UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Saved; a record and analysis of a production Gray, John 1972

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
831-UBC_1972_A8 G73.pdf [ 9.57MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 831-1.0101593.json
JSON-LD: 831-1.0101593-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 831-1.0101593-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 831-1.0101593-rdf.json
Turtle: 831-1.0101593-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 831-1.0101593-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 831-1.0101593-source.json
Full Text
831-1.0101593-fulltext.txt
Citation
831-1.0101593.ris

Full Text

S A V E D A RECORD AND ANALYSIS OF A PRODUCTION by JOHN HOWARD GRAY B.A., Mount Allison University, 1968 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS in the Department of THEATRE We accept- this thesis as conforming to the required standard THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA September, 1972 In present ing th i s thes i s in p a r t i a l • fu l f i Iment of the requirements for an advanced degree at the Un iver s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia, I agree that the L ib ra ry sha l l make i t f r ee l y ava i l ab le for reference and study. I fu r ther agree that permission for extens ive copying of th i s thes i s for s cho l a r l y purposes may be granted by the Head of my Department or by his representat ives. . It is understood that copying or pub l i c a t i on o f th i s thes i s for f i nanc i a l gain sha l l not be allowed without my wr i t ten permiss ion. Department of The Un iver s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia Vancouver 8, Canada ABSTRACT Saved , a p l a y by Edward Bond, was produced and d i r e c t e d by John Gray i n p a r t i a l f u l f i l m e n t of the r e q u i r e -ments f o r a Mas te r of A r t s d e g r e e , i n the Department of T h e a t r e a t The U n i v e r s i t y of B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a , a t the Dorothy Somerset S t u d i o T h e a t r e , from October 21 t o Oc tobe r 24, 1970. The f o l l o w i n g i s a d e t a i l e d r e c o r d of t h a t p r o d u c t i o n , t o g e t h e r w i t h the d i r e c t o r ' s a n a l y s i s and i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of the s c r i p t . Saved was pe r fo rmed by a p r e d o m i n a n t l y s t u d e n t c a s t , i n costumes and s e t t i n g de s i g ned by A s t r i d J a n s o n , and w i t h the t e c h n i c a l d i r e c t i o n of R i c h a r d Spence r . Th i s r e c o r d i s d i v i d e d i n t o t h r e e main s e c t i o n s . The f i r s t i s a s h o r t s e c t i o n s e t t i n g f o r t h as s i m p l y as p o s s i b l e the s p e c i f i c d i r e c t o r i a l c oncep t used f o r t h i s p r o -d u c t i o n , t o g e t h e r w i t h a comment on the language of the p l a y . The second s e c t i o n c o n t a i n s a u n i t - b y - u n i t a n a l y s i s o f Saved , t o g e t h e r w i t h notes on the g r o u n d p l a n , d e s i g n , and costumes f o r the p l a y . i i The t h i r d s e c t i o n i s made up of the prompt s c r i p t of the p r o d u c t i o n , showing b l o c k i n g , d i v i s i o n i n t o u n i t s , notes on m o t i v a t i o n s , and l i g h t i n g and s c ene r y cue s . The promptbook i s preceded by a s c a l e g roundp l an f o r the p r o d u c -t i o n , a props l i s t , and p i c t u r e s of the p r o d u c t i o n w i t h notes on the scenes d e p i c t e d . TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT i i ' LIST GF ILLUSTRATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . v i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS v i i Chap te r 1 SAVED: DIRECTOR'S INTERPRETATION . . . . . . . 1 Bond ' s Use of Language i n Saved^. . - . . . . 6 2 SAVED: UNIT-BY-UNIT ANALYSIS 10 Note 10 Scene One 11 Scene Two . . . . . . . . . . 15 Scene Three . . 19 Scene Fou r . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Scene F i v e . 26 Scene S i x . . . . . . . . . 29 Scene Seven . . . . . . . . . . 45 Scene E i g h t . . 49 Scene Nine 56 Scene Ten 60 i v Chapte r Page Scene E l e ven 68 Scene Twe l ve . . 73 Scene T h i r t e e n 79 3 SAVED: GROUND PLAN, DESIGN AND COSTUMES. . . . 83 Saved: A Note on Costumes. 85 BIBLIOGRAPHY 91 APPENDICES A SAVED: PRODUCTION DETAILS. . . 92 B SAVED: DIRECTOR'S PROMPT BOOK 96 C PRODUCTION PHOTOGRAPHS 212 v LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Page Saved: G roundp lan 95 Scene 1, page 13 213 Scene 3, page 28 213 Scene 4, page 41 214 Scene 5, page 45 214 Scene 6, page 49 215 Scene 6, page 65 . ; 215 Scene 6, page 69 216 Scene 8, page 84 216 Scene 10, page 103 217 Scene 11 , page 108 217 v i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I w i sh to thank Mr. S t a n l e y Weese and Dr . P e t e r L o e f f l e r of The U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a ' s Department of T h e a t r e f o r t h e i r a s s i s t a n c e i n the p r e p a r a t i o n of t h i s t h e s i s . I s hou ld a l s o l i k e to acknowledge the h e l p o f Mr. R i c h a r d Spencer f o r h i s t e c h n i c a l a s s i s t a n c e d u r i n g the p r o d u c t i o n , my t y p i s t , S h a r i H a l l e r , and the c a s t o f Saved. v i i Chapte r 1 SAVED: DIRECTOR'S INTERPRETATION In h i s book On A g g r e s s i o n , Konrad Lo renz c l a i m s t h a t a l l c a r n i v o r o u s an ima l s are equ ipped w i t h b u i l t - i n i n h i b i t i o n s a g a i n s t the k i l l i n g of members of t h e i r own s p e c i e s . Lo renz d e s c r i b e s i n d e t a i l the e l a b o r a t e r i t u a l s and c o n t e s t s w h i c h , f o r most a n i m a l s , t ake the p l a c e of the b l ood feud over t e r r i t o r y and f e m a l e s . He d e s c r i b e s , however, two e x c e p t i o n s : r a t s and men. E x c e p t i o n a l among the c a r n i v o r e s , r a t s do sometimes k i l l o t h e r r a t s . But the c o n d i t i o n under wh ich r a t s may f r e e l y k i l l t h e i r own k i n d i s q u i t e s p e c i f i c . Rats l i v e i n packs or h o r d e s ; they do not f i g h t s e r i o u s l y w i t h , much l e s s k i l l , members of t he same pack . On the o t h e r hand, they a re m e r c i l e s s to members of o t h e r p a c k s , k i l l i n g them s l o w l y and p a i n f u l l y and w i t h e v i d e n t r e l i s h . The ana logy t o human be ing s i s a lmos t t o t a l . Human be ing s a l s o l i v e i n p a c k s , and the k i l l i n g of members o f the 1 2 pack i s u s u a l l y f o r b i d d e n ; but t h i s ban seldom a p p l i e d to members of o t h e r p a c k s . In f a c t , h o s t i l i t y t o ano the r pack i s o f t e n a means to a c h i e v i n g s o l i d a r i t y w i t h i n the pack . The t e n d e n c i e s of n a t i o n a l i s m , r a c i s m , and e t h n o - c e n t r i s m can a l l be seen as the a t t empt of a pack to d e f i n e i t s e l f i n terms of o u t s i d e r s . The C h r i s t i a n r e l i g i o n r e p r e s e n t s the l a r g e s t pack man has y e t been a b l e to f o r m . I t i s s t i l l a pack , non the -l e s s , as the Crusades and the I n q u i s i t i o n bear w i t n e s s . C h r i s t i a n i t y de te rm ined the m o r a l s , laws and customs of the g r e a t e r p a r t o f the Western Hemisphere and a c h i e v e d , a t l e a s t on the s u r f a c e , a modicum of u n i t y . But i n the t w e n -t i e t h c e n t u r y C h r i s t i a n i t y has ceased to be p o t e n t as a u n i f y i n g f o r c e over men. The f o u n d a t i o n f o r the pack has d i s i n t e g r a t e d . As a r e s u l t , s o c i e t i e s have f ragmented i n t o s m a l l e r p a c k s , t o a l a r g e e x t e n t e c o n o m i c a l l y d e t e r m i n e d . Among the p o o r , the packs are the s m a l l e s t o f a l l . With so many packs depend ing f o r t h e i r d e f i n i t i o n upon h o s i t i l i t y t o o u t s i d e r s our way of l i f e has become v i o l e n t and d i v i s i v e . Edward Bond ' s Saved i s s e t i n such a s o c i e t y . The peop le a re p o o r , and can r e l y upon no t r a n s c e n d e n t o r d e r f o r t h e i r mutual p r o t e c t i o n ; they have t h e r e f o r e banded t o g e t h e r i n t o s m a l l p a c k s . The f a m i l y group — Mary, Ha r r y and Pam — r e p r e s e n t s one such pack. In s p i t e of t h e i r mutua l h a t r e d 3 and re sen tment they s t a y t o g e t h e r . W i t hou t each o t h e r , they are u n p r o t e c t e d . I f one i s t o p r o j e c t i n t o the f u t u r e , i t i s l i k e l y t h a t they w i l l remain t o g e t h e r the r e s t o f t h e i r 1i ve s . The group of P e t e , C o l i n , B a r r y and Mike ( and , l a t e r , F red) r e p r e s e n t s ano the r such pack . C o n f l i c t s w i t h i n t h i s group are based upon the i n d i v i d u a l ' s a t t empt to a t t a i n s t a t u s w i t h i n i t . The c r i t e r i o n i s m a s c u l i n i t y , and mascu-l i n i t y i s s p e c i f i c a l l y d e f i n e d i n terms o f k i l l i n g and s e x u a l e x p l o i t . At t imes t h i s c o n f l i c t becomes v i o l e n t and t h r e a t e n s to d e s t r o y the g r oup , but the group a lways remains u n i t e d i n i t s h o s t i l i t y t o o u t s i d e r s . Wherever p o s s i b l e , the group p r o j e c t s i t s i n t e r n a l c o n f l i c t s on o u t s i d e r s . The baby i s the v i c t i m o f j u s t such a s i t u a t i o n . B a r r y has i m p l i e d t h a t Pete d i d not r e a l l y k i l l the c h i l d w i t h h i s c a r . To r e t a i n h i s s t a t u s , t h e r e f o r e , Pete has someth ing t o p r o v e . The baby becomes a b a t t l e g r o u n d as Pete and B a r r y t r y t o p rove t h a t each can go the f u r t h e s t i n m o l e s t i n g the baby. As C o l i n and Mike become/ invo l ved i n the c o n t e s t , the s i t u a t i o n ga i n s momentum. Fred has thus f a r remained o u t s i d e , but the group f o r c e s him to p a r t i c i p a t e s i m p l y by the t h r e a t of e x c l u d i n g h im. Note t h a t the baby i s f a i r game, f o r i t has been abandoned by the group to wh ich i t b e l o n g e d . We have i n the p l a y , t h e r e f o r e , two groups wh ich e x i s t to p r o t e c t themse lves f rom a h o s t i l e w o r l d . They a re 4 s u c c e s s f u l , but w i t h a s e r i o u s drawback: the i n d i v i d u a l i t y of each member has been degraded and s t i f l e d . Note t h a t not one c h a r a c t e r i n e i t h e r group has any a f f e c t i o n f o r any o t h e r c h a r a c t e r . Moreover the re sen tment and b i t t e r n e s s w i t h i n the f a m i l y p r e s e n t s doubts as t o whether membership i n such a group i s worth the p r i c e p a i d f o r i t . With the i n t r o d u c t i o n of Len we have a c h a r a c t e r who i s not connec ted to any p a r t i c u l a r g roup . The f i r s t prob lem p r e s e n t e d i s : ;how can a l one pe r son f i n d f u l f i l m e n t i n a s o c i e t y compr i sed of s m a l l groups wh ich depend f o r t h e i r i d e n t i t y upon h o s t i l i t y t o o u t s i d e r s ? I t i s p o s s i b l e , as i t t u r n s o u t , but t h e r e are s t a n d a r d s wh ich must be met. The most i m p o r t a n t c r i t e r i o n i s s e x u a l : the per son must be a b l e t o f u l f i l h i s s e x u a l r o l e . In the s o c i e t y d e p i c t e d i n S aved , the p r o p e r m a s c u l i n e r o l e i s t h a t of a g g r e s s o r , and the p r ope r f e m i n i n e r o l e i s t h a t of s e r v a n t - v i c t i m . N e i t h e r Len nor Ha r r y prove a b l e to f u l f i l t h e i r s e x u a l r o l e , and Mary and Pam respond c h a r a c t e r i s t i c a l l y : Mary becomes the a g g r e s -s o r w h i l e Pam l ook s e l s ewhe re f o r someone who w i l l a l l o w her to be h i s v i c t i m . The s t r u g g l e f o r r o l e i d e n t i f i c a t i o n i s u r g e n t : i n the f a t e of the baby we see what happens t o those w i t h o u t a r o l e t o p l a y . Len f i n d s i t d i f f i c u l t to become p a r t o f such a g r oup , f o r he i s e x t r e m e l y i n s e c u r e s e x u a l l y , as we d i s c o v e r i n Scene One. H i s a t t empt s a t a s s e r t i n g h i s m a s c u l i n i t y put 5 him a t odds w i t h H a r r y , whose r o l e of "man of the house " i s a p r e c a r i o u s one. Har ry i s a s e x u a l f a i l u r e , and by s e e k i n g i n c l u s i o n i n the pack as a man ("Can I s t a y the n i g h t ? " ) , Len becomes a t h r e a t to h im. In Scene Two i t appears as i f Len has s u c c e e d e d , but the i n t r o d u c t i o n of F r e d , who i s b e t t e r a b l e t o p l a y the m a s c u l i n e r o l e , p r e s e n t s a c o m p l i c a t i o n . Th i s i s f o l l o w e d by Scene T h r e e , wh ich r e i n f o r c e s both the s e x u a l r o l e theme and the g roup -pack theme. As the p l a y p r o g r e s s e s and Len remains w i t h the f a m i l y , a new q u e s t i o n o c c u r s : i s membership i n such a group wor th the p r i c e p a i d f o r i t ? The p r i c e i s ve r y c l e a r i n scenes F ou r , E i g h t , and E l e v e n . Th i s i s the most i m p o r t a n t q u e s t i o n of the second h a l f of the p l a y , and i s p r e s e n t i n the r e c u r r i n g q u e s t i o n , "Why do you s t a y , " asked by Fred and Pam. As Len becomes more and more a t ' o d d s w i t h Pam the s i t u a t i o n becomes l e s s and l e s s h o p e f u l . In Scene E l e ven the s i t u a t i o n comes to a head , w i t h a l l i t s p o t e n t i a l v i o l e n c e . At the end of Scene E l e v e n Len i s seen as a comp le te o u t s i d e r and i t seems c e r t a i n t h a t he w i l l l e a v e . He i s saved (perhaps l e a d i n g t o the p l a y ' s t i t l e ) by H a r r y , the s e x u a l d r o n e , who has g r a d u a l l y come to l ook upon Len as a r e p l a c e m e n t f o r the " s o n " he has l o s t . The f i n a l scenes seem to sugge s t t h a t r e j e c t s f rom o t h e r groups r o t a t e to one ano the r and form t h e i r own g r oup , h a t i n g one ano the r f o r t h e i r own f a i l u r e s , 6 y e t pe rmanen t l y bonded t o g e t h e r , s i n c e any group i s b e t t e r than none. T h i s g r udg i ng a c c e p t a n c e , however f a i n t , makes i t p o s s i b l e f o r Len to endure a l l the v i o l e n c e and d e g r a d a -t i o n . In t h i s s e n s e , the f i n a l scene r e p r e s e n t s a p o s i t i v e v i c t o r y f o r L en . As Bond remarks i n h i s i n t r o d u c t i o n to the p l a y , anyone who i s unab le t o see the end ing as such .has not y e t l e a r n e d to " c l u t c h a t s t r a w s . " G i ven the s o c i e t y Bond p r e s e n t s , such a p o s i t i v e end ing i s n o t h i n g s h o r t of a m i r a c l e . Bond ' s Use of Language i n Saved The s u b j e c t of Bond ' s use of language i n Saved de se r ve s s p e c i a l a t t e n t i o n , f o r the language s e r ve s s e v e r a l i m p o r t a n t f u n c t i o n s i n the p l a y . F i r s t l y , the language spoken b y - a l l - t h e c h a r a c t e r s in the p l a y i s our s t r o n g e s t i n d i c a t i o n t h a t what we are w a t c h i n g i s a n a t u r a l i s t i c p o r -t r a y a l o f a c l a s s or s o c i a l g roup . At t imes the f i g u r e s of speech used become so l o c a l t h a t i t i s d i f f i c u l t f o r the s p e c t a t o r who i s unfami 1 i a r w i t h t h i s p a r t i c u l a r s e c t i o n of London to unde r s t and what i s be i n g d i s c u s s e d . Mean ing , t h e n , i s a t t imes s u b o r d i n a t e d to v e r i s i m i l i t u d e . Connected to the above i s the f a c t t h a t language i s the o n l y key to s o l v i n g the prob lem of L e n ' s o r i g i n s . Nowhere i n the p l a y a re we t o l d where Len comes f r o m , beyond 7 the f a c t t h a t he and C o l i n went to the same h i gh s c h o o l . The language t h a t Len u s e s , however, i s the same language used by the o t h e r c h a r a c t e r s i n the p l a y : he i s not an o u t s i d e r by c l a s s . He i s not a g e o g r a p h i c a l o u t s i d e r . L e n ' s i n a b i l i t y to merge w i t h h i s s u r r o u n d i n g s , t h e n , i s more a p h i l o s o p h i c a l and mora l q u e s t i o n than a s o c i a l q u e s t i o n . The q u e s t i o n t h a t remains unanswered, t h e n , i s : How has Len come to be the way he i s ? Why i s h i s s e n s i b i l i t y d i f f e r e n t from t h a t of the o t h e r c h a r a c t e r s i n the p l a y ? T h i s l a c k of a fundamenta l m o t i v a t i o n f o r L e n ' s a c t i o n s (o r n o n - a c t i o n s ) i s perhaps a s t a t e m e n t i n i t s e l f . Bond seems to be s a y i n g t h a t , unaccoun t -a b l y , i n d i v i d u a l s e n s i b i l i t i e s emerge i n the most homogeneous of s o c i e t i e s . Our i n a b i l i t y t o answer f o r t h i s f a c t i s c o n -nec t ed to our i n a b i l i t y t o f i n d r e f e r e n c e p o i n t s f o r our e t h i c a l d e c i s i o n s and our b e h a v i o u r . The t h i r d f u n c t i o n of language i n Saved i s l e s s connec ted to n a t u r a l i s t i c a c c u r a c y . L e t us l o o k a t a s e c t i o n of Scene S i x (Page 52 ) . T h i s s e c t i o n occu r s a f t e r the open -i n g d i a l o g u e between Len and F r e d : . . . MIKE comes i n . Ee has a haver sack stung from one shoulder and c a r r i e s a rod. Ee wears-a small, flashy hat. FRED: No 1uck? M IKE : W o u d n ' t f e e d a ca t . LEN : Was te a t i m e . Ml KE : Same ' e r e . FRED : G o t a b r e e z e up . Ml KE : What y e r d o i n 8 FRED Now ? M I KE Yeh, t ' n i g h t . FRED Reckon anyth i n ' ? Ml KE B i f- a f un . FRED S u i t s me. M 1 KE You 1 re on. FRED Up the o ther end? M 1 KE 'Ow's the cash? FRED Broke. You? M 1 KE I ' l l touch up the o l d lady. FRED Get a coup le f o r me., LEN : T h a t ' l l pay f o r the f a r e s . M 1 KE P i ck yer up roun ' your p1 ace. FRED Not t o o . e a r l y . 'Ave a bath f i r s t . M.I KE Never know 'oo ye r ' I I be s 1 eep i n w i t h . FRED A f t e r e i g h t . Ml KE 1 f e e l ju s s r i g h t f o r i t . LEN : What? M 1 KE Out on the ' u n t . Even the l ook of the d i a l o g u e on the page g i v e s i t a h i e r o g l y p h i c q u a l i t y , the q u a l i t y of language b roken down to i t s b a r e s t e l e m e n t s . There i s no d e s c r i p t i o n ,\ no metaphor : F i g u r e s o f speech are r e s t r i c t e d to m u t u a l l y ag reed-upon i d i o m s . On the s u r f a c e at l e a s t , i t seems t h a t what we have here i s language used s i m p l y f o r the commun ica t ion of i n f o r m a t i o n . And y e t , a l ook at the above s e c t i o n w i l l r e v e a l t h a t p r e c i o u s l i t t l e i n f o r m a t i o n i s i n f a c t communicated. Fred and Mike w i l l meet a t e i g h t . Mike w i l l f u r n i s h the money. Even more i m p o r t a n t than i n f o r m a t i o n i s t he r i t u a l acknowledgement of one a n o t h e r ' s p r e s e n c e , a r e c o g n i t i o n t h a t 9 they a re of the same t r i b e . The gang o f t e n pe r fo rms v e r b a l r i t u a l s around the s u b j e c t of sex wh ich appear t o be acknow-ledgements o f one a n o t h e r ' s p o t e n c y . Language, t h e n , i s used by most of the c h a r a c t e r s e i t h e r t o pass on i n f o r m a t i o n or t o pe r f o rm r i t u a l acknowledgements and mutual r e a f f i r m a t i o n s . Language used f o r i n t e r p e r s o n a l , i n d i v i d u a l exchange i s a lmos t n o n e x i s t e n t . In t h i s r e g a r d two c h a r a c t e r s s t and o u t : Ha r r y and Mary. Wh i l e the o t h e r c h a r a c t e r s go th rough the mot ion s of c ommun i c a t i n g , Ha r r y and Mary have g i v e n up a l l p r e t e n c e of commun ica t ion and have ceased to use language a t a l l . In t h i s r e s p e c t , the s i l e n c e o f Scene T h i r t e e n i s e l o q u e n t . Chap te r 2 SAVED: UNIT-BY-UN IT ANALYSIS Note Saved i s d i v i d e d i n t o t h i r t e e n s c e n e s . For purposes of a n a l y s i s I have s u b d i v i d e d the scenes i n t o " u n i t s , " wh ich a re d e l i n e a t e d i n the prompt book (Chap te r 2). Any one of a number of event s may s i g n a l the b e g i n n i n g of a new u n i t . In most i n s t a n c e s I have r e l i e d upon . the f o l l o w i n g : 1. The e n t r a n c e o f a c h a r a c t e r , w h o - b r i ngs i n t o t h e s c e n e w i t h him a w h o l e s e t o f c i r c u m s t a n c e s . 2. A s h a r p s w i t c h i n o b j e c t i v e . . 3. A s h a r p c h a n g e i n . c h a r a c t e r r e l a t i o n s h i p , e s p e c i a l l y i n t e r m s o f d o m i n a n c e . For purposes of r e f e r e n c e I s h a l l r e f e r t o the page on wh i ch a u n i t o c cu r s when i n t r o d u c i n g a new u n i t . 10 11 Scene One Scene One i n i t i a t e s the r e l a t i o n s h i p between Len and Pam, w i t h the m o t i v a t i o n s o f both c h a r a c t e r s seen as p r i m a r i l y s e x u a l . Pam, f o r what appears t o be b a s i c s e x u a l r e a s o n s , has b rough t home a man whose p r i m a r y c h a r a c t e r i s t i c seems to be s e x u a l i n s e c u r i t y . We n o t i c e t h a t d u r i n g each s e x u a l e p i s o d e i n the scene Pam i s the i n i t i a t o r , w h i l e Len f i n d s eve r y p o s s i b l e excuse to t e r m i n a t e i t . The f i r s t purpose of the scene i s to m o t i v a t e the p l o t : t o p r e s e n t Len as a s e x u a l l y i n s e c u r e young man who i s anx i ou s t o f i n d a c c e p t a n c e , t o b e l o n g , to be i n c l u d e d i n a g roup . The second purpose of the scene i s t o i n i t i a t e the c o n f l i c t between Len and Ha r r y as a s e x u a l one, and to p r e s e n t Len i n t h i s sense as an i n t r u d e r , an unwelcome v i s i t o r . I t i s e v i d e n t t h a t s h o u l d Len f a i l to f u l f i l a s e x u a l r o l e w i t h Pam he w i l l be a comp le te o u t s i d e r t o the occupan t s o f the home. The s c e n e , t h e n , must f ocu s on Len as i n t r u d i n g on a t i g h t l y k n i t group whose s t a n d a r d s a re s p e c i f i c , and to pose the q u e s t i o n as t o whether he i s equ ipped to l i v e up to t he se s t a n d a r d s . The t h i r d purpose of the scene i s t o a l i g n the s p e c t a t o r ' s s ympath ie s w i t h the c e n t r a l c h a r a c t e r . To accom-p l i s h t h i s e nd , L e n ' s di lemma i s p r e s e n t e d much more l i g h t l y and w h i m s i c a l l y here than e l s ewhe re i n the p l a y . The tone of the scene i s p r i m a r i l y c om i c . 12 At the open ing of the s c e n e , Len makes a f a l s e e n t r a n c e . He i s i m m e d i a t e l y seen by the s p e c t a t o r as an outr s i d e r i n an u n f a m i l i a r e n v i r o n m e n t . When he makes h i s second e n t r a n c e ( " 2 " - Page 1 1 ) , he a vo i d s the m i d d l e of the room, c r o s s i n g t e n t a t i v e l y between the w a l l and the s o f a . Pam, on the o t h e r hand, c r o s s e s s t r a i g h t i n t o the c e n t r e o f the room ( " 3 " - Page 1 1 ) , i n d i c a t i n g t h a t she i s on f a m i l i a r g round . The open ing d i a l o g u e ( U n i t One) p r e s e n t s an i n t e r e s t -i n g s t u d y i n c h a r a c t e r dominance. Len i n i t i a t e s each exchange , a f a c t wh ich would seem to i n d i c a t e t h a t he i s the s t r o n g e r c h a r a c t e r ; but i t soon becomes e v i d e n t t h a t Len i s oom-pelled to t a l k , t h a t he i s c o v e r i n g up f o r s o m e t h i n g . L e n ' s m o t i v a -t i o n f o r the s c e n e , t h e n , i s t o c o ve r up f o r the f a c t t h a t s e x u a l l y he does not know what he i s d o i n g . Pam, on the o t h e r hand, does not f i n d i t nece s s a r y t o c o ve r up f o r any -t h i n g by making c o n v e r s a t i o n . Her m o t i v a t i o n t h r oughou t the scene i s t o " g e t on w i t h i t . " T h e r e f o r e i t i s Pam who i s i n c o n t r o l , a l t h o u g h i t i s Len who does most of t he t a l k i n g . Th i s r e l a t i o n s h i p i s emphas ized by movement: Pam's movements are d i r e c t whereas L e n ' s a re e v a s i v e . Note the number of pauses i n the s c e n e , and t h a t they a lways seem to i n d i c a t e h e s i t a t i o n on L e n ' s p a r t . As they t ake t h e i r p o s i t i o n s , Len beg in s t o employ t a c t i c s t o i n t e r r u p t the a c t i o n , f i n d i n g excuses to c o n c e a l h i s r e l u c t a n c e . He becomes ve r y f u s s y about the c ouch . He 13 g i v e s r o m a n t i c s i g n i f i c a n c e to what they a re d o i n g , a l t h o u g h Pam makes i t c l e a r t h a t she r e q u i r e s no such j u s t i f i c a t i o n and i s annoyed by the d e l a y . Len r e a l i z e s t h a t he cannot h o l d t h i n g s o f f any l o n g e r w i t h o u t becoming an o b j e c t of mockery . He resumes the p e r f o r m a n c e , a l t h o u g h i t i s e v i d e n t t h a t he i s ve r y i l l a t e a se . There i s a pause a t t h i s p o i n t d u r i n g wh ich they beg i n to make l o v e , and i t appears as though Len may be s u c c e s s f u l . Wi th the i n t r o d u c t i o n of Ha r r y a new u n i t beg i n s ( U n i t Two, Page 13 ) . The scene changes f ocu s and d i r e c t i o n , and t h e r e i s an ab rup t change i n rhy thm. Len p a n i c s , and l o s e s the s m a l l amount of c o n f i d e n c e he has been a b l e t o g a i n i n the scene up to t h i s p o i n t . I t becomes appar nt t h a t the a c t i o n w i l l be suspended i n d e f i n i t e l y when Len becomes s e l f -c o n s c i o u s t o the p o i n t of p r u d i s h n e s s ( " P u l l up y e r d r e s s " ) . In U n i t Three (Page 1 4 ) , t h e r e i s a r e t u r n to the theme of U n i t One, and Len f i n d s e ve r y p o s s i b l e excuse to a v o i d the f a c t t h a t he i s e xpec ted to f i l l a r o l e . But t h e r e i s a deve l opmen t , f o r Len has begun to use Ha r r y as h i s excuse f o r the d e l a y , c o n v i n c i n g h i m s e l f t h a t i f Ha r r y were not t h e r e t h e r e would be no p r ob l em. Ha r r y and Len have become r i v a l s . Pam, however, i s becoming amused a t L e n ' s d i s c o m -f o r t . When Pam laughs a l o u d , Len t h i n k s t h a t she i s amused by h im , t h a t t h i s i s a p o s s i b l e road to a c c e p t a n c e . He beg i n s t o e n t e r t a i n her ( U n i t F ou r , Page 16) and t h i s movement ga i n s 14, momentum, as Len uses the j o k e s to r e p l a c e i n words what he i s u n a b l e to do i n a c t i o n . In U n i t F i v e (Page 1 7 ) , Len b e g i n s t o d i r e c t the j o k e s a t H a r r y , u s i n g them as a weapon t o a s s e r t h i s s e x u a l s u p e r i o r i t y . By w i n n i n g Pam over to h i s s i d e (and by r e -a s s u r i n g h i m s e l f o f h i s own m a s c u l i n i t y ) i n t h i s way , Len has c r e a t e d the c i r c u m s t a n c e s f o r a c o n f l i c t w i t h H a r r y . Len i s now a t h r e a t t o H a r r y ' s s e x u a l p o s i t i o n i n the h o u s e . Wi th H a r r y ' s e x i t ( U n i t S i x , Page 19) the t e n t a t i v e movement of U n i t One i s resumed . Pam r e a l i z e s t h a t she must t a k e the l e a d , and the scene ends w i t h her t a k i n g the d o m i n a n t , m a s c u l i n e r o l e . L e n ' s f i n a l s t a t e m e n t , " T h i s i s the l i f e , " i s a key l i n e i n the s c e n e , f o r i t i s an echo"' o f U n i t One. I t i s an i n d i c a t i o n t h a t t h i s k i n d o f a c c e p t a n c e i s what Len has been l o o k i n g f o r . L a t e r , when he f i n d s t h a t l i v i n g i n such a group has i t s d r a w b a c k s , h i s " t h i s i s the l i f e " w i l l become "what a 1 i f e . " In t h i s scene Len i s the v a r i a b l e f a c t o r on whom f o c u s i s d i r e c t e d and whose m o t i v a t i o n s a re e x p l o r e d , w h i l e Pam remains r e l a t i v e l y c o n s t a n t . The q u e s t i o n s c o n c e r n i n g Pam's m o t i v a t i o n s are not e x p l o r e d u n t i l Scene Two, and the q u e s t i o n as t o why Pam p i c k e d Len up i n the f i r s t p l a c e r e -mains as y e t unanswered . Ih Scene Two i t w i l l become c l e a r t h a t a b a s i c d i f f e r e n c e e x i s t s between the two c h a r a c t e r s i n the f a c t t h a t Pam i s a c h i l d of the e n v i r o n m e n t p r e s e n t e d i n 15 the p l a y , wh e.r-e a*sr><Len;is c o n t r a r y t o the env i ronment i n c e r t a i n e s s e n t i a l ways. ) Scene Two In Scene Two s e v e r a l months have passed and we a re g i v e n a p i c t u r e o f the r e l a t i o n s h i p between Pam and Len as i t has e v o l v e d so f a r . They have a l l the appearance of a t y p i c a l l ower c l a s s c o u p l e , but as Pam's m o t i v a t i o n s f o r e n t e r i n g the r e l a t i o n s h i p are made c l e a r i t becomes appa ren t t h a t t h e r e i s a p o t e n t i a l c o n f l i c t . From Pam's r e l u c t a n t d e s c r i p t i o n of her home l i f e i t becomes c l e a r t h a t Len i s t o p r o v i d e an escape from her home env i ronment w i t h o u t l o s i n g the s e c u r i t y t h a t comes from such an a r rangement . T h e i r r e l a -t i o n s h i p i s t o be e v e r y t h i n g t h a t Mary and Ha r r y a re n o t : Pam is. to be the p a s s i v e , d omes t i c w i f e t o t e n , who i s t o f u l f i l the a g g r e s s i v e , m a s c u l i n e r o l e t h a t Ha r r y f a i l e d to l i v e up t o . The c o n f l i c t a r i s e s out of the f a c t t h a t Len has assumed a p a s s i v e r o l e . He puts h i s head i n her l a p . He a l l o w s her t o squeeze h i s p i m p l e s . Pam t a l k s o f her f u t u r e r o l e , of k n i t t i n g sweate r s and the domes t i c l i f e , but t h i s i s f o r her a poor s u b s t i t u t e f o r the p r o s p e c t of a s e x u a l l y dominant man. Thus , when Fred a p p e a r s , Pam's r e a c t i o n makes i t c l e a r what she r e a l l y wan t s . What i s ab sen t i n the 16 r e l a t i o n s h i p between Pam and Len i s p r e c i s e l y what m o t i v a t e d Pam to i n i t i a t e i t . Pam's immediate s e x u a l a t t r a c t i o n f o r Fred i s s i m i l a r to her i n i t i a l a t t r a c t i o n f o r Len wh ich r e -mained u n f u l f i l l e d . Pam wants t o f u l f i l ' t h e r o l e o f woman.. The pathos o f the s i t u a t i o n a r i s e s out of the f a c t t h a t the r o l e of woman as she unde r s t and s i t i s synonymous to the r o l e of v i c t i m . From the b e g i n n i n g o f her r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h Fred she s e t s out to become a v i c t i m , and she succeeds o n l y too w e i 1 . Both Len and Pam v i s u a l i z e s the o t h e r as someth ing they are n o t . S i m i l a r l y , the r e l a t i o n s h i p between them i s more a p r o d u c t of f a n t a s y than of r e a l i t y . The s e t t i n g of the scene v i s u a l i z e s the i s o l a t i o n needed f o r such a r e l a t i o n -s h i p to endu re . Fred v i s u a l l y b r i n g s Len and Pam i n c o n t a c t w i t h the e a r t h a g a i n , and the outcome i s i n e v i t a b l e . L e n ' s r e l u c t a n c e to a l l o w Fred to p u l l the boat a sho re i s w e l l f o unded . G e n e r a l l y , the scene s e r ve s t h r e e main f u n c t i o n s . I t p r o v i d e s e x p l a n a t i o n s as to Pam's m o t i v a t i o n s wh ich went u n e x p l a i n e d i n Scene One, and so fo reshadowed the e v e n t u a l d i s i n t e g r a t i o n o f the r e l a t i o n s h i p . Mary and Ha r r y a re i n t r o -duced i n t h i s s c e n e , and t h e i r unusua l a r rangement i s d e s c r i b e d . L e n ' s l i n e , "I w o n ' t t u r n out l i k e t h a t , " i s an i r o n i c f o r e s hadow ing of the f a c t t h a t t h e i r r e l a t i o n s h i p w i l l e v e n t u a l l y p a r a l l e l t h a t o f Mary and H a r r y . The t h i r d f u n c t i o n 17 of the scene i s t o i n t r o d u c e F r e d . The immediate r a p p o r t he e s t a b l i s h e s w i t h Pam i s e v i d e n c e t h a t they unde r s t and each o t h e r . T h i s makes Len uneasy , but t h e r e i s n o t h i n g he can do about i t . He i s an o u t s i d e r who does not r e a l l y unde r s t and what a m a l e - f e m a l e r e l a t i o n s h i p c o n s i s t s of i n t h i s p a r t i c u l a r g roup . So h i s r e a c t i o n i s a c o m b i n a t i o n o f u nea s i ne s s and f a s c i n a t i o n . Thus , the end ing of the scene i s l i n k e d to the c e n t r a l theme o f the o u t s i d e r ve r su s the g roup . U n i t One e s t a b l i s h e s the s e t t i n g , the t i m e , and the f a c t t h a t Len and Pam are on an i n t i m a t e b a s i s . We l e a r n t h a t Len i s now l i v i n g i n the house and i s anx iou s t o be a c cep ted t h e r e ("She r eckon me you r e c k o n ? " ) . They e x p e c t t o be m a r r i e d , and Pam imag ines domes t i c f u n c t i o n s she w i l l pe r fo rm such as k n i t t i n g s w e a t e r s . Len b r i n g s up the s u b j e c t of t h e i r f i r s t meet ing (Page 2 1 ) . Pam q u i c k l y changes the s u b j e c t , f o r the need t h a t b rough t about t h e i r f i r s t meet i ng i s s t i l l u n s a t i s f i e d . Pam i s s t i l l the dominant c h a r a c t e r , f o r she does not f e e l the need to answer ques t i on s or to ask them. At no p o i n t i n the p l a y does she ask Len where he came f r om. She e a s i l y a vo i d s L e n ' s q u e s t i o n i n g by p e r f o r m i n g the m o t h e r l y f u n c t i o n o f s q u e e z i n g a p i m p l e . U n i t Three beg in s when Len q u e s t i o n s Pam about her f a m i l y (Page 24 ) . We l e a r n of the r e l a t i o n s h i p between Mary and H a r r y , and Pam's r e l u c t a n c e to e l a b o r a t e i s as unde r -s t a n d a b l e as L e n ' s eagernes s t o f i n d out a l l about i t . Len 18 q u e s t i o n s her more i n s i s t e n t l y . Her l i n e , "I ' hope I never see 'em a g a i n , t ha s s a l l , " i s the most hones t a d m i s s i o n i n the s c e n e , and i s her p r i m a r y mo t i ve f o r r e m a i n i n g w i t h Len . R h y t h m i c a l l y the u n i t ga i n s momentum u n t i l Pam becomes angry and s t op s the c o n v e r s a t i o n . In U n i t F ou r , F red i s i n t r o d u c e d (Page 2 5 ) . L e n ' s r e l u c t a n c e to g i v e up the i s o l a t i o n o f the boat i s j u s t i f i e d , f o r what i s absent i n t h e i r r e l a t i o n s h i p i s i m m e d i a t e l y f u l -f i l e d by F r e d , whose s i m i l a r background and a g g r e s s i v e mas-c u l i n i t y enab l e him t o s t r i k e an immediate s o c i a l and s e x u a l r a p p o r t w i t h Pam. L e n ' s o c c a s i o n a l c o m p l a i n t of "Watch i t " i n d i c a t e s t h a t he i s aware o f what i s go ing on. But he i s unab le t o p a r t i c i p a t e or compete because he i s u n f a m i l i a r w i t h the r u l e s under wh ich the game i s be i n g p l a y e d . As an o u t s i d e r , he can o n l y watch the r i t u a l o f c o u r t s h i p as Fred and Pam p l a y i t . I t i s h i s unfami 1 i a r i t y as an o u t s i d e r t h a t e x p l a i n s both h i s l a c k of a c t i o n (he does not know t h a t , under the r u l e s , he i s e xpec t ed to r e a c t v i o l e n t l y t o win Pam b a c k ) , and h i s l a t e r f a s c i n a t i o n f o r F r e d . D i r e c t o r ! a l l y , two main d i f f i c u l t i e s e x i s t w i t h t h i s s c e n e . F i r s t l y , the i m p o r t a n t p i e c e s o f i n f o r m a t i o n and c h a r a c t e r i n s i g h t are s c a t t e r e d among l a r g e amounts of s m a l l t a l k . Th i s p r e s e n t s the p rob lem o f g i v i n g the scene a sense of d i r e c t i o n , of a v o i d i n g some of the meander ing q u a l i t y one n o t i c e s upon r e a d i n g the s c e n e . The d i f f i c u l t y o f 19 u n d e r s t a n d i n g what i s happen ing i n the scene i s made g r e a t e r by the f a c t t h a t the c h a r a c t e r s speak heavy d i a l e c t wh ich i s d i f f i c u l t t o a Canad ian a u d i e n c e . For t h i s rea son I compressed the s c e n e , making cu t s i n such a way t h a t the i m p o r t a n t p o i n t s I w i shed to emphas ize came c l o s e r t o g e t h e r . I a l s o r e p l a c e d s e v e r a l l o c a l e x p r e s s i o n s w i t h t h e i r Canad ian e q u i v a l e n t s . The second d i f f i c u l t y i s i n the s e t t i n g o f the s c e n e , and the l a c k of movement p o s s i b l e w i t h i n i t . T h i s p r e s e n t s a p rob lem of v a r i e t y . A l t hough body p o s i t i o n s and movement were u s e d , I emphas ized as much as p o s s i b l e the many changes and c o n t r a s t s i n speech rhythms t h r oughou t the s c e n e . D i v i -s i o n s o f u n i t s were emphas ized r h y t h m i c a l l y . Scene Three In Scene Three we are b rought up f a c e to f a c e w i t h the s o c i a l background o f the p l a y . I t i s one i n wh ich v i o l e n c e and c r u e l t y a re commonplace, and where peop l e must band t o g e t h e r f o r mutua l p r o t e c t i o n . But no group i s f r e e of i n t e r n a l c o n -f l i c t , f o r the i n d i v i d u a l members c o n t i n u a l l y s t r u g g l e f o r p r e s t i g e and s t a t u s . Such t e n s i o n s a re e x p i a t e d by a c t s of v i o l e n c e a g a i n s t the o u t s i d e w o r l d , and the se a c t s o f v i o l e n c e become c r i t e r i a f o r s t a t u s w i t h i n the g roup . O u t s i d e r s , t h e n , are made s capegoa t s f o r the v i o l e n c e i n h e r e n t i n the g roup . The g r oup , t h e n , s u s t a i n s and d e f i n e s i t s e l f by p e r p e t u a t i n g 20 the v i o l e n c e wh ich n e c e s s i t a t e s i t s e x i s t e n c e . In Scene Three we w i t n e s s the i n t e r i o r wo rk i ng s o f such a group and i t s r e -l a t i o n s h i p t o o u t s i d e r s such as Len . I t i s i n t e r e s t i n g t h a t Len i s seen w i t h Mary i n t h i s s c e n e . H i s r o l e as her p r o t e c t o r d e f i n e s him as p a r t of ano the r g r oup , the i n t e r n a l wo rk i ng s of wh ich we w i l l see i n Scene Four . I t a l s o foreshadows Scene Nine and f u t u r e c o n f l i c t s w i t h H a r r y . U n i t One g i v e s us a p i c t u r e of the v i o l e n c e r e f e r r e d to above. Pete was i n v o l v e d i n a motor a c c i d e n t i n wh ich a c h i l d was k i l l e d . He o b t a i n s g r e a t s t a t u s w i t h i n the group by c l a i m i n g t h a t the a c t was d e l i b e r a t e . Mike and C o l i n become p a r t of the event by a l l y i n g themse l ve s w i t h P e t e . The o n l y one to c h a l l e n g e P e t e ' s l e a d e r s h i p i s B a r r y , who e v i d e n t l y has the l owe s t s t a t u s i n the g roup. Note ("TOP" -Page 28) t h a t P e t e , C o l i n , and Mike a re grouped so t h a t Pete i s g i v e n p r o m i n e n c e , w h i l e B a r r y i s a p a r t from the t r i o and i s s q u a t t i n g * wh ich g i v e s him l e s s s t a t u r e . U n i t Two (Page 28) beg in s when B a r r y r i s e s to h i s f e e t and c h a l l e n g e s P e t e ' s s t o r y . Th i s i s B a r r y ' s b i d f o r power. Pete f o r c e s a c o n -f r o n t a t i o n w i t h the l i n e , " Th i n k I c a n ' t d r i v e ? " . There i s a danger of open f i g h t i n g . C o l i n and Mike sense t h i s t h r e a t to the s o l i d a r i t y of the group and a t t empt to m i t i g a t e the c o n f l i c t by making l i g h t o f the i n c i d e n t . When B a r r y r e a s s e r t s h i s c h a l l e n g e ( "He ' s h a v i n ' y e r o n ! " ) , C o l i n and Mike t u r n on 21 him and P e t e ' s p o s i t i o n i s s e c u r e d . The rema inde r o f the u n i t i s spent i n l e s s e n i n g th rough r i d i c u l e B a r r y ' s a b i l i t y t o d i s r u p t the g roup. The s o l i d a r i t y of the group i s r e - e s t a b l i s h e d w i t h the e n t r a n c e of Len ( U n i t T h r e e , Page 3 0 ) . A t t e n t i o n i s drawn to Len when C o l i n r e c o g n i z e s him as a f o rmer s c h o o l m a t e . In U n i t Three the rhythm i s much more h e s i t a n t and the atmo-sphere more t e n s e , as C o l i n r e a l i z e s t h a t he i s making c o n t a c t w i t h an o u t s i d e r who i s not r e c o g n i z e d by the r e s t of the g roup. The group makes j o k e s a t L e n ' s e xpen se , t h e r e b y d e -f i n i n g i t s e l f by f o r c i n g Len i n t o the r o l e o f o u t s i d e r . The group remains s o l i d t h r oughou t the r ema inde r of t he s c e n e , but the i n t e r n a l c o n f l i c t s we w i t n e s s e d e a r l i e r w i l l r e a s s e r t t hemse l ve s as a m o t i v a t i n g f o r c e i n Scene S i x . U n i t Four beg in s w i t h the i n t r o d u c t i o n of Mary (Page 3 2 ) . We soon f i n d two groups i n o p p o s i t i o n , as Len and Mary u n i f y as a de fen se a g a i n s t P e t e , M i k e , C o l i n and B a r r y . The f o u r boys thus become r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of the o u t s i d e w o r l d a g a i n s t wh ich the f a m i l y must p r o t e c t i t s e l f . T h i s seems to p a r t i a l l y m o t i v a t e the f a m i l y ' s r e m a i n i n g t o g e t h e r i n s p i t e of, t h e i r appa ren t mutua l h a t r e d . I t i s i n t e r e s t i n g t h a t L e n , a l t h o u g h he i s a c q u a i n t e d w i t h C o l i n , goes u n p r o t e c t e d when we f i r s t see him i n t h i s s c e n e . He i s not a p a r t of any group o t h e r than the f a m i l y . T h i s b r i n g s up the q u e s t i o n o f L e n ' s o r i g i n , wh ich i s never 22 answered. L a t e r , when the q u e s t i o n i s asked as to why he remains w i t h the f a m i l y , an i m p o r t a n t c o n s i d e r a t i o n seems to be t h a t he s i m p l y has nowhere e l s e t o go, and t h a t someth ing i s b e t t e r than n o t h i n g . U n i t F i v e (Page 34) r e a s s e r t s t he s i t u a t i o n o f U n i t One. P e t e , M i k e , C o l i n and B a r r y are a r e u n i t e d , s o l i d i f i e d g roup. In the l a s t two l i n e s we are reminded o f the t e r r i b l e v i o l e n c e of wh ich the group i s c a p a b l e . Scene Four Scene Four c o n t a i n s a s i m i l a r s t udy of the i n t e r i o r wo rk i ng s of a group to t h a t of Scene T h r e e . L e n ' s escape from l o n e l i n e s s and i s o l a t i o n has not been w i t h o u t i t s p r i c e . In f a c t , by the end of the scene one wonders i f h i s f o rmer s t a t e were not p r e f e r a b l e i n many ways ; a g rowing and r e c u r r e n t q u e s t i o n i n the p l a y seems to be "why does he remain i n the h o u s e ? " . The f a m i l y i n some r e s p e c t s c l o s e l y re semb le s the group we s t u d i e d i n Scene T h r e e . Under the s u r f a c e o f d a i l y r o u t i n e i s the same p o t e n t i a l v i o l e n c e we saw i n the p r e v i o u s s cene . In t h i s c a s e , however, the b a t t l e l i n e s a re f i r m l y drawn. I f the key l i n e t o Len and Pam's r e l a t i o n s h i p at the open ing was " T h i s i s the l i f e , " the key l i n e f o r the f a m i l y s i t u a t i o n i s "What a l i f e . " 23 B e s i d e s s e r v i n g the d r a m a t i c f u n c t i o n s of p l o t and c h a r a c t e r deve l opment , the scene s e r ve s a t h e a t r i c a l purpose q u i t e d i s t i n c t from the p r e v i o u s s c e n e s . Scene Four a t tempt s to f o r c e the aud ience i n t o ex-gerleno-ing the f a m i l y s i t u a t i o n we have heard so much abou t . The c o n t i n u i n g d i n of the baby, the t e l e v i s i o n s e t , the c o n s t a n t b i c k e r i n g , t o g e t h e r w i t h t he atmosphere of t e n s i o n and mutua l h a t r e d i s d e s i g n e d to wear down the s p e c t a t o r , to make the q u e s t i o n o f how the se peop le can spend t h e i r l i v e s i n t h i s way an i m p o r t a n t and mean i n g f u l one. The s c e n e , t h e n , i s de s i gned p a r t l y as an a s s a u l t on the s p e c t a t o r ' s n e r v e s . T h i s a l s o s e r v e s the t h e a t r i c a l f u n c t i o n of p r o v i d i n g a ' s h a r p c o n t r a s t t o the ve rbo sene s s and the comedy o f the p r e v i o u s s c e n e s . P r e d i c t a b l y , the r e l a t i o n s h i p between Pam and Len has d e t e r i o r a t e d . In f a c t , a g rowing p a r a l l e l emerges t o the r e l a t i o n s h i p between Ha r r y and Mary. L e n ' s avowed mo t i ve f o r r e m a i n i n g i n the house i s the c h i l d wh ich he b e l i e v e s t o be h i s , but l a t e r we w i l l d i s c o v e r t h a t t h i s i s not the c a s e . The baby i s s i m p l y an i n s t r u m e n t w i t h wh ich Len can s e r ve h i s d e s i r e to be needed, t o b e l o n g . At the open ing of the scene we see a v i s u a l d e p i c -t i o n of the r e l a t i o n s h i p between Ha r r y and Mary. The i n c i d e n t w i t h the l i g h t ( U n i t One, Page 34) shows not o n l y t h a t the l i n e s o f b a t t l e have been drawn f o r s o m e . t i m e , but a l s o shows t h a t they have l e a r n e d to vent t h e i r h a t r e d w h i l e a v o i d i n g a 24 d i r e c t c o n f r o n t a t i o n . They have i n t h i s sense found an e q u i -l i b r i u m whereby they can rema in t o g e t h e r . The q u e s t i o n , of c o u r s e , remains as to why t hey s h o u l d want t o remain t o g e t h e r . To h e i g h t e n the scene to f o l l o w , Mary i s d e p i c t e d as hav i ng a headache , and so i s perhaps more i r r i t a b l e than u s u a l . Pam e n t e r s , and a u n i t f o l l o w s wh ich i s r o u g h l y p a r a l l e l t o the p r e v i o u s u n i t : i n the c o n t r o v e r s y ove r the t e l e v i s i o n s e t , Pam d e l i b e r a t e l y s e t s out to i r r i t a t e Mary. A g a i n , a d i r e c t c o n f r o n t a t i o n o f t h e i r a t t i t u d e s towards each o t h e r i s a v o i d e d . Len e n t e r s , and a new u n i t beg i n s ( U n i t T h r e e , Page 3 5 ) , the main purpose of wh ich i s to e s t a b l i s h Len as be i ng a c c e p t e d as " p a r t of the f a m i l y " by Mary , w h i l e a t the same t ime i n c u r r i n g the h a t r e d of Pam. A p e r i o d of r e l a t i v e q u i e t f o l l o w s as Len ea t s and Mary , Ha r r y and Pam focus on the t e l e v i s i o n s e t . With the c r y i n g o f the baby ( U n i t F ou r , Page 3 6 ) , the main a c t i o n of the scene b e g i n s . Every a c t i o n a n d ' s t a t e -meht t h r oughou t the f o l l o w i n g u n i t has some b e a r i n g on the c r y i n g of the baby, e i t h e r d i r e c t l y c o n c e r n i n g i t or as an a t t empt to c a r r y on a c o n v e r s a t i o n above the d i n . Pam's r e a c t i o n to the screams i s to t u r n up the volume o f the t e l e -v i s i o n s e t , and not even Len makes any a t tempt to c omfo r t the baby. T h i s l a c k of r e ga rd weakens L e n ' s subsequent c l a i m t h a t he i s s t a y i n g i n the house i i i o r d e r t o p r o t e c t the baby. The u n i t c o n t i n u e s th rough Pam's e x i t up u n t i l her r e - e n t r a n c e . 25 Pam i n i t i a t e s U n i t F i v e (Page 38) by showing her s e x u a l contempt f o r Len . M a r y ' s l i n e , "I d o n ' t wanna ' e a r a l l t h i s a g a i n t ' n i g h t " i n d i c a t e s t h a t the q u a r r e l t o f o l l o w i s a r e g u l a r o c c u r r e n c e now. Pam poses the q u e s t i o n the s p e c t a t o r may ask s e v e r a l t imes t h r oughou t the p l a y : When y e r l e a v i n ' us? I 'm s i c k a n ' t i r e d a a r s t e n . " We have men-t i o n e d the weakness of L e n ' s r e p l y i n . v iew of the f a c t t h a t the c h i l d i s s c reaming a t p r e s e n t . Even Pam sees the r i d i c u -l o u sne s s of h i s pronouncement t h a t " k i d s need p r o p e r ' omes . " Throughout the u n i t we are s t r u c k by the c h a r a c t e r s ' comp le te i n d i f f e r e n c e to the c h i l d u p s t a i r s , and i n t h i s sense we are p repa red f o r the even t s o f Scene S i x . U n i t S i x beg in s w i t h F r e d ' s e n t r a n c e (Page 4 0 ) . We are f i r s t made aware t h a t Fred has r e p l a c e d Len i n Pam's a f f e c t i o n s . F red i s our i n d i c a t i o n of what i s m i s s i n g i n Harry and Len i n the eyes o f Mary and Pam. F r e d ' s comp le te s e x u a l dominance over Pam enab le s her t o a c t out he r r o l e of s e r v a n t - v i c t i m . U n l i k e Len o f Scene One, Fred c a l l s the t u n e . Pam buys h i s c i g a r e t t e s . She a c t s a c c o r d i n g t o h i s w i s h e s . She comp la i n s about h i s l a t e n e s s and h i s i g n o r a n c e o f h e r . But she a c c e p t s the s i t u a t i o n as a normal s t a t e of l i f e . Fred has succeeded where Len f a i l e d i n f u l f i l l i n g the dom inan t , a g g r e s s i v e r o l e e xpec ted of h im. The i r o n y l i e s i n the f a c t t h a t Pam i s c r e a t i n g the c i r c u m s t a n c e s f o r her own v i c t i m i z a t i o n . 26 Our second i m p r e s s i o n upon the e n t r a n c e o f F red i s o f L e n ' s comple te s u p e r f l u i t y i n the h o u s e h o l d . Far from r e c o g n i z i n g Len as a r i v a l , F red t r e a t s him as i f he were Pam's b r o t h e r i n s t e a d of her f o rmer l o v e r . When Fred and Pam l e a v e , Mary sees t h a t Ha r r y i s . e n j o y i n g the t e l e v i s i o n p rog ram. She t u r n s i t o f f and e x i t s . A new u n i t beg in s ( U n i t Seven , Page 41) when Len and Ha r r y c o n f r o n t each o t h e r . In the exchange to f o l l o w , Ha r r y t ake s h i s p l a c e i n the c e n t r a l a c t i o n as the o n l y c h a r a c t e r who unde r s tands L e n ' s r e a l mo t i v e s f o r r e m a i n i n g i n the house. He i m m e d i a t e l y becomes the dominant c h a r a c t e r w i t h the l i n e , "You wanna keep y e r door s h u t . " L e n ' s r e p l y c o n c e r n i n g the c h i l d i s p a t e n t l y f a l s e . We are s t r u c k by the p a r a l l e l b e -tween the se two c h a r a c t e r s , r e a l i z i n g t h a t here a re two men who a re l i v i n g , i n e x p l i c a b l y , w i t h women w i t h whom they have f a i l e d s e x u a l l y , i n an env i r onment o f h a t r e d and m i s t r u s t . The q u e s t i o n as to why the se two men remain i n t h e i r p r e s e n t s i t u a t i o n w i l l become the dominant q u e s t i o n i n the second h a l f of the p l a y . Scene F i v e Scene F i v e a c c o m p l i s h e s t h r e e main f u n c t i o n s . I t i s a t u r n i n g p o i n t f o r Pam, f o r i n t h i s scene we f i n d out t h a t Fred has ceased to be i n t e r e s t e d i n h e r ; he r r o l e o f v i c t i m : 27 i s r e a l i z i n g i t s e l f , i n her p a t h e t i c r e a c t i o n to t h i s change of e v e n t s . Throughout the r e s t of the p l a y , Pam becomes more and more p a t h e t i c as she t r i e s t o r e g a i n F r e d ' s a f f e c t i o n . The second f u n c t i o n of the scene i s to show t h a t Len has i n a sense ca r ved out a p l a c e f o r h i m s e l f w i t h i n the f a m i l y u n i t as Pam's p r o t e c t o r . He i s a b r o t h e r - l i k e f i g u r e (a r o l e t h a t does not c a r r y w i t h i t top much s e x u a l r e s p o n s i b i l i t y ) , and has c o n c e n t r a t e d h i s a t t e n t i o n s t o the s t r i c k e n Pam to the . e x t e n t t h a t Mary has become j e a l o u s and b i t t e r . The t h i r d f u n c t i o n o f the scene i s t o p r e s e n t the l i v e baby to the a u d i e n c e , i n p r e p a r a t i o n f o r t he k i l l i n g o f Scene S i x . The impac t o f a l i v e baby ons tage i s t remendous ; the aud i ence i s g i v e n the o p p o r t u n i t y t o e n v i s a g e the k i l l i n g of Scene S i x i n a l l i t s h o r r o r . W i t hou t the image of the baby i t i s a l l too easy to a b s t r a c t o n e s e l f from the e v e n t , t o l ook upon i t o b j e c t i v e l y a n d , i n a^detached way. At the open ing o f the scene i t becomes c l e a r t h a t Len has i ndeed found a r o l e f o r h i m s e l f w i t h i n the f a m i l y , as Pam's p r o t e c t o r or o l d e r b r o t h e r , a r o l e t h a t does not pose s e x u a l demands. The m o s t ' i m p o r t a n t p l o t f u n c t i o n of the scene i s s e r v e d i n U n i t One (Page 42) where we f i n d t h a t Fred has r e j e c t e d Pam and t h a t she i s f e i g n i n g i l l n e s s as a r e s u l t . Len m i n i s t e r s t o Pam an a s s e r t i o n of h i s new-found r o l e : a r o l e t o wh ich Pam i s f a r from r e c o n c i l e d , as we f i n d i n U n i t Two. The h o s t i l i t y wh ich i s s u s t a i n e d by both Mary and Pam i s 28 e v i d e n c e t h a t the mutual h a t r e d w i t h i n the f a m i l y has not l e s s e n e d , and t h i s exchange ( r e c a l l i n g the f i g h t over the t e l e v i s i o n s e t i n Scene Four) reaches a c l i m a x w i t h the l i n e , " Shut up! I 'm s i c k a ' the l o t of y e r ! " . L e n ' s e n t r a n c e w i t h the baby a t f i r s t appears t o be a genu ine a c t of a f f e c t i o n f o r the c h i l d . But i t q u i c k l y becomes c l e a r t h a t he i s i n f a c t u s i n g the b,aby to a s s e r t h i s new r o l e , j u s t as he used h i s m i n i s t r a t i o n s t o Pam. For examp le , when he p l a c e s the baby on the bed he i s d e m o n s t r a t -i n g how i m p o r t a n t he i s . But the second a t t e m p t , l i k e the f i r s t , t o be a p a r t of Pam's l i f e f a i l s and ends i n s h o u t i n g : LEN: I a i n ' t y e r p a i d n u r s e ! PAM: ( C a l l s ) Mum! I know why F r e d a i n ' t come - y e r been t e a r i n up me l e t t e r s . LEN : ' E d i d ! PAM: Y e r I i t t I e I i a r ! But i t must be made c l a r a t the same t ime t h a t Len po s se s se s a genu ine a f f e c t i o n f o r Pam. To make her happy, he t e l l s her t h a t Fred i s coming t h a t e v e n i n g . For the f i r s t t ime Pam a c c e p t s Len i n h i s new r o l e , and the scene ends i n r e l a t i v e harmony. As we w i l l see i n Scene S i x , Len has become a go -between i n the r e l a t i o n s h i p between Fred and Pam. M a r y ' s e n t r a n c e (End U n i t F ou r , Page 46) g i v e s us an i n t e r e s t i n g i n s i g h t i n t o her c h a r a c t e r . Her a f f e c t i o n f o r 29 Len i n Scene Four was e v i d e n t enough to sugges t t h a t she might f e e l r e j e c t e d i f he were to spend g r e a t amounts o f t ime w i t h Pam. The a f f e c t i o n she has f o r him i s ambiguous , somewhere between a son and a p o t e n t i a l l o v e r . The v y i n g f o r L e n ' s a f f e c t i o n by Pam w i l l appear a ga i n i n the p l a y , and i s ah i m p o r t a n t m o t i v a t i o n f o r Scene N i n e . The i n t r o d u c t i o n o f the ,baby i s an i m p o r t a n t e lement i n the s c e n e . P r e v i o u s l y we have heard the baby, and i t has become an e lement i n the a c t i o n , but not as a l i v i n g t h i n g , a human b e i n g . I t i s i m p o r t a n t t h a t we e x p e r i e n c e the baby i n t h i s way f o r the death i n Scene S i x t o have any r e a l meaning f o r the s p e c t a t o r . I t i s f o r t h i s rea son t h a t a r e a l baby must be used i n Scene F i v e . A l l of the above a c t i o n s and c h a r a c t e r notes are s u b o r d i n a t e to the r e a l i t y of a baby o n s t a g e , and t h i s image has g r e a t p o t e n t i a l f o r Scene S i x . For t h i s r e a s o n , Bond has w r i t t e n the scene so t h a t a l l i m -p o r t a n t p l o t f u n c t i o n s are c a r r i e d out b e f o r e t h e e n t r a n c e of the baby. I t i s i n t e r e s t i n g to note t h a t on the one p e r -formance where a d o l l was used i n s t e a d of a baby the e f f e c t o f Scene S i x was g r e a t l y weakened. Scene S i x Scene S i x i s by f a r the l o n g e s t scene i n the p l a y , and the even t s i t d e p i c t s a re i n a sense a c u l m i n a t i o n o f the 30 event s of the f i r s t f i v e s c e n e s . We w i t n e s s the h e l p l e s s n e s s of Len i n the go-between r o l e he has a s s i g n e d f o r h i m s e l f , Pam's r e j e c t i o n by F r e d , and the group e t h i c of Scene Three c a r r i e d to i t s l o g i c a l c o n c l u s i o n i n the s t o n i n g o f the baby. Thus the p l o t and c h a r a c t e r t h r ead s o f the f i r s t f i v e scenes a re t i e d t o g e t h e r , l e a v i n g one s i n g l e q u e s t i o n : why do t he se peop l e p e r m i t t hemse l ve s to l i v e l i k e t h i s ? The s t o n i n g of the baby s e r ve s s e v e r a l i m p o r t a n t p l o t f u n c t i o n s i n the p l a y . I t demons t ra te s the p r i m e v a l s a vage ry of the gang to the f a m i l y as a f o r c e a g a i n s t wh ich they must p r o t e c t t h e m s e l v e s . I t a l s o i n t r o d u c e s a n o t h e r e lement i n t o the c e n t r a l theme: i f Len i s t o f i n d a c cep t ance and a p l a c e f o r h i m s e l f i n such a w o r l d he must come to u n d e r -s t and the f o r c e s at work w i t h i n i t and i n a sense r e c o n c i l e h i m s e l f w i t h them. More i m p o r t a n t , however; the s t o n i n g of the baby s e r v e s a s i m i l a r f u n c t i o n to the even t s o f Scene Four i n t h a t i t g i v e s the aud i ence a t a s t e o f someth ing wh ich up u n t i l now has o n l y been a l l u d e d t o . The v i o l e n c e r e f e r r e d to i n Scene Three becomes a / r e a l i t y , j u s t as the f a m i l y l i f e r e f e r r e d to i n Scene Two becomes a r e a l i t y i n Scene Fou r . F i n a l l y , i n Scene S i x Pam becomes a p a t h e t i c f i g u r e , and her vehemence and c r a s s n e s s are b rought i n t o p e r s p e c t i v e . Bond i s c a r e f u l not to a l l o w us t o blame Pam f o r L e n ' s d i l emma , j u s t as he l a t e r a vo i d s p u t t i n g blame on Mary f o r H a r r y ' s s i t u a t i o n . 31 The open ing of Scene S i x r e p r e s e n t s a c o n f r o n t a t i o n between the s e x u a l w i nne r and the s e x u a l l o s e r , the man who seems to t h r i v e i n t h i s env i r onment and the man who does n o t . N o t i c e t h a t Fred has not been shown i n the c o n t e x t of any p a r t i c u l a r g roup : Bond seems to want t o emphas ize the o p p o s i -t i o n between Len and F r e d , and to i s o l a t e t h e i r c o n f r o n t a t i o n . L e n ' s a t t i t u d e towards Fred seems t o be somewhat of an enigma up u n t i l now, s i n c e he was r ema r kab l y l a c k i n g i n b i t t e r n e s s towards him a t the end o f Scene Four . We now see two m o t i v a t i o n s f o r Len to c o n f r o n t F red a t t h i s t i m e : he i s s t i l l f u l f i l l i n g an o l d e r - b r o t h e r f u n c t i o n f o r Pam, and he i s a t t e m p t i n g t o use Fred to g a i n a v i c a r i o u s e x p e r i e n c e of what i t i s l i k e to be a s e x u a l s u c c e s s , and to be a c c e p t e d i n t o the s o c i e t y d e p i c t e d i n the" p l a y . Fred seems t o be e v e r y t h i n g t h a t Len i s n o t : s t r o n g , s e x u a l l y competent and c o n f i d e n t , and a p p a r e n t l y i ndependen t of h i s e n v i r o n m e n t , a l t h o u g h we w i l l f i n d l a t e r i n t h i s scene t h a t t h i s a s sessment of him i s not e n t i r e l y t r u e . The i m p o r t a n t t h i n g i s t h a t here we must see t h a t Len i s e x p e r i e n c i n g h i s environment v i c a r i o u s l y , hav i ng h i m s e l f f a i l e d b a d l y . The v i s u a l image of Fred i n s t r u c t i n g Len on how-to b a i t the hook c l a r i f i e s the s i t u a t i o n a g r e a t d e a l . -If we a c c e p t the p h a l l i c symbol i sm of the f i s h i n g rod ( no t o n l y i s i t a d i r e c t p a r a l l e l as a metaphor ; i t i s v i s u a l l y obv iou s by the way i n wh ich the rod i s h e l d ) , we can see t h a t Len i s 32 u s i n g Fred as a model by which to g a i n a c cep tance i n t o the g roup. The o v e r a l l image of the scene i s o f a boy l o o k i n g to an o l d e r , more e x p e r i e n c e d b r o t h e r f o r a d v i c e on how to s u c c e e d . The main purpose of U n i t One (Page 4 7 ) , t h e n , i s to e l i m i n a t e Pam as a mot i ve f o r the c o n f r o n t a t i o n . I t i s i m m e d i a t e l y c l e a r t h a t Fred wants n o t h i n g more to do w i t h . . Pam, and from t h i s p o i n t of v iew the c o n v e r s a t i o n might w e l l have ended a f t e r U n i t One. But someth ing e l s e i s happen ing between the two c h a r a c t e r s , as i s made appa ren t i n U n i t Two (Page 4 7 ) , wh ich c o n t a i n s the b a i t i n g of the hook. I t i s now appa ren t t h a t Len i s s e e k i n g someth ing q u i t e d i f f e r e n t from Fred than t h a t he r e t u r n to Pam. In U n i t Three (Page 5 0 ) , Fred a s s e r t s h i m s e l f as , the dominant c h a r a c t e r and ends any p o s s i b l e d i s c u s s i o n over J Pam. In U n i t Four (Page 5 1 ) , however, t h e r e i s a s w i t c h as Len beg i n s to i n t e r r o g a t e F r e d . He beg i n s by t r y i n g t o e s t a b l i s h a r a p p o r t w i t h Fred over the f a c t t h a t they have both s l e p t w i t h the same g i r l . F r e d ' s r e p l y , " F a i r , depends on the b l o k e , " p o i n t s t o L e n ' s s e x u a l f a i l u r e and ends t h i s phase of the d i a l o g u e . H i s s e c o n d , more d i r e c t a t t empt to d i s c o v e r why or how Fred succeeded where he f a i l e d i s no more i l l u m i n a t i n g , and ends w i t h L e n ' s f r u s t r a t e d a d m i s s i o n t h a t he had eavesdropped on Fred and Pam. There are two reasons f o r L e n ' s f a i l u r e to l e a r n a n y t h i n g from the exchange. F i r s t l y , 33 Fred m i s i n t e r p r e t s L e n ' s q u e s t i o n i n g , f e e l i n g t h a t Len i s b l am ing h im , a c c u s i n g him of t a k i n g Pam away from h im. More i m p o r t a n t , however, i s the f a c t t h a t s e xua l prowess cannot be t a u g h t , and t h a t i t i s v e r y c l o s e to the a g g r e s s i v e i n s t i n c t t h a t l ead s to the v i o l e n c e i n the p l a y . S i n c e Len appears to be n o n - a g g r e s s i v e and n o n - v i o l e n t , he w i l l not succeed s e x u a l l y i n t h i s e n v i r o n m e n t . There w i l l be echoes of t h i s f a c t l a t e r i n the p l a y , such as the i n c i d e n t i n Scene E i g h t (Page 84) where L e n ' s i n a b i l i t y to s t r i k e Pam i s i n t e r p r e t e d by her as s e x u a l f a i l u r e . M i k e ' s e n t r a n c e and h i s subsequent c o n v e r s a t i o n w i t h Fred compr i se a new u n i t ( U n i t S i x , Page 5 4 ) , and i t g i v e s us a new p e r s p e c t i v e on the s e x u a l theme of the f i r s t p a r t o f the s cene . From the b e g i n n i n g i t i s e v i d e n t t h a t Fred and Mike have a much c l o s e r r a p p o r t , f o r Len i s a l l but i g n o r e d f o r the r e s t o f the s cene . With r e g a r d to the c l o s e n e s s o f s e x u a l i t y and a g g r e s s i v e n e s s , note the l a s t p a r t o f the e x -change between Fred and M i ke . Len-does not even unde r s t and what i s be i ng d i s c u s s e d : MIKE : I f e e l j u s s - r i g h t f o r i t . LEN : What? M IKE : Out on t h e ' u n t . FRED: (Jm-Ctates a b u l l e t ) Tschewwwwww! M IKE : ' E p i c k s 'em o f f a t a ' u n d r e d y a r d s . Exchanges l i k e t h i s tend to r e i n f o r c e our v iew i n t h i s p l a y o f the woman as a v i c t i m , to be c a p t u r e d , m a s t e r e d , and e x p l o i t e d . 34 The image of h u n t i n g i s a v i o l e n t one, and tends to r e f u t e the m a r r i e d l i f e , c h i l d r e n , and d o m e s t i c i t y . Hav ing been i n t r o d u c e d t h e m a t i c a l l y , the v i c t i m h e r s e l f a p p e a r s . Pam's e n t r a n c e , however, c o m p l e t e l y changes the f ocu s of the scene ( U n i t Seven , Page 5 5 ) . N o t i c e t h a t t h r oughou t U n i t Seven the c h a r a c t e r dominance i s s i m i l a r to the s i t u a t i o n w i t h Len and Pam i n Scene One. Pam, who f e e l s the need to t a l k , t o reach out to the o t h e r c h a r a c t e r , i s dominated by Fred who f e e l s no such need, and who s i m p l y agrees t o her demands w i t h o u t any i n t e n t i o n of c a r r y i n g them o u t . I t i s a l s o obv ious t h a t she i s me re l y u s i n g the baby as a means of g e t t i n g sympathy from F r e d . In U n i t E i g h t (Page 56) she a t tempt s t o a s s e r t her knowledge t h a t Fred i s the f a t h e r i n a p a t h e t i c a t t empt a t e m o t i o n a l b l a c k m a i l . T h i s e f f o r t f a i l s c o m p l e t e l y . U n i t N ine (Page 58) beg in s when Fred takes the o f f e n s i v e . He a s s e r t s h i s p h y s i c a l power over Pam i n an a t t empt to browbeat her i n t o l e a v i n g him a l o n e . Each i s u s i n g h i s r o l e i n the r e l a t i o n s h i p t o win power over the o t h e r : Pam as the i n j u r e d v i c t i m , Fred as the s t r o n g e r a g g r e s s o r . The b l o c k i n g r e i n f o r c e s t h i s movement: i n U n i t s Seven and E i g h t Pam chases Fred from p l a c e to p l a c e as he g a the r s h i s f i s h i n g g e a r , then l ead s him to the pram Pages 56, 57, 5 8 ) . At the s w i t c h t h a t occu r s i n U n i t N i n e , Fred Turns p h y s i c a l l y upon Pam ( " 3 " - Page 5 8 ) . Pam's l a s t a t t empt to use the baby as a means of f o r c i n g Fred t o come w i t h 35 her i s too b l a t a n t and f a i l s . F red has been i n t h i s s i t u a t i o n b e f o r e , and h i s r e p l y i s s i m p l e and b r u t a l : FRED: ' A l f t h e b l o o d y m a n o r ' s b e e n ' t h r o u g h y o u . PAM: R o t t o n l i a r ! FRED: Yeh? (To Mike) A i n ' t you ' a d ' e r ? M I KE : No t y e t . FRED: Y e r ' I I be n e x t . (Points to Len) What a b o u t Mm? (To Len) E h ? ' (To Mike) Y o u r s must be t h e o n l y s t i f f o u t s i d e t h e c o u r t y a r d she a i n ' t k n o c k e d o f f . But Fred has u n d e r e s t i m a t e d Pam's d e s p e r a t i o n and her b i t t e r n e s s . She responds w i t h the o n l y weapon she has l e f t , and abandons the baby to F r e d . L e n , m a i n t a i n i n g h i s b r o t h e r l y r o l e of Scene F i v e , goes to he l p her ( t h e r e i s no doubt now as to whether the baby i s h i s m o t i v e f o r s t a y i n g ) . Nobody has shown any r e a l conce rn f o r the baby e x c e p t as a means of g a i n i n g a t t e n t i o n f o r t hemse l ve s ( L e n ' s g e s t u r e of conce rn over the c a r r i a g e b r a k e , Page 56, i s no e x c e p t i o n ) . With Pam's e x i t , the baby has been c o m p l e t e l y abandoned to the o u t s i d e w o r l d . N o t i c e t h a t i n U n i t E l e v e n (Page 60) both Fred and Mike are i g n o r i n g the p re sence of the baby c o m p l e t e l y . T h e a t r i c a l l y , t h i s s e c t i o n s e r ve s as an i n t e r l u d e , a sharp c o n t r a s t to the n o i s e and v i o l e n c e t h a t comes b e f o r e and a f t e r i t . 36 With the e n t r a n c e of P e t e , B a r r y and C o l i n (Page 6 1 ) , U n i t Twelve beg in s and the scene ga in s momentum. Fred becomes an o b j e c t of r i d i c u l e over the baby ( B a r r y i n i t i a t e s t h i s i n r e t a l i a t i o n to F r e d ' s f l i p p a n t r e p l y to h i s q u e s t i o n ) . B a r r y i s thus u s i n g F r e d ' s v u l n e r a b l e s po t to g a i n a t t e n t i o n f o r h i m s e l f and to ga in s t a t u s i n the group (remember t h a t i n Scene Three h i s c l a i m s of v i o l e n c e and k i l l i n g b rought r i d i c u l e ) . N o t i c e (Page 62) t h a t B a r r y i n i t i a t e s each exchange over the baby and over i t s p a r e n t h o o d . In p e r f o r m a n c e , B a r r y ' s mocking song over 1apped . w i t h the exchange between Fred and Mike of U n i t T h i r t e e n (Page 6 1 ) . G r a d u a l l y the o t h e r j o i n e d i n the song u n t i l the whole group was l o u d l y s i n g i n g and r i d i c u l i n g F r e d . In an e f f o r t to get on the r i g h t s i d e , Fred j o i n s i n the r i d i c u l e w i t h h i s re sponse to the song ( "Save money " ) . Everyone l a u g h s , and the t e n s i o n i s o f f F red f o r the moment. We a re b e g i n n i n g t o see t h a t not even Fred i s immune to wan t -i n g the a p p r o b a t i o n of the g roup . B a r r y i n i t i a t e s a new u n i t ( U n i t F i f t e e n , Page 63) i n an obv ious a t t empt to g a i n a t t e n t i o n f o r h i m s e l f by c l o w n i n g w i t h C o l i n over the b a l l o o n . The homosexual i m p l i c a t i o n i s c l e a r , and c a l l s a t t e n t i o n to c e r t a i n i n t e r e s t i n g a s p e c t s of such g r oup s , p a r t i c u l a r l y the c l o s e n e s s of t he s e x u a l d r i v e , the d e s i r e f o r s t a t u s i n a g r oup , and the a g g r e s s i v e d r i v e . Throughout B a r r y ' s a n t i c s , Pete has been unamused. The r i v a l r y between him and B a r r y s t i l l p e r s i s t s , and f o r the 37 moment B a r r y seems to be g e t t i n g the b e s t of i t . When B a r r y goes too f a r and a l i e n a t e s C o l i n by pu sh i ng the pram over h im , Pete uses the o p p o r t u n i t y t o r e g a i n c o n t r o l of the s i t u a -t i o n f o r h i m s e l f (Page 6 4 ) . Pete f o r c e s a c o n f r o n t a t i o n w i t h B a r r y , s i m i l a r t o the c o n f r o n t a t i o n between them i n Scene T h r e e , e x c e p t t h a t C o l i n a l s o w i shes t o get h i s revenge on B a r r y . B a r r y i n t e r p r e t s the c h a l l e n g e as a j o k e to a v o i d be i ng d e f e a t e d , but Pete w i l l have none o f i t : P e t e ' s re sponse i s t o grab B a r r y f i r m l y by the c r o t c h , i n what would be the u l t i m a t e a f f r o n t to B a r r y ' s m a s c u l i n i t y . B a r r y ' s re sponse i s t o use the baby c a r r i a g e as a weapon. the p r e s e n t s i t u a t i o n and B a r r y ' s e a r l i e r exchange w i t h C o l i n over the b a l l o o n . Because the c o n f r o n t a t i o n i s w i t h P e t e , and the s i t u a t i o n i s d i f f e r e n t , the two j o k e s have c o m p l e t e l y d i f f e r e n t c o n t e n t s . T h i s seems to be t he case i n a l l scenes i n wh ich the gang a p p e a r s : the j o k i n g i n wh ich t hey engage i s used as an o u t l e t f o r communicat ing v a r i o u s d r i v e s and urges wh ich they cannot b r i n g out i n the open f o r f e a r of d e s t r o y i n g the g roup. The f a c t t h a t the baby c a r r i a g e i s b e i n g PETE : BARRY: PETE : C O L I N : BARRY: PETE : A i n ' s e e n y o u . ' e r e b e f o r e d a r l i n ' . 'Op i t ! -' Ow a b o u t p o p p i n ' i n t h e b u s h e s ? T w o ' s up . What a b o u t t h e n i p p e r ? Too young f o r me. N o t i c e the s i m i l a r i t y , i n the above l i n e s , between 38 used as a weapon means t h a t the q u a r r e l has the appearance of b o y i s h c l o w n i n g . The baby, t h e n , i s i n a d v e r t e n t l y becoming an o u t l e t f o r the f r u s t r a t i o n s and re sen tment s w i t h i n the g r oup , as w i l l become more and more appa ren t t h r oughou t the s c e n e . The i n s i g h t i n t o the s i t u a t i o n which grows t h r oughou t the scene i s t h a t peop le who are not p a r t o f or p r o t e c t e d by a group become scapegoat s , i n s t r u m e n t s w i t h which the members of a group can communicate w i t h each o t h e r and y e t remain t o g e t h e r . T h i s has c e r t a i n l y been t r u e o f the baby, f o r L e n , Pam, and now the gang a re a l l w i l l i n g to use the baby as a means to o b t a i n s t a t u s or a c cep tance w i t h i n a p a r t i c u l a r group o r , as i n Pam's c a s e , as a means of e s c a p i n g from one group i n t o a n o t h e r . On s tage , the c o n f r o n t a t i o n between Pete and B a r r y over the pram c o n t i n u e s u n i n t e r r u p t e d t h r oughou t Fred and M i k e ' s exchange ( U n i t 16, Page 6 4 ) . When B a r r y f e r o c i o u s l y pushes the c a r r i a g e a t P e t e , Pete r e v e a l s a weakness i n the s i t u a t i o n f o r B a r r y to e x p l o i t : P E T E : S t u p i d g i t ! C O L I N : Wass up w i t h Mm? BARRY: Keep y e r d i r t y ' a n d s - o f f me! P E T E : ' E M I ' a v e t h e l i t t l e p e r i s h e r o u t ! B a r r y r e c o g n i z e s P e t e ' s u n w i l l i n g n e s s to a l l o w the baby t o be harmed, and c a p i t a l i z e s on i t i n such a way as t o c a l l P e t e ' s s t a t u s i n the group i n t o q u e s t i o n : 39 BARRY: 0 yeh?. A n ' ' oo - r e c k o n e d t h e y r a n a k i d down? P E T E : T h a s s d i f f e r e n t . BARRY: 0 y e h . Noone t ' s e e y e r . Pete responds by f l i n g i n g the pram at B a r r y w i t h even g r e a t e r f e r o c i t y , f o r such an a c t i o n i s nece s s a r y f o r him to m a i n t a i n the image w i t h i n the group which he e s t a b l i s h e d i n Scene T h r e e . The a c t i o n i s c u t o f f b e f o r e a r e s o l u t i o n can be found when B a r r y n o t i c e s t h a t the baby i s awake. There i s a new u n i t ( U n i t E i g h t e e n , Page 65) and an ab rup t change i n rhythm as P e t e , B a r r y and C o l i n are d i s t r a c t e d by c u r i o s i t y and peer i n t o the c a r r i a g e . Note t h a t the r i v a l r y between Pete and Ba r r y has not been e r a s e d , and t h a t Pete has not succeeded i n v i n d i c a t i n g h i m s e l f from B a r r y ' s a c c u s a t i o n . Pete takes advantage of the g r o u p ' s f o cu s on the baby to g a i n a t t e n t i o n f o r h i m s e l f and to d i s p e n s e w i t h the rumour t h a t he has "no g u t s . " He p u l l s the b a b y ' s h a i r . The e f f e c t i s so s u c c e s s f u l t h a t he i s c a l l e d upon to p u l l the b a b y ' s h a i r a second t ime as Mike becomes i n t e r e s t e d . There i s now no q u e s t i o n t h a t Pete has r e - e s t a b l i s h e d h i s p o s i t i o n over B a r r y . ^ B a r r y , however, i s not about to be b e a t e n . He s e i z e s c o n t r o l o f the s i t u a t i o n and becomes the dominant c h a r a c t e r by a s u c c e s s i o n of moves: p i n c h i n g the baby, p u l l -i n g i t s d i a p e r s o f f , and by s p i t t i n g i n t o the pram. He i s so s u c c e s s f u l t h a t C o l i n beg i n s to i m i t a t e h im. 40 Pete i s then c a l l e d upon to top B a r r y , and h i s s u g g e s t i o n ( "G i ve i t a punch " ) i s i n t e n d e d to have t h a t e f f e c t . When c a l l e d upon to back up h i s s u g g e s t i o n , he makes the m i s t a k e of punch ing the baby l i g h t l y , t h e r e b y g i v i n g B a r r y the o p p o r t u n i t y t o beat him a t h i s own game by punch ing h a r d e r . Pete i s a la rmed by t h i s , even more so when C o l i n i m i t a t e s B a r r y . There i s a s w i t c h i n rhythm h e r e , as the c h a r a c t e r s f e e l a b i t uneasy about the way the a c t i o n has t a k e n . They n o t i c e F r e d . He has not p a r t i c i p a t e d i n the above s e c t i o n , and they are made s l i g h t l y uneasy by t h i s f a c t . When Fred r e f u s e s to j o i n them, they a re compe l l ed to r e - a s s e r t t h e i r ' l a c k of conce rn to each o t h e r , f o r s e l f - a s s u r a n c e . The f o u r c h a r a c t e r s exchange b o a s t s , r e s t o r i n g t h e i r c o n f i d e n c e : FRED: L e a v e i t a l o n e . PETE : Why? FRED: Y e r d o n ' t wan t a r ow . PETE : What row? Ml KE : What k i d ? C O L I N : 1 a i n ' s e e n no k i d . BARRY: No t me! PETE : Y e r w o u l d n ' t g r a s s on y e r m u c h e r s ? FRED : Grow up . BARRY: D ' n a r f l o o k i l l . S t u p i d b a s t a r d . (HE JERKS THE PRAM VIOLENTLY) PETE : T h a s s 'ow t h e y ' a n g y e r - g i v e y e r a j e r k . P e t e , as i t has been made appa ren t so f a r , i s a t a l k e r who i s unab le to c a r r y out h i s b o a s t s . I t i s by now appa ren t t h a t he i s unab le t o do as much damage as B a r r y , and 41 i n t h i s sense i s doomed to l o s e the c o n t e s t . He t a l k s i n the s e c t i o n to f o l l o w about b r e a k i n g f i n g e r s and of smo the r i n g the baby, but B a r r y e a s i l y d e s t r o y s the i l l u s i o n by h i n t i n g t h a t Pete would never be a b l e to c a r r y i t o u t . ( " Y e h . That would be s o m e t h i n " ) . The c o n t e s t i s q u i c k l y r e a c h i n g a c r i t i c a l p o i n t where e i t h e r one or the o t h e r must back down. F o l l o w i n g the tendency of Scene T h r e e , i t w i l l be n e c e s s a r y f o r them to u n i t e a g a i n s t an o u t s i d e r i n o r d e r to m a i n t a i n t h e i r s o l i -d a r i t y as a g roup . F r e d ' s command t h a t they l e a v e the baby a l one p r o v i d e s an o p p o r t u n i t y f o r t h i s . By t a k i n g a s t and o p p o s i t e to the r e s t of the g r oup , Fred l e a ve s h i m s e l f open to becoming an o b j e c t o f t h e i r h o s t i l i t y . They r e a c t d e r i -s i v e l y , f o c u s i n g and v e n t i n g t h e i r i n t e r n a l c o n f l i c t s on the o u t s i d e r . When Pete and B a r r y j e r k the pram, i t i s not so much to c o n t i n u e the c o n t e s t between them as t o to rment Fred and to demons t r a te t h e i r s u p e r i o r i t y over h im. Pete and Ba r r y are now a l l i e d a g a i n s t F r e d . The f o l l o w i n g a c t i o n s o f the group are t h e r e f o r e f o r the purpose of a r o u s i n g a g r e a t e r re sponse from F r e d . When Fred s tands and aga i n t e l l s them to l e a v e the baby a l one ( " T h e r e ' l l be a r o w " ) , t h e i r r e sponse i n d i c a t e s t h a t a c o n n e c t i o n has a r i s e n between m a s c u l i n e p r i d e and the a b i l i t y t o do damage to the baby. They c a l l F r e d ' s m a s c u l i n i t y i n t o q u e s t i o n on the grounds t h a t he has not y e t touched the baby: 42 P E T E : L e s s s ee y e r . BARRY: Y e h . P E T E : ' F r a i d s h e ' l l r u c k y e r . FRED: Hah ! (HE LOOKS INTO THE PRAM) Ch r i s s . P E T E : L e s s s e e y e r c h u c k t h a t . (PETE THROWS A STONE TO FRED. FRED DOESN 'T.TRY TO CATCH IT. IT FALLS TO THE GROUND. COLIN PICKS IT•UP AND GIVES IT TO FRED) With t h i s c h a l l e n g e , the focu s i s e n t i r e l y upon F r e d , w i t h a l l the group p r e s s u r e s i n h e r e n t i n i t . T h e i r q u i e t exchange d u r i n g F r e d ' s h e s i t a t i o n i s p a r t l y t o goad Fred o n , p a r t l y t o r e a s s u r e themse l ve s t h a t the baby i s not wanted by anyone and t h e r e f o r e can be s a c r i f i c e d w i t h o u t r e g r e t . When Fred i n t e n t i o n a l l y throws and m i s s e s , Pe te and B a r r y i m m e d i a t e l y throw s tone s i n t o the pram. Pete throws t o demons t r a te h i s s u p e r i o r i t y over F r e d . B a r r y throws m o r e / v i o l e n t l y t o a s s e r t h i s s t a t u s over both Pete and F r e d . Throwing s t one s at the baby has now become a c r i t e r i o n f o r a c cep tance i n t o the group and c o n f i r m a t i o n of one ' s m a s c u l i n i t y , t h e r e f o r e C o l i n and Mike f o l l o w s u i t . Fred cannot r e s i s t t h i s p r e s s u r e , and he too throws a s tone i n t o the pram, r e c e i v i n g app l au se from the g roup. Pandemonium breaks l o o s e , as each of t he boys com-petes t o top the a c t t h a t p receeded h i s , by b u r n i n g the baby and by h i t t i n g i t w i t h s t one s a t p o i n t b l a nk r ange . M i k e ' s r e sponse ("You ' ad what you w a n t ! " ) t o a t tempt s on the p a r t o f 43 the o t h e r s to r e s t r a i n him i s e v i d e n c e of the p l e a s u r e they a re r e c e i v i n g from the r e l e a s e of i n t e r n a l v i o l e n c e . When, they r e a l i z e t h a t the b e l l i s r i n g i n g (announc ing the c l o s i n g of the pa rk ) they become aware o f the danger they are i n and beg in t o e s c a p e , but s t i l l B a r r y must remain beh i nd to h i t the baby once more: somehow the baby becomes a symbol f o r e v e r y t h i n g i n the w o r l d wh ich he w i shes to conquer and d e s t r o y . He i s e x u l t a n t , as i f d e s t r o y i n g an enemy. Fred i s l e f t beh i nd to g a t h e r h i s f i s h i n g gea r . He does t h i s as q u i c k l y as p o s s i b l e , i n a d v e r t a n t l y l e a v i n g beh ind a box wh ich w i l l i n c r i m i n a t e h im. We have d i s c o v e r e d t h a t even F r e d , s eem ing l y the most s e l f - s u f f i c i e n t and i ndependen t c h a r a c t e r i n the p l a y , i s s u s c e p t i b l e t o the p r e s s u r e s e n -gendered by a g roup . A f t e r F r e d ' s e x i t t h e r e i s a l one pause of perhaps t h i r t y t o f o r t y - f i v e s e cond s . Pam's r e t u r n and her subsequent speech i s meant to i n d i c a t e her e x h a u s t i o n w i t h the s t r u g g l e she has been i n . Her r e t u r n i s i n t e n d e d as b r u t a l i r o n y , f o r her speech i n d i c a t e s t h a t f o r the f i r s t t ime i n the p l a y someone i s w i l l i n g to a c c e p t the baby w i t h o u t u s i n g i t f o r t h e i r own ends . Th i s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n o f the event s of Scene S i x i s i n t e n d e d to be an e x t e n s i o n of the themes o u t l i n e d e a r l i e r i n t h i s a n a l y s i s and i n my i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of the p l a y : t h a t of the i n d i v i d u a l , h i s r e l a t i o n to the group and , by e x t e n s i o n , 44 the q u e s t i o n of what happens to a pe r son who does not en j o y the p r o t e c t i o n and s a n c t i o n o f the g roup . I do not agree w i t h M a r t i n E s s l i n ' s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n , t h a t the k i l l i n g of the baby r e s u l t s f rom the f a c t t h a t Pam has g i v e n i t a s p i r i n . A c c o r d i n g t o Mr. E s s l i n , the b o y s ' a t t e n t i o n s are a t f i r s t w e l l - m e a n t , but they are d r i v e n to a f r e n z y by the b a b y ' s l a c k o f r e s p o n s e . Thus , a c c o r d i n g t o the i n t e r p r e t a t i o n , the event s i n Scene S i x and l a t e r i n the p l a y a r i s e as a r e s u l t of Pam's l a c k o f l o v e f o r the baby and the f a m i l y ' s l a c k o f 1ove f o r each o t h e r . In r e h e a r s a l , we d i s c o v e r e d t h r e e d i s a d v a n t a g e s t o t h i s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n . F i r s t l y , t h i s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n seems to g i v e a d i s p r o p o r t i o n a t e emphasis t o Pam when i t i s Len who i s the c e n t r a l c h a r a c t e r , and h i s a t tempt s to f i n d a c cep t ance the c e n t r a l a c t i o n . S e c o n d l y , such a v iew g i v e s a l l o f the boys the same mot i ve and i m p l i e s a homogeneity t o the group wh ich i s not born out i n Scene Three or i n Scene S i x . In Scene Three we see c e r t a i n t e n d e n c i e s w i t h i n the group wh i ch must be c o n t i n u e d i n some way i n Scene S i x . T h i r d l y , the i n t e r p r e t a t i o n c o n f i n e s the c e n t r a l theme to a q u e s t i o n of l o v i n g one ' s f e l l o w man, a mora l q u e s t i o n , when i n f a c t the c e n t r a l i s s u e s of the p l a y a re much b roade r than t h a t , hav i ng to do w i t h the b a s i c n a t u r e of the human s p e c i e s . For Scene S i x t o have any meaning i n c o n n e c t i o n w i t h the r e s t of the 45 p l a y , the k i l l i n g of the baby must be seen as the l o g i c a l a n d , i n t h i s s i t u a t i o n , i n e v i t a b l e , p r o g r e s s i o n o f t e n d e n c i e s o u t l i n e d i n the p r e c e d i n g s c e n e s . Scene Seven Scene Seven f u l f i l l s s e v e r a l i m p o r t a n t p l o t f u n c t i o n s , a l t h o u g h i t a l s o g i v e s us i n s i g h t s i n t o a l l the c h a r a c t e r s c o n c e r n e d . The scene s e r ve s the o v e r a l l purpose of c o m p l e t i n g , i n a s e n s e , the a c t i o n of the f i r s t h a l f of the p l a y ( L e n ' s e n t r a n c e i n t o the f a m i l y , h i s chang ing r e l a t i o n s h i p to Pam, the unwanted baby, the k i l l i n g of the baby , e t c . ) , 1eav ing the s p e c t a t o r w i t h c e r t a i n q u e s t i o n s c e n t r a l to the theme of the p l a y . These s p e c i f i c q u e s t i o n s w i l l form the main a c t i o n o f t h e second h a l f . The scene p r o v i d e s c e r t a i n p l o t i n f o r m a t i o n : m a i n l y i n the f a c t t h a t Fred has been a r r e s t e d f o r the c r i m e . The f a c t t h a t Fred has k i l l e d her baby makes ve r y l i t t l e d i f f e r e n c e to Pam: her a t t i t u d e to Fred i s unchanged, f o r w i t h o u t him she has no a l t e r n a t i v e but to r e t u r n to her f a m i l y and to Len . Mo reove r , the k i l l i n g of her baby r e i n f o r c e s the r o l e she has u n c o n s c i o u s l y a s s i g n e d f o r h e r s e l f , t h a t o f v i c t i m . The baby i t s e l f has become, i f a n y t h i n g , l e s s i m p o r t a n t to the c h a r a c t e r s . The f a c t t h a t Len was w a t c h i n g w h i l e the baby was be i n g k i l l e d g i v e s us a new i n s i g h t i n t o h i s c h a r a c t e r : f i r s t l y , 46 our s u s p i c i o n t h a t he was me re l y u s i n g the baby as an excuse to s t a y i n the house i s c o n f i r m e d , f o r he had no i n s t i n c t i v e urge whateve r t o r e s cue i t , e s p e c i a l l y s i n c e i t would mean d e f y i n g the group to do s o . S e c o n d l y , the image o f Len as a w a t c h e r , a man who must g a i n e x p e r i e n c e v i c a r i o u s l y , i s r e i n -f o r c e d . As an o u t s i d e r , unab le t o p a r t i c i p a t e i n the l i f e around h im , he must g a i n e x p e r i e n c e th rough o t h e r p e o p l e , Fred i n p a r t i c u l a r . To r e s cue the baby would mean p a r t i c i p a t -i n g i n someth ing which from the b e g i n n i n g has e x c l u d e d h im. We are b e g i n n i n g to see t h a t L e n ' s i n a b i l i t y t o a c t , t o change h i s s i t u a t i o n , a r i s e s out of a deep sense of a l i e n a t i o n , a l a c k o f d i r e c t i o n wh ich l i e s a t the co re of h i s c h a r a c t e r . Len i s now b e r e f t o f any appa ren t mo t i ve f o r r e m a i n -i n g i n the house. Pam's a t t i t u d e t o him i s c l e a r . The main q u e s t i o n l e f t t o the aud ience a t t h i s p o i n t i s : how can Len p o s s i b l y s t a y w i t h the f a m i l y now? I t now seems t h a t the s i t u a t i o n can do n o t h i n g but d e t e r i o r a t e . Pam i s q u i c k l y becoming a p a t h e t i c f i g u r e , and t h e r e i s no danger of her becoming the v i l l a i n o f the p i e c e . I t w i l l become i n c r e a s i n g l y c l e a r t h roughou t the second h a l f o f the p l a y t h a t the c h a r a c t e r s are c l u t c h i n g a t s t r a w s : they are l i v i n g i n a s i t u a t i o n where even the most g r udg i n g a c c e p t -ance by o t h e r peop le i s b e t t e r than n o t h i n g . In U n i t One (Page 72) we d i s c o v e r t h a t Fred has been charged w i t h the k i l l i n g . Immed ia te l y upon Pam's e n t r a n c e we 47 r e a l i z e t h a t the murder has changed n o t h i n g : he has no aware -ness of t he e n o r m i t y of the a c t , nor does he assume any r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r i t . Mo reove r , he s t i l l t a ke s h i s s e xua l dominance ove r Pam f o r g r a n t e d : w i t h i n moments Pam i s com-p l e t e l y s u b s e r v i e n t to h im , to the p o i n t where i t a lmos t seems as i f the murder were her f a u l t ( " Ye r got no r i g h t c h a s i n ' me w i t h a pram! Drop me r i g h t i n i t ! " ) . We must be made i m m e d i a t e l y aware i n t h i s u n i t t h a t t h e r e i s a comple te absence of any sense o f g u i l t . Hav ing been a l l but accused of the murder h e r s e l f , Pam changes the s u b j e c t i n such a way as t o l e t him know t h a t she i s on h i s s i d e . She i s now c o n v i n c e d t h a t Fred i s the v i c t i m of c i r c u m s t a n c e s , and i s anx i ou s to show her conce rn f o r him and her w i l l i n g n e s s t o h e l p , to the p o i n t of p e r j u r y i f n e c e s s a r y . In U n i t Two (Page 74) the g rowing i n t i m a c y and sense of sha red d i f f i c u l t y between them becomes l u d i c r o u s , as Fred uses Pam as a w i l l i n g v e h i c l e f o r h i s s e l f - p i t y . , The s i t u a t i o n i s f u l l of uncon sc i ou s i r o n y , and must be p l a y e d as s u c h : Fred and Pam are f a r from l o v e r s , and Fred i s by no means a r o m a n t i c hero who i s u n j u s t l y p u n i s h e d . With L e n ' s e n t r a n c e t h e r e i s a comp le te change o f rhythm and a new u n i t beg i n s ( U n i t T h r e e , Page 75). We f i n d t h a t Pam's a t t i t u d e to Len i s unchanged: i f a n y t h i n g she hates him more, and i n a sense ho l d s him r e s p o n s i b l e f o r her d i f f i c u l t i e s . F r e d , on the o t h e r hand, e v i d e n t l y c o n s i d e r s 48 him a f r i e n d . Th i s i s j u s t i f i e d i n p r a c t i c a l terms f o r , u n l i k e Pam, Len has remembered to b r i n g c i g a r e t t e s . F red has no l o n g e r any need f o r Pam and i m m e d i a t e l y d i s c a r d s h e r . Pam e x i t s i n t e a r s , and we are aware t h a t the r e l a t i o n s h i p has not ended where Pam i s c o n c e r n e d ; she has o b v i o u s l y a g r e a t s t a k e i n F r e d . Immed ia te l y t h e r e i s a sense o f r e l i e f on F r e d ' s p a r t . We are s t r u c k by the d i f f e r e n c e i n h i s g r e e t i n g t o Len . They are a m i c a b l e and f r i e n d l y , and i n U n i t Four (Page 75) Fred c o n f i d e s to Len i n b r o t h e r l y f a s h i o n t h a t he i s a p p r e -h e n s i v e about what h i s s en tence w i l l be. The r e l a t i o n s h i p , t h e n , i s a c o n t i n u a t i o n of the e a r l y p a r t of Scene S i x . They a re a lmos t l i k e s c h o o l chums, an ana logy wh ich a ga i n i s f i l l e d w i t h i r o n y . In U n i t F i v e (Page 76) Len c o n f e s s e s t o Fred t h a t he w i t n e s s e d the murder . F red makes no mora l judgement on the f a c t , but i s me re l y conce rned w i t h whether Len i n f o rmed the p o l i c e . L e n , on the o t h e r hand, f e e l s some mora l r e s p o n -s i b i l i t y f o r h i s i n a c t i o n ("I d i d n ' t know what t ' do. W e l l , I s h o u l d ' a s topped y e r " ) . The i n c i d e n t i s u n d e r s t a t e d , and not much i s made of i t a t t h i s t i m e , but i t a rouses q u e s t i o n s about L e n , f o r he e v i d e n t l y p l a c e s more s i g n i f i c a n c e on the event than F r e d . To beg i n w i t h , the f a c t t h a t even he , an o u t s i d e r , was unab le to summon the mora l c o n v i c t i o n to b reak w i t h the w i l l of a group of wh ich he i s not a p a r t , i s e v i d e n c e 49 of j u s t how a l i e n a t e d he i s . In Scene Ten the s u b j e c t w i l l be b rought up a g a i n , f o r Len i s e x p l o r i n g the i n c i d e n t i n an a t t empt to come to terms w i t h the v i o l e n c e wh ich seems to be a n e c e s s i t y of l i f e i n the w o r l d o f wh ich he w i shes t o become a p a r t . Scene E i g h t Scene E i g h t f u l f i l s t h r e e i m p o r t a n t p l o t and c h a r a c t e r f u n c t i o n s i n the p l a y . We see the b e g i n n i n g s o f a r e l a t i o n s h i p between Ha r r y and Len - a l o g i c a l one, s i n c e they occupy s i m i l a r p o s i t i o n s i n the house. On the o t h e r hand, L e n ' s r e l a t i o n s h i p t o Pam has d e t e r i o r a t e d i n t o c o n s t a n t f i g h t i n g , b i c k e r i n g and mutual h a t r e d . A l l the event s o f the f i r s t h a l f o f the p l a y , are ammunit ion f o r the f i g h t . In terms of p l o t , the s i t u a t i o n i s connec ted to the f i r s t h a l f o f the p l a y by the f a c t t h a t Fred i s to be r e l e a s e d soon . T h i s adds to the t e n s i o n o f the p r e s e n t s i t u a t i o n , f o r Pam hoped t h a t he w i l l r e p l a c e Len i n the house. She t h e r e f o r e needs Fred as a weapon a g a i n s t Len . In the f i r s t two u n i t s we see Ha r r y and Len as po -t e n t i a l f r i e n d s . They t e n t a t i v e l y seek each o t h e r o u t , s e a r c h out each o t h e r ' s weaknes se s , but they never f o r c e a c o n f r o n t a -t i o n , nor do they g i v e d i r e c t e x p r e s s i o n of sympathy, f o r f e a r t h a t the o t h e r might prove an enemy. The s e x u a l r i v a l r y f o r head of the house which was i n i t i a t e d i n Scene One has not 50 been f o r g o t t e n , and i t i s a lways t h a t e lement o f mutua l s u s -p i c i o n t h a t f o r c e s the two c h a r a c t e r s t o keep each o t h e r a t arms l e n g t h and r e v e r t to s m a l l t a l k . Throughout the s e c t i o n , n e i t h e r c h a r a c t e r answers the d i r e c t q u e s t i o n s o f the o t h e r , and y e t both c h a r a c t e r s ask t he se q u e s t i o n s , as i f d e f e n d i n g themse l ve s by a s s e r t i n g the v u l n e r a b i l i t y of the o t h e r . In t h i s p a r t o f the scene g r e a t a t t e n t i o n must be p a i d to the s u b t e x t , f o r t h i s i s where the r e a l c o n v e r s a t i o n l i e s . The rhythm of the s e c t i o n must be ve ry t e n t a t i v e , both to g i v e room f o r the s u b t e x t and to c o n t r a s t w i t h the u n i t b e g i n n i n g w i t h Pam's e n t r a n c e . Len i n i t i a t e s the c o n v e r s a t i o n by c a l l i n g a t t e n t i o n to the f a c t t h a t Ha r r y i s p e r f o r m i n g a f u n c t i o n n o r m a l l y c a r r i e d out by women. L e n ' s i n t e n t i s t o d i s c o v e r why Ha r r y remains i n the house; what keeps him t h e r e . H a r r y , on the o t h e r hand, i n t e r p r e t s L e n ' s comment as s u g g e s t i n g e m a s c u l a t i o n , and guards a g a i n s t any p o s s i b l e t h r e a t t o h i s m a s c u l i n i t y by a s s e r t i n g t h a t he was t r a i n e d i n the army t o i r o n h i s own c l o t h e s , and t h a t i s what "makes a man a y e r . " At t h i s p o i n t Mary e n t e r s , and her i n t e r r u p t i o n beg in s a new u n i t ( U n i t Two, Page 77). We have not seen Mary s i n c e Scene F i v e , and i t w i l l be remembered t h a t her e n t r a n c e was m o t i v a t e d by j e a l o u s y . L e n , i t appears t o h e r , i s f o r m i n g an a l l i a n c e w i t h someone e l s e i n the f a m i l y and t h e r e f o r e i s a t h r e a t to h e r . A s i m i l a r m o t i v e e x i s t s i n t h i s s c e n e . 51 A l t hough Len i s now c o m p l e t e l y a l i e n a t e d from Pam, an a l l i a n c e w i t h Har ry would be even more dangerous t o Mary. T h e r e f o r e , when she s tumbles upon Ha r r y and L e n ' s c o n v e r s a t i o n she immed-i a t e l y senses t h a t she i s i n t r u d i n g upon someth ing and f e e l s t h r e a t e n e d by the f a c t t h a t she i s not i n v o l v e d . There i s an u n c o m f o r t a b l e pause w h i l e Mary s ea r che s around her f o r some-t h i n g wh ich w i l l p r o v i d e an excuse to d e s t r o y the i n t i m a c y of the moment. She comp la in s l o u d l y about the c l o t h e s Len i s wea r i n g and e x i t s . We are l e f t w i t h the sense (wh ich w i l l be s t r o n g e r by the end of the scene) t h a t the house i s d i v i d -i n g i n t o two h o s t i l e camps, a l t h o u g h no c o n s c i o u s a l l i a n c e s are be i n g f o rmed. Len s t a r t s a new u n i t ( U n i t T h r e e , Page 77) by r e -t u r n i n g to the o r i g i n a l s u b j e c t : t h a t Ha r r y i s i r o n i n g i n a house o c c u p i e d by women. Ha r r y a v e r t s the i m p l i c a t i o n t h a t he s h o u l d a s s e r t h i s m a s c u l i n i t y . L e n ' s q u e s t i o n s becomes more d i r e c t and i n s i s t e n t . The u n i t reaches a c r i s i s when Ha r r y t u r n s to Len and s a y s : "You d o n ' t know what y e r t a l k i n g a b o u t , l a d . " There i s a d e a d l o c k , and Len l o s e s the o f f e n s i v e . I t i s now t ime f o r Ha r r y t o t ake the o f f e n s i v e . In s i m i l a r f a s h i o n to L e n , he b r i n g s up the s u b j e c t of F r e d ' s r e l e a s e and the t h r e a t i t poses f o r Len . L i k e H a r r y , Len a v e r t s the i m p l i e d q u e s t i o n of h i s s e x u a l f a i l u r e w i t h Pam, f i r s t by c o u n t e r q u e s t i o n s , then by vague answer s . Both c h a r -a c t e r s g i v e up the s t r u g g l e and r e t u r n to s m a l l - t a l k . But i n 52 the s u b t e x t of the c o n v e r s a t i o n have been t he most i n t i m a t e q u e s t i o n s i n v o l v i n g the l i v e s of both men. Pam's e n t r a n c e announces a comple te s w i t c h i n r h y thm, and the new u n i t i s announced by the pop mus ic wh ich i s p l a y i n g on her p o r t a b l e r a d i o ( U n i t F o u r , Page 7 8 ) . The sound i s t i n n y and i r r i t a t i n g . L i k e Mary, Pam senses an a l l i a n c e between Ha r r y and Len t h a t i s dangerous to h e r ; l i k e Mary she s ea r che s f o r someth ing t o c o m p l a i n abou t . Her " R a d i o - T i m e s " monologue i s the r e s u l t .of •  t h i s s e a r c h , and i s t h e r e f o r e d e -l i v e r e d w i t h the i n t e n t i o n of d i s r u p t i n g the room and of i r r i t a t i n g Len . But Pam i s no t c o l d and c a l c u l a t i n g . She i s not c l e v e r . She g e n u i n e l y b e l i e v e s t h a t w i t h Len i n the house she i s c o n s t a n t l y i n danger o f be i ng t aken advantage o f ; g r a d u a l l y she w i l l grow to a s s o c i a t e and i d e n t i f y e ve r y un -f o r t u n a t e even t i n the p l a y w i t h Len . L e n ' s re sponse to the s u b j e c t o f the " R a d i o - T i m e s " i n d i c a t e s t h a t t h i s i s a r e g u l a r o c c u r r e n c e . At f i r s t Pam's c o m p l a i n t does not seem to have the d e s i r e d e f f e c t and she t h e r e f o r e a c c e l e r a t e s , becoming more i n s i s t e n t . Ha r r y i s a b l e t o i g n o r e h e r , a s k i l l he has a c q u i r e d over the y e a r s , but Len becomes i n c r e a s i n g l y i r r i t a t e d u n t i l he e x c l a i m s , "I t o l ' y e r t ' keep i t i n y e r room, " o v e r r i d i n g Pam. The d i a l o g u e must be l ower i n volume to a l l o w f o r f u r t h e r d e v e l o p -ment, but w i t h s u f f i c i e n t i n t e n s i t y t o make i t appa ren t t h a t the c o n t r o v e r s y i s not mere l y over a magaz ine . 53 H a r r y ' s anecdote c o n c e r n i n g the s h i r t s p r o v i d e s a sharp c o n t r a s t to the d i a l o g u e between Len and Pam. Ha r r y i s d e m o n s t r a t i n g t o Len t h a t i t i s p o s s i b l e t o a b s t a i n from the argument , to a v o i d the m i s t a k e of f i g h t i n g w i t h Pam. L e n , of c o u r s e , i s unab le t o respond w i t h H a r r y ' s p a t i e n c e . He knows t h a t Pam i s anx iou s t o see him out of the house and so he has more a t s t a k e i n the argument. When Pam i n i t i a t e s the next u n i t ( U n i t F i v e , Page 80) by re suming the Rad io -T imes argument Len has reached the l i m i t o f h i s p a t i e n c e , and the d i a l o g u e i s more v i o l e n t than i n U n i t Four . Len t e m p o r a r i l y dominates the a rgument , f o r by r e f u s i n g t o comply w i t h Pam's r e q u e s t t h a t he get up he i s a b l e to c o n t r o l the p r o g r e s s o f the s i t u a t i o n and to an tago r n i z e Pam. Pam i s unab le t o r e g a i n c o n t r o l u n l e s s she s w i t c h e s t o ano the r s u b j e c t . She does so i n U n i t S i x (Page 8 1 ) , w i t h her s t a t e m e n t t h a t " F r e d ' s c o m i n ' 'ome. next week. " Len i s now on the d e f e n s i v e , f o r h i s p o s i t i o n i n the house (and the s m a l l amount of a c cep t ance he has a c h i e v e d ) i s t h r e a t e n e d . Len a t tempt s to defend h i m s e l f and to ga i n c o n t r o l by i m p l y i n g t h a t Fred i s h i s f r i e n d and t h a t he can have i n f l u e n c e over whether Fred w i l l w i sh t o s t a y i n the house. A g a i n , an impasse has been r e a c h e d , and Pam i s f o r c e d to f i n d ano the r l i n e o f a t t a c k . The a t t a c k she chooses i s much c l o s e r t o L e n ' s r e a l f e a r s , f o r i t i s based on the f a c t t h a t Len has nowhere e l s e to go. She p i e r c e s even deeper w i t h the s t a t e m e n t t h a t he i s 54 not wanted i n the house, and t h a t he i s r e s p o n s i b l e f o r the death of the baby. Len has e v i d e n t l y become Pam's s c a p e g o a t , her symbol f o r a l l the u n f o r t u n a t e t h i n g s wh ich have happened to h e r , and f o r her p r e s e n t s i t u a t i o n . Her a c c u s a t i o n s are so i r r a t i o n a l t h a t Len has no d e f e n s e , and the u n i t degen-e r a t e s i n t o nonsense as i t a c c e l e r a t e s i n t o a s h o u t i n g match , i n c r e a s i n g i n volume and pace . The c l i m a x i s reached when Len s tands a b r u p t l y and shout s " Shut u p ! , " a s s e r t i n g h i s s u p e r i o r p h y s i c a l s t r e n g t h . The f o l l o w i n g u n i t ( U n i t Seven, Page 83) i s i n d i r e c t c o n t r a s t w i t h U n i t S i x . Between long s i l e n c e s Pam l a c o n i c a l l y sums up the s i t u a t i o n between them. She i n i t i a t e s U n i t E i g h t by t u r n i n g to Ha r r y f o r s u p p o r t . H a r r y ' s l a c k of an a f f i r m a -t i v e r e p l y i n f u r i a t e s her anew. The f i g h t i n g i s on a g a i n , q u i e t l y a t f i r s t but w i t h i n c r e a s i n g vo lume. The Rad io -T imes i s b rought up a g a i n . Pam i s v e r g i n g on h y s t e r i a , and we become i n c r e a s i n g l y aware of how much she s tands t o l o s e i f her hopes i n Fred are not born o u t . The u n i t reaches a c r i s i s s i m i l a r to U n i t S i x when Len t h r e a t e n s to s t r i k e h e r . A g a i n , he i s a t t e m p t i n g to a s s e r t m a s c u l i n e dominance based upon p h y s i c a l s t r e n g t h . Pam d e f i e s h i m , and he i s unab le t o c a r r y out h i s t h r e a t . Pam i s v i c t o r i o u s , and has n o t h i n g but c o n -tempt f o r him ("I a i n ' l e t t i n ' a b l oody l i t t l e weed l i k e you push me a r o u n d ! " ) . 55 In U n i t E i g h t (Page 8 5 ) , Len beg in s a new exchange , but the d i a l o g u e i s i n t e r r u p t e d by M a r y ' s v o i c e . The d i a -l ogue w i t h Mary i n f u r i a t e s Pam — i t i s as i f Mary were d e l i b e r a t e l y a n t a g o n i z i n g h e r . The rhythm of the p r e v i o u s u n i t resumes. The c l i m a x of U n i t E i g h t , and i n a sense the c l i m a x of the s c e n e , o ccu r s w i t h Pam's l i n e : " Y e r w o u l d n ' t ' e l p a c r y i n ' b aby . " The scene q u i c k l y draws to a c l o s e . H a r r y ' s o f f e r o f the i r o n i n g board i s i n t e r e s t i n g , f o r i t has two i m p l i c a t i o n s : f i r s t l y , the e m a s c u l a t i o n i t s y m b o l i z e s f o r L e n , and s e c o n d l y i t i s a symbol of H a r r y ' s a vo i dance of the wra th of the women, h i s w i t h d r a w a l . L e n ' s p l e a t h a t he i s " t r y i n ' t ' ' e l p " i s ambiguous, f o r we are never su re who i t i s he i s t r y i n g to h e l p . In a s e n s e , the per son who needs he l p most i s h i m s e l f . The main d i r e c t o r i a l prob lem i n t h i s scene i s i n -a c h i e v i n g r h y t h m i c v a r i e t y . In one s e n s e , the d i a l o g u e between Len and Pam must be o r c h e s t r a t e d l i k e a p i e c e of mu s i c . At the same t i m e , however , the aud ience must be made aware of the ted ium of the c o n t i n u o u s r e p e t i t i o n w i t h i n the s cene . Scenes F o u r , E i g h t , and E l e v e n are to have a c u m u l a t i v e e f f e c t on the a u d i e n c e : they must g i v e the s p e c t a t o r a sense of the rhythm o f l i f e p r e s e n t e d i n the p l a y . S e v e r a l t imes d u r i n g these scenes the s p e c t a t o r must get the i m p r e s s i o n t h a t the movement cannot go on , t h a t someth ing must o ccu r t o b reak the rhythm and b r i n g i t to an end. But the p o i n t i s made 56 aga i n and aga i n t h a t no f i n a l a c t i o n e x i s t s , t h a t l i f e w i l l go on. Scene T h i r t e e n e p i t o m i z e s t h i s q u a l i t y of "ad i n f i n i t u m . " Scene Nine In p r e v i o u s scenes we have w i t n e s s e d a g rowing r e l a -t i o n s h i p between Len and H a r r y . Mary has made f o u r a p p e a r -ances i n the p l a y , each one r e l a t i n g t o Len i n some way. In Scene T h r e e , Len p l a y e d the r o l e of M a r y ' s p r o t e c t o r a g a i n s t the o v e r t u r e s of the gang. In Scene Four we see Mary p r a c -t i c a l l y d o t i n g on L e n , h o v e r i n g over him w h i l e he ea t s h i s food and c o m p l a i n i n g t o him of her aches and p a i n s . T h i s r e l a t i o n s h i p has not d e v e l o p e d , f o r i n Scenes F i v e and E i g h t we see her i n t r u d i n g upon L e n ' s c o n v e r s a t i o n s w i t h o t h e r c h a r a c t e r s t o c omp l a i n about h i s appearance and h i s l a c k of a t t e n t i o n to h i s food and , more p a r t i c u l a r l y , t o Mary. In Scene Nine we see Mary u s i n g her o n l y weapon — her s e x u a l i t y — i n an a t tempt to win Len as an a l l y . Throughout the scene she p l a y s two r o l e s — m o t h e r and l o v e r — wh ich a re d i s -t i n c t l y f e m i n i n e and which a re l a c k i n g i n L e n ' s l i f e . Her r e a l i z a t i o n t h a t she has t h i s power grows g r a d u a l l y and i n n o c u o u s l y . But the f a c t t h a t Len i s a l one and t h a t he has been w i t h o u t a woman s i n c e Pam became a t t r a c t e d to Fred p r o -v i d e s Mary w i t h an e x c e l l e n t o p p o r t u n i t y both to win L e n ' s 57 a t t e n t i o n and to r e a f f i r m her own a t t r a c t i v e n e s s ( t he rea son f o r M a r y ' s need of such a f f i r m a t i o n w i l l be made c l e a r i n Scene T w e l v e ) . When Har r y e n t e r s , she i s a b l e t o use t h i s s i t u a t i o n as a weapon a g a i n s t h im. The scene t h e r e f o r e s e r ve s the added purpose of s e t t i n g the s i t u a t i o n f o r Scene Twe l ve . U n i t One (Page 84) e s t a b l i s h e s the f a c t s wh ich s e t ' up the s c e n e . I t i s e v e n i n g . Len i s a l one w i t h n o t h i n g t o do , w h i l e Mary i s p r e p a r i n g f o r an e ven i ng out w i t h f r i e n d s . She i s l a t e f o r the engagement and i n a h u r r y . For the open -i n g p a r t of the s c e n e , t h e r e f o r e , t h e r e w i l l be a sharp c o n -t r a s t i n rhythm between the two c h a r a c t e r s . T h i s r h y t h m i c d i f f e r e n c e i s i m p o r t a n t , f o r i t w i l l s w i t c h . a s the scene p r o -g r e s s e s . Len w i l l become more t en se as he r e a l i z e s what i s h a p p e n i n g , w h i l e Mary w i l l g r a d u a l l y s l ow down as she r e a l i z e s the c o n t r o l she has over the s i t u a t i o n and over Len . At the b e g i n n i n g of U n i t Two (Page 87) t h e r e i s a s i l e n c e as Len p o l i s h e s h i s s h o e s , d u r i n g wh ich Mary r e a l i z e s j u s t how a l one Len i s i n the p r e s e n t s i t u a t i o n . S h e " r e a s s u r e s him t h a t he w i l l not l o s e h i s room, speaks s y m p a t h e t i c a l l y t o him about Pam and F r e d , even o f f e r s him a d v i c e and c o n s o l a t i o n . She i s o b v i o u s l y p l a y i n g the r o l e of mother t o - L e n , a s i t u a -t i o n made s l i g h t l y ambiguous by the f a c t t h a t Mary i s o n l y p a r t l y c l o t h e d . The m o t h e r l y tone i s c o n t i n u e d , but as U n i t Three beg i n s (Page 8 8 ) , the i m p l i c a t i o n s i n the r e l a t i o n s h i p become 58 i n c r e a s i n g l y s e x u a l . She i s s a y i n g t h a t she unde r s tands t h a t Len i s s e x u a l l y f r u s t r a t e d . She even a d v i s e s him on what a g i r l wants i n a man, and what he s hou l d do to s u c c e e d . Thus f a r i n the c o n v e r s a t i o n Mary has t a ken the l e a d . The tone i n the d i a l o g u e changes a b r u p t l y w i t h M a r y ' s l i n e : " I t ' s i n eve ry man. I t ' a s t ' come o u t . " There i s a pause where Len l ook s up at Mary. Mary r e a l i z e s t h a t Len has put the onus on h e r . She i s f l a t t e r e d , and r e a c t s l i g h t l y and c o y l y : "We d i d n ' t c a r r y on l i k e t h a t when I was you r a g e . " As the u n i t p r o g r e s s e s , the r e l a t i o n s h i p g r a d u a l l y s h i f t s as Len takes the o f f e n s i v e by t e a s i n g Mary, who responds c o y l y and s e x u a l l y . Both c h a r a c t e r s are e n j o y i n g the s i t u a -t i o n : Mary i s f l a t t e r e d , Len i s a r o u s e d . The j o k i n g tone of the d i a l o g u e must be s l i g h t l y e x a g g e r a t e d , but w i t h an u n d e r l y i n g tone of r e a l i t y . In o t h e r wo rd s , the aud i ence must be aware t h a t both c h a r a c t e r s are g e n u i n e l y s e x u a l l y a r o u s e d , a l t h o u g h the chance of a r e a l e n c o u n t e r i s s l i g h t . P r e d i c t a b l y , the tone becomes more s e r i o u s as Mary a ga i n b r i n g s up the q u e s t i o n o f L e n ' s s e x u a l f r u s t r a t i o n , and Len sugges t s t h a t she i s the a n t i d o t e f o r i t . The s i t u a t i o n has gone as f a r as i t can go w i t h o u t an a c t u a l s e x u a l e n c o u n t e r . A new u n i t beg in s ( U n i t F ou r , Page 90) wh ich d e s t r o y s the s e x u a l l y - c h a r g e d atmosphere when Mary c a t c h e s her s t o c k i n g . There i s a comple te break i n rhythm as Mary rushes around l o o k i n g f o r someth ing to s t op the r u n . Len t a ke s charge and 59 sugges t s t h a t she sew the s t o c k i n g , but the t a b l e s are com-p l e t e l y t u r n e d when she sugge s t s t h a t he do i t . There i s ano the r ab rup t s w i t c h i n rhythm here ( U n i t F i v e , Page 8 9 ) . The a m b i g u i t y of the s i t u a t i o n i s c l e a r to both of them, but she r e f u s e s t o acknowledge i t . She i s e n j o y i n g L e n ' s d i s c o m -f i t u r e , t a k i n g advantage of the s i t u a t i o n to e s t a b l i s h her s e x u a l power over Len . Len i s e x t r e m e l y ne r vou s . He p u r p o s e l y drops the need le to a v o i d the s i t u a t i o n , but Mary q u i c k l y f i n d s i t . He beg in s work on the s t o c k i n g , and the d i a l o g u e becomes more and more e x p l i c i t , both c h a r a c t e r s aware of t h e s e x u a l l y charged atmosphere ("You watch where you go. Yer a i n ' on y e r 'onnymoon y e t " ) . Mary t a n t a l i z e s L e n , never a l l o w i n g an o u t -r i g h t d e c l a r a t i o n of s e x u a l need. Only Mary n o t i c e s the e n t r a n c e . o f Ha r r y ( U n i t S i x , Page 9 2 ) . Ha r r y r e f u s e s to acknowledge the s i t u a t i o n , f o r t h a t would mean a v i c t o r y f o r Mary. Mary s t ands t r i u m p h a n t , making the most of her tempora ry a l l i a n c e a g a i n s t H a r r y . Len n o t i c e s Har ry when he t u r n s t o l ook f o r s c i s s o r s , and immed-i a t e l y r e a l i z e s the t r a p he i s i n . But t h e r e i s no e s c a p e , f o r the damage has been done. M a r y ' s command t o L e n , " B i t e i t , " i s d i r e c t e d s t r a i g h t a t H a r r y . She i s i n comp le te c o n t r o l , and t h a t i s her d e c l a r a t i o n of v i c t o r y . When Ha r r y e x i t s , Mary has no reason to c o n t i n u e the p e r f o r m a n c e . She b r i s k l y f i n i s h e s her p r e p a r a t i o n s f o r l e a v i n g and c o m p l e t e l y i g n o r e s the p r e c e d i n g s i t u a t i o n w i t h Len . She e x i t s , and Len i s 60 a l one a g a i n . Len has been used as a weapon, f o r a s i m i l a r purpose to the baby i n the f i r s t h a l f o f the p l a y . In one sense he i s as a l one as he was when he e n t e r e d the house. At the same t i m e , however, he o c c u p i e s a s i m i 1 a r . p o s i t i o n to t h a t o f H a r r y ; a s e x u a l f a i l u r e , a l one and unwanted e x c e p t as a u s e f u l i t e m . The i r o n y of the scene i s t h a t he has a t the same t ime become H a r r y ' s enemy. Scene Ten In t h i s scene the main p l o t wh ich beg in s w i t h the e n t r a n c e of Fred and c l i m a x e s w i t h the k i l l i n g o f the baby i s i n a sense r e s o l v e d . We have l e a r n e d i n Scene E i g h t t h a t Pam e x p e c t s Fred to t ake the p l a c e of Len when he i s r e l e a s e d ; a p a t h e t i c hope, f o r Fred o b v i o u s l y wants n o t h i n g more to, do w i t h Pam. Len r e a l i z e s the f u t i l i t y of Pam's p l a n s f o r F r e d . His main o b j e c t i v e i n coming to the c a f e t e r i a i s to p i c k up the p i e c e s when Pam i s r e j e c t e d by F r e d , and to t ake advantage of the s i t u a t i o n and a s s e r t a p l a c e f o r h i m s e l f i n Pam's l i f e . We a l s o see a r e s o l u t i o n to the group c o n f l i c t s we w i t n e s s e d w i t h i n the gang i n scenes Three and S i x . F r e d , because he has e x p e r i e n c e d j a i l , a way of l i f e even more savage than the one he l e f t , has r e p l a c e d Pete as l e a d e r of the g r oup , a l t h o u g h Pete has not acknowledged t h i s . By k i l l i n g the baby and t a k i n g the b l ame, Fred has found a p l a c e f o r h i m s e l f w i t h i n 61 the g r o u p . He has no c o m p e t i t i o n f rom B a r r y , who h o l d s him i n g r e a t a d m i r a t i o n , or f rom P e t e , who can c l a i m no such c o n -c r e t e a c h i e v e m e n t . N o t i c e t h r o u g h o u t the scene P e t e ' s u n -s u c c e s s f u l a t t e m p t s t o a s s e r t h i s o l d p o s i t i o n i n the g r o u p . He f e e l s the t h r e a t f rom F r e d , but can do n o t h i n g about i t . He f i n a l l y a s s e r t s h i m s e l f t o , o f a l l p e o p l e , Pam, who .has -l o s t f rom b e g i n n i n g t o e n d . U n i t One (Page 94) e s t a b l i s h e s c e r t a i n m o t i v a t i o n s and f a c t s f o r the r e s t of the s c e n e . I t i s e a r l y m o r n i n g and i t i s c o l d — a c o l d wh ich a f f e c t s Pam most of a l l , f o r Len g i v e s no i n d i c a t i o n o f b e i n g u n c o m f o r t a b l e . T h i s i s an i n -t e r e s t i n g c h a r a c t e r n o t e . C o l d s u g g e s t s l o n e l i n e s s and d i s -c o m f o r t : t h e r e i s an i m p l i c a t i o n i n t h i s t h a t Pam i s a t l e a s t p a r t l y aware t h a t Fred w i l l r e j e c t h e r . Len i s aware of t h i s , and o f f e r s her t e a , " t o warm her u p . " He i s p l a y i n g the r o l e o f p r o t e c t o r , o f f a t h e r - f i g u r e ; he i s making h i m s e l f n e e d e d . Pam senses t h i s e f f o r t on L e n ' s p a r t , and t h i s i s the s o u r c e of her i r r i t a t i o n a t h i s m i n i s t r a t i o n s , as w e l l as the f a c t t h a t he w i l l i n h i b i t her m e e t i n g w i t h F r e d . T h e i r m o t i v a t i o n s t h r o u g h o u t t h i s p a r t o f the scene t h e r e f o r e c o n f l i c t : Pam wants Len to get out f rom between her and F r e d , w h i l e Len wants t o p r o t e c t her f rom F r e d . In U n i t Two, Pam becomes , o u t w a r d l y , l e s s h o s t i l e to L e n . She i s p l a y i n g the r o l e of a s y m p a t h e t i c f r i e n d i n o r d e r t o p e r s u a d e Len to l e a v e ("It 's no l i f e f o r a f e l l a . 62 You a i n ' a bad s o r t " ) . Len sees th rough t h i s and responds h a r s h l y . As i n U n i t One, they beg i n s h o u t i n g a t each o t h e r , and Pam moves to ano the r t a b l e . There i s a pause and Len e x i t s and r e - e n t e r s . Not t o have h i s purpose undermined so e a s i l y , he r e t u r n s w i t h ano the r cup o f t e a , a ga i n o f f e r i n g to "warm her up , " and t r y i n g t o p r epa re her f o r F r e d ' s r e j e c -t i o n . The tone of the open ing i s resumed. A new u n i t beg in s w i t h the e n t r a n c e o f P e t e , M i k e , C o l i n , B a r r y , Fred and L i z . U n i t Three (Page 96) e s t a b l i s h e s the dynamics of the new g roup , f o r c e r t a i n power s w i t c h e s have t aken p l a c e . N o t i c e (Page 96) t h a t Fred d e c i d e s where they w i l l s i t w h i l e P e t e , the f o rmer l e a d e r o f the g r oup , a c t s as F r e d ' s w a i t e r and pays f o r the m e a l . Fred o r d e r s more than Pete can a f f o r d , but P e t e ' s p r o t e s t i s f a i n t and i s q u i c k l y drowned out by the r e s t of the g roup . Fred e v i d e n t l y po s se s se s g r e a t power and p r e s t i g e . The s e x u a l j o k e c o n c e r n -i n g L i z e s t a b l i s h e s her r e l a t i o n s h i p to Fred (she was b r i e f l y ment ioned i n Scene S i x ) . A l l l e a v e to get the food e x cep t F r e d , L i z and B a r r y , who admires Fred to the p o i n t of i m i t a t i n g him and en joy s the r e f l e c t e d g l o r y . U n i t Four (Page 97) beg i n s when Pam, who up u n t i l now has been u n n o t i c e d , a s s e r t s her p r e s e n c e . Fred r e a l i z e s he must acknowledge her and d u t i f u l l y wa lk s t o her t a b l e . There i s an u n c o m f o r t a b l e pause wh ich Fred breaks by j o k i n g w i t h the boys o f f s t a g e . Pam beg ins t o make f e e b l e c o n v e r s a t i o n , but i s 63 broken o f f by L i z who, u n w i l l i n g t o a l l o w F r e d ' s a t t e n t i o n s to go t o a f o rmer g i r l f r i e n d , m a n i p u l a t e s Fred back to her t a b l e . The f i r s t c o n f r o n t a t i o n between Pam and F red comes to an end w i t h n o t h i n g r e s o l v e d . As i n Scene S i x , Fred w i shes to a v o i d an u n p l e a s a n t c o n f r o n t a t i o n , but w i l l f i n d i t impos -s i b l e l a t e r i n the s cene . Throughout U n i t F i v e (Page 9 8 ) , Fred t ake s the s t a g e , and i s the c e n t r e of a t t e n t i o n , and the o t h e r s l augh a t h i s j o k e s whether they a re funny or n o t . H i s s t a t u s i s i n d i c a t e d by B a r r y , whose a t tempt to g a i n a t t e n t i o n by t e l l i n g a j o k e f a i l s b a d l y . When L i z asks Fred what i t i s 1 i k e " i n s i d e , " Fred becomes uneasy. He changes the s u b j e c t by t u r n i n g t o L e n , and aga i n goes to s i t a t t h e i r t a b l e . T h i s t i m e , L i z ' s a t tempt to r e g a i n F r e d ' s a t t e n t i o n f a i l s . In U n i t S i x (Page 9 9 ) , Pam s t a t e s c l e a r l y what she wants from F r e d : she wants him t o t a ke L e n ' s p l a c e and l i v e w i t h her i n the house. The a b s u r d i t y o f the s u g g e s t i o n i s i m m e d i a t e l y appa ren t t o everyone but Pam. T h i s i s the f i r s t s t e p i n a p r oce s s by wh ich Pam becomes more and more i s o l a t e d t h r oughou t the s c e n e . The a b s o l u t e f u t i l i t y o f her a t tempt to get Fred back i s o b v i o u s . From t h i s p o i n t i n the scene a l l her a c t i o n s become i r o n i c and p a t h e t i c . F red a ga i n escapes from the u n c o m f o r t a b l e s i t u a t i o n by j o k i n g w i t h L i z and B a r r y ( U n i t Seven , Page 9 9 ) . H i s two anecdotes a re b o a s t f u l , c o n c e r n i n g conques t s he made w h i l e i n 64 p r i s o n . But when the d i r e c t q u e s t i o n comes of what i t was l i k e i n p r i s o n , a l l F red can say i s t h a t i t was " c o l d . " One cannot h e l p but n o t i c e the echo of the word " c o l d " from the b e g i n n i n g of the s cene . Th i s i s a c r u c i a l s c e n e , f o r i t c o n t a i n s the most d i r e c t s t a t e m e n t of the p l a y ' s most i m p o r t a n t theme: c o l d ve r su s warmth; l o n e l i n e s s ve r su s company; s o l i t u d e ve r su s membership i n a g roup . Len unde r s t and s t h i s theme be s t of a l l , but i t a c t s upon and m o t i v a t e s a l l the c h a r a c t e r s i n t h e i r a c t i o n s . Throughout the p l a y we have seen s e v e r a l c h a r a c t e r s a l o n e , o u t s i d e a group ( L e n , F r e d , Pam, Mary and , l a t e r , H a r r y ) , and we have seen the l e n g t h s to wh ich they w i l l go to o b t a i n or r e t a i n membersh ip. The baby, the one c h a r a c t e r i n the p l a y who f a i l e d c o m p l e t e l y to i n c l u d e h i m s e l f i n a g r oup , became a member of the dead — q u i t e a l a r g e and c o n t e n t e d g roup . L e n , u n d e r s t a n d a b l y , p r e f e r s any group r a t h e r than n o t h i n g ( d e a t h ) . With M i k e ' s e n t r a n c e , our a t t e n t i o n i s b rough t back to the group which was s en t f o r the f o o d , and ano the r u n i t beg in s ( U n i t N i n e , Page 101). Mike j o k i n g l y r e f e r s t o the f a c t t h a t they are pay i ng f o r the m e a l , h i n t i n g t h a t F red need not e x p e c t f u t u r e tokens of g r a t i t u d e . Fred o f f e r s to pay, i n d i c a t i n g t h a t the meal does not go anywhere near pay i ng f o r what he has done f o r them. Pete e n t e r s , and we have a c o n f r o n t a t i o n w i t h i n the g r oup , between the o l d l e a d e r and the man who has won new power and s t r e n g t h . Pete c h a l l e n g e s 6 5 Fred ("We a i n ' got a c r aw l up you r a r s e " ) , but the f i g h t i s a v e r t e d by the r e s t of the group who w i sh to r e t a i n the p r e s e n t s t r u c t u r e . The s i t u a t i o n m i r r o r s the c o n f r o n t a t i o n between Pete and B a r r y i n . Scene T h r e e , and i t i s e v i d e n t t h a t a power s w i t c h has taken p l a c e . Fred has won a p l a c e i n the group th rough h i s a c t i o n s of Scene S i x and Seven. The c o n f r o n t a t i o n a v e r t e d , M i k e , C o l i n and Pete e x i t and Fred aga i n t ake s the s t a g e , much as he d i d i n U n i t s F i v e and Seven , t o escape from an u n c o m f o r t a b l e s i t u a t i o n . At t h i s p o i n t Fred d e c i d e s t o use L i z ' s r e q u e s t f o r a l i g h t t o get r i d of Pam so t h a t he can t a l k to Len .abou t the s i t u a t i o n w i t h Pam ( U n i t Ten , Page 102 ) . He w i shes t o a s s u re Len t h a t he does not want Pam, and to seek L e n ' s f r i e n d -s h i p and a p p r o b a t i o n a f t e r the c o n f r o n t a t i o n of Scene Seven. The d e v i c e he uses i s p a t h e t i c and i r o n i c : Pam i s t o l i g h t L i z ' s c i g a r e t t e . Her h u m i l i a t i o n i s made g r e a t e r when Fred demands t h a t she s i t a l one a t ano the r t a b l e , i s o l a t i n g her even more from the r e s t of the g roup . I t i s a t t h i s p o i n t t h a t Len asks the q u e s t i o n , "Wha t ' s i t f e e l l i k e when y e r was k i l l i n ' i t ? " ( U n i t T e n , Pages 102 -103 ) . L e n ' s morb id f a s c i n a t i o n w i t h the death of the baby i s the d a r k e s t s i d e of h i s c h a r a c t e r . He i s not t r y i n g t o " g e t a t " F r e d : he g e n u i n e l y would l i k e t o know what i t f e l t l i k e . T h i s f a s c i n a t i o n i s p a r t i a l l y e x p l a i n e d by Bond i n h i s i n t r o d u c t i o n to the p l a y : 66 . . . Len, the chief character, is n a t u r a l l y good, in s p i t e of his upbringing and environ-ment, and he remains good in s p i t e of the ^ pressures of the play. But he is not wholly good or e a s i l y good because then his goodness would be meaningless, at least for himself. His f a u l t s are brought home- to- him by his ambivalence to the death of the baby and his morbid f a s c i n a t i o n w i t h . i t afterwards.* I f L e n ' s i s o l a t i o n can be s a i d to a r i s e out of h i s mora l " g o o d -n e s s , " then h i s a t t empt s to become p a r t of a group must i n c l u d e coming to an u n d e r s t a n d i n g o f the o p p o s i t e of " g o o d n e s s . " By v i c a r i o u s l y e x p e r i e n c i n g the death of the baby , Len i s , i n e f f e c t , d i r t y i n g h i s hands i n o r d e r t o be e l e g i b l e f o r membership i n a " b a d " s o c i e t y . The p r i m a r y e f f e c t of t h i s a s p e c t of L e n ' s c h a r a c t e r i s t o make him more b e l i e v a b l e to an a u d i e n c e . Up u n t i l now Len has been p i c t u r e d as a f a t h e r , or b r o t h e r - f i g u r e to Pam, who s e l f l e s s l y wants to h e l p her t o bea r F r e d ' s r e j e c t i o n . But Len i s no C h r i s t - f i g u r e . To p o i n t t h i s o u t , i t i s n e c e s -s a r y t o i n c l u d e i n c i d e n t s t h a t remind us t h a t Len has an axe to g r i n d , t h a t he wants t o get someth ing out o f t h i s f o r h i m s e l f . The moment between Fred and Len i s b roken by the d i a l o g u e between B a r r y , L i z and M i ke . T h i s g i v e s Fred t ime to r e a c t to L e n ' s q u e s t i o n , and i t g i v e s us a chance to see Pam f u r t h e r h u m i l i a t e d . Note the a m b i g u i t y i n the t i t l e s o f the songs — they r e f e r t o Pam and s hou l d be d i r e c t e d a t h e r : Edward B o n d , Saved, 1966 , M e t h u e n P l a y s c r i p t s , M e t h u e n C o . L t d . , L o n d o n , p. 1 21 . 67 BARRY: L I Z : BARRY: L I Z : ' Ow about ' I broke my ' E a r t ? Yeh. Thass g r e a t . A'W-e I I they a i n ' got ' i t . • Funny! What about 'My ' E a r t is BARRY: Broken ' ? They got t h a t . Th i s p r oce s s of h u m i l i a t i o n i s n e c e s s a r y t o m o t i v a t e Pam's o u t b u r s t i n U n i t T h i r t e e n . Fred i n t e r p r e t s i t as a condemnat ion of him and he defends h i m s e l f . I t i s e v i d e n t , however , t h a t t h i s i s not the c a s e : Len g e n u i n e l y w i shes t o know ( e x p e r i e n c e ) what i t f e l t l i k e to k i l l the baby. F r e d ' s o u t b u r s t b r i n g s back P e t e , M i k e , C o l i n and B a r r y . d e s p e r a t e , u t t e r l y f u t i l e a t t empt to get back F r e d ' s a f f e c t i o n . The s i t u a t i o n i s s i m i l a r to t h e i r c o n f r o n t a t i o n i n Scene S i x ( U n i t Seven , Pages 5 5 - 5 7 ) , as Pam f o r c e s Fred i n t o a c o r n e r w i t h her demands f o r a f f e c t i o n - and p r o t e c t i o n . N o t i c e t h a t she sees Len as the s ou r ce of a l l her p r o b l e m s ; she c o m p l e t e l y r e f u s e s to acknowledge the p o s s i b i l i t y t h a t Fred may not want her even a t t h i s p o i n t . c l i m a x , " B e l t u p ! , " where Fred p h y s i c a l l y pushes her away, and t h e r e i s a s h o r t break i n the momentum o f the s c e n e . Pam r e t u r n s , and i s q u i c k l y and v i s c i o u s l y r e b u f f e d by F r e d . Pam In U n i t Twelve (Page 103) the q u e s t i o n i s r e p e a t e d . In U n i t T h i r t e e n (Page 104) Pam makes a f i n a l , The d i a l o g u e between Pam and Fred b u i l d s t o the 68 i s now c o m p l e t e l y out o f touch w i t h what i s happen ing around h e r ; she can o n l y c a l l f o r h i s b r e a k f a s t , i n a p a t h e t i c a t t empt to assume a r o l e i n h i s l i f e . The scene i s b rough t to a c l o s e , but not w i t h o u t an e p i l o g u e . Pete a t tempt s to t ake charge of the e x i t , but nobody pays any a t t e n t i o n to h im. His s t a t u s i n the group has d e t e r i o r a t e d to the p o i n t where the o n l y pe r son he can a s s e r t h i m s e l f t o i s Pam, and he i s s u e s t o her a t h r o u g h l y redundant t h r e a t . Len has i n a sense a c c o m p l i s h e d h i s purpose i n coming to the c a f e t e r i a . Pam has no one to t u r n to but h im. I t appears t h a t he has won by d e f a u l t . Scene E l e v e n In Scene E l e v e n , Twelve and T h i r t e e n the f a m i l y s i t u a t i o n i s b rought t o a r e s o l u t i o n , but not b e f o r e s t u d y i n g the i m p l i c a t i o n s of Scene Nine and r e s o l v i n g the r e l a t i o n s h i p between Len and H a r r y . One i m p o r t a n t i m p r e s s i o n the aud i ence must r e c e i v e i n t he se scenes (as i n Scenes Four and E i g h t ) i s t h a t the q u a r r e l i n g and the v i o l e n c e cannot go on w i t h o u t an end , and y e t i t does go on. The f a c t t h a t t h e r e i s no end to the s i t u a t i o n d e p i c t e d i n the p l a y , t h a t the peop l e i n the p l a y go on t h r oughou t t h e i r l i v e s w i t h o u t r e a l l y chang ing t h e i r s i t u a t i o n i s a major s t a t e m e n t i n the p l a y . There i s 6 9 the i r o n y t h a t the group p r o t e c t s i t s e l f from the v i o l e n c e of the o u t s i d e w o r l d , and y e t a t the same t ime s u s t a i n s the v i o l e n c e of the o u t s i d e w o r l d by c o n t r i b u t i n g t o the c l i m a t e i n wh ich i t e x i s t s . Throughout the chang ing r e l a t i o n s h i p between Len and Ha r r y t h e r e has been i m p l i e d the f a c t t h a t each has been a s e x u a l c h a l l e n g e to the o t h e r . In Scene One, Ha r r y i s an o b s t a c l e t o Len and Pam, and Len cove r s up f o r h i s i n s e c u r i t i e s by making fun o f Ha r r y as h i s s e x u a l i n f e r i o r . In Scene T h r e e , Len i s M a r y ' s p r o t e c t o r , a r o l e wh ich s h o u l d be f i l l e d by H a r r y . I n - l a t e r c o n v e r s a t i o n s a t the end of Scene Four and i n Scene E i g h t we s t i l l f i n d a s e x u a l c h a l l e n g e beh i nd the t h i n g s they have to say t o one ano the r ( f o r i n s t a n c e , Len t a l k s about H a r r y ' s i r o n i n g w h i l e Ha r r y ment ions L e n ' s l o s s of Pam). T h e r e f o r e , a l t h o u g h t h e r e has been a g rowing unde r -s t a n d i n g between the two , a t the same t ime t h e r e has a lways been t h a t e lement of s u s p i c i o n , of m i s t r u s t . In Scene E l e v e n t h i s s e x u a l r i v a l r y i s b rough t t o the s u r f a c e , b rough t about by the event s o f Scene N i n e . By the end of Scene E l e v e n , Len f i n d s h i m s e l f c o m p l e t e l y a l o n e . The f i r s t u n i t of Scene E l e v e n (Page 107) c o n t a i n s a " c l a s s i c " f i g h t between Ha r r y and Mary, one t h a t we imag ine to be of the k i n d t h a t o c c u r r e d b e f o r e they s topped t a l k i n g to each o t h e r . We see t h e i r t e c h n i q u e of f i g h t i n g : Mary a t t a c k s d i r e c t l y by a c t i o n s and t h r e a t s , w h i l e Ha r r y f i g h t s 70 by r e f u s i n g t o respond to her a t t a c k s ; by f r u s t r a t i n g her a t tempt s t o e l i c i t a r e s p o n s e . U n i t One c o n t a i n s a f a c e - o f f . S i n c e i t was she who was d i s c o v e r e d w i t h L e n , Mary i s i n the most v u l n e r a b l e p o s i t i o n . She t h e r e f o r e must use o b j e c t s such as the t e a p o t as a f o cu s f o r a t t a c k , and not the r e a l s u b j e c t of the argument. Ha r r y responds by l e a v i n g the room, the m o s t ' f r u s t r a t i n g t h i n g he c o u l d do. In t h i s s e n s e , Ha r r y can be the more v i s c i o u s of the two. In U n i t Two (Page 107) Mary moves c l o s e r t o the r e a l s u b j e c t of the f i g h t . Ha r r y f i g h t s back t h i s t ime by a t t a c k i n g d i r e c t l y and b r i e f l y , then l e a v i n g a ga i n w i t h o u t a l l o w i n g Mary t o r e s p o n d . Mary must a ga i n use an o b j e c t as a f ocu s f o r her ange r , and she q u i t e c h i l d i s h l y s p i l l s H a r r y ' s b read onto the f l o o r . In U n i t Three (Page 108) Ha r r y c o n t i n u e s h i s a t t a c k i n the same way. N o t i c e t h a t he says n o t h i n g about the b read but c o n t i n u e s h i s e a r l i e r a t t a c k . So f a r , Ha r r y has the upper hand. He i s the i n j u r e d p a r t y and t h e r e f o r e can b r i n g more to bear on the f i g h t . He a l s o can r e c a l l i n j u s t i c e s s i m i l a r t o t h i s one , f o r he b e l i e v e s Mary t o have been u n f a i t h ^ f u l t o him b e f o r e . Here we have one more s i m i l a r i t y between Ha r r y and Len : both are c u c k o l d s . I t must be remembered, however, t h a t here we are d e a l i n g w i t h uncon sc i ou s m o t i v a t i o n s : each c h a r a c t e r i s me re l y c o n s c i o u s o f be ing h u r t and h u m i l i a t e d by the o t h e r . But I b e l i e v e i t n e ce s s a r y f o r the a c t o r t o 71 unde r s t and the u n d e r l y i n g s t r u c t u r e of h i s a c t i o n s i n a p l a y such as t h i s . T h i s . e n a b l e s the a c t o r t o see the l o g i c b e h i n d c e r t a i n a c t i o n s i n the p l a y , such as the k i l l i n g of the baby. For examp le , the f a c t t h a t Mary uses an o b j e c t as a f ocu s f o r a t t a c k i n H a r r y ' s absence i m p l i e s t h a t the a c t o r would focus a l l the f u r y she f e e l s towards Ha r r y upon the o b j e c t . In U n i t Four (Page 108) Mary comes to the a t t a c k , u s i n g the f a c t t h a t Har ry has not f u l f i l e d h i s m a s c u l i n e r o l e of f a m i l y p r o v i d e r . The a t t a c k has h i t home, and Ha r r y responds t h i s t i m e , but Mary p h y s i c a l l y t hwa r t s h i s r e sponse — a f u r t h e r a f f r o n t to h i s m a s c u l i n i t y . Mary has won the round and Ha r r y r e t u r n s to the t a b l e . Hav ing t r i u m p h e d , Mary can now b r i n g up the r e a l s u b j e c t of the argument: the event s t h a t o c c u r r e d between Mary and Len i n Scene N i n e . Ha r r y a t t a c k s as b e f o r e , u s i n g the s u b j e c t of M a r y ' s p a s t and p r e s e n t i n f i d e l i t y . Because H a r r y ' s i s the more s e r i o u s a t t a c k , Mary i s a ga i n on the d e f e n s i v e . As she p i c k s up the t e a p o t ( a g a i n a f ocus f o r her a n g e r ) , we r e a l i z e t h a t she i s t r a p p e d and d e s p e r a t e . When Har ry beg in s t o a t t a c k her s e x u a l appea l as w e l l , she defends h e r s e l f p h y s i c a l l y i n the c l i m a x o f t h i s p a r t of t he scene by h i t t i n g him w i t h the t e a p o t . The rea son f o r her d e s p e r a -t i o n w i l l be e x p l a i n e d i n Scene T w e l v e . Du r i ng the l a t t e r p a r t of the argument Pam has e n t e r e d , amazed a t the f a c t t h a t her p a r e n t s have s t a r t e d t a l k i n g . The c r a s h of the t e a p o t 72 b r i n g s an immediate and v i o l e n t r e a c t i o n from both Ha r r y and Pam. The scene must a c c e l e r a t e and i n t e n s i f y a t t h i s p o i n t . Len e n t e r s , and by U n i t Seven (Page 110) a l l c h a r a c t e r s have become i n v o l v e d i n the a c t i o n . Len a t t empt s to evade f u r t h e r d i s c u s s i o n of the f i g h t , f o r he senses t h a t i t conce rn s h im. Here a new u n i t beg in s ( U n i t Seven , Page 1 1 0 ) , f o r the f ocu s o f the scene has s w i t c h e d from Ha r r y t o Len . Len a t tempt s t o keep the focus on H a r r y and the blow on the head , but Pam i s eager to know what made them " s t a r t t a l k i n g ' , " and i n U n i t E i g h t (Page 111) the i n c i d e n t of Scene N ine i s r e v e a l e d i n a d i s t o r t e d form to Pam.. The a c t i o n a c c e l e r a t e s and i n t e n s i f i e s u n t i l Len a t t a c k s Ha r r y p h y s i c a l l y i n the c l i m a x of the s c e n e . The r i v a l r y between Len and Ha r r y has now come to a head. Pam's r e a c t i o n i s i m m e d i a t e , and her s t a t e m e n t t h a t Len i s about t o k i l l Ha r r y makes i t ' a p p a r e n t t h a t r e c o n c i l i a t i o n between her and Len i s i m p o s s i b l e . She now ho l d s him c o m p l e t e l y r e s p o n s i b l e f o r the death o f her baby , the l o s s of F r e d , and the d i s r u p t i o n of her f a m i l y . In U n i t N ine (Page 112) , Len a t tempt s t o de fend h i m s e l f a g a i n s t t he se a t t a c k s , but i t i s i m p o s s i b l e i n the f a c e of the h y s t e r i a around h im. Even h i s a t tempt to a s s i s t Ha r r y i s i n t e r p r e t e d as an a t t a c k . I t i s here t h a t Len s t a t e s h i s c a s e , h i s j u s t i f i c a t i o n f o r l i v i n g w i t h t he f a m i l y : 73 Len: I'm try i n ' t' 'elp! Oo else'11 'elp? If I go w i l l they come back? Will the baby come back? Will 'e come back? I'm the only one that's stayed an' yer wann'a get r i d a me! Aga in and aga i n t h r oughou t the p l a y Len has a s s e r t e d t h a t he i s " t r y i n g t o h e l p . " By " h e l p i n g " Len means t h a t he w i shes to make h i m s e l f i m p o r t a n t i n t h e i r l i v e s . By making h i m s e l f u s e f u l he has been a t t e m p t i n g to win i n c l u s i o n i n t o the g roup . But we can see t h a t a l l h i s a t t empt s to be u s e f u l have i n f a c t p roduced the o p p o s i t e e f f e c t . He has now f a i l e d to make a r a p p o r t w i t h each member of the f a m i l y , and i s to a l l i n -t e n t s and purposes c o m p l e t e l y a l o n e . Whereas a t the end o f Scene Ten i t was f e l t t h a t Len had won a p l a c e f o r h i m s e l f by d e f a u l t , i t now appears t h a t he i s c o m p l e t e l y a l one and has no a l t e r n a t i v e but to l e a v e . Scene Twelve Scene Twelve a c c o m p l i s h e s t h r e e o b j e c t i v e s . I t p r o -v i d e s a reason f o r Len to s t a y , and p a r t i a l l y answers the q u e s t i o n of why he has s t a y e d t h i s l o n g . S e c o n d l y , i t r e s o l v e s the r e l a t i o n s h i p between Len and H a r r y , wh ich reaches a c r i s i s i n Scene E l e v e n . The s e x u a l c o n f l i c t between them i s a t l e a s t p a r t i a l l y r e s o l v e d . F i n a l l y , the scene answers the q u e s t i o n of why Ha r r y has remained i n the house a l l t he se y e a r s . 74 The r e l a t i o n s h i p between Ha r r y and Mary i s p a r t i a l l y e x p l a i n e d , and the i r o n i e s i n h e r e n t i n i t b rought ou t ; The rhythm of the scene must convey the i m p r e s s i o n of e m o t i o n a l e x h a u s t i o n , f o r i t i s both the end o f the p l a y and the end of a p e r i o d i n the c h a r a c t e r s ' l i v e s . T h i s e x -h a u s t i o n , t h i s sense of summing up, s hou l d g i v e the p l a y a f e e l i n g of c o m p l e t e n e s s , a f e e l i n g t h a t the s i t u a t i o n has been t h r o u g h l y e x p l o r e d . Of c o u r s e , t h i s sense of c o m p l e t e -ness does not n e c e s s a r i l y g i v e the aud ience the i m p r e s s i o n t h a t a l l w i l l be w e l l ( a f t e r a l l , i t might be a s ou r ce of d i s a p p o i n t m e n t t h a t Len does not l e a v e ) . Scene Twelve i s meant to emphas ize t h e t f a c t t h a t the major q u e s t i o n s posed by the p l a y are e x p l o r e d but o n l y p a r t i a l l y answered. For examp le , H a r r y ' s avowed reason f o r s t a y i n g home i s not w h o l l y t r u e , and we are aware t h a t h i s p l a n w i l l never be c a r r i e d o u t . The c o m p l e x i t y of the c h a r a c t e r s ' m o t i v a t i o n s i s meant to m i r r o r the c o m p l e x i t y of l i f e . U n i t One (Page 113) e s t a b l i s h e s the rhythm of the s c e n e , the t ime of day , and the f a c t t h a t the f i g h t i s o v e r . We d i s c o v e r t h a t Len has been l i s t e n i n g t o Pam, and b e l i e v e s t h a t she has someone w i t h h e r . For the f i r s t t ime Har r y does not remind Len of h i s f a i l u r e w i t h Pam: i n f a c t he t r i e s to l e s s e n i t by deny ing t h a t she has anyone w i t h h e r , and by p o i n t i n g out t h a t Pam i s not worth the t r o u b l e anyway. The i m p o r t a n t f u n c t i o n of U n i t s One and Two i s t h a t they e s t a b l i s h 75 t h a t Len and Ha r r y a re no l o n g e r r i v a l s , but a re t a l k i n g about sha red s u b j e c t s from a common p o i n t of v i e w . The sense of s i z i n g each o t h e r up, of c a r r y i n g on a combat beneath the l i n e s , i s no l o n g e r e x i s t e n t . For the f i r s t t ime i n the p l a y , two peop le are be i n g honest and s t r a i g h t f o r w a r d w i t h each o t h e r . U n i t Two (Page 114) b r i n g s up f o r the f i r s t t ime the sense of j u s t i c e t h a t Har ry l i v e s f o r : More and more i n t h i s scene we w i l l f i n d Ha r r y t a l k i n g of " g e t t i n g e v e n , " of " g e t t i n g y o u r own b a c k . " H i s v i n d i c t i v e n e s s , however, i s b e l i e d by the compass ion he e v i d e n t l y f e e l s f o r Pam. L a t e r i n the s c e n e , Ha r r y c a u t i o n s Len not to " u p s e t " Pam, f o r i t would be " u n f a i r . " H a r r y ' s sense of j u s t i c e i s not one t h a t a l l o w s him to c a r r y out h i s r e venge . of the p l a y : i s Len a m i s f i t who c o u l d not s u r v i v e i n any group? Ha r r y answers t h a t i t would be "no d i f f e r e n t i f y e r go , " t h a t the arguments would not s top i f he l e f t , t h a t l i f e would be no more t r a n q u i l . C o n v e r s e l y , Len would f i n d l i f e no more harmonious anywhere e l s e i n the w o r l d . Len r e c o g n i z e s the u n c o m f o r t a b l e t r u t h i n t h i s and p r ompt l y changes the s u b j e c t . HARRY: LEN : HARRY: HARRY: LEN : S h e ' l l pay f o r i t . What? ' E r w a y s . Y e r ' I I g e t y e r own b a c k , i l o s t me c a s e k e y s . Y e r ' I I s e e . In U n i t Two Len a l s o b r i n g s up the f i r s t q u e s t i o n 76 In U n i t Three (Page 115 ) , Len b r i n g s up the s u b j e c t of the f i g h t of Scene E l e v e n . Ha r r y p o i n t s out t h a t the re sen tment s u n d e r l y i n g the f i g h t are much more d e e p - s e a t e d than Len s u g g e s t s , and t h a t such f i g h t s " c l e a r the a i r . " T h i s does not c o m p l e t e l y answer the q u e s t i o n of why the f i g h t o c c u r r e d i n the f i r s t p l a c e , but i t does t e l l us t h a t Har ry i s making an a t tempt to l e s s e n L e n ' s f e e l i n g s of g u i l t and r e s p o n s i b i l i t y . Har ry p o i n t s gut t h a t Len h i m s e l f was p a r t of the f i g h t l i k e anyone e l s e (Perhaps t h i s i s what c o n s t i -tutes the i n c l u s i o n he has been l o o k i n g f o r ) , and Len aga in changes the s u b j e c t . But we have reached an i m p o r t a n t p o i n t h e r e : b e i n g p a r t of a group i m p l i e s t a k i n g p a r t i n i t s r e -sentments and i t s u g l i n e s s as w e l l . I t i s not j u s t a m a t t e r of " h e l p i n g . " U n i t Three a l s o c o n t r a d i c t s H a r r y ' s a s s e r t i o n t h a t he i s s t a y i n g t o o b t a i n j u s t i c e from Mary. The q u e s t i o n of why Ha r r y remains i s g a i n i n g g r e a t e r i m p o r t a n c e . I t i s some-t h i n g deeper than v i n d i c t i v e n e s s and s t u b b o r n n e s s . In U n i t Four (Page 116) F r e d ' s r o l e i n the p l a y i s b rought to an end. Not o n l y has he f u l f i l l e d h i s f u n c t i o n i n the p l a y , but he has i n a sense found a permanent p l a c e f o r h i m s e l f ; h i s f u t u r e , i f d i m , i s s e c u r e . Len and Ha r r y r e t u r n aga in t o the s u b j e c t of L e n ' s l e a v i n g . L e n ' s p l a n to e m i g r a t e i s m e n t i o n e d , and the f u t i l i t y i s o b v i o u s . Ha r r y responds s i m p l y by r e a s s u r i n g Len t h a t he be long s w i t h the f a m i l y . T h i s 77 i s the t u r n i n g p o i n t i n the scene and , i n a s e n s e , the p l a y . Len has f i n a l l y g a i ned a c cep t ance from someone. L e n ' s q u e s t i o n wh ich beg in s U n i t F i v e (Page 117) r e c a l l s Scene S i x when he asked Fred what Pam "was l i k e " : LEN: . . . was she a l I r i g h t ? HARRY: Eh? LEN: In b e d . HARRY: Y e r know. LEN: No. HARRY: Up t o t h e man. LEN: Yeh? HARRY: I ' a d t h e b e s t . LEN : Go o n . HARRY: I ' a d ' e r s q u e a l i n g I i k e a p i g . L e n ' s q u e s t i o n has to do w i t h h i s s e x u a l i n s e c u r i t y , and H a r r y ' s answer i s an obv ious a t t empt to r e t a i n h i s m a s c u l i n i t y . I t i s a t o s s - u p as t o wh ich of the two i s the more i n s e c u r e . H a r r y ' s l i f e i s l a r g e l y based upon a t ime when he was "a man," when t h e r e was q u i e t , when v a l u e s were c l e a r . I t i s i r o n i c t h a t t h i s was d u r i n g the war. I t i s a l s o d o u b t f u l whether such a t ime even e x i s t e d e x c e p t i n H a r r y ' s memory, and Len i s aware of t h i s . H a r r y ' s memories a re s e r v i n g a purpose f o r the p r e s e n t , i n e n a b l i n g him to endure h i s f a i l u r e i n l i f e and h i s p o s i t i o n i n the house. In h i s i n s e c u r i t y , t h e n , Len i s by no means a l o n e . U n i t S i x (Page 118) c o n t a i n s the c l i m a x of the s c e n e , when Ha r r y asks Len not to go. H a r r y ' s c l a i m t h a t he , t o o , has p l an s of l e a v i n g i s an a t t empt to r e c o n c i l e the f a c t t h a t 78 he i s s t a y i n g w i t h h i s dreams of power. Len r e a l i z e s t h a t H a r r y ' s dream o f " g e t t i n g e ven " w i l l never come t r u e , and he sees the i r o n y and the pathos i n the s i t u a t i o n , f o r Har ry i s i n f a c t s u s t a i n i n g the c o n t i n u i n g b a t t l e i n the house i n o r d e r to defend h i s m a s c u l i n i t y from the a t t a c k s of Mary. Of cou r se i t i s H a r r y ' s p l a n of l e a v i n g t h a t f r i g h t e n s Mary i n t o a t t a c k i n g h im. The key t o H a r r y ' s dreams i s r e v e a l e d i n what i s p r o b a b l y H a r r y ' s most i m p o r t a n t speech i n terms of c h a r a c t e r : Harry: It's only right. When someone carries on like ' er 3 they 'ave t' pay for it. People can't get away with murder. What'd 'appen then? The i r o n y of the s p e e c h , of c o u r s e , i s i n the f a c t t h a t i n the space of the p l a y we have w i t n e s s e d peop le g e t t i n g away w i t h murde r , i n the k i l l i n g of the baby. In U n i t Seven (Page 119) we l e a r n t h a t Mary knows of H a r r y ' s p l a n t o l e a v e . The i n t e r n a l dynamics o f t he f a m i l y now become c l e a r : each pe r son has power over the o t h e r i n some sen se . An event such as the death of the s o n , or the death of the baby , i n i t i a t e s a c y c l e of mutual r e sen tment which c o n t i n u e s of i t s own momentum, u n t i l a s t a s i s i s reached such as the nonspeak ing p a c t between Mary and H a r r y . L e n ' s S ta tement t h a t i t " a i n ' worth i t " i s p e r f e c t l y t r u e , but i t i s out of the power of the p a r t i c i p a n t s t o s t op the momentum. 79 T h i s s i t u a t i o n becomes doub l y i r o n i c i n the f a c e of H a r r y ' s e v i d e n t compass ion f o r Mary and Pam: LEN: I ' d l i k e t * t e l l ' e r t ' jump o f f o n c e m o r e . HARRY: S o m e t i m e . D o n ' t u p s e t ' e r . I t a i n ' f a i r . T h a s s b e s t a l l r o u n d . Three r e a l i z a t i o n s have come to Len i n t h i s s c e n e : F i r s t l y , he has now someth ing a p p r o a c h i n g f r i e n d s h i p w i t h H a r r y . S e c o n d l y , he knows t h a t he i s not un ique i n h i s f a i l i n g w i t h Pam. F i n a l l y , he has found a p l a c e f o r h i m s e l f i n the g roup . But t h i s membership does not imp l y e i t h e r s e c u r i t y or h a p p i n e s s . In o r d e r t o s u r v i v e w i t h i n the group he must a c c e p t the c o n -f l i c t s w i t h i n i t , and a c c e p t the peop le who make i t up. Scene T h i r t e e n In the p r e v i o u s scene we ment ioned t h a t Len d i s c o v e r s , i n h i s r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h H a r r y , the means by which he can f i n d i n c l u s i o n i n the group and d e f e a t l o n e l i n e s s . Ha r r y makes no s e c r e t of h i s contempt f o r Pam, and y e t when Len says t h a t he would l i k e t o " t e l l ' e r t ' jump o f f once more , " Ha r r y t e l l s him to be k i n d . Har ry manages to l i v e w i t h peop l e a t t h e i r w o r s t . He has found a means t o c o e x i s t e n c e , and i s a b l e t o a c -cep t the i r o n i e s and paradoxes t h a t come out of such a s i t u a t i o n . 80 In Scene T h i r t e e n the aud i ence i s a l l o w e d to watch L e n ' s d i s c o v e r y i n a c t i o n . - The scene i s compr i sed o f the mundane event s o f t h e i r eve ryday l i v e s . Har ry f i l l s h i s f o o t -b a l l coupons ; Mary and Pam s i t and read the R a d i o - T i m e s . I n to the m i d s t of t h i s comes L e n , who p roceeds to r e p a i r the c h a i r b roken i n Scene E l e v e n He i s p e r f o r m i n g a. f u n c t i o n w i t h i n the g roup. The c h a r a c t e r s h a r d l y speak . They do not touch each o t h e r . They are l i k e p l a n e t s , s e p a r a t e y e t i n t e r d e p e n d e n t . The b a l a n c e i s m a i n t a i n e d . L e t us l ook a t how the p l a y ' s t i t l e , Saved, a p p l i e s to the c h a r a c t e r s i n the p l a y : At the b e g i n n i n g o f the p l a y , Pam's o b j e c t i v e was to e s t a b l i s h a r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h a man. I t was ment ioned t h a t the r e l a t i o n s h i p she sought was s t r o n g l y p a t t e r n e d a f t e r t h a t wh ich she obse rved i n Mary and H a r r y . The r e s u l t has been a p e r f e c t p a r a l l e l , down to the dead c h i l d . The r e l a -t i o n s h i p she has w i t h Len i s an unhappy one , but i t i s a b e t t e r a l t e r n a t i v e to the v i c t i m i z a t i o n she sought w i t h F r e d . Pam i s " s a v e d " from v i c t i m i z a t i o n by a man, and the p r i c e she pays i s her p o s s i b i l i t y f o r happ ine s s or e s c ape . Har ry now has a f e l l o w - f a i l u r e and a r ep l a cemen t f o r the son he has l o s t . The p o s s i b l y v i o l e n t outcome of the r i v a l r y begun i n Scene One has been a v e r t e d . In t h i s s e n s e , Har ry i s saved i n the most p o s i t i v e sense of any c h a r a c t e r i n the p i ay. 81 With Mary the q u e s t i o n i s more d i f f i c u l t . Mary hoped to f i n d i n Len a weapon a g a i n s t H a r r y . The p o s s i b l e outcome, had she s u c c e e d e d , i s h i n t e d a t by the v i o l e n c e o f Scene E l e v e n . L e n ' s new r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h Ha r r y i m p l i e s t h a t he w i l l no l o n g e r be used as a s e x u a l weapon. The b a l a n c e i s r e s t o r e d , and i n t h i s sense Mary too i s s a ved . Len has a c c o m p l i s h e d what he s e t out to do. He has won f o r h i m s e l f membership i n a g roup . He i s no l o n g e r a l o n e , an o u t s i d e r . And y e t , i t was h i s e x i s t e n c e as an o u t s i d e r t h a t d e f i n e d him as a human b e i n g . H i s i n d i v i d u a l i t y came out of the f a c t t h a t he was unab le t o merge w i t h a g roup . In a c h i e v i n g membersh ip, Len has become f u n c t i o n a l l y i n d i s -t i n g u i s h a b l e from H a r r y . He has l o s t h i s i d e n t i t y . Wi th r e ga rd to L e n , t h e r e f o r e , the t i t l e Saved i s i n t e n s e l y am-b i g u o u s . Len i s s a v e d , but he has been t o t a l l y d e s t r o y e d as a human b e i n g . I t i s here t h a t we can r e p l y t o the f r e q u e n t o b s e r -v a t i o n t h a t the p l a y i s n e g a f i v i s t i c and d e p r e s s i n g . In the c o n t e x t of the l i f e he i s p r e s e n t i n g Bond ' s p r i m a r y i n -t e r e s t i s i n a c c u r a c y . The p l a y a r r i v e s a t a r e s o l u t i o n wh ich i s d e p r e s s i n g t o the degree t h a t i t t r u e l y r e f l e c t s the q u a l i t y o f l i f e f o r many p e o p l e . To t h i s e x t e n t , Saved i s t r u e to the t r a d i t i o n s of e a r l y n a t u r a l i s m i n t h a t much o f i t s v a l u e i s as condemnat ion o f e x i s t i n g s o c i a l c o n d i t i o n s . Bond h i m s e l f admits t h a t much o f Saved i s s o c i a l comment; he 82 i s d e e p l y concerned w i t h the p o s s i b i l i t y (o r l a c k of i t ) o f e t h i c a l b e h a v i o u r i n the m i d s t of t w e n t i e t h c e n t u r y i n s t i t u -t i o n s . He seems to f e e l t h a t e t h i c a l d e c i s i o n s are i m p o s s i b l e , f o r we have l o s t or thrown away any r e f e r e n c e p o i n t s we might have had f o r such a d e c i s i o n . W i t hou t such laws or r e f e r e n c e p o i n t s , man f a l l s under the same laws which govern a l l a n i m a l s , and v i o l e n c e i s the i n e v i t a b l e r e s u l t . Chap te r 3 SAVED: GROUND PLAN, DESIGN AND COSTUMES The ground p l a n was h e a v i l y i n f l u e n c e d by t h r e e main f a c t o r s : 1. The m u l t i p l i c i t y o f s h o r t s c e n e s i n t h e p l a y n e c e s s i t a t e d a l m o s t i n s t a n t a n e o u s s c e n e c h a n g e s . 2 . A p r o p o r t i o n a l l y l a r g e a r e a was needed f o r s c e n e s t h r e e , s i x and t e n . . 3 . T h i s a r e a p l u s t h e l i v i n g room a r e a t o o k up a l I b u t t h r e e s c e n e s i n t h e p l a y . The f i r s t f a c t o r r e s u l t e d i n the s i m u l t a n e o u s s e t . We a l l o c a t e d the two s t r o n g e s t a reas ( i n terms o f the shape of the s t a g e ) to the l i v i n g room and the a rea f o r scenes t h r e e , s i x and t e n . Th i s p o s i t i o n i n g gave a sense o f d i s t a n c e between the aud i ence and the l i v i n g room a r e a , a g u l f o f b l a c k n e s s . I f e l t t h a t t h i s d i s t a n c e was r i g h t f o r the 83 84 i 1 1 u s i o n i s t i c , v o y e u r i s t i c q u a l i t y of the scenes t h a t t ake p l a c e t h e r e . The a rea was d e f i n e d by the f u r n i t u r e and by the l i g h t s , t o g i v e the l i v i n g room an e n c l o s e d , cramped f e e l i n g . The T .V. was on wheel s so t h a t i t c o u l d be r o l l e d back to the s o f a t o l e a v e more room f o r the o t h e r major a r e a . The p l a c i n g of the l a r g e r a rea meant t h a t the s t o n i n g of the baby would t ake p l a c e i m m e d i a t e l y i n f r o n t o f t he a u d i e n c e . I f e l t t h a t t h i s was r i g h t f o r the v i o l e n t n a t u r e of the s c e n e s , a l t h o u g h i t c r e a t e d problems i n r e a l i s t i c a l l y p r e -s e n t i n g the s t o n i n g . The a r c h i t e c t u r e o f the t h e a t r e a rea p r o v i d e d a nook i n wh ich to p l a c e Scene Seven. The bedroom a rea was g i v e n the o n l y o t h e r a v a i l a b l e space i n terms of s i g h t l i n e s . Here a ga i n the d i s t a n c i n g e f f e c t f o r most of the aud i ence was r i g h t f o r the na tu re of the s c e n e . Hav ing the aud i ence on two s i d e s gave us the g r e a t e s t f l e x i b i l i t y of any a r r angement , i n terms of the number o f e n t r a n c e s p o s s i b l e ( s e v e r a l were needed f o r a s i m u l t a n e o u s s e t ) and i n terms of the shape of the t h e a t r e ( l o n g and n a r r o w ) . Scene changes were done w i t h l i g h t wherever p o s s i b l e . In Scene Two the " b o a t " was moved th rough t h e down l e f t e n -t r a n c e , as were the t a b l e s f o r Scene Ten. With t h i s a r r a n g e -ment, no scene change took l o n g e r than twenty s e cond s . The ground p l a n proved l a r g e l y s u c c e s s f u l i n p r o d u c -t i o n , and I s t i l l f e e l t h a t i t was the be s t p o s s i b l e p l a n f o r 85 t h a t p a r t i c u l a r t h e a t r e ( the p l a y w r i g h t a p p a r e n t l y e n v i s i o n e d the p l a y i n a p ro scen ium a rch s e t t i n g ) . My o n l y r e g r e t was t h a t the h e i g h t of the c e i l i n g (and hence the l i g h t i n g i n s t r u -ments) was e x t r e m e l y l ow. As a r e s u l t , the l i g h t i n g d i d not d e f i n e the a reas as s h a r p l y as I had hoped. The d e s i g n i t s e l f was as s i m p l e as p o s s i b l e . The c o l o u r s were p r e d o m i n a n t l y b l a c k , grey and w h i t e , to empha-s i z e the n a t u r a l i s t i c - d o c u m e n t a r y q u a l i t y o f the p l a y . The back w a l l was t r e a t e d w i t h a faded grey w a l l p a p e r , as was the f ragment p a r t i a l l y s u r r o u n d i n g the Scenes F i v e and Twelve a r e a . F u r n i t u r e was b l a c k and g r e y . The t h e a t r e a rea was s u r r ounded i n b l a c k s . The p r o d u c t i o n was as s t a r k and m in ima l as p o s s i b l e , i n keep i ng w i t h the tone of the p l a y . Saved: A Note on Costumes The s t u d i o i n wh ich Saved was pe r fo rmed i s a v e r y s m a l l one, and w i t h the t w o - s i d e d s e a t i n g a r r angement , the s p e c t a t o r was a t a l l t imes v e r y c l o s e to the a c t i o n . In the m a j o r i t y of scenes i t was p o s s i b l e f o r s p e c t a t o r s t o reach out and touch the a c t o r . Under t he se c o n d i t i o n s , the o n l y way to a s su re v e r i s i m i l i t u d e i n co s tuming was f o r the a c t o r s t o wear t h e i r own c l o t h e s wherever p o s s i b l e . 86 LEN : B rown c o r d a r o y p a n t s , w h i t e s h i r t , b rown l a c e b o o t s , a g r e e n p l a i d woo l j a c k e t . L a t e r i n t h e p l a y , Len wo re a b rown c o t t o n wo rk s h i r t . L e n ' s costumes were p u r e l y f u n c t i o n a l work c l o t h e s . No a t t empt was made a t e m b e l l i s h m e n t or d e c o r a t i o n . Nor were l o c a l s t y l e s f o l l o w e d such as t u r n i n g up the s h i r t c o l l a r . . PAM: Scene One B l a c k s k i r t , m i n i s t y l e , b l a c k l a c e s l e e v e l e s s b l o u s e , b l a c k n y l o n s t o c k -i n g s , a g o l d l o c k e t worn i n s i d e t h e b l o u s e , b l a c k p a t e n t l e a t h e r s h o e s , a b l a c k p a t e n t l e a t h e r h a n d b a g . Scene Two C h a r c o a l g r e y s w e a t e r wo rn o v e r b l o u s e ; o t h e r w i s e same as S c e n e One. Scene Four S l i p , b I a c k . n e t s t o c k i n g s . L a t e r , b l a c k m i n i d r e s s , b l a c k woo l c o a t , t h r e a d b a r e b u t w i t h an a t t e m p t a t s t y l e . Scene F i v e S l i p . Scene S i x H o r i z o n t a l l y - s t r i p e d t u r q u o i s e s h o r t -s l e e v e d d r e s s , b l a c k s h o e s ( d i f f e r e n t f r o m 1 S c e n e O n e ) , b e i g e s t o c k i n g s . 87 Scene Seven B l a c k m i n i - s k i r t , w h i t e b l o u s e , b l a c k s h o e s , b l a c k n y l o n s t o c k i n g s . Scene E i g h t W h i t e b l o u s e ( d i f f e r e n t f r o m S c e n e S e v e n ) , c h a r c o a I - g r e y m i n i - s k i r t . Scene Ten Same as S cene S i x . Scene E l e v e n Same as S c e n e T e n , w i t h b l a c k woo l c o a t . Scene T h i r t e e n Same as S c e n e E i g h t . Pam's costumes i n d i c a t e d an u n s u c c e s s f u l a t t empt to d re s s s t y l i s h l y , w i t h l i t t l e ' m o n e y . . The same costume was worn i n Scenes S i x and Ten wh ich was a d e p a r t u r e from her u sua l r e l i -ance on b l a c k . T h i s p r o v i d e d v a r i e t y , and t i e d t o g e t h e r the two scenes i n wh ich she ' i s d e s t r o y e d by F r e d . MARY: Scene Three Faded brown, c o t t o n d r e s s , b rown s h o e s , no s t o c k i n g s , b l o n d w i g . Scene Brown F i v e p r i n t h o u s e d r e s s , b rown shoes. 88 Scene E i g h t Same as S c e n e F i v e . Scene N ine B l o n d w i g , c r e a m s i l k d r e s s w i t h b l a c k p r i n t , b l a c k n e t y o k e , brown n y l o n s t o c k i n g s , c r e a m h i g h - h e e I e d s h o e s , b l a c k p a t e n t I e a t h e r h a n d b a g . Scene E l e ven Same as S c e n e s F i v e and E i g h t . Scene T h i r t e e n Same as S c e n e E l e v e n . -HARRY: Brown woo l t r o u s e r s , w o r n , w i t h b r own . s u s p e n d e r s , w h i t e s h i r t , e i t h e r w i t h t i e ( S c e n e One) o r o p e n - n e c k e d , g r e y woo l s o c k s , b rown s l i p p e r s o r b rown l a c e b o o t s , " N a t i o n a l H e a l t h " - t y p e s p e c t a c I e s Scene Twelve Same as a b o v e , e x c e p t w h i t e l o n g -u n d e r w e a r t o p i n s t e a d o f w h i t e s h i r t . The main p o i n t to be made w i t h H a r r y ' s costume i s t h a t he has owned the se c l o t h e s f o r many y e a r s and has no use f o r or i n t e r e s t i n v a r i e t y . 89 P E T E : Scene Three W h i t e s h i r t , s t y l i s h g r e e n i r i d e s c e n t d o u b l e - b r e a s t e d s u i t , n a r r o w b l a c k t i e , b l a c k s h o e s w i t h p o i n t e d t o e s , g r e a s e d h a i r . Scene S i x B l u e d e n i m j e a n s , w h i t e s h i r t , b l a c k l e a t h e r j a c k e t , b l a c k s h o e s w i t h p o i n t e d t o e s . -Scene Ten Same as S cene S i x . M I KE : B l u e d e n i m j e a n s , w h i t e s h i r t , g r e y j a c k e t , b l a c k s h o e s . C O L I N : B l u e d e n i m j e a n s , w h i t e s h i r t , b l a c k I e a t h e r • j a c k e t . , g r e a s e d h a i r , b l a c k p o i n t e d s h o e s . Scene Three B l a c k t - s h i r t i n s t e a d o f s h i r t and j a c k e t . BARRY: B l u e d e n i m j e a n s , w h i t e s h i r t , b I a c k s h o e s , b e i g e s l e e v e l e s s s w e a t e r , b I ue woo I j a c k e t . The gang must g i v e the i m p r e s s i o n of u n i f o r m i t y ( B a r r y ' s costume i s a s l i g h t v a r i a t i o n ) and t oughne s s . 90 FRED: B l u e den im j e a n s , b l a c k a n k l e b o o t s , b rown s h i r t w i t h s e v e r a l b u t t o n s open and c o l l a r t u r n e d up . Scene Seven Same, b u t c a r r i e s b e i g e r a i n c o a t . Scene Ten Same, b u t w i t h b l u e c o t t o n s h i r t . L I Z : B e i g e m i n i - s k I r t > b l a c k s e e - t h r o u g h b l o u s e , b l a c k ny I on s t o c k i n g s , b l a c k , p a t e n t - l e a t h e r , k n e e - l e n g t h b o o t s . BIBLIOGRAPHY Bond, Edward. Saved. London: Methuen, 1966. E s s l i n , M a r t i n . The Theatre of the Absurd. R e v i s e d , e n -l a r g e d e d i t i o n - Mew Yo rk : Doub leday , 1969. L o r e n z , Konrad. On -Aggression. T r a n s . M a r j o r i e K e r r W i l s o n . New Yo r k : H a r c o u r t , Brace & W o r l d , 1966. T a y l o r , J . R . Anger and After. New e d i t i o n , e n l a r g e d ; London, Methuen, 1969. 91 A P P E N D I X A SAVED: PRODUCTION DETAILS PROPERTIES L I ST Scene One PAM 1 handbag, containing 1 h a n d k e r c h i e f 1 package sweets 1 package matches 1 package c i g a r e t t e s Scene Two LEN 1 bar c h o c o l a t e 1 h a n d k e r c h i e f Scene Three PETE MIKE 1 pocke t comb ' ( each ) COLIN 1 package c i g a r e t t e s (each) BARRY' Scene Four MARY p r . s a l t ' s pepper shake r s b o t t l e HP sauce t a b l e k n i f e t a b l e f o r k spoon t a b l e napk i n p i a te food . . t e a p o t cup , s a u c e r bowl sugar bowl puddi ng 92 93 Scene Four RAM Continued Scene F i v e On B e d t a b l e Scene S i x FRED LEN M I KE On F l o o r On Pram Scene Seven LEN Scene E i g h t HARRY PAM Scene Ni ne LEN 1 h a i r b r u s h 1 p l a s t i c bag containing cosmet i cs 1 b o t t l e m e d i c i n e 1 spoon s e v e r a l newspapers , magazi nes 1 hand m i r r o r 1 f i s h i n g rod 1 s m a l l t i n box 1 b a i t & t a c k l e box 1 net 1 package c i g a r e t t e s 1 package matches 1 package c i g a r e t t e s 1 package matches 1 have r s ack 1 f i s h i n g rod 1 package c i g a r e t t e s 1 package matches S e v e r a l s tones around p e r i m e t e r a c t i n g a rea 1 l ong b a l l o o n 1 c a r t o n c i g a r e t t e s 1 package matches 1 i ron 4 w h i t e s h i r t s 1 p o r t a b l e r a d i o 1 towe l 1 shoebrush 1 newspaper s e v e r a l cans s h o e p o l i s h Scene N ine Continued In T a b l e 1 need l e 1 s poo l t h r e a d Scene Ten B a c k s t a g e 8 cups 8 s a u ce r s Scene E l e v e n On Tab Ie B a c k s t a g e B readkn i f e bread 1 cup and s a u c e r 1 c o n t a i n e r m i l k 1 p l a t e b u t t e r 1 t e a p o t (breakable) 1 cup and s auce r Scene Twelve LEN HARRY 1 j a c k k n i f e 1 head bandage Scene T h i r t e e n B a c k s t a g e In T a b l e 1 hammer 1 pen 1 f o l d e r stamps 1 pen 1 package poo l s PAM 1 Radio Times 3 C .o c <-> o 0 9 i o d cr d CA c c d d u i U 4 c d -+-» - 5 c - c C4. — a o c o _ O r c © Q 0} u CO ^ i : c<i CM K ) 3-- i n vi) c*» cr c d -V o co o o o 3 6 1 € _ QP <- t -** -JC * 1 a d </» Ov " _3 31 A P P E N D I X B S A V E D : D I R E C T O R ' S PROMPT BOOK 96 97 SAVED: CAST Len . . . .Norman Browning Pam. .Sue D r i v e r Fred . . . D a l e W i l s o n Ha r r y B r i an P a r k i n s o n Mary. D iana Bel shaw P e t e . . . . : . C r a i g Dav id son B a r r y Ed A s t l ey C o l i n . . . . . . . . . T o n y B a n c r o f t Mi ke .Matthew Wal ker L i z L e s l ey Rachuk Baby • • • • Tony . Ba l 1 T e c h n i c a l D i r e c t o r . . . . . . . . . R i c h a r d Spencer Stage Manager. Jeremy Long L i g h t i n g Gary O l son A s s i s t a n t to the D i r e c t o r . . . . Sue Hay P r o p s . . Wanda T i l l e y D i r e c t e d by John Gray Designed by A s t r i d Janson S A V E D by Edward Bond 99 SCENE ONE * The living-room. The front and the two side walls make a triangle that slopes to a door back centre. Furniture: table down right, sofa left, TV set left front, armchair up right centre, two chairs close to the table. Empty. Thn Ann* n/innn Len romes jn., ffe goes straight out again. PAM (off). In there. I.EM mmpa in. He gne.s dmim tn the snfa. He stares at it.i-All right? 2 Jteuse.„P„A M_cpmesin. LEN. This ain' the bedroom. PAM. Bed ain' made. LEN. Oo's bothered? PAM. It's awful. 'Ere's nice. LEN. Suit yourse-f^ Yer don't mind if I take me shoes off? (He kicks them off.) No one 'ome ? PAM. NO. LEN. Live on yer tod ? PAM. No. LEN. O. Pause. Ho eiu baeh on the much _ ' / Yer all right ? Come over 'ere. PAM. In a minit. LEN. Wass yer name ? PAM. Yer ain' arf nosey. v 100 12 S A V E D L E N . Somethin' up? P A M . Can't I blow me nose? She puts her hanky back in her bag and puts it on the table. Better. C She sits on the couch. L E N . Wass yer name? P A M . Wass yourn? L E N . Len. P A M . Pam. L E N . O. (He feels the couch behind with his hand.) This big enough ? ^ P A M . What yer want? Bligh! L E N . Don't wan' a push yer off. Shove that cushion up. P A M . 'Ang on. L E N . ' O W often yer done this ? P A M . Don't be nosey. L E N . Take yer shoes off. P A M . In a minit. L E N . Can yer move yer - thass better. 8 P A M . Yer d'narf fidget. L E N . I'm okay now. P A M . O W ! L E N . D'yer 'ave the light on ? P A M . Suit yerself. L E N . I ain' fussy. P A M . Ow! ^ L E N . Can yer shut them curtains ? P A M goes left to the curtains. Yer got a fair ol'arse. '0 P A M . Like your mug. M L E N . Know somethin' ? - I ain' touched a tart for weeks. P A M . Don't know what yer missin'. * [ 1 r * U * fa tu. fiLrWV, P ^  ' ft p rtiu , cLuatf 101 S C E N E O N E 13 L E N . Don't I? P A M sits on the couch, on the edge. L E N pulls her closer and tahee off her ihoet. Lucky. P A M . What? L E N . Bumpin' in t'you. P A M . Yeh. L E N . Yer don't mind me ? P A M . No. L E N . Sure? P A M . Yer wan'a get on with it.' L E N . Give us a shout if I do somethin* yer don't reckon. P A M . Bligh! Yer ain' better 'ave. * L E N . I could go for you. Know that ? Pause. ^ This is the life. P A M . Ow! L E N . Sh! Keep quiet now. tUtXA <U>(oiIANJLC P A M . Oi! L E N . Sh! P A M . Yer told me t'shout! p ^ ^ L The door opens, H A R R Y comes in^ie goes straight out again. L E N {lifts his head). 'Ere! f* P A M . What ? L E N . Oo's that? P A M . Ol' man. L E N (sits). Whass 'e want? P A M . That cushion's stickin' in me back. L E N . I thought yer reckon yer was on yer tod ? P A M . 'E's late for work. L E N . O. Why? PAM. Why? d«/ucU. ? I* sun up 102 14 SAVED . LEN. Yeh. PAM. I don't know. LEN. Reckon 'e saw? PAM. Shouldn't be surprised. LEN. Will 'e be long? PAM. Don't arst me. LEN. O. Well. / They lie down again. Slight pause, LEN lifts his head. 'Ear that? * PAM. NO. LEN. I 'eard somethin'. He goes to the door. He listens. He goes back to the couch and sits on the end. B PAM. Well? LEN. Better 'ang on. PAM. Why? LEN. Better 'ad. PAM. Think yer'll last ? *i LEN. Not if yer lie around like that. PAM. Like what? LEN. Sit up. PAM. I juss got right. LEN. More'n I 'ave. Chriss. (He feels in his pocket.) You smoke ? PAM. In me bag. LEN. Where's yer bag ? PAM nods at the table. He goes to the bag and takes out a cig-arette. He lights it. He starts putting the cigarettes back. Oh, sorry. He holds the packet out to her. PAM. No thanks. LEN (he puts the cigarettes away. He sits on the edge of the SCENE O N E CQijch, Pause. HP. tap* hk fnnt three nr fnur times). Wass 'is caper ? P A M . Wan'a cup 'a tea ? L E N . After. P A M . 'E won't be long. L E N . 'Adn't better. 'Ave a puff? P A M . No. L E N . Do yer dress up. ' P A M . Sorry. L E N . Yer never know 'oo's poppin' in. V HelgaesaojtheAootJitidjipemjj. P A M . You off? L E N . I could'a swore I 'eard 'eavy breathin'. P A M . Thass you. ^ L E N . 'Oo else yer got knockin' about? Yer ain't stuffed yer grannie under the sofa ? fYHj$ 3 o j U -PcKlU P A M . She's dead. L E N . 'Ard luck. - Wass 'is caper ? He sit<! on.n.jchait. / s My blinkin' luck. H£Man<kjmiLmlks^ 'E'll be late, won't 'e! I 'ope they dock 'is bloody packet. He listens, by the door, . i Not a twitter. P A M . 'E ain' bin out the back yet. L E N . The ol' twit. P A M laughs. Wass the joke ? P A M . You. 1 l6 SAVED LEN (atnused). Yeh. Me. Ha! 'E's a right ol' twit, ain' 'e 'Ere, can I stay the night ? PAM. Ain' yer got nowhere ? LEN. Yeh!-Well? PAM. No. LEN. Yer're the loser. - Sure's 'e's goin' ? - Why can't I ? PAM. Bligh! I only juss met yer. LEN. Suppose 'e's stoppin' 'ome? Got a cold or somethin' I'd do me nut! - Yer'd enjoy it. PAM. Big 'ead. LEN. 'OW many blokes yer 'ad this week? PAM. We ain't finished Monday yet! LEN. We'll take that into consideration. PAM. Saucy bugger! They laugh. 'Ow many times yer 'ad it this week ? LEN. I told yer once! 'Ow many blokes yer 'ad all told? Tfiey laugh. PAM. What about you an' girls ? LEN. Can't count over sixty. They laugh. PAM. Sh! LEN. 'E'll 'ear. - Oi, tell us! PAM. 'Ow many times yer done it in one night? They laugh. LEN. Why did the woman with three tits shoot 'erself ? PAM. Eh? LEN. She only 'ad two nipples. They laugh. 105 SCENE O N E 17 P A M . I don't get it. (She laughs.) What did the midwife say to the nun? L E N . Don' know. SIie.whisp£uJzUiis.exiJ^heyJaugK. You're great! What about the woman with three tits '00 'ad quads ? P A M . Eh? L E N . That'll teach 'er t'sleep with Siamese twins! They laugh. He whispers in her ear. P A M . Yer ought a be locked up! L E N . That's a feedin' problem! p A M . Sh - thass the back door. 'E's bin out the lav. L E N . Less give 'im a thrill. • H_ejum£ Cor - blimey! P A M . You're terrible! J£e-takes.some^weets-JxomJieJLJiagA^ I They're my sweets. L E N . Less 'ave a choose. (Loudly.) 'Ow's that for size? P A M . What yer shoutin? L E N UisLmts a sweet in her mouth). Go easy! Yer wanna make it last! SheJaughs. He. buesM^weetJuJialf-andjQakLajJt. Oo, yer got a lovely little soft centre. (Aside to PAM). First time I seen choclit round it I 1 He jumps on the sofa. P A M (shrill). Yer awful! . L E N . That still'ard? i&iLt P. 106 is SAVED P A M (laughs). Leave off! L E N . Come on, there's plenty more where that come from. He puts a sweet in her mouth. P A M (splutters). Can't take no more! L E N . Yeh - open it. Yer can do a bit more! P A M . Ow! L E N . Oorr lovely! He tickles her. She chokes. This'll put'airs on yer chest! ^ They try to laugh quietly. The door opens. HARRY puts his head in. He goes out. He shuts thedoor\S L E N calls; 'Ave a toffee! P A M . Oo-oo 'ave a toffee! L E N . Tried that mint with the 'ole in it ? P A M . 'Ave a toffee! L E N . What about the ol' dolly mixture? - Will 'e give yer a ruckin'? P A M . Ain' got the nerve. L E N (calls). Nosey ol' gander! They laugh. See 'is tongue 'angin' out ? P A M . 'E's fetchin' 'is dinner-box out the kitchen. L E N (calls). Don't work too 'ard, mate! P A M . Lay off, or 'e'll stay in out a spite. L E N (calls). Take a toffee for tea break, Dad! - I'd like'a sleep round 'ere. Yer'd be lovely an' warm in the mornin'. P A M . Yer're juss greedy! L E N . I give yer 'alf the sweets! ^ ^ P A M . I paid. Anyway, Mum'll be back. L E N . O. That the front door ? PAM. Yeh. "H-4 f - ^ l L * w t W A . c t 107 SCENE TWO She-gaeuajhejzurtains. 'E's off. LEN. Didn't take long. PAM. I tol' yer. LEN. Better be worth waitin' for. PAM. Up to you, ain' it! LEN. Thass all right then. She comes to the sofa and starts to undo his belt. This is the life. F&cU cnx.t SCENE TWO Park. PAM and LEN in a rowing boat. Otherwise stage bare. LEN. Cold? PAM. NO. LEN. Still pecky? j PAM. Yeh. i LEN. There's a bit'a choclit left. 'Ere. I PAM. No. j LEN. Go on. PAM. Ta. LEN. Thass yer lot. PAM. Why? LEN. No more. Silence. ' i I still ain' paid me rent this week. PAM. Me mum won't reckon that. LEN. Ain' got round to it. PAM. Surprised she ain' said. 108 20 SAVED Slight pause. L E N . She ever let on? PAM.'Bout us? L E N . Yeh. P A M . No. L E N . She don't mind ? P A M . Don't 'ave to. Your money comes in 'andy. Silence. ^ ' ^ ^ L E N . She reckon me, yer reckon? -^ St-ft P A M . Never arst. L E N . Thought she might'a said. P A M . Never listen. LEN. O. P A M . Yer ain't spent it ? LEN. 'Er rent? P A M . Yeh. L E N . Nah! P A M . Juss wondered. L E N . Don' yer truss me ? P A M . I'm goin'a knit yer a jumper. L E N . For me? P A M . I ain' very quick. L E N . Can't say I noticed. P A M . Yer'll 'ave t'buy the wool. L E N . Knew there'd be a catch. P A M . I got a smashin' pattern. i L E N . You worried about that rent? v L Lets**, iofclit P A M . I 'ad it give us. L E N . Yer'adn't better be one of them naggers. P A M . What colour's best? L E N . Thass about one thing your ol' girl don't do. P A M . What? L E N . Nag 'er ol' man. PAM. What's yer boot colouj? 109 S C E N E T W O 21 L*N^£hey all-suit-me. P A Mr I lika a red. Qr-a-bhie. L E N . Anythin' bright. Slight pause. \ P A M . I 'ave t' 'ave an easy pattern. . L E N . Will it be ready for the 'oneymoon ? j P A M . We ain''avin''oneymoon. . j LEN.'Oo's payin'? P A M . You. L E N . I can see I'll 'ave t' watch out. ; Pause. • b f^c-Porr'l know. [ EAM -^GettrrrHOT. j LWf-Shou-lUn'L wundta. I P A M . Where's the choclit? L E N . Yer 'ad it all. P A M . O. i L E N . Sorry. j P A M . There weren't much. > L E N . I'll get some when we go in. I P A M . I 'ad a blinkin' great dinner. ^ j Z. | L E N . I reckon yer got a kid on the way. i p Kty* ^ P A M- I a i n'- !' S t - ^ f t J v L E N . Never know yer luck. rAM. Ycr'll 'avo t' get up early in the muiiiin1 l 1 catch me. [ fcfi«r-©011C 111C UfSl. . f RAM-.-Yer-got a dirty mind. j Shght-paum. \ L B N . I'm 'andy-with mc 'andsr-Y-er—faTOW,-flx--up • the el' 1 •a-faii little place. I ain? livin'" in no blinkin' styi- , 110 22 SAVED PAM. Soundc all right. bEN. Easy t' kep swep' out an' that. Ycr'll be all rights PAM. I'd-better. Ho puts his head in bar lap. There is a slight pause. L E N . 'S great 'ere. Pause. Pam. P A M . What? LEN..Why did yer pick me up like that? P A M . Why? L E N . Yeh. P A M . Sorry then? L E N . Tell us. PAM.'Ow many girls you'ad? j L E N . No, I tol' yer my life. * t- Wwolck A^a«-vj« PAM.'Old on. p u » , V*yoU. L E N . What? h L P A M . Yer got a spot. L ttA.*v HnrwA^Tr L E N . Where? PAM.'Old still. L E N . Is it big ? P A M . 'Old still. L E N . Go easy! P A M . Got it! L E N . Ow! She bursts a spot on his neck. P A M . Give us yer 'anky. . . L E N . Yer got it? P A M . Yeh. L E N . Ow! It d'narf 'urt. * ^ He gives her his handkerchief. She dips her hand in the water i. hc*<J^. and dries it on the handkerchief. She gives it back to him. ' PAM. Yer wan'a wash sometimes. : ^ MduL O*. Kcr lt\p> S C E N E T W O L E N . Cheeky cow. (Slight pause. They are both lying down.) ^MiirYovniie luttmn. W&Nr-^ m-^ orryHPam ? MiW7^ ou2re-Hirt-mJ-tne4eg. LRNr-I-in-SOHyr F * A - M T - N O . L'«frAVhen^crgom1-a-^rt-me-ftimp«f ? ZAMr^till-^innoyed^^y-^er-'ave-i' say that-? L-E^ r-Tell-us-about-rne-jumpet1. j^ Nr-I-lt-get-it-t^moFfaT-An" we'l ettirt lookia' for a place fc^morra. p-A-Mr-No-places-round 'tic irE-N^Move-out-a-bitr-It's-beuer out. P A M . Yer'H-be4ucky. that~he-can-put-his arms-round /;<^.)~AiTtH.4nn4uek-y-w-kh^K>iy? p^Mv-Yer-don^t-deserve-it. LtN-X-said-Fnv^ofry—I-won^ t-aFfit no more. It's-me goed looks-dons-it. p^M—It-wa^-youT-It-werenk-no-one-else. L^N:-Lcss-go-t'bed-early-tinight. g-A-Mr-If-yergo'l' bed-ma^ l^arier-it-won^-be-wortli gcttir^ up. LEN (sings). Be-kind-toIycr-fbtrrsfboted^ ends T4rat^nt±-irrayi7e~somebod v's brother : • Y-ef-wouldn't-go-ba^k-wJt] ? WclHt-ir. Shght-pattse. T-feey-ffHist-tf foigui U!>. Wt bin 'UL 'ours. n " rpcr 24 SAVED L E N . Some mothers! Pause. ,. » i i U X M N uty- HMVK cv» cU i -Livin'-hke that must a got yer down. P A M . Used to it. L E N . They ought to be shot. P A M : Why? L E N . Don't it every worry yer ? P A M . Ow? L E N . Supposed you turned out like that ? P A M . No. LEN.'Ow'd it start? P A M . Never arst. L E N . No one said ? P A M . Never listen. It's their life. L E N . But -P A M . Yer can't do nothin', yer know. No one'll thank yer. L E N . 'Ow long's it bin goin' on? P A M . Longer'n I know. Pause. He sits and leans towards her. L E N . Must a' bin bloody rotten when yer was a kid. P A M . Never know'd no difference. They 'ad a boy in the war. L E N . Theirs? P A M . Yeh. L E N . I ain't seen 'im. P A M . Dead. L E N . O. P A M . A bomb in a park. L E N . That what made'em go funny? P A M . No. I come after. L E N . What a life. P A M . I 'ad me moments. L E N . I won't turn out like that. I wouldn't arst yer if I didn't know better 'n that. That sort of carry-on ain' fair. P A M . I know. 1 1 3 S C E N E T W O 25 L E N . We'll get on all right. I wonder it never sent yer off yer nut. P A M . Yer don't notice. L E N . It won't be long now. Why don't yer blow up an' knock their 'eads t'gether ? P A M (shrugs). I 'ope I never see 'em again. Thass all. Slight pause. L E N looks round. L E N . I ain^ -got a decent juiiipu. Pause. 'Ow'd they manage ? P A M . When? L E N . They writes notes or somethin' ? P A M . No. L E N . 'Ow's that? P A M . No need. L E N . They must. P A M . No. r\u,d-. L E N . Why? P A M . Nothin' t' say. 'E puts 'er money over the fire every Friday, an' thass all there is. Talk about somethin' else. L E N . Whass she say about'im? P A M . Nothin'. L E N . But -P A M . She never mentions 'im an' 'e never mentions 'er. I don' wanna talk about it. L E N . They never mention each other? P A M . I never 'eard 'em. L E N . Not once? P A M . No! j L E N . It's wet down 'ere. Pause. I ain' livin' with me in-laws, thass a fact. FRED (off). Four! L E N . I never got yer placed till I saw yer ol' people. 1.14 2 6 SAVED PAM. I never chose 'em! LEN. I never meant that! -PAM. Don't know why yer wan'a keep on about 'eml LEN. - I never try an' get at yer! FRED comes on down right. His back to the audience. FRED. Number-four-bang-on-the-door! PAM. Thass us. FRED. Less'ave yer! LEN. Less stay out! PAM. Why? FRED. Oi! PAM (to LEN). Come on. LEN. We're a pirate ship. FRED (taking the micky). You devil! PAM. Yer'll 'ave t' pay. LEN. Come an' get us! FRED. Wass up darlin'? 'As 'e got 'is rudder stuck? PAM (to LEN). I'm 'ungry. LEN. Why didn't yer say ? LEN starts to pull in. FRED moves towards them as the boat comes in. FRED. Lovely. 'Elp 'im darlin'. Thass lovely. She 'andles that like a duchess 'andles a navvy's pick. LEN. All right ? FRED. Lovely. He leans out and jerks the boat in. PAM stands awkwardly. LEN. Steady. FRED. 'Old tight, darlin'. He lifts her out. Yer wanna watch Captain Blood there. Very nice. LEN. Okay? PAM. Ta. FRED. Very 'ow's yer father. SCENE THREE LEN (stepping out). Muddy. PAM (to LEN). I enjoyed that. FRED. Same 'ere.* LEN. We'll do it again. FRED. Any time. PAM (to LEN). Got everythin'? FRED (to PAM). YOU 'ave. LEN (clowning). Watch it! FRED. 'Oo's bin' 'aving a bash on me duckboards ? PAM (to LEN). Less 'ave me bag. FRED. Bashin's extra. PAM. Yer wanna get yerself a job. FRED. I got one. PAM.'Irin'out boats! y. FRED. I'd rather 'ire you out, darlin'. LEN (joking). Watch it! PAM (to LEN). Ready ? LEN. Yeh. LEN and PAM start to go right. FRED. Why, you got a job for us? I wouldn't mind a bit a grind for you. ^ PAM. Yer'll 'ave t' join the union. FRED. I'm in, love. Paid up. . . . . LEN (joking). Yer'll be in the splash in a minute. JLEN and PAM gnmt Jejj. FRED (to himself). Right up. Like you, darlin'. Park. Bare stage. PETE, BARRY, MIKE, COLIN. PETE wears a brown suit and suede shoes. The jacket is short in the seat and tight on the shoulders. His tie is black. The others wear jeans and shirts. SCENE THREE 116 28 SAVED MIKE. What time they bury the bugger ? ' PETE. Couldn't tell yer. COLIN. Don' yer wan'a go ? PETE. Leave off! 'Oo's goin' a make me time up? COLIN. Why yer goin' then ? PETE. The ol' lady'll ruck if I don't. MIKE. Yeh, they reckon anythin'like this. COLIN. Blinkin' morbid. MIKE. Looks lovely in a black tie don' 'e! They laugh. PETE. What a carry on! 'E come runnin' round be'ind the bus. Only a nipper. Like a flash I thought right yer nasty bastard. Only ten or twelve. I jumps right down on me rewer an' bang I got 'im on me off-side an' 'e shoots right out under this lorry comin' straight on. MIKE. Crunch. COLIN. Blood all over the shop. MIKE. The Fall a the Roman Empire. PETE. This lorry was doin' a ton in a built-up street. BARRY. Garn! Yer never seen 'im. ^ PETE. No? BARRY. 'It 'im before yer knew 'e was comin'. PETE (lighting his pipe). Think I can't drive ? ' COLIN. What a giggle, though. MIKE. Accidents is legal. COLIN. Can't touch yer. PETE. This coroner-twit says 'e's sorry for troublin' me. MIKE. The law thanks 'im for 'is 'elp. PETE. They paid me for comin'. MIKE. An' the nip's mother reckons 'e ain' got a blame 'isself. COLIN. She'll turn up at the funeral. PETE. Rraammmmmmmmm! i COLIN. Bad for the body work. MIKE. Can't yer claim insurance? 117 S C E N E T H R E E 29 PETE. No. MIKE. Choked! COLIN. Ruined 'is paint work. BARRY.'E's'avin'yer on! H MIKE. Yer creep. * COLIN. Yer big creep. ^ PETE. Let 'im alone. 'E don't know no better. COLIN. ' E don't know nothin'. MIKE. Big stingy creep. COLIN. Yer wouldn't 'ave the guts. BARRY. No gUtS? 7 MIKE. Yeh. BARRY. Me? COLIN. Not yer grannie. ^ BARRY. I done blokes in. MIKE. 'Ere we go. BARRY. More'n you 'ad 'ot dinners. In the jungle. Shootin' up the yeller-niggers. An' cut 'em up after with the ol' pig-sticker. Yeh. MIKE (hoots). COLIN. Do leave off! BARRY. You lot wouldn't know a stiff if it sat up and shook 'ands with yer! MIKE. Aa! Shootin' up the yeller-nigs! COLIN. Sounds like brothers a your'n. BARRY. Get stuffed! PETE (to them all). Chuck it, eh? ^ COLIN. Yeller-niggers! My life! What yer scratchin' ? MIKE. 'E'S got a dose. ' * PETE. Ain' surprisin'. COLIN. Ain'it dropped off yet? MIKE. Tied on with a ol'johnny. -COLIN. It's 'is girl. MIKE. 'IS what? P E T E . Gunged-up ol' boot. L-C pUKtkti (I 7 13 X I A A * Cx U 6, l o M 118 3° i a SAVED . COLIN. 'E knocked it off in the back a 'is car last night -MIKE.'Is what? PETE. Pile a ol' scrap. MIKE. Ought a be put off the road. COLIN. 'E was knockin' it off in the back an' -MIKE. I 'eard. PETE. What? MIKE. The back-bumper fell off. PETE. Yeh? COLIN. I's a fact! > PETE. My life! MIKE. An'what she say ? COLIN. Yer juss drop somethin'. BARRY. Bollocks! He laughs at himself. MIKE. Yeh! COLIN. 'Aving trouble with yer 'orn ? ^ BARRY. It weren't no bumper! Me fog lamp come off. " fl X MIKE.'Is fog lamp! They roar with laughter. COLIN. I knew somethin'come off! MIKE. Flippin'fog lamp! PETE. Thass what she calls it! COLIN. Wonder it weren't 'is engine come out. BARRY. Better'n nothin'. MIKE. Yer couldn't knock someone down with that! PETE. It'd come t' a stop. MIKE. Shootin'up the yeller-niggers! BARRY. Yeh, yer ain' lived!' i> t\. LEN comes on dmtt right. ' PETE. Me mum's got a dirty great wreath. MIKE. Yeh! 1 E V k r L C 119 S C E N E T H R E E 31 C O L I N . Give somethin' for it ? P E T E . I ain' a 'ippocrit. ^ C O L I N . Oi - whass-yer-name! L E N . Eh? C O L I N . It's - Lenny, ain'it? L E N . Yeh. - O! 'Ow's it goin', admiral ? C O L I N . ' O w ' s yerself? • L E N . Not so dodgy. Long time. 3 -C O L I N . Me and 'im was t'school t'gether. M I K E . Yeh? C O L I N . What yer bin doin' ? BARRY. Reform school? M I K E . Don't 'e show yer up! tf C O L I N . Take no notice. Creep! - Workin' ? L E N . Worse luck. C O L I N . I couldn't place yer for a minute. (Slight pause.) Yeh. L E N . Yer ain' changed much. BARRY. What yer doin'now? L E N . Waitin'. . . . . M+K£r4—H G O L I N . It-was-in the-parky-yci Juuuui'i M-HC-E—Fhis-giri-ceme-tip t'me. GOLiN.An?-dra HeJaughs. C O L I N : - I knew alvcwaa thiuccii. * I I K E . But she cvvisuid mc dim. GO-LIN.-An? 'cr ol'-dad'd bin biisln'n' it of&for )raws. DABRYI Yer-?onoui» He-laughs. eoLiw. Twisted ya what? M I K E . -Never know-yer4ockl COLIN. Married? 1 2 0 32 SAVED LEN. Gettin' ready. BARRY. 'Oo W i th ? LEN. We're waitin' -COLIN. Pull the other one! MIKE. What for? PETE. Till she drops 'er nipper. COLIN. Else it looks bad goin' up the aisle. MIKE. She can 'ide it be'ind 'er flowers. BARRY. Is that what they carry 'em for ? COLIN. We live an' learn. MIKE. Takes all sorts. l MARY comes on up right. LEN. Thass us. COLIN. That? LEN goes to MARY. PETE. One man's meat. MIKE. More like scrag-end. BARRY. Bit past it, ain' she ? PETE. She's still got the regulation 'oles. MIKE. Experience 'elps. Yer get a surprise sometimes. LEN (to MARY). Less give yer a 'and. MARY. Whew! Ta. She gives him the shopping bags. LEN. Okay? MARY. I was juss goin' ter drop 'em. MIKE. 'Ear that. BARRY. Goin' a drop 'em! COLIN. In the park? MIKE. At 'alf-past twelve ? PETE (laughing). The dirty ol' scrubber. LEN and MARY start to cross hft * ever t'i $k*vidUr M c t 1 L x h H * SR.. 121 SCENE THREE 33 BARRY (to COLIN). That what they taught yer at school? COLIN whistles. LEN (amused). Put a sock in it. BARRY. What yer got at the top a your legs? What time's breakfast ? MARY. That your mates ? LEN. They're juss 'avin' a laugh. MARY. You all right with them bags ? LEN. Yeh. COLIN. Roger the lodger 'ad a bad cough. MIKE. 'E sneezed so 'ard. COLIN. 'Is door knob fell off. BARRY. 'Is landlady said we'll soon 'ave yer well. COLIN. So she pulled offer drawers. MIKE. An' polished 'is bell! MARY. Lot a roughs. ^ 1.F.N and M A R Y go out Jeff, fifiT-fe-Makcs ycr-thkik. ^ei*Nv-What? p-E^EEr-Never lmow-what-yep-fmsski'. M-IKE. T-r-ae. W5-T-Erj4cnew-a-bloke uiiic icikuncd 'c knuikcd off ?ii gnnnir. &ettNr-Ych? p-fc 11.. Ait-aTflisraRe. coLiN.-'QwVtha*? p^ gr^ Fhcre-was-a-ptnvei' cut at the time an? -B-A-R-R-¥;—^ E-t-hought-it waa 'io sister. M-T-K Ain'ypr rlevpr! MIKE. Tnist-rfie-omions! M ' 5 t^OwJ Ki-t j Circular t^^iMM 1 1 D A R R Y fe/uefJ J raspberry. PETE (smoking his pipe). Never know 'alf what goes on. 1 2 2 34 SAVED MIKE. That age she must be'angin'out for it. PETE. Stuffin' it all in before it's too late. COLIN. Yeh. There is a slight pause. PETE. Ooorrr! I'll 'ave t' fix up a little bird t'night. 'Ere, wass the time ? COLIN. Time we're back t' work. They groan. X '^Xlfc P,>*v* . 8 . MIKE (to PETE). Time yer're round the church they'll 'ave • £ R, , 'im down the 'ole or up the chimney or wherever 'e's goin'. PETE. I reckon they wanna put 'im down the 'ole an' pull the chain. ft SCENE FOUR The living room. Dark. ( The door opens. MARY comes in. She puts on the light. HARRY ' At, U.{ is sitting in the armchair. He is partly asleep, MARY puts sauce, salt and pepper on the table and goes out. HARRY gets up. He goes to the door and puts the light out. He goes back to the armchair. Pause. %r * The door opens, MARY comes in. Slie puts on the light. She takes knife, fork, spoon and table napkin to tlie table. She lays the napkin as a small table cloth. The door opens. PAM comes in. ^ EKtcf P« She wears a slip and carries a hair brush and cosmetics. She switches on the TV set. MARY goes out. Without waiting to adjust the set PAM goes to the couch and sits. She makes up her face. The door opens, MARY comes in with a plate of food. MARY (calls). It's on the table. She walks towards the table. To PAM. . 1 2 3 A> 0 SCENE FOUR 3 5 I told you not to walk round like that. _MAR3LpMK_r/(fl food on.thejable and. goes. out._p AM goes• to, the T.V set .and adjusts At. She goes back.toJhe.couch.and.sits._She makes up her face. M A RYj:omesm. (At the door). It's on the table! That's the second time! She goes to the TV set. I don't know 'ow they 'ave the nerve to put it on. SJie switches tn another channel. She step* hack tn Innk at the td&M&---b!L&Lep£f.oma^^ Hm. She steps forward and adjusts it again. If yer put it in the oven it goes 'ard as nails. She_stepjJ>ack^jidJ_Q.o£^ OM.d_watches TV. Pause. PAM. More like one a them daft mirrors at a circus. MARY. The man'll 'ave to come an' fix it. S}ie goes, to thej_ej^nd..adjustsjt. You don't know 'ow to switch it on. It goes all right when I do it. v E *i_comes inj^. LEN. Smells great. MARY. You've let it ruin. LEN. Nah. MARY. Cold as Christmas. LEN. Do me. He.sits. at,, the, table, and eats. u Lf MARY fex^^^iJ?»ixfe^M«jO. I don't know. - Did yer put the light out in the scullery ? L E N . Yeh. Us ft. tHtstr. 36 SAVED MARY. We need a new one. That's what's wrong with it. She goes back to the couch and-sitsi She watches silently. Pause. PAM. Looks like one a them hlarlr an' white minstrels, MARY. Well you do it} an' don't sit there pokin' 'oles. PAM. I ain' vvatchin'. M-ARY. Sounds like.it. LEN eats, MARY watches, PAM makes up. HARRY is still. The TV is fairly loud. A very long pause. Slowly a baby starts to cry. It goes on crying without a break until the end of the scene. Nothing happens until it has cried a long while. Then MARY speaks. Can yer see ? LEN. Yeh. MARY. Move yer seat. LEN. I can see. Yer a fair ol' cook. MARY. It's ruined. Yer get no encouragement t' try. Pause. The baby screams with rage. After a while MARY lifts her head in the direction of the screams. Pam-laa! Slight pause, PAM stands and puts her cosmetics in a little bag. She goes to the TV set. She turns up the volume. She goes back to the couch and sits. $ , , There's plenty of left-overs. LEN. Full up. MARY. An' there's rhubarb and custard. LEN: O. Pause. The baby chokes. * * SvwJl tut ' . feme Q^a^d.. Pause. 125 SCENE FOUR 37 PAM. Too lazy t' get up an' fetch it. MARY. Don't start. Let's 'ave a bit a peace for one night. Pause. PAM. 'IS last servant died a over-work. LEN. I ain' finished this, nosey. MARY. Why don't yer shut that kid up. PAM. I can't. . MARY. Yer don't try. PAM. Juss cries louder when I go near it. MARY (watching TV). I ain' goin' up for yer. (Still watching TV.) High time it 'ad a father. (To LEN). There's plenty a tea in the pot. LEN (watching TV). Yeh. MARY (watching TV), That's what it needs. No wonder it cries. (Pause. To LEN.) Busy? LEN. Murder. MARY (watching TV). Weather don't 'elp. LEN (still watching TV). Eh? (The baby whimpers pitifully. Pause. Still watching TV.) Ha! Pause, PAM picks up her things and goes out? MARY. About time. LEN. Wan'a cup ? MARY. No. There's milk in that custard. It'll only get thrown out. LEN (stands). I'll bust. He goes outf0 MARY (calls). On the top shelf. LEN (off). What? MARY. It's on the top shelf! Pause, LEN comes in. He carries a plate to theltable. Did yer get it? 1 i i 1 i I i » j i ! r£x«t P Uit 7 £Mrtr I» vuft 1 2 6 38 SAVED LEN. Yeh. He sits. g MARY. Shut that door, Len. Me 'ead's playin' me up again. * f LEN. Take some a yer anadins. MARY. I've 'ad too many t'day. Thass what makes it worse. LEN goes back to the door and shuts it. He goes to the table and eats. Did yer put the oven out ? . • LEN. An'the light. MARY. I ain' made a money, y'know. -Suddenly the baby cries much louder. Put some sugar on it. LEN sprinkles the sugar from a teaspoon. People'll send the police round 'ere next. LEN. It'll cry itself t'sleep. PAM comes in. She wears a dress. MARY. It's still cryin'. PAM. I thought the cat was stuck up the chimney. She sits on the couch and pulls up her stockings. 'Ad a good look ? - I'm tired a 'im watchin' me all the time. MARY. I told yer t' get dressed in the scullery like anybody else. PAM. I can dress where I like in me own 'ome. LEN (to himself). O no. PAM. You say somethin'? LEN (calmly). Yeh - shut up. / 0 PAM. I suppose that's your idea a good manners. . Pause. 127 SCENE FOUR 39 When yer leavin' us ? I'm sick an' tired a arstin'. MARY. I don't wanna 'ear all this again t'night. PAM.'E gets on me nerves. LEN. I ain'leavin'that kid. PAM. Why? LEN. With you? PAM. It ain' your kid. 1 ' LEN. No? PAM. Yer'll'ave t'take my word for it. LEN. Yer don't even know when you're lyin'. / 2. Pause. The baby cries. PAM. I don't understan' yer. Yer ain' got no self respect. LEN. YOU 'ave like. PAM. No one with any self respect wouldn't wanna stay. LEN pours tea for himself. Yer'll 'ave t'go sometime. Yer can't juss 'ang on till yer rot. MARY. Pack it up! No wonder that kid cries! PAM. Why don't you tell 'im t' go ? It's your job. 'E's gettin' on me nerves every night. If it goes on much longer I'll be ill. MARY. That'll teach yer t'bring fellas back. |I|PAM (to HARRY). Why don't you tell im? It's your 'ouse. There's bin nothin' but rows an' arguments ever since 'e got 'ere. I've 'ad all I can stand! (Slightpause.) Dad! SHOUT HARRY. I ain' gettin' involved. Bound t'be wrong. PAM (to LEN). I don't understan' yer. Yer can't enjoy stayin' 'ere. I T LEN drinks his tea. It's bad enough bein' stuck with a kid without 'avin' you 'anging roun' me neck. The 'ole street's laughin' be'ind yer back. P Sd-S. 11 P tu*ck. * P K h> Walt. ft 128 40 S A V E D L E N . I ain' leavin' that kid. P A M . Take it. I W L E N . With me? P A M . 'Ow else? M A R Y . 'Ow can 'e? P A M . Thass 'is worry. '1 M A R Y . 'E can't look after a kid. P A M . Put it on the council. M A R Y (shrugs). They wouldn't 'ave it if they've got any sense. The baby cries. P A M . Well? l V L E N . Kids need proper 'omes. P A M . Yer see! L E N (looks in the teapot). Out a' water. He goes out. ^ M A R Y . Wouldn't yer miss it? P A M . That racket? ^ The baby whimpers. There is a ring. P A M goes out. MARY quickly tidies the couch, L E N comes back with the teapot. M A R Y . Did the door go ? L E N (nods). Juss then. F R E D (off). All right, all right. I said I 'm sorry, ain' I ? P A M is heard indistinctly. Well let's say'alio first! F R E D comes in. 'Evenin'. 'Evenin', ma. M A R Y . We're just watchin' telly. F R E D . Any thin' interestin' ? M A R Y . Come in. F R E D . 'Lo, Len. 'Ow's life? L E N . Usual. 'Ow's the job ? libs. FX df. 2* F K h -htk, S l i t . 129 SCENE FOUR 41 FRED. Don't talk about it. EAM_£(?i/igUM. z * PAM. I still don't see 'ow that makes yer all this late. FRED. Give it a rest, Pam. PAM. The same last time. MARY. Take yer coat off. PAM. Yer oughta let me know if yer're goin'a be late. FRED. 'Ow could I? Sorry love. We'll juss 'ave t' make it later in future. PAM (to MARY). Can I put the kid in your room ? MARY. No wonder it can't sleep. Pushed around like some ol' door mat. PAM. Can I or can't I ? I ain' sittin' there with that row goin' on. MARY. Do what yer like. ^ FRED (to PAM). Get plenty a fags? MARY. Yer will anyway. PAM (to FRED). Ready ? FRED. See yer, Lenny boy. LEN. Yeh. PAM. It's all the same if I was meetin' yer outside in the street. I'd be left standin' in the cold. FRED (following PAM to the door). Got any fags ? I left mine be'ind. 2.7 ZAM.andjERED.ffo._cw?..LEN stacks the MlfngLPn~the_Aable and takes^omej)f-lhem^ut-JHie„bcd)yls-cryin^ LEN comes injigain^JHe^pickjipjhesauc and-goes.out. MARY., turns off the~yV set and goes out, HARRY LEN. O. HARRY. Finished. LEN. Ta. Pause. 1 3 0 SAVED Wish t'God I could take that kid out a this. HARRY (drinks). Better. . -LEN. No life growin' up 'ere. HARRY (wipes his mouth on the back of his hand). Ah. LEN. Wish t' God I 'ad some place. HARRY. Yer wan'a keep yer door shut. LEN. What? HARRY. T'night. LEN. Me door? HARRY. Yer always keep yer door open when 'e's sleepin' with 'er. LEN. I listen out for the kid. They ain' bothered. MARY (off). Night, Len. "' ' LEN (calls). Night. (To HARRY.) More? \ HARRY. NO. LEN. Plenty in the pot. HARRY (wipes his mouth on the back of his hand). Yer'll catch cold with it open. LEN (holding the teapot). Night, then. / He goes to the door. HARRY (sitting in the armchair). Put that light out. SCENE FIVE L E N . Did yer take yer medicine ? 131 S C E N E F I V E 43 Pause. Feelin' better ? P A M . I'm movin' down t' me own room t'morra. Yer'll 'ave t' move back up 'ere. L E N . Quieter up 'ere. P A M . Like a blinkin' grave. L E N . Why don't yer 'ave the telly up ? P A M . No. L E N . Easy fix a plug. P A M . Did yer see Fred ? } L E N . Yer never took yer medicine. (He pours her medicine and \ gives it to her.) 'Ere. ( P A M takes it.) Say ta. (She drinks it '• and gives a small genuine 'Ugh!') Read yer magazines ? P A M . Did Fred say anythin'? !• M A R Y (off). Pam-laa! She gettin' up, Len? f P A M (to herself). O God. ! M A R Y (off). The doctor says there's nothin't' stop yer gettin* : up. Yer're as well as I am. '• b&K-cleses^he-door-butjhe^oice-is-Jtill-heazd, Pam-laa! The dinner's on the table. L E N . Yer better off up'ere out a'er way. t P A M . The cow. 1 ULi&Mtaightens-LbeJied, l Leave that. | L E N . You're comin' undone.' ; i P A M . Leave it. L E N . It's all -P A M . I said leave it! L E N (continuing). Someone's got a give yer a 'and. P A M . I won't 'ave yer pullin' me about. ^ L E N (walking away). Why don't yer sit in a chair for 'alf'our ? P A M . Mind yer own business. L 1 3 2 44 SAVED LEN. Yer ain't doin'ycrself no good lyin'there. MARY (off). She gettin' up ? LEN. I'm only tryin' a 'elp. PAM. Don't want yer 'elp. j LEN. Yer got bugger all idea 'ow to look after yerself. PAM. GO away. LEN. Some one -PAM. For Chrissake! LEN. Someone's got a stick up for yer. (Slight pause.) Yer treated me like dirt. But I ain't goin' a carry on like that. MARY (off). Pamm-laa! 3 ? gL^vu^S PAM (calls). Shut up! I'm sick a' the lot of yer! (Slight pause.) Shut up! LEW goes out. ^ PAM. Thank Chriss for that. MARY (off). She up yet? LEN answers indistinctly. Pause, PAM pulls out the blankets that LEN tucked in. LEN comes back with the baby, "f T g^^^^ ^ § LEN (to baby). 'Ello then! 'Ello then! • PAM. O no. LEN. Look-ee that.'Oo that mummy-there? PAM. She's got the grub out on the table. LEN. It'll keep. PAM. She ain' better row me out for it. LEN. Take it. PAM. Put it back. LEN. Yer ought a take it. PAM. Don't keep tellin' me what I ought a do. LEN. Yer ain' even looked at it for weeks. PAM. Ain' going to. ' ' ' LEN. Yer'd feel better. Pause. 'Ello then. SCENE FIVE 45 PAM. Did yer give 'im what I wrote ? LEN. 'E's busy, 'e reckons. It's 'is busy time. PAM. Ha! LEN. 'Avin' yourn on a tray ? PAM. If yer like. LEN. It knows yer voice. PAM. Put it away before it starts. LEN. Good for its lungs. PAM. Yer d'narf annoy me, Len. LEN. I know. PAM. Yer're always pesterin' me. LEN. Someone's got a look after yer. PAM. There yer are! Thass another annoyin' thing t' say. (She sits.) This dump gives me the 'ump. Put that away. LEN. Yer can't let it lie on its back all day. Someone's got a pick it up. PAM (sitting back). Why should I worry? It's father don't give a damn. I could be dyin' an' 'e can't find ten minutes. LEN. I'm blowed if I'm goin' a put meself out if yer can't co-operate. He tries to put the baby in her arms.r PAM. I tol' yer take it back! Get off a me! Yer bloody lunatic! Bleedin' cheek! (Calls.) Mum! LEN. You'ave it for a change! l£K.pAUs^heJj.aby_.sx)^tMtStJs_sji^ LEN. I ain' your paid nurse! PAM (calls). Mum! - I know why Fred ain' come - yer bin tearin' up me letters. LEN. 'Edid! PAM. Yer little liar! (She turtle ninny frnm the hnhy ) I ain' touchin' it. 134 46 SAVED LEN. It'll stay there all night! . " •' . PAM. Thass what yer call 'elpin' me. r Pause, LEN picks up the baby. See! LEN. Can't give it a cold juss because we're rowin'. He goes towards the door. He stops. 'E said 'e'd look in. PAM (she turns round). When? (She turns back to the wall.) What did 'e say? LEN. I said yer wanted to see 'im. 'E goes 'e's up to 'is eyes in it. So I said I got a couple of tickets for Crystal Palace. 'E's knockin' off early. PAM. Saturday? LEN. T'night. PAM (turns). Yer got 'im downstairs! LEN. No. PAM (calls). Mum - is Fred there ? Fred ? - 'E might be early. LEN. There's a good'alf'our yet. PAM (excited). I 'ope 'is lot wins. LEN. 'E might be late. PAM. Not for football. Yer can say she's upstairs if yer wan' a go. Put it like that. LEN (looks at child). 'E's well away. PAM. I ain' cut me nails all the time I bin in bed. MARY (off). Lennie! LEN. Shall I get the scissors ? PAM. She won't shut up till yer go down. I got me own. MARY (off). Leonard! I keep callin' yer. (Outside the door.) 'Ow many more times. (She comes in.) I bin callin' the last 'alf 'our. Dinner won't be fit t'eat. 1 LEN. Juss puttin' the nipper back. MARY. That's the last time I cook a 'ot meal in this 'ouse. I mean it this time. (To PAM.) Yer can make yer own bed 1 3 5 f l O C SCENE SIX 47 t'morra3 you. (To LEN.) I ain' sweatin' over a 'ot stove. No one offers t'buy me a new one. (To PAM.) I can't afford t' keep yer on yer national 'ealth no longer. I'm the one 'oo ought to be in bed. 3» MARY goes out. PAM. I got all patches under me eyes. LEN. No. PAM. I feel awful. LEN. Yer look nice. PAM. I'll 'ave t' 'ave a wash. LEN. Yeh. ^. SCENE SIX The Park. A bare stage. FRED holds a fishing-rod out OUMP the stalls. He wears jeans and an old dull leather jacket. LEN sits beside him on a small tin box. On the ground there are a bait box, odds and ends box, float box, milk bottle, sugar bottle, flask and net.1 LEN. Round our place t'night? FRED. No. LEN. It's Saturday. FRED. O yeh. LEN. She won't like it. FRED. No. Pause. Yer wan' a get yerself a good rod. LEN. Can't afford it. i i * V U ^ k f c c u e & ir. Fb&L c/wi. 4$ SAVED F R E D . Suit yerself. L E N . Lend us yourn. F R E D . Get knotted. Slight pause. < L E N . I in yer woy then ? L E N . Sittin' 'ere. ¥ R E D . Free country. L E N . Ycr'd never think it. • • E K E D . Nippy. I J E N . Lend us yer jacket. r n E D i Jumpin. & E N . 'Ow much yer give for that? F R E D . Yer get 'em on h.p. faEN. Fair bit a work. P R E D (runs his hand along the rod): Comes in 'andy. Pause. L E N . She said yer was comin' round for the telly. F R E D . News t' me. L E N . Don't know whass on. F R E D . Don't care. L E N . Never looked. (Slight pause.) Never bothers me. Easy find out from the paper if yer -F R E D . Don't keep on about it. L E N . Eh? F R E D . Don't bloody well keep on about it. L E N . Suits me. (Slight pause.) I was agreein' with yer. I thought like -F R E D . Oi - Len, I come out for the fishin'. I don't wanna 'ear all your ol' crap. Slight pause. LEN turns his head right and stares at the river. 'Onest, Len - yer d'narf go on. 137 UKJuV S C E N E SIX 49 L E N . I only said I was agreein' with yer. Blimey, if yer can't... He stops. Pause. FRED. Sod! L E N . Whass up ? FRED. Bait's gone. L E N . Gone? They've 'ad it away. FRED. Never. L E N . Must 'ave. FRED. More like wriggled off. L E N . I mounted it 'ow yer said. FRED (winds in). Come 'ere. Look. Hs. takes. a.worm.from..the..worm.box. Right, yer take yer worm. Yer roll it in yer 'and t' knock it out. Thass first. Then yer break a bit off. Cop 'old o' that. He gives part of the worm to L E N . L E N . Ta. FRED. Now yer thread yer 'ook through this bit. Push it up on yer gut. Leave it. - Give us that bit. Ta. Yer thread yer other bit on the 'ook, but yer leave a fair bit 'angin' off like that, why, t'wriggle in the water. Then yer push yer top bit down off the gut and camer-flarge yer shank. Got it? L E N . Thass 'ow I done it. FRED. Yeh. Main thing, keep it neat. He casts. The line hums. Lovely. A long silence. ' . The life. Silence. i. D L me* t * bid 'To F. 138 50 S A V E D I . E N . Down the labour Monday. F A E D grUHtt. Start somethin'. KJlfVtlVvT No lifgj broken FRED. True. Silomoi L E N pokes in the worm box with a siieli. Feed 'em on milk L E N . Fact? Silence.' I'll tell 'er yer ain' comin'. F R E D . Len! L E N . Well yer got a let 'er know. F R E D . 'Oo says ? L E N . Yer can't juss -F R E D . Well? L E N . Shut up a minute. F R E D . Listen, mate, shut yer trap an' give us a snout. L E N . No. F R E D . Yer're loaded. j L E N . Scroungin' git! Smoke yer own. - She'll be up 'alf the night. That'll be great. - I reckon yer got a bloody nerve takin' my fags, yer know I'm broke. - Yer believe in keepin' em waitin' for it. Slight pause. F R E D . Yer used to knock 'er off, that right? L E N . Once. F R E D . There yer are then. L E N . What? F R E D . It's all yourn. L E N . She don't wan'a know. *• L X fcS O F 139 S C E N E SIX 51 FtM FRED. 'Ow's that? L E N . Since you 'ad 'er. FRED. What d'yer expect? No - they're like that. Once they go off, they go right off. L E N . Don't even get a feel. FRED. 'Appens all the time. Give us a snout. L E N . No. FRED. Tight arse. Slight pause. ' L E N . Skip? FRED. Yeh? L E N . What yer reckon on 'er ? FRED. For a lay? L E N . Yeh.* FRED. Fair. Depends on the bloke.' F n E D r Mo—get-that anytime. Silence. L E N . Gettin' dark. Silence. FRED. Call it a day. L E N . In a minute. FRED. Never know why yer stick that dump. L E N . Seen worse. FRED. I ain'. Slight pause. L E N . Skip? FRED. Whass up now? L E N . Why's she go for you ? FRED. They all do mate. LEN . No, why's she - ill over it ? 140 52 S A V E D F R E D . Come off it, she 'ad a drop a the ol' flu. L E N . Yeh. But why's she like that? , F R E D . It ain' me money. L E N . They all want the same thing, I reckon. So you must 'ave more a it. t F R E D . Thass true! O i l • i J C ^ l ^ ^ S L E N . What? ' . ; • F R E D . Still. Pause. Thought I 'ad a touch. Pause. • ,. . Nah. • . : ' They ease off. F R E D looks up at the sky. Jack it in. L E N . Anyway, thass what they reckon. > F R E D . Eh? L E N . They all want the same thing. F R E D . O. L E N . I reckon yer're 'avin' me on. i F R E D . Me? L E N . Like the fish that got away. . . • " j F R E D . I ain'with yer. He shakes his head. L E N . That big! (He holds his hands eighteen inches apart.) F R E D (laughs). More like that! (He holds his hands three feet • < apart.) " . .. L E N . Ha! Thass why she's sick. ... 7 - • .' F R E D . Now give us a fag. , L E N . No. [ ' vnnp.(spits). 'Ave t' light one a me own. S C E N E S I X 53 He takes one of Jiis„.o.wn...cigarettes..from„a.packetJnjtis^breast _pocket. He doesjwt tajiejh L E N . Mind the moths. PRED. Yer ever 'ad-wormo tip yer n o 9 C , in yer cai>, an' down yes-thfoat? trE-N. Not-4atdy. rRED. Ycr-wiH-in a minute L-EN. Well give m> a snout then. L E N . I used a'ear, know that? *• FRED. 'Ear what ? - 'E's like a flippin' riddle. L E N . You an' 'er. FRED. Me an' 'oo? L E N . On the bash. FRED. Do what? * L E N . Straight up. FRED. Chriss. L E N . Yeh. FRED. Yer kiddin'. L E N . On my life. Kep me up 'alf the night. Yer must a bin trying for the cup. FRED (draws his cigarette). Why didn't yer let on ? L E N . No, it's all a giggle, ain't it ? FRED (shrugs). Yeh ? Makes yer feel a right charlie. Hi-drvps\Jns_cigarAttej3nj^^ Chriss. Thass one good reason for jackin' 'er in. L E N . Don't start blamin' me. FRED. An' you was listenin' ? L E N . Couldn't 'elp it. FRED. O. H£jqysJiis^d.anMie,grmnd.ana^ packJiis,things. . Yot-didn't mind mc goiuLiound 'cr's. He give! i fr a ligfa. 142 54 irEN.-Same if I did. PR E D . I didn't know like. S A V E D UAU" JR E D . I thought sho was goin' sparer M M i Wan'a 'and? F R E D . No. Givo-uo -hoc tinj1 He packs in silence. I reckon it was up t' you t' say. Yer got a tongue in yer 'ead. Silence, M I K E comes in. He has a haversack slung from one shoulder and carries a rod. He wears a small, flashy hat. F R E D . No luck? 1 '' M I K E . Wouldn't feed a cat. L E N . Waste a time. •"• ; '' M I K E . Same 'ere. F R E D . Got a breeze up. M I K E . What yer doin'? ' ' ' F R E D . Now? ; M I K E . Yeh, t'night. F R E D . Reckon anythin'? '•' M I K E . Bit a fun. F R E D . Suits me. " ' " 1 M I K E . You're on. ' ; ' ' ' F R E D . Up the other end ? MIKE . 'Ow's the cash? ; F R E D . Broke. You? . i ; ; M I K E . I'll touch up the ol'lady. F R E D . Get a couple for me. L E N . That'll pay the fares. M I K E . Pick yer up roun' your place. F R E D . Not too early. 'Ave a bath first. M I K E . Never know '00 yer'll be sleepin' with. F R E D . After eight. 143 S C E N E S I X 55 M I K E . I feel juss right for it. L E N . What? M I K E . Out on the'unt. V-RLD (»>fift?ftf»-<^<tfgf)r^ Fschewwwwww! Mi-KEi 'E-pieks-^ em-up-at a 'undred yards. ncEV. ILVIIU: niagniiii lubblua. P A M a m i f f l in.. She pushes the, pram. The, hnnrl is tip. A Jnng hjue. sausage balloon floatsJmttLOj^viexj)/^ P A M . 'Ello.*" F R E D . Whass up? a P A M . Out for a walk. M I K E (nods at pram). Bit late for that, ain* it ? P A M (to FRED). What yer got? F R E D . Nothin'. P A M (tries to look). Less 'ave a look. .. . F R E D . Nothin'for you! P A M . Keep yer shirt on. M I K E . Yer nearly missed us. P A M (to F R E D). Don't get so 'airy-ated. M I K E . We was juss off. F R E D . What yer cartin'that about for ? P A M . Felt like a walk. F R E D . Bit late. P A M . Why? F R E D . That ought a be in bed. P A M . Fresh air won't kill it. F R E D . Should a done it earlier. P A M . Never'ad time. Why didn't you? F R E D . YOU know best. P A M . When yer comin' round ? F R E D . I'll look in. P A M . When ? F R E D . I don't know. PAM. When about? 3 F *fe«u^s • 1 F< K p. 144 56 SAVED FRED. Later on. P A M . Shall I get somethin' to eat ? FRED. No. P A M . No bother. FRED. The ol' lady'll 'ave it all set up. P A M . I got two nice chops. FRED. Shame. P A M . Well see 'ow yer feeh There's no oae-innow. I got rid a ' e m , PRED T Pity yer didn't cay> P A M . What time then ? FRED. I'll be there. ' P A M . Sure? FRED. Yeh. P A M . Say so if yer ain'. FRED. I'll be there. P A M . That means yer won't. FRED. Up t'you. P A M . Why don't yer say so ? FRED (picks up his gear. To MIKE). Thass the lot. P A M . It ain' no fun waitin' in all night for nothin'. M I K E . Ready? FRED (takes a look round). Yeh. _ P A M . Why can't yer tell the truth for once? FRED. Fair enough. I ain'comin'. 9 L E N . Pam -P A M . Yer'ad no intention a comin'. A L E N . Yer left the brake off again. M I K E (to FRED). Okay? ' ° ' P A M (to LEN). Put it on, clever. FRED (to MIKE). Yeh. P A M (to FRED). I knew all along. ' FRED. Come on, Pam. Go 'ome. ^ P A M . Fred. • • FRED. I know. 11 F LiTA^^U p 145 SCENE SIX 57 PAM. I didn't mean t' go off. I was goin' a be nice, I still ain' better.1,3 FRED. Go 'ome an' get in the warm. It's late. LEN (putting on the brake). Yer wan' a be more careful. PAM (to FRED). It's my fault. I never stop t'think. FRED. Yer wan' a stop thinkin' about yerself, I know that. PAM. It's them pills they give me. MIKE (to FRED). YOU comin' or ain' yer. FRED. Yeh.'*r PAM. No. i f FRED. I'll come round one night next week. ^ PAM. NO. FRED. Monday night. Ow's that? PAM. Yer'll change yer mind. FRED. Straight from work. PAM. Yer said that before. FRED. It's the best I can offer. PAM. I can't go back there now. FRED. Yer'll be okay. PAM. If I sit on me own in that room another night I'll go round the bend. FRED. Yer got the kid. ^ PAM. Juss t'night. I couldn't stand it on me own no more. I 'ad a come out. I don't know what I'm doin'. That kid ought a be in bed. Less take it 'ome, Fred. It's 'ad new-moanier once. FRED. You take it 'ome. PAM. Juss this last time? I won't arst no more. I'll get mum t' stay in with me. FRED. It's no use. PAM. Yer ain' seen it in a long time, 'ave yer ? She turns the prant-fmnd. It's puttin' on weight. FRED..Eh? P sfc-&j*x k i l t * u 6 ,f F pick* up irul 17 P JtA-uLu f 146 58 . S A V E D P A M . It don't cry like it used to. Not all the time. • M I K E . Past carin'. P A M . Doo-dee-doo-dee. Say da-daa. F R E D . Yeh, lovely. He looks away. L E N (looking at the baby). Blind. P A M (ro LEN ) . Like a top. F R E D . What yer give it ? P A M . Asprins. F R E D . That all right? P A M . Won't wake up till t'morra. It won't disturb yer. What time'll I see yer? F R E D . I'll look in. I ain' sayin' definite. P A M . I don't mind. Long as I know yer're comin'. F R E D . All right. t P A M . Pity t' waste the chops. I think I'll do 'em in case - : F R E D . Yeh, right. It's all accordin'. P A M . I'll wait up. F R E D . It'll be late, see. P A M . Thass all right. F R E D . Pam. 1 P A M . I'll treat meself t' box a choclits. F R E D . There's plenty a blokes knockin' about. Why don't yer pick on someone else. P A M . No. M I K E . Yer can 'ave me, darlin'. But yer'll 'ave t' learn a bit more respect. P A M . ' O W can I get out with that 'angin' round me neck? 'Oo's goin'a look at me? '•'•.< F R E D . Yer ol' girl'll take it off yer 'ands. M I K E . Drop'er a few bob. F R E D . Yer don't try. ** P A M . I can't! . 1 FRED. Yer'll 'ave to. ' F lo r\ V »y M 147 S C E N E S I X 59 P A M . I can't! I ain' goin' to! F R E D . I ain' goin' a see yer no more.? / $T p£fy % P A M . No. J F R E D . We got a sort this out some time. P A M . Yer promised! F R E D . It's a waste a time! P A M . They 'eard! F R E D . No. M I K E . Come on, mate. F R E D . It's finished. ** M I K E . Thank Chriss. Less shift! ^ P A M . Juss t'night. I don't care if yer bin with yer girls. Come 'ome after. Juss once. I won't bother yer. I'll let yer sleep. Please. F R E D . Chriss.*' P A M . O what d'you care ? I was flat on me back three bloody weeks! 'Oo lifted a finger? I could a bin dyin'! No one! Sha- starts pushing tho pram. M I K E . Good riddance! P A M (stops). You're that kid's father! Yeh! Yer ain't wrigglin' out a that! F R E D . Prove it. 1 P A M . I know\ F R E D . You know? M I K E . Chriss. F R E D . 'Alf the bloody manor's bin through you. P A M . Rotten liar! F R E D . Yeh? To M I K E . Ain'you'ad'er? M I K E . Not yet. F R E D . Yer'll be next. . Points to LEN. What about 'im ? LF ^t<-\ H to* 1 P ***** * PK k I r V A l * 148 60 S A V E D To L E N . Eh? To M I K E . Your's must be the only stiff outside the church-yard she ain' knocked off. P A M . I 'ate you! * F R E D . Now we're gettin' somewhere. P A M . Pig! F R E D . Thass better. Now piss off! P A M . I will. M I K E . Ta-ta! P A M . An' yer can take yer bloody bastard round yer tart's! Tell'er it's a present from me! P A M goes out. She leaves the pram. M I K E . Lovely start t' the evenin's entertainment. F R E D (calls). I ain' takin' it! It'll bloody stay 'erel M I K E . What yer wan'a let'er get away with-F R E D . Don't you start! I'ad enough with'er! L E N . I'd better go after 'er. F R E D . Send 'er back. L E N . See 'ow she is. , IX. L E N goes out after P A M . F R E D (calls). Don't leave 'er kid. Take it with yer. M I K E whistles after her. F R E D throws his gear down. Lumbered! M I K E . 'E'U send 'er back. F R E D . 'E ain' got the gumption. We'll drop it in on the way back. M I K E . Leave it 'ere. Won't be worth goin' time we're ready. F R E D . Give it five minutes. M I K E . Yer won't see'er again. F R E D . That won't be the worst thing in me life. , M I K E . Can't yer arst your Liz t' look after it ? F R E D . She'd tear me eyes out. Pause. They sit. * ft cttitr (t> F V Spiti ety\ F cdc P , cxifc< U S * , 149 S C E N E S I X 6l M I K E . They opened that new church on the corner. F R E D . What? M I K E . They got a club. F R E D . O yeh. M I K E . We'll 'ave a quick little case round. F R E D . T'night? M I K E . Yeh. F R E D . Get stuffed. M I K E . Straight up. F R E D . Pul  the other one. M I K E . Best place out for'n easy pick up. F R E D . Since when? M I K E . I done it before. There's little pieces all over the shop, nothin' a do. F R E D . Fact? M I K E . The ol' bleeder shuts 'is eyes for prayers an' they're touchin' 'em up all over the place. Then the law raided this one an' they 'ad it shut down. F R E D . Do leave off. i M I K E . Buggered up. j C O L I N . Like your arse. M I K E . Like your flippin' ear in a minute. P-ET-E. I i! C O L I N . Wass on t'night? M I K E . Laugh. ZARRX-ComesJtLufter, P E T F and c o m . ** ' fS Lr\.\sCf*l U»SC> B A R R Y . Fishin'? : F R E D . 'Angin' the Chrissmas decorations. B A R R Y . 'Ou?. bin churjkii' big dog-ead*? M I K E . Whcfo? i D A n i t Y . 'Ardly bin lit. P E T E , :. 'Ow's it then ? 150 62 S A V E D P E T E . 'E's juss waitin' for us t'shift an' 'e'll be on it. F R E D (holds it out). On the 'ouse. ' M I K E . ' A s ' e got a little tin? C O L I N . Like'n ol'tramp? j B A R R Y . O yeh - 'oo's mindin' the baby? C O L I N (seeingpram). Wass that for? M I K E . Pushin' the spuds in. F R E D (flicks the dog end to B A R R Y ) . Catch! C O L I N . 'Oo left it 'ere? B A R R Y . 'E's takin' it for a walk. P E T E . Nice. F R E D . Piss Off. B A R R Y . We don't wan' the little nipper t'ear that I Oi, come 'ere. *"* C O L I N and PETE go to the pram, * Oo's 'e look like ? They laugh. M I K E . Don't stick your ugly mug in its face 1 P E T E . It'll crap itself t'death. B A R R Y . Dad'll change its nappies. C O L I N (amused). Bloody nutter! F R E D . You wake it up an' yer can put it t'sleep. C O L I N and P E T E laugh. B A R R Y . Put it t'sleep? ^ C O L I N . 'E'll put it t'sleep for good. P E T E . With a brick. M I K E . 'E don't care if it's awake all night. B A R R Y . 'Oo don't? I'm like a bloody uncle t' the kids round our way. (He pushes the pram.) Doo-dee-doo-dee-doo-dee. M I K E (to F R E D). Jack it in eh? F R E D . Give 'er another minute. MIKE. We should a made Len stay with it. f a 7 £ p u a U \ prsk^s F I M F * t? 151 S C E N E S I X 63 U A L * FiPRe* F R E D . Slipped up. 'E dodged off bloody sharpish. M I K E . Sly bleeder. F R E D . I don't know - bloody women! M I K E . Know a better way ? F&£.D-and-MlKE..ar.e-.sitting..dirwn left. P E T E and C O L 1 M m y right. B A R R Y pushes the pram. BARRY. ' Rock a bye baby on a tree top When the wind blows the cradle will rock When the bough breaks the cradle will fall And down will come baby and cradle and tree an' bash its little brains out an' dad'U scoop 'em up and use 'em for bait. They laugh. F R E D . Save money. B A R R Y mkes.,the.balloon..He.posesjiiithJt. C O L I N . Thought they was pink now. B A R R Y (pokes at C O L I N ' . head). Come t' the pictures t'night darlin' ? (He bends it.) It's got a bend in it. M I K E . Don't take after its dad. B A R R Y (blows it up). Ow's that then? C O L I N . Go easy. B A R R Y (blows again). Thass more like it. (Blows again.) C O L I N . Do leave off. M I K E . That reminds me I said I'd meet the girl t'night. B A R R Y blows. The balloon bursts. C O L I N . Got me! " I£ejalls,dead.,BAKRX.pushesjhe pram oygrjnmf Get off! I'll 'ave a new suit out a you. B A R R Y (pushing the pram round). Off the same barrer ? P E T E . Ain' seen you 'ere before, darlin'. *• B A R R Y . 'Op it! */3 bty*t I t>iWdrt<L A-k ftrfWsACl f i ft , : ' 1 & Mil k l l t tA. C f X fa Shu & C 0 152 64 S A V E D P E T E . 'Ow about poppin' in the bushes ? C O L I N . Two's up. B A R R Y . What about the nipper ? P E T E . Too young for me. He 'touches' B A R R Y . B A R R Y . 'Ere! Dirty bastard! He projects the pram viciously after C O L I N . It hits P E T E . °* P E T E . Bastard! P E T E and B A R R Y look at each other. P E T E gets ready to push the pram back - but plays at keeping B A R R Y guessing. M I K E and F R E D are heard talking in their corner. M I K E . If there's nothin' in the church, know what ? F R E D . No. M I K E . Do the all-night laundries. F R E D . Yer got a 'and it to yer for tryin'. M I K E . Yer get all them little 'ousewives there. F R E D . Bit past it though. M I K E . Yeh, but all right. P E T E pushes the pram violently at B A R R Y . He catches it straight on the flat of his boot and sends it back with the utmost ferocity. P E T E sidesteps. C O L I N stops it. £ P E T E . Stupid git! C O L I N . Wass up with 'im? B A R R Y . Keep yer dirty 'ands off me! P E T E . 'E'll 'ave the little perisher out! B A R R Y . O yeh ? An' '00 reckoned they run a kid down ? P E T E . Thass different. B A R R Y . Yeh - no one t' see yer. ^ P E T E pulls the pram from C O L I N , spins it round and pushes it violently at B A R R Y . B A R R Y sidesteps and catches it by the handle as it goes past. *} ' px S i . A* P . ft «• * P to p t to F 3 ^ M f 1 5 3 SCENE SIX 65 BARRY. Oi - O i ! COLIN. Wass up? COLIN.and PETE come over. It can't open its eyes. BARRY. Yer woke it. PETE. Looks at its fists. COLIN. Yeh. PETE. It's tryin' a clout 'im. COLIN. Don't blame it. PETE. Goin' a be a boxer. BARRY. Is it a girl? PETE. Yer wouldn't know the difference. BARRY. 'Ow d'yer get 'em t'sleep ? PETE. Pull their 'air. COLIN. Eh? PETE. Like that. He.pullsjts_hair. COLIN. That 'urt. They laugh. MIKE. Wass 'e doin'? COLIN. Pullin' its 'air. FRED. 'E'll 'ave its ol' woman after 'im. MIKE. Poor sod. BARRY. 'E's showin' off. COLIN. 'E wants the coroner's medal. MIKE (comes to the pram). Less see yer do it.** PETE pulls its hair. Oyeh. BARRY. It don't say nothin', COLIN. Little bleeder's 'alf dead a fright. jt^LCpfc F. 154 66 S A V E D M I K E . Still awake. P E T E . Ain' co-operatin'. B A R R Y . Try a pinch. ' M I K E . That ought a work. B A R R Y . Like this. He pinches the baby. C O L I N . Look at that mouth. B A R R Y . Flippin' yawn. P E T E . Least it's tryin'. M I K E . Pull its drawers off. C O L I N . Yeh! M I K E . Less case its ol' crutch. P E T E . Ha! B A R R Y . Yeh! He throws the nappy in the air. Yippee! C O L I N . Look at that! They laugh. M I K E . Look at its little legs goin*. C O L I N . Ain' they ugly! B A R R Y . Ugh! M I K E . Can't keep 'em still! P E T E . 'Avin' a fit. B A R R Y . It's dirty. They groan. C O L I N . 'Old its nose. M I K E . Thass for 'iccups. B A R R Y . Gob its crutch. He spits. M I K E . Yeh! C O L I N . Ha! J 155 S C E N E S I X 67 He spits. M I K E . Got it! P E T E . Give it a punchy M I K E . Yeh less! C O L I N . There's no one about! Z£X£4>utich£s it? Ugh! Mind yer don't 'urt it. M I K E . Yer can't. B A R R Y . Not at that age. M I K E . Course yer can't, no feelin's. P E T E . Like animals. M I K E . ' I t it again. C O L I N . I can't see! B A R R Y . 'Arder. fc P E T E . Yeh. B A R R Y . Like that! He hits it. 7 C O L I N . An' that! He also hits it. M I K E . What a giggle! P E T E . Cloutin's good for 'em. I read it. ^ B A R R Y (to FRED ) . Why don't you clout it ? , F R E D . It ain' mine. P E T E . Sherker. Yer got a do yer duty. F R E D . Ain' my worry. Serves 'er right. B A R R Y . 'Ere, can I piss on it? C O L I N . Gungy bastard! M I K E . Got any matches ? They laugh. P E T E . Couldn't yer break them little fingers easy though ? C O L I N . Snap! P E T E . Know what they used a do ? 68 S A V E D M I K E . Yeh. P E T E . Smother 'em. B A R R Y . Yeh. That'd be somethin'. C O L I N . Looks like a yeller-nigger. B A R R Y . 'Onk like a yid. F R E D . Leave it alone. 1 0 " P E T E . Why? F R E D . Yer don't wan' a row. P E T E . What row? . M I K E . What kid? C O L I N . I ain' seen no kid. B A R R Y . Not me! P E T E . Yer wouldn't grass on yer muckers? F R E D . Grow up. B A R R Y . D'narf look ill. Stupid bastard. He jerks the pram violently. '** P E T E . Thass 'ow they 'ang yer - give yer a jerk. M I K E . Reckon it'll grow up an idiot. P E T E . Or deformed. B A R R Y . Look where it come from. P E T E . Little bleeder. He jerks the pram violently. That knocked the grin off its face. M I K E . Look! Ugh! l\ B A R R Y . Look! C O L I N . What? They all groan. P E T E . Rub the little bastard's face in it! B A R R Y . Yeh! P E T E . Less 'ave itl He rubs the baby. They all groan. B A R R Y . Less 'ave a go! I always wan'ed a do that! f 157 S C E N E S I X 69 P E T E . Ain' yer done it before? jBAViKXLdoesJtJZiLlaughs. C O L I N . It's all in its eyes. Silence. F R E D . There'll be a row.' M I K E . It can't talk. P E T E . 'Oo cares ? F R E D . I tol' yer. C O L I N . Shut up. B A R R Y . I noticed 'e ain' touched it. C O L I N . Too bloody windy. F R E D . Yeh? P E T E . Less see yer. B A R R Y . Yeh. P E T E . 'Fraid she'll ruck yer, F R E D ye . j. . Ha! * ! F X ro H*y* UeJooksJnjhe.pr.am. Chriss? P E T E . Less see yer chuck that. P E T E throws a stone to F R E D . F R E D doesn't try to catch it. It falls on the ground, C O L I N picks it up andeives it to F R E D . j j- wCHs Llftt M I K E (quietly). Reckon it's all right? C O L I N (quietly). No one around. P E T E (quietly). They don't know it's us. M I K E (quietly). She left it. B A R R Y . It's done now. V OfthX P E T E (quietly). Yer can do what yer like. I B A R R Y . Might as well enjoy ourselves. P f V l K K (fJc F P E T E (quietly). Yer don't get a chance like this e v e r y d a y . F.RED_ throws the stone. f 1 5 8 70 SAVED C O L I N . Missed. P E T E . That ain't'! i He throws a stone. B A R R Y . Or that! L, He throws a stone. !M I K E . Yeh! C O L I N (running round). Where's all the stones ? M I K E (also running round). Stick it up the fair! P E T E . Liven 'Ampstead 'eath! Three throws a quid! Make a packet. M I K E (throws a stone). Ouch! C O L I N . ' E a r that? B A R R Y . Give us some. He takes stones from C O L I N . C O L I N (throws a stone). Right ui the lug 'ole. F R E D looks for a stone. P E T E . Get its 'ooter. B A R R Y . An' its slasher! F R E D (picks up a stone, spits on it). For luck, the sod. He throws. ^ B A R R Y . Yyooowwww! M I K E . ' E a r it plonk! A bell rings. A" MIKE . 'Oo's got the matches? He finds some in his pocket. B A R R Y . What yer doin' ? C O L I N . Wan'a buck up! M I K E . Keep a look out. Srw i^ Cue ; tlttlrtt b^U.. 159 SCENE SIX 71 10 He^tarts.to throw burning matches in the pram, B A R R Y throws, / 7 t f ^ ^ g . / f misses MIKE. Look out, yer bleedin' git! COLIN. Guy Fawkes! PETE. Bloody nutter! Put that out! MIKE. No! You'ad what you want! PETE. Yer'll 'ave the ol' bloody park 'ere! A bell rings. * BARRY. Piss on it! Piss on it! COLIN. Gungy slasher. MIKE. Call the R.S.P.C.A. A bell rings. FRED. They'll shut the gates. PETE (going). There's an 'ole in the railin's. BARRY. 'Old on. JIi-lepMfprjijtom^ PETE. Leave it! ' BARRY. Juss this one! He throws a stone as P E T E pushes him over. It goes wide. Bastard! To PETE. Yer put me off! PETE. I'll throttle yer! BARRY. I got a get it once more! The. others have gone up left. He takes a stone from the.prnm nnA ^,ou&juit.painU)Iankj:ange-Jiiis. Yar! COLIN. Where's this 'ole! • MIKE. Yer bleedin' gear! 3 FRED. Chriss. Me mm dom to the rod and boxes. He picks them up. ( 0 <° *rlu k s t o p M . I fir jb*u. j (Sell \)ory InU. E v t ^ use 160 72 S A V E D B A R R Y . Bleedin'little sod! He hacks into the pram. Ho goes up loft. V f Xif J3 t^^C P E T E . Come on! ' ^ J J ^ J ^ p IA$C A bell rings, F R E D has difficulty with the boxes and rod. He throws a box away. F R E D . 'Ang on! 1 „ „ *£X ' fc F UJC «e goes up loft. T/wy go off up left, making a curious buzzing. A long pause. P A M comes in down loft. 1 : > g ^foy u f^cfc P A M . I might a know'd they'd a left yer. Lucky yer got someone t' look after yer. Muggins 'ere. She starts to push the pram. She does not look into it. She speaks in a sing-song voice, loudly but to herself. • , 'Oo's 'ad yer balloon. Thass a present from grannie. Goin' a keep me up 'alf the night ? Go t' sleepies. Soon be 'ome. Nice an' warm, then. No one else wants yer. Nice an' warm. • '•• - , Soon be 'omies. J * * j * £ <»t P U i C k SCENE SEVEN A cell. Left centre a box to sit on. Otherwise, the stage is bare. A steel door bangs. F R E D comes in from the left. He has a mack over his head. Ho sits ON tho case. After a slight pause he takes off tho mack, *- * * 4 , Silence. A steel door bangs. P A M comes in left. I P P A M . What'appened? ' f^i,^. ^<-*^tdL F R E D . Didn't yer see'em? ; P A M . I 'card. S C E N E S E V E N 73 F R E D . Bloody 'eathens. Thumpin' and kickin' the van. P A M . Oo? F R E D . Bloody 'ousewives! 'Oo else? Ought a be stood up an' shot! P A M . You all right? F R E D . No. I tol' this copper don't open the door. He goes we're 'ere, the thick bastard, an' lets 'em in. Kickin' an punchin'. He.holdsMpthe.mack^. Look at it! Gob all over. H_jLhta711s.it awayJxvmJiim. 'Course I ain' all right! Mimicking her. 'Are yer all right ?' P A M . They said I shouldn't be 'ere. But 'e was ever so nice. Said five minutes wouldn't matter. F R E D . Right bloody mess. P A M . They can't get in 'ere. F R E D . I can't get out there! P A M . I ain't blamin' yer. F R E D . Blamin' me? Yer got bugger all t'blame me for, mate! Yer ruined my life, thass all! *• P A M . I never meant -F R E D . Why the bloody 'ell bring the little perisher out that time a night ? P A M (fingers at her mouth). I wanted a -F R E D . Yer got no right chasin' after me with a pram! Drop me right in it! P A M . I was scared t' stay -F R E D . Never know why yer 'ad the little bleeder in the first place! Yer don't know what yer doin'! Yer're a bloody menace! 3 P A M . Wass it like? F R E D . They wan' a put you in, then yer'll find out. Bring any burn? 162 74 S A V E D P A M . No. F R E D . Yer don't think a nothin'! Ain' yer got juss one ? P A M . No. F R E D . Yer're bloody useless. P A M . What'll 'appen! F R E D . 'Ow do I know? I'll be the last one a know. The 'ole v ^ F XI*-thing was an accident. Lot a roughs. Never seen 'em before. Don't arst me. Blokes like that anywhere. I tried to chase 'em off. P A M . Will they believe that? F R E D . No. If I was ten years older I'd get a medal. With a crowd like our'n they got a knock someone. (He goes right.) Right bloody mess. P A M . Yer never bin in trouble before. Juss one or two woun-din's an' that. F R E D . 'Alf murdered with a lot a 'and bags! > P A M . Yer wan' a arst t' see the doctor. F R E D . Doctor! They shouldn't let him touch a sick rat with a barge pole. (He walks a few steps.) It's supposed a be grub. A starvin' cat 'Id walk away. (He walks a few more r steps.) Wass bin 'appening? S ' F Si7*1 P A M . Don't know. . ' ; F R E D . On yer own? P A M . What about them others? . ; F R E D . What about'em? , P A M . I could say I saw 'em. F R E D . That'd make it worse. Don't worry. I'm thinkin' it all i ' out. This way they don't know what 'appened. Not definite. Why couldn't I bin tryin' a 'elp the kid ? I got no cause t' 'arm it. . Ho sits on tho box, j PAM. I tol' 'em.' ! i F R E D (he puts his arms round her waist and leans his head J> ^ fo F\ against her). Yer'll 'ave t' send us letters. J fj CV\ ki* 163 SCENE SEVEN 75 PAM. I'm buyin' a pad on me way 'ome. FRED. Pam. I don't know what'll 'appen. There's bloody gangs like that roamin' everywhere. The bloody police don't do their job. PAM. I'll kill meself if they touch yer. ^ L U A t i ' A^eeLdooxJ}mg.s.X^^amejJrdeft. ' f-fvytt I tol' yer t' wait outside. *• LEN. I got 'im some fags. (To FRED.) I 'ad a drop 'em 'alf. PAM. 'E still won't leave me alone, Fred. LEN. I only got a minute. They're arstin' for a remand. FRED. Chriss. That bloody mob still outside? LEN. They've 'emmed 'em off over the road. FRED. Bit bloody late. PAM. Tell 'im t' go. LEN. We both got a go. That inspector wants you. FRED. Where's the snout? LEN. Put it in yer pocket. FRED (to PAM). See yer after. She puts her, arms round him.before he can take the cigarettes? f PAM. I'll wait for yer. FRED (pats her back). Yeh, yeh. God 'elp us. LEN (to PAM). Yer'll get 'im into trouble if yer don't go. ZRED-nods-at-.p A.M... She goes out crying. H F o u r FRED. 'Ow many yer got? LEN. Sixty. I 'ad a drop 'em 'alf. ' FRED. Will it be all right ? LEN. Give 'em a few like, an' don't flash 'em around. FRED. She never 'ad none. I'll do the same for you sometime. LEN. Put 'em in yer pocket. FRED. I don't know what I'll get. 1 LEN. Manslaughter. (Shrugs.) Anythin'. FRED. It was only a kid. * P C X i t U L ' t x K F Fx &ft * SI^AIJL eucs CUGV 164 76 S A V E D L E N . I saw. F R E D . What? L E N . I come back when I couldn't find 'er. F R E D . Yer ain't grassed ? ' L E N . No. F R E D . O. L E N . I was in the trees. I saw the pram. F R E D . Yeh. v L E N . I saw the lot. F R E D . Yeh. L E N . I didn't know what t'do. Well, I should a stopped yer. F R E D . Too late now. L E N . I juss saw. j F R E D . Yer saw! Yer saw! Wass the good a that? That don't 'elp me. I'll be out in that bloody dock in a minute! L E N . Nothin'. They got the pram in court. F R E D . Okay, okay. Reckon there's time for a quick burn ? L E N . About, v He gives F R E D a light. INTERVAL SCENE EIGHT The living-room. ^ H A R R Y irons, L E N sits. L E N . Yer make a fair ol' job a that. Pause. Don't yer get choked off. H A R R Y . What? • Fx fa L 1 f- fwv»jt OK 1 . * * Ll§^ CLK.L > IG'. Ujo HA^ft, t i ^ k t i p6.«U U p A V t « » I • 165 S C E N E E I G H T 77 L E N . That every Friday night. H A R R Y . Got a keep clean. L E N . Suppose so. Pause. Yer get used t' it. H A R R Y . Trained to it in the army. L E N . O. H A R R Y . Makes a man a yer. > M^^-comesJn^beJ^ks^araund. M A R Y to L E N . I wish yer wouldn't sit around in yer ol' work-clothes an' shoes. Yer got some nice slippers. MAKX-goes-OUt.*" L E N . She won't let Pam. H A R R Y . Eh? L E N . She won't let Pam do that for yer. H A R R Y . Don't take me long. Long pause. ' L E N . Yer could stop 'er money. Slight pause. Then she couldn't interfere. H A R R Y . Don't take long. Once yer get started. L E N . Why don't yer try that ? H A R R Y . That Pam can't iron. She'd ruin 'em. L E N . Ever thought a movin' on ? H A R R Y . This stuff gets dry easy. L E N . Yer ought a think about it. H A R R Y . Yer don't know what yer talking about, lad. L E N . No. I don't. H A R R Y . It's like everthin' else. L E N . ' O w long yer bin'ere ? ?tt KM. 78 S A V E D H A R R Y . Don't know. (He stretches his back. He irons again.) Yer mate's comin' out. LEN. Yeh. Why ? H A R R Y . Pam's mate. (He spits on the iron.) None a it ain' simple. LEN. Yer lost a little boy eh ? H A R R Y . Next week, ain't it? L E N . I got a shirt yer can do. (Laughs.) Any offers ? H A R R Y . She meet'im? L E N . Ain' arst. H A R R Y . You? L E N (shrugs). I'd 'ave t' get time off. H A R R Y . O. L E N . 'Ow d'yer get on at work? H A R R Y (looks up). It's a job. L E N . I meant with the blokes ? H A R R Y (irons). They're all right. L E N . Funny, nightwork. P A M comes in. She has her hair in a towel. She carries a portable radio. Someone is talking. She sits on the couch and finds a pop programme. She tunes in badly. She interrupts this from time to time to rub her hair. L E N (to H A R R Y ) . ' O W about doin' my shirt ? He laughs. P A M finishes tuning. She looks round. P A M . 'Oo's got my Radio Times? You 'ad it ? H A R R Y doesn't answer. She turns to L E N . You? L E N (mumbles). Not again. P A M . You speakin't' me ? L E N . I'm sick t* death a yer bloody Radio Times. P A M . Someone's 'ad it. (She rubs her hair vigorously.) I ain' goin' a get it no more. Not after last week. I'll cancel it. It's the last time I bring it in this 'ouse. I don't see why I S C E N E E I G H T 79 'ave t' go on paying for it. Yer must think I'm made a money. It's never 'ere when I wan'a see it. Not once. It's always the same. (She rubs her hair.) I notice no one else offers t' pay for it. Always Charlie. It's 'appened once too often this time. L E N . Every bloody week the same! * P A M (to H A R R Y ) . Sure yer ain' got it? H A R R Y . I bought this shirt over eight years ago. 1 P A M . That cost me sixpence a week. You reckon that up over a year. Yer must think I was born yesterday. Pause. She rubs her hair. *~ Wasn't 'ere last week. Never 'ere. Got legs. She goes to the door and shouts.1 Mum! She 'eard all right. ' 1 She goesbgcktpjh^jguch, and sits. She jtybs.her. hair. Someone's got it. I shouldn't think the people next door come in an' took it. Everyone 'as the benefit a it 'cept me. It's always the same. I'll know what t' do in future. Two can play at that game. I ain' blinkin' daft. (She rubs her hair.) I never begrudge no one borrowin' it, but yer'd think they'd have enough manners t' put it back. Juss walk all over yer. Well it ain' goin' a 'appen again. They treat you like a door mat. All take and no give. Touch somethin' a their'n an' they go through the bloody ceilin'. It's bin the same ever since -L E N . I tol' yer t' keep it in yer room! * P A M . NOW yer got a lock things up in yer own 'ouse. L E N . Why should we put up with this week after week juss because yer too -Pause. 168 80 S A V E D P A M . Yer know what yer can do. L E N . Thass yer answer t' everythin'. P A M . Got a better one ? H A R R Y . They was a pair first off. Set me back a quid each. Up the market. One's gone 'ome, went at the cuffs. Worth a quid. L E N . Chriss. Pause. P A M . I mean it this time. I'm goin' in that shop first thing Saturday mornin' an' tell 'im t' cancel it. I ain* throwin' my money down the drain juss to - o i l L E N . Wrap up! » ' tojb KMT O P A M . Don't tell me what t'do! L E N . Wrap up! ' P A M . Thass typical a you. She goes to the door and calls. Mum! To L E N . I ain' stupid. I know 'oo's got it. Calls. Mum! - She can 'ear. * ^ fi Utft. H A R R Y . Ain' worth readin' any'ow. L E N . Don't start'er off again. P A M (to L E N ) . You ain' sittin' on it, a course! >» ' '. 1 * P K f o t L E N . No. P A M . Yer ain' looked. i L E N . Ain' goin' to. P A M . ' O w d'yer know yer ain'sittin'on it? L E N . I ain' sittin' on it. P A M (to H A R R Y). Tell 'im t' get up! ' ' P X |b H H A R R Y . Waste a good money. P A M (to L E N ) . Yer'll be sorry for this. V w o X. J L E N . I'll be sorry for a lot a things. P fc. H A R R Y . Cuffs goin'on this one. P A M (by LEN'J chair). I ain' goin' till yer move. H A R R Y . Lot a lies an'pictures a nancies. P A M . Yer dead spiteful when yer wan'a be. 169 S C E N E E I G H T 8l L E N . Thass right. ty P A M (goes to the C01ichr ruhhintt her hair). 'E'OO laughs last. Fred's coming 'ome next week. L E N . 'Ome? P A M . 'Is ol' lady won't 'ave 'im in the 'ouse. L E N . Where's 'e goin' ? P A M . Yer'll see. L E N . 'E ain' 'avin' my room. tfuick-P A M . 'Oo said ? 0 L E N . She won't let yer. SUACCMI *n P A M . We'll see. L E N . Yer ain' even arst 'er. P A M . O no? L E N . No. P A M (rubs her hair). We'll see. L E N . I'll 'ave one or two things t' say. Yer too fond a pushin' people about.' P A M . Must take after you. L E N . I thought 'e'd be sharin' your room. P A M . I ain' rowin' about it. 'E'll 'ave t' 'ave somewhere t' come out to. Chriss knows what it's like shut up in them places. It'll be nice an' clean 'ere for 'im when yer're gone. L E N . 'Ave yer arst 'im yet? *" P A M . I ain' rowin' about it. If 'e goes wanderin' off 'e'll only end up in trouble again. I ain' goin' a be messed around over this! We ain' gettin' any younger. 'E's bound a be different. (She rubs her hair.) Yer can't say anythin* in letters. Yer can't expect 'im to. L E N . 'Ave yer arst 'im.3 P A M . I don' wan' a talk about it. L E N . You meetin' 'im? ; P A M . Why? - You ain' comin'I L E N . 'Oo said? P A M . 'E don't want you there! LEN . 'Ow d'yer know ? 170 82 SAVED PAM. O let me alone! LEN. 'E's my mate, ain' 'e ? PAM. I'm sick t' death a you under me feet all the time! Ain' yer got no friends t' go to! What about yer people? Won't they take yer in either ? LEN. Yer arst some stupid questions at times. PAM. Yer can't 'ave no pride. Yer wouldn't catch me 'angin' round where I ain' wanted. LEN. 'Oo ain' wanted? PAM. I don't want yer! They don't want yer! It's only common sense! I don't know why yer can't see it. It's nothin' but rows an' arguments. LEN. 'Oo's fault's that? PAM. Anybody else wouldn't stay if yer paid 'em! Yer caused all the trouble last time. LEN. I knew that was comin'. PAM. None a that 'Id a 'appened if yer ain' bin 'ere. Yer never give 'im a chance. LEN. Yeh, yeh. PAM. Yer live on trouble! LEN. That ain' what 'e told everyone. PAM. Same ol' lies. LEN. Listen'oo's talkin'! ^ PAM. Yer start off gettin' 'im put away -LEN. Don't be bloody stupid! PAM. Jealous! An' now 'e's comin' out yer still can't let 'im alone! LEN. You can't leave 'im alone yer mean! PAM. Yer laughed yer 'ead off when they took 'im away. LEN. Bloody stupid! You arst'im! PAM. Comin' 'ere an' workin' me up I LEN. Yer wan'a listen t* yerself I PAM. So do you. LEN. Shoutin'. PAM. 'Oo's shoutin' ? *r» x I>L 9 e^lnrvUiafiVv 171 SCENE EIGHT 83 LEN. You are! PAM. Yer 'ave t' shout with you! LEN. Thass right! PAM. Yer so bloody dense! LEN. Go on! PAM. Yer 'ave t' shout! LEN. Yer silly bloody cow! PAM. Shoutin' 'e says! 'Ark at 'im! 'Ark at 'im! LEN. Shut up! , l -PAM. We ain' carryin' on like this! Yer got a stop upsettin' ,3/ me night after night! JLEN. YOU start it! \AM. It's got a stop! It ain' worth it! Juss round an' round. if A very long silence. Yer can't say it's the kid keepin' yer. A long silence. It certainly ain' me. Thass well past. Silence. Yer sit there in yer dirty ol' work clothes. (To HARRY.) Why don't yer turn 'im out ? Dad. 1 HARRY. 'E pays 'is rent. PAM. Fred'll pay. \ HARRY. 'As 'e got a job? PAM. 'E'll get one. HARRY. Will 'e keep it? PAM. Thass right! * LEN. Now 'oo's startin' it? PAM. You are. LEN. I ain' said a word. PAM. No - but yer sat there! LEN. I got some rights yer know! PAM. Yer're juss like a kid. 1 rxb n 3 £ f y y \ $ W * l " A - f e / O V " i 1 172 8 4 SAVED LEN. I'm glad I ain' yourn. PAM. I wouldn't like t' 'ave your spiteful nature. LEN. I certainly wouldn't like yourn! PAM. Thass right! I know why yer sittin' there I LEN. Yer know a sight bloody too much! PAM. I know where my Radio Times is! LEN. Stick yer bloody Radio Timesl PAM. I know why yer sittin' there! LEN. That bloody paper! PAM. Why don't yer stand up ? LEN. Yer don't even want the bloody paper! PAM. As long as yer causin' trouble -LEN. Yer juss wan' a row! PAM. - then yer're 'appy! LEN. If yer found it yer'd lose somethin' else! PAM (goes to LEN'S chair). Stand up then! *• LEN. NO! PAM. Can't it a got there accidentally ? LEN. No! PAM. Yer see! "* LEN. I ain' bein' pushed around. PAM. Yer see! LEN. Yer come too much a it! PAM. No yer'd rather stay stuck! LEN. A sight bloody too much! PAM. An' row! T LEN. Shut up! ^ PAM. Thass right! LEN. I tol' yer t' shut up! PAM. Go on! LEN. Or I'll bloody well shut yer up! PAM. 0 yeh! LEN. Yer need a bloody good beltin'. ^ PAM. Touch me! LEN. You started this! j 0 1 Si*K»l*.v ku»£4 r C n h t •hO*U H P. ? W i fk f i t 173 S C E N E E I G H T 85 P A M . Go on! * L E N (he turns away). Yer make me sick! *S P A M . Yeh - yer see. Yer make me sick! She goes to the doon I ain' lettin' a bloody little weed like you push me around! Calls. Mum. She-camesJiack. " I wish I 'ad a record a when yer first come 'ere. Butter wouldn't melt in yer mouth. Calls. Mum! H A R R Y (finishing ironing). Thass that, thank Chriss. P A M (calls). Mum! - She can' 'ear. Calls. You 'eard ? H A R R Y . Put the wood in the 'ole. L E N . I'd like t' 'ear what they're sayin' next door. P A M . Let 'em say! L E N . 'Ole bloody neighbour'ood must know! P A M . Good - let 'em know what yer're like! L E N . 'Oo wen' on about pride ? P A M (calls through door). I know yer can' ear. M A R Y (off). You callin' Pam ? P A M (to LEN ) . One thing, anythin' else goes wrong I'll know '00 t' blame. M A R Y (off). Pam! P A M . Let 'er wait. M A R Y (off.) Pam! L E N (calls). It's all right! One a 'er fits! P A M (calls). 'E's sittin' on the chair. M A R Y (off). What ? P A M (calls). 'E's got my paper! ' *~ M A R Y (off). What chair ? P A M (calls). 'E 'as! » MARY (off). I ain' got yer paper! 1 i i i i *i s t i l t U w u L t * - -174 86 S A V E D P A M (calls). It don't matter! M A R Y (off). What paper's that? ^ P K HSU £hb • P A M (calls). It don't matter! You bloody deaf ? « , i L E N . Now start on 'er! • H A R R Y (piling his clothes neatly). Didn't take long. P A M (to L E N ) . Yer're so bloody clever! L E N . If I upset yer like this why don't you go ? P A M . Thass what you want! L E N (shrugs). You want me t' go! P A M . I ain' bein' pushed out on no streets. L E N . I'm tryin't' 'elp. P A M . Yer wouldn't 'elp a cryin' baby. L E N . Yer're the last one a bring that up! P A M . 'Elp ? - after the way yer carried on t'night. L E N . I lost me job stayin' out a 'elp you when yer was sick! ^ , P A M . Sacked for bein'bloody lazy! L E N (stands). Satisfied ? Ci rH CKvduV P A M (without looking at the chair). Yer torn it up or burnt it! Wouldn't put that pass yer! P A M goes out. Silence, H A R R Y finishes folding Ms clothes. ' ^  M A R Y (off). Found it yet? ( l Pause. H A R R Y . Wan'a use it? L E N . No. H L c,tl H A R R Y folds the board. ^ SCENE NINE ! The living-room. L E N has spread a paper on the floor. He cleans his shoes on it. M A R Y comes in. Site is in her slip. She walks about getting ready. M A R Y . 'Ope yer don't mind me like this. •' ' M tA.fc-t.rJ lU I *\ L-ljKt C U C Hr IV. PtX<(.t 175 S C E N E N I N E 87 -two L E N . You kiddin' ? M A R Y . It's such a rush. I don't really wan'a go. L E N . Don't then. M A R Y . I said I would now. L E N . Say yer don't feel up to it. M A R Y . Yes. (She goes on getting ready.) Makes a change I suppose. L E N . Never know, it might be a laugh. M A R Y . Yer got a do somethin't' entertain yerself. Pause. I 'ope yer ain' usin' 'er Radio Times. L E N . Ha! ' M A R Y . She's got no patience. It'll land 'er in trouble one a these days. Look at that pram. I told 'er t'wait. She should a got two 'undred for that. L E N . Easy. M A R Y (looks at her shoes). This ain' nice. No, she 'as t' let it go for fifty quid, the first time she's arst. Can't be told. Yer couldn't give these a little touch up for me ? 3 L E N . Sling'em over. M A R Y . Ta, dear. L E N . What yer put on these ? M A R Y . That white stuff. L E N polishes her shoes in silence. Thinkin'? ' L E N . No. M A R Y . Whass worryin'yer? L E N . Nothin'. M A R Y . I expect yer're like me. Yer enjoy the quiet. I don't enjoy all this noise yer get. *• L E N . She said somethin' about my room ? M A R Y (amused). Why ? L E N . What she say? M A R Y . That worried yer ? MX h> s*r»-176 88 S A V E D L E N . I ain' worried. MARY. She's not tellin' me 'ow t' run my 'ouse. She pulls on her stockings. L E N . O. (Holds up her shoes.) Do yer? MARY. Very nice. Juss go over the backs dear. I like t' feel nice be'ind. I toP 'er there's enough t' put up with without lookin' for trouble. L E N . Better? MARY. Yes. I 'ad enough a that pair last time. She steps into one shoe. We're only goin' for the big film. She can do what she likes outside. j L E N (gives her the other shoe). Thass yer lot. MARY. 'E wants lockin' up for life. Ta, dear. I don't expect yer t' understand at your age, but things don't turn out too bad. There's always someone worse off in the world. L E N (clearing up the polishing things). Yer can always be that one. MARY. She's my own flesh an' blood, but she don't take after me. Not a thought in 'er 'ead. She's 'ad a rough time a it. I feel sorry for 'er about the kid -L E N . One a them things. Yer can't make too much a it. MARY. Never 'ave 'appened if she'd a look after it right. Yer done a lovely job on these. What yer doin' t'night ? L E N (sews a button on his shirt). Gettin' ready for work. MARY. Yer don't go out so much. L E N . I was out Tuesday. MARY. Yer ought a be out every night. L E N . Can't afford it. MARY. There's plenty a nice girls round 'ere. L E N . I ain' got the energy these days. They want - somethin' flash. M A R Y . Yer can't tell me what they want. I was the same that age. 177 S C E N E N I N E 89 L E N . I ain' got time for 'alf a 'em. They don't know what they got it for. M A R Y . I thought that's what you men were after. L E N . 'Alfa 'em, it ain' worth the bother a gettin' there. Thass a fact. M A R Y . What about the other 'alf? *" faose L E N . Hm! M A R Y (having trouble with her suspender). Yer 'ave t' go about \ it the right way. Yer can't stand a girl in a puddle down the ( back a some ol' alley an' think yer doin' 'er a favour. Yer )j got yer own room upstairs. That's a nice room. Surprised I yer don't use that. I don't mind what goes on, yer know that. 1 As long as yer keep the noise down. L E N . Ta. M A R Y . It's in every man. It 'as t' come out. Pause. We didn't carry on like that when I was your age. L E N . Pull the other one. M A R Y . Not till yer was in church. Anyway, yer 'ad t' be engaged. I think it's nicer in the open. I do. ^  L E N . I bet yer bin up a few alleys. M A R Y . You enjoy yerself. I know what I'd be doin' if I was you. L E N . You meetin' a fella ? M A R Y . No! I'm goin' out with Mrs Lee. L E N . Waste. M A R Y . Don't be cheeky. L E N . Yer look fair when yer all done up. M A R Y . What you after ? Bin spendin' me rent money ? L E N . Wass on? M A R Y . Don't know. Somethin' daft. L E N . Shall I look it up ? M A R Y . They're all the same. Sex. Girls 'angin' out a their | dresses an' men bendin' over 'em. ' 1 A\ x h S t r ^ , Acquit* gov-Urs 178 S A V E D L E N . It's one of them nudes.'Eard the fellas talkin'. M A R Y . Shan't go in. L E N . Don't know what yer missin'. M A R Y . Different for men. L E N . Always full a tarts when I bin. M A R Y . Thass where yer spend yer money. L E N . Very nice. Big ol' tits bouncin' about in sinner-scope. M A R Y . Don't think Mrs Lee'd fancy that. ! L E N . I'll 'ave t' take yer one a these nights. M A R Y . I'd rather see Tarzan. L E N . Thass easy, come up next time I 'ave a bath. M A R Y . Count the'airs on yer chest? L E N . For a start. M A R Y . Sounds like a 'orror film. L E N . I enjoy a good scrub. On me back. M A R Y . Thass the regular carry-on in China. L E N . No 'arm in it. M A R Y . No. ; Slight pause. , Pam's very easy goin'for a nice girl. I suppose yer miss that ' . ' ^  ttf t X C i |*WV"St L E N . Takes a bit a gettin' used to. M&fct -M A R Y . ' O w ' d yer manage? "> • . ' . : L E N . Any suggestions ? Slight pause. M A R Y . Bugger! T L E N . Eh ? M A R Y . Thass tore it! L E N . Wass up ? M A R Y . O blast! I caught me stockin'. ^ L E N . O. M A R Y . That would 'ave to 'appen. L E N . 'Ow'd yer do it?. MARY. Juss when I'm late. Bugger it. <». drawer* 179 S C E N E N I N E SheJaakx.in thejable_ir.awer..« 91 'Ardly worth goin' in a minute. Excuse my language. Never find anythin' when yer want it in this place. * L E N . What yer lost? M A R Y . It's the only decent pair I got. L E N . Thass a shame. M A R Y . It'll-run. K M . Lcre 'ave a shufttes. M A R Y . Caught on that blasted chair. It's bin like that for ages. L E N . Yeh. Thass a big one. M A R Y . Pam's got'er nail-varnish all over the place except when yer wan'a find it. L E N (offers her the needle). 'Ave a loan of this.'* M A R Y . It'll run, y'see. L E N . Less do the cotton. M A R Y . I certainly can't afford new ones this week. ,. L E N (threading the needle). Not t' worry. ' . M A R Y . I'm no good at that. L E N . Well, 'ave a bash. M A R Y . It'll make it worse. L E N . No it won't. M A R Y C^«yj^.^/PP!t.fl»Jj^ci!g??i£eaf). You do it. L E N . Me? M A R Y . I never could use a needle. I should a bin there by now. L E N . I don't know if I -M A R Y . Get on. It's only doin' me a good turn.' L E N . It ain' that. I -M A R Y . Mrs Lee's waitin'. I can't take 'em off. I'm in ever such a 'urry. They'll run. L E N . Yeh. It's dodgy. I don't wan'a prick -M A R Y . Yer got steady 'ands your age. x L E N (kneehin front of her and starts darning). Yeh. (He drops she, needle). O.* MARY. All right? « , ; LM X I K ck*-l'r 3 U S^A^Jj , Sol-*- o^L cAwr. . 1 1 8 0 92 SAVED L E N . It's dropped. M A R Y . What? L E N . Me needle. M A R Y . Yer're 'oldin' me up. L E N (on his hands and knees). 'Ang on. M A R Y . That it? L E N . No. M A R Y (she helps him to look). Can't a got far.' L E N . It's gone. M A R Y . What's that? L E N . Where? M A R Y . That's it. There. L E N . O. Ta. ^ M A R Y (puts her foot back on the chair). I ain' got all night. L E N . I'll 'ave t' get me 'and inside. M A R Y . You watch where yer go. Yer ain' on yer 'oneymoon yet. Yer 'and's cold! L E N . Keep still, or it'll jab yer. M A R Y . You watch yerself. L E N . I'll juss give it a little stretch. M A R Y . All right? L E N . Yer got lovely legs. ^  M A R Y . You get on with it. L E N . Lovely an' smooth. 4 M A R Y . Never mind my legs. L E N . It's a fact. M A R Y . Some people'd 'ave a fit if they 'eard that. Yer know what they're like. L E N . Frustrated. M A R Y . I'm old enough t' be yer mother. 7 H A R R Y comes in. He goes straight to the table. To L E N . Go steady! L E N . Sorry. > M A R Y . You watch where yer pokin8. That 'urt. Set U t K ^ t r . 181 S C E N E N I N E 93 L E N . I tol' yer t' keep still. M A R Y . Yer'll make it bigger, not smaller. H A R R Y takes ink and a Pools coupon from the table drawer, He_putsjhemjm.thejab.le. L E N . That'll see yer through t'night. HukuLkwiJauhuk^-*' M A R Y . Wass up now? , • L E N . Scissors. M A R Y . Eh? ' L E N . I 'ad 'em juss now. • M A R Y . Bite it. 3 L E N . Eh? M A R Y . Go on. L E N (leans forward). Keep still. M A R Y . I can't wait all night. V l£KMtesjhejhr.egdjJfrj&Ajix,y: goes, out. Took yer time. L E N (stands). Ow! I'm stiff. M A R Y (looks). Ta, very nice. L E N . Ain' worth goin' now. M A R Y . 'Ave I got me cigarettes ? L E N . Alight be somethin' on telly. M A R Y . I can't disappoint Mrs Lee. L E N . I 'ad a feelin' 'e'd come in. M A R Y . Yer'll be in bed time I get back. L E N . She won't wait this long. M A R Y . I'll say good night. Thanks for 'elpin'. L E N . Stay in an' put yer feet up. I'll make us a cup of tea. M A R Y . Can't let yer friends down. Cheeiio. *• L E N . Okay. M A R Y eoes. J.V.K~takesui-Jiandker.chief.-fromJns pocket. He s3mcJw.sjheJigiL0ff.ami goes to lite couch. * * 3 A i / v t t L e-t H • v £x«t H, U S £ I "fa Ut»\>t. €"K<t At. U i t . 94 SAVED 182 6^  0 * C SCENE TEN A cafe". Furniture: cliairs and three tables, one up right, one right and one down left. Apart from this the stage is bare. ' LEN and PAM sit at the table up right. LEN (drinks tea). Warms yer up. Pause. These early mornin's knock me out. 'Nother cup? Pause. . r • PAM. Wass the time? ;"; LEN. Quarter past. PAM. Why ain't they got a clock? Pause. . . LEN.'Ave another one. PAM. Thass the fourth time yer keep arstin. LEN. Warm yer up. PAM. Go an' sit on yer own table. Pause. LEN. Sure yer wrote the name right? PAM. We'll look bloody daft when 'e finds you 'ere.; Wass 'e goin'to say ? r ' , . " ""' LEN. 'EIlO. Pause. . • ,; . Let me go an* find 'im. P A M . No. • , • L E N . There's no use-183 UhCt SCENE TEN 95 PAM. No! LEN. Suit ycrself. * PAM. DO I 'ave t' say everythin' twice? LEN. There's no need t' shout. PAM. I ain' shoutin'.v LEN. They can 'ear yer 'alf way t' -PAM. I don't wan'a know. LEN. Yer never do. Silence. S PAM. Len. I don't want a keep on at yer. I don't know what's the matter with me. They wan'a put the 'eat on. It's like death. Yer'd get on a lot better with someone else. LEN. Per'aps 'e ain' comin'. PAM. They must 'ave all the winders open. It's no life for a fella. Yer ain' a bad sort. LEN. Yeh. I'm goin' a be late in. PAM. Don't go. ' LEN. You make me money up ? PAM (after a slight pause). Why can't yer go somewhere ? LEN. Where? PAM. There's lots a places. LEN. 'Easy t' say. PAM. I'll find yer somewhere. LEN. I ain' scuttlin' off juss t' make room for you t' shag in. PAM. Yer're a stubborn sod! Don't blame me what 'appens t' yer! Yer ain' messin' me about again. LEN. I knew that wouldn't last long! 3 PAM. I'm sick t' death a yer. Clear off! She eoes to the table down-left and sits, LEN goes out left. Pause. Hexomes back with a cup of tea. He tmts it on the table in front of & JZAxUHeMands. LEN. It'll get cold. Pause. 7 skru^s . Utr Wit ' i K p t . LHM . P r\*kt 1 up 4».cKc I J t cfe-e^<U. i ; I cut US1. tx Uit TAJoU . 184 96 SAVED Did 'e say 'e'd come ? Pause. Did 'e answer any a your letters ? She re-acts. I juss wondered! PAM. I tol' yer before! LEN. Thass all right then. ' Pause. PAM. It's like winter in 'ere. There are voices off right. Someone shouts. A door bangs open. MIKE, COLIN, PETE, BARRY, FRED and LIZ come in. * COLIN. 'Ere we are again. BARRY. Wipe yer boots. MIKE. On you! BARRY. Where we sittin' ? MIKE. On yer 'ead. BARRY. On me arse! Liz. Don't know 'ow 'e tells the difference. She laughs. FRED. This'll do. PETE. All right? Liz. Can I sit 'ere? MIKE. Sit where yer like, dear. BARRY. What we 'avin' ? PETE (to FRED). What yer fancy ? FRED. What they got? PETE (looks left). Double egg, bacon, 'am, bangers, double bangers, sper-gety -BARRY. Chips. FRED. Juss bring the lot. * ErsUr <-> T>,B,M, F, t ' t . •Kiolt. ML 185 Ukwt Four SCENE TEN 97 PETE. Oi, ease off. FRED. An' four cups a tea. PETE. I'm standin'yer for this! FRED. Make that twice. • . * . .BARRY. An' me! 1 PETE (ro Liz). Wass yourn, darlin' ?* FRED. Now or later? PETE. Now, t' start with. BARRY. Tea and crumpet. Liz. Could I 'ave a coffee ? FRED. 'Ave what yer like, darlin'. BARRY. Cup a tea do me! • . COLIN. Wass she'avin'later! ' LIZ. Dinner. MIKE. Teas all round then. * BARRY. Right. MIKE (to FRED). Sit down, we'll fix it. PETE, MIKE and COLIN so off left. * FRED. Where's all the burn ? Liz. I only got one left. FRED (calls). Get us some snout. MIKE. Five or ten? FRF.D makes a rude gesture. Liz offers Mm her, cigarette. FRED. Keep it, darlin'. I'm okay. HP. turns (m.tw and PAMJ. Oi, 'ello then. 'Ow's it goin' ? fh. xhmdf.Mnd(>,u inmii. ht tluun,taM*f. T.r.M hit ,iln>ttrl?~imt., PAM. 'Ello. , FRED. Thass right, yer said yer'd be 'ere. (Calls.) That grub ready ? (To PAM.) Yeh. BARRY (to FRED). Big gut! COLIN (off). Give us a chance! PETE (off). They didn't teach yer no manners inside. FRED. Yer're arstin' for trouble. I don't wan'a go back juss yet. H flOtv P. * Px h * e n t P, M, 1 186 98 SAVED PAM. You all right? FRED. Yeh. You look all right. . • Liz. Don't yer reckon 'e looks thin ? PAM. I can't -Liz. Like a rake. I toP yer, didn't I? Yer wan'a get some meat on yer. FRED. I will when that grub turns up. BARRY and LIZ are sitting at the table up right. BARRY bangs the table. BARRY. Grub! COLIN (off). Ease up, louse! BARRY (calls). Make that two coffees. (He puts on an accent.) I feel like a cup. . . . Liz. Ain' what yer sound like. PETE (off). Shut 'im up! BARRY makes a gesture. FRED. Why did the policewoman marry the 'angman? Liz. Eh? FRED. They both liked necking. They laugh. PETE (off). Why was the undertaker buried alive ? L i z . 'Is job got on top a 'im. They laugh. BARRY. Why did the woman with three tits 'ave quads ? . MIKE. We 'eard it! The rest groan. COLIN (off). What about the sailor 'oo drowned in 'is bath? FRED. 'Is brother was the fireman 'oo went up in smoke. . • • >>•) They laugh. PETE (off). Didn't know they.let yer 'ave jokes inside. 187 U>tt S c o t * SCENE TEN 99 Liz. Wass it like? ' FRED. In there ? Liz. Yeh. * FRED (shrugs. To LEN). 'OW'S the job? LEN. Stinks., t FRED. It don't change. (He sits at their table.) Long time. Liz. Got a light? *" FRED (to PAM). I got yer letters didn't I. PAM. Yeh. FRED. I ain' good at writin'. PETE, COLIN and MIKE shout and laugh, off. PAM. Where yer goin' ? FRED. I'm goin' to 'ave the biggest nosh-up a me life. BARRY (to FRED). Did yer be'ave yerself inside? PAM (to FRED). NO, after that. FRED. O yer know. PAM. Yer fixed up ? FRED.'Ow? PAM. I'll take yer roun' our place. FRED. O -LEN. Yer can muck in with me a couple a nights. Give yerself time t' get straight. FRED. Ta, I don't wan' a put -LEN. Yer won't be in the way for a couple of days. PAM. Murn'll shut up. It'll be nice and quiet. Thass what yer need. FRED. Yer must be kidding! BARRY (to L i z ) . Arst 'im if ' e be'aved isself. L i z (to FRED). 'Ear that? FRED. Yer know me. ' BARRY. Not 'arf. FRED. One day. L i z . Yeh. FRED. This padre 'as me in. * ' f Ctrv»sc i crvt- 6 f * f S f UrNtfLf , X LiZ. M'ti to iiotrfc F I ' lUept^ cLc to ff. 100 SAVED BARRY. 0 yeh. FRED. Wants t' chat me up. 'E says nothin that comes out a a man can be all bad. BARRY. Whass that? 3 FRED. Then 'e 'ops out an' I 'as a little slash in 'is tea. L i z and BARRY laugh — Liz very loudly. , L i z . What'appened? FRED. 'E reckoned they ain' put the sugar in. They laugh. Another bloke -L i z . Yeh. <j FRED. Stares at me. Keeps starin' at me. All day. It's 'is first day, see. : ' BARRY. Go on. FRED. So I gets 'im on the landin' an' clobbers 'im. BARRY. Bang! FRED. An' it only turns out 'e'd got a squint! They laugh. L i z . Wass it like inside? _ FRED. I got chokey for the clobberin'. Bread and water! BARRY. On yer jack. FRED. Only good thing there's no one t' scrounge yer grub. BARRY. Yer d'narf tell 'em. FRED. Ain' my sort a life. Glad I done it once, but thass their lot. Ain' pinnin' nothin' on me next time, t L i z . Wass it like? > ] FRED. In there? ., : .. L i z . Yeh. FRED. Cold. L i z . Eh? F R E D . Cold. a Silence. M I K E comes in a few paces from the left. S C E N E T E N 101 M I K E . Won't be 'alf a jik. FRED.'Bout time. C O L I N (off). 'E still moanin' ? COLINcomeson.and. stands.whaMlHE.' F R E D . Eh? C O L I N . Bet yer couldn't carry-on in there. F R E D . Lot I couldn't do in there, if yer like t' look at it. M I K E . We ain' got a treat yer everyday. F R E D . I'll pay for this if you like. (To L i z . ) Lend us ten bob. P E T E . 'Oo arst yer t' pay ? F R E D . I reckon it's worth one lousy meal.3 P E T E . Yer made yer own decisions, didn't yer ? B A R R Y (comes down). Wass up ? P E T E . We ain' got a crawl up yer arse. C O L I N . Grub smell all right, don't -PETE . 'Ang on a minute, Col. M I K E (to P E T E ) . Nah, it's 'is first day out, Pete. Let 'im settle down. C O L I N . Come on. P E T E . 'E ain' swingin' that one on me. PF.TF. and r.OI.lNfrt out left.'1 M I K E (to F R E D ) . 'E got out the wrong bed this mornin*. M I K E follows them off. Slight pause.S F R E D (laughs). It's the ol' lag comin' out a mel (Shouts.) Whoopee!*" B A R R Y . Ha-ha! Whoopee! FRED. She was only a goalkeeper's daughter ' ,• She married a player called Jack 190 102 S A V E D It was great when 'e played centre forward But 'e liked to slip round to the back. (He laughs.) I used a lie in me pit thinkin' a that. C O L I N (off): What? F R E D : Nosh. L i z . That all? F R E D . An' tryin' a remember whass up your legs. L i z . I'll draw yer a picture. Give us a light. ; ' f K fa P-F R E D (to P A M ) . Give 'er a light. * 7 He gives her a box of matches. She takes them to Liz. To L E N . Wass'er game? ^ f># fo LiZ.. L E N . I don't wan'a get involved, mate. , F R E D . Yeh?'Yer should a read them crummy letters she keeps sendin'. She ain' goin' a catch me round 'er place. L E N . No. What was it like ? . . F R E D . No, talk about somethin'else. L E N . No, before. F R E D . Yer 'eard the trial. P A M comes back to the table. *" • x. Go away, Pam. \ (* K ^ P A M . I wan' a finish me tea. ' L E N . Thass cold. F R E D . Can't yer take a'int? Take yer tea over there. . . : . P A M . Wass goin'on? L E N . Nothin'! -' • F R E D . No one's talkin'about you. •.••'•,! ' • P A M (going to sit dozen at the table). I'd rather - 3 i . . . F R E D .oP a m ! * A . ptn'moU H She goes to the unoccupied table and watches them. 'Er ol' people still alive ? If yer can call it that. L E N . Yeh. F R E D . Yer ain' still livin' there? • * '•" L E N . I'm goin'soon. 6f 191 SCENE TEN 103 UJ\ut FRED. Yer're as bad as them. She won't get me there i n a month a Sundays. LEN. What was it like ? FRED. I tol' yer. LEN. No, before. FRED. Before what? LEN. In the park. FRED. Yer saw. LEN. Wass it feel like? FRED. Don't know. LEN. When yer was killin' it. FRED. Do what? 1 LEN. Wass it feel like when yer killed it? (BARRY (to L i z ) . Fancy a record ? . i z . Wouldn't mind. JARRY. Give us a tanner then, . i z . Yer're as tight as a flea's arse'ole. JARRY. An 'alf as 'andsome. I know. - Out a change. LIZ gives him sixpence. He goes off down right, MIKE brings on tmi-aupj- c MIKE. Comin' up. FRED. Very 'andy. BARRY (off). 'Ow about T Broke my 'Eart* ? 7 L i z . Yeh. Thass great. BARRY (off). Well they ain' got it. L i z . Funny! What about 'My 'Eart is Broken'? MIKE (to L i z ) . One coffee. BARRY (off). They got that. L i z (to MIKE). The sugar in it ? MIKE. Taste it. 9 M I K E goes off left. L E N . Whass it like, Fred ? FRED (drinks). It ain' like this in there.' ou r. exit M D C . 1? ^rit< £> « j K f t a u 192 Ufvtfc 104 SAVED LEN. Fred. FRED. I toF yer. . LEN. No yer ain'. FRED. I forget. • . -LEN. I thought yer'd a bin full a it. I was - -FRED. Len! LEN. - curious, thass all,'ow it feels t'- .. : . FRED. No! *" He slams his fist on the table. 1 . ; . LEN. Okay. FRED. It's finished. ' • L E N . Yeh. FRED (stands). What yer wan' a do? Tho juko box starts. LEN. Nothin'. FRED. Wass'e gettin'at ? LEN. It's finished. PETE, MIKE, COLIN and BARRY come oh. P A M stands. L i z still sits. 3 FRED. I were'n the only one. LEN. I ain' gettin' at yer, skip. PETE. Wass up? ". ; ; . >.'; FRED. Nothin'a do with you. 1 PAM. 'E was rowin'. v ;r ' FRED. It's nothin'. Where's that grub? ; PAM. I knew 'e'd start somethin'. FRED. Forget it. • 1 .,.;>.; . PAM. I toF'im not t'come. FRED. Where's that flippin' grub? Move. *; > COLIN and MIKE go off left. 3 PAM.'E won't let me alone. *l FRED. I'm starvin' I know that. , ' PAM. 'E follers me everywhere. 1 Vu>U*b • ft h *- p st-^KtUj x ec. F j^^orti k«.r. o o p b4" 193 SCENE TEN 105 FRED. Ain' you lucky. PAM. Tell 'im for me! Tt 'im! Tt 'im! FRED. It's nothin'a do with me! PAM. It is! It is! BARRY. She's started. c FRED. 'Ere we go! He sits and puts his head in his hands. ^ PAM (ta LEN). See what yer done ? FRED. Didn't take 'er long. f PAM. It's your place t' stick up for me, love. I went through all that trouble for you! Somebody's got a save me from 'im. FRED. Thanks. Thanks very much. I'll remember this. Ik-stands and stum buik 10 htWWh lublc. Liz (starting to click her fingers). I can't 'ear the music! t PAM (ta LEN). Don't bloody sit there! Yer done enough 'arm! PETE 'Oo brought 'er 'ere ? FRED. Chriss knows! PAM (pointing to LEN). 'E started this!'0 FRED. I don't care what bleedin' wet started it. You can stop it! PAM (ta LEN). I 'ate yer for this! FRED. BELT UP! PAM (goes to FRED, who sits at his table). I'm sorry. Fred, 'e's goin' now. It'll be all right when 'e's gone. ' 1 , n p X fo f LJ__j£oes_mJjngve,. FRED. All right. / y PAM (looks round). Where's 'is grub ? 'E's starvin' 'ere. (She goes to touch his arm.) I get so worked up when 'e -FRED. Keep yer 'ands off me! So 'elp me I'll land yer so bloody 'ard they'll put me back for life! PETE (moving in). Right. Less get ourselves sorted out. t u COLIN comes on left. * Px k> P ' PK h> U •* Px h F •bo pvwA- 0urm4 i f F sfc-^ i^ 194 io6 SAVED P A M . It don't matter. I juss got excited. (Calls.) Where's 'is breakfast ? It'll be time for - ' ? FRED. Breakfast? I couldn't eat in this bloody place if they served it through a rubber tube. P E T E . Come on! (Calls.) Mike! FRED. All I done for 'er an' she 'as the bloody nerve t' start this! P E T E . Come on, less move. BARRY. She wants throttlin'. M I K E comes on left, C O L I N and FRBD go out right. The door bangs. *S . • i ii .. .v.;- :J. Liz. I ain'drunk me coffee. ' : i P E T E . I said move! ' •" ' M I K E . Flippin'mad'ouse. ••}.;••. M I K E goes out right. The door bangs. to Liz. We paid for it! P E T E . Move! L i z and BARRY go out right. The door bangs. *"1 You come near 'im again an' I'll settle yer for good. Layoff. a x P E T E goes out right. The door bangs, L E N still sits. P A M stands. \i Pause. L E N . I'll see yer 'ome. I'm late for work already. I know I'm in the way. Yer can't go round the streets when yer're like - that. (He hesitates.) They ain' done 'im no good. 'Es gone back like a kid. Yer well out a it. (He stands.) I knew the -, little bleeder 'Id do a bunk! Can't we try an'.get on like before ? (He looks round.) There's no one else. Yer only live once. O p * IJ e x i t f<u<*g us t 195 S C E N E E L E V E N 107 u r u t •TWO SCENE ELEVEN * The living-room. On the table: bread, butter, breadknife. cup and saucer and milk tA&RX.sitsj)nJhe„cojich. ( HJLK&X-comes. injwith„a_potjof„tea._He„goes_to^h&jabh_ He aitsjtndJiu.ttenJb/jad.MausejvM ^ MAS.Y_zoes_.out. HARRY goes on working, M A R Y comes back jsti_h_a_c_ip_jmd_wiw^ cQuch.and sits. She sips. 3 ^ H WRY moves so that his.back is Jo,her. Heputshis cup upright inJiis,jaucer.^He_fiuts_miIk.in.the cup..He reaches to tick up the teapot.,. J__\RYlstands._gaes.to the table, and moves the teapot out of Us reach. She goes back to the couch. Sits. Sips. * MARY. My teapot. Sips. Pause. HARRY. My tea. He pours tea into his cup, MARY stands and goes to the table. Site.empties his cup, on.the.floor. * HARRY. Our'n. Weddin' present. MARY (goajajhe_cowhjmd__ts). From my mother. HARRY. That was joint. MARY. Don't you dare talk to me! HARRY goes out.7 f M A R Y (loudly). Some minds want boilin' in carbolic. Soap's too good for 'em. (Slight pause.)lDirty filth! Worse! Ha! (She goes tn the,dao__and.calls). Don't you dare talk to me! Shr.gnes tn the, cntir.h nnd sill H A R R Y comes in. l U H ^ k f c t U « - # 3.3: FAIL U p Ajrtfrw * fo < K h w l o l i (%foi H 4 a J . l t . sV**& fo X h> C ^ U t U , 7 Af «.*.t. u-ft, f'fo* a n . sAcv.b. «i fo x -h» dov t^k, s «b 196 108 S A V E D H A R R Y . I'll juss say one word. I saw yer with yer skirt up. Yer call me filth ? H A R R Y goes out. Slight pause, M A R Y goes to the table and empties his slices of bread on to the floor. She goes back to the " couch and drinks her tea. MARY. Mind out of a drain! I wouldn't let a kid like that touch me i f e paid for it! H A R R Y comes in. He goes straight to the table. ' H A R R Y . I don't want to listen. M A R Y . Filth! H A R R Y . There's bin enough trouble in this 'ouse. Now yer wan'a cause trouble with 'im! M A R Y . Don't talk t'me! You! v H A R R Y (sees his bread on the floor). Yer juss wan'a start trouble like there was before! (He stoops and picks up the bread.) 3 Middle-age woman - goin' with 'er own daughter's left-overs - 'alf 'er age - makin' 'erself a spectacle - look at this! - No self control. M A R Y . Filth! H A R R Y . Like a child - I pity the lad - must want 'is 'ead tested. M A R Y . There'll be some changes in this 'ouse. I ain' puttin' 1 up with this after t'day. Yer can leave my things alone for a start. All this stuff come out a my pocket. I worked for it! I ain' 'avin' you dirtyin' me kitchin. Yer can get yerself some new towels for a start! An' plates! An' knives! An' cups! Yer'll soon find a difference! H A R R Y . Don't threaten me - t-M A R Y . An' my cooker! An' my curtains! An' my sheets! ' H A R R Y . Yer'll say somethin' yer'll be sorry for! \f He comes towards her. Thoro is a chair in tho-way. He trips over it. The leg comes off. ** A) 5th O A t r U c J * * H X h M>U. ' W pklti u p irttd * M K K H ^ M X L M IAAU 6\>tr 197 S C E N E E L E V E N 109 MARY. Don't you touch me! HARRY. Two can play at.your game! Yeh! I can stop your money t'morra! *" MARY. Don't yer raise yer'and t'me! 1 ttARRY\_go.es^backja^the^cU7le...He„starts^cuttingMead^Eause. I knew yer was stood outside when 'e was there. I 'eard yer through the door. I'd a bet my life you'd come in! HARRY. Old enough t' be 'is mother. Yer must be 'ard up! MARY. I seen you stuck 'ere long enough! You couldn't pick an' choose! HARRY. One was enough. MARY. No one else would a put up with yer! HARRY. I can do without! Yer ain' worth it! MARY. Ha! I saw yer face when yer come through that door. I bin watchin' yer all the week. I know you of old, Harry! 1 HARRY. Yer'll go out a yer mind one day! MARY. Filth! * HARRY. I 'ad enough a you in the past! I ain' puttin' up with your lark again. I'm too old. I wan' a bit a peace an' quiet. M A R Y . Then why did yer come in ? HARRY. Me pools was in that table. MARY. Yer was spyin'! Yer bin sniffin' round ever since! I ain' puttin' up with your dirt! (She picks up the teapot.)' Yer can bloody well stay in yer room! ZAMxomesJa. * P A M . Chriss. (Calls.) It's them! HARRY (cutting bread). I ain' sunk so low I'll botheryou\ M A R Y . Yer jealous ol' swine! ' HARRY. Of a bag like you? M A R Y . '£ don't think so! I could a gone t'bed, an' I will next time 'e arsts me! HARRY. Now 'e's caught a sniff a yer 'e'll be off with 'is tail between 'is legs ? I i I I I t I i At K P*-. 110 S A V E D She hits him with the teapot. The water pours over him. PAM is too frightened to move. . >•.;>• Ah! »»'•''* •. , MARY . 'Ope yer die! • v , - - v .• H A R R Y . Blood! * .,• .. , ... M A R Y . Use words t' me! H A R R Y . Blood! •' • ••••>• •- •'• PAM. Mum! • ' '--:> ••:;>•''••• H A R R Y . Ah! ' ' " »• LEN (<>#). Whass up? • •;>». <:rH.i..(t\>, H A R R Y . Doctor. ! • J i . . M A R Y . Cracked me weddin'present.'Im. * i : v -r.\ > LEN comes in. , , ... LEN. Blimey! . ;••, V , V L V,,» , •...» J ,.•-*.<>•, H A R R Y . Scalded! t• v . v .•: ;-, j P A M . Whass'appenin'? V . :: i - r o < - , ; . : : , • • ? ; . • , ; _ > ; . > ' H A R R Y . She tried t' murder me! j ' ; ,.-. • M A R Y . Yer little liar! / •, .'..;>;..; PAM. Are yer all right? I •:,',_>;. H A R R Y . Yer saw'er. . I J .•"•>, M A R Y . ' E went mad. I . .-,-/n LEN. It's only a scratch. \ f - u : - . . , , . . : v . - "• ' P A M (to M A R Y ) . Why? . / ,•• : MARY .'Effin an'blindin'. , „>. .* LEN. Yer'll live. H A R R Y . Blood. <'.=• v P A M (to M A R Y ) . Whass 'edone? V• , : - , ; ./.:.• L E N . ' E ' s all wet. :••$.<>: M A R Y . Swore at me! ...... PAM . Why? H A R R Y . Doctor. ^ J - • M A R Y . There's nothin' wrong with 'im. H A R R Y . Scalded. M A R Y . I 'ardly touched 'im. 'E needs a good thrashin'! i 199 SCENE ELEVEN . I l l LEN (to PAM). Get a towel. HARRY. I ain' allowed t' touch the towels. MARY. I kep' this twenty-three years. Look what 'e's done to it! PAM. What 'appened? ' LEN. Nothin'. They 'ad a row. PAM. 'E called 'er a bag. *• LEN. It's nothin'. I'd better be off t' work. They'll give us me cards. We juss seen Fred. 'E looks all right, well 'e don't look bad. It ain' Butlins. (To PAM.) Get 'im up t' bed. Put the kettle on. Yer could all do with a cup a tea. ^ PAM (to MARY). What made yer start talkin' ? MARY. Yer 'eard 'im call me a bag. (To LEN.) 'E went mad over catchin' you last week. ' LEN (looking at HARRY'* head). Yer'll 'ave t' wash that cut. It's got tealeaves in it. PAM. Caught 'oo last week ? MARY (pointing to HARRY). 'Is filth. (Points to LEN.) Arst 'imT PAM (to LEN). What 'appened ? LEN. Nothin'. HARRY. I was cuttin' bread. (W* pirh< up the hnife ) She flew at me! ^ PAM (to LEN). I knew it was you! (To HARRY.) Whass 'e done ? LEN. Nothin'. MARY. Filth! HARRY. I found 'em both. ** HjL.pointsmthjbeJwifeja.the_sp0t. LEN (pulling at HARRY). No! ' HARRY. She'll'ave t"ear. LEN (he pulls at him). No! HARRY. She'ad *er clothes up. PAM . No! i .y i I * Px fo \r*kU. i, j i H * kiii^vcLi L i ) 200 112 S A V E D L E N . Yer bloody fool! Yer bloody, bloody fool! L E N shakes H A R R Y . The knife waves through the air. • H A R R Y . Ah! P A M . That knife! M A R Y . Filth! P A M . 'E'll kill 'im! L E N . Bloody fool. P A M (screams). Oh! No! - Whass 'appenin' to us? She sits on the couch and cries. Pause. ^  H A R R Y . Tm an' 'er. P A M (crying). Why don't 'e go? Why don't 'e go away? All my friends gone. Baby's gone. Nothin* left but rows. Day in, day out. Fightin' with knives. H A R R Y . I'm shakin'. P A M (crying). They'll kill each other soon. L E N (to PAM ) . Yer can't blame them on me! P A M (crying). Why can't 'e go away! H A R R Y (removes his shirt). Wet. P A M (crying). Look at me. I can't sleep with worry. M A R Y . Breakin' me 'ome. ' P A M (crying). 'E's killed me baby. Taken me friends. Broken me 'ome. H A R R Y . More blood. M A R Y . I ain' clearin' up after 'im. 'E can clear 'is own mess. P A M (crying). I can't go on like this. L E N (to PAM ) . There was nothin' in it! P A M (crying). I'll throw myself somewhere. It's the only way. H A R R Y . Cold. l L E N goes to H A R R Y . P A M (sitting and crying). Stop 'im! They'll kill each other! L E N (stops). I was goin' a 'elp 'im. V P A M (crying). Take that knife. The baby's dead. They're all gone. It's the only way. I can't go on. P t u J c t fc-t> cud U L X h> H 3 P * t - * K c ( . £ 201 S C E N E T W E L V E 113 M A R Y . Next time 'e won't be so lucky. P A M (crying). Yer can't call it livin'. 'E's pullin' me t' pieces. Nothin' but trouble: f L E N . I'm tryin't' 'elp! 'Oo else'll 'elp ? If I go will they come back ? Will the baby come back ? Will 'e come back ? I'm the only one that's stayed an' yer wan'a get rid a me! P A M (crying). I can't stand any more. Baby dead. No friends. L E N . I'll go. P A M (crying). No one listens. Why don't 'e go? Why don't they make 'im go ? M A R Y . 'E can stay in 'is own room after t'day. L E N . I'll find somewhere dinnertime. H A R R Y . Me neck's throbbin'. P A M (crying). No 'ome. No friends. Baby dead. Gone. Fred gone. 1 p s i b 2>t 8 SCENE TWELVE L E N ' J bedroom. XKT&Jies,face.Mown..on-the~floor~JThe„side~of..M agaimt^tfe..figprboazds~Jl£~hak^ suitcase on thejied. In it.are..a fm.xhings-Pame, _t; Mnations.Me_was.sjiaIeLsa.cks_J£ajhQes^ rnp nf hnndnget. HP rnmet up behind T i?u T PM him tlnvaly H A R R Y . Evenin'. L E N . Evenin'. H A R R Y . Get up. Yer'll catch cold down there. L E N . 'Ow's yer 'ead ? i H A R R Y (touches it). Don't know. '• L E N . Thass a good sign. H A R R Y . All right now ? L E N . I was listenin'. 3 Lid d o u i A © - J ^ A - I A * tut* r r - a v ; FA.<U t* L>Uck * i i ^ k f c t u t * » s ; P<^L<- v x p ^ y t ^ i w d 202 114 SAVED He draws the knife between two boards. Clears the crack. Yer can 'ear better. HARRY. Thass a good knife. ** LEN. She's got someone with 'er. HARRY. Thought yer might like someone t' say good night. LEN. Yer can 'ear 'er voice. HARRY. No. LEN. She's picked someone up. I couldn't get anywhere with me packin'. HARRY. No- I saw 'er come in. LEN. Could a swore I 'eard someone. * * ^ ^cfc*$ HARRY. Not with 'er! LEN. She's still good lookin'. HARRY. 'Er sort's two a penny. Lads don't 'ave t' put up with 'er carry-on. LEN. I used t' 'ear Fred an' her down there. HARRY. No more. LEN. Kep' me awake. 4 HARRY (sits on the bed). Tired. Nice 'ere. 4 H StH LEN. Seen worse. HARRY. Quiet. LEN. Sometimes. ' Pause. HARRY. She's cryin'. LEN. O. HARRY. In bed. I passed 'er door. LEN. I knew I 'eard somethin'. HARRY. Thass what yer 'eard. LEN puts a pair of socks in the case. Won't be the last time. LEN. Eh? 4 H A R R Y . 'Owlin in bed. L E N . O. *• '3 203 S C E N E T W E L V E I I5 H A R R Y . She'll pay for it. L E N . What? * H A R R Y . 'Er ways. Yer'll get yer own back. L E N . I lost me case keys. y H A R R Y . Yer'll see. L E N . Long time since I used it. H A R R Y . Where yer goin' ? L E N . 'Ad enough. H A R R Y . No different any other place. L E N . I've heard it all before. -^Pause. H A R R Y . Thought yer'd like t' say good night. L E N . Yeh. Ta. H A R R Y . They're all in bed. L E N . I get in the way, don't I ? H A R R Y . Take no notice. L E N . Sick a rows. H A R R Y . They've 'ad their say. They'll keep quiet now. L E N . I upset every - 1 H A R R Y . No different if yer go. They won't let yer drop. L E N . Different for me. U£.puts„CLshkt.injhe.case. I never put a finger on your ol' woman. I juss give 'er a 'and. H A R R Y . I known 'er longer'n you. * L E N . She reckoned she was late. H A R R Y . Ain' my worry. L E N . But yer 'ad a row. H A R R Y . She 'ad a row. L E N . You shouted. H A R R Y . It ain' like that. L E N . I 'eard yer. H A R R Y . It clears the air. Sometimes. It's finished. - Y o u shouted. s 1 L o » i « Uj» ( O O / L ^ C J hr fay* c t o t k i ok ctJt. 7 Stops I » 5 Hi L Ur\}«r6nb. Pau^xc. 204 I l6 SAVED Pause. LEN. I'll'ave t' look for that key. HARRY. I left 'er once. LEN. You ? HARRY. I come back. LEN. Why? HARRY. I worked it out. Why should I soil me 'ands washin' an' cookin' ? Let 'er do it. She'll find out. »' I rV\.pt. ( t K t LEN. Yer do yer own washin'. ' i HARRY. Eh? ; LEN. An' cookin'. ' HARRY. Ah, now. Pause. LEN. I can do without the key. I ain' goin' far. HARRY. Bin in the army? LEN. No. HARRY. Yer can see that. Know where yer goin' ? LEN. Someplace 'andy. For work. HARRY. Round Fred? ; LEN. No. HARRY. She won't see 'im again. LEN. Best thing, too. Yer ain' seen what it done t' 'im. 'E's like a kid. 'E'll finished up like some ol' lag, or an' ol' soak. Bound to. An' soon. Yer'll see. V He moves the case along the bed.' • ' /\6Ut4 CC-SC C* That'll keep till t'morrow. . 6^ btdL. HARRY. It's a shame. ' ' ' •: LEN. Too tired t'night. Wass a shame? HARRY. Yer stood all the rows. Now it'll settle down an'yer-LEN. I 'ad my last row, I know that. HARRY. Sit 'ere. LEN (sits on the bed). It's bin a 'ard day. ' . L J HARRY. Finished now. : ©K- bfcA. , ©pp. H. P6»U«( SCENE TWELVE 117 A long pause. LEN . I'd like t' get up t'morrow mornin' and clear right out. There's nothin't' keep me 'ere. What do I get out a it? Jack it in. Emigrate. HARRY. Yer're too young t' emigrate. Do that when yer past fifty. ' LEN . I don't give a damn if they don't talk, but they don't even listen t' yer. Why the 'ell should I bother about 'er ? HARRY. It's juss a rough patch. We'ad t' sort ourselves out when you joined us. But yer fit in now. It'll settle down. LEN . No one tells yer anything really. Slight pause. H Was she all right ? HARRY. Eh? ' LEN . In bed. HARRY. Yer know. »-LEN. No. HARRY. Up t' the man. LEN . Yeh? HARRY. I 'ad the best. LEN . Go on. HARRY (quietly). I 'ad 'er squealing like a pig. 1 LEN . Yeh. % HARRY. There was a little boy first. LEN . In the war. , HARRY. Then the girl. LEN . On leave. _ HARRY. An' back t' the front. LEN . Go on. . . HARRY. I saw the lot. LEN . What was it like? ,. HARRY. War? Slight pause. * •.. 1 I f ' H t o o let I 2 0 6 n 8 S A V E D Most I remember the peace an' quiet. Once or twice the 'ole lot blew up. Not more. Then it went quiet. Everythin* still. Yer don't get it that quiet now. L E N . Not 'ere. H A R R Y . Nowhere. L E N . Kill anyone? J ( H A R R Y . Must 'ave. Yer never saw the bleeders, 'ceptin' prisoners or dead. Well, I did once. I was in a room. Some bloke stood up in the door. Lost, I expect. I shot 'im. 'E fell down. Like a coat fallin' off a 'anger, I always say. Not a word. Pause. Yer never killed yer man. Yer missed that. Gives yer a sense a perspective. I was one a the lucky ones. Pause.' L E N . 'Oo tied your 'ead ? H A R R Y . I managed. I never arst them. L E N . I'm good at that. H A R R Y . No need. Pause. Nigh on midnight. L E N . Gone. He takes off his shoes and stands. He drops his tivtoem H A R R Y . Yer don't wan'a go. L E N . Eh? 3 H A R R Y . Don't go. No point. L E N (his trousers round his ankles). Why ? H A R R Y . Yer'd come back. L E N . No use sayin' anythin' t'night -H A R R Y . Don't let 'em push yer out. L E N . Depends 'ow I feel in the mornin*. tie site on tho bod and pulls off his trenserer 40 f_ruh rW$ to L, tcvtk other*. 5 L looks U p b>uL. 207 i uy\wV S«.v>cn i S C E N E T W E L V E I I Q H A R R Y . Choose yer own time. Not when it suits them. L E N . I don't know anythin' t'night. H A R R Y . I'd like yer t' stay. If yer can see yer way to. L E N . Why? H A R R Y (after a slight pause). I ain' stayin'. L E N . What? * H A R R Y . Not always. L E N . O, yeh. *• Hje,putsjhesP^e^pn_thejHoor. H A R R Y . Yer'll see. If I was t' go now she'd be laughin'. She'd soon 'ave someone in my bed. She knows 'ow t' be'ave when she likes. An' cook. L E N . Yeh, yeh. He. slides thejmejundetAheJ2edMndjits„onJhe„he4. H A R R Y . I'll go when I'm ready. When she's on 'er pension. She won't get no one after 'er then. I'll be out. Then see 'ow she copes. L E N . Ain' worth it, pop. H A R R Y . It's only right. When someone carries on like 'er, they 'ave t' pay for it. People can't get away with murder. What'd 'appen then ? L E N . Don't arst me. H A R R Y . She thinks she's on top. I'll 'ave t' fall back a bit -buy a few things an' stay in me room more. I can wait. L E N . 'Ead still 'urt ? * H A R R Y . She'll find out. L E N . I can let yer 'ave some aspirins. H A R R Y . Eh? L E N . Can yer move up. ^ H&rryj-tqnds. No, I didn't mean that. H A R R Y . Yer should be in bed. We don't wan'a waste the light. 10 r L shop's, totk* up. | cast . dlotc* ! e**e. Pu.i> cast ; on r l * * * ~ -| 7 ijtvp-L |iK\t.: p e o p l e K^oc to lick L r e c i t e s tub ' 10H c U r t i t * X K i H 208 120 SAVED LEN. I won't let on what yer said. HARRY. Eh? ** LEN. You leavin'. HARRY. She knows. LEN. Yer told 'er ? HARRY. We don't 'ave secrets. They make trouble. Don't speak to 'em at all. It saves a lot a raisunderstandin'. * LEN. O. HARRY. Yer'll be all right in the mornin'. LEN. No work t'night ? HARRY. Saturday. LEN. I forgot. I HARRY. Night. W H d-OO ' LEN. Funny we never talked before. /?ci -U - tt HARRY. They listen all the time. LEN. Will yer come up next Saturday night? HARRY. No, no. Cause trouble. They won't stand for it. LEN. I'd like t' tell 'er t' jump off once more. HARRY. Sometime. Don't upset 'er. It ain' fair. Thass best all round. LEN (looks round). It's like that. HARRY. Listen! LEN. What? HARRY holds up his hand. Silence. [ZCYK^^^XV He goes to the door. Still cryin'? HARRY. She's gone quiet. Silence. There - she's movin*. Silence. L E N . She's 'eard us. 2 0 9 SCENE THIRTEEN 121 HARRY. Best keep away, yer see. Good night. LEN. But -HARRY. Sh! He holds up his hand again. They listen. Silence. Pause. The living-room. PAM sits on the couch. She reads the Radio Times. MARY takes things from the table and goes out. Pause. She comes back. She goes to the table. She collects the plates. She goes out. Pause. The door opens, HARRY comes in. He goes to the table and opens the drawer. He searches in it. PAM turns a page. MARY comes in. She goes to the table and picks up the last things on it. She goes out. HARRY'* jacket is draped on the back of the chair by the table. He searches in the pockets. PAM turns a page. There is a loud bang (off). Silence. HARRY turns to the table and searches in the drawer. / HARRY. Good night. LEN. 'Night. HARRY goes. SCENE THIRTEEN 210 122 S A V E D M A R Y comes in. She wipes the table top with a damp cloth. There is a loud bang (off). M A R Y gOM OUt. H A R R Y takes ink and envelope out of the drawer. He puts them on the table. He sits on the chair. He feels behind him and takes a pen from the inside pocket of his jacket. He starts to fill in his football coupon. A short silence. P A M quickly turns over two pages. Immediately the door opens and L E N comes in. He carries the chair that H A R R Y tripped over and broke. He takes it down right and sets it on the floor. He crouches. His head is below the level of the seat. He looks under the chair. He turns it upside down. He fiddles with the loose leg. M A R Y comes in. She straightens the couch. She takes off her apron and folds it neatly. She sits on the couch and pushes the apron down the side of the couch. Silence. Stop. L E N turns the chair upright. He still crouches. He rests his left wrist high on the chair back and his right elbow on the chair seat. His right hand hangs in space. His back is to the audience. His head is sunk into his shoulders. He thinks for a moment. P A M stands and goes to the door. L E N . Fetch me 'ammer. P A M goes out. H A R R Y writes, M A R Y sits. L E N presses his hand on the seat and the chair wobbles, M A R Y takes up the Radio Times and glances at the backpage, H A R R Y takes a small leather folder out of the inside pocket of his jacket. He places the folder on the table. X S C E N E T H I R T E E N P A M comes in and sits on the couch. 123 L E N turns the cliair upside down and looks at it. M A R Y puts the Radio Times back on the couch. She pats the pillow, P A M picks up the Radio Times. In one connected move-ment L E N turns the chair upright and stands to his full height. He has grasped the seat at diagonally opposite corners, so that the diagonal is parallel with the front of his body. He brings the chair sharply down so that the foot furthest from him strikes the floor first. It makes a loud bang. Still standing upright he turns the chair upside down and looks at the leg. He turns the chair upright and sets it down. He crouches. He places the flat of his palm on the seat. The chair still has a little wobble. P A M folds the Radio Times and puts it down. H A R R Y takes a stamp from the folder, L E N sits on the chair and faces front. He puts his head between his knees to peer under the chair, H A R R Y licks the stamp and silently stamps the envelope. He reaches behind him and puts the folder and the spare coupon in the inside pocket of his jacket. L E N gets off the chair and crouches beside it. His back is to the audience. He bends over the chair so that his stomach or chest rests on the seat. He reaches down with his left hand and pulls the loose rear leg up into the socket. H A R R Y reaches behind him and puts his pen into the breast pocket of his jacket. He puts the ink in the table drawer. L E N slips his left arm round the back of the chair. His chest rests against the side edge of the seat. The fingers of his right hand touch the floor. His head lies sideways on the seat. M A R Y sits, P A M sits. H A R R Y licks the flap on the envelope and closes it quietly. The curtain falls quickly. * * Li$hk £u.e * 2.?: A P P E N D I X C* P R O D U C T I O N P H O T O G R A P H S Page r e f e r e n c e s r e f e r to t e x t as noted i n B i b l i o g r a p h y . 212 SCENE. ONE, PAGE 13 LEN: L u c k y . PAM: What? L E N : B u m p i n ' i n t o y o u . SCENE THREE, PAGE 28 MIKE: A c c i d e n t s i s l e g a l . C O L I N : C a n ' t t o u c h y e r . PETE : T h i s c o r o n e r t w i t s a y s ' e ' s s o r r y f o r t r o u b l i n ' me. 215 216 SCENE S IX, PAGE 69 BARRY: I n o t i c e d f e a i n ' t o u c h e d i t . C O L I N : Too b l o o d y w i n d y . FRED: Yeh? PETE : L e s s s ee y e r . SCENE EIGHT, PAGE 84 LEN: Y e r need a b l o o d y good b e l t i n ' ! PAM: Touch me! LEN : SCENE TEN, PAGE 103 Wass i t f e e l l i k e when y e r k i I l e d i t ? 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.831.1-0101593/manifest

Comment

Related Items