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UBC Theses and Dissertations

Compositions Samandari, Farshid 2007

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COMPOSITIONS by FARSHID S A M A N D A R I L THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL F U L L F I L M E N T OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF M A S T E R OF MUSIC i n THE F A U L T Y OF G R A D U A T E STUDIES (Composition) THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH C O L U M B I A April 2007 © Farshid Samandari, 2007 A B S T R A C T The thesis for the Master of Music degree in Composition consists of live performances of original works composed during graduate study. The student is expected to have written and have performed approximately an hour of music for various media. My compositions were performed on: Apogee on November 10, 2005, by Mark McGregor in Recital Hall. Prelude to Certitude on April 3, 2006, by VSO in Orpheum. Of Life and Love on March 18, 2006 by Turning Point Ensemble in Western Front. Asheghaneh on September 30, 2006 by VICO IN Chan Center. Beyond on March 31 2007 by Morgan Zentner in Recital Hall. This compilation, despite the variety of medium, clearly represents my interest in contemporary classical vocabulary, spectral analysis, and extended techniques, as well as the precious universal heritage of ethnic music. Shapes and forms of these pieces though representative of contemporary composition, has aesthetic roots in various ethnic arts, especially in their frequent use of non-western ratios. The pitch material despite its occasional resmblance to existing traditional music is derived from synthetic modes, which combines a number of divergent elements including Indian raga, Persian gushe and Varesian techniques. I have adapted a harmonic language, which is derived from spectral analysis of few Persian instruments, including Tar and Santur. This bimodal harmonic language is often ornated with a modal counerpoint, which has its roots in different ethnic modes. In other words, not only the structure and plan but also the content of hese pieces conveys intercultural elements. r - IV -T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S ABSTRACT ii TABLE OF CONTENTS iv APOGEE 1 Performance Notes 1 Program Notes 1 Apogee 2 PRELUDE TO CERTITUDE 7 Instrumentation 7 Composer's Notes 7 Prelude to Certitude . 8 OF LIFE AND LOVE: A D A M AND EVE NOW 29 Instrumentation 29 Performance Directions 29 Program Notes 30 Of Life and Love 32 - V -TABERNACLE OF UNITY 50 Texts 50 Enunciation 50 Performance Notes 51 Enunciation Key 51 Tabernacle of Unity 52 ASHEGHANEH: MONOLOGUES AGLOW 65 Instrumentation 65 Texts: Quatrains of BabaTahir 66 Enunciation Key 69 Performance Directions 70 Program Notes 72 Asheghaneh 75 BEYOND 150 Performance Notes 150 Program Notes 150 Beyond 152 TOWARDS UNITY 160 - vi -Instrumentation 160 Performance Notes 160 Program Notes 161 Towards Unity 162 -1 -Apogee duration: circa 9' Performance Notes Slow wide vibrato/ vibrato lente et amplitude forte: That is the speed of vibrato is slow and its amplitude wide. Aeolian son: Usually it refers to where only the breath is audible. However here it refers to a combination of the breath and sound, which should start with a breath and progressively change to a combination of breath and the note. glissando: or portamento: can be achieved through both gradually opening or closing the keys along opening and closing the mouth piece with the embouchure. multiphonics: along the combination of notes and their performance order (usually may start with a single note and then turn to multiphonics), a fingering graph according to Hirushi Koizumi's "Technique for contemporary flute music :for players and composers"is provided. Program Notes Apogee is a journey in the midst of extrema: from innermost earth to utmost orbit (Apogee). Three figures, representing tempers, are introduced briefly. Throughout this quest each evolves to encompass four tempered Gushes, which mold a new Moqam. - 2 -Apo0ee for 0Tute solo Farshid Samandari Andante cantabile J = 76 © Farshid Samandari, A p r i l 2005. Revised September 2005. - 6 -- 7 -Prelude to Certitude duration: circa 6' Instrumentation Woodwinds: 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Bb clarinets, 2 Bassoons. Brass: 4 French horns in F, 2 Bb Trumpets, 2 Trombones, 1 Tuba. Percussions: Timpani; Percussion 1: Vibraphone, Glockenspiel; Percussion 2: Bass Drum, Low Gong, Triangle, Suspended Cymbal. Harp Strings: Violin I, Violin II, Violas, Cellos, Double bass Composer's Notes "This is the Day wherein the divine Lote-Tree calleth aloud, saying: O people! Behold ye My fruits and My leaves, incline then your ears unto My rustling. Beware lest the doubts of men debar you from the light of certitude." 1 This piece deals with spiritual journey of every human from doubt and uncertainty towards the tranquility of certitude. It depicts a glimpse of this expedition, the entire path still unpaved. 1 Baha'u'llah, Tablets of Baha'u'llah, revealed After the Kitab-i-Aqdas (Chicago: Baha'i Publishing Trust, 1988) p. 78. © Farshid Samandari, January 2006. - 9 -- 1 0 -- 12-- 14-- 15 -- 18-- 19-- 2 0 --21 --22--23 --24--25 --26 - 2 7 --28 Of Life and Love: Adam and Eve now! -29 -duration: circa 11' Instrumentation Woodwinds: Flute, Oboe, Clarinet (in Bl») Brass: Trumpet (in B b), Trombone Percussion: Vibraphone2, Tambourine, Temple Blocks3, Low Gong (or TamTam), Tom-Tom4, Suspended Cymbals5 Piano6 Strings: Violin, Cello, Double Bass Performance Directions pizzicato for woodwinds refers to very soft percussive sound, which is more centered on air sound than the specified pitches. - v ~ ~ ~ for winds slow wide vibrato, ranging from a microtone sharp to microtone flat. con sordino for Brass unless specifically mentioned refers to straight mute. 2 Percussionist needs four of each soft and hard mallet, a gong beater and a bow. 3 Set of four 4 Set of four s Set of three 6 To play the harmonics, one needs to prepare the piano. o for Trombone refers to stopped (with hand) and gradually open'. -30 -? soft mallet T hard mallet I Gong beater arco for vibraphone refers to using bow on instrument. gliss for vibraphone is diatonic not chromatic. Tambourine: in this piece could only played with beaters, unless specified with the sticks of the beater in hand. Gong: should be played by Gong or Tam-Tam beater. Piano: the difference between muted and harmonics is due to the position of the hand (left or right) inside the piano. Pressing further on the strings creates harmonics. P r o g r a m n o t e s "Let us tell, some other day This parting hurt and woe; Let us write, some other way, Love's secrets — better so." 7 Of Life and Love consists of a few illustrations of the Biblical epic, depicted as if they recur regularly in every daily life. However, I leave it up to audience imagination to follow the story of Adam and Eve, or to regard this music as an abstract music or even to create their own drama. 7 Baha'u'llah, The Four Valleys, p. 63, from Rumi, Divdn-i-Shams. If following biblical epic in "Adam and Eve, now!," there Adam represents spirit of a human being, and Eve his/her soul. The tree of good and evil signifies the human world, created noble, but filled with paradoxes, which creates a gray line between abundance and lack of every quality. The serpent represents attachment to the human world, which led the soul and spirit from the world of freedom to the world of bondage and caused him to turn from the Kingdom of Unity to the human world.8 Piece aims not only to utilize different cultural elements but also to bind them through Chehar-gah Dastgah presented as an urlinie. It begins with a horn call, to inaugurate both new day and year as in Persian tradition,9 a tradition borrowed from Tibetan Buddhist monasteries. Piece continues with few short sections to shape a developmental palindrome. Another horn call ends the piece to reminds a new beginning at the end. "Veiled in My immemorial being and in the ancient eternity of My essence, I knew My love for thee; therefore I created thee, have engraved on thee Mine image and revealed to thee My beauty."10 8 For more information see: Abdu'l-Baha, Some Answered Questions, p. 123-6. 9 Traditionally an ensemble of Soma gives call, which is a brass instrument similar to Shaum. 1 0 Baha'u'llah, The Arabic Hidden Words, no.3. © Farshid Samandari, February 2004. Revised, December 2005. -33 -- 3 6 --40--42-- 4 5 --46-Tabernacle of Unity based on a verse by Baha'u'IIah 50 for Choir (SATB) & Piano duration: circa 6' Texts O w e l l - b e l o v e d o n e s ! T h e t a b e r n a c l e o f u n i t y h a t h b e e n r a i s e d ; r e g a r d y e n o t o n e a n o t h e r as s t r a n g e r s . Y e a r e t h e f r u i t s o f o n e tree , a n d t h e l e a v e s o f o n e b r a n c h . (Baha'u'IIah, Gleanings from the Writings of Baha'u'IIah, p. 218) Enunciation SaraapaTtJe-yeh* yegaanegi boland shod; The tabernacle of unity hath been raised; Beh chashm-eh bigaanegaan yekdigar raa mabinid. regard ye not one another as strangers. relation proposition as of 'in English. - 5 1 -Hameh baar-eh* yek daar-id,, Ye are the fruits of one tree, va barg-eh yek shaakhsaar. and the leaves of one branch. Performance notes • Solos, may preferably stay with the choir. • Solos should join tutti, from G . • To make distinction of languages easier, two different fonts for Farsi and English are used. • Farsi text is capitalized and punctuated as European languages. • Farsi text is transliterated using the following enunciation key. Enunciation Key r aa: as in wall. a: as in hat. e; as in head. 0: as in cold. jj. as in feel. eh: sharp ending "e" sound, h is non-pronounced. r g; as in go or garment. VJ. as in year or yard. kh: as German "ch"like "Bach." an unpronounced consonant as in air or apple. - 5 2 -T a b e r n a c l e of U n i t y based on a vetse by BahA'u'llah Farshid Samandari Soprano Tenor ban(nn) b'n(nn) ban(nn) b'n(nn) ban(nn) b'n(nn) ban(nn) ban(nn) b'n(nr. tan(nn) t'n(nn) tan(nn) t'n(nn) tan(nn) t'n(nn) tan(nn) t'n(nn) tan(nn) t'n(nn) tan(nn) t'n(nn) Anime J = 100 solo Sop. solo\ Alt. Sop. Alt mm tan'(nn) t'n(nn) tarffiin) t'n(nn) tarilnn) t'n(nn) . tanfnn) t'n(nn) tan^ nn) t'n(n ban(nn) b'n(nn) ban(nn) b'n(nn) ban(nn) b'n(nn) ban(nn) b'n(nn) ban(nn) b'n(nn) ban(nn) b'n(nn) ban(nn) b'n(nn) ban(nn) b'n(nn) ban(nn) b'n(nn) ban(nn) b'n(nn) tan{nn) t'n(nn) tan(nn) t'n(nn) tan(nn) t'n(nn) Ta - ber - na - cle, ta - ber-© Farshid Samandari, October 2005. S A T B revision June 2006. con Ped. - 5 4 --56--57--58--59--60-meh baa - reh yek daa - ric(, va bar - geh yek shaakh - saar. allargando poco a poco -61 -[93| rltardando • PPP 3hi bo - Und shod. Sa - raa - par - de - yehy Sa - raa - par - de - yehy PPP ghi bo - [and shod. 4P—^ft—^ Sa - raa - par - de - yeh Sa - raa - par - de - yeh/ ghi bo - land shod mm rltardando -62 -Sa - raa - par - de - yehy Sa - raa - par - de - yeh ye- gaa - ne - gi/ piu animato J = 112 -63 -va bar - «ye ha - meh baa - re yek daa - rid va -y-rrrr rr |T~ -I.. " M I " " " _ f _ r _ r _ r _ r _ r _ r _ r _ 1 * 7 lJlJ_J.lJ.-J— -65 -Asheghaneh Monologues Aglow based on quatrains by Baba-Tahir for Choir & Intercultural Ensemble duration: circa 19' Instrumentation Singers: Solo Tenor (preferably one familiar with Persian chanting technique and Radif)11; Choir (SATB - at least 6666) Ethnic: Erhu/Kementche, Santur12, Ud Percussion: Tabla; Zarb/Daf; Marimba/Temple blocks/Suspended Cymbals/Vibra Slap/Maracas/bongos Strings: Violin I, Violin II, Viola, Cello, Contrabass It is better to amplify solo singers. Using soft and regular mallet (rmizraab) -66 Text:^ Quatrains of BabA-TAhfr 1. Sahargaahaan faqaaneh bolbolaaneh; 0 ^ 0Ul3ja-ui Beh yaadeh ruyeh por nureh golaaneh. ^ J ^ J ^ J J j J J J U ,%J Zeh 'aaheh mo falak aakar hazr keh, ^ j-> »l J Asar dar naaleyeh sute-delaaneh. >JVJ ^ j J >"> /\)ightingale by dawn is not but wailing/ Recal l ing the memory of the flower glowing. Des t iny evades the gasp of my waiL The cry of broken hearts is piercing. Delom az dardeh to daa'em qamineh; Ai**- H J J j J j l ^ Be baalin kheshtamo bastar zamineh; A**j J^i <^ JL ,u Hami jormom keh mo the dust dirom; C I « J J ,0$* ^ Na har keh dust direh haalash 'ineh. >y » J J J ^ J J ^ J * <J Longing thee my companion forever; Stone my pi [low, dust my cover; M y only fault is your love; N o t every devotee can thus suffer! Deleh to key zeh haalom baakhabar bi? ^ W H ^ j ( / J 2 J J !3 Original Persian verses of Baba-Tahir face their roman transliteration, followed by provisional translation by F. Samandari (August 2006). -67 Kojaa rahmat be 'in khunin jegar bi? ui j£+ O R * * O J ' *i I * * To keh khunin jegar hargez nabudi; j J J A & > * J ^ - ? ' O K * * Key az khunin jegarhaa baakhabar bi? ui 0A»* ^ When could ye fathom my estate? Where could ye favor this bleeding soul? Never suffered a pain or wound/ How could you feel an afflicted heart? • • 11. Do zolfunet bovad tare robaabom; i^ Wj J ^ J J J ^ J ^ J J J Cheh mikhaahi az 'in haaleh kharaabom? f^J^ d^ctf' j ' u^^J^ To keh baa mo sareh yaari nadaari; isJ^ijJ^ J** >• W A i ^ Cheraa har nimeh shau 'aa'i beh khaabom? r^j* ^  u^ J " Strings to my lute thy locks all; What else you expect from me in fall? Should you not to lead me free/ Why ramble in my dreams by nightfall! Qameh 'eshqat biyaabun parvarom kard; Jj* Cishi —— ^ Havaayeh bakht bi baalo parom kard. ^ ?J$J ui ( ^ tfb* Beh mo gofti saburi kon saburi; J J J ^ L A I S J J ^ U & J * >i Saburi torfeh khaki bar sarom kard. pj^Ji LSJJ*** Agony of thy love settled me in a barren desert, Air of fate consumed my body and soul; " ^ You called me to be patient/ "patient!" Patience has shrouded me in dust! Maraa na sar na saamun 'aafaridand; ^ U U U AJ** A lj-> Parishaanam parishaan 'aafaridand; ^JJJJ2| QIUUJJ . Parishaan-khaateraan raftand az yaad; j J - ^ j LAAL^ Maraa az khaakeh ishaan "aafaridand. CAAJ1 , - S ^ J I '>* N o peace for now/ no hope for tomorrow; M y share of fate: piles of sorrow. Ardent devotees are long shrouded dust; Out of their remaining/ Vm fashioned! • • • 111. Yeki dardo aa na sar na saamun 'aafaridand; tli>>jJ ij^ 3 J J J Maraa na sar na saamun 'aafaridand; CiiJ** if* 3 6^3 c^i Maraa na sar na saamun 'aafaridand; Cx3J**3 6^33 J J J J u>*jJ j ' >» Maraa na sar na saamun'aafaridand; JHUU O^JU Ij a^J) ^ ^ l u u Some rather pain/ some potion; Some rather union/ some separation; Of pain and potion/ union and separation/ I; Rather only beloved volition. Nasimi kaz bone, aan kaakol aayo, Maraa koshtar ze booyeh sonbol aayo; Cho sau girom khyalash raa dar aaqush, Sahar az bastarom booye gol aayo. Breezes passing that forelock. J$ J™ J ui cr4*— 6 9 J J ! IS ji ^J^i JI ^ Are better than scent of hyacinth; Shall I sleep with her memory at night, By dawn my bed is fragrant of its scent. Enunciation Key f aaj. as in wall ai as in hat 01 as in cold vowels as i n moon i l as in feel ej. as in head ^eh: only appears at the end of the words, represents a sharp e as in pet ( Jj an unpronounced consonant as in air or app/e yi consonant as in year wi consonant as the ending consonant in show consonants ^ gi as in goat he: ending h is a pronounced consonant (jl as French "r" V -70-Performance directions • Soft amplification of solo Tenor (specially if he uses Persian traditional chant technique), Tabla (not Zils), Zarb (not Daf), Erhu, Santur and Oud is highly recommended. However, to preserve acoustic quality amplification should be through microphone not pickups. • Unless there is an unmeasured t remolo sign (three short slanted parallel lines) on a long note, such notes on Santur or Oud should be performed without reez. • Wiggly lines on top of the notes represent vibrato. Changes in the amplitude of such lines represent changing the range of vibrato. • Tilted lines to or from notes imply portamento or glissando to or from a note. Unless a gliss is indicated this effect is a short ornament. • * v : Implies just regular mordent mordent. Choir & solo • The dynamics expressed for solo represent its comparative loudness, if amplified solo should consider singing mildly softer, to maintain same balance. • Whenever choir is singing only vowels (not words), singers should gradually transition vowels from one to the other. For example an aa followed by oo, may . blend to create a sound similar to Aom. The speed of such transition is upon discretion of choir director. • Whenever a (mm) follows the ending m, represents a sustained mm at the end. • Slow wide vibrato: vibrato within a wide pitch range with a slow change rhythm. Erhu Here slur lines only represent phrasing of the music, not bow marking as common for bowed instruments. Performer has to devise suitable bowing. Oud • Harmonics that appear in this part are natural harmonics. Performer has to devise suitable bowing. • Snap pizz. on Oud is the same as on bowed strings. • Here slur lines only represent phrasing of the music, not plucking. Performer has to devise plucking. Percussion • Notes for temple block refer to a set of five and each written on a line from low to high. • Tambourine needs to be mounted on a stand and played by a beater/mallet (tambourine without membrane). • If pitched triangle is available either E or B triangles are preferred. • Bongos are replacing Naqareh (if available replaced with that). So should be played with fairly thin wooden/metal beaters. Preferably beaters head should be U-shape. Santur • Here slur lines only represent phrasing of the music, not plucking. Performer has to devise plucking. Strings • Glissando pizzicatos resemble Gamak, plucking the first note and swiftly moving toward the other pitch, without plucking again. Tabla • High and low notes only represent approximate pitch of every attack. Low notes refer to Bayan and high notes respectively to Dayan. • | : Represents Gamak. • Except for few instances where syllables are indicated, performer may interpret the exact beat types. • Unmeasured tremolo refers to very fast (unmeasured) performance, similar to reez or drum roll. Zarb • Unless there is a torn accompanying reez-i-bak that is represented by notes on first line versus fifth line, performer may interpret the exact beat types. • Notation method used for daf is based upon the same standard. • X-note heads represent rings only: just shaking the Daf. P r o g r a m N o t e s Asheghaneh implies lover's manner as well as the style of Ashiqs, who are mostly sufi troubadours in the Azerbaijan and Kurdistan region. Ashiqs' art classically, and Baba-TaMr1* quatrains typically attempt to depict only an inner state: a static moment. This piece, however tries to join these separate instants and draw a timeline: a statement of states. This piece is a day in a lover's life. It starts by a dawn and ends by next. It opens with longing for the beloved as day set them apart. Nightingale by dawn is not but wailing, Recalling the memory of the flower glowing. Gradually yearning turns to hopeless calls, and breeds a cynical worry: Never suffered a pain or a wound, How could you feel an afflicted heart? Second movement presents a hopeless complaint against fate for the torments of love. No peace for now, no hope for tomorrow; My share of fate: piles of sorrow. *4 Baba-Tahir (944-1019) is known as one of the most revered and respectable early poets and mystics of Persian history. Most of his life is shrouded in mystery. He probably mostly lived in Hamedan, Iran. His nickname, Oryan (the Naked), suggests that he was a wandering devish. Legend tells that he was an illiterate woodcutter, attending lectures at a religious school, where he was not welcome by his fellow-students. His quatrains were originally read in Pahlavi, Luri,Kurdish, Mazandarani, and Hamedani dialects, taking their present form in the course of time. The quatrains of Baba-Tahir have a more amorous and mystical connotation rather than philosophical. -74-Third movement reflects lover's deliberate choice, and thus one's hope of deliverance of pain: an end to separation. Shall I sleep with her memory at night, By dawn my bed is fragrant of its scent. -75 -Asheghaneh Monolgues Aglow based on quatrains of BAbA -TAMr Farshid Samandari I. Largo J = 60 Soprano Percussion! |Hlf^-' Farshid Samandari, August 2006. - 7 6 -- 7 8 -- 7 9 --80-- 8 2 --83 --84--85--86--88-- 8 9 -stringendo -91 --93 -- 9 4 --97-0 - 101 -- 102-- 103 -- 106-- 107--108 -- 109-- 110-- I l l --112--113 -- 115 --116--117-- 1 1 8 --119-- 120-- 121 -- 1 2 2 -- 123 -- 1 2 4 -- 126-- 127-- 128 -- 129 -[245] - 130-- 1 3 1 -- 132 -- 133 -- 134-- 135 -- 136-- 137-- 138-- 139-- 140-- 141 -- 142-- 143 -- 144 -- 145 -- 146-- 147-- 148 -- 149-Beyond for English horn with or without interactive electronics duration: circa 11' Performance notes • Fingering indications are based on Bruno Bartolozzi:New Sound for Woodwind. • Smorzato: is obtained through short produced exclusively diaphragm, without using tongue. • Tempo indications, as well as rhythms to a lesser extent, are to be performed organically. Thus, performer can deliberately interpret indicated tempos to suit his/her virtuosity and aesthetic taste. • Microtones indicated or the fast passages, if afflicting the natural flow of the music, could be considered as optional and so replaced with he closest semitone. Program notes Beyond is the second in a set of compositions for solo and interactive electronics, where electronics are mainly derived from soloist lines. Piece is a chromatic exploration on an imaginary microtonal moqdm formed through the union of a pair of distinct tetra-tone gushes. Piece begins with distinct contending figures. Rivalry arouses as each tries to expand its share. Eventually however, increased contention leads to a more profound perception, one that unites all the partial figures to outline a complete entirety. "Some Hindus were exhibiting an elephant in a dark room, and many people collected to see it. But as the place was too dark to permit them to see the elephant, they all felt it with their hands, to gain an idea of what it was like. One felt its trunk, and declared that the beast resembled a water pipe; another felt its ear, and said it must be a large fan; another its leg, and thought it must be a pillar; another felt its back, and declared the beast must be like a great throne... Waves of foam rise from the sea night and day, You look at the foam ripples and not the mighty sea.15 ^Rumi, Mathnavi ofRumi, tr. E.H. Whinfie. vol.3 p.29 Beyond for English Horn with/without interactive accompaniment for Morgan Zentner 152 Farshid Samandari rubato J=69 j? ff 3=£ • 0 3 • 0 vv 2 . 3 8 2 — ^ 8 "4~*r s * ^ 1 ^ > 1 i?P — = 3 S _ 70 smorzato -* f- f- • p. . «- "8 _ : ^— 4H>- ••^r- V + 1 © Farshid Samandari, March 2007. PPP - 153 -30 s 11 espressivo • mp - • -:- sjf mp 14 fP i3 30» * - = — 1 & v T U ^ - 1 *~ — 9 ^ § r gj % T - £ 18 4 accel. X T 20 JRRP accel.. J=120 tempo primo J=69 smorzato . ppp JJJ -0 L 2J B I ppp. o 74 • tt non vibrato Jr 4 * oop —p mf 25 - 154-- 155 -- 156-- 157-Towards Unity for Orchestra Commisioned by Vancouver Symphony Orchestra - 160 -Duration: circa 5' Instrumentation 1 Piccolo, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 1 English horn, 2 Bb clarinets, 1 Bass Clarinet, 2 Bassoons,l Contrabassoon; 4 French horns in F, 3 C Trumpets, 2 Trombones, 1 Bass Trombone, 1 Tuba; Timpani 3 drums either: one 32"and two28" or one of each 32", 28", and 25" (initially tuned as E, A, Bb); Percussion 1: Snare Drum (without snare), Tenor Drum, Bass Drum (preferably set flat), Triangle. Percussion 2: Triangle, Tarn Tarn, Suspended Cymbal, Vibraphone, Temple Blocks (set of five), and Glockenspiel. Harp; Strings: Violin I, Violin II, Violas, Cellos, Double bass. Performance notes X-headed notes: (for drum) rim shot + /muted: (for drum) holding membrane with one hand + -> o/o->+ : (for Brass) gradually from stopped to open/ from open to stopped glissando: every glissando takes the entire duration of it's starting note. Tremolo accel./rit.: gradually to/from unmeasured tremolo Program notes Towards Unity is inspired by the cultural mosaic of Vancouver, as well as the Olympic's mission of unity. Music depicts elements from first nations drumming, various eastern modes and systems as well as a continuum of western harmonic progression. Music begins as these elements are in rivalry. Gradually these gestures tend to coexist, and eventually complement each other to build an aggregate. Olympic's five interlocking rings are represented by five chords which eventually unifies rival elements. Towards Unity 'Moderate sempre cantabile J=100 Commisioned by Vancouver Symphony Orclieslra for 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympic J£2 J mo jamandai Conlrabussoon Bass Trombone ppp- • ' - -j mm n j j j a. (Dil CI] Yi\ / El| Gli M) y 'Mi- 1. • mf © Farshid Samandari, April 2007. - 163 -- 164-- 166-- 170-- 171 -173 - 179-- 182-- 184-o I N T E R - C U L T U R A L R E A L I T I E S -The inter-cultural project is a work in progress, with approaches as varied as the cultures that thrive on our planet. From the outset the challenge has always been to create an art that is more than hybrid, more than a simple juxtaposition of cultural types, but rather an art whose aesthetic stands on its own within a new and vibrant context. In art, as in life, it takes time to create context, to go beyond mere experiment, but this is precisely what the composers and performers of the Vancouver Inter-Cultural Orchestra (VICO) have set about to do. Inter-Culturealistic is about creating music that incorporates a real taste of different traditions; pieces that have meaning in and of themselves. This art of our emerging planetary future is no hodgepodge or smorgasbord - it is art from the real world, real because of its interculturalism, real because of the enthusiasm and care put into the making of it, real because of the long history of artists experimenting with new ideas and building bridges between cultures. Acknowledgements The VICO is comprised of musicians from all across the spectrum of world and classical music in Vancouver. Indeed, our roster is made up of musicians who belong also to smaller music ensembles with a significant standing on the world stage, namely: Orchid Ensemble, Mearingstone, Uzume Taiko, Sangha and the Armadillo String Quartet. We gratefully acknowledge the willingness of their individual members to be part of our orchestra. We are deeply thankful to the Chan Centre for facilitating this concert, and sincerely hope that this collaboration will be but the first of many in the years to come. Thank you Sid, Wendy, Joyce and Rachel. Finally we wish to thank our funders for their generous support - the Canada Council for the Arts, the BC Arts Council, the Province of British Columbia Gaming Branch, the Hamber Foundation and the SOCAN Foundation. And thank you, dear patron, for being here, for lending your ear, for helping to create this small oasis of beauty and peace in a troubled world. Moshe Denburg Program Director, VICO t Canada Council Consell des Arts y5r\ > for the Arts du Canada fc** BRrnsH COLUMBIA ARTS COUNCIL roNDATION II 9/Kxt S O C A N I m m » Rumen Ihcllainber r°™™. foundation ~ > ~ ' » ' ^ „ , COLUMBIA. . . . FOUNDATION IhCh o C O N C E R T P R O G R A M Antarsukha (Happiness from Within) Music by Gordon Grdina - ud, santur, tombak/daff, tab la-This work is based on an Arabic maqam (mode) called huzam. The intra features an extended taqasim (improvisation) for ud and santur, followed by the body of the piece which features the two percussionists. Asheghaneh (Monolgues Aglow) *World Premiere* Music by Farshid Samandari (2006) Text: the quatrains of Baba -Tahir (in the Farsi language) - tenor solo, choir, erhu, marimba/percussion, ud, santur, tombak/daff, tabla, violin 1, violin 2, viola, cello, double bass -Asheghaneh implies a lover's manner as well as the style of Ashiqs, who are mostly sufi troubadours in the Azerbaijan and Kurdistan region. The Ashiqs' art classically, and. Baba-Tahir's' quatrains typically, attempt to depict only an inner state: a static moment. Asheghaneh, however, tries to join these separate instants and draw a timeline: a statement of states. This piece is a day in a lover's life. It starts by a dawn and ends by next. It opens with longing for the beloved as day sets them apart. Nightingale by dawn is not but wailing. Recalling the memory of the flower glowing. Gradually yearning turns to hopeless calls, and breeds a cynical worry: Never suffered a pain or a wound, How could you feel an afflicted heart? The second movement presents a hopeless complaint against fate for the torments of love. Wo peace for now, no hope for tomorrow; My share of fate: piles of sorrow. The third movement reflects the lover's deliberate choice, and thus his hope of deliverance from pain: an end to separation. Shall I sleep with her memory at night, By dawn my bed is fragrant of its scent. Farshid Samandari Vancouver, August 2006. 1 BabS-Tahlr (944-1019) is known as one of the most revered and respectable early poets and mystics of Persian history. Most of his life is shrouded in mystery. He probably lived for the most part in Hamedan, Iran. His nickname, Oryan (the Naked), suggests that he was a wandering dervish. The quatrains of Baba-Tahir have more of an amorous and mystical connotation than a philosophical one. o C O N C E R T P R O G R A M Ting Song (Listening to the Pines) Music by Hua Yan-jun (1890-1950) Arr. Lan Tung (2004) - choir, erhu, zheng, marimba/percussion -During the Song Dynasty (960AD -1279AD) there were many wars between the Han in central China and the invading northern Jin. One account from this period describes a battle where the forces of Yue Fei, the famous Han general, routed the Jin army, which then fled in panic to the foot of a mountain. There the Jin waited anxiously, listening to the sound of the approaching Han troops by putting their ears to stones known as pine stones. This piece was inspired by that event. Hua Yan-Jun, also know as A Bing, was a wandering blind folk musician who left a rich legacy of compositions that have become "classics" in Chinese music. This new arrangement uses the choir in an orchestral manner to both support and contrast the solo erhu. Sheydaayi (Love Crazed) Music by Amir Haghighi Text: Saadi (in the Farsi language) ~ Tenor Voice, Harp, Daff (frame drum) -INTERMISSION Eagle Flies to Mountain Music by John Oliver (2006) Eagle Flies to Mountain was commissioned by the BC Chinese Music Ensemble. Tonight's performance is the world premiere of the revised version of the work. - zheng, erhu, gaohu, clarinet, accordion, Chinese percussion, pipa, daruan -The title may imply a traditional story-telling music, but I thought of this title as a symbol of the basic idea of the piece, which is to explore the four elements (earth, air, fire, water) and their implementation in concepts of the zodiac, specifically the personalities of cusp signs. Cusp signs take on the characteristics or personality traits of two adjacent signs of the zodiac. The four elements are attributed to various signs. Cusp signs combine two elements. Here I have named the combination of Earth/Air as "mountain," and Water/Fire as "eagle." Each of these combinations contains opposites and represents well the concept of yin and yang. Earth is apathetic, sluggish, grounded, practical and conservative in approach. Air is irritable, changeable, intellectual and abstract, inventive and clever. Water is sad, brooding, flowing, wavering, intuitive and emotional. Fire is active, enthusiastic, creative and courageous. The mountain is where earth and sky meet. Eagle flies high near the sun, then dives to catch fish in the water. Eagle can also fly to the mountain. This story is eternal, without an end. Yet we have stories about how it all began. And this is how my music begins. John Oliver THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF MUSIC Recital Hall Saturday, March 31, 2007 .5:00 p.m. 'A Touch of Perception" NON-REQUIRED STUDENT RECITAL Morgan Zentner, English Horn The American Dream Jennifer Butler Beyond Farshid Samandari -INTERMISSION-Joumey Martin Ritter Fierce Desire for Love's Delight Nebojsa Macura Program Notes & Performer / Composer Biographies "A Touch of Perception" is a project that started as an independent study while working on my master's degree in oboe performance. It has since given birth to a much bigger project with the end product being a professionally produced CD of all new music from tonight's concert featuring the English horn. The title of this concert emerges from the idea that music is perceived differently from one person to the next and each of these pieces gives different views of this concept. All of the composers are students at various stages of their education at the UBC School of Music, ranging from Undergraduate to Doctoral level. The hope is that every audience member has a different experience and having the small visual aspects added to the performance encourages this. My main goal was to provide the world of music with new and innovative music written for an instrument that is more often than not overlooked. -Morgan Zentner Morgan Zentner: Morgan Zentner is a rising young oboist who startecfher career in upstate New York. She began her studies at an early age with the oboists from the Syracuse Symphony and excelled quickly at the instrument. After a move to North Carolina with her family, she studied with John Ellis of the Warner Brothers Symphony, while attending the North Carolina School of the Arts. She was accepted into the East Carolina School of Music on a full scholarship and studied with Bo Newsome, earning a bachelor's degree in oboe performance. Ms. Zentner then decided to pursue a Masters Program in Instrumental Performance and chose the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. She is currently working towards the completion of this degree on a full scholarship. Ms. Zentner most recently has been accepted into the Guildhall School of Music and Dance in London, England and will leave this summer to study primarily with Gordon Hunt. Jennifer Butler: In September 2004, Jennifer returned to UBC in pursuit of a DMA and has spent most of this year preparing for her comprehensive exams. She is currently planning a thesis project that explores the history of women as creative artists. Her other main focus this year has been her work with CURV, a composer collective with Kristy Farkas and Marci Rabe. CURV is currently preparing the large collaborative work 20 Silent Words, which will be performed by Continuum Contemporary Music in Toronto for this April. Jennifer has studied composition with Glenn Buhr, Peter Hatch, Omar Daniel, Keith Hamel and Brent Lec, and has attended workshops with Arraymusic, Pacific Opera Victoria, the ThunderBay Symphony, the Kitchner-Waterloo Symphony, and the Penderecki String Quartet. Her music has been performed by many ensembles such as: the Microscore Project, Four Gallon Drum, Standing Wave, the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, the Vertical Orchestra, and the Ad Mare Wind Quintet. Vancouver duo Tiresias recently recorded her new work For Dreams of Things that Cannot Be. Note: The American Dream is a subjective term usually implying a successful and satisfying life. Perceptions of the American dream are usually framed in terms of American capitalism, its associated purported meritocracy, and the freedoms guaranteed by the U.S. Bill of Rights. The term is not easily defined, and has subjective meaning to many who claim it http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Dream. Farshid Samandari Farshid Samandari born in 1971, his catalogue includes from chamber music to orchestral, from art song to chorals. His music reflects his interest in contemporary classical vocabulary, spectral analysis, and extended techniques, as well as the precious universal heritage of ethnic music. His profound faith in Unity in Diversity, has stirred him towards integration of contemporary classical vocabulary with diverse ethnical music, to develop an intercultural musical tone and language in his compositions. This vision has directed him to collaborate with a variety of soloists, choirs and ensembles including Tehran National Symphony Orchestra, the Vancouver Inter-Cultural Orchestra, Laudate Singers, and Turning Point Ensemble. Beyond is the second in a set of compositions for solo and interactive electronics, where electronics are mainly derived from soloist lines. Piece is a chromatic exploration on an imaginary microtonal moqdm formed through the union of a pair of distinct terra-tone gushes. Piece begins with distinct contending figures. Rivalry arouses as each tries to expand its share. Eventually however, increased contention leads to a more profound perception, one that unites all the partial figures to outline a complete entirety. "Some Hindus were exhibiting an elephant in a dark room, and many people collected to see it. But as the place was too dark to permit them to see the elephant, they all felt it with their hands, to gain an idea of what it was like. One felt its trunk, and declared that the beast resembled a water pipe; another felt its ear, and said it must be a large fan; another its leg, and thought it must be a pillar; another felt its back, and declared the beast must be like a great throne... Waves of foam rise from the sea night and day, You look at the foam ripples and not the mighty sea. Rumi, Mathnavi of Rumi, tr. E.H. Whinfie. vol.3 p.29 Martin Ritter Martin has had pieces performed by Capilano College Singers, UBC's Contemporary Players and Chamber Strings. He has participated in readings with ensembles such as the Phoenix Chamber Choir and has been featured at several Sonic Boom festivals. He has also worked with performers such as Corey Hamm, Ralph Markham and Kenneth Broadway. His composition instructors include Mark Armanini, Stephen Chatman and Keith Hamel. Currently, he is finishing his Bachelor of Music at UBC. Journey For English hom and Max/MSP Journey consists of two contrasting musical materials, developed through additive/subtractive processes in which pitches are eliminated and/or reassigned. The electro acoustics are designed to further illustrate the journey. At first they are underlying the opening material without much interaction/distraction. As the electronic "carpet" fades away, a new relationship between performer and computer is established and a second theme emerges. Two things are happening. First the computer "imitates" the performer, using more and more abstract effects. Later on, the computer "listens" to the performer, adding layers of sound. While, at first, the performer has control over the density, this power is stripped away until the computer and performer go separate ways. Nebojsa Macura Nebojsa Macura (b. 1982) holds a Bachelor of Music degree in Composition from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where his principal teachers were Stephen Dembski and Laura Schwendinger. Groups that have performed Neb's compositions include Turning Point Ensemble, UW-Madison Contemporary Chamber Ensemble and Contemporary Vocal Ensemble, and UBC Contemporary Players. His music has been presented at Sonic Boom Festival, Vancouver Art Gallery's Eine Kleine Lunch Musik, and West Coast Student Composers' Symposium. In May 2007, Neb will graduate from the University of British Columbia with a Master of Music degree in Composition. The title Fierce Desire for Love's Delight comes from the English translation of a poem from India, and suggests the composition's programmatic aspect. While the use of electronic music in a lyrical neo-Romantic idiom may seem unorthodox to some, it presents the opportunity to create a unique commentary on one of the most universal human experiences. All the melodic material is derived from the chant-like theme presented by the English Horn at the beginning of the work, while the harmonic language is triadic and based primarily on mediant relationships. Jean Coulthard Readings Monday, April 3, 2006 Orpheum Theatre Ken Hsieh, Conductor i \ V A N C O U V E R 5JMPHONY BRAMWELL TOVEY, Music Director Farshid Samandari His music reflects his interest in contemporary classical vocabulary, spectral analysis, and extended techniques. In addition his profound faith in Unity in diversity, stirred him toward integration of different ethnic music and vocabulary in his compositions. This vision directed him to collaborate with a variety of choirs and ensembles including Tehran National Symphony Orchestra, and Vancouver Intercultural Orchestra, Laudate Singers, UBC guitar Quartet, and Turning Point Ensemble, as well as soloists such as Michael Strutt. Prelude to Certitude "This is the Day wherein the divine Lote-Tree calleth aloud, saying: O people! Behold ye My fruits and My leaves, incline then your ears unto My rustling. Beware lest the doubts of men debar you from the light of certitude." This piece deals with spiritual journey of everyone human from doubt and uncertainty towards the tranquility of certitude. It depicts a glimpse of this expedition, the entire path still unpaved. 1 Baha'u'IIah, Tablets ofBahd'u'Mh, revealed After tlie Kitdb-i-Aqdas (Chicago: US Baha'i Publishing Trust 1988) p. 78. J3J3J3J3J3J3J3J3 Deanna C C . Peluso Deanna Peluso is a B.C. born composer who has just finished herB.A. in Music Composition at Simon Fraser University. She has previously completed a B.A. in Cognitive Psychology, which she incorporates into her musical compositions. Her interests in compositions are generally acoustic, and for smaller ensembles, but she has an interest in integrating acoustic and electroacoustic compositions with other fine and performing arts, such as collaborations with film, theatre, dance or visual performance art. This is Deanna's first involvement with the Jean Coulthard Readings, and her first full orchestra piece. The Music Box Circus The Music Box Circus is a piece that is reminiscent of a amalgamation of an early 1900's children's music box, and a small traveling circus from the same era. Up in an old attic within an aged trunk, a small antiquated wooden music box lies within the dusty pieces of what used to be someone's treasured possessions. The illusion of a miniature size circus being trapped in a music box, where the key crank needs to be turned to keep the performance moving, yet mysteriously each time the music box winds down, it is wound up again. The circus is eternally suspended in time, repeating varied performances until the music box's internal mechanisms will only allow for the music to gradually wind down and unfold its Final performance. Colin MacDonald Co l in M a c D o n a l d (b.1971) is a f ree lance saxophonis t , composer , a n d ar ranger living in Vancouve r , B C . H e comple ted a B . M u s . in s a x o p h o n e at the Universi ty of Bri t ish C o l u m b i a , where he studied with Ju l ia No lan and David Branter. Co l i n is artistic director of the new mus ic group E n s e m b l e S y m p o s i u m , a member of the Saxoph i l i a s a x o p h o n e quartet, and p roduces concert of his own m u s i c as a soloist. Pr imari ly self- taught as a compose r , Co l in has studied j a z z ar rang ing with F red Str ide, world rhythms with G l e n V e l e z and Tr ichy S a n k a r a n , and B a l i n e s e g a m e l a n with Michae l T e n z e r and I D e w a Ketut Alit. In 2003 he w a s m a d e an A s s o c i a t e C o m p o s e r of the C a n a d i a n M u s i c Cen t re . Skillful Means In Z e n Buddh i sm we are taught to a p p r o a c h difficult situations with mind fu lness , and to act "skillfully" to rel ieve any suffer ing or con fus ion . I find the per fo rmance of mus i c to be a particularly vivid situation where great skil l is needed in order to work harmon ious ly with others. In Skillful Means I sought to cha l lenge the players with a work of virtuosity wh ich e m p h a s i z e s the communi ty , not the individual soloist, and whe re me lod ies and rhythms are c reated through the interplay of multiple parts. This p iece is a cont inuat ion of my fasc inat ion with pattern mus ic , and the slightly vert iginous feel ing c reated by o d d -number meters. Nicholas Fairbank Nicho las Fa i rbank l ives in Vic tor ia B C . H e t e a c h e s keyboard instruments & theory at the Vic tor ia Conserva to ry of M u s i c and is Director of the V i a Choral is choir . Af ter ear ly s tud ies in V a n c o u v e r he went to London , E n g l a n d and Par is , F rance , s tudy ing p ipe organ with Chr is topher Herr ick, R i cha rd Popp lewe l l and Naji Hak im. H e holds A R C T & A R C C O d ip lomas in organ per formance, and an M M u s degree in compos i t ion from the Universi ty of V ic tor ia where he w a s a w a r d e d the Martlet Award for E x c e l l e n c e in A d v a n c e d Compos i t i on (2004). H is compos i t ion teachers have inc luded S t e p h e n C h a t m a n & J o h n C e l o n a . Mr. Fa i rbank 's ca ta logue includes works for vo ice , p iano and o rgan solo, and for var ious chora l and instrumental ensembles . Dance A s the title sugges ts , this 10-minute p iece is choreographic in nature, but is in tended as a d a n c e more for the orchestra l inst ruments than for actual dancers . A melod ic motif (C -G - A b - E - D ) is int roduced in the open ing bars and l inks the p iece throughout , but constant ly chang ing rhythms, the lack of a definite tonal centre, and vary ing orchestra l colorat ions often d isgu ise this tune. T h e form is roughly A - B - A 1 ; about 4 minutes into the p iece there is a s low sect ion, at the end of wh ich a bassoon solo l eads back into faster mater ial involving s o m e contrapuntal t reatment of the first motif wh ich b e c o m e s more and more f ragmented as the p iece arr ives at its end . J3J3J2J3J3J3J2J3 i ii H'I I iM i P i l ii i ''lift1' Ml WW11 I  < ^ ilwi il tWHwBilii BJlwiiWilW* i ' iltiliin'W IjIRIef §§§* Sonic Boom 06 ftOWtt UNO fcCAPS: March 16 - 19 Western Front Theatre 303 East 8th Avenue, Vancouver Tickets: General: $15; Concession: $10; Four-day pass: $30 Presented by Vancouver "Pro M u s l c a V a n c o u v e r P r o M u s i c a Saturday, March 18, 2006 Turning Point Ensemble Owen Underhill, Director Trays in the Upright Position Daniel Pruger Of Life and Love "Adam and Eve Now" Farshid Samandari Echoes Tudor Feraru so little time (Catherine Graff Mientras en Espafla Kimla Attiana Voices Rising Marcus Goddard I N T E R M I S S I O N In the Fury of a Passing Moment Jeffrey Mettlewsky Blowhole Joanna Chapman-Smith Fantasy No. 3 {Premiere) John Baker 1. Prelude (Serio, tempo moderato); 2. Invention 1 (Animato); 3. //7i/e/?fon2(Interlude<Lento); 4. Passacaglia (Andante) Reflections on Solitude Nebojsa Macura Rocketfish Alfredo Santa Ana ...in a sort of runic rhyme John Burke Turning Point Ensemble: Brenda Fedoruk, flute/alto flute; Beth Orson, oboe/English horn; Francois Houle, clarinet; Marcus Goddard, trumpet; Jeremy Berkman, trombone; Marc DestruW, violin; Peggy Lee, cello; Colin Corner, double bass; Jane Hayes, piano; Daniel Tones, percussion Biographical notes begin on page 24 14 The Turning Point Ensemble was founded in 2001 with the mission to increase the understanding and appreciation of concert music composed during the past hundred years, linking the music of earlier times to the music of today. The ensemble has strongly championed Canadian composers through multiple performances of new works and recordings. The ensemble's debut CD, Strange Sphere (Artifact) - the music of Victoria resident Rudolf Komorous - was released in 2004, and a second CD of the music of Barbara Pentland is in development. The Turning Point Ensemble has collaborated with Vancouver Pro Musica on their Further East/Further West concerts, and is thrilled to be ensemble in residence with the Sonic Boom Festival. Owen Underhill lives in Vancouver where he is active as a composer and conductor, and faculty member in the School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University. As a conductor, Underhill has made conducting appearances with the Turning Point Ensemble, CBC Radio Orchestra, Manitoba Chamber Orchestra, the Victoria Symphony, the Vancouver Symphony, the National Arts Centre Orchestra, and the Vancouver New Music Ensemble. Underhill has been especially active in contemporary music (orchestral and ensemble) and opera. Among his most recent compositions are Canzone di Petra (2004) for flute and harp commissioned by Heidi Krutzen and Lorna McGhee, Laments and Dances (2003) commissioned by ARRAYMUSIC of Toronto, and The Widening Gyre (2002) written for the Turning Point Ensemble. He has had works performed by such groups as the Continuum Ensemble of London, the CBC Radio Orchestra, Vancouver Symphony, ARRAYMUSIC, the Manitoba Chamber Orchestra, the St. Lawrence String Quartet, the Austrian Ensemble for New Music, and the Arcadian Winds of Boston. Underhil lserved as Artistic Director of Vancouver New Music from 1987 to 2000. He is currently, with Jeremy Berkman, Co-Artistic Director of the Turning Point Ensemble. His music and performances exist on a number of compact disc recordings including/Ce/es//a/ Machine: Music of Owen Underhill which was released in 2000. • «$* • Portions of this concert by Turning Point Ensemble are being recorded by the Canadian Broadcasting Company to be broadcast at a later date. 15 Trays in the Upright Position ... In case of an emergency, walk calmly to the nearest exit, turn the handle and press outward. Exits are located here, here, here, and here. Should the room pressure drop, oxygen masks will fall from the ceiling within easy reach. Audience members with children or others requiring assistance should secure their own mask first and then proceed to assist the other. Now as we prepare for take-off, please bring your seats and trays into the upright posiiton, sit back, and enjoy the ride. Thank you for your attention. Of Life and Love: Let us tell, some other day This parting hurt and woe; Let us write, some other way, Love's secrets — better so."' Of Life and Love consists of a few illustrations of the Biblical epic, depicted as if they recur regularly in every daily life. However, I leave it up to audience's imagination to follow the story of Adam and Eve, or to regard this music as an abstract music or even to create their own drama. If following biblical epic in "Adam and Eve, now!, " there Adam represents spirit of a human being, and Eve his/her soul. The tree of good and evil signifies the human world, created noble, but filled with paradoxes, which creates a gray line between abundance and lack of every quality. The serpent represents attachment to the human world, which led the soul and spirit from the world of freedom to the world of bondage and caused him to turn from the Kingdom of Unity to the human world.2 The piece aims not only to utilize different cultural elements but also to bind them through Cheh&r-gah Dastgah presented as an urlinie. It begins with a horn call, to inaugurate both new day and year as in Persian tradition,3 a tradition borrowed from Tibetan Buddhist monasteries. The piece continues with few short sections to shape a developmental palindrome. At the end, another horn call ends the piece to remind of a new beginning . "Veiled in My immemorial being and in the ancient eternity of My essence, I knew My love for thee; therefore I created thee, have engraved on thee Mine image and revealed to thee My beauty"* 1 Baha'u'IIah, The Four Valleys, p. 63, from Rumi, Divdn-i-Shams. 2 For more information see: Abdu'l-Baha, Some Answered Questions, p. 123-6. 3 Traditionally an ensemble of Soma gives call, which is a brass instrument similar to Shaum. 4 Baha'u'IIah, The Arabic Hidden Words, no.3. 1 6 Echoes: The composition was conceived as an expansion of a single melody. Its main features are linearity and heterophony. The five instruments echo one another, playing shorter or longer segments of a modal-chromatic line, which in part is derived from a traditional song. The density of texture varies from section to section, depending on the amount of delay between overlapping entries, and the chromatic overcharge. The piano is treated exclusively as a melodic instrument (actually, two melodic instruments - corresponding to the two hands). The lines assigned to the two hands are either isorhyfhmic and spaced out across the keyboard, or complementary and confined to a particular closed register. There is a continuous build-up of tension toward the Coda, which serves as the final climax, introducing a more easily discernable, diatonic sound language. so little time: How long should we stay in one place before moving on? Is it possible to return once we have left it behind? This piece is an honest journey that searches for where the heart truly belongs. Mientras en Espafla: This piece was inspired by a trip to Spain Ln 2005. Voices Rising was inspired by Dylan Thomas's poem, "Do not go gently into that good night". In the music, solo instruments ascend by wide leaps out of a murmuring harmonic texture and drift back down to where they began. In the Fury of a Passing Moment was composed in fall 2005 while studying at Simon Fraser University. Jeffrey Mettlewsky was interested in writing a score for cello, trombone and clarinet that is based on the development of extended independent lines as a form of counterpoint among the three instruments. The result is an unrelenting piece of music both in its continuous fast-paced rhythm and reiterated themes, emphasized by the cello part. An improvised sustained section for double clarinet contrasts the clarinet's rapid melodic figures throughout the score. The use of chromaticism comments on the fleeting nature of sound and key signature in the piece, relating to the instantaneous temporality of a single moment in time. Blowhole: The idea for this piece is for the notated music to emerge from and submerge in freer improvised material like the back of a whale at the water's surface. Fantasy No. 3 is an atonal piece with a sense of harmonic progression based on the composer's PSTP system. (See biographical note.) The Prelude movement is in binary form, the two thematically parallel sections each beginning with three cello pizzicato notes. The first half modulates from the PSTP {{F, G, Bb, C}, {F#, G#, A, B}, {C#, D, D#, E}} to {{Bb, D, Eb, G}, {F#, G#, A, B}, {C, Db, E, F}}, ending with the sonority Eb-G-Bb-D. The 17 second half reverses this procedure, closing with the quintal sonority Bb-F-C-G which emerged in the opening. This Bb quintal sonority is a focus for the whole piece. Invention I is based on the row <Bb, G, F, C, G#, A, B, F#, D, C#, E, D#>. This is developed by classical Schoenbergian means, leading to a close in long notes which in turn connect PSTP-wise to the opening of Invention 2. The latter, mainly for the strings alone, constantly juxtaposes sonorities a tritone apart. After an exchange of roles in a texture of block chords vs. arpeggiation, all five instruments together invoke a passage from the prelude. The Passacaglia meme is a 12-tone row (plus concluding Bb) suitable for harmonization by the opening PSTP. The final variation echoes the prelude opening. Reflections on Solitude: Like many of my compositions, it contains a significant autobiographical element. Written in the months following a 1500-mile relocation that involved the crossing of an international as well as a cultural border, the work is a portrayal of inner tumult resulting from the inevitable sense of isolation experienced upon finding oneself in an unfamiliar environment, separated from friends and family. Rocketfish: Almost every attempt by an artist, composer, or writer to explain their work is met with failure. It is impossible to exert control over the effect of music through a written explanation because the work itself will change the conditions of reception given the listening experience of the audience. The composer can only bring a limited amount of understanding to her work, but it is the listener who will make up her own mind about what she listens to and how she will interact with the work, so the insight that the composer provides can influence and suggest a strategy for enjoying the event, but the work speaks for itself and connects with the audience without the aid of the composer. So if there is anything I can say about the piece that I wrote for today, it would be to say that it moves horizontally and vertically, like a rocketfish. ...In a Sort of Runic Rhyme: The title of the piece derives from a recurring line in Edgar Allan Poe's famous 1849 poem, The Bells, which onomatopoetically depicts the sound of bells in differing poetic contexts. Similar to the way the word "bells" articulates the poem's verse structure, the tubular bells delineate the thirteen major sections of the music, which are of equal length but of varied expression. The tubular bell notes are extended by the piano's tolling chords, which unfold a succession of thirteen harmonies that are taken up increasingly by the ensemble and made to rhyme through a network of internal references. 18 Student Composers' Workshop March 19,10:30 A.M. -2:30 P.M. Jeffrey Ryan, Moderator Tamahi Creek Julien Giraud Along with a Soft Kiss A Dream Revised Snake Charmer Rock Jessica Han Aaron Engum Alexia Katerina Tsangarakis Drosera Ensemble: Rebecca Blair, Clarinet; Edgar Bridwell, Violin; Jessica Werb, 'Cello; Rachel Anderson, Piano; Nick Avipro,Percussion; Kimla Attiana, Artistic director Mr. Ryan's biography appears on page 35. ***** ARAGON MU/IC JERVICE/ Composition - Arranging - Conducting - Publication 1 9 I N T E R - C U L T U R A L R E A L I T I E S The inter-cultural project is a work in progress, with approaches as varied as the cultures that thrive on our planet. From the outset the challenge has always been to create an art that is more than hybrid, more than a simple juxtaposition of cultural types, but rather an art whose aesthetic stands on its own within a new and vibrant context. In art, as in life, it takes time to create context, to go beyond mere experiment, but this is precisely what the composers and performers of the Vancouver Inter-Cultural Orchestra (VICO) have set about to do. Inter-Culturealistic is about creating music that incorporates a real taste of different traditions; pieces that have meaning in and of themselves. This art of our emerging planetary future is no hodgepodge or smorgasbord - it is art from the real world, real because of its mterculturalism, real because of the enthusiasm and care put into the making of it, real because of the long history of artists experimenting with new ideas and building bridges between cultures. Acknowledgements The VICO is comprised of musicians from all across the spectrum o.f world and classical music in Vancouver. Indeed, our roster is made up of musicians who belong also to smaller music ensembles with a significant standing on the world stage, namely: Orchid Ensemble, Mearingstone, Uzume Taiko, Sangha and the Armadillo String Quartet. We gratefully acknowledge the willingness of their individual members to be part of our orchestra. We are deeply thankful to the Chan Centre for facilitating this concert, and sincerely hope that this collaboration will be but the first of many in the years to come. Thank you Sid, Wendy, Joyce and Rachel. Finally we wish to thank our funders for their generous support - the Canada Council for the Arts, the BC Arts Council, the Province of British Columbia Gaming Branch, the Hamber Foundation and the SOCAN Foundation. And thank you, dear patron, for being here, for lending your ear, for helping to create this small oasis of beauty and peace in a troubled world. Moshe Denburg Program Director, VICO S » Canada Council Conseil des Arts /8k BRITISH COLUMBIA C D for the Arte du Canada WSStr £ ™ ™ C I L m P O N D A T I O N » / / • • . c f e S O C A I N I m COLUMBIA F O U N D A T I O N ThiChan C P N C E R T P R O G R A M Antarsukha (Happiness from Within) Music by Gordon Grdina - ud, santur, tombak/daff, tabla-This work is based on an Arabic maqam (mode) called huzam. The intro features an extended taqasim (improvisation) for ud and santur, followed by the body of the piece which features the two percussionists. Asheghaneh (Monolgues Aglow) *World Premiere* Music by Farshid Samandari (2006) Text: the quatrains of B2ba -TShir (in the Farsi language) - tenor solo, choir, erhu, marimba/percussion, ud, santur, tombak/daff, tabla, violin 1, violin 2, viola, cello, double bass -Asheghaneh implies a lover's manner as well as the style of Ashiqs, who are mostly sufi troubadours in the Azerbaijan and Kurdistan region. The Ashiqs' art classically, and Baba-Tahir's' quatrains typically, attempt to depict only an inner state: a static moment. Asheghaneh, however, tries to join these separate instants and draw a timeline: a statement of states. This piece is a day in a lover's life. It starts by a dawn and ends by next. It opens with longing for the beloved as day sets them apart. Nightingale by dawn is not but wailing, Recalling the memory of the flower glowing. Gradually yearning turns to hopeless calls, and breeds a cynical worry: Never suffered a pain or a wound, How could you feel an afflicted heart? The second movement presents a hopeless complaint against fate for the torments of love. No peace for now, no hope for tomorrow; My share of fate: piles of sorrow. The third movement reflects the lover's deliberate choice, and thus his hope of deliverance from pain: an end to separation. Shall I sleep with her memory at night, By dawn my bed is fragrant of its scent. Farshid Samandari Vancouver, August 2006. 1 Baba-T3hir (944-1019) is known as one of the most revered and respectable early poets and mystics of Persian history. Most of his life is shrouded in mystery. He probably lived for the most part in Hamedan, Iran, His nickname, Oryan (the Naked), suggests that he was a wandering dervish. The quatrains of Baba-Tahir have more of an amorous and mystical connotation than a philosophical one. o C O N C E R T P R O G R A M Ting Song (Listening to the Pines) Music by Hua Yan-jun (1890-1950) Arr. Lan Tung (2004) - choir, erhu, zheng, marimba/percussion -During the Song Dynasty (960AD -1279AD) there were many wars between the Han in central China and the invading northern Jin. One account from this period describes a battle where the forces of Yue Fei, the famous Han general, routed the Jin army, which then fled in panic to the foot of a mountain. There the Jin waited anxiously, listening to the sound of the approaching Han troops by putting their ears to stones known as pine stones. This piece was inspired by that event. Hua Yan-Jun, also know as A Bing, was a wandering blind folk musician who left a rich legacy of compositions that have become "classics" in Chinese music. This new arrangement uses the choir in an orchestral manner to both support and contrast the solo erhu. Sheydaayi (Love Crazed) Music by Amir Haghighi Text: Saadi (in the Farsi language) - Tenor Voice, Harp, Daff (frame drum) -INTERMISSION Eagle Flies to Mountain Music by John Oliver (2006) Eagle Flies to Mountain was commissioned by the BC Chinese Music Ensemble. Tonight's performance is the world premiere of the revised version of the work. ~ zheng, erhu, gaohu, clarinet, accordion, Chinese percussion, pipa, daruan -The title may imply a traditional story-telling music, but I thought of this title as a symbol of the basic idea of the piece, which is to explore the four elements (earth, air, fire, water) and their implementation in concepts of the zodiac, specifically the personalities of cusp signs. Cusp signs take on the characteristics or personality traits of two adjacent signs of the zodiac. The four elements are attributed to various signs. Cusp signs combine two elements. Here I have named the combination of Earth/Air as "mountain," and Water/Fire as "eagle." Each of these combinations contains opposites and represents well the concept of yin and yang. Earth is apathetic, sluggish, grounded, practical and conservative in approach. Air is irritable, changeable, intellectual and abstract, inventive and clever. Water is sad, brooding, flowing, wavering, intuitive and emotional. Fire is active, enthusiastic, creative and courageous. The mountain is where earth and sky meet. Eagle flies high near the sun, then dives to catch fish in the water. Eagle can also fly to the mountain. This story is eternal, without an end. Yet we have stories about how it all began. And this is how my music begins. John Oliver © THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF MUSIC Recital Hall Saturday, March 31, 2007 5:00 p.m. 'A Touch of Perception" NON-REQUIRED STUDENT RECITAL Morgan Zentner, English Horn The American Dream Jennifer Butler Beyond Farshid Samandari -INTERMISSION-Joumey Martin Ritter Fierce Desire for Love's Delight Nebojsa Macura Program Notes & Performer / Composer Biographies "A Touch of Perception" is a project that started as an independent study while working on my master's degree in oboe performance. It has since given birth to a much bigger project with the end product being a professionally produced CD of all new music from tonight's concert featuring the English horn. The title of this concert emerges from the idea that music is perceived differently from one person to the next and each of these pieces gives different views of this concept. All of the composers are students at various stages of their education at the UBC School of Music, ranging from Undergraduate to Doctoral level. The hope is that every audience member has a different experience and having the small visual aspects added to the performance encourages this. My main goal was to provide the world of music with new and innovative music written for an instrument that is more often than not overlooked. -Morgan ZentneT Morgan Zentner: Morgan Zentner is a rising young oboist who startecfher career in upstate New York. She began her studies at an early age with the oboists from the Syracuse Symphony and excelled quickly at the instrument. After a move to North Carolina with her family, she studied with John Ellis of the Warner Brothers Symphony, while attending the North Carolina School of the Arts. She was accepted into the East Carolina School of Music on a full scholarship and studied with Bo Newsome, earning a bachelor's degree in oboe performance. Ms. Zentner then decided to pursue a Masters Program in Instrumental Performance and chose the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. She is currently working towards the completion of this degree on a full scholarship. Ms. Zentner most recently has been accepted into the Guildhall School of Music and Dance in London, England and will leave this summer to study primarily with Gordon Hunt. Jennifer Butler: In September 2004, Jennifer returned to UBC in pursuit of a DMA and has spent most of this year preparing for her comprehensive exams. She is currently planning a thesis project that explores the history of women as creative artists. Her other main focus this year has been her work with CURV, a composer collective with Kristy Farkas and Marci Rabe. CURV is currently preparing the large collaborative work 20 Silent Words, which will be performed by Continuum Contemporary Music in Toronto for this April. Jennifer has studied composition with Glenn Buhr, Peter Hatch, Omar Daniel, Keith Hamel and Brent Lee, and has attended workshops with Arraymusic, Pacifc Opera Victoria, the ThunderBay Symphony, the Kitchner-Waterloo Symphony, and the Penderecki String Quartet. Her music has been performed by many ensembles such as: the Microscore Project, Four Gallon Drum, Standing Wave, the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, the Vertical Orchestra, and the Ad Mare Wind Quintet. Vancouver duo Tiresias recently recorded her new work For Dreams of Things that Cannot Be. Note: The American Dream is a subjective term usually implying a successful and satisfying life. Perceptions of the American dream are usually framed in terms of American capitalism, its associated purported meritocracy, and the freedoms guaranteed by the U.S. Bill of Rights. The term is not easily defined, and has subjective meaning to many who claim it http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Dream. Farshid Samandari Farshid Samandari bom in 1971, his catalogue includes from chamber music to orchestral, from art song to chorals. His music reflects his interest in contemporary classical vocabulary, spectral analysis, and extended techniques, as well as the precious universal heritage of ethnic music. His profound faith in Unity in Diversity, has stirred him towards integration of contemporary classical vocabulary with diverse ethnical music, to develop an intercultural musical tone and language in his compositions. This vision has directed him to collaborate with a variety of soloists, choirs and ensembles including Tehran National Symphony Orchestra, the Vancouver Inter-Cultural Orchestra, Laudate Singers, and Turning Point Ensemble. Beyond is the second in a set of compositions for solo and interactive electronics, where electronics are mainly derived from soloist lines. Piece is a chromatic exploration on an imaginary microtonal moqdm formed through the union of a pair of distinct tetra-tone gushes. Piece begins with distinct contending figures. Rivalry arouses as each tries to expand its share. Eventually however, increased contention leads to a more profound perception, one that unites all the partial figures to outline a complete entirety. "Some Hindus were exhibiting an elephant in a dark room, and many people collected to see it. But as the place was too dark to permit them to see the elephant, they all felt it with their hands, to gain an idea of what it was like. One felt its trunk, and declared that the beast resembled a water pipe, another felt its ear, and said it must be a large fan; another its leg, and thought it must be a pillar; another felt its back, and declared the beast must be like a great throne... Waves of foam rise from the sea night and day, You look at the foam ripples and not the mighty sea. Rumi, Mathnavi ofRumi, tr. E.H. Whinfie. vol.3 p.29 Martin Ritter Martin has had pieces performed by Capilano College Singers, UBC's Contemporary Players and Chamber Strings. He has participated in readings with ensembles such as the Phoenix Chamber Choir and has been featured at several Sonic Boom festivals. He has also worked with performers such as Corey Hamm, Ralph Markham and Kenneth Broadway. His composition instructors include Mark Armanini, Stephen Chatman and Keith Hamel. Currently, he is finishing his Bachelor of Music at UBC. Journey For English horn and Max/MSP Journey consists of two contrasting musical materials, developed through additive/subtractive processes in which pitches are eliminated and/or reassigned. The electro acoustics are designed to further illustrate the journey. At first they are underlying the opening material without much interaction/distraction. As the electronic "carpet" fades away, a new relationship between performer and computer is established and a second theme emerges. Two things are happening. First the computer "imitates" the performer, using more and more abstract effects. Later on, the computer "listens" to the performer, adding layers of sound. While, at first, the performer has control over the density, this power is stripped away until the computer and performer go separate ways. Nebojsa Macura Nebojsa Macura (b. 1982) holds a Bachelor of Music degree in Composition from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where his principal teachers were Stephen Dembski and Laura Schwendinger. Groups that have performed Neb's compositions include Turning Point Ensemble, UW-Madison Contemporary Chamber Ensemble and Contemporary Vocal Ensemble, and UBC Contemporary Players. His music has been presented at Sonic Boom Festival, Vancouver Art Gallery's Eine Kleine Lunch Musik, and West Coast Student Composers' Symposium. In May 2007, Neb will graduate from the University of British Columbia with a Master of Music degree in Composition. The title Fierce Desire for Love's Delight comes from the English translation of a poem from India, and suggests the composition's programmatic aspect. While the use of electronic music in a lyrical neo-Romantic idiom may seem unorthodox to some, it presents the opportunity to create a unique commentary on one of the most universal human experiences. All the melodic material is derived from the chant-like theme presented by the English Horn at the beginning of the work, while the harmonic language is triadic and based primarily on mediant relationships. Jean Coulthard Readings Monday, April 3, 2006 Orpheum Theatre Ken Hsieh, Conductor ^ \ V A N C O U V E R 5JMPHONY B RAM WELL TOVEY, Music Director Farshid Samandari His music reflects his interest in contemporary classical vocabulary, spectral analysis, and extended techniques. In addition his.profound faith in Unity in diversity, stirred him toward integration of different ethnic music and vocabulary in his compositions. This vision directed him to collaborate with a variety of choirs and ensembles including Tehran National Symphony Orchestra, and Vancouver Intercultural Orchestra, Laudate Singers, UBC guitar Quartet, and Turning Point Ensemble, as well as soloists such as Michael Strutt. Prelude to Certitude "This is the Day wherein the divine Lote-Tree calleth aloud, saying: O people! Behold ye My fruits and My leaves, incline then your ears unto My rustling. Beware lest the doubts of men debar you from the light of certitude." This piece deals with spiritual journey of everyone human from doubt and uncertainty towards the tranquility of certitude. It depicts a glimpse of this expedition, the entire path still unpaved. ' Baha'uTJah, Tablets of Baha'u'IIah, revealed After the Kitdb-i-Aqdas (Chicago: US Baha'i Publishing Trust, 1988) p. 78. J3J3J3J3J3J3J3J3 Deanna C.C. Peluso Deanna Peluso is a B.C. born composer who has just finished her B.A. in Music Composition at Simon Fraser University. She has previously completed a B.A. in Cognitive Psychology, which she incorporates into her musical compositions. Her interests in compositions are generally acoustic, and for smaller ensembles, but she has an interest in integrating acoustic and electroacoustic compositions with other fine and performing arts, such as collaborations with film, theatre, dance or visual performance art. This is Deanna's first involvement with the Jean Coulthard Readings, and her first full orchestra piece. The Music Box Circus The Music Box Circus is a piece that is reminiscent of a amalgamation of an early 1900's children's music box, and a small traveling circus from the same era. Up in an old attic within an aged trunk, a small antiquated wooden music box lies within the dusty pieces of what used to be someone's treasured possessions. The illusion of a miniature size circus being trapped in a music box, where the key crank needs to be turned to keep the performance moving, yet mysteriously each time the music box winds down, it is wound up again. The circus is eternally suspended in time, repeating varied performances until the music box's internal mechanisms will only allow for the music to gradually wind down and unfold its Final performance. J3j3j3j3j3j3j3jJ Colin MacDonald Co l in M a c D o n a l d (b.1971) is a f ree lance saxophonis t , composer , and ar ranger living in V a n c o u v e r , B C . H e comp le ted a B . M u s . in saxophone at the Universi ty of Bri t ish C o l u m b i a , where he s tudied with Ju l ia No lan and David Branter. Co l i n is artistic director of the new mus ic group E n s e m b l e S y m p o s i u m , a member of the Saxoph i l i a s a x o p h o n e quartet, and p roduces concer t of his own mus i c as a soloist. Primari ly self- taught a s a compose r , Co l in has s tudied j a z z ar rang ing with F red Str ide, world rhythms with G l e n V e l e z and Tr ichy S a n k a r a n , and Ba l i nese game lan with Michael T e n z e r and I D e w a Ketut Alit. In 2003 he w a s m a d e an A s s o c i a t e C o m p o s e r of the C a n a d i a n M u s i c Cen t re . Skillful Means In Z e n Buddh i sm we are taught to a p p r o a c h difficult situations with mindfu lness, and to act "skillfully" to rel ieve any suffer ing or confus ion. I f ind the per formance of mus ic to be a particularly vivid situation where great skil l is needed in order to work harmonious ly with others. In Skillful Means I sought to cha l lenge the players with a work of virtuosity wh ich e m p h a s i z e s the communi ty , not the individual soloist, and whe re me lod ies and rhythms are created through the interplay of multiple parts. This p iece is a cont inuat ion of my fasc inat ion with pattern mus i c , and the slightly vert iginous feel ing c reated by o d d -number meters. J3J3J3J3J3J3J3J3 Nicholas Fairbank Nicho las Fa i rbank l ives in V ic tor ia B C . H e teaches keyboard instruments & theory at the Vic tor ia Conserva to ry of M u s i c and is Director of the V i a Chora l is choir. Af ter early s tud ies in V a n c o u v e r he went to L o n d o n , E n g l a n d and Par is , F rance , s tudy ing pipe o rgan with Chr is topher Herr ick, R i cha rd Popp lewe l l and Naji Hak im. H e holds A R C T & A R C C O d ip lomas in organ per fo rmance, and an M M u s degree in compos i t ion from the Universi ty of Vic tor ia where he w a s a w a r d e d the Mart let Award for E x c e l l e n c e in A d v a n c e d Compos i t i on (2004). H is compos i t ion teachers have inc luded S tephen C h a t m a n & J o h n C e l o n a . Mr. Fa i rbank ' s ca ta logue includes works for vo ice , piano and organ solo, and for var ious chora l and instrumental ensemb les . Dance A s the title sugges ts , this 10-minute p iece is choreograph ic in nature, but is intended a s a d a n c e more for the orchest ra l instruments than for actual dancers . A melod ic motif ( C -G - A b - E - D ) is introduced in the open ing bars and links the piece throughout, but constant ly chang ing rhythms, the lack of a definite tonal centre, and vary ing orchestral colorat ions often d isgu ise this tune. T h e form is roughly A - B - A 1 ; about 4 minutes into the p iece there is a s low sec t ion , at the end of wh ich a bassoon solo l eads back into faster mater ia l involving s o m e contrapuntal t reatment of the first motif wh ich b e c o m e s more and more f ragmented a s the p iece arr ives at its end . > Sonic Boom 06 totttitNu N S W M U S I C PANORAMA March 16 - 19 Western Front Theatre 303 East 8th Avenue, Vancouver Tickets: General: $15; Concession: $10; Four-day pass: $30 Presented by Vancouver Pro Mu.stcfl V a n c o u v e r P r o M u s i c a Saturday, March 18, 2006 Turning Point Ensemble Owen Underhill, Director Trays in the Upright Position Daniel Pruger Of Life and Love "Adam and Eve Now" Farshid Samandari Echoes Tudor Feraru so little time Katherine Graff Mientras en Espafla Kimla Attiana Voices Rising Marcus Goddard I N T E R M I S S I O N In the Fury of a Passing Moment Jeffrey Mettlewsky Blowhole Joanna Chapman-Smith Fantasy No. 3 {Premiere) John Baker 1. Prelude (Serio, tempo moderate); 2. Invention 1 (Animate); 3. Invention 2(Interlude<Lento); 4. Passacaglia (Andante) Reflections on Solitude Nebojsa Macura Rocketfish Alfredo Santa Ana ...in a sort of runic rhyme John Burke Turning Point Ensemble: Brenda Fedoruk, flute/alto flute; Beth Orson, oboe/English horn; Francois Houle, clarinet; Marcus Goddard, trumpet; Jeremy Berkman, trombone; Marc Destrube, violin; Peggy Lee, cello; Colin Corner, double bass; Jane Hayes, piano; Daniel Tones, percussion Biographical notes begin on page 24 14 The Turning Point Ensemble was founded in 2001 with the mission to increase the understanding and appreciation of concert music composed during the past hundred years, linking the music of earlier times to the music of today. The ensemble has strongly championed Canadian composers through multiple performances of new works and recordings. The ensemble's debut CD, Strange Sphere (Artifact) - the music of Victoria resident Rudolf Komorous ~ was released in 2004, and a second CD of the music of Barbara Pentland is in development. The Turning Point Ensemble has collaborated with Vancouver Pro Musica on their Further East/Further West concerts, and is thrilled to be ensemble in residence with the Sonic Boom Festival. Owen Underhill lives in Vancouver where he is active as a composer and conductor, and faculty member in the School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University. As a conductor, Underhill has made conducting appearances with the Turning Point Ensemble, CBC Radio Orchestra, Manitoba Chamber Orchestra, the Victoria Symphony, the Vancouver Symphony, the National Arts Centre Orchestra, and the Vancouver New Music Ensemble. Underhill has been especially active in contemporary music (orchestral and ensemble) and opera. Among his most recent compositions are Canzone di Petra (2004) for flute and harp commissioned by Heidi Krutzen and Lorna McGhee, Laments and Dances (2003) commissioned by ARJIAYMUSIC of Toronto, and The Widening Gyre (2002) written for the Turning Point Ensemble. He has had works performed by such groups as the Continuum Ensemble of London, the CBC Radio Orchestra, Vancouver Symphony, ARRAYMUSIC, the Manitoba Chamber Orchestra, the St. Lawrence String Quartet, the Austrian Ensemble for New Music, and the Arcadian Winds of Boston. Underhil Iserved as Artistic Director of Vancouver New Music from 1987 to 2000. He is currently, with Jeremy Berkman, Co-Artistic Director of the Turning Point Ensemble. His music and performances exist on a number of compact disc recordings including/Ce/es//'a/ Machine: Music of Owen Underhill which was released in 2000. • 4* 4* Portions of this concert by Turning Point Ensemble are being recorded by the Canadian Broadcasting Company to be broadcast at a later date. 1 5 Trays in the Upright Position ... In case of an emergency, walk calmly to the nearest exit, turn the handle and press outward. Exits are located here, here, here, and here. Should the room pressure drop, oxygen masks will fall from the ceiling within easy reach. Audience members with children or others requiring assistance should secure their own mask first and then proceed to assist the other. Now as we prepare for take-off, please bring your seats and trays into the upright posiiton, sit back, and enjoy the ride. Thank you for your attention. Of Life and Love: Let us tell, some other day This parting hurt and woe; Let us write, some other way, Love's secrets -- better so. " ' Of Life and Love consists of a few illustrations of the Biblical epic, depicted as if they recur regularly in every daily life. However, I leave it up to audience's imagination to follow the story of Adam and Eve, or to regard this music as an abstract music or even to create their own drama. If following biblical epic in "Adam and Eve, now!, " there Adam represents spirit of a human being, and Eve his/her soul. The tree of good and evil signifies the human world, created noble, but filled with paradoxes, which creates a gray line between abundance and lack of every quality. The serpent represents attachment to the human world, which led the soul and spirit from the world of freedom to the world of bondage and caused him to turn from the Kingdom of Unity to the human world.2 The piece aims not only to utilize different cultural elements but also to bind them through Chehar-gah Dastgah presented as an urlinie. It begins with a horn call, to inaugurate both new day and year as in Persian tradition,3 a tradition borrowed from Tibetan Buddhist monasteries. The piece continues with few short sections to shape a developmental palindrome. At the end, another hom call ends the piece to remind of a new beginning . "Veiled in My immemorial being and in the ancient eternity of My essence, I knew My love for thee; therefore I created thee, have engraved on thee Mine image and revealed to thee My beauty."* 1 Baha'u'IIah, The Four Valleys, p. 63, from Rumi, Divdn-i-Shams. 2 For more information see: Abdu'l-Baha, Some Answered Questions, p. 123-6. 3 Traditionally an ensemble of Soma gives call, which is a brass instrument similar to Shaum. 4 Baha'u'IIah, The Arabic Hidden Words, no.3. 16 Echoes: The composition was conceived as an expansion of a single melody. Its main features are linearity and heterophony. The five instruments echo one another, playing shorter or longer segments of a modal-chromatic line, which in part is derived from a traditional song. The density of texture varies from section to section, depending on the amount of delay between overlapping entries, and the chromatic overcharge. The piano is treated exclusively as a melodic instrument (actually, two melodic instruments - corresponding to the two hands). The lines assigned to the two hands are either isorhythmic and spaced out across the keyboard, or complementary and confined to a particular closed register. There is a continuous build-up of tension toward the Coda, which serves as the final climax, introducing a more easily discernable, diatonic sound language. so little time: How long should we stay in one place before moving on? Is it possible to return once we have left it behind? This piece is an honest journey that searches for where the heart truly belongs. Mientras en Espafla: This piece was inspired by a trip to Spain in 2005. Voices Rising was inspired by Dylan Thomas's poem, "Do not go gently into that good night". In the music, solo instruments ascend by wide leaps out of a murmuring harmonic texture and drift back down to where they began. In the Fury of a Passing Moment was composed in fall 2005 while studying at Simon Fraser University. Jeffrey Mettlewsky was interested in writing a score for cello, trombone and clarinet that is based on the development of extended independent lines as a form of counterpoint among the three instruments. The result is an unrelenting piece of music both in its continuous fast-paced rhythm and reiterated themes, emphasized by the cello part. An improvised sustained section for double clarinet contrasts the clarinet's rapid melodic figures throughout the score. The use of chromaticism comments on the fleeting nature of sound and key signature in the piece, relating to the instantaneous temporality of a single moment in time. Blowhole: The idea for this piece is for the notated music to emerge from and submerge in freer improvised material like the back of a whale at the water's surface. Fantasy No. 3 is an atonal piece with a sense of harmonic progression based on the composer's PSTP system. (See biographical note.) The Prelude movement is in binary form, the two thematically parallel sections each beginning with three cello pizzicato notes. The first half modulates from the PSTP {{F, G, Bb, C}, {F#, G#, A, B}, {C#, D, D#, E}} to {{Bb, D, Eb, G}, {F#, G#, A, B}, {C, Db, E, F}}, ending with the sonority Eb-G-Bb-D. The 17 .''second half reverses this procedure, closing with the quintal sonority Bb-F-C-, G which emerged in the opening. This Bb quintal sonority is a focus for the whole piece. Invention 1 is based on the row <Bb, G, F, C, G#, A, B, F#, D, C#, E, D#>. This is developed by classical Schoenbergian means, leading to a close in long notes which in turn connect PSTP-wise to the opening of Invention 2. The latter, mainly for the strings alone, constantly juxtaposes sonorities a tritone apart. After an exchange of roles in a texture of block chords vs. arpeggiation, all five instruments together invoke a passage from the prelude. The Passacaglia meme is a 12-tone row (plus concluding Bb) suitable for harmonization by the opening PSTP. The final variation echoes the prelude opening. Reflections on Solitude: Like many of my compositions, it contains a significant autobiographical element. Written in the months following a 1500-mile relocation that involved the crossing of an international as well as a cultural border, the work is a portrayal of inner tumult resulting from the inevitable sense of isolation experienced upon finding oneself in an unfamiliar environment, separated from friends and family. Rocketfish: Almost every attempt by an artist, composer, or writer to explain their work is met with failure. It is impossible to exert control over the effect of music through a written explanation because the work itself will change the conditions of reception given the listening experience of the audience. The composer can only bring a limited amount of understanding to her work, but it is the listener who will make up her own mind about what she listens to and how she will interact with the work, so the insight that the composer provides can influence and suggest a strategy for enjoying the event, but the work speaks for itself and connects with the audience without the aid of the composer. So if there is anything I can say about the piece that I wrote for today, it would be to say that it moves horizontally and vertically, like a rocketfish. ...In a Sort of Runic Rhyme: The title of the piece derives from a recurring line in Edgar Allan Poe's famous 1849 poem, The Bells, which onomatopoetically depicts the sound of bells in differing poetic contexts. Similar to the way the word "bells" articulates the poem's verse structure, the tubular bells delineate the thirteen major sections of the music, which are of equal length but of varied expression. The tubular bell notes are extended by the piano's tolling chords, which unfold a succession of thirteen harmonies that are taken up increasingly by the ensemble and made to rhyme through a network of internal references. 18 Student Composers' Workshop March 19,10:30 A.M. -2:30 P.M. J e f f rey R y a n , M o d e r a t o r Tamahi Creek Julien Giraud Along with a Soft Kiss Jessica Han A Dream Revised Aaron Engum Snake Charmer Rock Alexia Katerina Tsangarakis Drosera Ensemble: Rebecca Blair, Clarinet; Edgar Bridwell, Violin; Jessica Werb, 'Cello; Rachel Anderson, Piano; Nick Avipro,Percussion; Kimla Attiana, Artistic director Mr. Ryan's biography appears on page 35. ***** ARAGON MUJJIC JERVICE/ Composition - Arranging - Conducting - Publication 1 9 

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