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Graduate recitals Pain, Daniel 2007

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GRADUATE RECITALS by DANIEL PAIN B. Mus., University of British Columbia, 2006 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSIC in THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES (Orchestral Instruments) THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA June, 2007 © Daniel Laurence Pain, 2007 ABSTRACT The thesis for the Master of Music degree in Orchestral Instruments consists of two full-length recitals, or the equivalent, with emphasis on solo works, but also including representative chamber works. My two full-length recitals were performed on 17 June 2006 and 15 March 2007. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF MUSIC Recital Hall Thursday, March 15, 2007 5:30pm MASTER'S STUDENT RECITAL* DANIEL PAIN With Aleksander Szram, Piano Concerto for Tuba or Bass Trombone Andante con Moto Andante Expressivo Allegro Ritmico Eric Ewazen b.1954 Will there Be A Time Moderato Elizabeth Raum b.1945 The Neighbors Fighting Zone Will there Ever Be a Time - I N T E R M I S S I O N -Concerto for Tuba and Orchestra John Williams b. 1932 Allegro Moderato Andante Allegro Molto In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Music degree with a major in Tuba. Program Notes Eric Ewazen - Concerto for Tuba or Bass trombone. This concerto actually started its life as a Sonata for Tuba or Bass Trombone and Piano. It was commissioned by, and dedicated to, Karl Kramer who is the principal tuba of the New Haven Symphony Orchestra and is a professor of music and the University Of Illinois School Of Music. The piece was transformed into a concerto in 1998 on the suggestion of Warren Deck. That year it was used as the contest piece for low brass held at the Julliard school of Music. In its new concerto format it was premiered by Stefan Sanders with the Julliard School Orchestra under the Direction of Jahja Ling. This piece encompasses a very rich sound characteristic of the composer. It provides many challenges throughout including extreme registers; going up to a high Ab in the first movement, and multiple meter changes in the 3 t d movement also adding to the difficulty of the piece. Elizabeth Raum - Will There Be A Time - For Solo Tuba. The Piece was written as a commission for the Canadian Tubist John Griffiths. He had originally asked Mrs. Raum to write something humorous but a week later she came back to him and said that she just didn't think of the tuba as a humorous instrument and thus came "Will There Be A Time". The piece was conceived and then developed after reading an article in a News Paper. It was pertaining to the Soviet Regime during the early 20 th century. Due to the wide spread political unrest in the Soviet Union at this time many citizens were often resettled in different parts of the country and many political parties were formed. This caused a great deal of turmoil among the residents of the Soviet Union pitting one political faction against the other. The article, as read by Elizabeth Raum, referred to two women. The article had quoted one women saying "We were neighbors yesterday, We had coffee together." These two lines (both spoken in the second movement by the tuba player) provided the initial inspiration for writing this piece. The Second movement expresses the bewilderment of friends that have been forced to become enemies against their will. The first movement is very powerful and quite "violent" in presentation. It describes a menacing force intent on conquest. It also describes powerful feelings of anger. The third movement, "Fighting Zone", depicts a very horrific battle scene with many extended performance techniques used to create sounds of gunfire and the rumble of tanks. The fourth and final movement is a very somber recollection of the aftermath of the incidents but also conveys a quality of hope. The real "horror" within this piece is the fact that some societies are forced to accept violence. The title asks whether there will ever be a time without violence. This piece was given its premier performance by John Griffith's as a guest artist at the international Tuba-Euphonium Conference in Riva del Garda, Italy, in 1997. John Williams - Concerto for Tuba and Orchestra. John Williams has called the tuba a very agile instrument and actually referred to it as a "really large cornet." This is not the first time he has written for tuba. He has written demanding solos for the instrument in his orchestral version of Star Wars in order to represent Jaba the Hut. He also wrote an extended tuba solo for a Dick Van Dyke movie called Fitzwilly. The piece is actually quite light although it contains somewhat of a contemporary edge. Unlike most contemporary music this piece is very accessible to the average listener and has proven to be quite enjoyable. This piece is written in a very high register for the tuba and stays up there the whole way through. It also demands a great deal of flexibility. Although the piece features the tuba throughout, the orchestrated version provides solos for the flute, English horn, a horn quartet and a trio of trumpets. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF MUSIC Recital Hall Saturday, June 17, 2006 8:00pm MASTER'S STUDENT RECITAL* DANIEL PAIN With Katherine Dowling, Piano And the Vancouver Chamber Brass Effie Falls In Love Effie takes A Dancing Lesson Effie Joins The Carnival Effie Goes Folk Dancing Effie Sings A Lullaby Fantasy for Tuba Malcolm Arnold b.1921 Suite No. 1 ("Effie Suite") Effie Chases A Monkey Alec Wilder b.1907 Serenade No. 12 Vincent Persichetti Intrada b. 1915 Arietta Masherata Capriccio Intermezzo Marcia - I N T E R M I S S I O N -The Legend if Heimdall Elizabeth Raum Heimdall's Gjallarhorn b. 1945 Tale of the Bard Attack on Asgard Quintet Jan Koetsier Andante con moto b. 1911 Andantino Molto Vivace In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Music degree with a major in Tuba . Programme Notes Malcolm Arnold - Fantasy for Trombone This short piece for solo tuba is one of 17 fantasies that Malcolm Arnold wrote for a wide variety of solo and grouped instruments. Among the other 17 Fantasy's that Malcolm Arnold wrote there are Fantasy's for solo Guitar, Solo Recorder and String Quartet, combined flute and clarinet, and also a Fantasy for Brass Band. Most of his other fantasy's are for solo instruments. The form of each fantasy is determined by the composer. Therefore each of Malcolm Arnolds Fantasy's use different forms depending on what he wanted to do with each one. In general fantasies use familiar themes with slight variations. In between the repetition of the familiar theme of the tuba fantasy are two little interludes. On is fast and technical and the other is slow and lyrical. Alec Wilder - Suite No.l ("Effie Suite") This piece is made up of six short movements. The piece draws on a variety of emotions and requires a great deal of technique from the tuba player. It tells the story of an Elephant named Effie. The first movement "Effie Chases a Monkey" is the shortest of the six lasting roughly less than a minute. The movement maintains a very rapid pace and finishes with a quick jump down of an octave which is supposed to resemble Effie falling down in exhaustion from chasing the monkey. The Second movement is very slow and lyrical which resembles emotions of love. Hence the title "Effie falls in Love". It places the tuba in high register throughout and maintains this single sentiment. The third movement is in 6/8 time and includes a bombardment of notes and covers a very wide range. This is perhaps the most challenging of movements and is entitled "Effie takes a Dancing Lesson". The fourth movement portrays Effie at the Carnival. "Effie Joins the Carnival". This is in 4/4 time and puts the tuba players technique to the test by using rapid sixteenth notes to portray Effie's act at the Carnival. The fifth movement which is called "Effie goes folk Dancing uses a folk like melody throughout. It is the easiest of the movements but is perhaps the most catchy and tuneful. The last movement "Effie sings a Lullaby" is very calm. It puts the tuba in a high register to give it a tenor like tone quality. Vincent Persichetti - Serenade No. 12 This is piece is also in six short movements but is written for solo tuba with no accompaniment. The six movements: Intrada, Arietta, Mascherata, Capriccio, Intermezzo, and Marcia can also be used as independent studies. Occasionally these movements will be performed independently. Gene Pokorney of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra had the rare opportunity of performing the fifth movement "Intermezzo" just before the intermission at an orchestra concert several years ago. Elizabeth Raum - The Legend of Heimdall This Concerto is a tone poem that describes the story of Heimdall. Heimdall was the ancient Norse god who kept watch over the Asgard which was the city of gods. When he sensed danger he would sound the alarm with his Gjallarhorn. The first movement portrays Heimdall watching over the city waiting to sound his alarm should there be any danger. At one point within the movement he sounds the alarm three times which is then echoed in the orchestra. The second movement puts the tuba in the role of the bard in a tavern telling the story of Heimdall to the other patrons. He is eventually interrupted by a fiddler who entertains the people with a very folk like tune. The bard eventually interjects and continues telling the story of Heimdall. The third and final movement of this concerto "Attack on Asgard" depicts a battle. The leitmotifs from the previous movements are heard throughout but the battle dominates the mood of this movement. This piece was commissioned by the CBC for tubist John Griffiths, and was premiered by the Regina Symphony Orchestra conducted by Vladimir Conta in 1991. Jan Koetsier - Brass Quintet This quintet begins with a beautiful trumpet melody that eventually leads into a fast rhythmic section. This section begins with an independent tuba line that is fast and rhythmic. The tuba then begins to play an obbligato bass line while the melody is heard in the upper voices of the quintet. This reoccurring melody eventually makes its way through all of the instruments and finishes with a big crescendo diminuendo in all of the instruments. The second movement begins with very lyrical trio in 3/4 played by the two trumpets and trombone which eventually leads into a quick repeated section played by the trombone, horn, and tuba. The opening lyrical section returns before leading into a very fast 3/8 section that demands a great deal of technique from the tuba, horn, and trombone. The lyrical section returns again but this time it adds all of the instruments creating a very nice choral like sound. It finishes with four rich chords complemented by the brass instruments. The third movement begins at a brisk tempo and gets progressively faster throughout. The middle of this movement uses a "burlesco" section in 7/8 which provides an interesting contrast from the rest of the movement. It then leads back into it's regular 6/8 meter but slightly faster than the initial tempo and uses a fugue in the horn and tuba underneath a triumphant melody in the trombone. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF MUSIC Recital Hall Thursday, March 15, 2007 5:30pm MASTER'S STUDENT RECITAL* DANIEL PAIN With Aleksander Szram, Piano Concerto for Tuba or Bass Trombone Andante con Moto Andante Expressivo Allegro Ritmico Eric Ewazen b.1954 Will there Be A Time Moderato Elizabeth Raum b.1945 The Neighbors Fighting Zone Will there Ever Be a Time - I N T E R M I S S I O N -Concerto for Tuba and Orchestra John Williams b. 1932 Allegro Moderato Andante Allegro Molto In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Music degree with a major in Tuba. Program Notes Eric Ewazen - Concerto for Tuba or Bass trombone. This concerto actually started its life as a Sonata for Tuba or Bass Trombone and Piano. It was commissioned by, and dedicated to, Karl Kramer who is the principal tuba of the New Haven Symphony Orchestra and is a professor of music and the University Of Illinois School Of Music. The piece was transformed into a concerto in 1998 on the suggestion of Warren Deck. That year it was used as the contest piece for low brass held at the Julliard school of Music. In its new concerto format it was premiered by Stefan Sanders with the Julliard School Orchestra under the Direction of Jahja Ling. This piece encompasses a very rich sound characteristic of the composer. It provides many challenges throughout including extreme registers; going up to a high Ab in the first movement, and multiple meter changes in the 3 r d movement also adding to the difficulty of the piece. Elizabeth Raum - Will There Be A Time - For Solo Tuba. The Piece was written as a commission for the Canadian Tubist John Griffiths. He had originally asked Mrs. Raum to write something humorous but a week later she came back to him and said that she just didn't think of the tuba as a humorous instrument and thus came "Will There Be A Time". The piece was conceived and then developed after reading an article in a News Paper. It was pertaining to the Soviet Regime during the early 20 th century. Due to the wide spread political unrest in the Soviet Union at this time many citizens were often resettled in different parts of the country and many political parties were formed. This caused a great deal of turmoil among the residents of the Soviet Union pitting one political faction against the other. The article, as read by Elizabeth Raum, referred to two women. The article had quoted one women saying "We were neighbors yesterday, We had coffee together." These two lines (both spoken in the second movement by the tuba player) provided the initial inspiration for writing this piece. The Second movement expresses the bewilderment of friends that have been forced to become enemies against their will. The first movement is very powerful and quite "violent" in presentation. It describes a menacing force intent on conquest. It also describes powerful feelings of anger. The third movement, "Fighting Zone", depicts a very horrific battle scene with many extended performance techniques used to create sounds of gunfire and the rumble of tanks. The fourth and final movement is a very somber recollection of the aftermath of the incidents but also conveys a quality of hope. The real "horror" within this piece is the fact that some societies are forced to accept violence. The title asks whether there will ever be a time without violence. This piece was given its premier performance by John Griffith's as a guest artist at the international Tuba-Euphonium Conference in Riva del Garda, Italy, in 1997. John Williams - Concerto for Tuba and Orchestra. John Williams has called the tuba a very agile instrument and actually referred to it as a "really large cornet." This is not the first time he has written for tuba. He has written demanding solos for the instrument in his orchestral version of Star Wars in order to represent Jaba the Hut. He also wrote an extended tuba solo for a Dick Van Dyke movie called Fitzwilly. The piece is actually quite light although it contains somewhat of a contemporary edge. Unlike most contemporary music this piece is very accessible to the average listener and has proven to be quite enjoyable. This piece is written in a very high register for the tuba and stays up there the whole way through. It also demands a great deal of flexibility. Although the piece features the tuba throughout, the orchestrated version provides solos for the flute, English horn, a horn quartet and a trio of trumpets. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF MUSIC Recital Hall Saturday, June 17, 2006 8:00pm MASTER'S STUDENT RECITAL* DANIEL PAIN With Katherine Dowling, Piano And the Vancouver Chamber Brass Effie Falls In Love Effie takes A Dancing Lesson Effie Joins The Carnival Effie Goes Folk Dancing Effie Sings A Lullaby Fantasy for Tuba Malcolm Arnold b. 1921 Suite No. 1 ("Effie Suite") Effie Chases A Monkey Alec Wilder b.1907 Serenade No. 12 Vincent Persichetti Intrada b. 1915 Arietta Masherata Capriccio Intermezzo Marcia - I N T E R M I S S I O N -The Legend if Heimdall Elizabeth Raum Heimdall's Gjallarhorn b.1945 Tale of the Bard Attack on Asgard Quintet Jan Koetsier Andante con moto b. 1911 Andantino Molto Vivace A In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Music degree with a major in Tuba . Programme Notes Malcolm Arnold - Fantasy for Trombone This short piece for solo tuba is one of 17 fantasies that Malcolm Arnold wrote for a wide variety of solo and grouped instruments. Among the other 17 Fantasy's that Malcolm Arnold wrote there are Fantasy's for solo Guitar, Solo Recorder and String Quartet, combined flute and clarinet, and also a Fantasy for Brass Band. Most of his other fantasy's are for solo instruments. The form of each fantasy is determined by the composer. Therefore each of Malcolm Arnolds Fantasy's use different forms depending on what he wanted to do with each one. In general fantasies use familiar themes with slight variations. In between the repetition of the familiar theme of the tuba fantasy are two little interludes. On is fast and technical and the other is slow and lyrical. Alec Wilder - Suite No.l ("Effie Suite") This piece is made up of six short movements. The piece draws on a variety of emotions and requires a great deal of technique from the tuba player. It tells the story of an Elephant named Effie. The first movement "Effie Chases a Monkey" is the shortest of the six lasting roughly less than a minute. The movement maintains a very rapid pace and finishes with a quick jump down of an octave which is supposed to resemble Effie falling down in exhaustion from chasing the monkey. The Second movement is very slow and lyrical which resembles emotions of love. Hence the title "Effie falls in Love". It places the tuba in high register throughout and maintains this single sentiment. The third movement is in 6/8 time and includes a bombardment of notes and covers a very wide range. This is perhaps the most challenging of movements and is entitled "Effie takes a Dancing Lesson". The fourth movement portrays Effie at the Carnival. "Effie Joins the Carnival". This is in 4/4 time and puts the tuba players technique to the test by using rapid sixteenth notes to portray Effie's act at the Carnival. The fifth movement which is called "Effie goes folk Dancing uses a folk like melody throughout. It is the easiest of the movements but is perhaps the most catchy and tuneful. The last movement "Effie sings a Lullaby" is very calm. It puts the tuba in a high register to give it a tenor like tone quality. Vincent Persichetti - Serenade No. 12 This is piece is also in six short movements but is written for solo tuba with no accompaniment. The six movements: Intrada, Arietta, Mascherata, Capriccio, Intermezzo, and Marcia can also be used as independent studies. Occasionally these movements will be performed independently. Gene Pokorney of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra had the rare opportunity of performing the fifth movement "Intermezzo" just before the intermission at an orchestra concert several years ago. Elizabeth Raum - The Legend of Heimdall This Concerto is a tone poem that describes the story of Heimdall. Heimdall was the ancient Norse god who kept watch over the Asgard which was the city of gods. When he sensed danger he would sound the alarm with his Gjallarhorn. The first movement portrays Heimdall watching over the city waiting to sound his alarm should there be any danger. At one point within the movement he sounds the alarm three times which is then echoed in the orchestra. The second movement puts the tuba in the role of the bard in a tavern telling the story of Heimdall to the other patrons. He is eventually interrupted by a fiddler who entertains the people with a very folk like tune. The bard eventually interjects and continues telling the story of Heimdall. The third and final movement of this concerto "Attack on Asgard" depicts a battle. The leitmotifs from the previous movements are heard throughout but the battle dominates the mood of this movement. This piece was commissioned by the CBC for tubist John Griffiths, and was premiered by the Regina Symphony Orchestra conducted by Vladimir Conta in 1991. Jan Koetsier - Brass Quintet This quintet begins with a beautiful trumpet melody that eventually leads into a fast rhythmic section. This section begins with an independent tuba line that is fast and rhythmic. The tuba then begins to play an obbligato bass line while the melody is heard in the upper voices of the quintet. This reoccurring melody eventually makes its way through all of the instruments and finishes with a big crescendo diminuendo in all of the instruments. The second movement begins with very lyrical trio in 3/4 played by the two trumpets and trombone which eventually leads into a quick repeated section played by the trombone, horn, and tuba. The opening lyrical section returns before leading into a very fast 3/8 section that demands a great deal of technique from the tuba, horn, and trombone. The lyrical section returns again but this time it adds all of the instruments creating a very nice choral like sound. It finishes with four rich chords complemented by the brass instruments. The third movement begins at a brisk tempo and gets progressively faster throughout. The middle of this movement uses a "burlesco" section in 7/8 which provides an interesting contrast from the rest of the movement. It then leads back into it's regular 6/8 meter but slightly faster than the initial tempo and uses a fugue in the horn and tuba underneath a triumphant melody in the trombone. 

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