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Graduate recitals Wong, Quennie Kwan Wing 2007

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GRADUATE RECITALS by QUENNIE KWAN WING WONG B.Mus., University of Calgary, 2005 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSIC in THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES (Orchestral Instruments) THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA April, 2007 © Quennie Kwan Wing Wong, 2007 ABSTRACT The thesis for the Master of Music degree in Orchestral Instruments consists of two full-length recitals, or the equivalent, with emphasis on solo works, but also including representative chamber works. My two full-length recitals were performed on April 26, 2006 and April 10, 2007. Recital Hall Tuesday, Apri l 10,2007 8:00 p;m. - . : MASTER'S RECITAL* QUENNIE WONG, Percussion October Night (1986) =. ; -: ,.; ..• .. . .; . .... Michael Burritt I. L a r g o , , . . ; , j ; (b. 1962), • .•>II.;.: Allegro .•.,/. • - . - v v . '.,,>,•• -.y • •'. • .• -•• Variations for Four Drums and Viola (1957) , • i Michael Colgrass I. , Introduction . - . . : , : , (b. 1932) . II. Variation I III. Variation II IV. Variation III V. Variation IV ; VI. Variation V VILF ina le ,. ; Felisa Hernandez, viola Cold Pressed (1990, revised 1994). David. Hollinden, (b. 1958) I N T E R M I S S I O N - ... Rite of Passage (2002) Jesse fvlonkman Nicholas Jacques, percussion. Michael McDiarmid, percussion Brian Nesselroad, percussion * In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Music degree with a major in Percussion. October Night Michael Burritt Michael Burritt is currently the associate professor and director of percussion 1 studies in the School of Music at Northwestern University, Prior to this appointment, he was the associate professor of percussion at Kent State University. Mr. Burritt received his bachelor and master of music degrees, as well as the prestigious "; performers certificate from the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. His teachers have included John Beck, Gordon Stout, Paul Yancich, and Herbert Flower. As one of the world's leading percussion soloists and pedagogues, Mr. Burritt is in frequent demand performing concert tours arid master Classes throughout North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. He has been a featured artist at seven Percussive Arts Society International Conventions, and has directed his university percussion ensembles in Showcase Concerts at three PASIC's. Mr. Burritt is also active as a composer, who has written two books of etudes as well as numerous solo and chamber works for marimba and percussion. October Night, is one of his well-known solo marimba works. October Night is dedicated to Gordon Stout, one of his former percussion ; teachers. This work is inspired by a famous poem by Dylan Thomas; Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night, which is about Mr. Thomas begging his father to fight against his impending death. The poem conveys two powerful yet very different moods: one of sorrow and deep remorse and the other of aggression and anger. Thus, Mr. Burritt writes October Night in two movements depicting these contrasting emotions. '' • " v The first movement^ Largo, is a chorale painting the sadness expressed in the poem of the approaching death of Mr.'Thomas' father. It is written in a romantic style and moves between the keys of C and B-flat major. Three different mallet rolling techniques are implemented: traditional, independent arid ripple. The second-' .:•'<••' movement is an energetic allegro depicting the emotional intensity of the poet when he begs his father to fight against death. It develops motivically through the use of perfect 5ths and major 6ths separated by minor 2nds arid augmented 4ths. It is in sonata form and concludes with a coda derived from the first movement. Variations for Four Drums and Viola Michael Colgrass Michael Colgrass started his music career as a jazz musician at the age of twelve. He entered the world of symphonic music when he studied at University of Illinois in 1954, first as a percussionist then as a composer. After his composition studies with • Lukas Foss and Darius Milhaud at the Berkshire Music Festival and the Aspen School, Mr. Colgrass went to New York and worked as a freelance musician. He premiered many of his own works, including Variations for Four Drufns and Viola, which he dedicated to Emanuel Vardi, principal violist of the N B C Orchestra, the violist with whom he premiered the work. In 1967, Mr. Colgrass stopped playing to devote himself entirely to composing. Since then he has received commissions from numerous orchestras, chamber groups, choral groups, soloists arid organizations. He won the 1978 Pulitzer Prize for Music . for Deja vu, a concerto for four percussionists, .which was commissioned and-: premiered by the New York Philharmonic. In addition, he received an Emmy Award in 1982 for a PBS documentary "Soundings: The Music of Michael Colgrass." He is still an active composer now, and resides in Toronto. ^ • . ! The word "variations" from the title of the piece, Variations for Four Drums and Viola; refers to the opening motive, not a theme. Themes are made from this motive into five variations. This pieceis a difficult work for both the percussionist and the violist. It shows off the violaand the drums (which are usually roto-tpms, for they are tunable) iri all their variety. The percussionist has fast tuning changes! to make between movements, and the violist has everything from trilledoctaves to triple stops; to contend with. The drums are often used here as a melodic instrument as well as an • • accompaniment for the viola.• . •. •„ Cold Pressed David Hollinden David Hollinden has composed extensively for percussion. His music reveals his training in composition and also of his background in rock music arid his affinity for rhythm and nurnber. He studied with Harvey Sollberger and Juan Orrego-Salas in Indiana University for his bachelor degree in composition. He received his master's degree iri composition frorii the University of Michigan, where lie studied with Fred , . Lerdahl, William Albright and Leslie Bassett. : ' The title of the piece, Cold Pressed, originally refers to the method of extracting olive oil which results in the most robust and full-bodied flavor. The piece is full of syncopations, contrasting timbres and has a rock-influenced style, which, when they are all blended together, the music becomes vivid, spicy and obsessively persistent. Mr. Hollinden composes this piece with "timbre staff' notation, a system which . takes advantage of the performer's familiarity of the bars of.a keyboard-mallet, instrument. In this approach, the instruments required in the piece are set up in the , configuration of a large keyboard-mallet instrument.! For example, the large tom-tom is positioned as i f it was middle " C " , the medium tom-tom as "C#", the snare drum as "D" , and so on. Thus; the player reads a melbdically notated part and can-readily find the instruments in the configuration, but there is absolutely no correspondence; between the notated and the sounding pitches. • . ' • Mr. Hollinden does; however, require some:instrument tuning; although specific pitches are not required, as,, for example^ tuning the medium tom-tom a perfect fifth below the snare drum- and choosing the lowest crotale so as to match the pitch of.the snare drum. • •• " -! . • : ' • • .. . • Piano Phase Steve Reich Steve Reich is famous for his minimalist and phase shifting music, both of which styles he pioneered. He discovered the magic o f phase shifting, one time he played two identical tape loops of a preacher's voice simultaneously and listened how they went :. out of phase with each other. Based on those tape loops, he composed the first piece of this technique entitled It's Gonna Rain in 1965. In 1966, he composed another piece of the same .kind; called Come Out. r .... •, •, Shortly after completing Come Out^ Mr. Reich began to think about writing live instrumental music with phase shifting technique. Piano Phase, composed in 1967, was the threshold. In this piece, the performers repeat a rapid twelve-note melodic figure, initially in unison; As one player keeps tempo with.robotic precision,,the other-speeds up very slightly until the two parts line up.again, but one sixteenth note apart./ The second player then resumes the previous tempo; This cycle of speeding up and i then locking in continues throughout the piece; the cycle comes full circle three times,, the second and third cycles using shorter versions of the initial figure. As the title explains itself, this piece was originally composed for two pianos. However, later, Mr. Reich tried the piece with Russell Hartenberger on two marimbas, and this instrumentation became another option to perform this piece. Rite of Passage : , Jesse Monkman Born in Syracuse, New York, Jesse Monkman began his percussion studies with.;, Jeff Grubbs at age eleven. Mr. Monkman received his bachelor's and master's degrees at the New England Conservatory pf Music studying with Frank Epstein and Wi l l . . Hudgins of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Currently he plays, with the Portland Symphony Orchestra of Maine, Boston Modern Orchestra, as well as other -performance venues in the Boston area. Besides performing, Mr. Monkman also teaches at the Powers Music School in Belmont. . . . This piece, Rite of Passage, infuses percussion sounds and "feel" derived from African and Eastern decent, with more modern influences of jazz harmonies. The typical duple time signatures, such as 2/4, 4/4, are not often seen in this piece; instead,, it is mostly composed of odd number time signatures such as 5/8,. 7/8, 7/16,, 11/16, • r 13/16. The composer emphasizes high energy and dynamic contrast. To establish a groove, accents are put every four measures, starting when the main*theme is first stated. The composer asks to exaggerate these accents as they emphasize the main : theme, which is highly repetitive. Even though the soloist of this piece is really the marimba, sometimes it plays as an accompanist to the three percussionists, who are originally the support to the marimbist. For example, in the middle of the piece,, there is a massive drumming section.which resembles East Asian drumming styles. While, • the percussionists are playing aggressively and brutally on theirinstruments, the ; . marimba lays a groove as a foundation. There is also, towards the marimba cadenza, a vibraphone solo/improvisation where the marimba accompanies like a guitar. The last sectionof the piece is intended to start very heavy, building intensity and speed to the; end. of the piece. . . . . . . ^. . . . THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH C O L U M B I A SCHOOL OF MUSIC Recital Hall ' - < ; • Wednesday, April 26, 2006 8:00 p.m. MASTER'S STUDENT RECITAL* QUENNIE WONG, Percussion Ein Liebeslied? (1992) :, Nebojsa.Jovan Zivkovic (b. 1962) Ilijas (1996) '•• -. • .; Neboj§aJovan Zivkovic The Labyrinth (2002) . , , - . Chappell Kingsland • • •• - • • : • • : . . (b. 1980) This is No Sonata (1990) Robert C. Constable (b: 1958). Carpe Diem ' . . : ; : • : ,. Susan K. Powell Annabelle Ip, percussion : • (b. 1970) - I N T E R M I S S I O N - ., . - . . ; . . . . : ; : . Short Story for Solo Timpani (1979) I. Introduction II. Conflict III. Negotiation IV. Confrontation Concerto No. 2 for Marimba and Orchestra (2001) - . . ' •• NeyRosauro I. Water Running in High Mountain (b. 1952) II. Reflections and Dreams III. Walking on Clouds Stefan Honisch, piano Ron Newman . (b. 1952) * In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Music degree with a major in Percussion. Nebojsa Jovan Zivkovic - Ein Liebeslied? & Ilijas-Zivkovic not only composes music for percussion, but is also a virtuosic percussionist himself. He completed his master's degree in composition, music theory and percussion in Germany. He tours extensively in Europe, performs frequently in the US, and has also appeared in Japan, Taiwan, Korea and Mexico. From his repertoire one can see his musical style is influenced by both classical and contemporary music. Ein Liebeslied? is a slow, short and calm chorale, and is in ternary form. By playing constant tremolo oh the marimba, this piece truly displays the tender and sensitive nuances of the marimba sound. Ilijas is an enormous contrast to the previous work. This piece, named after a small town in the former Yugoslav republic of Bosnia, has close associations with folk tunes from the Balkan area, as well as mixed rhythms and tonal scales whose roots might be found even ; further East. The introduction of the piece is rhapsodic, and it sets a melancholic mood. The middle part is composed in a number of various odd meters (5/8, 7/8, 9/8, 11/8, 15/8) with the melody in octaves played by the right hand. Its swift tempo initiates a lively, vigorous, and fiery atmosphere. This part repeats several times in various ways, including using different harmonies and various styles of accompaniment in the left hand, and it leads for a moment into a major key. However, the minor key returns soon after and the melancholic mood remains until the end. Chappell Kingsland - The Labyrinth Chappell Kingsland received his undergraduate degree in music from the Eastman School of Music with a double major in Composition and Organ Performance. His principal teachers have included Augusta Read Thomas (Composition), Hans Davidsson (Organ) and Tony Caramia (piano). This piece, the Labyrinth, received the Winner prize of the Percussive Arts Society Composition Contest 2004. The piece opens with several different musical ideas presented in quick succession,* ? -. which are then explored, combined, and transformed. The music is a tangled journey through juxtapositions of chromaticism and diatonicism, density and sparseness, thick harmonies and quick melodies, and widely varying moods - requiring great virtuosity and creative interpretation from the performer. r The Labyrinth has some stylistic affinities with the work of modern composers like Luciano Berio andKaikhosru Sorabji, but also with more jazz-orientedcomposer/performers like Keith Jarrett and John Zorn. . • .• - Chappell Kingsland Robert C. Constable - This is No Sonata . . - . v ' . -•-Robert Constable received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of South Florida and pursued masters and doctoral studies at the Eastman School of Music. He studied with Samuel Adler, Hilton Jones, Robert Morris and Joseph Schwantner; and in 1986 he . . received a Fulbright Scholarship to study with Gyorgy Ligeti in Germany. His award-winning compositions have been performed throughout the United States and Europe. Currently he is a-member of the music faculty and Director of the Electronic Music Studio at New College, of the University of South Florida; • This is No Sonata is performed on nine instruments - three each in three-basic timbral groups: skinned instruments, wood instruments and metal instruments. The actual . instrumentation and the placement of those instruments are left up to the performer, except Constable specifies that the low skinned instrument should be a large bass drum operated by a foot pedal. This piece is based on a nine-note "melodic" figure (which could be considered as a tone-row). Throughout the piece, either the restatement of the original theme, its retrograde,, or fragments of it would be found. The performance of this work can be amplified for.-a more dynamic impact than it is already without the amplification. Susan K: Powell - Carpe Diem . Susan Powell obtained her Doctor of Musical Arts in percussion performance from Northwestern University. Since 2000, she has been the Assistant Professor of Percussion and Director of Percussion Studies of the Ohio State University. She performs as a solo percussionist and with the Pendulum Percussion Duo and the Shiraz Trio. Carpe Diem is typically translated into English as "seize the day". This piece is a multi-percussion duo which involves rudimental snare drum technique tremendously, such as double-stroke rolls, buzz rolls, crush rolls and drags. There is a strong rhythmic connection between the two parts; they either counteract each other, or they reinforce each other. This piece is relentless in tempo and in style, which is probably the reason why Powell titles it Carpe Diem. Ron Newman - Short Story for Solo Timpani This piece, even though it is titled Short Story, has no specific story line to follow. The performer has the privilege to decide what story s/he wants to tell. Each of the four movements in this piece could stand alone as an independent solo. The third movement, Negotiation, makes use of a very different colour, using snare drum sticks instead of timpani mallets. Rapid tuning changes, meter modulation, and metric modulation are three elements that bring major challenges to this piece. Some very complex meters are involved, such as in Conflict, there is a time signature of three and a third quarter notes per bar, and in Confrontation, there are (12/16 + 3/32) and (3/16 + 3/32). Ney Rosauro - Concerto No. 2 for Marimba and Orchestra A native of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Ney Rosauro is known;as the most popular composer of percussion concerti, which average 150 performances each year by distinguished orchestras and wind ensembles worldwide. He has been teaching percussion at all educational level for over thirty years, and currently he is the Director of Percussion Studies at the University of Miami; FL; USA: .< •..••••;..-:: The Concerto No. 2 for Marimba was sponsored by a grant from the University of Miami. The concerto is dedicated to Keiko Abe, a Japanese marimba virtuoso. The first movement has two contrasting themes and depicts the way water makes its path down rocky mountain slopes. The second movement starts with a quote from J.S: Bach and develops into a romantic and somewhat mystical atmosphere. Later, anew theme in a lively and contrasting.tempo is • introduced, which serves as a motive for a fugato movement that is developed before the main themes return. The third movement has a lively tempo; but its soft melody and rhythmic structure in a 5/4. meter evokes an image of music coming from the clouds. The fugato idea, that appears in the second movement returns in this .movement before the solo cadenza. Jn the cadenza, the wooden sound played with the rattan handles of the sticks depicts an old . tradition of African balaphones. A quote from a Keiko Abe theme follows, and excerpts of the main themes of the concerto reappear. After the re-exposition of the main themes, acoda. . using the same vigorous motive from the introduction concludes the work in an uplifting mood. . . . . . . . , •., . .... .;. - Ney Rosauro . • •' '. • . • - • THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH C O L U M B I A SCHOOL OF MUSIC Recital Hall Tuesday, Apri l 10, 2007 8:00 p.m. MASTER'S RECITAL* QUENNIE WONG, Percussion October Night (1986) Michael Burritt I. Largo (b. 1962) II. Allegro Variations for Four Drums and Viola (1957) Michael Colgrass I. Introduction (b. 1932) II. Variation I III. Variation II IV. Variation III V. Variation IV VI. Variation V VII. Finale Felisa Hernandez, viola Cold Pressed (1990, revised 1994) David Hollinden (b. 1958) - I N T E R M I S S I O N -Piano Phase (1967) Steve Reich (b. 1936) Annabelle Ip, marimba Rite of Passage (2002) Jesse Monkman r (b. 1972) Nicholas Jacques, percussion X T J i v i i a ^ i J.TJH.JU»I*U i i i i u , p c i v i i a a i u i i Brian Nesselroad, percussion * In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Music degree with a major in Percussion. October Night Michael Burritt Michael Burritt is currently the associate professor and director of percussion studies in the School of Music at Northwestern University. Prior to this appointment, he was the associate professor of percussion at Kent State University. Mr. Burritt received his bachelor and master of music degrees, as well as the prestigious performers certificate from the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. His teachers have included John Beck, Gordon Stout, Paul Yancich, and Herbert Flower. As one of the world's leading percussion soloists and pedagogues, Mr. Burritt is in frequent demand performing concert tours and master classes throughout North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. He has been a featured artist at seven Percussive Arts Society International Conventions, and has directed his university percussion ensembles in Showcase Concerts at three PASIC's. Mr. Burritt is also active as a composer, who has written two books of etudes as well as numerous solo and chamber works for marimba and percussion. October Night, is one of his well-known solo marimba works. October Night is dedicated to Gordon Stout, one of his former percussion teachers. This work is inspired by a famous poem by Dylan Thomas, Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night, which is about Mr. Thomas begging his father to fight against his impending death. The poem conveys two powerful yet very different moods: one of sorrow and deep remorse and the other of aggression and anger. Thus, Mr. Burritt writes October Night in two movements depicting these contrasting emotions. The first movement, Largo, is a chorale painting the sadness expressed in the poem of the approaching death of Mr. Thomas' father. It is written in a romantic style and moves between the keys of C and B-flat major. Three different mallet rolling techniques are implemented: traditional, independent and ripple. The second movement is an energetic allegro depicting the emotional intensity of the poet when he begs his father to fight against death. It develops motivically through the use of perfect 5ths and major 6ths separated by minor 2nds and augmented 4ths. It is in sonata form and concludes with a coda derived from the first movement. Variations for Four Drums and Viola Michael Colgrass Michael Colgrass started his music career as a jazz musician at the age of twelve. He entered the world of symphonic music when he studied at University of Illinois in 1954, first as a percussionist then as a composer. After his composition studies with Lukas Foss and Darius Milhaud at the Berkshire Music Festival and the Aspen School, Mr. Colgrass went to New York and worked as a freelance musician. He premiered many of his own works, including Variations for Four Drums and Viola, which he dedicated to Emanuel Vardi, principal violist of the N B C Orchestra, the violist with whom he premiered the work. In 1967, Mr. Colgrass stopped playing to devote himself entirely to composing. Since then he has received commissions from numerous orchestras, chamber groups, choral groups, soloists and organizations. He won the 1978 Pulitzer Prize for Music . for Deja vu, a concerto for four percussionists, which was commissioned and premiered by the New York Philharmonic. In addition, he received an Emmy Award in 1982 for a PBS documentary "Soundings: The Music of Michael Colgrass." He is still an active composer now, and resides in Toronto. The word "variations" from the title of the piece, Variations for Four Drums ami Viola, refers to the opening motive, not a theme. Themes are made from this motive into five variations. This piece is a difficult work for both the percussionist and the violist. It shows off the viola and the drums (which are usually roto-toms, for they are tunable) in all their variety. The percussionist has fast tuning changes to make between movements, and the violist has everything from trilled octaves to triple stops to contend with. The drums are often used here as a melodic instrument as well as an accompaniment for the viola. Cold Pressed David Hollinden David Hollinden has composed extensively for percussion. His music reveals his training in composition and also of his background in rock music and his affinity for rhythm and number. He studied with Harvey Sollberger and Juan Orrego-Salas in Indiana University for his bachelor degree in composition. He received his master's degree in composition from the University of Michigan, where he studied with Fred Lerdahl, William Albright and Leslie Bassett. The title of the piece, Cold Pressed, originally refers to the method of extracting olive oil which results in the most robust and full-bodied flavor. The piece is full of syncopations, contrasting timbres and has a rock-influenced style, which, when they are all blended together, the music becomes vivid, spicy and obsessively persistent. Mr. Hollinden composes this piece with "timbre staff' notation, a system which takes advantage of the performer's familiarity of the bars of a keyboard-mallet instrument. In this approach, the instruments required in the piece are set up in the configuration of a large keyboard-mallet instrument. For example, the large tom-tom is positioned as i f it was middle " C " , the medium tom-tom as "C#", the snare drum as "D" , and so on. Thus, the player reads a melodically notated part and can readily find the instruments in the configuration, but there is absolutely no correspondence between the notated and the sounding pitches. Mr. Hollinden does, however, require some instrument tuning, although specific pitches are not required, as, for example, tuning the medium tom-tom a perfect fifth below the snare drum, and choosing the lowest crotale so as to match the pitch of the snare drum. Piano Phase Steve Reich Steve Reich is famous for his minimalist and phase shifting music, both of which styles he pioneered. He discovered the magic of phase shifting one time he played two identical tape loops of a preacher's voice simultaneously and listened how they went out of phase with each other. Based on those tape loops, he composed the first piece of this technique entitled It's Gonna Rain in 1965. In 1966, he composed another piece of the same kind, called Come Out. Shortly after completing Come Out, Mr. Reich began to think about writing live instrumental music with phase shifting technique. Piano Phase, composed in 1967, was the threshold. In this piece, the performers repeat a rapid twelve-note melodic figure, initially in unison. As one player keeps tempo with robotic precision, the other speeds up very slightly until the two parts line up again, but one sixteenth note apart. The second player then resumes the previous tempo; This cycle of speeding up and then locking in continues throughout the piece; the cycle comes full circle three times, the second and third cycles using shorter versions of the initial figure. As the title explains itself, this piece was originally composed for two pianos. However, later, Mr. Reich tried the piece with Russell Hartenberger on two marimbas, and this instrumentation became another option to perform this piece. Rite of Passage Jesse Monkman Born in Syracuse, New York, Jesse Monkman began his percussion studies with Jeff Grubbs at age eleven. Mr. Monkman received his bachelor's and master's degrees at the New England Conservatory o f Music studying with Frank Epstein and Wil l Hudgins of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Currently he plays with the Portland Symphony Orchestra of Maine, Boston Modern Orchestra, as well as other performance venues in the Boston area. Besides performing, Mr. Monkman also teaches at the Powers Music School in Belmont. This piece, Rite of Passage, infuses percussion sounds and "feel" derived from African and Eastern decent, with more modem influences of jazz harmonies. The typical duple time signatures, such as 2/4, 4/4, are not often seen in this piece; instead, it is mostly composed of odd number time signatures such as 5/8, 7/8, 7/16, 11/16, 13/16. The composer emphasizes high energy and dynamic contrast. To establish a groove, accents are put every four measures, starting when the main theme is first stated. The composer asks to exaggerate these accents as they emphasize the main theme, which is highly repetitive. Even though the soloist of this piece is really the marimba, sometimes it plays as an accompanist to the three percussionists, who are originally the support to the marimbist. For example, in the middle of the piece, there is a massive drumming section which resembles East Asian drumming styles. While the percussionists are playing aggressively and brutally on their instruments, the marimba lays a groove as a foundation. There is also, towards the marimba cadenza, a vibraphone solo/improvisation where the marimba accompanies like a guitar. The last section of the piece is intended to start very heavy, building intensity and speed to the end of the piece. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH C O L U M B I A SCHOOL OF MUSIC Recital Hall Wednesday, Apri l 26, 2006 8:00 p.m. MASTER'S STUDENT RECITAL* QUENNIE WONG, Percussion Ein Liebeslied? (1992) Nebojsa Jovan Zivkovic . (b. 1962) Ilijas (1996) The Labyrinth (2002) Nebojsa Jovan Zivkovic. Chappell Kingsland, (b. 1980) This is No Sonata (1990) Robert C. Constable (b. 1958) Carpe Diem Annabelle Ip, percussion Susan K. Powell ,. (b. 1970) I N T E R M I S S I O N Short Story for Solo Timpani (1979) I. Introduction ' II. Conflict III. Negotiation IV. Confrontation Ron Newman ' (b. 1952) Concerto No. 2 for Marimba and Orchestra (2001) I. Water Running in High Mountain II. Reflections and Dreams III. Walking on Clouds Stefan Honisch, piano Ney Rosauro (b. 1952) * In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Music degree with a major in Percussion. Nebojsa Jovan Zivkovic - Ein Liebeslied? & Ilijas- : Zivkovic not only composes music for percussion, but is also a virtuosic percussionist himself. He completed his master's degree in composition, music theory and percussion in . Germany. He tours extensively in Europe, performs frequently in the US, and has also appeared in Japan, Taiwan, Korea and Mexico. From his repertoire one can see his musical style is influenced by both classical and contemporary music. Ein Liebeslied? is a slow, short and calm chorale, and is in ternary form. By playing constant tremolo on the marimba, this piece truly displays the tender and sensitive nuances of the marimba sound. Ilijas is an enormous contrast to the previous work. This piece, named after a small town in the former Yugoslav republic of Bosnia, has close associations with folk tunes from the Balkan area, as well as mixed rhythms and tonal scales whose roots might be found even. ; further East. The introduction of the piece is rhapsodic, and it sets a melancholic mood. The middle part is composed in a number of various odd meters (5/8, 7/8, 9/8, 11/8, 15/8) with the melody in octaves played by the right hand. Its swift tempo initiates a lively, vigorous, and fiery atmosphere. This part repeats several times in various ways, including using different harmonies and; various styles of accompaniment in the left hand, and it leads for a moment , ; into a major key. However, the minor key returns soon after and the melancholic mood remains until the end. Chappell Kingsland - The Labyrinth Chappell Kingsland received his undergraduate degree in music from the Eastman School of Music with a double major in Composition and Organ Performance. His principal teachers have included Augusta Read Thomas (Composition), Hans Davidsson (Organ) and Tony Caramia (piano). This piece, the Labyrinth, received the Winner prize of the Percussive Arts Society Composition Contest 2004. The piece~ opens with several different musical ideas presented in quick succession, ;. which are then explored, combined, and transformed. The music is a tangled journey through juxtapositions of chromaticism and diatonicism, density and sparseness, thick harmonies and quick melodies, and widely varying moods - requiring great virtuosity and creative • .-' . • interpretation from the performer. =; • The Labyrinth has some stylistic affinities with the work of modern composers like Luciano Berioand Kaikhosm Sorabji, but also with more jazz-oriented1 composer/performers like Keith Jarrett and John Zorn. • - Chappell Kingsland Robert C. Constable - This is No Sonata Robert Constable received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of South . Florida and pursued^ masters and doctoral studies at the Eastman School of.Music- He studied with Samuel Adler, Hilton Jones, Robert Morris and Joseph Schwantner, and in 1986 he received a Fulbright Scholarship to study with Gyorgy Ligeti in Germany/His award-winning compositions have been performed throughout the United States and Europe. Currently he is a member of the music faculty and Director of the Electronic Music Studio at New College, of the University of South Florida; This is No Sonata is performed on nine instruments - three each in three basic timbral . groups: skinned instruments, wood instruments and metal instruments. The actual instrumentation and the placement of those instruments are left up to the performer, except.. Constable specifies that the low skinned instrument should be a large bass drum operated by a foot pedal. This piece is based on a nine-note "melodic" figure (which could be considered as a tone-row). Throughout the piece, either the restatement of the original theme, its retrograde, or fragments of it would be found. The performance of this work can be amplified for a more; dynamic impact than it is already without the amplification. Susan K. Powell - Carpe Diem , • • Susan Powell obtained her Doctor of Musical Arts in percussion performance from Northwestern University. Since 2000, she has been the Assistant Professor of Percussion and Director of Percussion Studies of the Ohio State University. She performs as a solo percussionist and with the Pendulum Percussion Duo and the Shiraz Trio. Carpe Diem is typically translated into English as "seize the day". This piece is a multi-percussion duo which involves rudimental snare drum technique tremendously, such as double-stroke rolls, buzz rolls, crush rolls and drags. There is a strong rhythmic connection between the two parts; they either counteract each other, or they reinforce each other. This piece is relentless in tempo and in style, which is probably the reason why Powell titles it Carpe Diem. Ron Newman - Short Story for Solo Timpani This piece, even though it is titled Short Story, has no specific story line to follow. The performer has the privilege to decide what story s/he wants to tell. Each of the four movements in this piece could stand alone as an independent solo. The third movement, Negotiation, makes use of a very different colour, using snare drum sticks instead of timpani mallets. Rapid tuning changes, meter modulation, and metric modulation are three elements that bring major challenges to this piece. Some very complex meters are involved, such as in Conflict, there is a time signature of three and a third quarter notes per bar, and in Confrontation, there are (12/16 + 3/32) and (3/16 + 3/32). Ney Rosauro - Concerto No. 2 for Marimba and Orchestra : A native of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Ney Rosauro is known as the most popular composer of percussion concefti, which average 150 performances each year by distinguished orchestras and wind ensembles worldwide. He has been teaching percussion at all educational level for:. over thirty years, and currently he is the Director of Percussion Studies at the University of Miami, FL, USA\ • . The Concerto No.2 for Marimba was sponsored by a grant from.the University of Miami. The concerto is dedicated to KeikoAbe, a Japanese marimba virtuoso. The first movement has two contrasting themes and depicts the way water makes its path down rocky mountain slopes. The second movement starts with a quote from J:S: Bach and develops into a romantic. and somewhat mystical atmosphere. Later, a new theme in a lively and contrasting tempo is introduced, which serves as a motive for a fugato movement that is developed before the main themes return. The'third movement has a lively tempo, but its soft melddyand rhythmic structure in a 5/4 meter evokes an image of.music coming from the clouds. The fugato idea . that appears in the second movement returns in this movement before the solo cadenza. In the cadenza, the wooden sound played with the rattan handles of the sticks depicts an old ... tradition of African balaphones. A quote from a Keiko Abe theme follows, and excerpts of the main themes of the concerto reappear. After the re-exposition of the main themes,, a coda using the same vigorous motive from the introduction concludes the work in an uplifting mood. --Ney Rosauro ••<•••• • * , ,;. • 

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