 , i , V 6 0 627 157 HSAVEVALUE 9, 3. 1.V59 6 23 153 HSAVEVALUE 1 0 + , 4 , * 3 , V 5 6 PARTS SALES/GEN JOB 629 159 HSAVEVALUE 1 0 * , 4 , 9 , V 5 6 630 TERMINATE' POINT FOR STABILIZATION SIMULATION 6 3 I 1 r 160 TEST NE *2 ,K25,FRAM TERMINATE FRAME JOBS c>32 \ 161 ASSIGN 23.FN18 633 162 TRANSFER .*23,WHS,AAG 6 34 163 FRAH DEPART 42 635 164 « TRANSFER .TERM 636 637 633 * » s « * * » » * * G E T PARTS FROM WAREHOUSE 639 * 640 ! 165 WHS ASSIGN 5.K1 641 166 QUEUE 41 642 167 SAVEVALUE 7+.K1 64 3 168 A CM TEST GE V5 .K135 .ACL 644 16 V TEST LE V5 .K435.ACN 645 170 ACL TEST E X3 .K3 646 17! TRANSFER ,AC0 647 172 • ACN TEST LE V 5 . K 5 648 173 TRANSFER .ACM >>4 9 174 ACO SAVEVALUE 7 - . K 1 6 50 175 DEPART 41 651 176 AAG « ft TEST G V7 .KO.AAJ 652 653 • 6 54 » * * t*444 « * G E T PARTS FROM STOCK 6 55 * 656 177 . ASSIGN 8, V3 667 173 QUEUE 39 • • 658 179 TEST E X25.K2.A3T 669 130 TEST L V5 .K510.AAK 660 13 ! TRANSFER , AAL 66 1 132 ABT SEIZE 10 662 13 3 TRANSFER .AAM 663 184 AAL SEIZE 10 664 185 TEST L V2 5.K0.AAM 66 5 166 ASSIGN 8, V26 666 1 3 7 ASSIGN 9, V27 667 L r ADVANCE *9 66S 13'/ RELEASE 10 669 19'' •PR HIP. IT Y 2 670 1 19: AO VANCE 2 671 192 TRANSFER .AAK 672 193 AAM ADVANCE *R 673 194 RELEASE 10 674 19 5 A AN DEPART 39 675 i 96 TRANSFER ,AAJ 6 76 19 7 AAK St IZE i 1 6 77 193 TEST L V28.X0 .AA0 673 199 ASSIGN 8.V29 679 200 ASSIGN 9 .V30 6 30 201 ADVANCE » 9 631 202 RELEASE 1 I 6 82 20 3 PRIORITY 2 633 7 C 1 f 204 ADVANCE 2 684 205 TRANSFER ,AAL 636 206 AAO ADVANCE *8 636 20 V RELEASE 11 687 v 20!; TRANSFER t A AN 6 38 ) ( 209 AAJ DEPART 42 6 39 • 210 TAJ QUEUE 43 JOIN OUEUE FOR MEN BAYS EQUIP 6 90 211 TEST E BV*3,K1 691 * 692 * 693 s**#*##**#GE"r MEN FOR JOB 694 * 69 5 212 DEPART 43 6 96 213. AAP ASSIGN 20 ,K1 697 214 AA S TF ST L V36.K1,AAQ 6 98 215 AAR ASSIGN 20 + , K l 699 216 TEST G *20,K10,AAS ** CHECK WHEN UPDATING MEN 700 217 ADVANCE 1 701 21 3 TRANSFER , AAP 702 21? AAO TEST GE V I O f K l , AAT 703 22 ) ASSIGN 32.V10 7 04 221 ASSIGN 33.V11 705 2?2 TEST E BV12 ,K1,AAR 706 • 223 ASSIGN t>, V14 707 224 HSAVEVALUE 5 * , * 3 2 , * 3 , K 1 , H 708 225 HSAVEVALUE 5+ , *33 , *3 tK l ,H 7 0" 226 MS AVEV ALU £ 5 + , * 3 2 , 9 , K l , H 710 227 HSAVEVALUE 5 * , * 3 3 . 9 , K 1 , H 711 223 AAU ASSIGN 12, K l 712 229 SEIZE *32 713 " 23C SE I ?.E *33 714 2 : 1 TRANSFER , A .3 G 7 15 232 A AT ASSIGN 30.V36 716 233 GATE NO *30,AAR 717 234 ASSIGN 6, V13 713 235 MSAVEVALUE 5+ ,-*30 , * 3 , Kl ,H 719 236 HSAVEVALUE 5+,*30,9 ,K1,H 7 20 23 7 SEIZE *30 721 233 TRANSFER , A BG 722 723 * 724 ********««GET SAYS FOR JOB 725 726 . 2 3 7 A3G ASSIGN 21 ,K1 727 240 ABH TEST L V33,K1,ABI 723 24 1 ASJ ASSIGN 21 *•, Kl 729 24 2 TE ST r, *2 1 ,V40,ABH 730 243 ADVANCE 1 731 244 TRANSFER , A BG 732 245 A3I TEST GE V15.K1,A3K 733 246 TEST E BV13,K1,A3J 7 34 24 7 ASS IGN 14 ,K1 735 2<.8 ASSIGN 34.V15 736 249 . ASSIGN 35,V16 737 250 SEIZE *34 733 251 SEIZE *35 7 39 252 TRANSFER ,ZZY 740 J o ca 741 742 743 744 74? 740 747 748 7 49 750 _L5.l_ 7 82 753 7 54 755 75 fc 757 758 759 760 761 762 _Z£\i_ ~7 64 765 766 767 768 769 7 70 771 7 72 7 73 7 74 _7 7S_ 7 76 777 778 7 79 7 30 781 732 7 83 784 785 7 86 737 783 7 39 79Q 791 792 _ri3_ 794 7 95 796 797 253 ABK ASSIGN 36 .V38 254 GAT£ NU » 3 6 . A 3 J 255 SEIZE » 3 6 256 TRANSFER . .ZZY 257 258 * * * * « * * « * * G E T E Q U I P M E N T FOR J O B ZZY SPLIT TRANSFER _ASE TRANSFER_ l . A B E , A AW t F N 2 GET EQUIPMENT FOR LUBRICATION JOBS 260 261 262 263 264 26 5 266 267 CAM CAN GATE NU ASS ICYN TRANSFER GATE" 'NU ASSIGN TRANSFER ADVANCE TRANSFER 6 2 ,DAM 11 .X62 .OAK 63.DAN 11,K63 .OAK 1 ,DAA GET EQUIPMENT FOR BRAKE JOBS 268 269 270 272 273 274 275 276 DA3 TRANSFER . 2 5 0 , D A 0 , 0 A p OAO GATE NU 51.DAQ ASSIGN U . K 5 1 TRANSFER t OAK  DAP GATE NU 57.CAQ ASSIGN 11.K57 TRANSFER .DAK DAQ ADVANCE 1 TRANSFER .DAB GET EQUIPMENT FOR TUNE UP JOBS 277 CAC GATE NU 52.DLR 278 ASSIGN 1I .K52 279 TRANSFER .OAK _2_erj DLR G ATE NU 6 5 , OAR 281 2S2 28 3 284 CAR ASSIGN 11.K65 TRANSFER »D AK Al/VAI.'CE 1 TRANSFER ,CAC GET EQUIPMENT FOR ELECTRICAL JOBS 285 266 237 288 239 290 291 292 293 OAO DAS OAW OAV DAU OAX TRANSFER SPLIT GATE NU ASSIGN TRANSFER . 5 0 0 , O A S , O A T 1, DAU 54,CAV U , K 5 4 , DAK ADVANCE 1 TRANSFER ,DAW TRANSFER .500 ,DAX,DAY GATE NU 55.DAZ ASSIGN 11,K55 793 295 TRANSFER , DAK 799 296 CAY GATE NU 56,DAZ 300 29 7 ASSIGN 11,K56 301 >. 293 TRANSFER t DAK 302 f 299 DAZ ADVANCE 1 B03 300 TRANSFER . ,DAU 804 30 1 DAT SPL IT 1 , OAU 8 05 302 TRANSFER ,DAC 806 807 * GET EQUIPMENT FOR FRONT END JOBS 308 « 809 303 DAE SPL IT l .DLA 3 10 204 DLD GATE NU 60,DBC 811 305 ASSIGN U . K 6 0 812 306 TRANSFER , DAK 8 13 307 DSC ADVANCE 1 8 14 303 TRANSFER .OLD 8 15 309 OLA GATE Nl 64,DLB 816 310 GATE NU 6 4 , D L C 817 31 ! ASSIGN 11,K64 8 13 312 TRANSFER ,CAK 8 19 31 3 DLC ADVANCE 1 320 3 1-. TRANSFER ,OLA 8 2 1 315 DL8 » TERMINATE 3 22 823 GET EQUIPMENT FOR DRIVE LINE JOBS 824 825 ' • 316 DAE GATE NU 53,DSD 8 26 317 ASSIGN 11.K58 827 313 TRANSFER ,DAK 828 319 oao GATE NU 59,DOE 829 323 ASSIGN 11,K59 830 321 TRANSFER ,DAK 8 31 322 DDE GATE NU 64.D3E 832 323 ASSIGN 11.K64 833 324 TRANSFER ,DAK 8 34 325 OSE ADVANCE 1 8 35 326 * TRANSFER fOAF 8 36 837 .GET EOUIPf EN T FOR CHASSIS JOBS 8 33 8 i9 32 7 D TRANSFER . 5 0 0 , D A F , 0 3 F 840 32 8 DBF V TERMINATE . 841 • 642 GET EQUIPMENT FOR MAJOR JOBS 84^ 1 * 844 32 • CAH TRANSFER - 2 5 0 , 03G,OAF 845 3 3 3 D3G SPLIT 1, DAF 846 231 DKB GATE NU 53.DKA 647 332 ASSIGN U , K 5 3 6 48 333 TRANSFER , D AK 849 33 • OKA ADVANCE 1 850 335 * TRANSFER ,DKB 851 852 SEIZE EQUIPMENT UNTIL FINISHED 853 336 DAK SEIZE *11 355 337 DAL ASSIGN 7 , V19 856 3 38 TEST LE * 7 , * 6 . 0 A L 357 331 T r ST L V5,K 51 0,CAA flis V 340 TEST L V 5 , K 5 0 7 , 0 A C 859 ' 34 1 TEST GE V90.K510.QAO 360 \ 342 ASSIGN 7.V91 861 343 QAD TEST LE * 7 , K 1 , Q A E 862 344 ASSICN 7.K1 863 345 TRANSFER .OAS 8 64 346 OiE ASSIGN 7- ,K1 865 347 CAB ADVANCE *7 3b6 348 OAC RELEASE •1 1 867 349 TERMINATE • 868 350 CAA TEST L V5.K1017.QAC 869 351 TEST GE V90.K1020.QAB 8 70 35 2 ASSIGN 7.V92 371 353 * TRANSFER .OAO 872 873 874 JOB 875 876 354 J AA TEST E •12 .K1 , JAB 8 77 355 RELEASE "32 8 78 366 RELEASE *33 8 7'"! 357 TRANSFER , JAC 880 , 353 JAB RELEASE *30 8 81 359 JAC TEST E *1 4 . K l . JAD 832 360 RELEASE "34 333 351 RE LEASE *35 3 34 362 TRANSFER , JAE B85 363 JAD RELEASE » 3 6 8 36 364 JAE PRIORITY 4 837 365 ADVANCE 2 888 366 ASSIGN 3 7 , K l 3 89 367 ADVANCE 3 390 368 TRANSFER ,TAJ 891 • 3 69 JAF TEST E * 1 2 , K i t JAG 892 37C RELEASE "32 893 371 RELEASE « 3 3 394 272 TRANSFER . J A M 398 373 JAD RELEASE "30 8 9r> 3 74 JAH TEST c * 1 4 , K 1 , J A I 897 37 5 RELEASE » 3 4 898 • 376 RELEASE ' 3 5 899 377 TRANSFER , JAS 900 378 JAI REl EA SB *36 901 37? JAS ADVANCE 1 902 330 TRANSFER ,A CM 903 33 1 A AW ASSIGN I8 .K0 904 3 82 T E S T L V 5 . K 5 1 C J A J 905 383 TEST L V 5 , K 5 0 7 , J A A 906 • 3 3 4 TEST L VS .K210.KAK 907 383 ASSIGN 18.K30 90S 336 KAK TEST G V 3 1 . K 0 . J A P 909 367 TEST NE X 2 5 . K 2 . J A L 910 • 388 TEST E V 6 . K 1 2 . J A M 911 H H "7 C CT 3 3 9 T E S T E * 1 2 , K i , J A N 9 1 2 3 9 0 T E S T E V 2 , K 0 , J A O 9 1 3 | 3 9 ] T R A N S F E R , K A P 9 1 4 i 3 9 2 JAP H S A V E V A L U E 8 < - , 7 , * 3 0 , P 1 9 9 1 5 I 3 9 3 M S A V E V A L U E Z* , 8 , * 3 0 , P 1 9 9 1 6 ' 3 9 4 H A L T E S T G P 6 . K 0 . L A P 9 1 7 3 9 5 A S S I G N 6 - . K 1 9 1 R 3 9 6 L A P A D V A N C E * 6 9 I V 3 9 7 T R A N S F E R , J A F 9 2 0 3 9 8 PAP H S A V E V A L U E 8 + , 7 , * 3 2 . V 6 8 9 2 1 i 3 9 9 H S A V E V A L U E B * , 7 , * 3 3 , V 6 9 ' 1 2 2 1 4 0 0 H S A V E V A L U E 8 » i 8 , ' » 3 3 , V 6 9 9 2 3 i 1 4 0 1 H S A V E V A L U E B + , 8 , * 3 2 , V 6 8 9 2 4 i 4 0 2 T R A N S F E R , H A L u 2 5 4 0 3 JAN T E S T E ^ H 7 ( * 3 0 , K 1 l . K O . J A L . 9 2 6 ! 4 0 4 T R A N S F E R , J A P 9 2 7 1 4 0 5 J A H T E S T E * 1 2 , K I , J A Q 9 2 3 i 4 0 6 T E S T E V l . K O . J A O 9 2 9 4 C 7 T R A N S F E R , M A P 9 3 0 ! 4 0 6 J A O A S S I O N 6 - , V 2 7 9 3 1 i 4 0 9 H S A VE V A L U E 8 * , 7 , * 3 2 , V 6 4 C U M A P P F R T I M E 9 3 2 I 4 1 0 M S A V E V A L U E 8 + , 7 , * 3 3 > V 6 5 C U M A P P F R T I M E 9 3 3 1 4 1 i HS A V E V A L U E fi*,3,*32,V64 C U M A P P F R T I M E 9 3 4 i 4 1 2 M S A V E V A L U E 8 + , 8 , * 3 3 , V 6 5 C U M A P P F R T I ME . 9 3 5 ! 4 1 3 A S S I G N 1 9 . V 3 7 9 3 6 1 4 1 4 A S S I G N 1 0 , V 2 7 9 3 7 4 i ' . PAA T E S T G * 1 0 , K 2 , P A B 9 3 8 i 4 1 6 A S S I G N 1 0 " , K 2 9 3 9 i 4 1 7 P A B A D V A N C E * 1 0 9 4 0 ; 4 1 3 T R A N S F E R , J A A 9 4 1 •1 4 1 9 JAQ T E S T E M H 7 ( * 3 0 , V 4 2 ) , K O , J A L 9 4 2 j 4 2 0 T R A N S F E R , J A P 9 4 3 4 2 1 J A L A S S I G N 6 - . V 2 7 9 4 4 4 2 2 H S A V E V A L U E 8 + , 7 , * 3 0 , V 4 9 4 5 4 2 3 H S A V E V A L U E 8 + , 8 , * 3 0 , V 4 9 4 6 4 2 4 A S S I G N 1 9 , V 3 9 4 7 1 4 2 5 A S S I G N 1 0 . V 2 7 9 4 3 4 2 6 T R A N S F E R , P A A 9 4 9 4 2 7 J A J T E S T L V 5 . K 1 Q 1 7 . J A A 9 5 0 4 2 3 T E S T L V 5 , K 7 2 0 , R A K 9 5 1 4 2 9 A S S I G N 1 8 . K 3 0 9 5 2 4 3 0 R AK T E S T G V 3 4 . K 0 , J A P 9 5 3 4 3 1 A S S I G N 6 - , V 3 0 9 5 4 4 3 2 T E S T E * 1 2 , K l . C A P . 9 5 5 4 3 3 H S A V E V A L U E 8 « - , 7 , * 3 2 , V 6 4 C U M A P P F R T I M E 9 5 6 4 3 4 H S A V E V A L U E 6 < - , 7 , * 3 3 , V 6 5 C U M A P P F R T I M E 9 5 7 i, 3 ;'. " S A V E V A L U E 8 + , 8 , « ' 3 2 , V 6 4 C U M A P P F R T I M E 9 ^ 3 4 3 ( . H SA V r V A L U E B + , 3 , * 3 3 , V 6 5 C U M A P P F R T I M E 9 5 9 4 3 7 A S S I G N 1 9 . V 3 7 ° 6 0 4 3 3 J A R • A S S I G N 1 C V 3 0 9 6 1 4 3 9 T R A N S F E R , P A A 9 6 2 4 4 " C A R H S A V E V A L U E 8 + , 7 , * 3 0 , V 4 9 6 3 4 4 1 H S A V E V A L U E R + , 3 , * 3 0 , V 4 9 6 4 4 4 2 A S S I G N 1 9 , V 3 9 6 5 4 4 3 T R A N S F E R , J A R 9 6 6 4 4 4 A B M T E S T NE * 4 5 , K 1 . T E R M 9 6 7 4 4 t . T E S T E * 4 0 , K 0 , A S K 4 9 6 8 o f—1 f 446 TERM DEPAR T *2 969 447 DEPART V48 970 44 8 DEPART 40 971 44 9 TABULATE 5 972 450 TABULATE 10 9 73 i ?— 451 Tt RMI NA IE " 74 \ 975 » 976 » » » « » e » e t » R g TURN CARS FOR AOOITIONAL WORK 977 * 978 452 ASK4 DEPART *2 979 453 DtPAS T V43 ISO 454 ASSIGN 6,K0 931 455 ASSIGN 2 , » 4 1 93? 456 ASSIGN 3.FN3 9 33 457 ASSIGN 9 , KO 934 458 ASSIGN 10,KO Vii 6 459 ASSIGN 18,KO 986 460 ASSIGN 19,*40 987 4 6 ; ASSIGN 12,KO 9 88 462 ASSIGN 14,KO 9 39 463 ASSIGN 25,KO 9 90 4'.4 ASSIGN 4 ,K0 '.<H 465 ASSIGN 5,K0 992 466 ASSIGN 45 ,K1 "93 467 PRIORITY 1 994 4<8 TRANSFER , NBA 995 « 996 097 * * * * * * » « * * G E N £ R A T E FACILITY PREEMPTING TRANSACTIONS 993 * 9 99 469 GENERATE , , , 1 GEN FAC PR EE MP TORS 10 M 470 ABS SAVEVALUE 1,K1 l o o t 471 ASSIGN 3,K20 N+-ONE MECHANICS 1002 472 ACW LOO? 3 , ACS IP03 473 SAVEVALUE 1 , K2 0 1004 474 AS S I GN 3 . K 1 0 N » O N E BAYS 10 05 475 ACX LOOP 3 , ACT 1D06 476 SAVEVALUE 1.K5 0 1007 47 7 ASSIGN 3.K20 N+1 EQUIPMENT 1008 478 ACY LC-CP 3 , ACU 10 09 479 TERMINATE 1010 4 3 'j ACS SAVEVALUE l t . K l 10 11 4 b : ASSIGN 1 , XI 1012 ' 4 'J .1 SPL IT l .ACV 10 13 4 B ''- TRANSFER , A C « 13 14 4 3 4 ACT SAVEVALUE l + , K l 10 15 4c5 ASSIGN 1, XI 1016 486 SPLIT 1, ACV 1017 487 TRANSFER ,ACX 1013 438 ACU SAVEVALUE l + , K l 10 19 4. ; 9 ASSIGN 2, XI 1020 4<.C S» L I T l . A C V 1021 491 TRANSFER ,ACY 1022 492 ACV SPLIT 1,CALC 1223 49 3 TEST E * l ,K61,VCA 1024 494 SPL IT l .AC I 10 25 J 495 V. VCA T R A N S F E R * * * ,ACZ 1 0 2 6 1 0 2 7 1 0 2 3 1 0 2 9 1 0 3 0 t 1 e e e # a * * 9 e * f A C l L I T Y S H I F T P R E E M P T O R 1 0 3 1 S * 1 0 3 2 ! 1 496 ACZ T E S T E MH7(*1,V6) ,KO,KAA 1 3 3 3 i 497 A D V A N C E 2 1 0 1 0 3 4 i 198 P R E E M P T *1 10 3 6 ' 499 A D V A N C E • 15 1 0 3 6 j 5 0 0 M S A V E V A L U E 8 + , 2 t * l , K 3 0 1 0 3 7 i 5 0 1 A D V A N C E 1 5 1 0 3 8 ' i 5 0 2 R E T U f N * 1 1 0 3 9 i 5 0 3 A D V A N C E 2 7 0 1 0 4 0 f 5 0 4 P R E E M P T »1 1 0 4 1 ] 505 A D V A N C E 15 1 0 4 2 i 5 0 6 M S A V E V A L U E 8<-,2,*l,K510 1 0 4 3 5 0 7 A D V A N C E 495 1 0 4 4 ! 508 RE T U R N * 1 1 0 4 5 509 T R A N S F E R , C C Z 1 0 4 6 ! 5 1 0 KAA T E S T E M H 7 ( * 1 , V 6 1tK2 , K A B 1 0 4 7 5 1 1 P R E E M P T » 1 1 0 4 8 1 5 1 2 A D V A N C E 1 5 1 0 4 9 i 5 1 3 M S A V E V A L U E 6 * , 2 . » 1 , K 5 1 0 1 0 5 0 I 5 1 4 A D V A N C E 495 1 0 5 1 | 515 R E T U R N * 1 1 0 5 2 516 A D V A N C E 2 1 0 1 0 5 3 i 5 1 7 P R E E M P T * 1 1 0 5 4 ! 518 A D V A N C E 1 5 12 5 5 i 5 1 9 M S A V E V A L U E 8 * , 2 , « 1 , K 3 0 1 0 5 5 s 5 2 0 A D V A N C E 15 1 0 5 7 • 5 2 1 R E T U R N » 1 1 0 5 3 j 5 2 2 A D V A N C E 2 7 0 1 0 5 9 1 5 2 3 T R A N S F E R , C C Z 1 3 5 0 i 5 2 4 K A 3 T E S T E M H 7 ( * 1 , V 6 ) . K l , K A C 1 0 6 1 5 2 5 P R E E M P T *1 1 0 6 2 5 2 6 A D V A N C E 1 5 1 0 6 3 5 2 7 M S A V E V A L U E 8 < - , 2 , * l , K 1 0 2 0 10<*4 5 2 8 A D V A N C E 1 0 0 5 1 0 6 6 5 2 9 R E T U R N * 1 1 0 6 6 5 3 0 T R A N S F E R , C C Z 1 0 6 7 5 3 1 K A C T E S T E M H 7 ( « 1 , V 6 ) , K 3 , K A D 1 0 6 8 5 3 2 A D VA N r E 1 0 2 0 1 0 6 9 5 3 3 , C C Z 1 0 7 0 5 3 4 K A D A D V A N C E 7 5 0 1 0 7 1 5 3 5 P R E E M P T * 1 1 0 7 2 5 3 6 A D V A N C E 1 5 10 7 3 5 3 7 M S A V E V A L U E 8 + , 2 , * l , K 2 7 0 1 0 7 4 5 3 3 ' A D V A N C E 2 5 5 1 0 7 5 5 3 9 R E T U R N * 1 1 0 7 6 5 4 C T R A N S F E R , C C Z 1 0 7 7 * * * * < . P A Y M E N A T T H E E N D O F E A C H P A Y P E R I O O 1 0 7 3 5 4 1 CCZ TE S 7 L » 1 , K 1 , C C L 1 0 7 O 5 4 2 T R A N S F E R . A C Z 1 0 8 0 543 CCL T E S T C » 1 , X 1 7 , C C M 1 0 8 1 544 T R A N S F E R , A C Z 1 0 3 2 1 o H -p--p-r 5 4 5 CCM T E S T E V 6 , K 1 , C C N 1 0 8 3 5 4 6 T R A N S F E R , C C O 1 0 8 4 5 4 7 CCN T E S T N E X 2 4 . K 2 . A C Z 1 0 9 5 '. 4.') T E S T E V 6 , K 7 , A C Z 1 0 8 6 5 4 9 CCO T E S T G ' M X 3 I R , « l ) , F N 2 0 T C C P 1 0 3 7 -> — 5 5 0 M S A V E V A L U E 8 + , 9 , * l , F N 1 6 1 0 8 3 -1 5 5 I M S A V E V A L U E 9 + , 4 , 1 , F N 1 6 1 0 8 9 5 5 : CCO MS A V E V A L U E B , 8 , « 1 , K 0 1 0 9 0 5 5 3 T R A N S F E R , A C Z 1 0 9 1 5 5 4 CCP M S A V E V A L U E 8 + t 9 . * l . F N 1 7 1 0 9 2 5 5 5 MS A V E V A L U E 9 + , 4 , 1 . F N 1 7 1 0 9 3 5 5 5 T R A N S F E R , C C Q 1 0 9 4 * K ' 9 5 * 1 3 9 6 * 1 0 9 7 * 1 0 9 3 • a f t c e o a e t e T f t U C K T R A V E L R O U T I N E 1 ' 1 9 9 * 1 1 0 0 5 5 7 A C I S A V E V A L U E 8 , K 1 1 1 0 1 5 '.-e T E S T GE V 5 , K 6 0 1 1 0 2 5' . . 9 S A V E V A L U E 8 , K 2 1 1 0 3 5 6 0 S E I Z E * l 1 1 0 4 '. 6 ; S A V E V A L U E 1 5 + , K l 1 1 0 5 5 6 2 A S S I G N 2 , V 8 9 1 1 0 6 5 6 3 T E S T G E V 5 r P 2 1 1 0 7 5 6 4 R E L E A S E * 1 1 1 0 8 ' 6 i S A V E V A L U E 8 . K 3 1 1 0 9 . 5 6 3 A D V A N C E 5 1 1 1 0 5 6 7 S A V E V A L U E 8 , K 1 1 1 1 1 5 6 5 T E S T G E V 5 , K 3 9 0 , A C Q 1 1 1 2 5 6 9 A C P T E S T L E V 5 . K 5 1 1 1 3 5 7 3 T R A N S F E R , A C I 1 1 14 5 7 1 A C Q T E S T G E V 5 . K 3 6 0 1 1 1 5 5 7 2 S E I Z E * 1 1 1 1 6 5 7 3 S A V E V A L U E 8 , K 2 1 1 1 7 5 7 4 S A V E V A L U E 1 6 + , K l 1 1 1 3 5 7 5 T E S T GE V 5 , K 5 0 5 1 1 1 9 5 7 6 R E L E A S E * 1 1 1 2 0 5 7 7 S A V E V A L U E 8 , K 3 1 1 2 1 5 7 8 A D V A N C E 5 1 1 2 2 5 7 9 S A V E V A L U E 8 , K l 1 1 2 3 ~ 3 C T R A N S F ER , A C P 1 1 2 4 1 1 2 5 1 1 2 6 » * » » » 4 * * e * C A L C L < L A T I 0 N O F F A C U T I L I Z A T I O N S 1 1 2 7 ft 1 1 2 3 5 8 1 C A L C A D V A N C E 6 1 1 9 1 1 2 9 • 8 . ! T R A N S E E P. , C A L C 4 1 1 3 0 5 3 3 C A L C 3 A D V A N C E 6 1 2 0 1 1 3 1 5 8 4 C A L C 4 M S A V E V A L U E f.*, 1 , - » 1 , K 6 1 2 0 1 1 3 2 5 8 5 M S A V E V A t U E 8 , 3 , « 1 , V 5 3 1 1 3 3 ' 8 ' . M S A V E V A L U E 8 , 4 , » 1 , V 5 4 1 1 3 4 5 3 / M S A V E V A L U E 8 , 5 , * 1 , V 5 5 1 1 3 6 5 8 8 M S A V E V A L U E 8 , 1 0 , * l , V 6 l C A L C O V E R A L L E F F I C I E N C Y 1 1 3 6 5 3 9 T R A N S F E R T C A L C 3 1 1 3 7 * 1 1 3 3 5 9 3 C A L C 6 S P L I T 1 , C A L C 7 1 1 3 9 / 591 ADVANCE 2 1143 592 SAVEVALUE 13 .K100.H SET THRU? = 100? 1141 593 SAVEVALUE 1 0 , V 8 7 , H CALC PART? 1142 •39 4 SAVEVALUE 11 ,V8B,H CALC FACL J 1143 • 595 SAVEVALUE 12,V86,H CALC SERV? 1144 ? 596 MS AVEVALU t 9 + , 7 , l , K 1 0 3 2 CUM FIXED OHEAD EXPENSE 1145 597 MSAVE VALUE 9 , 9 , 1 , V 6 2 CALC TOTAL COST 1146 69 3 M SAVEVALUE 9 , 1 0 , 1 , V 6 3 CALC PROFIT BEF BON,TAX, DEPREC. 1147 599 TERM! NAT E 1148 600 CALC7 ASSIGN 1* ,K1 1 149 60 1 MSAVEVALUE 1 0 , 6 , * 1 , V 9 4 1150 602 MSAVEVALUE 1 0 , 7 , * 1, V95 1 1 51 60 3 MSA VE VALUE 1 0 , 8 , * 1 , V 9 6 11 52 604 TEST E P 1 . K 9 . C A L C 7 1153 605 TERMINATE 1154 606 GENERATE 6 1 2 0 , , , 1 0 1 I 56 607 SPLIT 1,CALC6 1 1 56 603 ADVANCE 3 115 7 609 TERMINATE 1 1153 START 3 , , 1 RUN FOR (CC19) WEEK S WITH STATS AT END OF EACH 1159 RE PUR T 11 60 OUTPUT 1161 EJECT 1162 MHSA H U E 1, THE MAN SELECTION MATRIX IROK=DEGREC- OF CHOICE, C0L = 1 116 3 GEN JOB, F l EMENT=KAN) 1164 EJECT 1165 MHSA TITLE 3,THE EMPLOYEE SKILL MATRIX (ROW = MAN,COL=GEN JOB,EL EI 1166 . M ENT = E FFIC i ENCY) 1167 EJECT 1 1 63 MHSA TITLE 4, THE BAY SELECTION MATRIX I ROW= DEGR EE OF CHOICE , C o l 1169 L=GEN JOB,ELEMENT = B A Y » ) 11 70 EJECT 1171 MHSA TITLE 5,A MATRIX OF JOBS PROCESSED (ROW=MAN, COL=GEN J O B . C O H I 1 72 9=T0TAL JOES) 1173 EJECT 1174 MHSA TITLE 6,A MATRIX OF MACHINE UTILIZATION (I £ PERCENT OF ME1 1175 CH APPL T I ME ! 1 1 76 EJECT 1177 MHSA TITLE 7,THE SHIFT MATRIX (ROW=FAC IL ITY,COL = DAY OF TWO WEEK 1 1173 PERIOD) 11 79 EJECT 1 1 80 MSAV TITLE 8 ,A SUMMARY GF THE UTILIZATION OF FACIL IT IES (COL= F l 1 1 31 AC#) 1182 EJECT 1 1 S3 MSAV TITLE 9 ,A PROFIT/LOSS STATEMENTIREF BON,TAX,DEPREC,AND FIXE1 1134 i 0 OHEAD EXP OF C/SICE OEPT) 11 35 EJECT 11 36 MSAV TITLE 10,PARTS AND LAB SALES BY GEN JOB CATEGORY (COL=GEN JI 1 187 OS ) 1188 EJECT . 1 1 39 GRAPH C T , 1 , 1 5 , + 1190 ORIGIN 54 ,12 1191 X SYM,5 ,1 1192 Y 0 , 6 0 , 4 0 , 1 1193 13 STATEMENT 3 , 9 0 , A GRAPH OF SERVICE TIMES FOR EACH SPECIFIC JOB 1 11 94 (X = JCC NO.,Y=SERV . T IME IN MIN.IPAGE AA 1196 ENDGRAPH 1196 ) o \ EJECT 11 97 GRAPH C T , 1 6 . 3 0 , + 1193 ORIGIN 54, 12 1199 X S Y M , 5 , 1 1200 Y 0 , 6 0 , 4 0 , 1 12 01 J 18 STATEMENT 6 , 9 0 , A GRAPH OF SERVICE TIMES FOR EACH SPECIFIC JOB 1 1202 \ (X^JOB NO.,Y=SERV . TIME IN MIN •)PAGE AB 1203 ENDGRAPH 1204 EJECT 1205 GRAPH C T , 3 1 , 3 8 , + 12 06 OR I GIN 54 ,12 1207 X SYM, 4, 8 1208 Y 0 , 3 0 , 4 0 , 1 1209 18 STATEMENT 8 , 8 0 , A GRAPH OF SERVICE TIMES FOR EACH GENERAL JOB 1 12 10 1 (Y=SERVICE T[ME IN MIN.) 12 1! j ENDGRAPH 12 12 EJECT 12 1"* i GRAPH C T , 3 9 , 4 3 , + 12 14 I l ORIGIN 54 ,12 1215 | X S Y M , 4 , 8 12 16 i Y 0 , 3 0 , 4 0 , 1 1217 1 18 STATEMENT 8 , 3 0 , A GRAPH OF SERVICE TIMES FOR SPECIAL PHASES OF J l 1213 | CB PROCESSING 12 1^ 20 STATEMENT 10 , 5 0 , ' L P T S ' IS TIME TO OBTAIN LOCAL PARTS ONLY 1 12 2 0 ! 1221 20 STATEMENT 1 1 , 5 0 , ' T H R U ' IS SERV TIME FOR JOB IN ANO OUT OF SHOP 1 12 22 i 1223 i 2C STATEMENT 1 2 , 5 0 , ' W A R E " IS TIME TO OBTAIN WAREHOUSE PARTS ONLY 1 12 24 1 1225 1 20 STATEMENT. 1 3 , 5 0 , ' P A R T - IS TIME TO OBTAIN ALL PARTS FOR ALL J0BS1 1226 1 *.- i 1227 i 20 STATEMENT 1 4 , 5 5 , • F A C L 1 IS TIME JOB WAITS TO OBTAIN REDD FACILIT1 1223 IES 1229 ENDGRAPH 12 30 EJECT 1231 GRAPH X H , 1 0 , 1 3 , + 12 32 OR I GIN 5 4 , 1 2 1233 X SYM, 8, 8 1234 Y 0 , 2 , 5 0 , 1 1235 18 STATEMENT 8 , 6 5 , A GRAPH OF OELAYS AS PERCENT OF TOTAL TIME IN SHI 1236 CP 12.57 ENDGRAPH 1233 END 1239 -• J Int Still ' r\ 1« ix ln.-i.ti r 1 7 < 3 * 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ( 0 0 (l 0 0 0 c 1 0 I z > 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 1 0 7 ) 0 0 0 b K •( 11 li- * ( < •t ) i 1 ) I l i 1* < 15 1 t'. U I's 1** i t ;i ? j 7* 77 7b 7>J * U E Z f F f l 57 SO w i t S<J <c ft I I ; *,1 f . f 70 1 > 1 J KIW4 1-?, C M H I i J S ll-l? A*F J ! lKO * 7 1 *, 0 1 f s f- 1 I 0 1 1 7 f. 0 t 7 1 <) f; 1 10 t o . j 11 2 2 1? 4 *> I1 A A t". 4 t 1> 7 1 If 0 0 17 1 1 j It 1 t I l ' 1 1 ir 1 I *1 * 3 ?}> 3 3 3 1 7* > ) j 7*> i J • 1 3 • 77 * k <re < K 7'' 4 4 K I „ S 3n-so, Ciauvns u -12 A " E * O "•' * 3 47 1 3 3 3 1 ; 3 3 3 i 3 3 " 3 1 V V- 3 i J 3 A 4 » > 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 cl I 1 ' <• 1 1 »'. i l Computer Output From Simulation Experiments Appendix B contains the important pages of computer output from each of the sixteen experiments. The output for the f i r s t experiment contains a l l of the key pages of computer printout, and output of the following experiments contains only information (tables, graphs) which i s d i f f e r e n t than that of the f i r s t . A b r i e f explanation of each page of output appears below. 1. Queues. The c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s of each queue at the end of the simulation are printed under the self-explanatory column headings. The queues named LUB01 to MJR30 contain the job, by that type, from entry to the shop, to e x i t from i t . Those t i t l e d LUBE to MAJR are s i m i l a r queues for each General Job Type. 2. Table 10. This table shows the frequencies of jobs l a t e for each of up to s i x t y 30-minute time i n t e r v a l s . 3. The S h i f t Matrix. This i s a matrix seventy (# of f a c i l i t i e s ) rows by twelve (# of days i n 2 weeks of simu-lation) columns. Each element i s a code explaining the s h i f t worked by the f a c i l i t y (row) on the day i n question (column). The codes are explained on page 120 4. Summary of the U t i l i z a t i o n of F a c i l i t i e s . For each f a c i l i t y (o to 70) there are ten s t a t i s t i c s printed: Row 1: T o t a l time simulated (minutes) . Row 2: Tot a l time preempted (not available to be u t i l i z e d ) . Row 3: Total time avai l a b l e to work. Row 4: Actual time worked. Row 5: Percent of available time, a c t u a l l y worked. Row 6: Hourly wage r a t e . Row 7: Tot a l Accumulated F l a t Rate Minutes. Row 8: Weekly accumulated F l a t Rate Minutes . Row 9: Accumulated Pay ($). Row 10: E f f i c i e n c y when working. 5. Graphs - s e l f explanatory. ts*!************************************* * * * QUEUES * * * *************************** **********^** -, • • QUEUE MAXIMUM AVERAGE TOTAL ~ Z E R O ' PERCENT AVL •'• AG c $ AVERAGE TABLE CUR P EN T CONTENTS CONTENTS ENTRIES ENTRIES ZEROS TIME/TRAMS TIME/TRANS NUMBER CONTENTS LUB02 3 .223 41 .0 6 6 . 6 5 3 6 6 . 6 5 8 eRK06 1 . 0 0 3 1 . 0 1 0 8 . 0 0 0 108.000 8RKC8 2 .409 9 . 0 557.444 557. 444 TUN09 . 991 35 . 0 346.7 14 34o .714 3 TUN1 1 1 .033 3 . 0 3 6 0 . 0 0 0 36U.000 ELE12 . 1 . 0 7 8 5 . 0 192.399 192.399 EL E 13 1 . C5 3 4 . 0 165.250 16 5 . 2 5 0 £ L E 14 1 .017 3 . 0 6 9. 666 09 .666 ELE 15 6 . 541 29 ,. - 0 397.620 39 7.62 0 2 FRT 16 3 . 666 22 . 0 370.772 370.772 2 F R 7 1 7 2 " . 2 5 7 6 ' . 0 526.166 5 2 6. 166 F RT 1 8 1 . C69 1 . 0 " 8 4 5 . 0 0 0 8 4 5 . 0 0 0 CRV! 0 1 . 079 1 . 0 9 7 0 . 0 0 0 970.GOO ORV2 0 3 .522 14 • .0 4 5 6 . 8 7 1 456.571 1 DRV 2 1 2 . 431 1 1 .0 4 3 0 . 5 4 5 4riu.845 . . . DRV22 I .042 2 . 0 260.500 2 6 0 .500 -1 CHA?3 2 . 2C7 6 ' ' • ' ' " ' . 0 42 2 .500 4 2 2 . 5 0 0 CHA24 2 . 145 3 . 0 5 9 5 . 0 0 0 396 .000 2 CHA2 6 1 . 28 9 7 . 0 507. 142 507-142 ' 1 CHA27 1 . 152 . 7 . 0 2 6 6 . 1 ) 5 h 2 6 6.656 l CHA23 4 .91 1 45 . 0 248.066 248 .066 1 ft. V J R 2 9 5 1 .076 20 .0 6 5 9 . 1 4 9 6 5 9 . 1 4 9 7 LUBE ' 3 .22 3 " 4 1 . 0 ' 6 6 . 6 5 5 6 6 . 6 5 6 SR.'-K 2 . 4 1 3 10 • .0 5 1 2 . 5 0 0 5 1 2 . i C O Ti.-cE 1.07 9 38 . 0 347.762 34 7. 76 2 3 EL EC 6 1. C91 41 . 0 325 .526 926 2 F '<' y x A . 99 3 29 . 0 419. 2 75 419 .275 2 0'-' ••' 4 1. C75 23 .0 4 7 0 . 3 2 1 4 7 0 . 3 2 1 C r S 5 1. 7C7 68 . o 307. 367 307 .367 .'' ."• J R 5 1 .076 20 . 0 6 5 9 . 1 4 9 65 9. 149 2 L P T S . 147 120 . 0 15.053 15.08 3 T FRU 13 7 . 684 229 . 0 410.816 4 10 . 8 i 0 1 /I A RE 6 1.339 3 5 .0 468.714 468. 714 1 PART e 1.437 275 134 4 8 . 7 6 6 . 2 36 125. 164 > FACL i t ' ' 3. 40 9 359 164 4 4 . 4 113. 113 203.604 10 i iVE>AGE TIME/TRANS = AVERAGE •TIMS/TRANS EXCLUDING ZERO ENTRIES • S T D A )-> H - - . -T A B L E 10 E K T R I ES I N T A 8 L E K E A * A R G U M E N T S T A N O A R O D E V I A T I O N SUM O F A rvblli. LN T S 21 9 1 8 1 . 0 6 5 3 . 1 8 . 0 0 0 . 3 8 9 2 9 . 0 0 0 N . 1 N - ' . ' E I C H T F D U R R E R O B S E R V E D P E R C E N T C U M U L A T I V E C U M U L A T I v r M U L T I R L E o r v i A i i n M L I M I T F R E O U f c ' X Y Of T O T A L P E R C E N T A G S . R E M A I N D T R L - I - R D M - A N - 3 0 0 6 2 . 7 9 2. 7 9 7 . 2 - 1 . t o o - 1 2 3 9 - 2 70 0 . 0 0 2 . 7 9 7 . 2 -1. 49 1 - 1 1 " . . . . _ - 2 4 0 2 . 9 3 3 . 7 9 6 . 2 - 1 . 3 2 5 - 1 0 8 8 - 2 1 0 1 . 4 6 4 . 1 9 5 . 8 - 1 . 1 5 9 - 1 0 0 7 - 1 RO 2 . 0 3 5 . 1 9 4 . 8 9 9 4 - 9 30 - 1 5 0 2 . 9 3 6 . 0 9 1 . 9 - . 8 2 8 - . '15 i - 1 2 0 7 3 . 2 5 9 . 3 9 0 . 6 - . Du2 - 7 7 5 -to 5 2 . 3 2 1 1 . 6 8 8 . 3 - . 4 9 7 - 6 9 3 _ - 6 0 9 A . 18 1 5 . 8 8 4 . 1 — . 331 - . 6 21 " " " ' " - 3 0 2 3 1 0 . 6 9 2 6 . 5 7 3 . 4 - . 1..5 - . 5 4 3 0 21 9 . 7 6 3 6 . 2 6 3 . 7 - . 0 0 0 - 4 '.-6 30 19 8 . 8 3 4 5 . 1 5 4 . 8 l o 5 - . 3 ( W 60 15 6 . 9 7 5 2 . 0 4 7 . 9 . 331 - 312 9 0 7 3 . 2 5 5 5 . 3 4 4 . 6 49 7 - . 2 34 120 10 4 . 6 5 5 9 . 9 4 0 . 0 o 6 2 - . i r . 7 150 10 A . 6 5 6 4 . 6 3 5 . 3 828 - . 0 8 0 1.10 8 3 . 72 6 8 . 3 3 1 . 6 99 4 / - . 0 0 2 2 1 0 3 1 . 3 9 6 9 . 7 3 0 . 2 1 . 159 . 0 74 2 4 0 3 1 . 3 9 7 1 . 1 28 . 8 1 . 3 2 5 . 1 5 1 2 70 6 2 . 7 9 7 3 . 9 2 6 . 0 1 . 49 1 . 2 2 9 3 0 0 i 1 . 3 9 7 5 . 3 2 4 . 6 1. o 5 6 . 3 06 3 30 2 . 9 3 7 6 . 2 2 3 . 7 1 . 8 2 2 . 3 8 3 3 60 5 2 . 3 2 7 8 . 6 2 1 . 3 1 . 9.:-. 8 . 4 6 1 3 9 0 3 1 . 3 9 7 9 . 9 2 0 . 0 2. 153 . 8 1 3 4 2 0 3 1 . 3 9 8 1 . 3 1 8 . 6 2 3 1 9 . 6 15 * 5 0 1 . 8 6 8 3 . 2 1 6 . 7 2 . 4 8 5 . 6 9 3 4 8 0 ^ ' 1 . 3 9 8 4 . 6 1 5 . 3 2 . o>0 . 7 70 5 1 0 3 1 . 3 9 8 6 . 0 1 3 . 9 2 316 . . 8 4 7 5 4 0 2 . 9 3 8 6 . 9 1 3 . 0 2 . 98 J . 92 5 5 7 0 3 1 . 3 9 MP. 3 1 I . 6 j 148 1 . o r ? 6 0 0 4 1 . 6 6 ..• 9 0 . 2 9 . 7 3 . 3 1 3 1 . 0 7 9 _ ' 3 0 0 •"0 9 0 . 2 9 . 7 3 . 4 79 1 . 1 5 7 660 2 . 9 3 91 . 1 8 . 8 3 64 6 1 . 2 34 6 4 0 1 . 4 6 9 1 . 6 0 . 3 3 . 8 1 0 1 . 3 11 ' 7 2 0 2 . 9 3 9 2 . 5 7 . 4 3. 976 1 . » 59 7 50 1 . 4 6 9 3 . 0 6 . 9 <. 1-2 1 . 4 i> 6 7 8 0 2 . 9 3 9 3 . 9 6 . 0 4 j 0 7 1 . 8 4 3 6 10 1 . 4 6 94 . 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' 8 1 1 " o " ROW/COLUMN 11 U ii 14 15 16 . 17 18 1 9 2 0 1 12 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 2 6 4 8 0 3 2 4 0 3 2 4 0 3 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 " 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 C 1 2 2 4 3 1 2 2 4 0 3 5 7 6 0 9 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 3 3 7 1 2 2 7 - 8 - 8 - 1 2 - 1 2 - 1 2 - 1 2 - 1 2 - 1 2 50 L*h 0 'J 0 0 U 0 u I-6 1 C 3 0 lr . f to 1 0 8 0 1 0 8 0 4 5 0 2 9 3 0 0 0 0 7 0 1 2 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 81 3 4 0 - 1 - 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 9 6 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 BOH/COLUMN *1 22 2 3 2 ' 2 5 2 6 27 28 2 9 ^ 0 I 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 •12240 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 4 0 3 2 4 0 3 2 4 0 c 3 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 . 1224U 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 9OO0 9 0 0 0 90.10 0 4 7 4 5 4 4 7 4 9 ( .768 6 4 2 6 1 7 5 0 47 3 6 1 2 2 7 - 8 - 3 0 . . _ 5 ACS 3 8 7 552 524 142 ' 3 8 6 136 0 0 ROWS 1 0 . COLUMNS 2 1 - 3 0 ARE ZERO ROUS 1 - I C , COLUMNS 3 1 - 5 0 ARE Z f f t o P C K / C O L U K 1 ! ' 51 52 53 5 4 55 5 6 57 5 8 ' " ' 5 9 " " 6 0 1 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 i ? ? 4 0 2 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 'j <> V 3 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 7 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 ? 4 0 A 73 1 1 5 0 9 1 8 2 9 3 2 6 9 2 8 1 4 a 7 4 9 0 4 1 0 0 2 ) 5 2 5 " : " 5 S 3 74 2 3 21 22 3 - 6 1 1 334 2 4 1 XC.US 6 - 1 0 . COLUMNS 5 1 - 4 0 ARE Z E R O 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 ? ? 4 0 7 4 4 0 3 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 U 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 1 2 2 4 0 4 ^ 0 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 7 4 8 8 4 - 7 5 ^ 1 2 ^ 1 2 - 1 2 - " l 2 - 1 2 ' H 6 4 0 5 8 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 ROWS 6 - 1 0 . COLUMNS 6 1 - 7 0 ARE 2 E R C ^ A GRAPH OF SERVICE TIMES. FOR_E_AC.H GENERAL JOB (Y=SEKVICE TIME IN MIN.) 720 6S0 660 630 600 _57_0_ 540 510 430 4 50 420 + + 300 270 240 2 10 + + 130 150 ! 20 60 30 ,++ + + + + + + + •• + + + + ++ +•«•+ + LUBE ' BRA K *-+++*- + ++++ + + + +f + + + TIJNF ELEC FR ON ORI V + + + + + + 4 C HA S o A . G R A P H 0F_ S E R V I C E . . T I M E S FCJR S P E C I A L P H A S E S OT JOB.. P R O C E S S I N G ' L P T S ' I S T I M E TO 0 3 T A I N L O C A L P A R T S O N L Y ' T H R U ' I S S F R V T I M E F O R J O B I N A N D O U T OF S H O P W A K E ' I S T I M E T U O B T A I N W A R E H O U S E P A R T S O N L Y ' P A R T ' I S T I M E TO O B T A I N A L L P A R T S F O R A L L J O B S ' F A C L * I S T I M E J O B W A I T S TO O B T A I N R E Q O F A C I L I T I E S 1 2 C O 1 1 7 0 1 1 4 0 1 1 1 0 1 C B 0 I C 5 0 1 0 2 0 9 4 0 9 6 0 9 3 0 900 I - 7 0 8 4 0 8 1 0 7 8 0 7 S 0 7 2 0 6 5 0 6 6 0 6 2 0 6 C 0 5 7 0 5 4 0 5 1 G 4 6 0 4 5 0 4 2 0 3 9 0 3 6 0 3 3 0 300 2 7 0 2 4 0 2 1 0 + + + + 1 8 0 1 5 0 1 2 0 9 0 6 0 3 0 + + • + + + + • + + + + + + + + + + + + K + •*• + + + +«• + + + -1 L P T S THR U WARE «• + + + -++ + + + + + + + + + +•*• + P A R T F A C L >Tr> A r—' o ICO 93 46 94 92 90 ea 66 A GRAPH OF DELAYS AS PERCENT CF TOTAL TIME IN SHOP P. tl BO 73 76 74 ~TT~ 70 63 66 64 62 S3 66 54 52 50 4>i 46 44 42 4 0 33 36 + + 34 + + + + + + +•«- + + 32 + + + + + + 30 + + +• 2'i + + + + + + 26 + + + + + TT 22 20 13 16 14 TT 10 6 • + 4 • ' + 2 • • + + +•+•*•++ + + • + ++ + * + + + + + + + + + +•+++ + + + + + + + + + + + • + + •+++• + PART FACL SERV • ++ + + + THRU <STI_3 A CUEUES O QUEUE MAXIMUM AVERAGE TOTAL ZERC PERCENT AVERAGE SAVFRAGE TA3LE CURRENT CONTENTS CONTENTS ENTRIES ENTRIES ZERCS TI ME/TRANS TIME/TRANS NUMBER CONTENTS LUP02 A .22 3 85 . C 40.235 48. 235 BRKCi 1 - C U I .0 27.CCO 27.000 HRKG-3 2 .498 24 .0 381.791 381 .791 2 TUNC 9 5 1.2E4 61 .0 386.819 386.819 1 TUNIC 1 .C53 1 .0 981.CCO 981 -CCC TUNU 1 . CS 5 5 .0 350.000 3 50.000 ELE12 2 .0 44 6 . 0 136.500 136.500 ELE13 2 .160 e .C 369.SCO 3 65.SCO 2 ELE 1 4 1 .ce9 5 .0 327.799 327.759 EL = 15 7 1.241 51 . 0 447.117 447.117 EXT! 6 ' 5 1.127 38 . C 54 5. CCO 545.CCO 1 E H T 1 7 2 .325 13 .0 544 .92 2 544.522 F R T 1 o 1 . CS4 3 . .0 577.333 577.333 CR7! 9 l .174 4 .c 803. CCO 803.000 !).'.V2 3 3 .699 21 .0 612. C47 612.C47 D RV 2 1 3 .454 13 .0 641.615 641.615 CRV22 " 1 " " ' . I C S 3 . 0 663.666 663 .666 CHA2 3 2 .171 11 . 0 2 8 5.636 285.636 2 • CH.'. 2 4 2 .C54 4 .0 252 .250 252.250 Cl-A 2 5 i 2 2 1CC.0 • CCD .000 CM/V26 2 .176 11 . C 295. 272 295 .272 CHA27 I .114 11 .0 191. 818 191.818 1 7 1. 572 79 .0 366.797 366.797 1 - . .'.j.Jt'V iz 1.632 20 . c 999.500 999.5C0 1 L'.U'E A .223 85 -c 48. 235 48.235 !'.'<AK 2 .sec 25 .0 367.599 367. 599" 2 TUNE 6 1.433 67 .0 392.940 392.940 1 S L E C 7 1 .536 73 .C 403.C59 403.099 • 2 ' ' F R C N 6 1 .60 7 54 .0 546.777 546.777 1 i;R iV 1.437 41 . 0 643.829 643 .829 Cl-"'. •> 2 .0 9 5 11(1 7. 1.6 326.152 331.775 4 !•?• JR c 1.6 32 30 .0 999. 5C0 999.5CC 1 CMS 4 .158 2C3 3 1.4 14.310 14.524 11-KL 22 10.4 89 398 . 0 483.934 483.984 11 "" XARE 8 . .892 51 . 2 3.9 321. 431 334.550 1 PART • S 1.050 490 ?S4 53.0 39.383 85.389 1 FACL 18 6.122 742 25 1 33.8 151.508 228.959 6 ! iAVE RACE T I l-E/TRANS = AVERAGE T1ME/TRANS EXCLUDING ZERO EM TRIES T A B L E 10 E N T R I E S IN T A B L E 3 8 7 MEAN ARGUMENT 2 7 6 . 0 0 5 STANDARD 0 E V I A T I 0 N 388.COO SUM OE ARGUMENTS 1 0 6 8 1 4 . C O O N C h - W E I G H T E D 1 UPPER O B S E R V E D PER CENT C U M U L A T I V E C U M U L A T I V E M U L T I P L E D E V I A T I O N j - • - ' . L I M T FREQUENCY OF TOTAL P E R C E N T A G E REMAINDER CF M F AN FROM MEAN - 3 0 0 7 I . 6 0 i . e 9 3 . 1 - 1 . C 8 6 - 1 . 4 6 4 - 2 7 C C . 0 0 1 . 8 9 0 . 1 - . 9 7 8 - 1 . 4 C 7 - 2 4 0 3 . 7 7 2.5 97 . 4 - . 8 6 9 - 1 . 3 2 9 - 2 1 0 0 .00 2.5 9 7 . 4 . - . 7 6 0 - 1 . 2 5 2 - I S C 4 1.01 3.6 96.3 - . 6 5 2 -1.175 - 1 5 C 4 1.C3 4 . 6 95.3 - . 5 4 3 - 1 . 0 9 7 • , . •'• . - •. -120 8 2.C6 6.7 93.2 - . 4 3 4 - 1 . 0 2 0 . - 9 0 2 . . 5 1 7.2 9 2 . 7 - . 3 2 6 - . 9 4 3 - 6 0 2C 5 . 1 6 12 . 4 87.5 -.217 - . 8 6 5 - 3 0 2 3 • . 5 . 9 4 1 8 . 3 8 1 . 6 -.108 - . 7 8 6 0 3 0 7 . 7 5 2 6 . C 7 3 . 9 - . CCC - . 7 1 1 . 3C 21 5 . 4 2 31 . 5 68 . 4 . i c e - . 634 60 22 5 . 6 8 3 7 . 2 62 . 7 . 2 1 7 - . 5 5 6 r 9 0 12 3 . 1 0 40.3 5 5 . 6 . 3 2 6 - . 4 7 9 120 14 3.61 4 3 . 9 56.0 . 4 3 4 - . 4 0 2 15C 15 3 . 8 7 4 7 . 8 5 2 . 1 . 5 4 3 - . 3 2 4 V": 1 8 0 8 2 . 0 6 4 9 . 8 5 0 . 1 . 6 5 2 - . 2 4 7 2 1 0 17 4 . 3 9 5 4 . 2 4 5 . 7 . 160 - . 1 7 0 24C 8 2 . C 6 5 6 . 3 4 3 . 6 . e69 - . C 5 2 270 12 3 . 10 5 9 . 4 4 0 . 5 . 9 7 8 - . 0 1 5 • ••'. . » , ••• • -. • • 3 0 0 1 0 2.58 6 2 . 0 3 7 . 9 1 . 0 8 6 . 0 6 1 c • j . 330 12 3 . 1 0 65 .1 34 . 8 1 . 1 9 5 . 1 3 9 26C 5 1 . 2 9 6 6 . 4 3 3 . 5 1 . 3 0 4 . 2 1 6 I 3 1 0 7 1 . 8 0 60.2 31.7 1 . 4 1 3 . ^ 9 3 '- '•• v; • i 4 2 0 IC 2 . 5 8 70 . 8 2 9 . 1 1 . 5 2 1 . 3 7 1 i - 4 5 0 5 1 . 2 9 72.0 27.9 1 . 6 3 0 . 4 4 8 4 6 0 5 1.29 7 1 . 3 2 6 . 6 1.739 . 5 2 5 ••• 5 1 0 4 1 . 0 3 7 4 . 4 2 5 . 5 1 . 8 4 7 .6C3 V " ' ' 54 0 9 2 . 3 2 7 6 . 7 2 3 . 2 1 . 9 5 6 . 6 8 0 5 7 0 7 1 . 6 0 7 8 . 5 2 1 . 4 2 . 0 6 5 . 7 5 7 6 C 0 8 2 . 0 6 CO.6 1 9 . 3 2 . 1 7 3 . 8 ) 5 •' i - •.*. 430 10 2.58 83.2 16.7 2.282 . 9 1 2 66 0 7 1.80 8 5 . C 14.9 2.391 . 9 8 9 6 9 0 7 i .eo 8 6 . e 13. 1 2. 4 9 9 1.066 72C 7 1 . 8 0 8 8 . 6 11 . 3 2.6C8 1 . 144 ' *i < 750 3 . 7 7 8 9 . 4 1 0 . 5 2 . 7 1 7 1 . 2 2 1 7(10 2. . 5 1 8 9 . 9 1 C . 0 2.826 1 . 2 9 8 -. E-.C 6 1 . 5 5 9 1 . 4 8 . 5 ' 2.934 1 . 3 7 6 £ 4 0 2 . 5 1 9 1 . 9 8.0 3 . 0 4 3 1 . 4 5 3 8 7 0 4 1 . C 3 9 3 . C 6 . 9 3 . 1 5 2 1 . 5 3 0 1 3 0 3 .77 9 3 . 7 6 . 2 3 . 2 6 C 1 . 6 0 8 43C 6 1 . 5 5 9 5 . 3 4 . 6 3 . 3 6 9 1 . 6 6 5 9 6 0 5 1 . 2 9 9 6 . 6 3 . 3 3 . 4 7 8 1 . 7 6 2 9 9 0 0 .00 9 6 . 6 3.3 3 . 5 8 6 • 1 . 8 4 0 >' • .- 6* - ' . ' ' 1 C 2 C 1 . 2 5 9 6 . 8 3.1 3 . 6 9 5 1 . 9 1 7 1C5C 1 . 2 5 9 7 . 1 2 . 8 3 . 8 0 4 1 . 9 9 4 1 0 1 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 1 2.8 3 . 9 1 2 2 . 0 7 2 1 1 1 0 2 . 5 1 9 7 . 6 2. 3 4 . C 2 1 2 . 1 4 9 • , • y; - 1 1 4 0 1 . 2 5 9 7 . 9 2.0 4 . 1 3 0 2.226 1 1 7 0 0 . . C O 9 7 . 9 2.0 4 . 2 3 9 2 . 3 0 4 1 2 0 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 9 2.0 4 . 3 4 7 2.381 121C 0 • . C O 97 . 9 2 .0 4 . 4 5 6 2.458 1 2 6 0 0 .CO 9 7 . 9 2 .0 4 . 5 6 5 2.536 i 1210 1 .25 9 3 1 1.8 4.673 2.61 i s 13/C C .00 98 1 1 . 8 4.782 2. 690 1350 1 .25 98 4 1 .5 4.891 2.768 1380 1 .25 9e 7 1.2 4 . 9 9 9 2.845 i*;c C . C O 98 7 1 .2 s.ice 2.922 1440 1 .25 98 9 1.0 5.217 2 .959 J C V E ^ r L C W 4 1.03 ICO C .0 \ A V E R A G E V A L U E C F C V E R F L C K O H oa A SUMMARY O f THE U T I L I Z A T I O N OF F A C I L I T I E S ( C C L - P A C » > F U L L K C R C MATRIX 8 R C U / C O L L M N 1 2 3 A 5 6 7 6 . 9 1 0 | f5 : — i 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 0 1 B 3 6 U 1 8 3 6 0 I C 3 6 U 1 8 3 6 U 1 S 3 6 U ^ 2 0 1 1 1 6 0 1 1 1 6 0 1 1 1 6 0 i n t o 1 1 1 6 0 • 1 1 1 6 0 1 1 1 6 0 1 1 1 6 0 9 7 2 5 c 7 2 C 0 7 2 C 0 7 2 0 0 7 2 C 0 7 2 C 0 7 2 C C 7 2 C C 7 2 C 0 8 6 4 0 A 0 6 2 8 2 6 5 5 7 6 5 9 4 6 3 1 8 6 09 3 6 5 0 2 6 6 1 2 6 5 5 7 1 7 9 1 5 0 8 7 2 9 1 C 9 1 5 87.7 8 4 6 9 0 3 9 1 8 9 1 0 2 0 7 6 0 4 5 0 3 3 7 4 50 4 5 0 4 5 0 4 5 0 • 4 5 0 2 2 5 1 0 6 0 7 0 5 7 1 6 4 7 5 C 84 21 4 9 3 5 6 6 1 5 5 732 7 3 E 5 4 9 0 8 u 8 0 0 C 3 1 9 1 3 4 1 0 5 0 0 6 0 0 9 0 5 4 0 4 0 2 6 0 6 5 4 0 5 4 3 5 4 0 5 6 9 2 7 0 6*7 1C 0 9 C 9 7 2 4 122.8 7 6 7 1 0 6 7 8 8 1 1 1 1 6 7 3 9 0 RCW/CCLUMN 11 12 1 3 14 15 1 6 I / lb 19 "1 1 1 3 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 5 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 18 360 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 2 9 7 2 0 4 8 6 C 4 6 6 0 48 60 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 3 8 6 4 0 1 3 5 C 0 1 3 5 0 0 1 3 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 1 4 2 3 C 0 - 1 2 - ' . 2 - 1 8 - 1 8 - 1 8 - 1 0 - 1 8 - 1 8 5 4 7 n c U U 0 U U U 0 " 6 1 0 8 0 1 C E 0 1 0 8 0 L C 8 0 4 5 0 2 9 2 4 5 0 4 5 0 4 5 0 4 5 0 7 0 2 4 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 C C 0 0 9 156 e39 - 3 - 3 0 0 0 C 0 0 1 0 0 1 C 7 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 » C K / c c i U M \ - 21 22 2 J , , . 2 4 25 2 6 2 7 2 8 2 9 30 I 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 0 0 2 0 C C C 0 0 4 8 6 0 4 8 6 0 4 8 6 0 ° 3 l a j i v 1 6 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 0 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 ' 1 8 3 6 0 ' 1 3 5 0 0 1 3 5 C 0 " 1 3 5 0 0 L> 4 1 2 S 5 6 9 5 4 7 1 3 1 M 9 5 4 7 4 2 2 2 7 3 8 0 2 3 0 C - 1 2 - 1 2 0 5 6 3 3 5 1 9 7 1 3 5 1 9 2 2 9 4 0 1 1 7 0 0 0 0 RO'RS 6 - 1 0 . COLUMNS 2 1 - 3 0 ARE ZERO HOWS 1 - 1 C . CCLUMNS S 1 - 5 C ARE' RCK/COLUMN' 51 5 2 5 3 54 55 5 6 5 7 . 5 8 5 9 6 0 18 3 6 0 . 1 8 3 6 3 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 . 1 E 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 0 1 3 3 6 0 2 0 C C C 0 0 0 C 0 O 3 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 • 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 3 3 6 0 4 2 2 0 2 0 7 4 1 3 5 8 5 8 7 6 4 2 6 6 0 1 I C 1 0 5 7 9 7 3 0 7 5 4 3 4 5 11 1 1 2 73 31 34 3 5 5 5 9 7 3 9 7 2 9 5 RCWS 6 - 1 0 . COLUMNS 5 1 - 6 C ARE ZERO R O W / H U M 61 6 2 4} 6 ' 45 66 s-7 19 64 70 . — . . ... 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 0 2 1 1 1 6 0 • 4 8 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 3 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 3 3 6 0 0 7 2 0 0 n s e c 0 0 0 0 C C 0 °< . 4 4 3 5 4 1 7 4 9 - i e - 1 8 - 1 8 - 1 8 - 1 6 - 1 8 - 1 8 0 5 6 0 4 129 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ROWS 6 - 1 C , CCLUMNS 6 1 - 7 0 ARC ZERO B / A GRAPH OF SERVICE TIKES FOR EACH GENERAL JCE (y = SERVICE TIME IN MIN. ) 1200 1170 H A C 1110 1C30 1C50 1C20 9^0 960 930 SCO 3 70 840 810 780 7 50 720 690 66C 630 6C0 _5 7C_ 540 510 430 45G 4 20 _3 90_ 260 3 30 300 2 70 2 4-J _2_1 G_ 130 150 120 90 ' 60 30 + + + + + + + + + + + + + + H + + + H t + + + + + M - * 4 t - t 4 + » H + i + i M t + t l + t + + + + + + * t + l t t + f + + + + t LUBE BRAK TUNE CLEC + + + + FRON H-+-t + -t + + + + ++ + + + + ++ -f + * + + + -l+ + + t + DRIV CHAS MAJR / o'! > — 1 : ; : : : — + - - - . + A GRAPH GF SERVICE TIMES FOR SPECIAL PHASES OF JG3 PROCESSING 4- ' LPTS • IS TIME TC OHTAIN LCCAL PARTS ONLY + ' T HR U • IS SERV TIME FOR JOB IN AND OUT OF SHOP + ' HARE IS TIME TO OBTAIN WAREHOUSE PARTS ONLY •PART • IS TIME TC OBTAIN ALL PARTS FOR ALL JOBS 1200 + •FACL • IS TIME JOB WAITS TO OBTAIN RECD FACIL IT IES 1170 1140 + 111C 4-1030 + 1050 + 1C20 + 590 + 960 + 9 30 + 9C0 + S7C + 3 40 310 4 73 0 + 7 5C + 7 20 * 690 660 + 630 + 6 DC 4-570 540 + 510 430 •f + + + +• 4 50 + + 4-420 • + + 390 + + 260 + + 330 + 4- * 300 + 4 + 4 4 4 4 270 4- + + + + 240 + + +• 4 4 210 4 4 4- + 130 • 4 4 4 + 150 • + 4 + 4 . 44-4 + 120 + 4 + 4 + • + 90- • + + 4 - 4 + + 60 • + + 4 + + + 30 + 4 4 4- 4 4 + 4- + 4-0 + + + + + + + + + 4 4 4 + 4 4 - 4 + + + 4 + + .44- - f44444 + 4+++ + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + ++ + 4 4 4 + + LPTS THRU WARE PART FACL o 100 + V 98 + + + ? 9 6 + + + s 9 4 + * • • <?2 • A GRAPH OF C6LAYS AS PERCENT CF TO TAL TIKS IN SHOP 9 0 + + £8 + + + 86 + + + 84 + + + 82 + 4* 80 +• + + 7 8 •f + + 76 + + + 74 + + + 7 2 + + + 70 + + +• 60 + + 4-66 + + + 6 4 + + + 6 ? + + 60 + + + 5 3 + + + •+++++ + +• c (_ + + + + • 54 + + +• + + 52 + + +• + 50 + + + + + 48 + + +• + • + 4 6 + + + + 4-4 <. + +• + + 4 ? + * + + + 4C + + + + + "5 8 +• + + + 4-36 -f + + + + 24 + + + + + 32 + + + + 3 0 + + + ++++•+++ + + 2H + + + + * 26 +- + + 4- + + + 24 + + + + + + +• 22 + + +• + + + +> 20 + +• +• • • + + 13 + - + + 4- + + + 16 + + + + * + 4-14 + + + + + 12 + + + + • + + 10 + + • • • 4 4 + + • + + + + 4-8 + +> + + + • + + • + 6 + + + + 4- + + + 4-+ + + + + + + + + 2 + 4- + + + + + + + C + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + 4 + + + 4 4 + + + + + + + + + 4 + 4 + + + + ? AR.T FACL SERV THRU \ J H ON fO QUEUES O * • " . " " \ Q U E U E M A X ! MUM AVERAGE TOTAL ZERO PERCENT AVERAGE IAVERAGE TABLE CURRENT" CONTENTS CONTENTS ENTRIES ENTRIES ZEROS TIME/TRANS TIME/TRANS NUMBER CONTENTS LU50? . 195 61 . 0 58. 754 58. 754 E k K.0 6 1 . 000 l .0 15.000 15.000 P.?. KO 7 1 . 032 l .0 595.000 595.000 5RK08 . 2 -419 18 .0 . 427.944 42 7.944 TU.N09 5 . 875 52 .0 309.192 3 0 9 . 1 9 2 TUMO 1 .012 1 . 0 230.000 230-000 TLN1 1 1 .023 5 .0 84.799 84. 799 ELE 12 1 . 036 9 .0 74.333 74. 333 EL E l 3 1 .029 5 .0. 106.599 106.599 ELE14 1 .018 4 .0 83.000 83. 000 f..r IS 4 .461 4 6 ~ .0 180.195 180.195 2 F ' . T l 6. 3 .46 7 33 .0 260.151 260.151 2 F K T 1 7 2 . 1 76 10 .0 323.500 323. 5 0 0 - • - 1 1 8 1 . C o 9 3 . 0 427.333 4 2 7.333 DRV 19 1 .049 2 .0 4 5 7.000 457. 000 a:'V2C 4 .415 . '._ .20 .. .. .0 _ . 381.149 331.149 0PV21 2 .322 13 . 0 454.845 454.845 'ISV22 1 .124 3 .0 764.666 764.666 .> A-2 3 2 . 1 1 2 8 .0 257.750 257.750 CHA24 1 .058 4 .0 268.250 268.250 CHA25 1 . C O O 1 1 100.0 .000 . 0 0 0 > . . r.i 1 .. . .108 I C . -0 . 199.799 199.799 C1-A27 1 .050 9 .0 1 0 3 . I l l 103. U l CFA28 A . 8 3 4 67 .0 228.671 228.671 1 M „ r 2 9 3 . 7 3 2 27 . 0 497.962 4 9 7 . 9 o 2 I U ? E 3 .195 6 1 .0 58.754 5 8. 754 ERA K 2 .452 20 .0 415.649 415.649 - TUNE 5 . .__ .911 ... 58 .0... 288.482 .... 288.432 . :._ 2 E LE C .53 4 64 .0 153.434 153.434 2 fR.Qf; A . 7 1 3 46 .0 2.84.825 284.325 2 C R I V . 9 1 1 38 .0 440.631 440.631 1 OiA 3 5 i . 16 4 9 o 1 1.0 2 1 5 . 9 7 9 216. 183 1 " A.: R . 7 3 2 2 7 .0 49 7 .962 497.962 1 '. " s 5 . 1 6 7. 177 . „ _ _ 1... . 5 . 17. 344 ._. 17.443 .. . . . . T SA i; i ' i 5 .634 342 .0 302.534 302.534 9 .'• R •: 6 1 . 34 9 52 1 1.9 476.672 486.019 2 - A p T 7 1 .517 413 2C9 50. 6 67.450 136. 553 i 1 0 1.61.3 490 286 58.3 60.46 7 145.240 3 JA ' 'RACE T IKE/TRANS AVERAGE T I ME/TRANS EXCLUDINC ZERO ENTRIES O 1 6 4 .< o i i 2 ? N -I —« C • O O O t < m io -c c • o o o o c I I 1 I I — O O — f (s, .© ^ sr> o o *f if. ^ r I 1/1 ^ UN ' o o o o o o •JI fj C J ffl — -< I I I >0 f i if» f^- h-. « c ^ •*> c •C sT -J" rrO O IA Ifl N O o o o o e J r- O f-1 -O C O — n . -f .j- in m o o l <N o « c O I O •* d o c> o o c c -/ .j- <"> J"1 O O- % -» JC -G IT ^ r C — r « s - -C -O O O O O O o o .** >c e-a 1 O >J JJ (> NT- C C* O O o o o o o ( 7- O Cr O O I 3 O C O l U t > U > O f l i N /l 1. r l -C C O f"i I- o -. J J r . j P  O O O O I o c o o — .; — — o <7 r ^ f i rft -J -J ? J M N o o o o O c .Vj -1 <~"1 NT* »f -I > A SU-fMARY CF THE UTILIZATION OF FACILITIES <CDL" FAC«) FULLWCRC MATRIX 8 0 18360 18360 18360 18360 18360 18360 13360 13360 18360 — * z 0 11160 11160 11160 11160 11 160 11160 11160 11 160 9720 3 0 . .. .. 72C0 . 7200 . 7200 7200 .. _. . 7200 7200 72O0 7200 8440 A 0 5345 2867 5 841 3895 4684 54 19 4207 3528 1553 5 0 •'-7 A 2 398 611 540 650 752 584 489 7 9 0 4 SO 337 440 450 440 460 450 1^ A-i . ^ 5 4 0 . . ' 7 5 4 .402 . 763 _ 60 5. 1 384 361 1 126 .. 540 .. 894 . 540. 1130 5572 0 540 . 1063 2966 116 .. 270 807 MOW/COLUMN . 1 . 2 3 11 18360 9720 8640 635 12 16360 4860 13500 1 6 9 4 13 18360 4860 13500 zXL. 14 .18360 4860 13500 -12 15 18360 11160 7200 3344 16 18360 18360 0 -18 17 18360 18360 0 -18 13360 ld360 0 19 18360 183O0 0 -1 8 13360 18350 73 1080 0 225 125 1080 1883 0 666 1111 1080 0 0 -3 0 0 1080 4 6 4 450 3518 0 5 4 0 _105_2_ 0 292 . - 0 . 0 0 0 450 .. 0 . 0 0 P_ 0 450 0 . 0 0 2_ 0 450 0 0 0 0_ 450 :. 0 RCW/COLUMN 1 18360 0 22 . 18360 18360 2 _ 19360 Q_ 18360 0 18360 0 1836C 4 ' k ' O 18360 4 3-0 1S360 1B360 18360 16360 18360 18360 13500 13500 10061 7063 9235 7197 3231 6022 1694 -12 . 547 . 33'. 502 .391 _ ..175 . 327 ...125 0 ROWS 6-10, COLUMNS 21-30 ARE ZERO 13500 -12 ROWS 1-10, COLUMNS 31-50 ARE ZERO 18360 18 360 1.3 340 3360 13 3 4 0 18360 59 18350 0 0 0 0 0 0 18360 18360 13360 18360 18360 18360 . . 220 1578 . .973 - -. .367..... 459 495 . 11 35 52 19 24 26 ROW'S 6-10. CCLUHNS 51-60 ARE ZERO 0 18360 18360 8 34 9 481 16360 53J6 286 13360 4296 233 IE 360 11 160 7? OA 13360 4860 ,.n400 13360 18360 18360 13360 18360 18360 18360 18360 18360 13360 18360 18 360 18 360 13360 4703 1364 -18 653 101 0 ROWS 6-10, COLUMNS 61-70 ARE ZERO -18 0 -18 0 -18 0 -16 0 -18 0 o O N NJ-1 ..A. GRAPH .OF...SERVICE_TIMES_F.OR._EACH.._GENE.RAL..JOB (V 'SERVICE TIME IS MIN.) 1200 1170 1140 1110 1080 1050 1020 990 960 030 900 8 70 840 810 760 750 720 690 660 630 600 670 540 510 480 450 420 _a9fi_ + ++ + + +• +++ + + + + + 3ft0 330 300 270 240 _210_ + + + + + + 18G 150 120 90 60 + + + + + + + + + + O ON + +•+ + + + + + + +• L + + + + USE «• + + +++• h4- + + + +++ + ++++ + ++ + +-+-f + +++ + + 4- + + + + TUNE ELEC F RON f+++ + + + + + + + 4- + *- + + + + + + + + *-+- + -*-"* DRIV CHAS MAJR 1A .A GRAPH OF ..SERVICE TIMES. FOR . SPEC I Al PHASES ..OF...JOB ._PROCE SSING_ •LPTS' IS TIME TO OBTAIN LOCAL PARTS ONLY 'THRU' IS SERV TIME FOR JOB IN AMD OUT QF SHOP 1200 117C 1 140 1110 1 WARE' IS TIME TO OBTAIN WAREHOUSE PARTS ONLY 1 PART• IS TIME TO OBTAIN ALL PARTS FOR ALL JOBS •FACL* IS TIME JOB WAITS TO OBTAIN R ECD. F AC I LI T 1 ES .. 1CB0 1050 1020 990 S60 . _9.3.Q_ 90 0 870 .. £40 810 780 750 720 690 660 630 600 570 540 510 480' 450 420 _3.1C_ + +• + •• + *• 36C 330 300 270 24C 210 + + + + +• + + + 180 150 120 9C 60 30 + + + + O *+• + +- + +-*••• + + +• + + + + +••••*•++ + •+ + LPTS THRU !•*• + + +• + «-+•+••++••++•-+ + ••+•+ WARE PART ••++++ + + + + + ' FACL i . A 100 93 96 S4 92 90 83 86 + + +•++ +++ . A GRAPH. OF.. DELAYS .AS...PERCENT._OF....TOTAL....T.I.HE...IN_SH0P._ 84 82 80 78 76 74 72 70 68 66 6 4 60 58 56 54 52 _5JC_ 48 4 6 44 42 40 33 36 34 32 30 28 26 + + 4- • + + + + ++ + + *• + • • • 24 22 20 18 16 _L4_ 12 + 10 • : 3 + "6 + 4 '•• 2 4 H ON . ca + + + + + 4- + -fr+ + + +- + + + PART •++++++++•++• + +++•+ + + ++ FACL SERV «-+ + +++ ++• + THRU Q U E U E S O Q U E US MA X I M U M A V E R A G E T O T A L Z E R O P E R C E N T A V E R A G E S A V E R A G E T A 3 L E C U R R E N T COT* T E N T S C O N T E N T S E N T R l E S E N T R I E S Z E R O S T I M E / T R A N S T I M E / T K A N S N U M B E R C O N T E N T S l U 3 0 ? 3 . 2 1 6 7 6 . 0 5 2 . 2 2 3 5 2 . 2 2 3 B R <C 6 1 . 0 0 7 1 . 0 1 4 1 . 0 0 0 1 4 1 . 0 0 0 BR K G 7 1 . 0 0 6 1 . 0 1 1 3 . 0 0 0 1 1 3 . 0 0 0 B R K 0 3 3 . 4 4 5 2 4 . 0 3 4 0 . 6 8 3 3 4 0 . 5 6 3 1 T U ' I 0 9 6 1 . 3 0 0 6 0 . 0 3 9 8 . 1 1 6 3 9 8 . 1 1 6 1 T y M O 1 . 0 2 6 1 . 0 4 7 9 . 0 0 0 4 7 9 . 0 0 0 T u M 1 1 . 0 7 8 6 . 0 2 3 8 . 8 3 3 2 3 8 . 8 3 3 E l E 1 2 2 . 1 3 2 4 . 0 ' 6 0 6 . 2 5 0 6 0 6 . 2 5 0 S l i ' 1 3 2 . 1 4 0 8 . 0 3 2 3 . 0 0 0 3 2 3 . 0 0 0 2 E L : 1 4 1 . 0 4 2 5 . 0 1 5 4 . 7 9 9 1 5 4 . 7 9 9 E L ! 1 5 6 . 5 6 4 51 . 0 3 4 7 . 2 1 5 3 4 7 . 2 1 5 FP T ' ri 3 . 7 0 6 3 8 . 0 3 4 1 . 3 9 4 3 4 1 . 3 9 4 3 F^ 7 I 7 2 . 1 1 7 1 3 . 0 1 6 5 . 6 1 5 1 6 5 . 6 1 5 F R T 13 1 . 0 6 0 3 . 0 3 1 1 . 6 6 6 3 1 1 . 6 6 6 OK V I 9 2 . 1 6 4 4 . 0 7 0 7 . 0 0 0 7 0 7 . 0 0 0 D r t V : , 0 3 . 6 0 9 21 . 0 5 3 3 . 0 0 0 5 3 3 . 0 0 0 OrV. 1 3 . 4 4 0 1 3 . 0 6 2 2 . 6 1 5 6 2 2 . 6 1 5 OR V 2 2 1 . ( 6 2 3 . 0 3 3 5 . 3 3 3 3 3 5 . 3 3 3 C H A 2 3 2 . 1 4 3 1 1 . 0 2 3 9 . 0 9 0 2 3 9 . 0 9 0 2 C H A 2 4 1 . 0 1 2 4 . 0 5 5 . 2 5 0 5 5 . 2 5 0 C r i A . : 5 1 . 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 . 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 C H A . ! 6 1 . 1 1 2 1 1 . 0 1 8 8 . 6 3 6 1 8 8 . 6 3 6 C H A ^ 7 1 • 1 0 5 1 1 . 0 1 7 6 . 0 0 0 1 7 6 . 0 0 0 I C H A 2 3 5 1 . 2 6 9 7 9 . 0 2 9 5 . 0 3 7 2 9 5 . 0 3 7 2 M J R 2 9 5 1 . 1 9 3 3 0 . 0 7 3 0 . 6 3 3 7 3 0 . 6 3 3 I L U 5 E 3 . 2 1 6 7 6 . 0 5 2 . 2 2 3 5 2 . 2 2 3 6 R . 1 K 3 . 4 5 3 2 6 . 0 3 2 4 . 1 5 3 3 2 4 . 1 5 3 1 T u ••: E 6 1 . 4 0 4 6 7 . 0 3 8 5 . 0 5 9 3 8 5 . 0 5 9 1 E L : C 7 1 . 2 7 9 6 8 . 0 3 4 5 . 4 5 5 3 4 5 . 4 5 5 2 F RON A . 6 7 4 5 4 . 0 2 9 7 . 4 2 5 2 9 7 . 4 2 5 3 OH IV 5 1 . 2 6 7 4 1 . 0 5 6 7 . 5 8 5 5 6 7 . 5 3 5 C K A S 6 1 . 6 4 2 1 1 8 2 1 . 6 2 5 5 . 6 7 7 2 6 0 . 0 8 6 5 K '. J R 5 1 . 1 9 3 3 0 . 0 7 3 0 - 6 3 3 7 3 0 . 6 3 3 1 L . - T S 4 . 1 6 9 1 9 5 2 1 . 0 1 5 . 9 3 8 1 6 . 1 0 3 T- R >J 2 0 3 . 3 5 9 3 9 8 . 0 3 8 5 . 6 9 3 3 8 5 . 6 9 3 13 v*' .'• ^ E 7 1. 2 2 6 5 9 2 3 . 3 3 8 1 . 6 4 4 3 9 5 . 0 3 4 2 ; A • 7 9 1 . 3 9 5 4 8 0 2 5 a 5 3 . 7 5 3 . 3 8 5 1 1 5 . 4 2 7 2 r '- . 1. 1 5 3 . 62 5 6 4 6 2 6 5 4 1 . 0 1 0 3 . 9 0 3 1 8 4 . 8 4 9 7 T Ay AO: T ! M ; / 7 . - A . N S - A V S R A C E T I M E / T R A N S E XC L UO I NG Z E R O E N T R I E S • h-' vO T A 6 L E 10 E N T R I E S IN T A B L E M E AN ARCUMENT 1 6 2 . 5 4 0 STANDARD D E V I A T I O N 3 * 3 . 0 0 0 SUH OF ARGUMENTS 6 2 5 7 ( 1 . 0 0 0 N O N - W E 1 C H T C 0 U P P E S L I M I T - 3 C 0 - 2 7 0 - 2 4 0 -210 - 1 ftn fRfcGUtNCY 10 TOTAL 2 . 5 9 1 . 0 3 . 2 5 . 5 1 1 . 0 1 CUMULATI VE PERCENT A'r.E 2 . 5 3 . 6 3 . 8 A . A 5 . 4 C U M U L A T I V E REMAINDER 9 7 . 4 9 6 . 3 9 6 . 1 9 5 . 5 9 4 . 5 - 1 5 0 - 1 2 0 - 9 0 - 6 0 - 3 0 10 16 39 1 . 8 1 2 . 0 7 2 . 5 9 4 . 1 5 10.1? 11 . 4 2 7 . 2 9 . 3 1 1 . 9 1 6 . 1 2 6 . 2 3 7 . 6 9 2 . 7 9 0 . 6 8 8 . 0 6 3 . 8 7 3 . 7 6 2 . 3 MULT I P L E O f l i t A.N - 1 .345 - 1 . 6 6 1 - 1 . 4 7 6 - 1 . 2 9 1 - 1 . 1 0 7 - . 92 2 - . 7 3 8 - . 5 5 3 - . 3 6 9 - . 1 8 4 - . 0 0 0 DEVI AT l_p-J__ PROM MFA.N - 1 . 3 4 8 - 1 . 2 6 1 - 1 . 1 7 3 - 1 . 0 R 6 )98 - . « 1 1 - . 8 2 3 - . 7 3 6 - . 6 4 9 - . 5 6 1 - . 4 7 3 30 60 90 1 2 0 1 5 0 ! 80 2 10 2 4 0 2 7 0 3 0 0 3 3 0 3 50 3 9 3 4 2 0 4 5 0 4 9 0 5 1 0 5 4 0 5 7 0 4 0 0 6 30 4 6 0 6 9 0 H 2 _ 7 5 0 7 8 0 8 1 0 8 4 0 B 7 0 9 f 0 9 30 9 6 0 9 5 0 10 20 10 50 10 30 1110 1 1 4 0 1170 120'J 1230 24 2 3 16 2 4 19 6 . 2 3 5 . 9 7 4 . 1 5 6 . 2 3 4 . 9 3 3 . 5 3 2 . 8 5 1 . 0 3 2 . 3 3 1 . 8 1 1 . 2 9 1 . 0 3 1 . 0 3 1 . 5 5 1 . 0 3 2 . 3 3 1 . 0 3 1 . 0 3 . 0 0 1 . 2 9 1 . 0 3 1 . 0 3 1 . 2 9 1 . 5 5 . 5 1 . 5 1 . 7 7 . 7 7 . 2 5 . 2 5 . 0 0 . 2 5 . 2 5 . 0 0 . 2 5 . o o . 0 0 4 3 . 8 4 9 . 8 5 4 . 0 6 0 . 2 6 5 . 1 6 8 . 8 7 1 . 7 2 . 7 7 5 . 0 7 6 . 8 7 8 . 1 7 9 . 2 8 0 . 2 " 1 . 8 8 2 . 8 6 5 . 1 8 4 . 2 8 7 . 2 8 7 . 2 8 8 . 5 8 9 . 6 9 0 . 4 9 1 . 9 9 ' 4 . 0 9 4 . 5 9 5 . 3 9 6 . 1 9 6 . 3 9 6 . 8 9 7 . 1 9 7 . 4 5 7 . 6 9 S . 7 9 8 . 7 9 B . 7 5 6 . 1 5 0 . 1 4 5 . 9 3 9 . 7 3 4 . 8 _ 3 I 2 8 . 3 2 7 . 2 2 4 . 9 2 3 . 1 2 1 . 8 2 0 . 7 1 9 . 7 1 8 . 1 1 7 . 1 1 4 . 8 1 3 . 7 1 7 . 7 1 2 . 7 1 1 . 4 1 0 . 3 9 . 3 8 . 0 6 . 4 5 . 9 5 . 4 2 . 8 2 . 5 2 . 3 2 . 0 2 . 0 1 . 5 1 . 5 1 . 2 1 . 2 1 . 2 1 . 2 . 1 3 4 . 3 6 9 . 5 5 3 . 7 3 8 . 9 2 2 I. 1 0 7 1 . 2 9 1 1. 4 7 6 1 . 6 6 1 1 . 8 4 5 2 . 0 3 0 * I 2 . 3 9 9 2 . 5 8 3 2 . 7 6 8 2 . 9 5 3 3 . 1 3 7 _ J - 3 Z 2 _ 3 . 5 0 6 3 . 6 9 I 3 - 3 7 5 4 . 0 6 0 4 . 2 4 5 4 . 4 2 9 4 . M 4 4 . 7 9 8 4 . 9 6 3 5 . 167 5 . 352 5 . 7 2 1 5 . 9 0 6 6 . 0 9 0 6 . 2 7 5 6 . 4 5 9 _ 6 ^ 6 4 4 _ 6 . 6 2 9 7 . 0 1 3 7 . 198 7 . 3 8 2 7 . 5 6 7 7 . 7 5 1 - . 3 06 - . 2 9 8 - . 2 1 1 - . 1 2 4 - . 0 3 6 . 0 5 0 .'l~3R . 2 2 5 . 3 11 . 4 0 0 . 4 9 8 . 5 7 * . 661 . 7 5 0 .838 . 9 2 5 1 . 0 1 1 1 . 1 0 0 1 . 1 8 7 1 . 2 7 5 1 . 3 6 2 1 . 4 5 0 1 .517 <> 15_ 1 - 7 1 2 1 . 8 0 0 I . E 87 1 . 9 7 5 2 . 0 62 2 . 1 5 0 2 . 2 3 7 2 . . ' 2 4 2 . 4 1 2 2.499 2 . 5 6 7 2-674 2 . 7 6 2 2.il'.9 2 . 1 3 7 3 . 0 2 4 3 . I 12 3 • 1 99 1 2 9 0 0 . 0 0 9 8 . 7 1 . 2 7 . 9 3 6 . 3 . 2 0 7 1 3 2 0 1 . 2 5 9 8 . 9 1 . 0 8 . 1 2 1 3 . 3 7 4 1 3 5 0 0 . 0 0 9 8 . 9 1 . 0 8 . 3 0 5 3 . 4 6 1 1 3 8 0 0 . C O 9 8 . 9 1 . 0 8 . 4 9 0 3 . 5 4 9 1 4 1 0 0 . 0 0 9 8 . 9 1 . 0 8 . 6 7 4 3 . 6 3 6 14 4 0 Q . 0 0 9_8. 9 1 . 0 8 . 6 5 9 3 . 7 2 4 C V e v F L C w 4 1 . 0 3 AVE > ACE V A L U E O f UVfcRFLO'w 1 8 0 1 . 7 5 1 8 1 7 1 c c O >- o S 3 x ~t O O O ^ O -fc rt O s/* ~ I- -O «V to /- •* C O O r~ o C •c O r- >^> n rj -J-^ t~ m oo°°i o o O -O 3 J" -r — i ' v o - a >r O CD O N •a t~-O IN- -0 , <M -o j-O O CO • u% o; -r> -o o v. <B w o C J- O ; t-» ~t fv ti> O O O O f - ~ r - 0 0 ( N ; 0 o -5 O N * ri ' lA c vr. - • - • *\ r- r~,-< Is-o -a o c-1.'' r-J o - - - 1 - IA e o o o o o o o a o o o o O O o o o o r- O O O < o o o > o o o o o -o o o o o •O V t> H> O o o o o « c O O O O rt O — O - « -O ' • N o o o -o a \ii ^ r- to o* c o o ,-1 J> O <S« O o -> o •O C <M t*l -» -o co 2 "* o o a — *-» •o c t -rt urv (A o O "f *>-•O — **M rt >ft o o c o o c •6 o rt e l f - o o o o o c / - • 4 4 . +. .. .. A GRAPH CF SERVICE .TIMES...FOR.EACH GENERAL JOB (Y=SEfWICE TIME .IN MIN.) + 4 + + 4 . 12C0 4 , . _ . .. _ _ 1170 + 1140 4 11)0 • l oao 4 1050 4 1020 4 990 4 060 4 930 4 SCO 4 £70 4 • . 840 + 310 4 • 78 0 4 7 SO 4 72 0 4 4 + 4 4 600 4 ' 4 4 _ _ .. 66 0 4 ; . . _'. ,.,. 4 * 430 4 +" 4 600 4 4 4 4 4 4 540 •*• 4 4 4 4 4 + 510 + 4 4 4 4 460 + 4 4 + 4 4 >0 4 4 4 4 4 420 + 4 4 + 4 300 + 4 4 4 4 360 + 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 3 30 4 4- 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 .... 3G0 + 4- 4- + 4- 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 ' 4 2 70 + 4 - 4 - + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 240 4 4 - 4 - 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 21 0 4 + 4- 4 - 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 - 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 l ' ;0 +• + + 4 4 4 4 4 4- 4 4 4 4 4 4 1*0 * . . . + + . . . . , - + + . 4 4 . 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 90 • 4 4 - 4 - + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 60 4 4 4 + - 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 •^o 4 4-4-4- 4 4 - 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 0 + t + + + t+ T-+4 + 4 + f + + t + + + + f 4 + 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 K + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 1 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 LUSF. B*AK TUNE £ LEC FRON DRIV CHAS M A JR r—1 A GRAPH OF SERVICE TIMES FOR SPECIAL PHASES OF JOB PROCESSING •LPTS' IS TIME TO OBTAIN LOCAL PARTS ONLY • 'WARE' I S TI ME TO OBTAIN WAREHOUSE PARTS ONLY + 'PART' IS TIME TO OBTAIN ALL PARTS FOR ALL JOBS .. 1200 + . . . . . ' F A C L ' I s TIME J03 WAITS TC OBTAIN REQO FACILIT IES 1170 1140 + 1 U O + 1CB0 +• 1050 + . 1020 + _ : . 990 960 * 9 3 " + 400 • 870 4-840 +• 810 + 760 • 750 4 720 + . 690 66 0 + 630 + 600 4 570 4 540 510 480 450 420 390 360 330 300 270 240 .210 160 150 120 90 60 30 4-4 + 4-4- + 0 *4 LPTS 44++++++++++++++++++++4 THRU WARE PART FACL I B 96 + 4 4 N 94 + * 4 4 . 92 • . A CRAPH OF DELAYS AS PERCENT OF TOTAL TIME IN SHOP 90 + 4 4 88 4 _ 4 86 + 4 4 64 4 4 4 82 + 4 4 . . . ,. , 80 4 . ' + 4 76 + 4 4 76 + 4 4 74 4 4 4 72 4 4 70 + 4 4 68 4 4 4 66 4 4 4 64 +• 4 4 62 4 4 4 60 4 4 4 58 + 4 4 . . 56 4 . . _ '.„ 4 4 54 + 4 4 52 4 4 4 50 4 4 4 48 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 4 JJ . 44 4 4 4 4 4 42 4 4 4 4 4 40 4 4 4 4 4 33 4 4 4 4 4 36 4 4 4 4 4 34 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 32 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 30 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 4- 4 4 4 4 4 4 7 6 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 24 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 22 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 .20 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 13 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 16 4 i > 4 4 4 4 4 4 • 4 4 4 14 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 12 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 10 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 - 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 . 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 +++++++ • ++•-*• + + ++ + + FACL -P-SERV THRU "7 01 **************************************** * * * QUEUES * * * ***********************<:**************** M A X I M U M A V E P A G E T O T A L Z C P O P E R C E N T A V E R A G E S A V L R A G E T A B L E C U R R E N T C O N T E N T S C O N T E N T S E N T R l ES E N T R I E S Z E R O S T I M E / T R A N S TI M E / T R A N S N U M B E R C O N T E N T S 1 tJhC 7. 3 .71 5 7 1 . 0 6 3 . 6 9 0 6 8 . 6 9 0 1 . 0 0 0 1 . 0 1 8 . 0 0 0 1 3 . 0 0 0 t (•.'. C 8 2 . 34 2 1 7 . 0 3 7 0 . 1 1 7 3 7 0 . 1 1 7 l 1 U U 9 5 . 8 7 3 5 3 . 0 3 0 4 . 4 7 1 3 0 4 . 4 7 1 2 T u ' - l ' J 1 • f 0 7 1 . 0 1 4 6 . 0 0 0 1 4 o . 0 0 0 T I . ' M 1 1 . 0 1 3 6 : 0 5 7 . 0 0 0 5 7 . 0 0 0 H - 1 2 1 . r i b 5 . 0 2 7 9 . 7 9 9 2 7 9 . 7 9 9 t L : ! 3 1 . 0 4 1 . 0 1 5 ' . . 1 9 9 1 6 4 . 1 9 9 E l f . 1 4 1 . 0 1 •-, 4 . 0 6 6 . 5 0 0 6 6 . 5 0 0 £ t . ' 1 5 4 . 5 H 4 4 6 . 0 2 3 3 . 4 7 3 2 3 3 . 4 7 0 1 ' • U U . 4 3 8 3 3 . 0 2 4 3 . 9 6 9 2 4 3 . 9 0 9 2 .- i- T 1 7 2 . 1 5 9 1 0 . n 3 1 0 . 8 9 9 3 1 0 . 6 9 9 F .- T i 3 1 . 0 2 5 . 0 1 5 4 . 6 6 6 1 5H . 6 6 6 L r V 1 V . 1 . 0 2 5 2 . 0 2 3 7 . 5 0 0 2J7. 5 0 0 0 - 2 . 3 8 1 2 0 . 0 3 5 0 . 3 9 9 3 5 0 . 3 9 9 OR V 2 1 2 - 3 2 8 1 3 . 0 4o>3. 4 6 1 4 6 3 . 4 6 1 I 0 - V 2 2 1 . 1 1 3 3 . 0 7 2 2 . 6 6 6 7 2 2 - 6 6 6 C H A 2 3 2 . 1 3 5 8 . 0 3 1 1 . 8 7 5 3 1 1 . 8 7 3 ( ' - . 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N 3 . . 6 3 3 ' 4 6 . 0 2 5 2 . 6 9 5 2 5 2 . 6 9 5 2 o ••, I V 3 . 8 5 3 3 8 . 0 4 1 2 . 5 2 6 4 1 2 . 5 2 6 1 C - ; A s 7 i . ;• o 6 99 1 1 . 0 2 2 3 . 7 2 7 2 2 6 . 0 1 0 2 -'• J r- A . 3 5 6 2 7 . 0 6 1 0 . 0 0 0 6 1 0 . 0 0 0 1 ' L R T f , 7 . 1 5 5 1 6 4 1 . 6 1 7 . 4 5 1 1 7 . 5 5 8 T . - F tj 1 4 5 . 8 ' - 0 3 4 2 . 0 3 1 3 . 5 9 3 3 1 3 . 5 9 3 1 0 W Al - E 8 1 . 4 9 3 5 6 . 0 4 9 1 . 3 2 1 4 9 1 . 3 2 1 5 p i : - - i 9 1 . 6 5 4 . 4 1 9 2 2 3 5 3 . 2 7 2 . 4 9 6 1 5 4 . 9 7 9 5 F . - . r . i 1 1 1 . 5 6 9 5 0 5 3 2 9 6 5 . 1 5 7 . 0 7 1 1 6 3 . 7 5 5 1 S f i - A G E T IM.fc/T F A N S = A V r R A G E T I "IF / I R A N S E X C L U D I N G Z E R O E N T R I E S 2. A 176 >: o ZD H Z y C T. N* r~ c- c u" ~! j] 3 T,r- «/. -/ IN <\ 1 I I I I I ^t-O'-J-Jf -O "O —( rt ^  f- O •if , •> -~ O -o — O «\ £ O j l.- ~ J< -V Vi N .1 O — 'C uv u" v." r\ Clff u" (J- tv C J-; <C r- f- iTi -C .f r- o> 7 l I" N N 1 (V -1 t1 c-l-< D O J • N O f ) ^ O N f - '• - t r~ <• •J N M f l J ,» :* < r\l ^ U C C O O O I si* r» e •« "3- o ^ ^ O T l ^ - 4 1 7 - N J N O D 0 ' ! T3 /\ "V C fi -y 1* (Tl -.; C ^ • - • l / M J - ) C ? - l N O ^ O;—• j-l .> -M j; ! T f- C <**• j o <r o-o <i i/> si" o -c ' CJ 1*1 fv ^ : i- c r < i C C c ; *D o o o c o c o c c> c. c »1 1' H V h ^ N i> m i O C* r^, r • it.T •* s ^ -n C •c f~ e ? e — r> <, • I/-, i/\ ui i*"i tri u-;ui i/i a~ j i u C C- <L» C o C - i . . i LT- (M j i r 0- C J - O C C <: o car O •MOO-** Nm e fi ni rt p- rt .j -f i J O O (- h if lA IV. 17- t> C ' J f- O C O 1 7 7 c o c — c •» O r.- o — ii- C vf c c (S, •A C . O O C -H o c - O O C- —< -J IT - M O N C l f r . (V - tA — n - (V O IT. s * j \ - IT 0 o c o w c- o — cs ft 4 «A O O O O 1 ,0 o OS <D o o o o o o o o o o o c o c o o o o o o o o o o cc ^ JS. 1% o o O f •coo. . c o o o . r -I" O 10 . o o o o « C O O C O f< o a; J ^ — 00 c w JI JJ IS- (Q O- O ,0 O O 0 0 0 o -r S ir »>j o 0 0 0 C C- - 3 •A f - l A GkfPH OF SERVICE TIMES F(Ik EACH GENERAL JOB <Y*SERVICE TIME IN MIN.) c 12or- • 1 1 7C • 1 1 4 '! * 111 r t -lCfc'j 10 50 1020 99C •Jt(. 900 * :-:7{, • E 4 0 + 210 • 7 SO • 7 50 • 720 650 6 6 0 6 30 6CC 5 1 0 A£C 450 42 0 39 0 260 27 0 24 0 ?1 C 150 120 90-+ + + + t * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * BR AK TUNE ELEC F RON t * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ORIV CHAS MAJR H 00-0 f'F SEHVICF TIMES FOR SPECIAL PHASES OF JOD PROCESSING + •LPTS IS TIME TO OBTAIN LOCAL PARTS ONLY • ' T 1 ! IS SF^V TVM r-V* jr;p. IN AND OUT OF SHOP + •WAR f- IS T I « E T(J OBTAIN WAREHOUSE PARTS ONLY + •PART IS TIME TO OBTAIN ALL PAPTS FOR ALL JOBS • 12CC + •FACL IS TINF J03 WAITS TO OBTAIN RfQO FACILIT IES J 1 70 + i 14C + • 11 IP + 1 1. '. 4 1C50 • 1020 4 4 460 • 5 3 0 4 OCC + ft 70 • b « 0 4 « U ; 4 7fcc: • 7 5-'' 4 72 0 + 69 0 + 6 6 0 + 6 30 4 6C-C 4 670 4 5 4 0 4 5 K 4 4fcf/ 4 +• + 4 + 4 50 4 + + 420 4 4 + 3 9 0 4 4 4 36 0 4 4 4 3 3 0 4 4 4 5 0 C 4 4 444- 4 4 27C. 4 4 4- 4- 4 240 4 4 4 4 4 210 4 4 + + 4 16 0 4 4 4 4 4 15C 4 4 4 4 4 . . 120 -*• 4 4 4 4 90 4 4 4 4 4 60 4 4 4 4 4 + + + + 3 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 44-44 . -•4 +*++4*44* LPTS • 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 - 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 TH^ U WAP.E PART FACL XA H1 r*2 + A G2APH OF CtfLAYS AS PERCENT OF TOTAL TIME IN SHOP or. + 4 + H % • 4 + iiC 4 + d4 4 + + H2 • 4 4 9.0 + 4 + 76 + + +• 76 4- + + 74 4 + + 72 4 + 4 -70 4 4 4 t.-l + + + 6 6 4 + +-+ + + f.? + 4 + L 0 4 + +• 5 ft 4 + + 56 4 + 4 -- 64 4 + + 52 + + + 50 f 4 + 4 4 /•6 + 4 + ++++++++ + + 4 4 4 + 0 4 + + + + ?.y. 4 4 4 + 4 -3 6 +• 4 4 4 4 -J4 4 4 - 4 4 + 32 4 4 4 4 - + j *"J 4 4 4 + 4 2 4 + 4 + 4 * * 4 + + 4 + + • V r. f 4 4-+ 4+ 4 + 4 + 4 4 4 + 2 4 4 - 4 4 + + 4 4 + ? i + 4 + + + 4 4 4 +• r '"J 4 f 4 4 + + 4 4 + 1 o 4 4 4 4 4 + + + + If, 4 + 4 4 + + + 4 + 1/- 4 4 - 4 4 + 4 + 4 4 -12 4 4 + 4 + 4 4 4- 4 I' J 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 + 'j 4 + 4 4 + ' 4 4 + + f, 4. + + 4 4 + 4 4 + 4 4 4 *• 4 + 4 + + 2 4 4 4 4 + + + 4 + 0 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 * 4 + 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 + 4 + + + + + h+++++++++++++++ PART FACL SFP.V THPU 2 A s ) H 03->-* * * QUEUCS * * * : o CJUEUE KAXIKUK AVERAGE TOTAL ZERO PERCENT AVFRAGE $ AV tKAG E TABLE CURRENT CONTENTS CONTENTS ENTR1ES ENTRIES ZEROS TI MF / TRANS TIME/TRANS NUMBER CONT ENTS LUBC2 3 . 263 83 .0 58.289 58.289 B.KKC6 1 . 000 1 . 0 16.000 1b -000 BR KG 7 1 . 00 7 1 .0 131.000 13 1. 000 SRK08 2 . 351 27 .0 2 39 .0 7 4 239.074 1 TU.\09 4 .894 60 . 0 2 73. 766 273.756 TUN 1 0 1 .017 1 . 0 328.000 328. 000 TU.M 1 2 . 050 6 .0 154 .66 6 154. t>6 6 ELE12 1 .039 6 .0 119.500 119.5U0 EIE13 2 . 100 8 . 0 230.750 230- 750 2 ELF 14 1 . 026 5 . 0 96.000 96.000 ELI- 16 6 .564 5 1 .0 20 3. 41 1 203.4 11 FR T 1 6 ? . 600 3 8 .0 290.026 290.O^b I FRT 17 2 . 142 13 . 0 201.307 201 .307 F « U 8 1 .04 3 3 . 0 267.666 2 0 7 . 0 6 6 D^Vl'V 1 . C93 4 . 0 431.500 431.500 1 0RV20 3 .450 21 . 0 393.809 393.809 0RV21 3 .319 13 . 0 451.845 451. 845 0RV2 2 1 .031 3 . 0 195.666 195-606 CH A? '3 2 . 10 9 1 1 . 0 183.464 183.454 1 CM.'. 2 4 2 .02 7 4 .0 126.000 126. 000 CHA25 1 . 000 2 2 1 0 0 . 0 .000 .000 CHA26 1 .159 1 1 . 0 266. 363 256.353 1 C H A 2 7 1 . C62 11 .0 103.9C9 103.909 1 CHA23 5 1.158 79 . 0 269.329 269.329 2 r'Jr'29 4 .874 30 . 0 53 6.43 3 535.433 1 I U5E 3 .263 83 .0 58.289 58.269 GR AK 2 .359 29 . 0 227.655 227.o55 1 TUI.E 5 .962 67 .0 263. 910 263. 910 EL EC 5 . 730 70 ' .0 191 .671 191-671 2 r-RC: 4 .78 6 54 .0 267. 425 26 7.42 5 1 !.•;< I V 4 . 896 41 .0 40 1. 390 401- 39 0 1 CrAS 1.517 118 2 1.6 236.203 240.275 5 M A J R 4 .374 30 .0 536.433 635.433 I LPTS 4 . 143 208 4 1.9 12.701 12.950 T HF'J 15 6.413 398 . 0 296.904 295.904 11 WAS- E 7 1.104 59 .0 343.644 343.644 3 RAF T 7 1.247 492 2 58 52.4 46.579 97.935 3 F ACL 12 1.961 59 9 344 57.4 60.133 141.254 4 SAVERAGE TIME/TRANS = AVERAGE TIKE/TRANS EXCLUDING ZERO ENTRIES Z B I OP-^ -O r-- :r O ^ ^ r- D 3 • f a ; i-• — — o- «» "i •» IT. W. f-< a. o o c c o <r * \> >*• «*> i«-t* ^ o o o o o o o — ' - I I I ^ =: ? C — -c I fi -a o "7- • r . 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COLUMNS 3 1 - 5 0 AWE Z E P d RC1./COLUMN 51 52 53 5 4 5 5 5 4 5 7 l i 5 9 6 0 1 1 8 3 4 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 I". 160 1 4 1 6 0 1 f- l O 2 C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 c 0 3 18 360 1 8 3 6 0 1(1360 1 8 3 6 0 1 0 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 . 1 8 3 6 0 1.1160 1 K 3 6 0 1 » ? 6 0 165 1 6 7 0 1 0 4 6 45 •> 4 9 5 5 1 4 2 7 5 9 6 4 0 7 3 J 7 5 1 4 9 5 fl 9 0 56 2 6 26 2 7 14 5 3 5 3 9 7 2 7 4 f O K S 6 - 1 0 , COLUMNS 5 1 - 6 0 ARE m a SOW/COLUMN 6 1 6 2 6 3 6 4 6 5 66 . 6 7 6 6 6 9 7 0 1 1H360 18 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 0 0 l t*360 1 8 1 6 0 0 2 1 1 1 6 0 4 S 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 18. (00 1 8 3 6 0 0 3 7 y'.'.Cl u"» .... 0 0 0 n 0 _ 3 . . . r 197 4 5 3 7 1 4 9 2 - 1 8 - I B - 1 8 - 1 8 - 1 8 - 1 4 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 SOWS t - 1 0 , COLUMNS 6 1 - 7 0 ABC 2 E R U O ft O A GRAPH CF SERVICE TIMES FOR EACH GENERAL JOB (Y=SERVICE TIME IN MIN.) 1 2 0 0 1 1 7 0 1 1 4 0 1 1 10 1 0 6 0 1 0 5 0 1 0 2 0 9 4 0 9 6 0 2>r,_ voo 6 7 0 8 4 0 8 10 7 6 0 7 5 0 7 2 0 • 6 9 0 <-6 6 0 + 6 2 C • 6 0 0 • 5 4 0 + 5 1 0 + 4 4 4 4 4 60 4 4 . 4 4 5 0 + 4 4 4 2 C + 4 4 39 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 6 0 4 4 4 4 4 3 30 4 4 4 4 4 3 CO 4 4 4 4 4 2 70 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 21'' + + 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 • i;>e 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 150 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 ' 4 4 4 4 4 4 1?0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 90 *• 4 4 4 4 4 4 . 4 4 4 4 4 4 *- 4 60 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 " 4 4 4 4 4 4 20 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 * *• 4 4 0 + * . + + + + T + + + + »- + + + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + . + 4 LUFJF- BKAK TUNfc ELF.C FRUN ORIV CHAS MA JR 2 B >* J • WAKE• I S TIME TO OBTAIN WAR EHOUSE PARTS ONLY + •PART • 1 s TIME TO OBTAIN ALL PARTS FOR ALL JOBS 12CC • ' F A C E ' IS TIME J03 WAITS TO OBTAIN RECD FACI LI TIES 1 170 1 140 1 1 1 0 • A GRAPH OF SERVICE TIMES FOR SPECIAL PHASFS OF JOB PROCESSING ' L P T S ' IS TIME TO 03TAIN LOCAL PARTS ONLY TN 720 690 660 6 30 6CC 5 7J)_ SAO 510 480 4S0 420 3 90 360 330 300 270 240 210 160 150 120 90 60 30 • ••••••••••* + + + + + + +-t-+ + + ++++ + + + +4- + + + + -»- + «- + + + + + * + + + + ++++++++4- + + + + +-i LPTS TH-tU WARE PART FACL Z B 100 V 9H + 4 4 } ? 96 + 4 4 \ 9 4 4 4 92 + A GRAPH CF UELAYS AS PF.RCHNT OF TOTAL TIME IN SHOP 90 + 4 4 fl^ + 4 4 86 + 4 4 g4 4 4 e? + 4 4 so + 4 4 7u + 4 4 76 4 4 7 A + 4 4 72 +• 4 4 70 +• 4 4 *• 4 4 /j6 • 4 4 64 + 4 4 6? 4 4 4 60 + 4 4 08 4 4 4 56 4 4 54 + 4 4 52 4 4 50 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 43 4 4 4 4 46 • 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 42 4 4 4 4 4 40 + • 4 . 4 4 4 3* 4 4 4 4 4 36 4- 4 4 4 4 34 • 4 4 4 4 32 4 4 4 4 4 30 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 26 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 26 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 24 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 22 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 20 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 lb 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 16 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 14 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 12 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 10 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 8 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 6 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 K 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 PART FACL SCRV THRU 2. B oo. « OUEUES * * * *4 4 » 4 4 t 4 4 t « # 4 4 4 t H 4 « « 6 # « « 4 * « # 9 * * 4 * * 4 6»v« 3 A O'JEUE MAXIMUM AVERAGE TOTAL ZERO PERCENT AVERAGE tAVERAGr/ TABLE CURRENT CONTENTS CONTENTS EN TRIES ENTRIES ZERCS T IME/TUANS T 1ME/TRANS NUMBER CONTENTS L u n r ? A .247 69 .0 65 .855 65.855 BRKC6 1 .003 1 .0 15.CCO 1 5. CCO B RK C 8 2 • 2C 1 18 .0 211.944 211 -<)44 TUNC9 4 .5C.7 52 .0 338.172 338 .172 1 TUMO 1 .031 1 . C 946.CCO 946.CCO TUN 1 I 2 . C54 7 . .0 2 4 7.142 247.142 El. E 1 2 1 .122 6 .0 373.333 373 .833 ELE1 3 1 .041 5 .C 153.799 153.799 F L r 1 1 .02 6 4 .0 122.SCO 122.5CC ELE 15 5 . 715 46 .0 285.673 235.673 2 f R I 11 3 .542 33 . 0 302.121 302 .12 1 2 FRT1 7 2 .1 96 10 . c 361.SCO 361.500 FRT If! 1 .031 3 .0 500.666 500.666 L M V 19 1 .027 2 . 0 2 5 5 .500' 285 .500 CRV2 0 3 .512 20 . C 4 70. 059 470.099 URV2 1 2 .259 13 .0 423. CCO 423.CCO 1 DRV 2 2 1 .015 3 . 0 93.333 93.333 CSIA2 3 2 . 130 8 .0 299.750 299.750 CH-* 2 4 2 .1 09 4 .0 501.25C 501.250 CFA25 1 .CCC 1 1 100.0 .000 .000 CF.-.26 1 .135 10 . 0 249.C99 249 .099 CHA2 7 1 .1 18 9 . 0 242. U l 242 . U l CHA 28 . A .ee4 67 .0 • 242.447 242.447 MJR 29 1 .924 27 . 0 628.703 628.703 1 LIJPE .247 69 . C 65. e55 65.885 r . : ' . / . K ' 2 . 2 C 8 19 .0 201.578 201.578 TUNE A 1. 1C3 60 .0 337.6B3 337. te3 1 ELEC 5 .90 6 t l .0 272.B35 272 . 835 2 FRCN 4 .821 46 .0 327. 978 327. 978 2 IH1V 4 .854 38 .0 412.947 412.947 1 CKAS 6 1.378 99 1 l . 0 255.727 258.336 RA JR 4 .92 4 27 .0 628.7C3 628.703 1 CRTS 3 .138 1 69 2 1.1 !5.C53 15.233 TFP.U 14 6.463 342 . 0 347.049 347 .049 7 WARE 7 1 .1 39 55 . C 380. 363 380.363 1 P A '-> 7 7 1.2 7 7 419 226 5 3 . 9 56. CCO 121.575 1 FACL 13 2.558 526 271 51.5 89.207 184 .011 2 ; A v ; K A c E T !•'£/ TRANS - AVERAGE T 1 HE/TRANS EXCLUDING ZERO ENTRIES H oa A SI T A B L E 10 E N T R I E S I N T A B L E 335 UPPER PEAN ARGUMENT 136 .30 4 STANDARD O E V I A T I C N 282.000 SUM OF ARGUMENTS 4 5 6 6 2 .CCO O B S E R V E D PER CENT C U M U L A T I V E LICIT -3CC - 2 7 C - 2 4 0 - 2 1 0 - 18C , F R E C U E N C Y 7 1 5 1 4 -15C - 1 2 0 - 9 0 - 6 0 - 3 0 C 30 60 9C 12C 130 i ec 210 240 270 30 C 330 360 35C 420 450 48C 510 540 57C 6QC 63 0 660 69C 720 750 7cC E10 £40 67C 5C0 93 0 960 SSC 1020 1C50 TOTAL 2 .08 . 2 9 1.49 .29 1 .19 PEKCEN TAGE 2 . 0 2 .3 3 . 8 4 . 1 5 . 3 10 16 25 33 35 4 9 9e 77 46 85 11 .64 24 10 14 U 12 7. 16 2 .98 4 . 1 7 3 .28 3 .58 1 .19 4 13 8 9 3 1 9 . 8 8 . 3 8 . 6 8 . 3 8 . 3 8 1 . 7 9 . 59 .59 1 .19 1. 19 1 .49 2 .00 . 5 9 1.19 . 8 9 1 .49 . 89 .89 . 5 9 1.49 .29 . 5 9 . 2 9 .CO .29 . 2 9 .CO .29 R E M A I N I N G F R E C L E N C I E S ARE A L L ZERC 6. 8 9 . 8 14 .6 2 2 . 0 3 1 . 9 43 .5 5C .7 5 3 . 7 5 7 . 9 61 . 1 64. 7 _6S^9_ 6 7 . 1 71.C 7 3.4 76 .1 78. 5 8 0 . E 82 83. S3. 86. _ 8 7 . _ 89 T() 9 0 . 4 9 1 . 6 9 2 . 5 94 .0 94. 9 95.8 96 .4 97. 9 9e. 2 98.8 9 9 . 1 5 9 . 1 9 9 . 4 9 9 . 7 5 9. 7 100. 0 C U M U L A T I V E REMAINDER 9 7 . 9 97 .6 9 6 . 1 9 5 . 8 2 1<< .6_ T i 93 . 9C. 85. 77. 68. 56. 4 9 . 2 4 6 . 2 42 .0 3 8 . 8 3 5 . 2 34 .0 ~32 23 26 23 21 19 "T7T3" 1 6 . 7 16 14 13 12 ~Tc' 9 . 5 8 . 3 7 .4 5 . 9 5 . 0 4 . 1 3 .5 2 . 0 1 . 7 1 .1 . 5 .2 .2 .0 MULTIPLE 0"F~>"£~AN~" - 2 . 2C0 - 1 . 9 8 0 - 1 . 7 6 0 - 1 . 540 - 1 . 320_ - i T Y O O - . 8B0 - . 6 6 0 - . 4 4 0 - . 2 2 C - . O C C T2?0~~ . 44C . 6 6 0 . 8 8 0 . 1 00 .32C 754/0"" .760 . 580 2 .2C0 2 .421 2. 641 ""2T8 6 r 3 .081 3 . 3CI 3 .521 3 .741 _ 3 . 961_ 4 . 1 3 1 4 .401 4 . 6 2 2 4. 842 5 .062 ?82 5C2 722 942 162 382 _ 602_ 6T822 7. C43 7 . 2 6 3 7 .483 7 . 7 0 3 N C N - W E I G H T E D DEVIATION ~TT\TjlT~Mc AN~~ - 1 . 5 4 7 - 1 .44C - 1 .334 - 1 .228 - I . 1 2 1 - f . 0 1 5 * " - . 9 0 8 - . 8 0 2 - . 6 9 6 - . 5 8 9 - . 4 8 3 - . 3 76 - . 2 7 0 - . 1 6 4 - . 0 5 7 .043 . 154 T 2 6 F .367 .474 . 5EC .686 . 793 1.006 1.112 1 .218 1.325 1 .431 53 7" 1. 644 1 .750 1 .857 1.963 _2_. 0 6_9_ 2 . 1 76 2. 2E2 2 .388 2 .495 2. 601 2_. 7C8_ 2 ."814 2 . 9 2 0 3 . C27 3 .133 3 . 2 4 0 .. . _ •;•.' A S U r . - A J Y CF THE U T I l l i A T I G N CF F A C I l IT CS ( C O L - F A C « I • • " " ' ' • ' ! ; ! , • ' ; F U U X C R D M T R I X a i ;:. '.V;J • RCW/CCIUKN 1 2 3 4 6 7 6 9 10 : 2 1 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 18 360 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 1 * 3 6 0 1 5 3.iO i t ;/,:> s \ 2 0 1 1 1 6 0 1 1 1 6 0 ' 1 1 1 6 0 1 1 1 6 0 1 1 1 6 0 11 i 6 C 11 1 6C 111 6 C 9 : o : 3 0 7 2 C C 72CC 721C 7 2 0 0 7 2 00 7 2 0 0 ?ZCO 720C P 6 i 0 '• • •*;.• : A 0 4 0 0 6 5 4 9 2 60 80 5 2 3 5 5 1 2 5 40 13 5 3 2 7 4 7 j ; '. '. 1 2 • \ • '*' 5 0 6 7 9 7 6 2 8 4 4 7 2 7 7 1 1 6 6 8 735 6 5 5 1 54 [ 0 4 5 C 3 3 7 4 5 0 4 5 0 4 5 0 4 5 0 4 5 0 2 2 5 t c e o ; 7 0 4 8 2 9 4 2 8 7 t u o 4 1 3 2 6 0 6 8 4 7 6 5 5 5 06 4 3 4 6 I 3 0 0 0 1 3 7 3 0 3 8 3 0 0 14 7 o ! <! 0 5AC 4 C 2 5 4 0 540 5 4 0 54C 5 4 0 2 7 0 5 0 6 i 10 0 7 E C H 5 0 731 . U 6 7 9 9 0 1 1 2 3 6 6 9 0 I R C W / C O l l r T , 11 12 13 14 15 16 1 / • l a I 5 2 01 1 1 0 3 6 0 1 0 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 3 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 - I S 3 6 0 J 2 1 7 2 0 4 8 6 0 4 8 6 0 4 8 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 0 3 6 0 1 0 3 6 0 1 5 3 6 0 l a Bt-o i 5 6 * 0 1 3 5 C C 1 3 5 0 0 1 3 5 0 0 0 0 C C 0 0 i A 506 1 6 2 ; 2 6 2 - 1 2 - 1 8 - 1 8 - 1 8 - 1 5 - 1 8 - I o i 50 120 19 0 ' 0 0 0 C 0 0 £ 1 C 8 0 KOO • 1 0 8 0 1 0 C 0 4 50 29 2 4 5 C 45C 4 5 0 4 1 C \ 7 0 1055 2 5 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 °i 9 U l 0 » . 3 74 - 3 0 0 0 c 0 ', '••.'t . \ 1 0 0 1144 9 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 c i i R C U / C O l U f N 21 22 2 3 24 2 5 2 4 . 27 26 2 9 1 1 30 i 1 U 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 83 6C 1 8 3 6 0 0 ! 2 0 0 C 0 0 0 4 8 6 0 4 3 6 0 4 8 6 0 o ; 3 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 0 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 3 5 0 0 1 3 5 CO 1 3 5 0 0 " 0 " : A U 2 3 6 7344 U 0 1 6 7031 2 8 8 2 5 5 2 6 1621 2 6 2 - 1 2 °! 5 611 359 5 5 5 3 82 1 5 6 3 0 0 1 2 0 19 0 oj ROWS 6 - 1 0 , CCIUKIIS 2 1 - 3 0 ARC ZERO 1 i ROWS l - I C , C C I U . " I » S 3 1 - 5 C ikf. ZERO i R C W / C C l l r ' N 51 5 2 53 54 5 5 5 6 57 58 5 9 60 J 1 1 8 3 6 0 1 0 3 6 0 t 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 9 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 E 3 6 C 1 0 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 0 ' 1 8 3 6 0 ; 2 C C C 0 tl 0 a c 0 • CT: 3 1 0 3 6 0 1 B 3 6 0 1 3 3 6 0 1 0 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 10 3 6 3 ; A 183 1872 1 3 4 C 4 9 5 3 6 7 4 4 0 ' 36 5 4 3 7 5 76 5 . 2 1 1 1 5 9 1C1 72 26 1 9 2 3 1 5 1 3 3 1 3 1 1 4 J ROWS 6 - 1 0 . C C I U X X S 5 1 - 6 0 ARE ZERO i RQW/C31UMM 61 62 6 3 64 6 5 6 6 6 7 60 6 9 70 j I 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 B 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 oi 2 1116C 4 8 6 0 4 9 5 0 0 1 6 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 I E 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 0 °i 3 7 700 135CC 1 3 5 C C 1 8 3 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 Oj 4->i,5 1 2 7 2 1 7 0 3 5 00 -Te ^71 ^Ti - l a T^e o~) 6C2 94 12 194 0 0 0 0 0 0 ROWS 6 - I C , C O l U f t t S 6 1 - 7 C ARE ZERO C A GRAPH OF SERVICE TIMES FOR EACH GENERAL JCB (Y=SERVICE TIME IN MIN.) 1200 1 1 7C 1140 _1 1 I 0_ l"C3 0 1C5C 10 20 99 0 9 60 9 3C_ 900 " 6 70 e^ c 8 10 78 0 750 720 690 660 630 6CC 570 510 480 4 50 420 390 2 60 3 30 30 G 270 2 AC _?1.V_ 1 H C 150 120 90-60 30 LUBE ERAK TUNE JLEC H- + + + + + + + -f + + + + ++ + +H FROM DRIV CHAS • + + + + +••+• + + MAJR O 3A. ' L P T S ' IS 11 FE TC OBTAIN LCCAL PARTS ONLY • 'THRU' IS SFRV TIME FOR JOB IN AND OUT OF SHOP + •HARE' IS T IMC TO OBTAIN WAREHOUSE PARTS ONLY + •PART' I s TI CE TC OBTAIN ALL PASTS FOR ALL JOBS i z o o 'FACL • IS TIKE JOB WAITS TO OBTAIN REOD FACIL IT IES 1 170 • 114 0 •4-1110 + A GRAPH OF SERVICE TIMES FOR SPECIAL PMASFS OF JOB PROCESSING 1080 1C5C 1C2C 990 9 AO 930 SCO 8 70 8 40 810 78C 7 80 720 69 0 66C 6 30 6G0 5 70 5 40 510 4 8 0 450 42C 390 3 60 330 300 270 240 210 I HO 150 120 9C 60 30 H - + + + + + + + + + + + ++ + + + *- + + + + * + + ++ + + + + + + + + + -* + 4++ + + + -» LPTS THRU WARE PART FACL 3 A H1 192 + + + + + + + + • +• + + + + + +:+=) + + • + • + +.+. + + + + + + + + +•+. j *• ,xi C oo <J ^ r\;!a ! O * QUEUES » * . * • • j LH'EJE MAXIMUM AVERACC TOTAL ZERO PERCENT AVERAGE $ AVERAGE TABLE CURRENT 1 t j CONTENTS CONTENTS ENT RIES ENTRIES ZEROS TIME/TRANS TI ME /TRANS NUMBER CONTENTS 1 LU302 /, . 218 76 . 0 5 2 . 6 0 2 52 .802 ! 8**06 1 .00 1 1 . 0 3 2 . 0 0 0 3 2 . 0 0 0 j 3 • .39 9 25 . 0 293. 439 293 . 439 1 TUN 09 A . 922 60 . 0 2 8 2 . 4 3 3 2 8 2 . 4 3 3 j 7 U M 0 1 .018 1 . 0 343. 000 3 4 3 . 0 0 0 TUN1 1 1 . 066 7 . 0 147.428 147. 426 i EL El 2 2 . 1 2 3 4 . 0 5 8 8 . 0 0 0 58 8 .000 i t L E 1 3 . 2 U 8 . 0 4 8 5 . 0 7 5 4 8 5 . 8 75 3 f LE 14 i . 04 8 5 . 0 176.399 176 .399 I E L E 1 > 6 . 694 51 . 0 2 5 0 .093 2 5 0 . 0 9 8 i F R 7 1 4 A .84 1 38 . 0 4 0 6 . 6 31 40o . 6 3 1 1 ] ? « T 1 7 2 . 246 13 . 0 346 .845 3 4 6 . 8 4 5 i FRT I 8 1 . 0 5 3 3 . 0 367 .666 35 7 .bob , * V l 4 1 • 161 4 . 0 6 9 7 . 5 0 0 697 . 500 1 CRV20 2 . 577 2 I . 0 504 .761 504. 76 1 1 i 0RV2 1 2 . 3 1 1 13 . 0 539 .153 6 3 9 .153 i 0RV2 2 1 . 029 .0 182.ocn 182.000 > CH.-.2 3 2 . 1 1 9 11 . 0 199.27? 199 .272 1 CH;.24 2 .020 4 . 0 9 3 . 7 S 0 9 3 . 750 ' ! CHA25 1 . 00 0 2 2 100.0 .000 .ooo CKA2 6 1 . 2 1 0 1 1 . 0 3 5 0 .908 3 5 0 . 9 0 8 1 CHA27 2 . 14 3 1 1 . 0 2 3 9 . 7 2 7 239 . 727 2 • j C.HA2 8 5 1.314 79 . 0 30 5 .594 305 . 594 I i FJS29 4 .836 30 . 0 542 .899 5 4 2 . S 9 9 1 .•: j LUBE 4 .218 76 . 0 5 2 . 6 0 2 52. 802 fa- AK 3 . 401 26 . 0 283.384 2 8 3 . 3 8 4 | Tb -^ E 4 . 997 68 . 0 269 .426 2 6 9 . 4 2 0 1 tLfc C 7 1 .08 2 6 8 . 0 292.293 292 .293 3 Fktlt: 4 1.14 5 54 .0 389.518 3 S 9 . 5 1 8 1 j I.'1 IV 3 I. 140 4 1 . 0 510.85.3 5 1 0 . 3 5 3 2 [ r.tii 5 5 1 .808 118 2 1.6 281 .406 286. 258 ct '•' AJ R 4 . 884 30 . 0 54 2 . 8 " 9 54 2 .69 9 1 J LPTS A . 150 20 1 4 1 .9 13 .716 13.994 i ThP U If. 7 .702 39 8 _ . - 0 .. . . 355 .396 355 .396 12 ; V.AR E 6 1. 433 5 2 . 0 507.826 507 .826 5 ! PAkT 9 . 1.583 431 256 53. 2 60 . 632 129.61 7 5 ! F AC L 1 3 3. 244 62 7 295 4 7 . 0 9 5 . 0 3 5 179.47 8 3 M VER.'.OE T IME/TRAtlS = AVERAGE TIME/TRANS EXCLUDING ZERO ENTRIES 1 ! I J i ' • - ! J f—1 T A 8 L E 10 E N T R I E S IN TAE.LE MEAN ARGUMENT STANDARD D E V I A T I O N SUM Of ARGUMENTS 3 6 6 1 3 6 . 6 1 3 3 3 6 . 0 0 0 5 2 7 3 3 . 0 0 0 N'1N-Wf IC.HTFO U'R F-° n i ' S E R V t o PER CENT C U M U l A T I V E CUMULAT 1VE M U L T I P L E Ot-V 1A T l i lN ? L I M I T F R L u u f N L Y OF TOTAL P E R C E N T A G E RE MA I NOTR Ul McAN FROM A\- 3 - 3 0 0 I 3 3 . 3 6 3.3 9 6.6 - 2 . 195 - i . 2 9 9 - 2 7 0 1 . 7 5 1.6 9 6 . 3 - 1 . 9 7 6 - 1 . 2 1 0 * - 2 40 6 1 . 5 5 5 . 1 9 4 . 8 - 1 . 75o - 1 . 1 2 0 - 2 1 0 6 1 . 5 5 6 . 7 9 3 . 2 - 1 . 5 3 7 - 1 . 0 3 1 - I S O 6 1 . 0 3 7 . 7 9 2 . 2 - 1 . 3 1 7 - . 9 4 2 - 1 6 0 7 1 . 0 1 9 . 5 9 0 . 4 - 1 . 0 9 7 - . 6 5 1 - 1 2 0 14 3 . 6 2 1 3 . 2 86 . 7 - . 8 7 8 - . 7 6 3 - 9 0 1 I 2 . 8 4 1 6 . 0 8 3 . 9 - . 6 5 3 - . 6 74 - 6 0 15 3 . 8 9 1 0 . 9 8 0 . 0 - . 4 3 9 - . 5 8 5 - 3 0 4 2 1 0 . 8 8 3 0 . 0 6 9 . 1 - . 2 19 - . 4 9 5 0 4 6 11 . 6 5 4 2 . 4 5 7 . 5 0 0 0 - . 4 C . 6 30 18 4 . 6 6 4 7 . 1 5 2 . 8 . 2 1 9 - . 3 1 7 60 1 I 4 . 4 0 5 1 . 5 4 8 . 4 . 4 3 9 - . 2 2 8 9 0 14 3 . 6 2 5 5 . 1 4 4 . 8 . 6 5 d - . 1 18 1 2 0 21 5 . 4 4 6 0 . 6 3 9 . 3 . d / 6 - . 0 4 9 1 5 0 15 3 . 8 8 6 4 . 5 3 5 . 4 1 . 0 9 7, . 0 3 9 • -1 8 0 11 2 . 8 4 6 7 . 3 3 2 . 6 1 . 3 1 7 . 1 2 9 2 1 0 14 3 . 6 2 7 0 . 9 2 9 . 0 1 . 5 3 7 . 2 13 2 4 0 9 2 . 3 3 7 3 . 3 2 6.6 1 . 7 5 6 . 3 0 7 2 7 0 6 1 . 5 5 7 4 . 8 2 5 . 1 1 . 9 7 6 . ?"h 3 C O 6 . 1 . 5 5 7 6 . 4 . 2 3 . 5 2 . 1 9 5 . 4 * 6 3 3 0 6 1 . 5 5 7 7 . 9 2 2 . 0 2 . 41 5 . 5 7 * ?. 6 0 1 J 3 . 3 6 61 . 3 1 f t . 6 2 . 6 3 5 . 6 6 4 3 1 0 5 1 . 2 9 8 2 . 4 1 7 . 3 2 . 3 54 . 7 5 4 4 2 0 8 2 . 0 7 B 4 . 7 1 5 . 2 3 . 0 7 4 . 8 4 3 4 50 It 2 . 0 7 8 6 . 7 1 3 . 2 3 . 2 9 3 . 9 32 4 no 13 3 . 3 6 9 0 . 1 9. 8 3 . 5 1 3 1 . 0 2 1 6 1 0 4 1 . 5 5 9 1 . 7 8 . 2 .1.733 l . l 1 1 5 ' 0 4 1 - 0 3 9 2 . 7 7 . 2 3 . 7 5 2 • 1 . / O O 5 7 0 4 1 . 0 3 9 3 . 7 6 . 2 4 . 172 1 . ?R4 6 00 3 . 7 7 ' 9 4 . 5 5 . 4 4 . 39 1 1 . 3 79 6 30 5 1 . 2 9 9 5 . 8 4 . 1 4 . 6 1 1 1 . 4 6 1 6 6 0 3 . 7 7 9 6 . 6 3 . 3 4 . 331 1 . 6 5 7 6 9 0 1 . 2 5 96 . 8 3 . 1 5 . 0 5 0 1 . 6 4 6 7 2 0 1 . 2 5 9 7 . 1 7 . 8 6 . 2 / 0 1 . 7 1 * 7 5 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 1 2 . 9 5 . 4 8 9 1 . 8 2 6 7 8 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 1 2 . 8 5 . 7 0 9 1 . 9 1 4 8 1 0 0 .. . . 0 0 9 7 . 1 . . . 2 . 8 . 5 . 9 2 9 2 . C 0 4 8 4 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 1 2.8 6 . L46 2 . 0 9 3 8 7 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 1 2.8 6 . 3 0 8 2 . 1 8 2 SCO 0 . 00 9 7 . 1 2 . 8 6 . 5 8 7 2 . 2 7 1 9 3 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 1 2.8 6 . 8 0 7 2 . 3 6 1 5 6 0 0 . 0 0 97 . 1 2.8 7. 02 7 2 . 4 50 0 9 0 1 . 2 5 9 7 . 4 . 2 . 5 7 . 2 4 6 2 . 5 3 9 io?o 1 . 2 5 9 7 . 6 2 . 3 7 . 4 6 6 2 . 6 . : ^ 1 0 5 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 - 6 2 . 3 7 . 6 6 5 2 . 71P l O b O 0 . C O 9 7. 6 2 . 3 7 . 9 0 5 ? . M l 7 11 10 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 6 2 . 3 8 . 1 2 5 2 . 8 9 6 1 1 4 0 1 . 2 5 9 7 . 9 2 . 0 6 . 3 4 4 2 . 9 8 6 1170 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 9 2 . 0 8 . 5 6 4 3 . 0 7 5 12 00 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 9 2 . 0 8 . 7 8 3 3 . 1 6 4 1 2 3 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 9 2 . 0 9 . 0 0 3 3 . 2 54 1 / 4 0 0 . 0 0 ° 7 r 9 2 . 0 9 . 7 7 1 3 . 3 4 3 J 1 2 9 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 9 2 . 0 9 . 4 4 2 3 . 4 3 ? 1 3 2 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 9 2 . 0 9 - o o 2 3 . 5 2 1 1 5 5 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 9 2 . 0 9 . 6 s l 3 . 6 1 1 1 3 6 0 1 . 2 5 9 8 . 1 1 . 8 1 0 . 1 0 1 3 . 7 0 0 1410 0 . 0 0 9 8 . 1 1 . 8 ' 1 0 . 3 2 1 3 . 7 6 9 . 0 0 9 « . ; 1 0 . 5 4 0 3 . 8 79 OVERFLOW 7 1 . 8 1 AV f R A GC V A L U E O f O V E R f L O w 1 7 4 3 . 4 2 • A SUMMARY CF THF UTILIZATION OF FACILITIES ICOL" fAC«) i „ FUllWORO PA TA I X 8 KC«/CCLUHN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 6 9 1 0 1 / ? I 0 18360 18360 18360 16340 16360 16360 13360 1? 360 l f ' r . 0 \ 2 0 11160 11160 11 160 11160 11 1 60 11 160 11 160 11 laO 9720 j 3 0 7200 7200 7200 7200 7200 7200 7200 72-0 ?'..-0 4 0 5951 6098 6 190 5290 5253 5980 694 1 497t> 1 '.4 9 i .5 0 826 846 C49 734 729 031 -326 69 1 1 0 6 0 450 337 4^0 4 5n 460 4 5 0 /.4fl ? i"". i :.<o 1 ' 7 0 5567 5949 7919 4567 5752 6665 6631 4459 0 8 0 0 0 62 59 144 0 0 144 0 9 0 540 402 60 3 540 540 54 7 540 270 556 • •: • • *i i 10 0 938 975 1266 855 1067 1113 1114 66 6 0 kCW/COLUMN 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 1 9 2 0 1 16360 16 360 16360 18360 16360 16360 l»3</0 13360 . Iii 360 li'.V-O 2 972C 4 860 4o60 4860 16360 18360 18i00 13360 1 3360 If >-0 • 3 8640 13500 13500 135O0 0 0 0 0 C 0 4 1 747 219 -12 - 18 -1 8 — 16 -IS - \ '1 -18 ! 5 45 1 30 22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 108C 1080 1080 1060 450 292 450 450 4 50 450 . . . 7 0 1829 279 0 . 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - • •. " -i 4 • i 9 134 632 91 -3 0 0 0 0 0 0 in n 1035 933 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 •"; • i i . f R0WCCIUMN 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 16 360 18 360 16360 18360 16360 18360 16 ioO 16 360 1R3C.0 0 2 0 0 0 0 n 0 4 I M ) i n h ( i 4 ,*.-.11 0 3 16 360 18360 10360 18 360 18360 16360 13600 135--2 135CO 0 4 1143'! 7931 10465 7711 3727 7637 1767 2 0 a -1? 0 5 622 . 431 565 • 419 202 415 130 22 0 0 .OV.S 6-10. COLUMNS 21-30 ARE ZERO kOkS 1-10, COLUMNS 31-50 ARE ZERO •• • ik •. PCW/COLUMW 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 56 59 60 1 1P360 18340 18360 1B340 1 8340 1 8360 18360 1 R160 1 * 1 i l / , . ] 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O ? 0 . . 3 18360 18360 18360 18360 16360 18360 .18 360 16 560 . 16 360 1 6160 4 . 163 1707 1450 514 312 550 91 9510 5342 . 5359 5 9 52 78 27 16 29 4 517 345 I 82 F.BKS 6-10, COLUMNS 51-60 ARE ZERO ROWYCOLUM'l 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 66 69 70 1 16360 18360 1B360 16360 10360 18360 18360 18360 18340 0 2 11160 4 660 4860 0 10360 18360 16360 10360 18 360 0 7706 n'.nn !•"•» _. a r- 1 ) 4647 1364 133 5269 -18 -18 -18 -1 3 -18 0 645 101 9 286 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 _ ' . I _ l kOWS 6-10, COLUMNS 61-70 A*E ZERO • O r\ 3 B I . , 3 A GRAPH CF SERVICE TIKES FOR EACH GENERAL JOB (Y=SERVICE TIKE IN MIN.) 12CO 11 70 1110 I 110 1C60 10 50 1020 94 0 460 9 30 900 f 70 640 610 76 0 750 720 690 660 630 600 5 7Q 5^0 510 4 60 450 4 20 . 3 9,0 3t>0 330 20 0 27 0 24Q + +++• + + + + + -»• + + + + 120 9 0 60 30_ r+-r + -r + 4-++ + + -r + < TUNE L-LFC 2>B F RON ORIV CIIAS MAJR A GP.APH OK SERVICE TIMES FOR SPECIAL PHASES OF JOB PROCESSING ' L P T S 1 IS TIME TO OBTAIN LOCAL PARTS ONLY 'THRU' IS SERV T H E FOR JOB IM ANO OUT OF SHOP 12CO 1170 l l ' - O JJULCL. •WARE' IS TIME TO OBTAIN WAREHOUSE PARTS ONLY 'PART ' IS TIME TO OBTAIN ALL PARTS FOR ALL JOBS ' F A C L ' IS TIME JOB WAITS TO OBTAIN REDO FACILIT IES 1080 1050 1020 990 9 60 930 500 870 840 810 780 75 0 720 650 660 630 600 570 540 « 510 H 480 -l 450 * 4 20 < 39 0 3 360 « 3 30 -i 3C0 1 270 * 240 1 210 < 180 t 160 * 120 3 5 0 i 6? < 3.0_J ********************* ************************** ****** LPTS THRU 3>B WARE ******* FACL 1 0 0 • 53 4 4 +• j ? 9 6 + + + \ 54 4 + + 9 2 4 A G R A P H C F D E L A Y S A S P E R C E N T OF T O T A L T I M E I N S H O P 9 0 4 + - + 8 8 4 + + £6 + + + 8 4 4 + + 8 2 4 + + 8 0 + + *4-7 8 4 + 7 6 4 + 4 7 ' - 4 + •+• 7 2 4 + 4 7 0 4 + + 6 8 4 +• 4 6 6 4 + + 6 4 4 + + 6 2 4 + + 6 0 4 + + 5 6 4 + + 5 6 4 + 5 4 4 + + 5 2 4 + + 6 0 4 - + + 4 3 4 +• + 4 6 4 + + 4 4 4 + 4 4 2 4 4 + 4 4 + 4 + 4 + + 4 0 4 + + + 4 4 4 4 4 + 3 6 4 4 + + + +++- + + + + + 3 4 4 4 + + + 4 + 3 2 4 - - + + . • + . - . . . + + 3 Q 4 4 + + + + + 2 B + + + + + + + '/*• 4 4 + + + 4 + 2 4 4 4 4 + + + + 2 2 • 4 + + + 4 4 2 0 4 . 4 + 4+4+ + + ..• + + .. . + + + 1 8 4 + + 4 4 + + 4 4 1 6 4 + 4 + + + + 4 + 1 4 4 4 4 + 4 + + 4 1 2 + + 4 4 4 4 + 4 + 1 0 4 4 4 + + 4 + 4-jj * 4 4 + 4 4 + • . + 4 6 4 4 4 + 4 + + + u. 4 + + + + + + + 4 ? 4 4 4 + + 4 4 4 + 0 + + + t + + + + + + + + 4t. + t + + t | + | + + + ++ + + + + f + f | + + +++++t+++*-+++H -4 + 4++-i - + +++4 + 4+ + P A R T F A C L S E P V T H R U i CC-3 B ; O * OUEUES * ; Q U E J I MA X I M U X A V E R A G E TOT A L Z E R O P E R C E N T A V E R A G E t A V E R A G t T A B L E C U R R E N T j i C O N T E N T S C O N T E N T S E NTP. 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' • IT-O'i • 1 H--V1 , v. i <- n 1 R 3 4 H 0 o • n 4 3 ) ' . 1 3 4 5 152 4 3 6 8 165 - 1 8 - 1 6 - 1 8 - I S 0 3 6 0 2 0 9 1 1 2 3 6 8 0 0 0 0 0 I _ . ; , f\) R L k S 6 - 1 0 , COLUMNS 6 1 - 7 0 ARE Z E R O j O ' ' ' O 4 A A GRAPH OF SERVICE TIMES FOR EACH GENERAL JOB <Y=SERVICE TIME IN MIN.) 12CC 1 170 1 I 4': 1 1 1 ••• IC:-.', • 10-so + 1C20 • w'.o • 5 60 • Of.:, • 270 • a 4 0 • BIO • 7 K • 7SO • 720 + 6 s <; + 6 iO • 6 3c • 60 0 • 8 70 * 540 * 510 • 4 B'; + 450 + 4 2 0 + 3 C -0 + i f L 300 + 27C + 240 * 210 * 180 1 i 0 k + + + **- + ++ +-f-++++V + + + + + + + 4 + + + 4 + + + + + + 4 + + + + ++ + + -f + + ++ +t-f-+ + LUBE BR A K TUNE ELEC FROM 4A ro o A GRAPH CF SERVICE TIMES FOR SPECIAL PHASES OF J03 PROCESSING •LPTS* IS TIME TO Q3TAIN LOCAL PARTS ONLY ' T h P i J ' IS SEi-'V TI'-IE rOP. JOB IN A NO OUT QF SHOP  1 2 0 0 1 1 7 0 1 1 4 0 _ l i J . O _ 1 0 c 0 1 0 5 o 1 0 2 0 4 5 0 9 6 0 9 CO 5 7 0 8 4 0 8 1 0 7 8 0 7 5 0 •Ht.?E' IS TI"E TO OBTAIN WAREHOUSE PARTS ONLY •PAi'Ti IS TIME TO OBTAIN ALL PARTS FOR ALL JOBS •FACL' IS TIME JOB WAITS TO OBTAIN REOO FACILITIES 7 2 0 6 9 0 6 6 0 t 3 0 6 0 0 5 7 C ' . 4 0 5 1 0 4 8 0 4 5 0 4 2 0 3 9 0 2 CO 2 7 0 2 4 0 2.1o 1 8 0 1 5 0 1 2 0 9 0 H + + +4 + 4-+ + + + + 4 I.R 1 5 T K « U WARE PART I- + + + + + ++•+ + + + FACL 4-A • V C Q 4 4 4 ? '->(< 4 4 4 \ <•,£. + 4 4 92 • A GRAPH LF DELAYS AS PERCENT QF TOTAL T IME IN SHOP 90 4 4 4 P.B 4 4 4 c /. 4 4 4 iS 4 4 4 4 82 4 4 4 HO 4 4 4 7b 4 4 4 7A 4 4 4 7<- • 4 4 72 4 4 4 70 4 4 4 6 8 4 4 4 h(- 4 4 4 04 4 4 4 + 4 4 £ (< r 4 4 54 » 4 4 5t^ 4 4 4 54 4 4 4 5 2 4 4 4 • c r 4 4 4 ^? 4 4 4 •=> 4 4 4 a 4 ' . 4 4 4 4? 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 ^ 0 4 4 4 4 4 2 f ; + +• 4 4 4 3 6 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 22 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 • 30 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2H 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 ? A 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 24 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 ? 2 4 f 4 4 4 4 4 ? 0 •V 4 4 4 + 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 '<'• 4 - i- t- 4 4 4 4 4 4 1' . 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 J /. + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 12 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 10 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 A 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 ? 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 0 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 * - 4 + 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 . 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 PAf-T FACL SERV • THRU 4^A CL'EUES * * * CUEUE MAX I CUM AVER ACE TOTAL ZERO PERCENT A VE R AC F JAVS RACE TABLE CURRENT CCNTEtaS CONTENTS ENTRIES ENTRIES ZEROS TIME/TRAMS T IME/TRANS NUMBER CONTENTS LUBC2 2 . 2 : 5 P.l .0 5 3 . 4 1 9 53 .419 d-iiti.b 1 • UL 1 1 . 0 32. Ut'U 32 V C C O URK.ce 2 .557 24 .C 4 2 6 . 8 3 3 4 2 6 . 8 3 3 2 T UM C 9 5 1.32 7 61 .0 399 . 753 399 . 753 TU'llO 1 .CcC 1 . 0 1109.000 1 1 09 .000 TUM 1 2 .087 7 . c 2 2 9 . 5 7 1 229 .571 SLE 12 2 .061 4 .0 2P0.240 280 .2 50 c L t l i i . 22 i H . I J 6 1 2 . 5 0 U 5 I 2 ".5 00 i E L E1 4 1 .079 5 . c 290. 199 290 .199 EL E I 5 7 1. CA? 51 .0 3 7 5 . 2 3 5 375 .235 1 F R r 16 5 1.0 73 28 . 0 518.684 518 .684 1 FRT 17 2 .3 16 13 .c 4 4 4 . 8 4 5 44 4 . S45 F R I 1 8 1 . I C C 3 .0 6 1 7 . 3 3 3 617 .333 1 - i V H 1 . 1 ' -1. 4 . u 4 O U . 1 5 1 ) 460 .750 3RV20 2 .A 4 1 21 • C 306.238 386 .238 U/V2 1 2 .287 13 . 0 405 .538 405 .438 C R V 2 2 1 . C«4 3 . 0 3 1 6 . 3 3 3 3 36 .3 3 3 CH12 3 2 .14 5 11 . 0 242 .636 24? .636 1 CHA 2 4 2 .0.3 9 4 . 0 1 52. 250 132 . 2 4 0 . e ra 2 : 1 . L 1i. / 2 1 uu .u • ULI'J . L L L' CK-W 6 1 .153 11 . 0 2 5 6 . 8 1 8 256 .818 CH-27 1 .138 11 .c 2 3 0 . 7 2 7 230 . 727 1 c fi •  2 a 5 1 .3E5 79 .c 3 2 1 . 9 3 6 321 .936 2 MJ R 29 1. C C 4 30 . 0 6 1 4 . 7 3 3 614 .733 1 LljTiE 2 .235 31 . c 53.4 19 53 .419 L' S . 3 ') •) . L 4 11. L 3 4 '411 ;"C39 £ TIJ; E 6 1.475 69 .0 392 . 768 39 2 . 768 ELF.C 7 1 .405 68 .c 3 7 9 . 5 4 3 379 . 543 4 rHO'i 5 1 . 4 E 9 54 .0 506 .308 50 6 .388 1 CRIV -EE4 41 . 0 395 .976 394 .975 CHAS 5 1 .84 2 113 2 1.6 . 2 8 9 . 7 7 9 294 . 775 4 )>?—r7!— 4 L . 6 'J 4 .10 . L 614 . Iii 6T4- . I i i 1 LP is 2 . 15C 2 12 4 1 . 3 1 3 . 0 5 6 1 3 .307 T>-RL 18 8 .937 393 .c 4 1 2 . 3 7 9 412 .379 12 ' V.AHE 5 1.222 52 . 0 431.S65 431 . 665 5 PAP. T 7 1.373 4 06 254 5 2 . 2 5 1 . 9 0 3 108 .728 5 FACL 15 4 . 5 4 ? 672 277 4 1 . 2 124 .305 211 .475 3 SiJt'--' j I. : 1 Ft./ i RAf.s = AVtHAL;" 1 lMh/ 1 R A M S LXCLUU1NL /.LRU fciJIRlbS ro o vr, E N T R I E S IN TA>>LE MEAN STANDARD C E V I A T I C N SUK OF ARGUMENTS 1 0 6 1 9 1 . 7 6 6 3 4 1 . C C O 7 4 0 2 2 . C O O K C N - U E 1 G H T E 0 L ' P E R 08 S t I V C O P £ R CE7.T c u x u u n v E C U M U L A T I V E M U L T I P L E O E V I A T I O N i L I /* I 1 M f c U L r . N L V 11/ I M . V t i i l t M l>..t K L H A T N C r " UE ' ' C A N —F*nr~rr. s - 3 0 0 0 2 . 3 3 2 . 3 9 7 . 6 - 1 5 6 4 - 1 . 4 4 ? - 2 7 C 3 . 7 7 3 . 1 96 . 8 - 1 4 0 7 - 1 . 3 5 4 -2<-C 5 1 . 2 9 4 . 4 9 5 . 5 - 1 . 2 5 1 - 1 . 2 6 6 - 2 1 0 7 1 . 0 1 6 . 2 9 3 . 7 - 1 . 0 9 5 - 1 . 1 7 8 - 1 5 0 4 1 . 0 3 7 . 2 9 2 . 7 - . 518 - 1 . 0 9 0 - 161. 4 1 . 1 . 3 H . 2 9 1 . 7 . 7H2 - i . l W - 1 2 0 11 3 . 36 1 1 . 6 8 8 . 3 - . 6 2 5 - . 9 1 4 -<sc 6 1 . 5 5 1 3 . 2 8 6 . 7 - . 4 6 5 - . 826 - 6 C 15 4 . 5 2 1 8 . 1 8 1 . 8 - . 1 1 2 - . 7 3 e - 3 0 2 6 6 . 7 3 ? 4 . 8 7 5 . 1 - . 1 5 6 - . 6 5 0 0 3C 7 . 7 7 3 7 . 6 6 7 . 3 - . C C C - . 5 6 ? 30 t 4 6 . 2 1 J 8 . H 6 ! ' . 1 . 1 5 6 " 4 7 4 -60 18 4 . 6 6 4 3 . 5 5 6 . 4 . 3 1 2 - . 3 8 8 00 16 4 . 1 4 4 7 . 6 5 2 . 3 4 6 9 - . 2 5 3 12C 16 4 . 1 4 5 1 . 8 4 8 . 1 . 6 2 5 - . ? 1 C 1 5 ? 1 1 2 . 84 5 4 . 6 4 5 . 3 . 7 9 2 - . 1 2 2 180 15 3 . 8 8 5 8 . 5 4 1 . 4 5 3 8 - . 0 3 4 t L 9 18 4 . 6 6 ( .1 .2 1 6 . 7 1 . 0 5 5 7 C 5 3 24C 8 ? . 0 7 6 5 . 2 3 4 . 7 1 . 2 5 1 . 1 4 1 2 70 1 1 2 . 8 4 6 e . i 3 1 . 8 1 . 4 0 7 - 2 2 9 300 7 1 . 8 1 6 9 . 9 3 C . 0 1 . 5 6 4 . 3 1 7 33C 9 2 . 3 3 7 2 . 2 2 7 . 7 I . 7 2 0 . 4 C 5 360 10 7 . 59 7 4 . 8 2 5 . 1 1 . 8 7 7 . 4 9 1 1 1 2 .64 1 1. 1 2 2 . 2 2 C 33 . 5 6 1 4 ? C a 2 . C 7 7 9 . 7 2 0 . 2 2 . 1 9 0 . 6 6 9 4 5 0 6 1 . 5 5 8 1 . 3 1 6 . 6 2 . 3 4 6 . 7 5 7 4 8 0 9 2 . 3 1 8 1 . 6 1 6 . 1 2 5 0 3 . 8 4 5 . 51C 4 1 . 0 3 84 . 7 1 5 . 2 2 . 6 5 5 . 5 3 1 54C 6 1 . 5 5 8 6 . 7 1 1 . 7 2 . 8 1 5 1 . 0 2 1 v / ' j 4 1 .Li 8 / . 3 1 2 . o 2 . 9 7 2 I . 1 0 9 6 0 0 7 1 . 0 1 H 9 . 1 i c e 3 128 1 . 1 9 7 M C 2 . 5 1 8 9 . 6 1 0 . 1 3 . 2 8 5 1 . 2 ( 5 (.60 6 1 . 55 9 1 . 1 8 . 8 3 .44 1 1 . J 7.1 6 4 5 7 1 . 8 1 9 3 . C 6 . 9 3 558 1 . 4 6 1 7?C 1 . 2 5 9 1 . 2 6 . 7 3 . 754 1 . 5 4 5 j . I I 9'.. L 5.9 3 . 9 10 1 . 6 3 / 7 8 0 4 1 . 0 3 9 5 . C 4 . 9 4 . 0 6 7 1 . 7 2 ? 8 1 0 4 1 . 0 3 9 4 . 1 3 . 8 4 . 2 2 3 1 . 3 1 2 E4C 1 . 2 5 9 6 . 3 3 . 6 4 . 3 0 0 1 . 5 C C 3 7 0 I . 2 5 5 6 . 6 3 . 3 4 . 5 3 6 1 . 9 8 8 5GG 2 . 5 1 9 7 . 1 2 . 8 4 6 5 3 2 . 0 7 6 1 U '41.1 2 . 8 4 . 1 4 9 i. l t > 560 0 . C O 9 7 . 1 2 . 8 5 . 0 0 6 2 . ? 5 ? 5 7 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 1 2 . 8 5 162 2 . 3 4 0 1C2C 1 . 2 5 9 7 . 4 2 . 5 5 . 3 1 8 2 . 4 ? 8 1C5C 1 . 25 9 7 . 6 2 . 3 5 . 4 7 5 2 . 5 1 6 108 0 0 . 0 0 9 7 . 6 2 . 1 5 . 6 3 1 2 . 6 C 4 L 1 1 J c . J O 9 7.6 2 . 3 5 . 7 8 8 ? . 6 9 ? 114C c . C O 9 7 . 6 2 . 3 5 . 9 4 4 2 . 7 E C 1 1 7 0 0 .CO 9 7 . 6 2 . 3 6 . 1 0 1 2 . 8 6 8 1 2 0 0 1 . 2 5 « 7 . 9 2 . 0 6 2 5 7 2 . 5 5 6 123C 2 . 5 1 9 8 . 4 1 . 5 6 . 4 1 4 3 . 0 4 4 12 60 0 . C O 9 C . 4 1 . 5 6 . 5 7 0 3 . 1 3 2 1 2 ' ; c 5 Too 9e74 T75 JTTTS •>T2Y0 -132C C . 0 0 9 8 . 4 1 . 5 6 . £ e 3 3 . 3 C 8 135C • C . . C O 5 0 . 4 1 . 5 7 . 0 1 9 3 . 3 5 6 130O 0 . 0 0 9 8 . 4 1 . 5 7 . 1 9 6 3 . 4 8 4 141C C . 0 0 9 8 . 4 1 . 5 7 . 3 5 2 3 . 5 7 2 144C C . 0 0 4 8 . 4 1 . 5 7 . 5 0 9 3 . 6 6 0 r v r m c J s /rsns i r c r c -A V E 8 A G E VALUE C r C V c R F L C w 1 6 1 1 . 6 6 / A SLMMARY OF T t - £ U T I L I Z A T I O N CF F A C I L I T I E S ( C O L - E A C H ) FULLKU. ' .U MATRIX 8 V ROW/C3LUMN 1 2 3 • 5 6 7 S 9 I C 1 18 J6' j IE 360 I I ! 36J 1636'J 1 8 1 6 0 1 8 J 6 U 1 8 J 6 U l U i i U i s j c L ' •> 2 0 1 1 1 6 0 1 1 1 6 0 11 1 50 i n t o 11 160 1 1 160 U H C 1 1 1 6 C 972 0 3 0 7 2 C C 7 7 C C 7 2 0 0 7 2 0 0 7 2 0 0 7 2 0 0 72CC 7 2 0 0 8 6 4 0 A 0 5 8 7 8 6 2 6 3 t 392 5 8 5 6 5 3 0 8 6 3 7 3 6 0 9 8 5 4 1 9 1 3 2 8 5 0 . 8 16 0 6 9 8 8 7 818 7 3 7 8 6 5 8 4 6 752 211 6 c 4 5 C 3 3 7 4 5 0 4 50 4 5 0 4 5 0 4 5 0 2 2 5 1 0 8 0 0 5 9 1 1 5 6 / / 15 5/ 5 4 8 6 5 / 7 1 53 79 6 9 0 9 4 5 b J 0 8 0 0 0 3 9 7 76 71 c 0 1 4 7 0 * 5 0 5 6 0 4 C 2 613 540 5 4 0 5 4 0 551 2 7 0 6 4 9 10 0 1 C C 9 0 9 7 12 02 9 1 7 1 0 7 4 8 4 4 1 1 3 2 818 0 i l C W L L l l M N 11 12 I i L 4 15 1 6 I 7 11! 1 9 Z ' J 1 1 8 3 6 0 1C36C 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 18 360 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 2 9 7 2 0 4 8 6 0 4 e 6 C 4 8 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 IS 3 6 0 1 3 3 6 0 3 8 6 4 0 1 3 5 0 0 1 3 5 0 0 1 3 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 561 1 8 5 9 2 8 0 - 1 2 - 1 8 - 1 8 - 1 8 - 1 8 - 1 8 - 1 8 5 0 4 13/ / L 0 0 u 0 0 o 6 ioeo 1080 1 0 0 0 1 0 8 0 4 5 0 2 9 2 4 5 0 4 5 0 4 5 0 4 5 0 7 0 2 C 2 2 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 C • 0 0 8 0 c c C 0 0 0 0 0 0 184 6 5 6 96 - 1 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 K. 0 1 0 8 7 1 0 7 5 0 0 0 c 0 0 0 R O W C O L U M N 21 22 2 3 7 4 2 5 2 6 2 ' . 28 2 9 30 I 10 360 1 9 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 .18360 ie360 1 0 3 6 0 10.360 1 8 3 6 0 1 S 3 6 0 0 2 e C 0 0 D 0 4 86 0 4 8 S C 4 8 6 0 0 3 "16 269 111)60 ' 1 S 3 6 ' : 1 8 3 6 C 18 360 1 8 3 6 0 1 3 5 0 0 1 3 5 C 0 ' 1 3 5 0 0 0 A 1 1 8 6 0 8 7 7 6 1 2 6 6 8 6591 3 9 1 0 7 5 C 9 1 8 5 9 2 S 0 - 1 2 0 ; 6 4 5 4 7 7 6 8 9 3 5 8 212 408 137 20 0 0 ROWS 6 - I C , COLUMNS 2 1 - 3 0 ARE ZERO RUKS 1 - I t , LL'LUHNSj 3 1 - 5 0 A H t 2 L 8 U aCVi/COLUMS 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 5 9 60 1 i 1 1 8 3 6 0 1 3 3 6 0 1 8 3 5 0 1 3 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 18 3 6 0 1 2 0 0 C 0 0 0 C C " 0 0 3 i 1 B 2 6 0 1 8 3 6 C 1 9 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 0 1 0 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 5 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 ; 4 v ? ? 0 1670 1 3 0 3 4 0 3 4 9 5 5 5 0 5 5 1 0 2 6 3 5 5 9 9 2 7 7 2 ', <-. 1 1 90 70 21 26 29 2 558 3 0 4 1 5 0 i MOMS 6 - 1 C , COLUMNS 5 1 - 6 0 ARC 2 E 8 0 i B C k / C C L L M N 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 C 1 8 3 6 C 1 6 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 1116U 4 » t C 4 C 6 C C 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 8 3 6 0 1 6 3 6 0 7 2 C C 1 3 5 C 0 1 3 5 C O 1 8 3 4 0 1 8 3 6 0 0 C C 0 • ; o 4 ^ 5 6 T477 IT?; 4~5~T5 5T2 =r8 =75 ' =TB* =T8 : 0"^ ; 632 106 13 2 7 0 28 0 0 0 0 0 I ROWS 6 - 1 C , COLUMNS 6 1 - 7 0 ARC ZERO j Q 4B • | *"^ ' A GRAPH CF SERVICE TIMES FOR EACH GENERAL JCB (Y=SERVICE TIME IN MIN. ) I 200 720 690 6 6C 6 30 6 ' 0 570 ARC 6 50 A 2 C 390 1170 + 1140 11 K + U-V'J 1 0 50 + ic?-C + 9'tO + 960 9'3 0 + 9CC + S 70 • 8'-C + • 81 0 +-7 3 0 + • 7 50 • 3 60 330 3CC 270 24 0 2 :C 130 120 9C 6 0 3 r ' + + + + o CQ-• + + + + + + + + + + + + + * + -»•* LL'jE -4- + ++ + + f + + + -r + +-rk + + + + t + + + -t + ++ ++ +4 + + + + + +4+ + + -r + + * + + + + BRAK. TUNE ELEC FRCN +++++++++ CRIV • + + +• + «•+• + CHAS MA JR 4B •f _____ • .. _ „ + A G R A P H O F S E R V I C E T I N E S F O R S P E C I A L P H A S E S C F J O B P R O C E S S I N G + 1 L P T S * I S T I M E TQ OE T a I N L O C A L P A R T S O N L Y + * T H R U ' IS SITRV T I M E F O R JO? I N A N D O U T O F S f t C P . + 'WARE' IS T l M l : TO O B T A I N UARCHQL*SE P A R T S C N L V 4 ' P A R T * I S T I M E TO O G T A J N A L L P A R T S F O R A L L J O O S J ? c c 4 • F A C L ' I S T I N E J C 5 ' W A I T S T C G O T A I N R E G D F A C I L I T I E S 1 ! rO + 11 I l l " + 1 C 2 C 4 1 0 5 0 + 1 0 2 0 9 9 0 4 s e c 4 9 3 9 4 9 y . i 4 £ 7 0 f >;4C 4 1 1 0 + 7 P C + : 7 5 ' 4 7 >C 4 4 9 0 4 ». 6 6 0 + 6 3 0 4 r 6 C C 4 5 7 0 4 6<.G 4 5 1 0 4 A qp 4 4 5 0 + 4 2 0 4 4 4 4 4 3 9 0 • 4 + + + 4 4 3 4 C 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 0 4 4 4 4 4 3 0 . : 4 4 4 4 4 2 7 0 4 4 4 4 4 Z ' - C + 4 4 4 4 2 1 0 + 4 4 4 4 1 - . 0 4 4 4 4 4 • 1 5 0 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 9 0" 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 t r 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 V; 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 LPTS T H K U ' vi AR E P A R T F A C L J ro o vo r 9 6 + 4 4 94 • • • -I? 4 A GRAPH UF CHUAYS AS PERCENT OF TOTAL TINE IN SHOP 90 +• 4 4 88 + 4 4 8 6 + 4 4 84 + 4 4 82 + 4 4 6 0 + * 4 73 4 4 : 76 + 4 4 : 74 + 4 4 i l i 4 4 7 0 * 4 4 68 + 4 4 66 + 4 4 64 + 4 4 62 + + 4 60 4 4 58 + 4 4 56 + 4 4 54 +• 4 4 52 + + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 50 • 4 4 4 4 4 8 + 4 4 4 4 46 4 4 4 4 44 + 4 4 4 4 42 + 4 4 4 4 40 4 4 4 + 4 3 3 + 4 4 4 4 3 6 + 4 4 4 4 3 4 +• 4 4 4 4 32 + 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 3 0 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 28 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 / A 4 4 + 4 4 4 2 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 22 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 • 4 4 4 4 4 4 I h •t- 4 4 4 4 4 4 11 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 I L + + + + 4 4 4 + + 4 4 4 4 4 4 12 + + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1C 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 8 + + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 + 4 + 4 4 4 + + 4 + + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 + + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 44 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 FACL SERV THRU 4B * * * OUEUES » * * Cdl.UE MAX I MUM AVERAGE TOTAL ZERO PERCENT AVERACF tAVERAGE TABLE CURRENT CONTENTS CONTENTS E NT Rl ES ENTRIES ZEROS TIME/TRANS TIME/TRANS NUMBER CONTENTS • LUB02 3 . 2 3 ' . 5 3 . 0 7 4 . 2 5 8 7 4 . 2 5 8 6RK06 1 • ooo 1 . 0 6 . OOO 6 . 0 0 0 Bi- KC7 I . 04 0 1 . 0 746 .000 746. 000 B-KC3 2 . 339 18 . 0 346 .500 3 4 6 . 5 0 0 1 TIJN09 5 . 8 5 4 5 2 . 0 301.634 301.634 1 TUNIC 1 . 030 1 . 0 5 5 3 - 0 0 0 5 5 3 . 0 0 0 TlJNl 1 L . 02 7 6 . 0 8 4.666 3 4.666 E IE 1 2 I .021 6 . 0 6 5 . 333 65.333 ELE13 I . 036 5 .0 134.399 134 .399 ELE14 1 . C19 4 . 0 87 .250 8 7.230 ELE15 4 .470 4 6 . 0 137.804 187.304 1 FRT16 3 . 36 7 33 . 0 2 0 4 . 7 2 7 2 0 4 . 7 2 7 2 F ° T 1 7 1 . 120 10 . 0 220 . 500 220.500 F R T 1 8 1 .005 3 . 0 3 3 . 3 3 3 33. 333 DR V 1 9 1 . 029 2 . 0 269 .500 2 6 9 . 5 0 0 DRV2 0 3 . 3 5 1 20 . 0 322 .500 3 2 2 . 5 0 0 1 0RV2 1 2 . .419 13 . 0 593 .076 593. 076 1 O^V22 1 .12 0 3 . 0 736.000 736.000 CHA2 3 2 .032 8 . 0 189.375 189.375 ChA24 1 -04 2 4 . 0 193.500 193. 500 CHA2 5 1 . 0 0 0 1 1 100 .0 .000 . 0 0 0 CHi26 2 . 13 3 10 . . 0 . 244. 299 2 4 4 . 2 9 9 • CHA 2 7 1 . 0 7 3 9 •.o 149.222 149.222 O.A2B . 5 1 5 67 . 0 251 .029 2 5 1 . 0 2 9 2 f J •'• 2 9 3 .774 27 . 0 526.8o2 52 6.592 1 LU~ = 3 . 234 53 . 0 7 4 . 2 5 3 7 4 . 2 5 3 BPAK 2 . 330 20 . 0 349.449 3 4 9 . 4 4 9 1 TUNE 5 .911 59 . 0 2 3 3 . 8 3 0 233 . 830 1 cl.EC A . 5 4 7 6 1 . 0 164.786 164.78Q 1 FRCN 3 . 4 9 3 4 6 . 0 196 .578 196.978 2 OR I V A - 9 2 0 38 . 0 4 4 4 . 9 2 0 444.9 2 0 7 CIA S 6 1. 246 99 1 1 .0 2 31 .252 2 3 3 -612 2 M;..:R 3 .7 74 27 . 0 526. 592 526. 592 1 L P T S A . 131 171 2 1.1 14 .122 1 4 . 2 8 9 16 5. 528 34 2 . 0 296.830 29 6 . 6 3 0 10 * A ? g 6 1.533 52 . 0 541 .653 ' 5 4 1 . 6 5 3 5 • B-Af-; 7 1 . 6 5 5 40 8 217 5 3 . 1 7 4 . 9 5 3 16C.109 5 FACL 13 1. 327 47 8 321 6 7 . 1 5 0 . 9 7 9 156.210 1 S A V E R A G E TIME/TRANS = AVERAGE TIME/TRAMS EXCLUDING ZERO ENTRIES /o: V. 7. O lf> r l fij C Cf ^ •-.-if- f". f rjC p-| <; m . I-, £ • • • .• M -\ C O i M r ^ i n < ' X :> '-J ,* v~ J5 T; C7* — r\) -J j - , so C --• -J/ w r~ rr> 0~*r>\*trir-<T<z*Jt r,>tf*-Ct C r-|(\ *J IT -f rfti""! -« —. O C f N <IT IT" * C ' M « O Q J «*if- * IP ^  * W | N J S T ^ - O l " * ! 1 . - • C O " - r j - i | r o r- r- i.. c ' j *-4 "t . j . r» o * - -r, c i - 1 r , —• f i *• J"'. c . n i j - r-_ f\: c- -t a u. i : ~> O O r-- © kft >*> f\i O C^'l'J ~-J-Oj^iZt--rvJXI ^ m n N,N - i i a > i c I > ^ m c o >—-2 ^ C- C- C- O-t> » O O N rA ?|5 3 af > f*> O CT- O f\i -C 1- O O c a c * rv P- 0" -O si fvilfl f l >f o; -' O -1 O O -- -o o -r 7- f O fA N 1 JJ I O O O C « I iT\ O r- 7. O «f 1A 0 • ^ . J5 Q ^ f/ "1| -I O C H TO y J" o* o ; o — .-M • > N -1 ^  M l O -- O r - i J C ' / v f A - T - r * CO -V O O •Jv (1 0 ^ -o 17"C N >f " CD P" ol > ' < l ^ i N < O I ' l - , ^ * l l W r * J I > C O ' CT-CT- r- r-> f O O O O O ' N C C <NJ -J C C O O G O O O O O C fN f" -* O -« O I / M , M ^ in a o o o o -* o o o c o o c o o o O -5 o o o o o o o O fN r*1 m «c tc r- fr 3 C o — 1 •Of" o-o-2 V? - 1 o o o 00 o o o o r i SUMMARY CF The UTILIZATION OF FACILITIES ICfL" F A C ) FUL LKGP.D MATRIX 8 i L ' RCW/COLUMN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 4 9 10 / / 1 0 18360 18360 13360 18360 18360 lSjoO 18360 ie'oo 1-360 0 11 160 11 160 11 160 11160 11 160 11160 11 160 111':') 9 7 20 3 c 7200 7200 7200 7200 7200 7200 7200 72-r f - 4 0 A 0 3601 3509 5 364 3950 4390 5070 4574 39 31 13 32 5 0 500 487 74 4 548 609 704 63 5 546 144 6 0 45 0 337 450 450 480 430 440 2>5 1 " 0 7 0 4702 2799 6523 J317 5151 4922 5205 3250 0 8 0 0 0 82 303 56 0 0 5 6 0 9 0 540 402 540 540 54 0 540 540 270 525 ( • 10 0 1305 797 1200 753 1160 970 1157 812 0 • -! RC/COLUKN 11 12 13 14 15 1 6 17 18 19 ?c . j 1 18360 18340 18360 18360 18360 18360 18360 18 360 183o0 l«160 '] 9720 4860 4840 4860 11160 11160 16360 18360 18360 I d s O ' 1 3 8640 13500 13500 13500 7200 7200 0 0 0 0 - A A A69 1 455 170 -12 3803 2151 -18 -18 -18 -1» '' z 54 107 1 2 0 528 298 0 0 0 0 ; 6 1080 1080 1080 1080 450 2°2 450 450 450 450 ' 1 7 0 1446 136 0 4039 1833 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 V-j | 9 176 487 54 -3 540 348 0 0 C 0 10 0 593 1094 0 106 2 852 0 0 0 0 : i •' i R C M / C C L U K I 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 so 1 18 360 18360 18360 18360 18360 18360 18360 18360 1 8360 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 4tlo0 4860 4 8^0 0 3 18 360 18360 18 360 18360 18360 18360 13500 13500 13530 0 A 10079 7252 9657 7 36 2 3102 6279 1455 1 70 -1 2 0 5 548 394 52 5 400 168 34 1 10 7 12 0 0 ROhS 6-10, COLUMNS 21-30 ARE ZERO ROWS 1-10, COLUMNS 31-50 ARE ZERO -'.'.1 ROW/COLUMN 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 50 1 18360 18360 18360 18360 18360 18360 18360 13360 1?360 151*0 V 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 :. j • .. 3 18360 18360 18360 18360 18360 18360 16300 18360 16360 18360 183 1615 1450 330 477 305 <1 9 74 9 5656 23 19 ! i 5 9 87 78 17 25 20 4 530 313 109 : i • • ROMS 6-1C COLUMNS 51-60 ARE ZERO ROW/COLUMN 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 1 18 360 18360 18360 18360 18360 18360 lSioO 18360 18360 0 2 1U60 4 660 4860 0 18360 18360 18 360 18360 18 360 0 7 20O 13 800 13500 18 340 n 0 0 • 0 0' j o 4317 1125 152 3763 599 83 U 204 RC»S 6-10, COLUMNS 61-70 ARE ZERO -10 0 -18 0 ro o • A GRAPH OF SERVICE TIMES FOR EACH GENERAL JOB (Y=SERVICE TIME IN MIN.) 1200 1170 1 140 1110 S4C + 510 + 4-4-4-+ • 480 + + + j 4t)0 + + + ! A 20 + + + + + + + i 390 + + + + + 36 0 + + + + + J 330 + + + + + + + + + ! 3C.0 + + + + + + + i 270 + + + + + + + + + + ! 2^0 + + + + + + + + i 210 + + + + + + + + + + + + + ! IOO + + + + + + + + + +• + + + + + j 150 + + + + + + ++ + + + + + + + + + 120 + + + + + * + ... . • + + + + + + + ^0 + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + 60 + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + 30 + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + ! 0 + + + + ++++•••+ + + ++++ + ++++++ + +++++ + + +++++- + + + + + + + +++++++++++ + + + + + 4 + + + + + + + + + + H ++++++++++++ LUBE tiR A K TUNE ELEC FKON ORIV CHAS M A J R j ro H SA o •LPTS* IS TIME -TO OBTAIN LOCAL PARTS ONLY • • THRU' I s SEPV TIME FOR JOB IN AND OUT CF SHOP 'WAR E ' I s TIME TO OBTAIN WAREHOUSE PARTS ONLY • • PART• I s TIME TO OBTAIN ALL PARTS FOR ALL JOBS 12C0 •FACL' I s TI ME JOB WAITS TO OBTAIN REOO FACILIT IES 1170 + • 1 140 1 1 10 • A GRAPH OF SEPVICE TIMES FOR SPECIAL PHASES OF JOB PROCESSING 1080 1050 1020 950 960 530 9 CO 870 e4 0 810 780 750 72 0 69C 660 6 30 600 570 540 510 480 450 4 2 0 390 360 330 300 270 240 210 lao I S O 120 90 6 0 H-+++++4- + + + + + + 4 + + + + + +-*-PART FACL • ro •i s o i o o V 98 + 4- 4 / ? 96 4 + + S 94 4 + • 92 + A GRAPH OF DELAYS AS PERCENT OF TOTAL TIME IN SHOP 90 + + + 88 + + 4 8 6 • + + 84 • + 4 32 4 + 4 eo 4 + + 78 4 + + 76 + • 4 74 4 + + 72 4 + 4 70 4 + + 68 + + 4 66 4 + 4 64 4 + + 6 2 4 + 4 6 0 4 + + 5 3 4 + + 56 4 + + 64 4 + + , • 52 4 + + 50 4 4 4 43 4 + 4 46 + ++++++++ 4 4 44 4 + 4 + + 42 + + + + + 40 4 + + + 4 38 4 + 4 + + 36 4 + 4 + + 34 4 4' 4 + + 32 4 + + + 4 30 4 44 4*- 4 4 + + 2 8 4 4 • 4 - + 4 + 4 2 6 • 4 4 4 4 4 + 2 4 4 4 4 - 4 44 4 4 4 4 4 4 + + 4 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 + 2 C'- 4 4 4 4 4 4 4- + + . IS 4 4 4 4 4 4 + + + 16 4 * • 4 4 4 t + + + I A 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 + \z 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 + i c 4 4 4- 4 4 + + + + 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4. + tj * • 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 *• 4 4 4 + 4 • + + ? 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + + 0 4 4 4 44 + 44 4 4 4 4 4 -4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 H ++++++++ PAP.T FACL SERV . THRU f - ' 5 A ********************************* ******* Q U E U E S Q U E U E M A X I M U M AV ER A G E T O T A L Z E R O P E R C E N T A V E R A G E $ A V E R A G E T A B L E C U R R E N T C O N T E N T S C O N T E N T S E N T R I E S E N T R I E S Z E R O S T I M E / T R A N S T I M E / T R A N S N U - M 8 F R C O N T E N T S L U BO 2 5 . 3 3 0 8 1 . 0 7 4 . 9 6 2 7 4 . 9 6 2 B P K 0 6 1 . 0 0 0 1 . 0 4 . 0 0 0 4 . 0 0 0 E H * 0 8 3 . 3 3 7 2 3 . 0 2 6 9 . 6 9 5 2 6 9 . 6 9 5 T U N C 9 . 8 0 S 6 1 . 0 2 4 2 . 4 0 9 2 4 2 . 4 0 9 1 T U M O 1 . 0 4 6 1 . 0 8 4 5 . 0 0 0 8 4 5 . 0 0 0 T U N 1 1 2 . 0 3 1 5 . 0 I 1 5 . 0 0 0 1 i 5 - 0 0 0 E L E l 2 1 . 0 1 6 5 . 0 6 0 . 3 9 9 6 0 . 3 9 9 E L E 1 3 2 . 1 1 4 8 . 0 2 6 3 . 8 7 5 2 6 3 . o / 5 2 E L E 1 4 1 . C 4 5 5 . 0 1 6 6 . 7 9 9 1 6 6 . 7 9 9 , E L L 1 5 6 . 7 2 5 5 1 . 0 2 6 1 . 3 3 3 2 6 1 . 3 3 3 . F t T ' 1 6 3 1 . 4 6 4 3 8 . 0 2 2 4 . 2 6 3 2 2 4 . 2 6 3 . 1 F P . T 1 7 2 . 0 o 5 1 3 . 0 1 2 0 . 4 6 1 1 2 0 . 4 s l F P T I 8 1 . 0 2 9 3 . 0 1 3 2 . 0 0 0 1 8 2 . 0 0 0 DP V Vi 1 . C 7 1 4 . 0 3 2 6 . 0 0 0 3 2 6 . 0 0 0 0 K V 2 0 2 . 3 3 5 2 1 . 0 3 3 7 . 2 8 5 3 3 7 . 2 8 5 I D R V 2 1 2 . 2 9 7 1 3 . 0 4 2 0 . 4 6 1 4 2 0 . 4 6 1 DR V 2 2 1 . 0 4 2 3 . 0 2 6 1 . 0 0 0 2 6 1 . 0 0 0 C H A 2 3 2 . 10 4 1 1 . 0 1 7 3 . 8 1 8 1 7 3 . o l a 1 C H A 2 4 2 . 0 1 9 / t . 0 9 1 . 7 5 0 9 1 . 7 5 0 C H A 2 5 1 . 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 . 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 C H A 2 6 2 . 1 4 6 1 1 . 0 2 4 3 . 8 1 8 2 4 3 . 8 1 3 C H A 2 7 1 . 0 6 5 1 1 . 0 1 0 9 . 3 6 3 1 0 9 . 3 6 3 1 C H A 2 3 4 . 9 7 4 7 9 . 0 2 2 6 . 6 0 7 2 2 6 . 6 0 7 2 MJ?.29 3 . 7 7 6 3 0 . 0 4 7 5 . 3 6 6 4 7 5 . 3 6 6 1 L ua E 5 . 3 3 0 3 1 . 0 7 4 . 9 6 2 7 4 . 9 ( > 2 8RA.< . 3 3 3 2 4 . 0 2 5 3 . 6 2 5 2 5 6 . o 2 5 V j N c . 8 8 2 6 7 . 0 2 4 1 . 8 9 5 2 4 1 . 8 9 5 1 E L E C 6 . 9 0 2 6 9 . 0 2 4 0 . 2 1 7 2 4 0 - 2 1 7 2 F R C N . 5 7 9 5 4 . 0 1 q 6 . 9 ? 5 1 9 6 . 9 2 5 I OX I V 3 . 7 9 7 4 1 . 0 3 5 6 . 9 7 5 3 5 6 - 9 7 5 1 C H A S 5 1 . 3 1 0 1 1 8 2 1 . 6 2 0 3 . 9 4 9 2 0 7 . 4 u 5 4 FA J R 3 . 7 7 6 3 0 . 0 4 7 5 . 3 6 6 4 7 5 . 3 6 6 f 1 L P ' S 4) . 1 5 4 2 0 4 6 2 . 9 1 8 . 8 8 2 1 4 . 3 0 3 T KkU 1 6 5 . 9 3 8 3 9 8 . 0 2 7 4 . 0 1 0 2 7 4 . 0 1 0 1 0 w A fj 5 . 5 6 7 4 9 . 0 3 6 2 . 5 1 0 3 6 2 . 5 1 0 3 P A R T 6 1 - 1 2 1 4 8 4 2 6 0 5 3 . 7 4 2 . 5 5 1 9 1 . 9 4 1 3 F A C L 1 2 1 . 8 1 7 5 9 0 3 5 0 5 9 . 3 5 6 . 5 5 2 1 3 9 . 0 2 4 3 i A V b k A C E T I M E / I F A N S = A V E R A G E T I M E / T R A N S E X C L U D I N G Z E R O E N T R I E S s e> • T A 8 L E 10 E N T k l E S IN TA6LE MEAN AH GU M E NT S T A N 0 A R 0 D E V I A T I O N SUM Or AKilUMEN TS 368 4 6 . 5 4 1 2 5 9 . 0 0 0 1 6 8 3 4 . 0 0 0 Nn. - : -wr IGHTr 0 U^^ETt E 3 S E R V E 0 CUMULAT IVE L I M I T - 3 C 0 - 2 70 - 2 5 0 - 2 1 0 - I 30 f KEGUE.NCY 19 1 3 - 1 5 0 - 1 2 0 - 6 0 - 3 0 90 1 2 0 1 5 0 1 6 0 2 1 0 2 6 0 2 7 0 3 0 0 3 3 0 3 6 0 3 9 0 A 20 A 5 0 A 60 5 1 0 _ 5 A 0 5 7 0 6 0 0 6 3 0 6 6 0 6 9 0 7 5 0 7 6 0 6 10 6 4 0 6 7 0 9 0 0 9 30 5 60 9 9 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 5 0 _1CB0__ m o 1140 1 1 1 ! I2G0 1 2 3 0 12 40 OF TOTAL 4 . 6 9 . 2 5 . 7 7 I . 0 0 1 . 2 3 2 . 3 1 4 . 6 9 5 . 4 1 0 . 76 1 2 . 1 1 1 0 . 3 0 C U M U L A T I V F P E 6 C E N I ACE 4 . 6 5 . 1 5 - 9 7 . 7 9 . 0 26 2 5 15 13 14 6 . 4 4 3 . 8 6 3 . 35 3 . 6 0 3 . 6 0 9 10 2 . 3 1 2 . 5 7 1 . 5 4 1 . 5 4 1 . 2 6 1 . 0 3 . 2 5 1 . 5 4 1 . 0 3 . 5 1 . 5 1 1 . 2 6 . 7 7 . 2 5 . 5 1 . 0 0 . 2 5 .00 . 2 5 . 5 1 . C O . 5 1 . 0 0 "Too"" . 0 0 . 0 0 . 0 0 . 0 0 U . 3 1 6 . 2 2 1 . 6 3 0 . 4 4 2 . 5 5 2 . 8 5 9 . 5 6 5 . 9 6 9 . 3 7 3 . 1 7 6 . 6 6 0 . 4 6 2 . 7 6 5 . 3 8 6 . 3 6 8 . 4 8 9 . 6 9 0 . 7 9 0 . 9 9 2 - 5 9 3 . 5 9 4 . 0 9 4 . 6 9 5 . 8 9 6 . 6 9 6 . 9 9 7 . 4 9 7 . 4 9 6 . 1 5 fi." I 9 9 . 4 9 9 . 4 9 9 . 4 9 9 . 4 9 9 . 4 » E M A I.MU 6 9 5 . 1 9 4 . 8 9 4 . 0 9 2 . 2 9 0 . 9 36 . 6 8 3 - 7 7 8 . 3 6 9 . 5 5 7 . 4 4 7 . 1 4 0 . 4 3 4 . 0 3 0 . 1 2 6 . 8 2 3 . 1 1 9 . 5 1 7 . 2 1 6 . 6 1 3 . 1 1 1 . 5 1 0 . 3 9_._2_ 9 . 0 7 . 4 6 . 4 6 . 9 5 . 4 4 . 1 3 . 3 3 . 0 2 . 5 2 . 5 2 . 3 1 . 8 1 . 0 1 . 0 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 M u L J ^ H L E _ C r ,".CAN - 6 . 1 6 0 - 5 . 5 6 2 - 4 . 9 4 4 - 4 . 3 2 6 - 3 . 7 0 8 - 3 V C 9 0 - 2 . 4 7 2 - 1. 6 5 4 - 1 . 2 3 6 - . 6 1 8 - . U O Q 1 . 2 3 6 1 . 6 5 4 2 . 4 7 2 3 . 0 9 0 3_. 7 0 8 _ 4 . 3 2 6 4 . 9 4 4 5 - 5 6 2 6 . 1 6 0 6 . 796 7 . 4 1 6 8 . 034 8 . o i 2 9 . 2 7 0 9 . 6 6 6 1 0 . 5 0 6 _ U . 1 2 4 _ 1 1 . 742 1 2 . 3 6 0 1 2 . 5 7 6 I 3 . 5 9 6 1 6 . 2 1 4 _ 1 4 . 6 i 2 _ ~ l " 6 . ' o b 1 6 . 0 6 8 1 6 . t .66 1 7 . 3 0 4 1 7 . 9 2 2 _ 1 8 . 5 4 0 _ 19". 1 5 3 1 9 . 7 7 6 2 0 . 3 9 5 2 1 . 0 1 3 2 1 . o 3 1 2 2 . 2 4 9 2 2 . . 5 5 7 2 3 . 4 8 5 2 4 . 1 0 3 2 4 . 7 2 1 2 5 . 3 3 5 , .25,95,7 . 04 V I A * I Fan .H v7"A\ - I . ) 4 5 - 1 - 2 2 9 - 1 . 114 - . 6 9 3 - • 3 6 2 - ,*7r.&. - . 6 5 0 - . 5 3 4 - . 4 1 9 - . 3 0 3 - . 1 67 . 0 4 4 . 160 . 2 7 4 . 3 9 1 . 5 0 J _ - o 2 1 . 7 3 9 . 556 . 9 7 0 1 . 0 6 6 _ 1 . 2 0 2 _ f.".»i"a 1. •34 1 . 6 5 0 1 . 6 65 1 . 7 8 1 __1 . *W7__ 2 . O i l 2 . 1 29 2 . 2 4 5 2 . 3 6 " 2 . 4 76 2 . 5 9 2 2 . if ; - ! " 2 . ? 2 4 2 . 9 J 9 3 . 0 6 5 3 . 1 7 1 _ 3 . 2 8 7 _ 3 . 4 0 3 3 . 4 1 9 3 . 5 3 4 3 . 750 3 . 8 6 6 _ ' - " 6 2 _ . 4 .095 A . 2 IA 4 . 3 2 9 4 . 4 4 6 4 . 6 6 1 4 . 6 7 7 14 10 1 4 4 0 AVERAGE V A L U E OF OVERFLOW . 0 0 . 0 0 . 0 0 . 0 0 . 0 0 . 0 0 . 5 1 1 9 1 7 . 0 0 9 9 . 4 9 9 . 4 9 9 . 4 9 9 . 4 9 9 . 4 9 9 . 4 1 0 0 . 0 .5 .5 .5 2 6 . 5 7 5 2 7 . 1V3 2 7 . 3 1 1 2 8 . 4 2 9 2 9 . 0 4 7 2 9 . 6 5 5 4 . 7 9 3 4 . 9 0 9 5 . 0 24 6 . 1 4 0 5 . 2 5 6 A S U G A R Y Cf T H E U T I L I Z A T I O N OF F A C I L I T I E S I C O L " F A C » I fULL'.ORO M A T R I X 8 RGW/COLUMN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 0 16360 18360 18160 18360 18160 16360 18 J 6 0 1 * 3 4 0 18160 \ 2 0 11160 11 160 11 160 U160 1 1 1 6 0 11160 11 160 1 1 1 6 0 5720 3 0 7200 7200 7 20 0 7200 7 2 0 0 72u0 7 2 0 0 7 2 0 0 •»5A0 A 0 4501 4739 6061 A 721 4768 5290 4 8 7 4 360 1 1*63 5 0 625 653 84 1 665 660 734 635 500 217 A 0 450 337 450 450 460 4 50 4 6 0 22 5 1 0 8 0 7 0 4539 4492 7276 4364 4552 55 31 5069 3473 0 8 . 0 0 0 0 ' 34 3 3 0 0 103 0 9 0 540 402 556 540 540 543 540 270 706 10 0 1008 947 1200 858 956 1U1 111Z 935 0 P.CW/COLUK:* 11 12 13 14 1 5 16 17 1 3 lo 20 1 18360 18360 16360 18360 18360 16 360 163o0 1336(1 16 360 18160 2 9720 4660 4660 4 86 0 11160 11160 183u0 18360 18360 tS360 3 8640 13300 13500 13500 7200 7200 0 0 0 0 A 506 1 6 39 592 -12 4501 3968 -13 -16 -16 -1 8 5 58 121 63 0 625 551 0 0 0 0 6 1080 1080 1080 1080 450 292 450 450 450 450 7 0 1664 632 0 5456 2284 0 . 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 183 599 219 -3 540 348 0 0 0 0 10 0 1 0 1 5 1067 0 1212 575 0 0 0 ROW/COLUMN 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 26 29 30 1 16360 18360 18360 18360 18360 16360 18360 18360 18360 0 2 C 0 0 0 0 0 46o0 4 8 6 0 48t>0 0 3 18360 16360 18360 16360 18360 18360 13500 13500 13 50C 0 A 12C80 6500 10505 6161 4628 6609 1639 59 2 - 1 r 0 5 657 462 593 . .443 262 359 121 43 0 0 KOhS 6-10, C O L U M N S 21-30 ARE ZERO P.CJaS 1-10, C O L U M N S 31-50 ARE ZERO R C W C U L U M ' l 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 56 59 6 0 1 13 3 6 0 18360 16 360 18360 1 8360 18360 13360 16360 18360 15360 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 16 360 18360 18360 16360 18360 18360 18360 16366 16360 16>60 A 293 1872 1156 569 550 532 55 9345 6113 2717 5 15 101 62 30 29 28 2 508 332 147 I.OWS 6-10. C O L U M N S 51-60 ARE ZERO kOn/COLUKN, 61 62 6 3 64 65 6 6 67 68 69 70 1 16 360 18360 18 360 18360 16360 18360 18360 18360 IP 360 0 2 11150 4860 A660 0 ' 18 360 18360 183o0 18360 18360 0 3 7 200 13 5 0 0 13600 1 9360 9 . 0 c 6 0 0 J 4 4776 1308 317 6260 -18 -18 -18 -18 -18 0 5 663 96 23 340 0 0 0 0 0 0 BUV.S 6-10, C O L U M N S 61-70 ARE Z E R O SB A GRAPH OF SERVICE TIKES FOR EACH GENERAL JOB (Y=SERVICE TIME IN MIN.) 1200 1170 114G 1110 i c a o 1050 10?0 S9C 560 _ 9 3C_ 900 B70 fcAO 810 780 750 720 + 690 + 660 • 630 • 60C * _57G__«_ 54C • 510 • 480 • '.50 + 420 + 390 * 360 330 300 270 240 210 180 150 120 60 30 ro ro O • +-+++++•+++-++•++• LUBE BRAK TUNE ELEC -S-J5 CHAS MSJR 1 CZ 1 t A G R A P H C F S E R V I C E T I M E S F O R S P E C I A L P H A S E S OF J O B P R O C E S S I N G 12CC 1170 1140 1110 1C8C 1059 1020 990 96 0 n c _ 90 0 870 840 810 780 750 720 690 660 630 600 540 510 480 450 420 390 360 330 300 270 240 210 180 150 120 90 60 3i>_ 0 ' L P T S ' I S T I M E T O O B T A I N L O C A L P A R T S O N L Y ' T H R U ' I S S E R V T I M E F O R J O B I N A N D O U T O F S H O P 1 W A R E 1 I S T I M E T O O B T A I N W A R E H O U S E P A R T S O N L Y ' P A R T • I S T I M E T O O B T A I N A L L P A R T S F O R A L L J O B S ' F A C L ' I S T I M E J O B W A I T S TO O B T A I N R E Q D F A C I L I T I E S • • + +-* + +-*- + + ++ + + + -t-+'+H L P T S T H R U W A R E F A C L S B ro ro H 100 98 56 5 4 92 9G 83 3 6 A GRAPH OF DELAYS AS PERCENT CF TOTAL TIME IN SHOP 84 • 8? • 80 + 78 • 76 + 74 • 72 70 63 66 64 62 60 + 53 • 56 • 54 • 52 * 50 * 48 + 46 + 44 • 42 • 40 • 33 • +++•++++ 36 • 34 4 -32 * 30 • 23 * 26 • 24 * 22 + 20 • 13 + 1 5 • 1 4 * 1 2 + 1 0 * + + + +• + + + + 0 +* + *4 44 + 4- 4- + + + 4 44 4-4 44-4-4-44 44 4 ( + 4 * 4 + t t t 4 * + 4 + H + t » + 4 4 t t * 4 t + 4 f + l t 4 t t F A C L SERV S B ro ro ro •7 c n ft*************************************** QUEUES * * * * # * t # * * < c * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * CL'EUE MAX I MUM AVERAGE TOTAL ZERO PERCENT AVERAGE S A V E R A G E T A B L E CURRENT CONTENTS CUNTEN1S ENTR1ES E N T R I E S ZEROS T I M E / T R A N S T I M E / T R A N S NUMBER CONTENTS i u r « o ? 3 . 2 5 6 64 . 0 7 3 . 4 6 3 7 3 . 4 5 3 8 R X C 6 1 . 0 0 0 1 . 0 6 . 0 0 0 6 . 0 0 0 3 8 * 0 7 1 . 0 4 0 1 . 0 7 4 6 . 0 0 0 7 4 6 . 0 0 0 BRK0 8 2 . 3 9 5 17 . . . . . 0 4 2 7 . 4 7 0 4 2 7 . 4 7 0 1 TUt.09 5 . 8 7 3 52 . 0 3 0 3 . 5 5 7 3 0 8 . 5 5 7 1 TU.V'IC 1 . 0 0 8 1 . 0 1 6 0 . 0 0 0 1 6 0 . 0 0 0 T I : ' : 1 1 1 . 02 4 7 . 0 6 9 . 2 8 6 6 9 . 2 8 5 . EL? 12 I . 0 1 3 5 . 0 5 0 . 5 9 9 5 0 . 5 9 9 f I E 1 3 1 . 031 5 . 0 1 14.109 1 1 4 . 1 9 9 E L C 1 4 1 . . 0 1 5 4 . 0 6 9 . 2 5 0 6 9 . 2 50 E L i . 1 5 A . 4 8 5 4 6 . 0 1 9 3 . 6 5 2 1 9 3 . 6 5 2 1 F T - T l o 3 . 4 0 9 33 . 0 2 2 7 . 7 8 7 2 2 7 . 7S7 2 r - T 1 7 1 . 1 2 5 10 . 0 2 2 9 . 5 9 9 22 9 . 5 9 9 FR T 18 1 . 00 7 .3 . 0 4 3 . 3 3 3 4 3 . 333 0 R V 1 9 1 . 0 3 9 2 . 0 3 5 8 . 5 0 0 3 5 8 . 5 0 0 D R V 2 0 3 . 3 8 8 2 0 . 0 3 5 7 . 149 3 5 7 . 1 4 9 DRV21 2 . 2 9 8 13 . 0 4 2 1 - 3 8 4 4 2 1 . 3 6 4 1 DRV22 1 . 1 1 9 3 . 0 7 3 0 . 3 3 3 7 3 0 . 3 3 3 C H A 2 3 2 . 109 8 . 0 2 5 0 . 8 7 5 2 5 0 . 3 7 5 CMA24 1 . 0 8 0 4 . 0 2 3 4 . 0 0 0 2 3 4 . 0 0 0 0. C H A 2 5 1 . 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 . 0 . 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 C H A 2 5 2 . 158 10 . 0 2 9 0 . 8 9 9 2 9 0 . 3 9 9 C H A 2 7 1 . C 7 5 9 . 0 154.464 15 4 . 4 4 4 C H A 2 8 4 . 8 7 3 6 7 . 0 2 3 9 . 5 3 7 2 3 9 . 5 3 7 1 M ; 9 2 9 i . 84 9 27 . 0 5 7 7 . 5 5 2 8 7 7 . 5 9 2 1 LU 3 E . 2 5 6 6 4 . 0 7 3 . 4 5 3 7 3 . 4 5 3 BR AX 2 . 4 3 6 19 . 0 4 2 2 . 0 5 2 4 2 2 . 0 5 2 1 TUNE 5 . 90 3 6 0 . . . . 0 2 7 8 . 1 6 6 2 7 3 . 1 6 6 1 E L E C 4 . 545 60 . 0 1 6 6 . 8 1 5 1 6 6 . 8 1 6 1 F R.G N 3 . 541 4 6 . 0 2 1 6 . 1 5 2 2 1 6 . 1 5 2 2 l ) » IV 4 . 84 5 38 . 0 4 0 R . 6 6 7 4 -08 . n i / } C U A S 6 1 . 2 6 3 99 1 1 . 0 2 3 5 . 2 6 2 2 3 7 . 6 6 3 1 MAJR 3 . 84 9 2 7 . 0 5 7 7 . 5 9 2 5 7 7 . 5 9 2 1 L P T S 5 . 1 5 3 1 7 9 2 1 . 1 . 1 5 . 7 4 8 . . 1 5 . 9 2 6 THRU 16 5 . 6 7 0 342 . 0 3 0 4 . 4 4 1 3 0 4 . 4 4 1 c AR E 5 •1. 51 1 52 . 0 5 3 3 . 8 0 7 5 3 3 . 8 0 7 4 A = r 7 I . 6 6 5 4 1 3 214 5 1 . 8 7 4 . 0 3 6 1 6 3 . 65 3 4 r AC L 12 1 . 46 3 4 9 2 3 2 9 6 6 . 8 5 4 . 7 9 6 1 6 5 . 3 9 8 1 SAVERAGE T IME/TRANS = AVERAGE T I M E / T R A N S E X C L U D I N G ZERO E N T R I E S ro O O — o z t> o- o< c- C < s- +r -a -c c j O* O1 c ? • l -r tM O O O c ^ r- ^ — l i l t j r- r- ui . o o o -o .r o o- -c O C M <o <\ ( C; O O o O c — -* 1 t 1 - t> r- IT. «1 -C • r O .-J ^ C- ^ O o ' C N K C •» (M r-* eg rs i i A f i r- H o-> o o- c- cr- o-u-. * CO CD -0 -o «J ir> j- < ? C* f » (f c tr *e o • * f- r t» J1* "fl if* "J* u " « D N Cl 'J* " O. r«\ O V 'fi f\ u-i -0 • o « v* -f «• r r « - 0 i f M A - / O ] ' ' * i 0 > i t ) r " O C C ? Cf- O C <y c"i ~* O C o O i ~ e? i C- p« i . % -c — . « V •» -t K M ? > i> o o • C - " • O O P o O O C O- C O". o c > r> O O r> • • O -O 3" o o o o u-. -a -« ^ r- r- cc 0" J CM o 3 -O O .* O H .• ) >JO > ^ " o p C C- ff tT- <. O O O O O f f- r- t- r» : y j f J' o o o o a c o o o o o -o o c o o c< <*» O -i" "* -J f~- f- to -c 0' v 3- c <j- c 0- <7 t> O < O O O O O t> r. t*- -o s • J".v K UJ T I *g f> •j> •* ^ -J • a o o • v3 o & C V, — ~* o C> O I-I C « O O * . O O o o o o o o o o o o o c o c r- -f O o o c •c rj O " rt 1 i. J n. — — C C ' MT •7- o o o « - c o c o c c r. o- C O (M i " . 0* iT> •C e. rt | t£ — f. rt rt C C C> <^  c. 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J iA <- in INI rt tA C o rt r- , r c: _• r- ui * « rt cc cn or '. c — a a: CC r4 •T: < < < o c o rt to r - C O O M ~ O rt O lO •© rt C o C r- C rt c O C i A - rt c o c ,C C C O IN; r i C -O C ir - i U Ifi TC -e <f — o o -0 ~o -o c rt r-j S m rt ^  oa - r rt <c -o ^ r -O -J- r-l IN rt LA z 3 c o o «A c rt O O rt O O O — O O O O rt -c IM c c a r- O o C3 o o e o •* o O o c O <; O ° *V J". O -0 O IN O (N( O 1_) r. •c -O rt -o <-> rt — IN. u-» »C ^ 13 N£ IAO a. -t rt — « a: r-i -— a -* o VI _t o O O o o o o o o o o O O o — O O C %» o c o X c O o a> <M .X o o c ^ N W < co v- o •3 fv' rt o rt — < O o C rt x ui rt ts* rt ~i r\. -» » *^ -* ^ ic a: X i : D 3 . J .J o o O a o o o o v» •V AJ rt -f ip "P f- » O" o •A o f* «0 J- O u rt ^  iA <M rt <f* Al o JC :c •c -r o o I L A GRAPH GF SERVICE.TIMES FOR EACH GENERAL JOB (Y=SERVICE TIME IN MIN.) 12C0 11 70 1 1'. o 1 IIP 1CB0 1050 1020 560 "3 30 ooo 870 £40 810 780 780 72 0 690 660 630 6CC 570 540 510 480 450 420 390 360 330 • 00 270 24 0 210 180 150 120 90 60 3 0 LU £ E S RAK T UN E E IE C FRGN 0 RI V • 4-4-++•*• +• CHAS -VAJ.~ 6A A G R A P H CF S E R V I C E T I M F S F O R S P E C I A L P H A S E S OF J O B P R O C E S S I N G • L P T S ' I S T I K E T O 0 3 1 A I N L O C A L P A R T S O N L Y ' T H R U 1 I S S E R V T I M E F O R J O B I H A N D OUT O F S H O P  " I !o ' W A R E 1 I S T I M E T O O B T A I N W A R E H O U S E P A R T S O N L Y 1 P A r T• I S T I M E T O O B T A I N A L L P A R T S F O R A L L J O R S 1 2 0 0 4 1 F A C L • I S T I M E J O . l W A I T S TO G i l TA I N R E O O F A C I L I T I E S 1 1 7 0 + 1 1 AO • 1 1 1 0 + 1 0 H 0 4 1 0 S C +• 1 0 2 C • 9 9 0 + 9 6 0 +• 9 3 0 • 0 0 (j 4 8 7 0 • 8 4 0 4 P. 1 0 4 7 H 0 4 7 5 0 • 7 2 0 4 6 9 0 4 6 6 0 + 6 3 0 + 6 0 0 4 • 1 7 0 + b^O 4 5 1 0 • + • 4 4 4 H 0 • 4 4 4 5 0 • 4 4 4 2 0 + + 4 3 9 0 4 4 4 3 6 0 4 4 4 3 3 0 4 4 + 3 0 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 7 0 4 + 4 4 4 2 4 0 + + + 4 4 2 1 0 + 4 + + 4 I c O 4 4 4 4 4 1 5 0 • + 4 + 4 1 2 0 4 + 4 + _ . . . . 9 0 + + + 4 4 6 0 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 0 4 +• 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 0 + + + + + + + + + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 L P T S T H R U W A R E P A R T F A C L TV) <\> -0 100 98 , . . . . . 96 4 4 4 94 4 4 + 92 4 A GPAPH OF DELAYS AS PERCENT OF TOTAL TIKE IN SHOP • 90 + 4 • + 88 4 4 + 86 + 4 4 84 • 4 - + 82 + + + 80 4 + + 78 + + + 76 + + • 74 + 4 + 72 4 + + 70 4 + + 6 8 • + +-66 4 + 4 64 4 + + 6 2 + 4 + 60 + + + 58 + 4 + 56 + 4 • 54 + + + 52 + 4 + 50 + + + 48 * 4 4 s. 4 6 + + +• 44 + 4- 4 - 4 - 4 - 4 - + + 4- 4 4 42 4 4 + - 4 + 40 4 4 - + 4 4 3 8 4 • 4 4 4 3 6 4 4 + 4 + 34 4 4 + • . + 32 4 + 4 4 + 30 4- . 4 4 + + 2 8 +• 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 + 4 + + 2 6 4- 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 + + + + 2 4 •• + + + + + + + 4 22 *- 4 4 + 4 4 + + + 20 + -*- 4 4 _ 4 + + + 4 18 4- 4 4 4 4 4 + + • 1 6 +• 4 4 4 4 4 4 - 4 + 4 + + + + + + + I 2 4- + 4 4 + + 4 4 10 + + 4 + + + + ' 4 -8 4- + + " 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 + + 4 4 4 - 4 4 4 + 4 4- 4 + + + + 4 4 4 2 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 + ' 0 PART FACL SERV THRU ro ro 03-* * * OUEUES * * * s i CUEUE MAXIMUM AVERAGE TOTAL ZERO PERCENT AVERAGE tAVERAGE TARLE CURRENT i CONTENT S CONTENTS ENTRIES ENTRIES ZEROS TIME/TRANS TIME/ TRANS NUMBER CONTENTS ! I.'1BC2 3 . 2 2 7 S3 . 0 50 .253 50 .253 ; 8R*0 6 1 . 0 9 0 1 . 0 10.000 l o . u o o i K R K C 3 3 . 399 26 . 0 28 1.961 281. 961 1 j T!J.\C9 3 . 733 60 . 0 225.899 2 2 5 . 8 9 9 TUMG 1 . 0 2 3 1 . 0 517.000 51 7. 000 j TllHl I 1 . 0 2 7 6 .0 8 5 . 3 3 3 85. 333 1 FLE12 2 . 0'i2 5 . 0 14 6 .399 154.399 i ELE 1 3 2 . 126 8 . 0 291.125 2 9 1 . 1 2 5 2 E LI 1 4 1 . 035 5 . 0 129.699 12V.599 * FLE15 . 70'. 51 . 0 253.627 2 5 3 .627 i F K Tl 6 3 . A A 1 38 . 0 213.342 213 .342 i FRT I 7 2 . 092 13 . 0 130.076 130.076 j ! - .Tl 8 1 .025 3 . 0 158.333 156.333 l.R V 1 9 1 . ()34 4 . 0 16 7. 250 167. 250 i IJRV2 0 3 . 4 9 1 21 . 0 430.142 4 3 0 . 1 4 2 1 UR V2 I 2 . 3 74 13 . 0 528.538 523. 538 i t RV22 1 . 0 3 1 7> . 0 195. 6.66 195. 606 i < HA2 3 2 . 146 11 . 0 244.454 2 4 4 . 4 5 4 2 CHA24 1 .C 74 4 . 0 339.750 339. 750 CHA25 1 . 000 2 2 100-0 .000 . 000 C.HA26 2. - 127 11 . 0 . 212 .727 2 12 .727 CHA27 1 .110 11 . 0 184.000 184.000 1 j CHA28 A 1 . 090 79 . 0 253.506 253 .50o 2 MJR29 3 . 7 6 1 30 . 0 465.833 4 6 5 . 8 3 3 1 1 LLi'.E 3 .227 83 . 0 50 .253 40. 253 bRAK 3 . 399 27 . 0 271 .888 27 1.686 1 j r ijf; E A . 794 67 . 0 217.654 2 1 7 . 6 5 6 ELEC . 90'( 69 . 0 241.797 241 .7v7 2 i F RG N 4 . 5 5 9 54 . 0 190.240 190.240 D M V 4 . 932 41 . 0 417 .460 4 17 . 5 0 0 1 CMAS 5 l . 54 a 118 2 1.6 24 1 . 008 245 .163 i MA JK 3 . 761 3 0 .0 . 465 .8 33 46 6. 83 3 I LPT S 6 . 1 6 2 202 3 1.4 14.782 15.005 i THRU 16 6 .162 39 8 . 0 283 .879 28'3 . 879 10 V* M r\ c 6 1. 3SL • 54 2 3 . 7 469 .888 4 3 7 . 9 6 1 5 i PAST 9 1 - 544 489 245 54. 1 47 .995 126 .607 5 i "• AC L 10 1 .632 58 2 364 62. 5 51. 500 137. 490 1 i Sf.VcRACE TIME/TRANS = AVERAGE TIME/TRANS EXCLUDI NG ZERO ENTRIES i 6 B | i < o I r r r • ll ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; 1 m m m " II In n S . 5 5 7 " il - r- =. 3. ° = M S S S i mil o 2 imr°" s in*!-S i IF m m ' Vis." i * 2 s IIP 2 ? rss= a 1 Pi II' * II' 8 II Ml s m 5 1! s lit 2= 3 I 3 55 s A GRAPH OF S E R V I C E T IMES .. F Oft EACH GENERAL JOB (Y = S E R V I C E T I K E I N M I N . ) 1 2 0 0 11 7C 1 140 JL1JL0_ l C b O 10 SO 1 0 2 0 9 4 0 5 6 0 9 30 9 C 0 8 7 0 8 4 0 BIO 7 8 0 7 90 7 2 0 • 6 9 0 • 6 6 0 + 6 3 0 • 6 0 0 * 5 7 0 * 540 5 1 0 4 8 0 4 50 4 2 0 3 5 0 3 ' .0 3 30 2 7 C 2 4 0 2 10 1 8 0 I 5 0 ro ro L U B E B.**K TUNE r.LEC DRIV r++- + + + + + +- + + + -l--r + + + -.+ « - H ChAS M A J < •WAR E' IS TI^E TO OBTAIN WAREHOUSE PARTS ONLY • PARI ' I S TIME TO OBTAIN ALL PARTS FOR ALL JOBS 1200 •f • r ACL• IS TIME JOB WAITS TO OBTAIN REQD FACIL IT IES 1170 1 140 + 1110 * A GRAPH CF SERVICE TIMES FOR SPECIAL PHASES CF JOS PROCESSING • LPT S' IS TIME TO OBTAIN LOCAL PARTS ONLY 108 0 1 CSO 1020 44 0 9 30 90C 370 840 310 780 7 2 0 * 690 + 660 +• 630 *• 600 • 570 + 5^0 •4 510 +• 480 + . . . _ 4S>0 + +• + •*• + 420 +• + +• 39 0 +> + +-360 330 300 270 240 ?. I f 160 1 SO 120-90 60 +++++++++++++ LPTS rl AR E PART FACL V 93 + 4 4 ? 96 + 4 + 94 • 4 4-92 + A GRAPH OF 0EL AYS AS PERCENT CF TOTAL .TIME IN SHOP 90 • 4 4-8 3 + 4- 4 8 6 4 4 4 84 4 + + 82 4 4 4-80 + 4 4 78 4 4- + 76 4 4 4 7 4 4 4 4 72 4 4 4 70 4 4 4 6 3 4 4- 4 66 4 4 4 64 4- 4 4-6? 4- 4 4 60 4 4 4-53 4 4 4-56 • 4 4-54 4- 4- 4 52 + 4 4 50 4 4- 4-43 4- 4 4 - 4 4 4 4 4 - 4 4 4-46 4- + 4- 4- 4-44 4 4 4 4 + 42 + + 4 4 4 4 0 4 4- 4- 4 3 8 4 •+ 4- 4 4-3 6 4 + 4 4- 4 34 + + 4 4 4-32 4 + + 4- . . . . 4-30 + 4 4 4 4 28 + + 4 4 4-2', 4 4 4 - 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 24 * 4 - 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + + 4 4 4 + 22 4 + + + + 4 4 + 4-20 4 +• + + . . + . . . + 4- _.. 4 + . . . . „ . ....... -13 4 + + + + 4 4- 4 4- • 16 4- + + 4 + 4 4 4 4 14 4 4 + + + 4 4- 4 4-12 4 + + + +• 4 4 4- 4 10 4- 4 + 4 4 4 4- 4- 4-8 4 + 4 4 4 4- 4 4 4 6 4 + + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + . + 4 4 4 4- 4-2_ -4_ 4 4 4 + 4 4 1 r + 4 4 + +. + +.f-f + + 4 - - t - 4 - t - 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 f 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 1-444-4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4-4 4 4 4 PAH r FACL S ERV THRU I i 1 (oB> TV) CUEUES CUEL'E VAX I NIC AVERAGE TOTAL ZERO PCRCF.NT AVRACE ^AVERAGE TABLE CURRENT CONTENTS CG.NT = .\'TS EN TRIES ENTRIES ZERCS TIMC/TR AN S TIME/TRANS NUMBER CCINTENTS LUBC2 3 . 254 92 - 0 6 7 . 7 93 6 7 .793 8RKC6 1 .00 1 1 . 0 3 ? . C C C 32.COO BRK03 3 .402 32 -C 308.312 308. 312 2 TUNCs 5 1. 211 e6 . 0 344.802 3 4 4 . 8 0 2 3 TUN10 1 .012. i . 0 314. COO- 3 1 4 . 0 0 0 T U M 1 2 .13 1 9 . C 3 5 8. C C C 35e. CCC 1 E L E 12 2 . C64 8 .0 212 .000 212.000 1 EL E 1 3 <c . 1 2 3 6 . 0 3 /:). 3 /5 i I U . 3 75 E L E1 1 .0 7 8 7 . C 275.714 2 7 5 . 7 1 4 1 ELE15 6 . eC7 62 . 0 3 l e . 983 3 i e . 5 8 3 1 FR ( 11 5 . 6 7 1 48 .0 342 .708 342.708 2 FR Tl 7 '2 . 1 5 9 17 . 0 230.294 230 .294 1 FRT18 1 .07 9 5 • c 3ee. CCO 388. CCC 1 OR'/ 1 9 1 . 1 C4 5 .0 51 ) . 6 H 5 1 3 . 5 9 9 CRV20 . 6 6 4 28 . 0 580.856 580 .856 1 DRV? 1 3 . 4 36 20 . 0 5 3 2 . 6 9 9 5 3 2 . 6 9 9 2 0HV22 1 .C .36 3 -C 298 .666 2 9 8 . 6 6 6 C H * 2 3 2 .223 13 . 0 . 4 2 0 . 3 8 4 420 . 3 8 4 CHA2 4 2 . 0 2 3 4 . 0 141.250 141.250 C n A 2 S 2 2 I U U . L . LCC . LLC C HA 2 6 2 .217 16 .0 333.375 333.375 CHJ27 1 .095 14 . 0 166.64 2 166 .642 CHA2S 5 1 .263 1 0 7 . C 289.C74 289.074 4 K.1R29 A 1.147 .46 . 0 610.956. 610 . 9 56*. 2 L' J r; E ~i . 2 5 4 92 . 0 6 7 . 7 9 3 67 .793 t; R A K 3 .404 33 • c 299.439 299.939 2 ru;.E 5 1.355 96 . 0 3 4 5 . 7 l e 345 . 7 1 8 4 EL;C 6 1.C79 E5 .0 310 .941 310.941 2 FR.').-; 6 .911 70 . 0 318 .642 318.642 4 OR I V 5 1 .2 4 0 56 • c 542.535 54?.535 3 O A S 9 1 . 82? 156 2 1.2 286.076 289.791 4 M U K 1 . 14 / 46 . 0 610 .956 610.956 2 LPTS 5 .177 272 3 1. 1 1 5 . 937 16.115 THRL 21 - 8 . ? 3 8 530 . c 380 .571 38C.571 21 WARE 8 1. 541. C'C 2 2 . 2 433.033 442 .875 6 PART 10 1.768 624 32C 6C .4 6 6. 3 C9 137.923 6 FACL 1 2 3 . 5 12 840 347 4 1 . 3 102 .375 1 7 4 . 432 12 ' ~ U > / E ' . A G L ISVJ/lKAfiS = AVc'. A<^L t l V t l IRANS EXCLUDING IkttU fcNIRIES 7 > P 1 IT*.'.-.^'':-:'.': if i l ¥ i 7T7 ' ' l"——> » - s s - = - . p n : i i s - s : s : : s ; s s = * o •* — P ? 5 iii&isiiiii " y s s s i s s s s s j r s s s a s o •sssss una 2 |5» S3, f 2 I 3 'S2 »S2 * IIP? Ms; H I P i !!"? r ir r ...... in? pp pp ..... 1°"° 15"=2 6 P *§2 FR3 s. i s I 111 M s I IP " r r * I T M l 2£ . i s M M i'P Pi J n M i " M r M i " M i " M l MP 3 PI MP r.'i A GRAPH CF SERVICE TIMES FOR EACH GENERAL JOB (Y=SERVICE TIME IN MIN.) 10 SO 1070 <i-lCi S';C 9 30 — 9 " 8 70 RAC 8 I 0 780 750 4 60 63C 60C 570 510 ABC 4 50 420 390 ioo 3 30 3C0 270 240 210 " l c 3 -150 120 90 6C 30 . l t H 4 1 H * t l * ' i m H * t 4 t H * H 1 4 t i m t t 4 t t l t l * * t * + LUBE RHAK TUNE ELEC • ro : CO-"AJR 7 + 'WARS' lb 1 I Ct IL 01! IAIN KAKfcllUUbfc P3RIS LNLY + •PART" IS TIME TO OBTAIN ALL PARTS FOR ALL JOBS 1200 + 'FACL* IS T 1ME JOB WAITS TO OBTAIN REOD FACIL IT IES U 70 + 1 140 1 110 + A GRAPH GF SERVICE TIMES FOR SPECIAL PHASES OF JOB PROCESSING ' L P T S ' IS TIME TO OBTAIN LCCAL PARTS ONLY •Tl-RU' IS SERV TIKE FOR JOB IN AN0 OUT OF SHOP IT 1C50 + 1C2G + 0'<0 • •760 • 510 • r t\ 0 70 840 810 780 750 i 2 ' / * 6 9 0 • 660 • 6 30 • 600 • 570 • ~5"4Xr 510 4=0 450 4?C 300 J6o f~ 330 + 2CG + 270 + 240 + 210 * 1 oo 150 120 00 60 30 • + + + + • • » + + + + • • I ro + + + + + + + + + \ ^ o T T + T T T T T T T T T T T + T T T T T T T T T + T T T T T ^ ^^O LPTS THRU WARE PART FACL ICO 9 8 -9~6~ 94 92 90 8 3 8 6 A GRAPH CF CELAYS AS PERCENT OF TOTAL TIKE IN SHOP 8 2 3 0 7 3 7 6 7 4 —rr 7 0 6 8 6 6 6 4 6 2 r. 0 5 8 5 6 5 4 5 2 5 0 4 4 4 4 2 + 4 0 + 3 3 + 3 4 + 3 2 t 3 0 + ic + 2 6 + 4 + 4 + 4 + + + • 4 4 4 4 + + + + 2 4 2 2 2 0 1 3 1 6 1 4 44-4 + 4 4 4 + 1 0 o 6 4 2 PBRT FACL SERV THRU ro O * # j * OUEUES * ! * . * ; QUEUE MAXI MUM AVERAGE TOTAL ZERO PERCENT AVERAGE SAVERAGE TABLE CURRENT CONTENTS CONTENTS ENTR'I ES ENTRIES ZEROS TIME/TRANS T IME/TRANS NUMBER CONTENTS L U 80 2 4 .218 76 .0 52. 802 52.8U2 I1RKC6 1 . 001 1 .0 32. 000 32 .000 iSRKGii 3 . 399 25 . 0 2 9 3 . 439 2 9 3 . 4 3 9 "UNC9 A .922 60 .0 282.433 282 .433 TUN 10 1 . 01 H 1 .0 3 4 3 . 000 3 4 3 . 0 0 0 TUN1 1 1 . 066 7 . 0 147. 428 147-428 CLE12 2 .123 4 . 0 583 . 000 538. 000 • ELE13 3 . 2 1 1 8 . 0 485 . 675 4 8 5 .875 .3 c l E14 1 . 0 4 3 5 . 0 176. 399 17 6 .39 9 ELE15 6 .644 51 . 0 250 . 09 8 250 . 098 EE T16 4 . 84 1 3 8 . 0 4 0 6 . 631 406 .631 1 FR I! 7 2 .24 8 13 . 0 346. 84 5 .34 0 . 84 5 F R T 1 1 . 0 6 3 3 . 0 357 . 666 357 .666 ••RV19 1 • 151 4 . 0 697 . 500 69 7 .500 1 DRV20 2 .577 2 1 . 0 504.761 504. 7t>l 1 QRV2 1 2 . 381 13 . 0 5 3 9 . 1 53 5 3 9 . 1 5 3 0RV22 1 .02 9 3 . 0 IR2. 000 182-000 >:A2 3 2 .119 11 . 0 199. 272 199.272 1 ;JHA24 2 . 020 4 . 0 9 3 . 750 9 3 . 7 5 0 CHA25 1 .000 2 2 100.0 000 . 0 0 0 CHA 26 1 . 2 1 0 11 . 0 3 5 0 . 903 3 5 0 . 9 0 3 1 * CHt27 2 . 1 4 3 1 1 . 0 2 3 9 . 72 7 2 3 9 . 7 2 / 2 • CHAZS 5 1.314 7 9 - o 3 0 5 . 594 305 .594 1 '.JR29 . 885 30 . 0 542 . 899 542 .899 1 LUBE ' .213 76 . 0 52 . 802 52 .802 ERAK 3 .40 1 25 . 0 283. 384 263. 384 TU.'.E A . 9 9 7 63 . 0 2"9 . 426 2 6 9 . 4 2 6 ELEC , 7 1.682 68 . 0 292. 293 2 9 2 . 2 9 3 3 • FF.CN 1. 145 54 . 0 389 . 518 339 .518 1 DR1V , 3 1. 140 41 . 0 510 . 853 510 .853 2 C - A S - l fe' 5 1 .80 3 113 2 1.6 231. 406 2 8 6 . 2 5 8 5 MA JR ™sfe— . 835 30 . 0 542. 899 542 .899 1 L P T S 6 . 1 5 0 201 4 1.9 13. 716 13 .994 THc.U 16 7.702 39 8 . 0 35 5 . 396 35 5. 396 12 WARE 8 1.433 52 . 0 5 0 7 . 826 507.826 5 P APT 9 1. 588 481 256 53.2 60.632 129.617 5 FACL 13 3. 24 4 62 7 295 4 7 . 0 9 5 . 035 179. 478 3 ;.A / E K A C E T IME/TRANS = AVERAGE TI ME/TRANS EXCLUDING ZERO ENTRIES o 6 I I .1" 3 H a ; k is ir r r S!|= HF-i ~ ...... ISfss ¥1 5 i I T « S"SS 11-5 - .• M r MF MF M i -M r Ml MM MP MP ,3 v=7 -f / — 4 • 4 A G R A P H OF S E R V I C E T I M E S FOR. E A C H G E N E R A L J O B ( Y = S E P . V I C E T I M E I N M I N . ) 4 4 + 4 : + 1 2 0 0 4 1 1 7 0 4 1 i 1 4 0 4 1 1 1 0 4 i c a o 4 1 0 5 0 4 1 0 2 0 4 v*o 4 9 6 0 4 9 3 0 4-9 0 0 4 K 7 0 4 B 4 0 4 8 1 0 4 7 8 0 + 7 5 0 + 7 2 0 + 6 9 0 4 6 6 0 4 6 3 C • 6 0 0 4 5 7 0 4 5 4 0 4 4 4 4 4 5 ! C 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 BO 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 0 4 4 4 4 4 3 9 0 4 4 4 4 4 3 6 0 4 , 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 0 0 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 7 0 4 + 4-4-4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 1 0 4 4 4 + 4 - 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4- 4 4 1 8 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 5 C 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 1 2 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 9 0 + 4 4 4 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 'J 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 . 4 4 4 4 4 4 30 4 * 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 j_. .-1 0 + 4. + + + + i + f t t + + t + t + + + + * + *^+t + + + + t + t+ + + ++444++++t + + 4 + 4 + 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 L U B E B P A K T U N E E L E C F R O N DR IV C H A S M A J * -P" •P-s A -GRAPH OF SERVICE TIMES FOR SPECIAL PHASES OF JOB PROCESS INC •LPTS' IS TIME TO OBTAIN LOCAL PARTS ONLY 'THRU' I S SERV TIME FOR JOB IN AND OUT QF SHOP • 'WAR E' IS TIME TO OBTAIN WAREHOUSE PARTS ONLY • 'PART' IS TIME TC OBTAIN ALL PARTS FOR ALL JOBS 1200 • ' F A C L ' IS TIME JOB WAITS TO OBTAIN REQD FACILITIES 1170 • 1 I'O • JLU.Q_t 1030 * 1050 • 102 0 • 990 • 96C • Vj'i +  900 • 870 • 840 • 810 • 780 + 750 «•  720 • 690 • 660 + 6 30 » 60 0 • 5 7 C + : 540 • 510 • 460 • •+•• 450 * + + 4 20 + ' + • 39 0 * 4- +  360 • + • 330 + + + 3C0 + .... • + + • 270 • ' . • + + • 240 + + . + * + j 1 c. » -f -f + *  180 • * • + • 150 + ' • + + + 120 + + + + + <-}0 + + + -•-•*-60 + + • * *• **** + 30 » -f- + + + + + + ± *__± t-Jt : i • JY) WARE PART FACL j \J-| ro - p -o 

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