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Hansel and Gretel : a production thesis Holmes, Jeffrey Farnsworth 1979

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HANSEL AND GRETEL: A PRODUCTION THESIS by JEFFREY FARNSWORTH HOLMES B.Mus., Brandon U n i v e r s i t y , 1974 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSIC i n THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES Department of Music We accept t h i s t h e s i s as conforming to the r e q u i r e d standard THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA A p r i l , 1979 (c) J e f f r e y Farnsworth Holmes, 19 79 In p r e s e n t i n g t h i s t h e s i s in p a r t i a l f u l f i l m e n t o f the requ i rement s f o r an advanced degree at the U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h Co lumb ia , I ag ree that the L i b r a r y s h a l l make i t f r e e l y a v a i l a b l e f o r r e f e r e n c e and s tudy . I f u r t h e r agree t h a t p e r m i s s i o n f o r e x t e n s i v e c o p y i n g o f t h i s t h e s i s f o r s c h o l a r l y purposes may be g r a n t e d by the Head o f my Department o r by h i s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s . It i s u n d e r s t o o d that c o p y i n g o r p u b l i c a t i o n o f t h i s t h e s i s f o r f i n a n c i a l g a i n s h a l l not be a l l o w e d w i thout my w r i t t e n p e r m i s s i o n . o Department o f Mu.5 I The U n i v e r s i t y o f B r i t i s h Co lumbia 2075 Wesbrook Place Vancouver, Canada V6T 1WS Date 11 ABSTRACT The p r o d u c t i o n of an opera i s a complex p r o p o s i t i o n . There are many areas of thought and p l a n n i n g which are c r u c i a l to the p r e s e n t a t i o n of a u n i f i e d p r o d u c t i o n . T h i s t h e s i s i s a r e p o r t , based on the U n i v e r s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia Opera Theatre's p r o d u c t i o n of E n g e l b e r t Humperdinck 1s opera Hansel and G r e t e l . Of primary importance to the p r o d u c t i o n i s the d i r e c t o r ' s concept of the work, s i n c e the r e s t of the d e t a i l s of the p r o d u c t i o n are based on t h i s concept. Chapter I d e a l s w i t h the d i r e c t o r ' s concept of Hansel and G r e t e l , as w e l l as with the way i n which members of the c a s t d e a l t with the r o l e s they were to p l a y . The most t a n g i b l e evidence of concept i s the stage s e t t i n g . T h i s i s the t o p i c of Chapter I I , which i s both a r e p o r t of the design phase of the s e t s , and a d e s c r i p t i o n of the c o n s t r u c t i o n of the s e t s . L i g h t i n g the stage forms the m a t e r i a l f o r Chapter I I I . The d e s i g n e r ' s method i s d e s c r i b e d , with the bulk of m a t e r i a l , i n c l u d i n g h i s notes, l i g h t p l o t , and cue sheet appearing i n the appendices. There are a l s o s e v e r a l other areas of p r o d u c t i o n which do not have s u f f i c i e n t bulk to become ch a p t e r s . Chapter IV c o n t a i n s the r e p o r t on costumes, makeup, p u b l i c i t y , t i c k e t s , programme, and p r o p e r t i e s . The "evidence" of the p r o d u c t i o n appears i n the I l l appendices. Appendix I, the production score with a l l of the -staging noted, appears i n the envelope accompanying copy 1 of the thesis. Appendix II i s a colection of plates and diagrams which deal with the stage settings, both from a conceptual and s t r u c t u r a l point of view. Appendix III i s the material on l i g h t i n g , while the actual cue sheet forms Appendix IV. The f i n a l Appendix contains l i s t s and documents from the areas of production described i n Chapter IV. i v TABLE OF CONTENTS I The Concept 1 II The Sets, Part 1: Their Design 4 Part 2: The Construction 6 III The Lighting 17 Lighting Hansel and Gretel 2 0 IV Some Other Areas — Costumes 22 Makeup 24 P u b l i c i t y 2 5 Tickets and Programme 26 Properties 27 Bibliography 2 8 Appendix I The Performance Score i s contained i n the envelope accompanying 1^ *4<L copy 1, available i n Special Collections - ^ c . , s Appendix II Sketches and Drawings 30 Appendix III Lighting Notes and Diagrams 41 Appendix IV Lighting Cue Sheet 51 Appendix V . Properties l i s t s , programme"?* pamphlet, 54-6^ and poster , Pocket Light p l o t i n 1/4 inch scale V L I S T O F T A B L E S T a b l e I T a b l e o f G e l s U s e d 4 8 T a b l e I I I n s t r u m e n t S c h e d u l e 4 9 - 5 0 0 T a b l e I I I P r o p e r t i e s l i s t s , J a n u a r y 1 9 7 9 l i s t 5 4 - 5 5 T a b l e I V P r o p e r t i e s l i s t s , F i n a l P r o p e r t i e s L i s t 5 6 - 5 7 u s e d d u r i n g t h e p e r f o r m a n c e V I Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 LIST OF FIGURES Shape of the four platforms for Peter's house 7 Corner construction of a t y p i c a l f l a t 9 Reinforcing a brace with a Keystone block 9 Mechanism for Act III oven 15 Costume sheet 2 3 Sketch for Peter's house, Act I 30 Sketch for the-Forest, Act II " 31 Sketch for the Gingerbread house, Act III 32 Sketch and description of oven, Act III 33 Floor plan of Peter's house, Act I 34 Back of the Stage Right f l a t 35 Section of the Gingerbread house, Act III 36 Detai l of the Gingerbread house, Act III 37 Elevation of Act III oven 38 Reduction of portions of Act III cage 39 blueprint Photograph of the model for the Act I house 40 Origin a l document from the l i g h t i n g designer 41 Dimmer and c i r c u i t schedule for Act I 45 Dimmer and c i r c u i t schedule for Act II 46 Dimmer and c i r c u i t schedule for Act III 4 7 Programme for the performance of Hansel and 58 Gretel Pamphlet used i n advertising Poster Light pl o t i n 1/4 inch scale -5-9- pwcji pocket pocket v i i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I wish to thank the following people for t h e i r valuable assistance i n the preparation of t h i s t h e s i s : Professor French A. Tickner Mr. Ted Roberts Ms. Sonja Kozy CHAPTER I The Concept Before undertaking a f u l l s c a l e p r o d u c t i o n of an opera i t i s e s s e n t i a l t h a t a s t r o n g concept of the work has formed i n the mind of the p r o d u c e r / d i r e c t o r . To f i n d out how the pr o d u c t i o n concept f o r Hansel and Grete1 was formed, the w r i t e r i n t e r v i e w e d the d i r e c t o r , P o r f e s s o r French T i c k n e r of the U n i v e r s i t y of B r i t i s h Columbia Opera Theatre. The f o l l o w -in g m a t e r i a l i s the substance of t h a t i n t e r v i e w . The d i r e c t o r s a i d t h a t the f i r s t p l a c e to which he t u r n -ed i n the formation of h i s concept of Hansel and G r e t e l was the sc o r e . From h i s study of the score he e s t a b l i s h e d char-a c t e r r e l a t i o n s h i p s , the b a s i s of a concept. Having formed these r e l a t i o n s h i p s he looked a t the p s y c h o l o g i c a l i m p l i c a t i o n s between a c h a r a c t e r ' s a c t i o n s and h i s statements. Through st u d y i n g the statements made by a c h a r a c t e r , the d i r e c t o r was able to l e a r n much about the thoughts and f e e l i n g s of the i n d i v i d u a l . Once he had determined the f e e l i n g s of a c h a r a c t e r , he was the able t o pro v i d e m o t i v a t i o n f o r the a c t i o n s r e q u i r e d by the s c r i p t . While studying the s c r i p t , the d i r e c t o r developed a new concept of the t h i r d a c t . He viewed the a c t as a dream had by the c h i l d r e n . In order to use t h i s concept i t was necessary to r e v i s e the ending of the opera i n order t o allow the s t o r y to come f u l l c i r c l e . In the new ending, the Mother and Father come on-stage as i f from the end of Act I. They are s e a r c h i n g f o r the c h i l d r e n and e v e n t u a l l y f i n d them asleep 2 u n d e r a t r e e . A r e u n i o n t a k e s p l a c e a n d t h e f a m i l y m a k e s i t s e x i t t o g e t h e r . T h e m e c h a n i c s o f t h e a d d i t i o n o f a n e w e n d i n g w e r e r e l a t i v e l y s i m p l e . T h e m u s i c a l m a t e r i a l c h o s e n w a s a s e c t i o n o f some f o r t y - f o u r m e a s u r e s f r o m p a g e s 9 8-9 o f t h e p i a n o - v o c a l s c o r e ( A p p e n d i x I ) w h i c h w a s i n s e r t e d i n p l a c e o f t h e f i n a l e l e v e n m e a s u r e s o f A c t I I I . B y s t u d y i n g t h e s c o r e o n e c a n e a s i l y s e e t h a t t h e k e y r e l a t i o n s h i p s w i t h i n t h e t w o s e c t i o n s a r e t h e s a m e . S i n c e t h e f i n a l s c e n e d e s c r i b e d i n t h e p r e v i o u s p a r a g r a p h i s i n t h e f o r m o f a p a n t o m i m e , n o c h a n g e i n t h e t e x t w a s n e c e s s a r y . T h e a d d i t i o n o f t h e n e w m a t e r i a l a l s o s o f t e n e d w h a t w a s s e e n a s a n a b r u p t e n d i n g t o t h e o p e r a . B e c a u s e t h e o r i g i n a l e n d i n g w a s t o o c u r s o r y , t h e i n t e r p o l a t i o n o f t h e new e n d i n g a l l o w e d f o r a m o r e g e n t l e c o n c l u s i o n w h i c h w a s t h e r e f o r e m o r e s a t i s f a c t o r y f r o m t h e a u d i e n c e ' s p o i n t o f v i e w . T h e p r o c e s s o f f u s i n g t h e d i r e c t o r ' s c o n c e p t w i t h t h e i n d i v i d u a l c o n c e p t s o f c h a r a c t e r c h o s e n b y t h e a c t o r s w a s o n e o f a c c o m o d a t i o n . B y d i s c u s s i n g m o v e m e n t s a n d m o t i v a t i o n s , a c h a r a c t e r i z a t i o n w a s d e v e l o p e d w h i c h w a s a g r e e a b l e t o b o t h a n d f i t t h e o v e r a l l c o n c e p t . I n p r e p a r i n g t h i s c h a p t e r t h e w r i t e r a l s o s p o k e w i t h v a r i o u s m e m b e r s o f t h e c a s t . E a c h h a d a p e r s o n a l m e a n s o f d e v e l o p i n g a c h a r a c t e r . F o r o n e i t w a s t h e o b s e r v a t i o n o f c h a r a c t e r m o d e l s ; f o r a n o t h e r i t w a s t h e d r a w i n g f r o m w i t h i n o f p e r s o n a l e x p e r i e n c e . T h e o n e common e l e m e n t w h i c h e m e r g e d 3 from t h e i r statements was that t h e i r portrayals gained most from discussion and experimentation. Most also f e l t that the interplay of characters was c r u c i a l . As one actress put i t , "When I began to get reactions from Hansel, I found i t easier to react i n return". This production had some notable conceptual features. The Mother was given a more rounded character that usual. When not handled c a r e f u l l y she becomes a shallow, vicious harridan, capable of k i l l i n g her children. In t h i s production she was given a r e a l i s t i c motivation for her shortness of temper. She was desperately t r y i n g to provide for her family in the face of poverty, children who were less than d i l i g e n t , an unreliable husband, and no prospect of improvement. The Father, on the other hand, was given a character of greater dimension than he t r a d i t i o n a l l y has been given. By giving him a certa i n r o l l i c k i n g good humour and a serious concern for his children's well being, he was allowed to develop much more contrast i n his portrayal. The Witch was perhaps the most in t e r e s t i n g character of a l l . Because of the treatment of Act III as a dream sequence, the Witch became a dream figure, a child' s projection of the ugly side of mother. The Witch was never allowed to become an ogress. Even though she ate children they were always turned to gingerbread f i r s t . The concept of t h i s production of Harise1 and Grete1 was a s o l i d one; thus i t became the f i n a l a r b i t e r of a l l decisions. CHAPTER II The Sets, Part 1: Their Design The designer of the settings for a production such as Hanse1 and Gretel must begin with a clear picture of the work he i s undertaking. In the case of t h i s production, the designer was also the developer of the o r i g i n a l dramatic concept. In designing the sets, he found i t necessary to keep several r e s t r i c t i o n s i n mind. The f i r s t act house had to be small enough to move e a s i l y . In order to expand the apparent size of the house, a l o f t was added. The l o f t also provided another dimension to the set. The Witch's house, arid indeed a l l of Act III was seen as a projection of herself. As the designer said,"She would have seen the children coming and created a house based on herse l f , hat and a l l " . Since Act III was a child' s dream, nothing i n the setting was cru e l . Even the forest i n Act II was simply a lonely place with no inherent e v i l . Once the o v e r a l l concept was firmly established, a set of sketches were produced. Some of these sketches were reworked in order to have them conform more closely to the desired r e s u l t . The next step was tr a n s l a t i n g the sketches into working drawings for the scene shop to use. This t r a n s l a t i o n required a knowledge of construction techniques. Ideally, the scene shop i s given a f u l l set of dimension drawings from which to work. In the case of the designs for 5 Hansel and Crete1, time was of the essence. Professor Tickner was not only the designer, but the director and conductor as well, and there simply wasn't time to produce as many drawings in such great d e t a i l . In t h i s case, the set of drawings which were supplied showed the main dimensions. The f i n a l d e t a i l s of construction were l e f t to the d i s c r e t i o n of the builders. The builders, Derek Del Puppo and t h i s writer, took the drawings and produced r e s u l t s as close to the o r i g i n a l ideas as possible. The problems of construction varied with the set under consideration. Some of the building was s t r a i g h t -forward, as for example, the building of the f l a t s for Act I. Other areas were much more complex; for example, the pipe f i t t i n g associated with.the support for the sleeping l o f t i n the Act I house, or the construction of the Witch's house for Act I I I . Copies of the o r i g i n a l sketches and some of the construc-t i o n drawings appear i n Appendix I I . 6 The Sets, Part 2: The Construction The f i r s t pieces b u i l t were the various platforms. It was necessary to have the sets easily moveable because of their size and the heaviness of their construction; therefore platforms and casters were adopted as the easiest solution to the moveability problem. The construction of the platforms was relatively easy, since each consisted of a deck of 3/4" plywood and a perimeter frame of 2" X 4" stock. To make the whole platform more dimensionally r i g i d , one or more cross members of 2" X 4" were also used. In a l l , six platforms were built: two 4' by 8', two of irregular dimension, one 6' c i r c l e , and one 4' by 9'. The f i r s t four mentioned, when bolted together, formed the floor of the Act I house. The circ l e provided the base for the Act III oven, and the last platform became the floor of the Witch's house for Act III. The construction of each platform followed the same pattern. The frames were cut and laid out on the floor. The joints were nailed with 3" common nails, the decks were then glued on and nailed with I V common nails. The four sections of the Act I house floor were then placed face down on the floor, and holes were d r i l l e d to accept h" carriage bolts, (see diagram, page following) The next elements of the set to be bu i l t were the f l a t s . Standard techniques of construction were followed throughout. 4*9 i ^ / " ^ ^ > 6 " c a r r i a g e b o l t every f o o t A - j / — — ~ ~ 2 V 0 " 8 '0" f i g u r e 1 Shape of the f o u r p l a t f o r m s f o r P eter's house, Act I 8 The frames of the f l a t s were cut from 1" X 3" clear spruce stock. The various pieces were joined using simple butt j o i n t s held together with corrugated fasteners. These jo i n t s were then reinforced with gussets of 3/8" plywood, glued and nailed to the frames, (see diagram, page following) A l l of the s o l i d "trim" inside the f l a t s had an outside back-ing as part of the framework. Four f l a t s were b u i l t , three of which were l a t e r covered with "factory cotton". The a r c h i t e c t u r a l d e t a i l included two windows and one door. One of the windows had a curved top. The "sweeps" for t h i s curve were cut from 3/4" plywood and set into the square frame with corrugated fasteners. These jo i n t s were reinforced with 3/8" plywood, glued and nailed. The second window, of regular shape, was made as a seperate unit, which was then slipped into i t s framed opening and fastened with four toggles. The covering of the f l a t s with "factory cotton" was done in the following manner: the good side of the frame was covered with:a thin layer of "Bond-fast", a white glue, and the cotton then c a r e f u l l y l a i d over the frame. One edge of the cotton was stapled to the frame; then the cotton was stretched and the opposite side stapled. The stapling procedure was repeated for the top and botton r a i l s of the frame, as well as around the window.;and door openings. The glue was allowed to dry overnight. The following day the cotton covering the windows and door opening was 9 f i g u r e 2 C o r n e r c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a t y p i c a l f l a t f i g u r e 3 R e i n f o r c i n g a b r a c e w i t h a " K e y s t o n e " b l o c k 10 removed. The f l a t s were then ready for base-coating with white paint. This paint, a water-base .latex, served both to " s i z e " the cotton for the f i n a l coat of paint, and to shrink i t on the frame. The platform for the Act I house was moved onto the stage and assembled, using carriage bolts with oversize washers. Twenty-four 33s" casters were i n s t a l l e d on the faces of 2" X 8" plates fi x e d under the platforms with 1%" screws from the top and 3" drywall screws through the frames. The platform was then turned over, and the f l a t s were positioned on i t . They were fastened together with straps and screws on the plane surfaces and loose-pin hinges at the corners. The f l a t s were then fastened to the platform using small L-brackets. The s h e l l of the Act I house was now complete. The f i r s t step i n completing the i n t e r i o r of the house was the framing of the short i n t e r i o r wall. (See the f l o o r plan, Act I house, Appendix II) This wall was framed with 2" X 4" stock and i n s t a l l e d within the s h e l l . The door frame and "reveal" were made from 3/4" plywood, then fastened i n the framed opening using 1%" screws. The door, a single sheet of 3/4" plywood cut to s i z e , was hung, and a thumb latch was i n s t a l l e d . The next step was to make and i n s t a l l the support system for the sleeping l o f t of the house. (Act: I) This necessitated the creation of a rather complex framework of 1" galvanized pipe, the lengths of which were joined with:.a 11 variety of f i t t i n g s including "flanges", " s t r e e t - e l l s " , and "T-joints". The raw lengths of pipe were clamped i n a pipe vise, marked with chalk, cut to size with a tube cutter, threaded with a ratchet and die, and f i n a l l y assembled with pipe wrenches. This f i n a l assembly had three legs, the fourth being supplied by the short i n t e r i o r wall previously mentioned. The pipes were attached to the f l o o r and wall using'"flanges". A deck of 3/4" plywood was then f i t t e d and fastened to the framework with pipe-straps and screws. Trimming the i n t e r i o r was the next task. The pipe-work was f i r s t "Frenched-in" with three-sided fa l s e "posts" which ran up to roof l e v e l . Two other "posts" were fastened to the f l a t s . The horizontal "beams" were then added, (see photo of the model, Appendix II) The "posts" and "beams" were fabricated from 1" X 6" rough cedar. Frames were made for the " f i r e - p i t " and i t s hood, and covered with 3-ply, a t h i n mahogany veneer. The adjoining cupboard was constructed i n a s i m i l a r manner with two i n t e r i o r shelves and two sets of functional doors. The rest of the i n t e r i o r trim was primarily of 1" X 3" rough cedar. The ladder which provided access to the sleeping l o f t came from stock, a left o v e r from Riders to the Sea. The furnishings were also from stock: a table, a chair, and a three-legged s t o o l . A roof f l a t was made, covered, and base-coated while s t i l l on the f l o o r . When the paint had dried, the f l a t was i n s t a l l e d and fastened with 1%" screws. The stage l e f t window 12 was "leaded" w i t h t h i n s t r i p s o f wood. The f i n a l d e t a i l s t o be added were the "eaves", which were made from 3-ply framed with 1" X 3" spruce. Once the house was completed, i t was g i v e n a base-co&t of white p a i n t , and the f i n a l p a i n t i n g and t e x t u r i n g was done by P r o f e s s o r T i c k n e r . F o l l o w i n g the f i r s t r e h e a r s a l i n the s e t , i t was decided t h a t the p l a t f o r m r e q u i r e d e x t e n s i o n to f a c i l i t a t e e t h e f r e e -dom of movement r e q u i r e d by the a c t o r s . A smal l e x t e n s i o n was b u i l t , c a s t e r e d , and at t a c h e d t o the f r o n t of the o r i g i n a l p l a t f o r m w i t h loose-^pin hinges, e n a b l i n g i t t o be removed between a c t s f o r st o r a g e . The whole A c t I house was then anchored i n p o s i t i o n on the stage w i t h two 1/2" c a n e - b o l t s which s l i d i n t o holes, d r i l l e d i n the stage f l o o r . The c o n s t r u c t i o n on the A c t I I I house proved t o be the most d i f f i c u l t of the l a r g e r p i e c e s . The h o r i z o n t a l members of the house were a l l r e g u l a r curves of v a r y i n g r a d i i , c u t from 3/4" plywood wi t h a band saw. Where p o s s i b l e the h o r i z o n t a l members were c u t as s i n g l e p i e c e s , though most had to be cut as segments of s e m i - c i r c l e s . The r e a l i z a t i o n o f the v e r t i c a l members proved most d i f f i c u l t . They were an i r r e g u l a r curve, so i t was necessary to make a p a t t e r n . To do t h i s , a r e f e r e n c e l i n e was drawn on a sheet o f plywood, theln u s i n g the r a d i i of the h o r i z o n t a l members and t h e i r h e i g h t s on the r e f e r e n c e l i n e , a s e r i e s of p o i n t s were generated. These p o i n t s were then j o i n e d w i t h 13 a smooth freehand curve. The r e s u l t i n g p a t t e r n was used to cut the r e s t of the v e r t i c a l members from 1/2" plywood. The p i e c e s of the Act I I I house were then assembled. The f o l l o w i n g method of assembly was used: the a p p r o p r i -ate h o r i z o n t a l s e c t i o n s were cut, then f a s t e n e d to the v e r t i c a l members wit h corner b l o c k s , glue, and s t a p l e s . Once completed t h i s framework was covered with "chicken w i r e " to g i v e i t s t r e n g t h and support. F a c t o r y c o t t o n was a p p l i e d much as one would cover a f l a t ; t h a t i s , s t a p l e d and s t r e t c h e d . The c o t t o n was then p a i n t e d w i t h a mixture o f white glue and water to s i z e and s h r i n k i t . When dry, the house was g i v e n a base-coat of white p a i n t . The door and windows were made as seperate u n i t s , f i t t e d t o frames, and base-coated. The h a t / r o o f of the A c t I I I house was framed with 1/2" plywood with spruce r i b s , and covered with "Vancouver board", a heavy type of l i n e r board. J o i n t s i n the frame were r e i n f o r c e d with corner b l o c k s and n a i l s i f at n i n e t y degrees, or p l a t e s , g l u e, and n a i l s i f i n the same pla n e . The brim of the h a t / r o o f had an edge of 3-ply veneer. The whole s t r u c t u r e was f a s t e n e d to the Witch's house with 2" screws d r i v e n i n t o the h o r i z o n t a l p l a t e a t the top of the house. Since movement w i t h i n the house, or on i t s p l a t f o r m was minimal, i t was not necessary t o anchor i t to the stage. The f i n a l e x t e r i o r p a i n t i n g of the house was done by the scene p a i n t e r . The oven f o r the t h i r d a c t was framed w i t h 2" X 4" 14 stock r i b s attached to the 3/4" plywood base and two horizon-t a l rings of the same material. A door was framed-in and the oven exterior was covered with "Vancouver board". The main d i f f i c u l t y i n constructiong the oven was developing a mechanical system to allow the hat/roof to go up and down on cue. A diagram of t h i s mechanism may be found on the following page. Part of one side of the oven was designed to collapse, an e f f e c t achieved with a framed section cut out, and held i n place with a single toggle. The section could be released from inside the oven at the appropriate moment. The res u l t i n g hole was masked with a piece of black c l o t h . The painting of the oven was not d i f f i c u l t . After a )•> base-coat of white paint had been applied, the oven was paint-ed again to simulate p l a s t e r over brick. The i n t e r i o r was painted black to camouflage the bracing and hat/roof mechanism when the door was opened. As a safety measure the oven door could also be opened from the inside. The remaining piece of scenery for Act III was a cage. It was created on a base of 3/4" plywood and had a frame of the same material. The frame was covered with l a t h , attached in a random pattern to give the appearance of rough work. It was painted to aid i n the deception. Two framed pieces of painted 3-ply were stood on edge to provide the fence of gingerbread children. The trees for Act II were wide s t r i p s of burlap, weighted at the bottom, and capable of being "flown out" by the use of the theatre's " f l y -15 f i g u r e 4 M e c h a n i s m f o r A c t I I I o v e n 16 l i n e " system. The construction techniques used were, for the most part, standard, and may be found i n any good manual of scene design, and set construction, such as Scene Design and Stage Lighting by Oren Parker and Harvey Smith, or Scenery for the Theatre by Harold Burris-Meyer and Edward Cole. A major time saver during the production was the use of an a i r - s t a p l e r capable of f i r i n g 1/2" to lh" staples. Another labour-saving device was a variable speed power d r i l l used as a screw driver. The elimination of as: much hand-powered work as possible helped to speed the work along. This was a c r i t i c a l factor when working toward an approaching deadline. Careful layout and cutting, and the use of scrap material kept wastage to a minimum. CHAPTER III Lighting Lighting serves several functions on the stage. F i r s t , and most important, i t illuminates the actor. This l i g h t has to reveal shape, f a c i a l expression, and must also be of a suitable colour, since colour has much to do with mood. It i s possible to l i g h t the actor with a single candle, but t h i s would not f u l f i l l our c r i t e r i a for l i g h t i n g , however dramatic i t may appear. Modern l i g h t i n g practice suggests l i g h t i n g the actor from at least two, and preferrably three directions at once. The primary l i g h t source, or "key l i g h t " i s usually from the front and above at an angle of about f o r t y - f i v e degrees. The secondary l i g h t sources, or " f i l l l i g h t s " may come from almost any other d i r e c t i o n , but usually come from postions to the sides of the actor. The "key l i g h t " i s the so-called motivating l i g h t , and represents the sun, moon, or whatever else may be the p r i n c i -pal source of l i g h t . This l i g h t also does most to simply illuminate the actor. The f i l l l i g h t s remove the harsh shadows and do much to reveal the shape of the actor. Together they provide a three-dimensional sense to the stage. The second function of l i g h t i n g i s the general i l l u m i n -ation of the sets, costumes, and properties. This i s primari-ly a by-product of the area or acting l i g h t ; however, some situations c a l l for emphasis and may use l i g h t s c a l l e d 18 "specials". These "specials" may be focused on a piece of furniture, a doorway, or-even an area that requires emphasis. i The t h i r d function of l i g h t i s to assist, i n the creation of a mood. This i s accomplished by the use of colour, and by varying the i n t e n s i t y and d i r e c t i o n of the l i g h t . For instance, much can be done to a l t e r the mood by s h i f t i n g from a "warm" colour, perhaps an amber, to a "cool" colour, perhaps a pale blue. I t should be remembered that "warmth" i s r e l a t i v e . Pale blue w i l l appear warm compared with deep blue. Before discussing the l i g h t i n g of Hansel and Gr e te1 one must acquaint oneself with a few technical l i g h t i n g terms. Instrument — the i n d i v i d u a l l i g h t i n g device Leko — a brand name which i s commonly used to r e f e r to any e l l i p s o i d a l spotlight, and further i d e n t i f i e d by s i z e , i . e . 3, 6, or 8 inch Fresnel — abbreviated F r ' n l , a f l o o d l i g h t named afte r the inventor of i t s lens Gel — a transparent sheet of colour material, formerly ge l a t i n , now synthetic, which i s used to colour the beam of l i g h t from an instrument Gobo — a small sheet of opaque material with an excised pattern, which when introduced into the o p t i c a l t r a i n of a spotli g h t results i n the projection of the pattern The only other basic information necessary to the under-standing of the l i g h t i n g i s t h i s : each l i g h t i n g instrument i s plugged into an e l e c t r i c a l c i r c u i t , which i s then assigned to a dimmer, c o n t r o l l i n g .its i n t e n s i t y . Dimmers may control 19 i n d i v i d u a l l y , or may be c o n t r o l l e d i n groups by a master dimmer. Each dimmer has l i m i t a t i o n s on i t s c a p a c i t y , but most are capable of h a n d l i n g the l o a d of at l e a s t two instruments s i m u l t a n e o u s l y . 20 Lighting Hansel and Gretel The l i g h t i n g of Hanse1 and Gretel provided the designer, • Mr. Ted Roberts, with a d i f f i c u l t set of circumstances. He was working i n an unfamiliar plant with a board of limi t e d capacity and r e l a t i v e l y few instruments. The f i r s t step i n the design of the l i g h t i n g was to determine the capacity of the l i g h t i n g system with which he was to work. The notes he made during t h i s assessment d e t a i l -ed the e l e c t r i c a l c a p a b i l i t i e s of the l i g h t i n g board and c i r c u i t r y of the "Old Auditorium". Having done his work-up, the next step was to observe a rehearsal, and to note import-ant positions and scene complexes. These notes are included in Appendix I I I . His assessment complete he proceeded to the design stage of the l i g h t i n g . Using his rough notes, and bearing i n mind the li m i t a t i o n s of the system, the designer made a diagramatic l i g h t p l o t from which to work. The instruments were "hung" according to this "plot", and gelled to produce the desired colour e f f e c t s . The instruments were then c i r c u i t e d to provide maximum f l e x i b i l i t y and e f f i c i e n c y . Great care was taken i n t h i s procedure, since overloading a c i r c u i t , e s p e c i a l l y on a board of the vintage of that i n the "Old Auditorium", can e a s i l y r e s u l t i n plunging the entire production into darkness. After "hanging" the instruments, the designer was ready to proceed with a technical rehearsal. It twas during t h i s : 21 "tech" that f i n a l adjustments to the focus of the instruments were made. The various cues were then run to check the l e v e l of l i g h t on the stage during each important scene or po s i t i o n . The cue sheets and diagrams i n Appendices III and IV w i l l help the reader to follow the exact changes which occurred with each new cue. By examining the l i g h t p l o t and "gel" schedule, one may see the complete information on each i n s t r u -ment, including how and when i t was used. CHAPTER IV Some Other Areas Costumes The design o f costumes f o r a p r o d u c t i o n the s i z e of Hansel and G r e t e l i s normally a r a t h e r l a r g e task r e q u i r i n g s p e c i a l knowledge. The costuming f o r t h i s p r o d u c t i o n was s i m p l i f i e d g r e a t l y by some good f o r t u n e . Over the years t h a t the U.B.C. Opera Theatre has been i n o p e r a t i o n , s e v e r a l e x c e r p t s from Hansel and Crete1 have been done, with the r e s u l t t h a t costumes f o r the main c h a r a c t e r s were a l r e a d y i n e x i s t e n c e . The costumes used, t h e r e f o r e , were mainly from stock, with the ex c e p t i o n of the dress f o r the Mother, and the robes f o r the three Angels. The Mother's dress was made by a seamstress f o l l o w i n g a sketch of an a p p r o p r i a t e peasant costume. The Angels' robes were designed by P r o f e s s o r • T i c k n e r and r e a l i z e d by Ms. Mary S z i g e t y . Each person was made r e s p o n s i b l e f o r the f i t and maintenance of h i s costume. G r e t e l wore a d i r n d l , Hansel and Father wore s h i r t s , v e s t s , and breeches. F a t h e r a l s o wore a p a i r of h i g h boots. The Witches b l a c k dress was trimmed with l a c e d a i s i e s , and she wore a t a l l b l a c k f e l t h at wit h a f e a t h e r r o s e t t e on the band and a h e a r t on the crown. The ging e r b r e a d c h i l d r e n wore simple s h i r t / b r e e c h e s or b l o u s e / s k i r t combinations. Each c a s t member completed a costume form l i k e the one on the f o l l o w i n g page. 23 COSTUME SHEET Opera or Excerpt Character Costume No. Act & Scene Name Address Phone Period Character Type & Station Colour Scheme Description Amount Cost/Yd Cost Costume Material & Yardage Trim Cloak-Coat Material 4 Yardage Trim Sat Material & Yardage Trim Shoes Wig Accessories Gloves Purse Tie Shirt Scarf Jewelry Miscellaneous TOTAL Measurements Bust or Chest Neck Under Bust Head Waist Waist to Floor Hip Upper Inside Leg Crotch to Knee Lower Knee to Ankle Back Shoulders Front Waist to Crotch Neck to Shoulders Knee Back Neck to Waist Ankle Underarm to Waist Front to Waist Shoe Back Neck to Tip Bust Sock Back Neck to Waist Inside Arm Glove Outside Arm Height Elbow Weight Wrist figure 5 Costume sheet 24 Makeup Some classes i n stage makeup were planned for the early-part of January, but a number of minor i l l n e s s e s caused t h e i r cancellation. Thus i t was l e f t to the i n d i v i d u a l to manage his own makeup with the help of the more experienced members of the cast. The Witches used latex prosthesis noses and chins created on l i f e masks by Ms. Sheri Darcus. The makeup for a production requires some careful plan-mimg, since the st y l e of the makeup may run the gamut from s t y l i z e d to r e a l i s t i c . Since Hansel and Gretel, while a f a i r y t a l e , was being directed i n a r e a l i s t i c manner, i t was suggest ed to the various cast members that t h e i r makeup should be as r e a l i s t i c as possible. The only character to escape the r e s t r i c t i o n s of realism was the Witch, since her character was conceived as a projection within a dream. The addition of the gretesque latex pieces, then, was not incongruous with the realism of the rest of the opera. The rest of the characters were conceived as poor, but healthy, and th e i r makeup r e f l e c t e d t h i s . The Mother was herself as being about t h i r t y years old, while the Father chose an age closer to f o r t y - f i v e . The two children saw themselves as eight and ten respectively. 25 P u b l i c i t y One of the major problems of the production was the u n a v a i l a b i l i t y of the most common means of advertising: that i s , the l o c a l newspapers, both of which had been on s t r i k e for several months p r i o r to the production. As a r e s u l t of t h i s s t r i k e , p u b l i c i t y had to be obtained i n other ways. The f i r s t means of p u b l i c i t y used was a poster campaign-throughout the lower mainland. A poster was designed by the director and printed by a l o c a l p r i n t shop. The four hundred posters were then d i s t r i b u t e d by the members of the Opera Theatre. Posters were placed i n a variety of locations; such as the various buildings on campus, in student residences, and i n shops, schools, and l i b r a r i e s . A pamphlet with v i t a l information about the production and a message from Dr. Berry, the head of the Department of Music, was also c i r c u l a t e d to everyone on the departmental mailing l i s t . The poster and pamphlet are included i n the Appendices. The director appeared on l o c a l C.B.C. radio to talk about the U.B.C. Opera Theatre and the production. This interview was possibly the most successful form of advertising, since the interview was done mid-week, and the largest houses appeared on Friday and Saturday nights. 26 Tickets and Programme The t i c k e t s were printed at the same time as the posters with the sales and d i s t r i b u t i o n handled by the secretaries of the Department of Music. Tickets were available by either writing or phoning the department, or at the door. Some thought was put into scaling the house. In scaling the house there were two primary considerations. On the one hand was a desire to have the production pay for i t s e l f as much as possible from the box o f f i c e receipts. On the other hand was the problem of charging no more than the public was w i l l i n g to pay. After considerable d e l i b e r a t i o n the following scale was chosen Reserved seats ........$5.00 Balcony seats.. $4.00 Old age pensioners....$1.50 reduction i n any price range and students Children...... $1.50 reduction i n any price range The programmes were printed at the Department of Music. They contained pertinent information about the production, including the cast, crew, production s t a f f , and orchestra personel. A sample programme may be found i n the Appendices. Properties Properties are an important part of any production. The term refers to any small, portable object mentioned i n the s c r i p t or used by the actor. It i s necessary to take some care i n finding the "props" since they must f i t with the period and style of the production. In January a l i s t of the necessary "props" was prepared by reading the score and noting those items mentioned. The l i s t was then turned over to the di r e c t o r , who checked i t , and revised i t according to his staging. Most of the "props" were available from stock; however, i t was necessary to order s i x bisque milk jugs. Bisque i s pottery that has had i t s f i r s t f i r i n g only, and i s therefore very b r i t t l e . Since one of the more important scenes c a l l e d for the breaking of the milk jug, i t was important that a jug of t h i s material was available for each dress rehearsal and performance. The properties were put i n theocare of a "props mistress Ms. Sonja Kozy, whose r e s p o n s i b i l i t y i t was to assure that they were i n the r i g h t place at the r i g h t time. In addition, each cast member was given the r e s p o n s i b i l i t y of checking his or her own "props". Appendix V contains both the o r i g i n a l and revised "props l i s t s . 28 BIBLIOGRAPHY Burris-Meyer, Harold, and Edward C.Cole.Scenery f o r the Theatre. L i t t l e , Brown and Company, Boston, 1971. r e v i s e d e d i t i o n Corson, R i c h a r d . Stage Makeup. P t e n t i c e - H a l l , Inc., Engelwood C l i f f s , New J e r s e y , 1975. f i f t h ed. Parker, W.Oren and Harvey K. Smith. Scene Design and Stage  L i g h t i n g . H o l t , Rinehart and Winston Inc., New York, N.Y., 1974. t h i r d ed. 29 APPENDIX I The f i r s t appendix i s a copy of the production score which i s contained i n the envelope accompanying copy one of t h i s thesis. The following markings are used i n the score as a type of shorthand to record the staging. X a cross. The d i r e c t i o n i s given with an arrow, or with l e t t e r s . R ........... stage r i g h t L stage l e f t U upstage D ... downstage C ........ . .. centre Characters are generally abbreviated to single l e t t e r s . M . . Mother F Father H Hansel G . . . .. Gretel W . Witch The production score also notes the various cues. 30 APPENDIX II figure 6 Sketch for Peter's house, Act I, by F. Tickner f i g u r e 7 Sketch f o r the F o r e s t , A c t I I , by F. T i c k n e r 32 f i g u r e 8 S k e t c h f o r t h e G i n g e r b r e a d h o u s e , A c t I I I . F . T i c k n e r f i g u r e 11 Back of the Stage Right f l a t F . T i c k n e r 34 figure 12 Section of Gingerbread house, Act III F. Tickner figure 13 D e t a i l of Gingerbread house, Act III F.Tickner figure 14 Elevation of Act III oven F.Tickner 39 j ? o o f c«i£ ,"<s'x 4'3* 1J"' 1 a ppt> " sc. •• r,(. - r Sill . f \ flj »•> /^>^<« \ figure 15 Reduction of portions of Act III cage blueprint J . Holmes 40 figure 16 Photograph of the model for the Act I house 4l;; Dimmer/ C i r c u i t Schedule COTTLE " T R * Sato-T" » / 7 < J S.I0E P 5 L $ E>SE_ 8 ^ ® - / £ f—1 S3 - / r m cm - $4 d . 1 ' 1 2 HI, HZ. f i g u r e 17- O r i g i n a l document from l i g h t i n g d e s i g n e r Ted Roberts- March 1979. 42 Designer's notes for the l i g h t i n g of Hansel and Gretel Act I Cottage - set CS don't use f i r s t 2/DS — Area o f f right (soft l i g h t exterior) (stump) — Area cottage Loft Main f l o o r table Interior stool — Ent. area going from cottage o f f l e f t (soft l i g h t exterior) 0 House down for overture 1 As curtain opens. Starts with Hansel & Gretel working 2 Enter Mother — Heavy scene of scolding (door USC) 3 E x i t H & G Mother scene at table 4 Ent. drunk Father SR area s i t s on stump 5 Father goes around back and enters cottage USC s i t s at table 6 This scene becomes joyous with Mother & Father dancing Moves to discovery the children are gone (music slows down) distraught to s i t at SR stool To go f i n d the children M & F e x i t USC cross to SL e x i t to wing with lantern. Act II Five trees — strongest focus CCS & secondary's 1 Open with Gretel s i t t i n g at CS tree eating berries — day 2 Enter Hansel USCL 3 S h i f t slow to fear with the coming of night i n house Changes to dancing and playing on other trees much of t h i s scene i s played DSL 43 Designer's notes cont. 4 Enter the Witch at tree C and cross DSL of B as H & G cross DSR Witch brings them back to sleep standing beneath tree B and Witch crosses e x i t o f f USL 5 H & G sing prayer beneath tree B and go to sleep (slow fade down to centre tree solo focus) 6 Ent. of Angels PBlocking Enter out US trees c i r c u l a r dance DSC Act III 1 Scene opens with H & G asleep DS of cage & G awakes and walk about DS of skrim It i s morning i n the forest H wakes up/ they walk about DS and f i n a l l y s e t t l e down again DSL 2 ..Lights up behind skrim and then skrim f l y s out as they look US i n amazement and then move USC for scene abput the house 3 They move DS of cage and oven and then back to nibble at the gingerbread house (the witch interupts several times vocally from inside & they say i t s the wind (? l i t e change) 4 Enter the witch from inside the house and following scene continues CS i n front of the house 5 They escape her and chase about stage and end with her USL and them DSR/ freeze/ she comes down and takes H USL and puts him i n cage and she exits into house leaving G frozen DSR & H i n cage 6 Witch reenters/ t r i p s about/ sends G into house/ focus to cage where H goes to sleep 7 Witch -goes to oven and opens i t ( f i r e from within oven/ she closes door again) 8 Witch t r i p s about stage on her broom (very bizarre) 9 She wakes up H and checks him out for f a t / c a l l s G out 44 Designer's notes cont. of house to bring her r a i s i n s to feed H/ Gretel uses witches wand to put a quick s p e l l on her but comes back out of i t between house arid cage 10 Witch opens oven and has1 G check i t out and she gets witch to show her how to get into i t and she l e t s H go and they push the witch i n and close the door/ much joy DSC including song and dance 11 They pick condy off house there witch does t r i p i n oven and they look about and several children have appeared USL & USR (they are i n a trance) 12;„ H & G touch them on foreheads & break the s p e l l 13 Enter Father & Mother from DSR wing and reunite DSR with children 14 Other children open oven and take gingerbread out of oven and take to CS 15 Skrim comes i n l i g h t s out behind out/ key on on H .& G/ M & F slow cross to SR e x i t / l i t e s out enter DSR cross to H & G then 16 House up Act I Cottage 12 CYC 11 CYC GOBO Dim./Cir. Dim./Cir. 1 /6,21 7 /13>29 2 /22 8 /10,26 3 ./16 9 /1,8 4 /15 10 /9,12 5 /5 4 11 /56,57 6 718 12 /41,42 f i g u r e 1 8 Dimmer and c i r c u i t schedule A c t I Act II Forest 12 CYC 11 CYC GOBO 4WW 6CW 8 ANGELS 9 TREE GOBO SL & SR 10 7CW 5WW Dim./Cir. 1 / 6,21 2 / 4,20 3 / 3,17 4 /13,29 5 /10,26 6 /14,28 Dim./Cir. 7 /11,25 8 /27,30,55 9 /1,8 10 /37,40 11 /57,56 12 /41,42 figure 19 Dimmer and c i r c u i t schedule, Act II Act I I I Witch's Hut 12 CYC 11 CYC GOBO 1 2 3 9 WW Dim./Cir. Dim./Cir. 1 /6,21 7 /25,28 2 /4 f20 8 /26,29 3 /3,17 9 /10,13 4 /2,18 10 /38,39 5 /5,23 11 /56,57 6 /7,19 12 /41,42 f i g u r e ;20 -Dimmer and c i r c u i t schedule, A c t I I I . 48 Table of Gels Used Cinemoid Gel Number/Colour No. of Pieces Instrument 2 Light amber 4 Pattern 22 3 2 Pattern 26 3 7 Light rose 4 Pattern 123 2 Pattern 2 3 4 Medium amber 4 Pattern 23 9 Light salmon 6 Pattern 26 3 3 . Pattern 123 15 Peacock blue 2 Pattern 263 4 Pattern 2 3 17 Steel blue 3 Pattern 12 3 25 Purple 2 Pattern 123 41 Bright blue 4 Pattern 22 3 42 Pale v i o l e t 1 Pattern 22 3 32 Medium blue 4 12" X 12" 40 Pale blue 4 12" X 12" table I The numbers given r e f e r to the Cinemoid reference book of the Century/Strand Corporation. 49 Instrument Schedule Table I I (w ST t o o . f e t u s 1 %"UKo l i l t it i 1 *• U l~ . . 1. I 3 M 0 L 1 3 " DC 4 g" Z.£K«> " J 4 ? LLC 1 / .8 it OR .1 t . . . <> •4 u£ ...1 le ** •• Tilt »»' . 8 i-tf-r Hex .4/ l /1 1 •• - *M</V z 1 0 3 t"LBKo " z> 1 4i f I - CL i4 2 tl " - Wt\ z. i 3 H 2. •2. / t 1 « J W ITCH 7 2-i 4 C-OTTA-&H • TAllt • s '* l £ - ** c, rue / ? *' - STt?0L . .V 4.1 i * VJ ITCfi ? 2 * i •i 7 '1 •' S.d. 1U t ' 7 2/ 4 i SiOi CL . . tV ... i n » V A l • 2 II ArtbLLS i» ' Z? tfiCrtT ToUrt /. s CL . 4 l i f 2. n t l\ A/v&US tS i f i 4 2 1 " Ct . 1 >. .. i% UFT&AUUi ^4 ".. 50 if) 5 J { I I a 4 i i I PRACTICAL. - J b'o \J. fuooo-ifi - M i l ' . a. GhLLt-ii .KAIL. fifi T\>Jo c tot -ii.il hi.. ... Ulft GoboS CYC. ... ou£-/J -.7 / . 1 * • .51 ; / i •> 1 » » '? . / 1* Yf JZ-51 ACT I Rehearsal Cue Numbers Q.O 1 Q.I 26 Q.2 APPENDIX IV Lighting Cue Sheet House to h a l f / then out As curtain opens 1,6 2,3,4 5,9 7,8 10 11 12 dimmer 3 6 10 5 1 Enter Mother 2,3,4 10 10 l e v e l 32 3 7 Q.3 2 before Q.4 35 Q.5 6 before Q.6 60 3 before Q.7 dble. bar Q.8 Exi t Hansel and Gretel. Focus to table 2,3 10 6 6 Enter Father 1 8 4 8 Father enters the house 2,3 8 1 3 10 9 Ex i t Mother 6 7 Masters slowly to black as curtain closes House up ACT II 4 afte r 67 9 before 70 Q.O Q.l House to h a l f / then out Forest. Focus on Hansel 2 7 1,3 4 4/5 6,7 4 6 9 10 10 7 11 10 12 10 Q.la Hansel enters 1,3 52 Cue Sheet cont. Rehearsal Cue numbers 4 before 75 Q.2 90 92 9 8 ACT III 112 4 before 116 4 a f t e r 125 Q.3 Q.4 3 before Q.6 dble. bar Q.7 5 after Q.l 111 Slow s h i f t to night when Hans says "Night i s coming" 4,5 1,2,3 10 5 Enter Sandman 10 7 11 12 :.6 7 2 6 8 3 Hansel and Gretel say prayer CS and go to sleep 1,3 2 /2 10 3 8 / 3 6 Q.5 Enter Angels 8^  (slow build) 9 Masters slowly to black with curtain House up Q.O House to h a l f / then out Hansel and Gretel asleep DL i n front of scrim Segue to Q.2 1,2 3 4 7 7 Q.2 Dew-fairy enters 1,2 4 Q.3 Gretel awakes as morning grows 1,2,3 7 8 6 5 6 Q.4 Hansel and Gretel discover the Witch House lead 10,11,12 follow 4,5,6 8,9 1,2,3 10 8 53 Cue Sheet cont. Rehearsal Cue numbers 164 Q.5 Oven on. Breaker 30, c i r c u i t 24 169 Q.6 Witch r i d e s broom 1 — 6 r e s t o r e 1 — 6 8 6 2 a f t e r Q.7 Scrim i n . L i g h t s go wi t h i t 212 1,2,3 7 4 - 6 8 - 12 5 7 0 0 p.98 Q.8 1 as F a t h e r e n t e r s 2_ following.3_ 5 a f t e r 6 6 6 107 c r o s s i n g back 3_ / 2_ 4 / 4 p.99 Q.9 Masters down wit h c u r t a i n 3 b e f o r e dble. bar Q.10 1 - 6 8,9 TO - 12 f o r c a l l s 10 8 10 Q . l l House up 5.4.-APPENDIX V Table III Properties L i s t s January 19 79 L i s t Act I, scene i 1 Sewing for Gretel 2 Brooms and broom-making supplies 3 : Six bisque jugs containing 4 Milk Act I, scene i i 5 Bundle of faggots 6 Switch 7 Basket for berries Act I,scene i i i 8 Basket containing a) Jug of whiskey b) Ham c) Butter d) Flour e) Sausage f) Eggs g) Turnips h) Onions i) Tea j) Potatoes a) faggots b) straw or twigs c) cord 9 2 Mugs Kettle 10 11 Lantern 55-Props l i s t cont. Act I I , scene i 1 Flowers 2 Basket (see I , i i #7) 3 Nosegay 4 Strawberries 5 Off-stage cuckoo 6 Bag containing 7 Sand or g l i t t e r Act I I , scene i i 8 Anything for the Angels? gold cloth? Act I I I , scene i 1 Dew and a 2 Bluebell Act I I I , scene i i 3 Removable b i t s of Witch's house Act I I I , scene i i i 4 Rope 5 Wand — need something r e a l l y jazzy here 6 Basket containing 7 Almonds 8 Raisins 9 Cakes 10 Juniper branch 11 Faggots for f i r e 12 Broomstick to ride 13 Twig to t i c k l e Hansel 14 Bones 15 Goodies as per p.162 Piano Vocal Score 16 Gingerbread Wittoh 17 Gingerbread Children 56 F i n a l Properties L i s t used during the performance Table IV Act I, scene i 1 Sewing for Gretel 2 Brooms and broom-making supplies 3 Bisque jug 4 Milk 5 Lantern 6 Stool Act I, scene i i 7 Bundle of faggots 8 Switch 9 Basket for berries 10 Lantern should be hanging Act I, scene i i i 11 Basket containing a) faggots b) straw c) cord d) several brooms e) wooden mallet ham onions butter tea f l o u r potatoes sausage eggs 12 2 Mugs 13 Kettle 14 Lantern should be hanging Props l i s t cont. Act I I , scene i 1 Flowers for wreath 2 Basket — strawberries — 3 Nosegay — loose flowers 4 Off-stage cuckoo 5 Bag of g l i t t e r Act I I , scene ii.1 6 Gold net for Angels Act III The properties used for o r i g i n a l l i s t . 57 cherry tomatoes Act III were unchanged from the 58 f i g u r e 21 Programme f o r the performance of Hansel and G r e t e l VIOLIN I Randy Balzer, Concertmaeter Alison Eldredge Pat Armstrong Nicki Stieda Victor Wong Rachel King Andrea Bertram VIOLIN II John Suderman, Principal Leslie Moore Trish Barclay Myrna linger Nancy Fleming Valerie Baerg Crispin Sion VIOLA Gitta Krebs, Principal Leslie McAuley Bernice Wong Anita Hamburger-Douglas CELLO Susan Dallyn, Principal Grace Lee Charles Inkman Anne Dalton Nan Mackie DOUBLE BASS Hans Preuss; Principal Nina H^vaas Neil Bryson PICCOLO J i l l Rigby-Jones FLUTE Catherine Riddle Brenda Baird OBOE Julia Penistan Cristina Sewerin CLARINET Janine Oye Alex Nagy BASS CLARINET Richard Branion BASSOOf! David Boddington Laurie Inouye PKENCB HOW Holly Jackson Kendra Davison Peggy Moran Duncan Shaw TRUMPET Neil Hunter Nancy Harrison TROMBONE Tim Skeldon Rod Ellard Murray Crewe TUBA Dave Sabourin TIMPASI Bruce Wrigley PERCUSSION Jim Balfour Howard Jang Shelly Tkachyk BARP Donna BTOWH LIBRARIAN Hans Preuss STAGE MANAGER Hans Preuss ftJBC O P E R A T H E A T R E i An Opera i n Three Acts Text by Adelheid Wette J*isic by Englebert Humperdinck -CAST-Peter, a broom-maker Derek Delpuppo J e f f r e y Holmes*? Gertrude, Peter'8 second wife Katherine Hardert Hansel"} ..... Lena Hauser* I Their children Angela Furk Gretel) Heather.Ochs The Witoh Diane Fox Jennifer Jestley*t. The Sandman L i l l i a n Graham The Dew Fairy Fiona Blackburn Children and Angela * Indicates performances March 12 and 16 t In partial fulfillment of Master of Music (Opera) Degree Act I: Peter's House Act I I : The Forest Act I I I : The Witch's House OPERA CHORUS Maureen C i a m i e l l o Diane Fox Je n n i f e r J e s t l e y Grace Wiebe Angela Furk Lena Hauser L i l l i a n Graham Nadine Bohna PRODUCTION STAFF Dire c t o r French Tickner Coach/Accompanists Barbara Baxter , Carol Westdal Technical Director J e f f r e y Holmest Set Design French Tickner L i g h t i n g Design and Execution Ted Roberts Stage Manager Derek Delpuppo Construction Crew J e f f r e y Holmest Derek Delpuppo Tickets Music Department O f f i c e S t a f f House Manager Dolores Bastedo Crew Robert Gordy Kenneth Weremchuk THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 2075 W E S B R O O K M A L L V A N C O U V E R , B . C . , C A N A D A V 6 T 1 W 5 f i g u r e 22 P a m p h l e t u s e d i n a d v e r t i s i n g • \ An Opera in Three Acts Text by Adelheid Wette Music by Englebert Humperdinck o "° -CAST-Peter, a broom-maker Gertrude, Peter's second, wife Hansel 1 > Their children Gretel J : The Witch The Sandman The Dew Fairy Children and Angels UBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA UBC OPERA CHORUS STAGED AND CONDUCTED BY FRENCH TICKNER UBC OLD AUDITORIUM, 8:00 P.M. Monday, March 12, 1979 Friday, March 16, 1979 . Wednesday, March 14, 1979 Saturday, March 17, 1979 .. Derek Delpuppo Jeffrey Holmes Katherine Harder ..... Lena Hauser Angela Furk ... Heather Ochs ...... Diane Fox Jennifer Jestley .. Carol Westdal L i l l i a n Graham Fiona Blackburn (For ticket information see reverse side) Hansel and Gretel has charmed audiences since its appearance in the last decade of the nine-teenth century, when it established a new and refreshing current in the history of opera. Its fairy-tale atmosphere, representing reaction against the heavy and often mytho-logical preoccupations of its direct predecessors, brought to the stage children's tunes and dances (at times, to be sure, framed in nearly Wagnerian sonor-ities) , with just a whimsical bit of the supernatural. It is our privilege to invite you to hear this work, in one of the major events of our 1978-79 season. In presenting this full-length, fully garbed and orchestrated opera production (part of a distinguished series of biennial events), we accomplish two vital purposes: that of crowning in real stage experience the training of acting singers in our opera workshop; and, to our great satisfaction, that of extend-ing our program in illuminating performance for campus and community audiences. It is our hope that the excitement of our students and their gifted teacher, French Tickner, is matched by yours in sharing this occasion with them, and with all of us in the Department of Music at UBC. Wallace Berry Head, Department of Music University of British Columbia 1 3 CuK i CP"' i__r / / / "L_r tH3 «f 3 6-9 d ? — - d f — b o KEY J tLnpiotOfitL SPoT - £" a 6" tR£$t)£L ft 1 9 <r—} t—? c—» ;? t—? . i a - »^ 3 H o 3 o 5/ o 9 _2_ 4 C O _;> 11 hJANSELC&REIEL! LI&HTozsiCrU - T. ROBERTS SCALS. 'A' -- I'O" U B C O P E R A T H E A T R E G. S C H I R M E R OPERA S C O R E E D I T I O N S Engelbert Humperdinck HANSEL AND GRETEL IWCj.uo£D A S AfpeiOoik £ HANSEL and GRETEL *f Opera in Three Acts Music by Engelbert Humperdinck Text by A D E L H E I D W E T T E English translation by C O N S T A N C E B A C H E Revised by H A M I L T O N B E N Z Ed. 1267 G . S C H I R M E R New York/London V U ^ ^ U X A R G U M E N T ONCE upon a time a poor broom-maker and his wife lived in a lonesome cottage in the Harz Mountains with their little son, Hansel, and daughter, Gretel. When our story opens, the father and mother have gone away to sell brooms in the neighboring villages, leaving the children at work in the house. But work is tiresome, especially when empty stomachs are clamoring for unattainable goodies; finally the youthful pair start to romping about the room, and at the height of their frolic the mother enters, weary from her long trip and unhappy because she has been unable to sell her wares. She scolds the chitdren, and sends them out into the forest to pick wild strawberries for supper.—Late that evening the father returns, having disposed of his brooms at a good profit, and gailyunpacks a quantity of dainties; then, missing the children, he asks after them, and is horror-stricken at thought of their pitiful plight all alone after nightfall in the woods. Act II discovers the children roaming through the woods, gradually filling their baskets with strawberries; heedless of direction and time, even-tide finds them bewildered in the darkening forest haunted, as they have been taught to believe, by fairies and witches. The steep, rocky bulk of the Ilsenstein, a reputed gathering-place for evil sprites, looms up amid the trees; the wind whispers and moans uncannily, and shadowy bush and hollow take on strange and fearful shapes. The frightened children cower together beneath a spreading tree, and repeat their usual bedtime prayer to the "fourteen guardian angels," after which, calmer in spirit, they fall asleep with a fairy vision of the radiant angels floating around them. Act III opens at daybreak; the children awake, refreshed by a good night's sleep, and sing merrily. AH at once they notice an object overlooked in the evening darkness—a beautiful little house built of all manner of good things'to eat, and giving off a most appetizing odor. This is, alas! the abode of a wicked witch, an ogress who entraps small boys and girls by her spells, pops them into her oven, and bakes them into delectable gingerbread, upon which she fares. Hansel and'Gretel approach the house and begin to break off tasty morsels from the walls; the witch appears and in due course casts a spell over them to prevent their escape; she now shuts Hansel up in a sort of cage and feeds him on sweets to fatten him; then she tries to entice Gretel to bend down in front of the oven, so that she may be able to push her in and bake her; but Gretel pretends not to understand, and when the witch herself crossly bends down to show her how, the two children quickly shove her into the oven, bang the door shut, and dance around gleefully. There-upon, all the gingerbread shapes that formed the hedge around the witch's house are transformed—her spell being broken—into their rightful shapes of happy boys and girls who thank Hansel and Gretel for their deliverance; then the father and mother, who have been seeking their dear ones, burst Upon the scene, and all winds up with a chorus of thanksgiving. 31957 BI&siI and Qretel. Dramatis Person®. Peter, a broom-maker Baritone. Gertrude, his wife Mezzo-Soprano. Hansel) Mezzo - Soprano. firetel J .A1!!?. c.h!!d.r.en soprano. The Witch who eats children Mezzo-soprano. Sandman (the sleep fairy) Soprano. Dewman (the dawn fairy) Soprano. Children Sopranos and Contraltos. Fourteen Angels Ballet. First Act. Home. Second Act. The forest. T h i r d A c t . The witch's house. 31957 A Hansel and Gretel. Prelude. Ruhige, uicht zu langsame Bewegung. Andante con moto . ( J=e9) E . H u m p e r d i n o k . *?.| > J J - J ^ _ ^* ^  ^ — H ^ r . j j — ^ • * i — i J " 3 _^=y • d-< r r tr 1*^  r 8 n 1 • » > - * t>gi,——— F I . r3 ^ tj. i i | c i : — * cresc. ¥ ^ ' i w r r b . _ 1(9^' ^ -^ — v-—W 1" EFJr-N T 5 " ' [r r r " J p i r it B l . * i J j O - h 11 I H : j , I i p : '{ii* -" F F Ef L< 1 » 1 O 1 3 1 9 5 7 c x i — © © C o p y r I n t e r i R i g h . t l 9 6 9 b y G . S c h i l a t i o n a l C o p y r i g h t S r m e r , I n c . e c u r e d b o d P r i n t e d i n U . S . A . i ^ f f j JTi - - J -' T - i " ' ' \ - — t — —s-1 » J / i i L-g. 1 / T l l_e J > — -* Hh. _ . i/^-T F f i i nf^ p f p i yr 1 r i 2 ^ K I j-g „ M ^ ^ 1— 1 —i— dimm. poco riten. - II i P * Ms IQP 1—«—J -f = U " " " i [TCI A l l e g r o UOn trojjpo. Munter. 6)ie Halben ungefShr wie Torhsr die Viertel.) vi. A u >f^ TT 1 > f T i (/««£») 31957 , 1 J J - ^ I Trp. r11 4f -hf >ifibi» \ifdiynZ 1 Fl. i F 3 ^ p. E L = £ •Hf — = - cresc. •id —_ - -. - _ | _ Mj u If. g * tit-'. 1 1 f rf- & M — j J i dtnnn. o p • h j — < - — ~ * P " b i T i r i fr^Tfit— 1 u_ 31957 Hb. ill nji^'Hri LA J2 m . . . . ere^c. 31957 it uns Zeitmaxx aehr otfmUMieh beHckleunigen. Poco a poco accelerando. 31957 * fit ulnar m m mm M i J? string. • — # Im ZeitmaSS. fj57» zurikkhaUend.) . a tempo. Y«» jooro rilenuto.) mm m 4 I t * -i <r irffflh aw r r p •r*H»iT • espress avsarui |" r r ""» 4 • 5" U * — • — L . s-B—*! ^4^N r r* 1 1—o -L» 1 re 31957 10 31957 11 t # . f t -— — - f r f — T — —ar~ M r K ™ w ^ 1 8 j M B ~"1 -a. r p-rf^ r | -9—-—•# J povo riten. * — T T ~ lolto tra nquillo. i - — ^ gi—1 W -1 o -= .£ f L _ | L _ - *» f fr r — f . 7 PI it® V i 3= i _ p Tat ^ T r b . ros £ t t •- I i Hr. r r 31957 13 F i r s t A c t . Home. Allegretto con moto. J . = 83) m Fl m ci-1 73 Hr. Bass a s ID _(Cuitaln rises) 2 j jffr U S i First Scene. (A small and poorly furnished room. In the background a door; a small window near it, looking on to the forest. On the left a fireplace with chimney above it. On the walls are hanging brooms of various sizes. Hansel is sitting by the door, making brooms, and Gretel opposite him by the fireplace, knitting a stocking.) Gretel. IE !e Su . sy, and what is—tire—-news? 31957 13 The geese are running- bare.foot bo oaupothoy've no •. alio eat &otfJGr -fHVyiilo iHaZi, TO vJ&AR t i t p TUeuubblui hau—luathcr and plon ty to jpaio, Why nant tia * .7 TJ- • 7 7 r-» J>P j> j i j , \\ PfL*?$ Moon f-foM LoFT ^TJ Pl*T£ DiW/O SS-o/i^Cr ontlnniug) PuTs UP jUtroM X I? t 6 inab&thcpooreooin'a now— RKASOA) r u t ceese i4Me.too~ Hansel (interrupting her.) * xla i i^ t rr ti  .; . j ,M H /; .'I p J'i'p J PoSSlfeLg  Thentheyllhaveto gobare-footl 1 Ba 3 8 l ^ ™ ?=P1 Hansel. Hr. Goose-y-goose«y gan-der,; juit whal'u lu bu m 31957 14 d©«a? Wzo'Ugivemeniiutand sugar, for bread I have none? F £ ° „ , „ V* Mi*/u€r(?y 4s C/^ AJ 6B, ftuT we Af«v£ /to tt*K& g«fc*£_ J ^ P ' ' ' • • * J>^jJH,tJ'JiJ^p i'p I ['• I* vp- p B a *U go back to bed and I'll lie there a l l day,. _ ^ . t No-thing here to liretel (interrupting.) j!t> * / r i JJilp Jijip jui Thenwellh'aveto go hungry! I fr- ^ 0 0 * * eat so there's nothing to HAT tie* AN* J'U UOAXA • B E # » • — Hansel (throwing his work aside and getting np) •p p J u i ' p p i# mother would on-iyxuiim howio-a ELLIOT 31957 15 Gretel (getting up) gaint— You. I'm oo hungry Moritluiowwhu* t e — F o r weeks Pve wa-.twu an - ly i fp£5 M O T ufoKriju^tUGr y'tyiweec oeiiSfywi HSa ocl, dorit forgotwfaatfather ritard. a tempo* «»• "ffifoVk pbu *U.ier-<rui-f*i **to<t bread, ftte-ve nr. hacd,— u™» gat.ting H r ^ t ritar<i±_~ tempo said When mother wished that she were dead 4 ritard. "When past* bear - iag-a tempo w £ CA>O - / u»T -4*r our grief, the B 6 A R Trtc/O Lord w i l l senH re - l ief!" Hansel, m Yes,.Gre-tel, 31957 16 J M p p r j a p ? j p l r p l «Mp p r ^ N ^ ^ that's all ver - ry true; what a shame those nice words can't make a stew. X'M *j°r I** IHCiMooj) , fot> »*0 srE4o op Sf*&fcCrt£& fo tiKC $*n* r«»D n J 3 Bass. S*r. i P i, p y v P P PI TP flf'grr tel. It wotdd bo uuoh a treat If • «e had—somu.thingiiiidv to w,<^ . ti.o V M/iirt Vo^ O fian *<OV-ftf I A J A . ,JS •-fl Z-aag u v r h-hi j»b>p r J i Jjt3 f P P P jr, p r ijgi eat! Eggs and •fant4»r andsu-—ot .paste) fm gl-moot fu* • get .tan now tlioy ~T 1 , — 4 V r W*r^fil'rf / — V « "  •fa t va a > a r hmv thuy-~n— gAco/o .>i.». TMY.^r i » o c o hKni . > ^ don't give in to grumps, M/>4/ go JUT- -/OWL. K£E? vru Tom/to. g. Oretel, I wish_ Hr. CI. 531 r i B»S8. W3^ 31957 o to 17 Look hap-py or you'll give me, give me the dumps. This aw _ ful — face, VI. r Whew! what a sight, Looks l ike a hor-rid o l d _ cross patch s Be do mm Allegretto COD. motO.(J?^ J)/ < s h « t a k e s a b r o o m in her han<L) p Jl J | J, V I fl ^ J f g E WiQd.Olt-g. H r . Out of my way! Leave me I pray! &<iu.ne->r-y eft*-6- M M O I J - M A C - E m Str.P ML p p J ^ X T p p ' - U ^ i p puJ'p Ji IP Y p p J> Just let me reach you, Quick-ly I'll teach you How to make trouble Turn 5§1 i i 31957 18 M if J T l in i'H h iP p p H L r p t i g Crosspatch,crosspatch,Wliat is the use Grow-lmg and grumbl ing, . Ful l_of a-bus h li g, _ l - e, j.-.vTi.nvTrif , cresc. E 3 L-J—u"1 1— 1— 1 - 1 P P a P M P ^ P Off with you, out with ybus Shame on p J Jl J) Off with you, out with ybu> Shame on you, goosel Hansel ( seises the broom tooJ Crosspatch a - way, > J» J< JH p * J) J' p W i n d . v\ w ^ J ? J i » * Crosspatch a - way, Eas - y to r B > w n _ _ S t r . __^^mm — r I h n J ' J I J , T Ifl a Out, of my way! If 1 say! Wlicif I am hung-ry p p 'ifrp If 1 am hung - r y 111 nev.er say so, ^ m i | j 1 f l p J 9 ^ Sure-ly, I can say_ so, 1 CMT*tLr&vcr s w»u ^ i - Nev - er give i te r s)f»w» i i ' ufneu n * K i .JTT? r n i cresc. /ft 0 $i Or M P Ppp P |P Ppp p f(W> P INev-i Nev-ergiveup so, Chase it a-way sol Crosspatch,crosspatch,What.is file use P P PpHtfP ' I.P i P J> l&f JJY up_so, Cant chase a - way_so! AfJ'Qty . ALH>A/$ KHOVJ IT Crbsspatch,crosspatch,,V^hat_is the use^ 31957 19 t €iuw- lingandgrunib-liug, Full of a-bust*, • Au /»7ft t/wG- i Tile/OqurDi.t_PA&fC Off will i you, Out with yon. fp K r s Grow - l ing andgrumb-ling, Full of a-lmsH, i Off with you. , Out with crew. mm & T ^ S ALL MAT j Sharhe on you, goose! ( p r e t ( ! n d l a g to sweep away.) WHY o&wrVau. ^ ou.r ^ Ji J> Ji» That's right! Now rou, with you! ffl Tempo primo. (»W J>: >Vli J) J) Ji i f you will stop com-plaining Til tell you a most_ de - light - - - ful W i n d . — _ , r>t ILL T£U. y f r « . A *o%T Ot -—Lj&wr — fi i Hansel . ^ k V t = * B-= - - ^ r ~ * •—1 mv v . > j) i » secret! l h i . f i 0 Am de - l ight - - ful! > t)ft>»i— i. 1 V 1 it must be something * > l > . ^ — • — • ) -t* •0- ' - 1 . K ft • f 4 : 31957 ao nic X. b \ — ; \jj u r e n e l Wel l List - en, =t=tF >roth-er, dear l^fHtei A T< 1* f'P ' vU/*AT A sur - p n s e ! m 9 b—= • jt - = J»- d u 1 T L[/~ * ^ p j'i i ' » n j : I p p » j t hi1' p P p f •J i i • .i -ii. l A_ I W 7 . * _ ] _ . . I look in the jug, VI .. milk from the cow! e got it to-day from our a t ci. III I j I J I U / W : l 5 * 4 * * • P iiO" p B E * r P J * ' p l r p neigh - bor. rtittf M> * 5 / o f VI. A n d - m o t h - er, when she comes_ back Cant yjirf^U- A A f c £ S »K£ - T U > « J 6 -M - -XTT ^ J21 J'' pii^  p p p P if p r * home, Will make us a jun-ket all white wirii foam, w i c t , I fWe /T» A p H O - e . ^ o F "'Hansel (wfS g l W 6 w i f h fo( 'wn'ite i  am. crexc. 31957 21 Hansel (dancing round the room) 1 When a jun - kefs an - y-where near, Then Han - sel . Hiin - sel. 33 dfiE 3 Han-sel is there! Hww thiih is the creams on thr milk, lets i ' U her Sou. K&A LL.y TUitxl ( H e l i c k s t h e c r e a m o f f h i s f i n g e r . ) p P H y 1 * »1 p | T y | p |? -15=^^ tnntr i t I wouldn't I l ike to £ X)OA>T » W <T£/0O ~fo 0 Oe - ml-nl, &o£} I T S &cx Piu a n i m a t o . s ^ * ? S Gretel. ( g i v e s him a r a p o n b i s f i n g e r s . ) P hJ-'»i P \ v B — p p i «r t p ^ ¥-—r Such man-ners, Han-sel. A'ltiiT' you a - shamed? TJ4IL uul your #HV H A w $ E t stop IT H A v e y ^ i * . N< M A U D S T w i * drink'it Piu animate y m\,*m £ n 31957 Go back'to your work.again, be finger^ you gree-dy boy! '*>*TA«T you. TAtffc T H 6 6 J - A * < Ton. P I sfz I P ( 3 ^ pv> >P P ir iJ''p ji i'ip»» JiP Pip p . n p p quick, How can we both get done in time! If mother comes and wo havonWono *-4r£ Ti*eUiNoh*K£ TIM£ io f-HAie Oof*r \nfki-r Tempo come prima ^^ottf 11 Hansel (sticking right, We'll sleep, but on our stom-achs all the night 1 Work a-gain? bis bands Into bis trousers pockets.) p. 1J H p i r >fy *fe> not for me! > T ^ s Hb. That's not my i - dea at all, It doesn t ^wo rttara. 31957 23 a tempo suit me! It's such a bore! Dancing is what I pre-fer much. S^iricK-^^kltl^s^t \ %%pd**c* tot»iA&L *Jq(pKk Gre te l •At r \±Jy i r ' \ Dame i B g l Dane - ing! f'm Jt-h »= i c =S==£E ' — ? = r / > = sure it's n o t — a crime. ri if Liri ffy IT rfiC-d-r fJavJ 1 1 , 1 • 1 • 1 — 1 — wm 1 more. mm mm 1 H — f r -ep* f y - p — L p• f r * it p r j y ^ i p r p l G W ^ — H p . p p Y p ^We'jl^sing a song-iokeej)us in t ime! One that our grand - mother 233^ 4 fftlttrffTrfft f used to s ing us:  ^, Let's sing and da nee . iu time to the sing - ing! 31957 ][l}>) Allegretto con moto.(J=ioo) (clapping her hands) P'P P P Broth-er dance a step or two f > fff i f f f fWf i f M r ,1.1 I Bass. Dr. don't know how, When to turn or when to how, J J H - 7 " -fitter*, «AJ£ Trt#»6> 1 C A W T Show me what I ought to do, rt4 Cwdfc 31957 35 t So that I may dancelikeyou. m 1 f . u Oretel. v  I J) -h^-M p p p > With your foot you tap tap tap, V I . ^ cresc. i i i 7. T — r — r — r p p p H p Wrtb your hand you clap clap clap, ftight foot fiwt, fceft fo*t then, Round about -a*4 back -tc-gaJn! With yew foot you tap tap tap, Withyou* hand clap clap clap, v i . 51 P J1'/ Ip J'P IP ?p p J)|J < I pJJ'p^gS R4fih»foot f4rat,frffft footthen,Ronnd and bach a • gainl • That was ve-ry good indeed, i |h 11LMI cresc. 31957 26 fa Jl Ji JI JI I JTfyi I JHp p Ji I J> J'' J I p * J » i TT ' .1 . ; i i i m - :_ j t TT::_ i i And I'm sure that you'll suc-ceed. Try a-gain and I can see Han-sel soon wi l l ^ r — r - i H, — i l l 8 . cresc, S i a. T—r r—r r — r ( c l a p p i n g h e r h a n d s J o y f u l l y . ) I? j i J > J'Jvlp p p^ I j , Ji JM'J> dance like me! With your head you nick nick nick, With your fingers you i i i I B ^ p p r^J Ji r I p Ji f IP' p p'p I J' J> click click click, Right foot fifst, fceft foot tbea, Round a-frrat and back a . gain! L < « <—ST r ~p—m i k k HP Hansel. trb j)| p p p T | j , j> JrjTJil p p p H p ^ m • *r • - » — M 9- — 9 k \T r 7 r i^TT"^— 1 1 ^cjJ^r 1 JrLL^ 1 31957 p ^ r i P R; 0 */0 7>y|g TO SfogE jfrexel. 3 7 * 1 f P P •fceftfoot fees, Round and back a - gain! otoC =t{|£^ £ Here's a dif-Trent step to do, »oV Vou. WA * £ AV-oTAtt. C f f ^ c C m Wind Ps 1 i ~"V5 ' ' " i f um* AiC- &A>HCE ^ JW Ji JI j i i j i j t j , y i ' j » p JH p p p p ifr J-p-p it with me too! \. You must do f $ »p- ifrp Of-fer me your arm for| danc-ing, I ac-cept!|Now Atn ifjjgp W f 0-* T o ^ r - r t t i ? J U S T ^^TWo/J(«o$ m 5 (takes Hansel by the arm.) pw-U-S ^Ti> <j. lets start pranc-ing, OP A PfeATrie^ Come! Hansel I love to , cresc. S i — * i H P S ^ V ' p 17 p P | ^ I love to play and sins and .dance all day.. L^ve to have my fling, - J - g k - -n r * 5 — — » — ~ r r r z : — » — — — r r r ^ — * — — — * r r 31957 28 f 1 ' P P'lff P |p Ji Jiff if'P p plptJipplpg ji p play and sing and dance all day, just play and dance and sing. In fact I like to do it §* J'p Ji JMJij^JilJjJjJ.lj * J>lp Ji J> Jg factI'd/do it ev'-ry day, just play and dance and sing. In fact.I'd ,do it >vgQ -cy^ 3VsT6&&t<,,j s-o cue fiH0Ti+e,£ cKAtffiE. ?/ter£//o( 5 L1 i • — • 5 ^ ^ 3 r r r f r r TP P 'ip p ev'-ry day, play and dance and sing, J<**T ft&Gu-J '''Wis i* t»rs <»f p=t*-/J I'd do it everyday, I P J J) J I Jl ^  Ji I J> »>p P I P p i ' ^  I J) ^ #' * w • 0i • - f—r—^ p *——s>' • ' ev'-ry day, play and dance and sing. In fact I'd like to do it ev'-ry day. I I ' * A _ . 1 MJrJ I I n. ..... / «r—- 1 love to have my fling! Tra la la la la la! la la 5 ?<*-iT Loot To DAAJCfe ^ Jl Jt)" Ji IJ =i love to have my fling. gap 1 -fi m-Rlk -0 P~ 31957 29 then gives Mm a push) la la la la la la lal Come and have a twirl, my dear-est Han-sel,Come and have a HWSEL irieWhf. tioM> you. OANCL hr-Lone. <f£A&/ Vcl. M * jvip-p p -h ip*p p J ip P p dance with me, just so, Come hereto me, come here to me, I'm sure you ean't cay. itiOU.fi0 ufi LlKS. fir ToP CAWM 0*T Fl. ® Str. 3= f = f = P " f l i p 1 - r p Hansel (gruffly) \>]r j y | p* Ji ^ i ) l p" J) j ) i> No! Go a-way from me, goa-way from me, Im much too proud for you! With ' J L R K I M M I ^mmmmmm T, "-V* VI. Oretel. p- p p p I J> J J> JH Ji J' p p I Jr+-*-tH " . . . < • • •» m A » A _ J - J T * . 1 ' ' '1 » _ Mt - -re girls I de-trot dance, AB4—-so, my dear, I'm through'. Go, 31957 30 A . Hou AtoL wo*>K> io*. | W f" bA*)C£ 50N JtW r '71 n m - N s -C ^ H i ) > poco ritard. Tempo. P r - * — « — \> 4. • -fdances round H&nsrl) stu - pid Hans, con A i > «TJB feb 1 F " -cei-ted Hans, you U see 111 make you poco ritard. 1 h J> -r 1 ' F P 1 dance! Tra la Tempo. c, la la la la la la i _ n i h n i "Hfc ™ i i _ M J^Fj-J*—Tm—hr Hp • J * # | Bass. — 7 [ " J - 1 1 J — r 7 7 LJL^—sLs!—1 - as before . . - _ . . . . . . . and gives him a push} NE* .J>A j i H B i J s t e h Ji) pa 1 ~)fl J l J l J l J l U W ^ J| i l B l fl fl p p i la, tra la la fa la la la la la! Come and have a . dance mv dear-es la la ,      .  y t Hansel (dances round Onrtri.) , * Tra. El a la la la la la la 7 5 ^ tv p p Jl)lj)pl-P p p.-p 2.3 Ban-seLCome and have a dance with me, just so! T>p Vou. W I L L 6 N O I T *\f.Y > M < P -ty . $-r?f>! Wftff » » r tMAtp -ft? • <T»<»i , , -jda J) fl-fljTJUn ifr la la la, tra la la fa la la la la la! 0 . Gre-.tej des 0 Gre-tel dear, 0 Gretel. ^ypphhl^p P''PpliJ i p l'P' pd p IP' a IJ'I B sis-ter dear. Your stocking has a hole! 0 Han-sel dear, Q bro-ther dear, It' is-ter dear, Your stocking has  hole!  an-sel dear, 0 bro-ther dear, It's 31957 81 r p tJ> -hp i r * P i P ' P P. P I P p ^  W p p P P true, up-on my soul! But just for that' I tell you flat, don't dance with me; a. ^ > P I P jl P p p P P I P ^  ' ^ r^ P gain! Don't be a cat, it's, tit for tat, I say you dance a - gain! Tra la gain! Don't be a cat, it's, tit for tat, I say you dance a - gain! T r a l a 'oco ritard. Tempo. Vcl.| * (they dance as before) i f y&u;axotU I* *p i U I JUUifp I J^p J l J i -h A -h p la tra la la tra l a la la la , tra l a la tra la la tra la la ! Come and have a Hansel . 1 }t,vL«,u-roit.,tti*'**A&ii-<,ir Q(»ftA<r h*LLi A i A T r g < L\*U> one- Ht±*_j^_ p ppp iP p Jl Jwi p ip p P p I . M dance,my dear-est Han-sel,Come and have a dance, my dear-est Hans! I'll 31957 32 sing a rhyme to f-i.BE. AS ft)H jib1' J h > - f H fl ' ~* ft Y keep in time W-feito I dance wit] i h k k % 1 -K-N K a you! And 1 r » M f the stocking!. -A—rV-« *— 1 ft*1* M 1 J • ' sing a rhyme to keep in time W i j - n j i i 1 # — » — Id le I dance wit i vou! And ^ P J> 1 f the shoes are J T 3 hi i Ui:,|, 1 1 1 1 r " l 1 1 I H $ > * : — i — StrT • i l l " 3 ? ? Q B f fr. . f ^ 1," <l J—-—, - J — J i _ j — i J i 1 J J J J 1 2* Thuy dance by turns as before.) t J l J l J l 4n holecWfty mot horl l knit some new! Come and have* all inholeaWhy mother U buy some new! Trala latrala la tra la la la la, tra la vi. c i . la trala la trala la! Trala la trala la trala. la la la, tra la 31957 33 ( T h e n they seize each other's hands and dance round and r o u n d , ifanuu, ui.y JLUI ttkj Hansel! Tra la la trala la , tra la la tra la la. tra la la trala la trala la la la, tra la la la la, tra la la la la, tra la f T rr f n^T >~- , — „ =a=oat q u i c k e r a n d q u i c k e r , u n t i l a t l a s t t h e y l o s e t h e i r b a l a n c e a n d t u m b l e o v e r o n e a n o t h e r o n t o t h e f l o o r . ) la tra la la, trala la trala la, trala la trala la, trala la trala la, tra p. > p ^ plp Jp4P hp l J t pp^ Pp^ 1 PpJ) P la la la , trala la trala la, tra la t ia la la, trala la trala la, tra string-. r! 3 4 Allegro. The Mother. Scene I I . + i n e moiner. Hal-lo! , Grete l . r V p I 'P _p_ < ( A t thlB moment the door opens; Horo'c mother! the children see their mother com-Hansel. i , ,£ jump up q u i c k l y . ) Allegro, Moth" orJ It's mother! The Mother. is a l l — this— (lis - turb - - anee? What. SO i s _C A U G H T - ~ *<,T» U(j8yi ft* 1^ • • • Tempo primo. Gretel. If H O (Embarrassment.) Hansel. Twtt» Hansel-ThtT\ he wanteds. 31957 Mother (comes i n , unstraps ber basket and sets it down.) 3 5 o You call it work-ing, danc-ing and sing-ing? Just like a hoi-i-day Age 5Wi«<iA)fr"w#/h- is rtfi6 "fc**"^"'(H^rr *»u~ <J • 4 ffirir:^ cresr. G „<3 hop - ping and springing? r And while your pa-rents from • — l * T * £ W /?(£-f " — ' • ; "1 , [_ ' P P P f p l T J ' J>fr p =^fc ear - lv morn . ing jac— j f Ti l l late at night are slav.ing and to i l - ing. »oco rallent. , 7fc« -J' 31957 36 Q 0 * * Q Take that! r i in -—^ Now cui ne tet's ooa what youVe — T—-fa^— —JMMIi^l^l^l^l^l^H.. life P j J • J> i>p pJ> p P yet? Andyou. your*. bones^iave you nothing to show? Just how manybroonBhaveyos i i f f * r ^ • , . r - , . n , J . J - 1 • for. m fln-ished? rr - ge t— my stick, you use - less ««.*>Ju*f F*<(, T**rr y«u. SA*o/ Y> "" Cl. ' 31957 25 ,<2 IpiJ' p T / 37 P I I P• L J I children, And make your id - le f ing . ere t ing - le! vi. ^ crewc. -L i 21 • B o a — : o i • — — — ; p* f -r fp" K ff - H gy -flW ; 1 1 a f P~ J M JuJ>-J) p- AJI Oh no! Theregoesthe jug al l to pie-ces! ( . w e e p i n g ) ' " ^ i ™ ) > i ? ' f i T r 4<3r-«. ( 8 n e T o o T 5 a t her s k i r t , down w h i c h t i \ p.w> p.|T p p ^ Now what can I cook Tor sup-per? 3 8 the m i l k i s s t r e a m i n g . ) Stop, Han - sel how dare you espressico (Hansel cowtly titters.) T — r p esprassivo •f-^ | * N ^ , 6 . ^ ^ (<Joing~wtrt a stick after Hansel,who is running out at the door.) laugh? Watt; wait t i l l your fa - theroon>e8hom»l» "(With sudden energy she snatches a basket front the wall and throats it Into Gretel's hand.) T r r r r r r r r r o lit 'P V ,U*P' IHI -piolc uo> some! straw-ber-ries P P PP, And if you dont 31957 on t, 8 9 % you'll dim. v* JJJJJJJJJJ5 ( S h e s i ts down by the t a b l e , exhausted. ') 31957 40 S 5 nJ Jii r And T«W my pum' jug all smashed to piec f i t * « ' Yes, that's what comes, of los-ing my tem - per. ( w r i n g i n g her h a n d s ) ( s o b b i n g ) r r p i f piji^ i»r PPPIT | J V I 0 God, send h e l p _ to me! motto es-pressivo What "lwwe»I to give them, 5 w a r S B S B 5 p ^fo • M " ' l p , not a cruln bread b for my hun . - gry ohi c ild - ren! |J,^ VT3H f V * P - _ 5=*—iM"— 31957 41 in tKe mm No crust  tn  oup . board S1 W f 'if A Just noth-ingto eat, Hb.^  3 ^ r ( Sbe restaher head on ber band.*) r~pppir w>ir~p Ami n o - - thing but w a . ^ t e r to drink 1— CI. *veA<>&- Hb. ^ F T ^ ^ 3 am tir od t. th' ml- of Hv - ing! i 3 -1p7^  Ten.. Br 1 f 5 ( L a y s ber bead down on her arms and drops asleep.*) E E Com/ 6-/1 car Cod. send. h e l p _ to me 1 3 [*rP PP P 31957 4 8 ommodo. J.= J Scene HI. ( A voice is heard i n the distance) Father. 1 Tra l a l a l a , t ra l a l a I J ,_h J ^ Hr.(con Sordino) i£i r p'p p p p PI r^?pff FFff|r p- p p p p p-| l a , M l - t i e mo-ther,here am -H- Tra la l a l a , tra l a l a l a , Br inging luck and J e l - I l -i L i t j l imo-then E v ' - ry day 4e—.like- 4he o - t i e r ; With a b ig hole i n thi r,  b - t i e r e 31957 Tempo. fjf. (eomplaintngly) 43 purse, And in the s to-mach an e-ven worse. Tra l a l a l a , t ra l a la »r p- p p p P P i r \ v pgr flppi?; l a , Hun - ger is the poor man's ourse!, Tra l a l a , t ra £ Qrt*lt$ 4c j*-* _ _ _ _ (The father appears at the w i n d o w / y» r p p p p P P i - • i . i I n n f > i » < c I and l a , 1 Hun - ger is the poor man's onrse! f 1 *j F3=l e n c • = i — f _ | — i 1 itt iJTI 1 b«rn rrra = K v > —1 m i 1 i i- e - i i —- ) i i • • • • . 31957 44 vt > f J_9_ J_l, p |Pp P' P P M- p 2. T is - n't much that we re - quire, Just a l i t - tie food and 3. Yes, the rich en • j o y s his din-ner,While the poor grows dai - l y i P r P- p ? R P p 17 • fr ir p ? p f ire! But a - l a s , it's true e - nough, Life on some of us is th in-ner ; Strives to eat, as well he may, Some-what less than yes-ter mm cresc. r& j i g ( c o m p l a i n i n g ) Tempo. ^ p p- p p p ^ ^ rough! day! rit. Tra la la l a , tra hi la Tra la la l a , tra la la Tempo. l a , Hun - ger is a cus-tom-er l a , Hun - ger is the de-v i l to p » »pff Fppfir p" p p p ppp )utth! T r a l a l a , tra la la l a l a , Hun - ger is a ous-tom-er to gpay! l lT ra la l a , t  l  l  l  tra la la la l ,    i   t  l a , Hun - ger is the de-vi l to 31957 ( H e puts down his basket.) \ J hun - gel's, al l very well to feel yon can get a good square meal, But B a s s . n't. Tempo. r' tw , . ... h 121 when you can't, what's there to do, the purse be-ing lean and hun-gry too?_ 17 p FT r p F r i p p p p m Tra la la l a , tra l a l a l a , Tempo. 0 for a drop of "mountain dew 1" r f ~ « * UdJl,U Fl . 31957 A O.K r abblng J ofif 1 fr,.J>^ i - f j T i.,ij-n : ¥ » -Tff = ^ 4) Sir. > * fl< — • / FF * 1 T f - » a 9 Bass. 31957 f W r uvTH,. i.,Fr^ 47 With - in my_breast c a l l ' d so l o u d for food I oould. :ot 1 * JT J. '(i SI 1 4ft p 7 p g r Kflir m Tra l a l a , t ra la l a l a , Han - ger is an ur-gent P T t/ ^ rJtfJf '.teJ LjLljr Dble B W i n d I n a . , t l a . - = dimin — H j i — k i a J * 0 /» V o l . . > r f r T f r P r H 1 i S : — l h r . 0 31957 48 ( P u s h i n g him a n g r i l y f r o m her. 5 (Wants to M s s h e r ) No sir! P r m i i , You're off all dav with your c.h owl _ Axr-taJ.-te a C w . a.-3 E E * r day... don't you think co, dear wife ? fl' B P p P J) I f fun while I must keen the noun 3 = £ p h use! Wel l , we l l ! 31957 ( T u r n i n g to M s basket 49 then let us see. my dear,_ What we have got to eat , to -3 [Un poco piu moderato. $-£,// cy«j Mother, 1 P J J) P Father. A ver - y sim-ple b i l l of Un poco piu moderato 4b a — ritard. Cup-board bare, kit-chen bare, Nothing, and plen - ty of ft rit. v*t*>*E2. : +*fflfrdS'*'f *«« 31957 i ome prima. spare! tj, ff pff r 7 p f r i f p p p = p l T r a la l a l a , t r a l a l a l a , cheer up, mo - ther, your hus-band's here . Come prima. ^™ u ^ U i m m hk g *p p f F 1 Bringing rv-ry thing bill lir 1 1 IT dimin. i ( h e t a k e s h i s basket a n d beg ins t o d i s p l a y the c o n t e n t s . ) Mother. s B ^ 3 ^ but What r^M1 If ft -f©»4- please yon? 31957 51 ^ is this? Hum and but-ter— flour and r^flJ L>ff?j i :-^rJnr^ J . . . u ( H e l p i n g h i m t o u n p a c k i t ) ' [ 7 k f r 1 fe—s—* —J> K -h i dl—I 1 y n . sau-sage— Eggs, 5 \V\hKffpJA - Z T f l l . 1 _ t — a — / • i - j ) — * i _ do-zen_ ( Heav - ens,:but tbey f.^ 111 J i ff]i up itf • f -kLJ?' fk£/WJr r *r F r 'ip p < ^ cost a f o r - t u n e ! ) Tur-n tp i on - ionSr W p gp Ms ritard. J m 31957 52 Tempo come prima. Father.(He se izes her by the a r m a m i (lances r o u n d the r o o m w i t h her . ) * n f r P p ? r ? p p r |gPjl?r =g=i Tra la la la, tra la la la, trala la la la, hip hur-rah, Mother ( j o i n i n g i n . ) H f i p ^ p f p J ' J i p r la la la, tra la la la, tra la la la la, We can real-ly have a time, tra la la la, tra la la la la, WD hur.rah. Won't we have, a hap- PT time! - — hip r. r . t  ,   -py ti !  Now hip hur-rah. Won't we have a hap-py t ime!__ ^ ^ -lis - ten, how it all oame to pass I 1 31957 / Hr'. Weddings,fairs and pre - pa - r a - t i o n For_ a l l - k inds of ju - bi - l a - t ion l 5 4 r So I brought my_ best-goods out, Tramped with them from- house to^. house: Sweep your chim - neys apd your car - pets, sweep your cob - websF 3 ^ , 7 p T J H ' B F[j | p M ''(I P P T T P jyjB. And so I drove a roar- ing trade, And all that food is on - ly " «.cfcW 3 j § f f j f f z i p ; > half vi. of what- I earned. I cresc. 31957 b a ^ Lca^tj Joroo^i <fo "bauble (He knocks down some tinpote off the ohimneypiece g g with a clatter.) N o w b e q u i c k a n d s e t t h e — t a - b l e . 1 _ _ c o u l d - e a t a h o r s e a n d — s t a - b l e . ^ M o t h e r / W k ) / ^ -Lct-jt i ereWa lo t £ H res health  the broom s+rc^ "to the broom S^i c /< Here's a health mm ~±J£ £±££t t±rt% BE ma - ker! (He puts the glass of toddy to his lips,^ but suddenly stops short.) " (Shrugs her shoulders with a puzzled air.) m. m 1 Where is Hans? h! 31957 i to t Mother. K M l J V f l P » » J). p. i r' P r P who's lo know? But a* i least -r- , know this Hb j ^ * t It-tr > » i * -Wl J*'*' [hatthe jug is smashed to • * * r k — ;  i r * 1 * Y vi b i t s - Father. ^ J - ^ t h e 1 > 1 / ? > k . f l h Iff . 1 , mat?__ * tnejug is smashed to hits? W i n r t 9 h f c — " f c ^ y - M f - * ^ — — : J j L * L TrST 1,4 / - » 1 * l l ~ -e*eam- al l ran- a - i r a v l L ^ S t T l k l n g b is f i s t on the table In a rage.) ^ P BP P P "P tl S E , Hang It a l l ! Why is it those twolrap-scal - lions VL«!EJ They're in al-ways are in trou-ble? ^ fa?*^f' I J i 4- 1 ^ 31957 Mother. 57 p p P p jJiJ'p ip f-f-f P p i trou-ble . ev'~-ry min-ute. I just turn my back and they are isCl-it! vi. .—. v • J - • -» W E T pp pp p p P ff J»p p Ip p-p p p p P * •J w n i i ; l ...l • : l 'J; • _ j J ; J . _ J . l : l WhenT'camehomethey were jump-ing, hop-ping and dancing a-round.and thumping! fr r f r^ LcJ Q Ft. And I got so mad that —gave" a" • Father. ^ jjT"' > t> ^ l 1 " S S S E g g i . . i g S S K Au( i the r+ • Fftlr %J • • • M ^ S B S B B B B ^ E S h ^ n ^ ^ ^ B la- 8-if * 'P p — V— * L Jug—^ m And the jug of milk- was f U f j u g _ was — r 'ir?f_r»r P v > r» i 1 31957 ™ -Piifaniraato. ^ t > ^ - s r « : * 1 y p *=. j' 7 * 1 7 \j = a I Ha h h K > I p »p f1' luA J) J J ) 1 ha ha ha ha ha ha ha! V - - f ft -—+ mi—ml—ml—£ H- - - -•geryino - t h e F , 1 V i ^ ' f t u — h — 1 It s out of f ' \ r * y J ' « n ' J . J " L L- 11"! "1 — J 31957 savl But where couldHa'n-sel and Gre-tel have gone? . J / - H r . p3 3 =3? m 8-*—l S 6 E Il-sen-stein! (horrorstnick.) m i ^0 L (fetches a broom ^ f r o m the wall .) Wind. The II - sen-stein I , L • l#v>r-rr: M Mother. ' — Now don't tell me that! ] t*fkf lu^ . 3»ur *<*X W « M « ' M i n d L _ V*>*'< ^ H r . CI. ° r o » * \ V J (pizz.) Vcl, Hi (with an expression of contempt.) 5 dfcb 31957 i t FI . i Nw '^TTioufc- hus - Laud, be-have .'Put your broom! a-Dr. 60 t (He l e t s t h e b r o o m f a l l a n d w r i n g s h i s h a n d s . ) Un poco ritenuto. Father. My. chil- -dren •ain luat in the Un poco r i tenuto. dimin. 1 = 3 poco m m « tempo A/l^ F0 H i o gloom-y wood, all a - lone without moon or stars? vl/^r~- •L'*9" 1 \rY£a t e m p o 1 IM Is i f c z >F -Come p r i m a .  s i n c y v i *J Heaven! 9 ^ £f y f ? f i r The whole worldiknowsthe aw-ful ma - gicplace.the > f-S—r%— 0 1 H 1 1 - • 1 •-—4 — -fc: —\im L- m far*—» P m VP. •a k-? Ii H * — H ! ^ 5  4~ 9 l\f a te>»P.o I- . / / ( s u r p r i z e d ) The e - v^ <m ihe m he e . vil one? Who is she? ( w i t h place where the e -vil one dwells?- The 31957 J> jLlUn poco r i tenuto . ft* (starting bark.) f 61 « tempo (draws back) The gobbling ogress? mysterious empbasis.) 2 1 e picks up broom agnia' But. gobbling ugrcaa?— Uii poco r i te i iu to\ ; , » / . L • K l . / ^ i ^ H / , t oA •+ . U s e * * * * * * a tempo Vcl. dimin. - p Dble B. p p T.P P p tell me, just what is tell me, just what is the broom for? m The broomstick,the|broomstick,why Bass. J . . * h J..J73 what is it for, why what is it f° r? H b .ci.*' m They ride on it, they ride on it, the broo* ^Violet I dimin. f r e t ? 31957 JtJ> p - f - y P i f P P m Deep with-in the wood where witch-es dwell, there's one in league with the EE h F X * 1 £V| i > it powers of hell. Wind t mid - night hour,when rw ( p i z z . ) « # nobody knows, A - way to the witches' dance - she goes. f 'P * J -3 * 8 Uhtfiechi chimney so high ci ou a broomstickthey fly,. 31957 63 0 . ver hill and vale, o-ver dell and dale through the t mid - night air they gal-lop full tear s on a broomstick, on a m % m • m. eresc. A_0 • +vrr+ f s T p> P I r~ (Ms=fci • h*.»<*. Mother. ym,k* PI broomstick, hop, hop, hop,hop, the witch - es! The witch- es! 31957 « 4 B S E stalks a - round with a crinch - ing, crunch - ing , munch - ing sound, and Vl.ji 9* J (J* ij J) children plump and tender to eat she lures with m a - g i c ginger-bread sweet. t> P A . - - . iyi p iflp » ^ foul intent she 1 y bp r—p-lures the ch i l - dren, poor l i t t le 1 J b J j J , J"J things, in the ' g y » J " » rp » > r5 * » "p » » p V* ' 31957 6 5 o - ven red hot she pops al l the lot; she - shuts the door down, un -31957 66 ( w r i n g i n g b e r b a n d s ) •p p p P i- I * J>P P T N FP P Swathe ogress? • the ogress! ffeavfcheh/us! the yw g ff ^ y: jeklUJ h^Jibiffor c^ T °g r e s sjj* ' t h e ogress! i P P PPTTifni w,?p lp us! t  y ^ y servedup for dinner! "•Fwthe ogress! o u t o f t h e h o u s e . ) ffUX.^Isl*- ( t a k e s t h e w h t i i h y b o t H y f r o m t h e t w l f t c a n d r u n s a f t e r h e r . ) e > w-.,T»iG - . c w a x e s m e m n n y n  m e i r o  t r i e t m H T C P PT , , i i f H f i T a rf wait, .fui inw! . i we .W 'U both go to - geth-er and catch the witch! ——fl : ifl ' f y y jt y 1 y — • ( P r e l u i l e t o 3 t h e 2 n J A « 5 t ) 31957 • Goes on to the "Witches' Ride " 67 esante. (J = er.) de-0-The W i t c h e s ' R i d e . Prelude to second Act. J r . r> x~ - - a — 1 — r hi • i = f J^i f f f l f f ? ^ • »• >--sriz? • > - = i -3 ? * 3 •0- ~ -0-ab. »—0 J m — _ l_2_»_tj Ir. m m m _= __LJ— Z J J J " 137" i - t f — = • 1 « • a : 1 cresc. 1 31957 f 5 ? —m—-— -—P— j . J •*>nr r - i — | M r -»—^#-ir ESS3S £X—V f 1 1 — r — f — fr •—f ~ t _ > [|.r toco a poco piu animato vi stacc. cresc. —a- UM. FT 31957 70 5 J i ^^^^^^^^^^B jMWMBMMW J J J B J J J iX[w PT3. r353 . . y: ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ "TJPJ cresc. ii 1 Jn poco piu tranquillo. Trp espreastvo i # „ m SS9E5SSE3 S^EM . EE3I55B53 31957 B5^SB v «, CsSB S— , r-^ -, r ^ dim. j ~ f — — - - J : ' P " :  - • — 1 a IPs cresc. p f*"P,"T' k«-« J - 5 -^ J -J—a — 1 1 - f - 1 [ p ! E £ T 11 31957 72 1 r' r r r nrri 1 F l . Hb 1 I if ^ tiTii H r . Un poco r i tard . espressivo P.Trb. s t PP1 TV dim. I 7 I (The curtain rises.) MoltotranquiUo ( T h e m i d d l e o f t h e f o r e s t . I n t h e b a c k g r o u n d Is tbe " I l s e n s t e l n , th ick ly surrounded by f i r - t r e e s . On the r ight is a large f i r - t r e e , under which G r e t e l is s i t t ing on a mossy t r e e - t r u n k , and making a garland of w i l d rosea. By her side lies a nose-gay of f lowers. Amongst the boshes on the left i s HUnsel, looking for strawberries. Sunset.) • f m \ > — t -ffr r espressivo 1 i i g r i d J — . j _ dim. -r r r J » . PP 31957 ® 9 3> CJ ® Second A c t . 73 68 \ J In the forest. Scene I . Molto tranquillo.(J = 6e) Grete l (humming quietly to herself.) There stands a lit - tie man look-ing like • a -"£» *»» e. M "the ufooei. OL. —> y y /J»Str.(pizz.) • A 1 , , K K h i l l . . _ = f e = r w • i . - h - i. clown, He wears a l i t - t ie 11 ^ p; ' • cape made of .vel - v< • ' 3t 1 ' ' P ^  ' N hrmvn, TPII mp wVio trm 1 ^ -J —a k r * - ^ ** '''7 i] i — j 1 m i ' 1 * • PI"!*" • , L «•/ n\ a tempo i i ^ i i man can be, Standmgtherebeneaththetree, With the lit-tle cape_made of vel - vet 4 y ^ " f f ; . rfate* empo 31957 74 cock a\\ A d-vj? 'If*** on l t i J ^ ty i L t n °Jl -k*,r»e.l r p p J ' O * i J J> ii-iif i r p p gold, and his cheeks are red, He wears a l i t - t ie black cap up - on his F ^ y -F^f F 3* PP B J * p- p J i f ^ b r r V f r ^ J l J l J ) p head, Tell meiwho the man can be, Standingthoro-oo oi lontly, With the little ^^.J. he toe. • « vel.QtJb lo *rCW4Shti holds up the frnilnnil of roses ; and looks it all reuml) t „ ^ « v ( , a ^ t( blackcap up-on his head? mm JiPh>. 4 i§=£ 31957 -k/ e ^ Poco animate come pr ima. (J = s*) 75 1 1 hoad? .. L i ' i i H a n s e l ( c o m ^ o u ^ v i ^ n g his b a s k e t J ^ y f r i l l v ^ J I ^g^e, ^tf^uJ^rtricf^ n g t o , /«,t 's i- v p - f ^ r v i p p J' ITTPP • p i a p Hur - rah! Poco animato come p r i m a . ( J = 8 4 ) My has - ket's prac - ti - c'lly filled al -P ii k«*4 G- Grete l (standing up.) 3E fl _ wttvry doAX loo*1- L " frgp j OP p J' ji Ji And, — O L t read-y This ought to make Moth-er ver - y hap - py. 3 9 7 -frf-p1? P p p s p P P P J ^ r P how do you like my flow-ers? Look, you nev-er saw such a love - ly '" ^ \ \ , # IMC* d is 'Z'vc yofVtX i-or* 3 = 3E 5l (she t r i e s to put the wreath on Hansels head.) 3 ivreath. Hansel ( d r a w i n g hack roughly.) ........... ,^Me,...JV . P P B B Ji J' Ji J 1 r_ V „_£„!. r u Hb. J J7J You won't catch £ boy wear - ing thatl 31957 76 s the wreath on her.) ) Gretel. If Inn trri».Queenof the_ wood ,Then I must have my,arms full of i ~ P q-»» <i— i <- -hi**** -j. e^»«A 4.~ fWra j fj.!<rt<-Ua Hansel (gives her the nosegay.) <c»l P Cf ir. /p. Queen of the_ w o o d , / w i t h scep-tre and pip 31957 *~T * P- JZ: I give you tho strawberries, but don't oat thein ?1 t f alU Tempo- / J * , IJt, gf btsrUs ( H e g i v e s t h e b a s k e t f u l o f s t r a w b e r r i e s i n t o h e r o t h e r h a n d , a t t h e s a m e t i m e k n e e l i n g b e f o r e IHT 1 m J . i n h o m a g e . ) p i Str. — Gretel S E E  ( r o g u i s h l y . ) i*rr,,t<l> & ( A t t h i s m o m e n t a lokt*e~ c u c k o o i s h e a r d . ) Hanse l ( p o i n t i n g w i t h h i s h a n d . ) < P P* P r< P J |P Cuckoo, cuckoo,whep»are you? Cuckoo, cuckoo, Haw are you? Cuckoo.instrument ( b e h i n d t h e s c e n e s , h e a r d a s i f q u i t e i n t h e d i s t a n c e . ) 31957 78 (takes a strawberry from the basket, and pokes it into Han-sel's mouth: he sucks It'tip as Hansel (springing u >.) though h« were,drinking an egg.) 4^ ir * - C J -O - h©J I ean -d-o—tfcwfc- just like you! 2 = = (takes some strawberries .and lets them fall into Gretel's mouth.) (free and without regard to the rhythm of thp cuckoo's cry.) I / : -9-—- -T  e . L • i k L«t ii& du like the cuckoo too, Who takes more than he ought to do.. . lets pYobesvL iviA-c i «uctr -yUe, c,*,**.*, -feW? wit -EL Jfc = f c F 3 ? J* (It begins to grow dusk.) Gretel (does the same.) 4 : Hansel (helping himself aga in.) a.cda ** . — Cuckoo,whereareyou? Cuckoo, how are you? •-, one t r lCu»& 31957 Gretel (helping- herself 79 i 1 \ r Ui. 1 k k k : 1— cuckoo! m In your neighbour's nest you go,. mm T\T^ > ———" L - f r r Bass. yi u. -UL** A Cuckoo, C CUCkoo! ( H a » s « 1 P o u r ? , a handful of Jgfa. «.<^ e T ^ K O ? ^ Mt<,c>K nfitr *>Ua.r* ' strawberries into his mouth.] Cuckoo,why do you do so?. mm — r ' <w » ^ ' i r % ' _^ p * I J' ^ p p I p i And you're ve-ry greed - y too, _ . Oicliii l inir himself) Tell me, cuckoo, why are P * P p Cuckoo, cuckoo! 31957 Poco a poco animato. Gretel (horrified, clasping her hands together) 31957 ^ 4 Sic SColl Meno mosso. can't put the blame all on me. You, Gre-tel, ate just as man - y as i l ' i - M M ' P i u animate r f! i ^ s t * A , Y i \ o i, G r e t e L faff* pt*«t**"&i- k It-3" fi -r— Now we'll have to pick twice as man - y. ^ fco ilj ^ p i 1 > f me P i u animato. Wind We'llihave quite a j * ^ ^ j f T j j T ^ ^ T f r j j g Ii r>&e>f Fi r Fpr *|H r K r job in these hedg-es and bush-es I can't see a thing, just trees and for-est! 31957 a* 8 a , , Un poco ritenuto. & Pi i i mosso. Gretel. E f e s Ut'fl M ^ r fe^;^ '^^e, 6 Han-sel, Han-sel, 0what shall we 0.J& The sun's gone down, it's get- ting dark Un poco ritenuto.  •" '^JT~^J:T MOSSO-1 t 1—im J F M 0 Um i — r 1 0 0+rm— i i M i r t y r m do? What bad dis - o - be - dient chil- drenwe've been! We ought_ to have Hb.^  ss ^-n.r,i. bush. - es! ~ ^ | — e — ICf * is * 1= — 9 m~ 9— m— ) tP T'^Il - 4 , * — ^ f K L — ~ wow. -- o o — • ' 31957 — A — 83 ••- • I heard what the - J ^ - J fo - - rest 1 r r said;— li* t ^ I U J - — | 1 Hr. ; 1 h¥f? F F *^  to. >^ -. „ L L ^ f f l J . P. — © ;j r 1 p molto espressivo —»~T3t "are you not. "Chi l - dren,' chil - dren," it says, Solo-Vio l in. a - fraid?" .~£ -•J — 4 • . ... * • ^ — 9 —*—a #-5 =— 1  -P } f -»—W- 3 ^ 31957 1 reojU £(I>VIJ^  (4/t.Vt. U>$£ tempo 0 dear, but Han4el —you mean we're lost? S i I don't knowwhere weiare. i re. express. v - & 3 3 crwc. ex ress. s u n rS 1 a' — (pretending to be very brave) iyhow,ri -, di-cu)pugyou J ir  t'll.J < ^Jfrfy I If i i re! "7 I am a boy, 31957 85 Gretel. What's glimmering there . in the dark - „ - ness? H a j s e l . ^ ' ^ j»5^"tU>H>iH<i <»i f i e U M (L^ 4^«-e,j rhat's.on-ly the bir- ches in sil i l - ver p = Basa. * Gretel. Iff- r M > i r •©trt there, what's grin - ning right there t at, Th-that's only the stump of a wi l - low tree. 31957 « l l i u w i luaoiuyj | J -* J'^p [TP p' pip >H P J l i But what a dreadful form it takes,Andwhata horrid face it makes! M E Hansel (very loud j . " '• | J * j s A ^ Gretel (terrified) There— see! wisp is hop - ping a - bout Gretel, QflJi't be a-fraid of it! . Hr. "TtHfi$ n» <yi«- at«y ^ j t y f. y>r>i * r « '.MjV'r r ffive' a good loud cal l ' (Goes 8 o n i e 8 t e p s t ' l e ' ) i U * o f t " e stage, arid C f J V ^ ^ ^ J ^ ^ 1 ^ - fc^JlfcAlirough h's hands.) 31957 *~z\ t r f : 1' 9 <^ >f I- il My 87 CUCKOO (in the far distance behind the scenes, scarcely audible.) 1 Soprano (still more There!. distant) ppp © o 1 Alto (somewhat more You there! distant) PP 1 Alto You there! (Behind the scene, as though coming from the Ilsenstein.) p o°«0 Hansel. Q~ (very loud) You there! (The children cower together.) Who's there? f dimin. . Dr. V m 2 Sopranos. o o W 2 Sopranos. Where?-Gretel (somewhat timidly.) Where?_ a t Is someone there? Bel. =2 Dr express. •1 + W * V TJ • pp 31957 88 F Gretel (softly.) Did you hear?""** ' ' a voice said wh< •41 ere? Hansel, «? CI. F 0 0 m co« espress. P I wish I were home! I see the for - est f i l led with F gob - - l in ghosts! Hansel. p ppTp pr 1 r" I Noone'shere.Gretel dear. Stay with me. F l l 31957 89 i (A thick mist rises and completely hides the background.) I see some shad - owy m stay with you. I'll stay i you men com - ing! : ^ J. See — T — z <T f c j f T i L L J t u B i howtherr headk -»» ^ ' O 1 V I M cresc. - . . . i i r, K p i TUB shak-ing, shak- in]*! They're com - ing, they're com - ing, 31957 9 0 (Rushes horror-struck under the tree and fa l l s on her/Knees, h id ing herself behind Hansel.) P i i i animato. m Pa - -. ther, |4«7/» -me-mo - - ther, a Hansel. (^  At this moment the mist lifts on the left; a ^irT'irTrri/fn — P i i i animato. See t i litth/grey man is .seen with'^ftit^e'sack on his back.) A £ , O L S ~ •i'UaJ- •h/'t^. Ah ! . h p j ) i there, W i n d ^ the man-kin, I "'"^arpT" ' *"" sis - - ter dear! (beconi i ngweaker) i Un poco piii tranquillo. CTlie little, man approaches th« children with friendly 6'' s t" r t ; s> a n ( ' t n e ehildren gradually calm down.) m p Harp. dimin. mm * r / i J B 3 E W m i s ^ 'VI. Solo I — = i * p r it* 31957 «£ti>. j> csprtss. 91 0[O S c e n e TJ. Moderato. Sand-man (the Sleep-Fairy: strewing sand initho children's eves.) (with a soft gentle voice) I shut the children's peep -' ers, sh! And guard the l i t-t ie. U?LA« comis Soffc/y C"rt'€^if% £L' ^  ' ^ r t " 4»»»eJ«t *< sh! For dear-ly do I love them, sh! And glad - ly watch a -sleep J T T J in bove them, sh! And with my lit - tie bag a. rT\ The* m«,r ccuc^W t,hj VI. — — of sand Be -side the chil - dren's bed I stand j Then— lit - tie ^leep- j «^ol £ # Silent - [) ri:CtJr v.. *+• ci. 31957 hot* uJ>i[ tUi> Lirf/e. — « - J , , ^ p J i,J3 I J J ^ ? J[? if t Ji «ye - lids close, And_ l i t - t ic limbs have sweet re - pose: And #4 tg, ^ MS ma 31957 i 93 3 1 hap- py dreams wil l. come to you the hours you sleep! Sand-man was there! Let us first say our evening - pray - er! , , T / ! l ^ r ! [ o w n - 1"* '.^-^ y, , i „ 7 i _ . . *.:J ""lo their hands.) 33 l i s i L'istesso tempo. Gretel. mezza voce p i i When Kn ight I go to sleep,' Fourteen an-gels watch do_ keep,_ Two my head are ni U t  Hansel, mezza voce A <i nansei. m When at night I go to sleep,- Fourteen an-gels watch do_ keep,- Two my head are a L'istesso tempo. . k . 1 i ^ 7 i J ^ J , . i J -PfPp? 3 im I |J J J ' J j j , ^ f f n ^ •—*-m guard - ing, Two my feet are guid - ing, Two are on lay right hand, guard - ing, Two my feet are guid - ing, poco I Two are on my crest? r r i* cr^ -Jzg 9 4 mffic p right Two are on my left hand, Two who warmly cov - er, Twowho o'er me scmpre p mm m -0-er, hand, Two are on mv_ left hand, Two who warmly cov F 4 r a b b i V9C. 1 hov - er, Two to whom t is giv - en To guide my steps to Hea F i t i « i j r r i - » — • f - r J rc | MSt- — a — * — • — poco IIf. tr=—a—*•—5-— W rJ»Hh • . n f p T j J — J J «_fjji • •— r— • * @ FJ — —|5>e f r ^ 1 1 « J „ , ven. ven. (They sink down on the moss, and go to Bleep with their anus twined round each other.) Tempd .tWind m f y f t J . JTJ g Vol. tec maz ^ » l p j - Ml ' - + J = r f e s / w o ritard. l - J J - J — O • t ^ i * ft . — & * 1 U %o. • TV 31957 (Ou tuple i n a M k u u u B i ) VI m m STempo (Here a 05 bright light i: V I WW pp i i n rit. PP Hr. "•2T • 7 suddenly breaks through the mist, which forthwith rolls itself together into the form of a s i Con espressione. Hr. Str m zz 7" staircase vanishing in perspective In the middle of the stage.) m 4-4 E X 99 1 3 dimin. Tf-W S B I S S c e n e III. Pantomime. f ^ l P o c o a poco piii animato. (Fourteen angels, in light floating garments, pass down the staircase two and two, at Ci JI J •+?espress. s T f f r J « Hr. JL J •#• r f i * * intervals, while it is getting gradually lighter. The angels place themselves, according to 31957 9 6 i [the order mentioned In the evening hymn, around the sleeping children; the f i r s t couple at their heads, Harp . t i r r r ^ n . —e-£ 3 ^ * ' T the second at their feet, the third on the r l n h t . the f o a r t i n S l the left; then the f i f t h and sixth couples „ Mi ^T^ l B t r ^ l > "* t ' t h e">geWe8 amongst the other couples so that the circle of the angels is completed.) "ivlol M s V c l . o 'Sat i f * if* • y* [** • 1 i i V - - A A A ^ 31957 07 1 — 4 i — { -\—1\—1 -~—•— *~ oil • J Into the c l rc leTand takes its ^lace as " S o w d i a n angels" on each side of the. children.) g u a r i  l    i  r . n i ldrenj F espressico 3k " el'' >T *U^L 31957 •>« . 2 x -? «i2—» V The remaining angels now Join hands and dame a stately dance around the group.) jfT_ t V Terrpo moderato. (g-1 — /* W i n d . e=f^ 4 1—2-^l? J —» i=E-i=-it f=F=F ::=*:-:r:: espressu\> J i r r ?=J Vel. If f t #==£ 6 i ^ '"ir r r s --I—[—1—-— . E L T F 44= r — f " — 1 31957 'M*(Tb.e whole stage is f i l l e d with/an intense i t /an intense light.r I K C<-U?<XSj A f 4 H ft ir fl _o Ji, —w—•—-—— i s * — ^ 1 " — i — dimin. F=f= 0 <* l i L ; • 1 & — -W h i l s t the angels group themselves In a picturesque tableau the curtain slowly falls.) i H a r p ! ^ fr&T i L r k r 100 0 T h i r d Act. The Witch's House. Animato.(J=ioo) • • • Tromb. , i L t , H r - . r 01. & W > r 1 •Ait J " T T 3 J = F = I — © — - — = — = — = — = — Hh • • ' • H T 3 J j J • J J M:LI, - n i i l P J ^ i ^ - r W • [> 1 Q 1 1 1 • 1 fill i i -j£4» ± = r f — " — : — p — 1 31957 102 Accelerando assai. . " JT J /^SN, ./^ 3E"~^  V c l- n a 8 9-^ l U f i i l i l g L ^ I ^ I ft1 f-^n r cJ r r r-— ^ — « • — . J"> fegg sempre ( i fc: , j jcXLil/ ' irr irr ir i —0—_—y • T — : iCA-T Lf - ° • * E -W* WW l > - J A l I e g r i Wlnn\_ D non troppo. ( J s <g fMjLffe ft* 1 V ^ 1 rrfl^ If . t f ^ . ^ — ' r — Z J! ft" — — no ' Scene I . 103 (Scene the same as at the end of Act II . The background Is s t i l l hidden in mist .which gradual ly rises during the following. The angels hare vanished. Morning i s breaking. The Dew-Fairy steps forward and shakes dewdrops from a blue-bell over the Bleeping children.) i u?;1 know who loves the CL morn - ing, Who'll t i t * * -fro** L t t f J 4/< 31957 104 J r t la - zy, ding! - 7 K I ^ lh« • F y . _ L ° L _ P I — H i J ii r i i T i f i n 7 inf I dong! And with the golden light of m d it  t e gol e  lig t of day I chase the fa - ding H b . 5* p espressivo Cur- Uj night a - way, Fresh dew around me =f 7 J ' J sha - - king, And F l . hill and dale a -IjMdffl wa - - king; Then up, with all your pow - ers En - Joy the morning 31957 105 pr pirn* 1 J ir* r ir hours,— The scent of trees and f low-ers , Then up, all sleep . ers a -i f m HI sempre con Fed. 'SI - Wo,, l ing, Then up, a l l— sleep - ers, a - wake,. * x\ | * * ( H a r r i e s off s i n g i n g . The chi ldren begin to st ir .) 31957 1 0 6 Un poco piii lento. Grete l (rubs her eyes, looks around her, and raises herself a l i t t l e , whi lst Hansel turns over on the other J f '• Where am I? Am I a wake? 4U ii j) - J I - I i l K K l \§H 1 Tfr^i cf Vl.Solju— ST" i,-fos> r f r f L T High in the Alb—o pr p m c - f f l l f r L a •»"• o 8 0 = \ « — -for-tit -fi/f 4/»e twev^ iw* » t r nyffcA^^j -*8a. * 31957 107 ure. u — r IT f/i gin - ning to sing so sweet - - ly , From ear - l y _ 553 B B S 1133135 [HJSffiSnJ ( L V l 1 ^ ir i p i fr T ir ' J ir J J i J r f dawn they are a l l — a - wake, And sing us their morning hymn sing - ers, Good morn - ing! X ~to [\ 31957 108 accelerando Con moto moderato.(Jst») £ &\ t Tp r ^ i^Tfff^ ir~r / f Mi r j ^ 0 Hans you sleepy la-jHL- bones I . Han - sel, get Str. cresc. P 1 1 Ti-re-li-re-li, Its getting late! The lark had bet - ter 31957 109 Tl-re-li-re-li, fc-re-ii-re-li, ilh'r tftAfr - i r f i i f c i ti-reii-re-li, ti-re-u-ro-li, _y .9 i f J l t f A f J f c f c l —F " " n * 1 • f T T ' -1 y *y m y i ^ r T P i r T f f i j g i ti - ti - ti - ti-re-li-ti, ti-re-li-ti, ti-re-li, ti-re4i*elire-IT t i - t i - - - - t i ! Hansel (suddenly jnmps up , ,, w i t h a s tar t j L *j t v • • Is K i - ke-ri - ki! it's ear-ly yet! Ki - ke-ri-if: 31957 ki! it's ear-ly yet! Yes, the day is If? ' 'f \ h - - - X T HSgN A - - wake,. for it is ^ 4 m i •7 m o r n - ingT JTi - t i - t i J i t i - re - l i , re-li - re - l i , _ Ki - ke-ri - E - e - e - e -3. y. t i ft-re-li-re-li-re-li - t i . L ti-re-li-re-11-re-li, fi fe li re li re-li t , t i ! _ Ki - ke-ri - k i ! g o .3. . 31957 _4r 111 K i - ke-r i - k i ! vi. Hansel. /7 s-lred;c>U Gretel. N*. 6 : 3 sharp as a knife I nev-er slept so well,, in my life. Hr. . s e w 4 : -\s: range, a,4 t«t<ty $&e^ *p P f) P Wr hstf by t h i f=f=f i ten,Hans, here Pi.  e tree I had the strang-est kind of 31957 118 I Hansel (meditatively) | ^ r " r f J | Q J > i - i murtn' - r ing and rush - ing, .As though the , 31957 j j£ t i t * »*»JrJ) oirMi*5 oid? A ** ESI 113 Sud-den — a l l a - round a light-was.streaming, Hays of g-lo-ryfsom v y . K r - 1 Hb.i — — All up_ and— down the stair-way fall - ing from heav - en! iifr i r r V ir r -1 J Ir' JJ,l r * U fry ' ir r EE 31957 *JS& * ^ Such love - ly an - gels with shi o u i i u w i r e - i j «u i - ning gol-den wings— T2 M 114 Gretel (aston ^ P " p i , J r > " J i ^ Hansel (interrupting her nuickly) v You mean to say that you saw it too ? Fourteen angels there must haw been! Hb. |>Haj>e8l.« ' • ' I-- i . . i » R H . ii,HL»,ft r i « J Hr- p i_ r * j i r r v i ' n 7 f e i £ g s r r i — i — ... ..... ... . - . *J r 'ritnrdfT -y|y 1 . n>j . J toff 1,. Mr i 1 dimin. g _ Scene I I . (He turns towards the background: at t h i s moment the last remains of the mist clear away. In place of the f i r -trees is seen the W i t c h ' s H o u s e a t t h e I l s e n s t e i n , s h i n i n g i n the rays of the r i s i n g sun. A little distance _*--"'ffif, :o the left, is an oven; opposite t h i s , on the r i g h t , a large cage, both joined to the witch's house by a feno* . j - O t ^ ingerbread figures.) i . [1 t - ^ s ] ^ ^ A n i h i a t O . (J.= 60) Gretel (holds Hansel back in astonishment) H ^rib} Gretel (holds Hansel back in astonishment) i f . * j L i r i flight. 0 look! O look! 31957 (in the greatest excitement) w TtW^i- r - r - V - : i V - * r — poco fa rit. T T V 1 fw's r r T r • - J - - ^ ^ i • — — — — l i j i p do/re" r ' s t r con motto espressione 5& r a j -ay-8-Gretel (gradually regains her self-possession) The smell— is de-li-cious, / but 31957 is ae-u-cious,/ Dut ii .a^c so wftk i M f B r p i r ~P r F ifr to n O t y i may be it's a dream ? _ A cot - tage a l l made— of i in p i  A cot - tage all ade  of H&nael. p i A Hb,. 1 p dolce it M P * P S P t j - i V - ^ i g p m p i p f r i B B » p * . n cho - co - late cream. The roof is of can - dy in - vit - ine a bite, the * i j, a ra i -s ins in - vi te, And 1 J L * 0 _h ^ Jr B * » tt« 1 r * p V i ook! a l l a - r p" 1 = — i r V f c s — =" * P '*= ound is a T- T J) im— m • ' k — f l — z - * f l — ^ rai - sins in -vfte, A^id 5—d ± M ook! a l l a - r ff ft M F I r 7 ^ g jound is a r ^ f r F w i fr11 r1- . M b ? f 1 E f T l 31957 where is the queen who en - joys— so great a 31957 31957 would we. L -y / f c y C L»«,"4r o w ^ 3 ^ 3 be - gin?. She'd ask us m ^ 3 X T " would we be - gin?_ She'd ask us J PI n 4A Why don't we knock? 7 * r No, no-bod-y an-swers. Well, I'm going to Harp. Mr 31957 120 | J / • I O C I Gretel (pulling him bark horrified.) k ^ H p i , I M J g i Han-sf 1, you're cra-zy Really. . I'm sureyou have W r W t i n i np p ij> yJiT j t p ii r n i j ^ ^ s lost your mind. Who knows who is liv-ing inthatlovely house?_ A i , l i i li i J L H - i - i • • - • , * r i m \f J J>] Hb. 1 dimin. r j p « ™ rit. ¥ » p ' " " r J i i . f - a J > i r p r fflr^ii Harisel. a tempo I think I know. .Now he qui - et as a, mouse., _ '^ahm»o «^»* Uav ^gtan?n smi^g a/jg^U^g) Bass. (enthusiastically) P*P I * M I 11 V /If f J eels live in this lit - tie Yes! the M an - gels m 5 f 31957 Gretel (reflectively) look ^Lcfflocfg*^^ M i l * y * JT l 'T p < t > J S •J rvf „'„,.,,,„ t v „ , , 4 r 9-Of course not! Hr. You heard, when they sang us their Hb._ 'SpfMsivo iu animato Gretel.L [ ^ ' K ^ ^ ^ l 5 res. leVsifibble f W - m u . let's nibble f , ^ _ ? f / l v l . „ . . . . L . i , . V - L ' , / ^ Y t's n'i  ftr res^  it Come, let'stfibbiea bit of the cot-tage! Come,let's nib-Hie it l ike  ni l  t-t ! P i i i animato. . m 31957 3? 123 i like two mice -i ver - y hun gry. tJ'i, J>^» txJ. P two mice ver - y hun gry. H B - • • " T : •, V ere.*?. y i l F (They hop along, hand in hand, towards the back of the stage ; Trp*. A A i 7 7 y tad stillVS --Hr. -0. Aff nrWhen steal along cautiously"on tip-toe to the house. After some hesi-put p • " • m Vol. s i c * S* s i tation Hansel breaks off a bit of .cake-from the right-hand corner.) . \r^yent}d 0"f*P M l -to <>H » 1 y 31957 .e-A \0 (a) 133 S c e n e I I I ; P L'istesso tempo. (J=j.) A voice f rom the house. nio-blinff. at mi EE E E J l L b f e , ' ib-bie, u ib -b le , mouse - 4rie» who's ib-bung, t my house--kit*? , Wind. Harp. dim in. 3 Hansel (starts, and in his fright lets the piece of cuke falU i > ' j i j i l f i What was that sound?' ( 1""^ - k - {wt .^ ~tunuf(s \ ii f m pp Gretel (somewhat timidly.) * The wind, the heu (dittoQ ,4 ay*-*^ JotJ&jS^'^ci m venly wind! r—* Gretel (picks up the piece of cake and tastes it.) Hansel ffiftjEfi+faG-31957 124 f£ 'f just L H Gretel d^ts HHdsel bite i \ l % > - a r -t.) i i j — V 1 Just taste mid —1 2_ try it! 1 »r > r h r ^ )4 Gretel (ditto f •de e - li - ciousjwith froeting'Oiuthe top A Heav - en of can - dy,:the I T <aftltc -is de; - li - ciousjwithfrost-ingon the top. A Heav-en of can -'dy,ithe 31957 r p r i r U ^ 125 F t An - gel's Can-dy Shop.. A lem - on » j ' l i i*. y** u el's An - g l' Can-dy Shop. i t Ah, here's some fudge. MM > t y 1 *• r w ft ft gum drop A car' - mel! » u "P and mints! • CI Ami cakes! H b . -Creams! and @ . J JIT ft , nJ^r i p ^ i a t p i r i p p ^ j A can - dy mak-er must own this coHage. fcalls out.) y ji y lic'-rice. fti^ HV Can-dy maker! cre.sc. . *r ejcjr 31957 c-126 Leok kou\ kin*-**' ^ Ti v-come out! 4- v | I ^ ' f i t i n r — f <*.U>LJ ^ . y ^ 4w A- ^jH^breaks a big piece of cake off the wall.) — ^ 1 ft'" i-G-:,ir lj» * T .JP else your house_ will soon be with-oytl uii * E E GZUL 4l £=1 P 5 * Gretel . 31957 127 e upper part of the house-door opens gently, and the Witch's head is seen at i t . The children at f i rs t do not see her, and go oi l feasting m e r r i l y . Then she opens the whole door , steals w a r i l y up l£kk - £3= — ^ 1 1 • " rV ' " « r - r ^ 7 - # H P 1 ' I T H H Wrr±,you g r p 'r ob - bling mousebtt iouse-kie+ to the c h i l d r e n , and throws a rope round the neck of H a n s e l , who, wi thout any m i s g i v i n g s , t u r n * u M Hansel ( t a k i n g another bite.) > if p p.: i f \t p pip i r « l Eat what you want but leave me a - lone! .Hb. Tit d* O ^ L ^ — — ^ y ^ j v r r i • his back to her.) uJri&L cJ; ^in&fap^QQ a p 0 C 0 stringendo. Gretel (snatches the piece from his band.) You've got your share, so . * f l P 'P >p Ha ha ha hu ha ha ha ha hu ha ha E E why should I oare. . l/J dk JLoot Hu ha ha hu ha 31957 128 0 * P y y t ^ X Allegro non assai. ha! i t * Pr^l £ Hansel (horror-struck.) i J> V v I Hp ha! The Witch (laughing shrilly.) Let go! Who are you? He he, he he, he he he he he he! w i n d . A l l e g r o non assai. Let me go! The Wi tch (drawing the children towards her.) hi H * JY 3 = £ An gels both! (And goo r sey-Poco ritennto. (She caresHBH the children.) OtfVI gan - ders!) 1/ Ife^s. »«-5'e« » h ^ f "~V '>W W i n W i n d . O H You ecome -tor 31957 129 v J' jvr > II p r ; P v i - s i tmer that is sweet! You charm - ing i f — ^ i ? — * — _ — ^ 1 »-= — , | M = t r r - 7 ^ = t r _ J J — \JJ dJ " I T < P ir Pi i i animato. Hansel (makes despairing efforts « ^ ^ « « Who are you, chil - dfen, so nice to eat! to free himself.) Tempo come prima. The Wi tch . Pap ug - ly one? Let me go! E I VK. M P Now, A f J A — ^ 31957 130 what makes you say such th ings? I — vi. =^r— J > W i n d ^ ' » ' » » -m—m-9*- 3 £ V I . s r -a *n R o - s i - n a Dain-ty-mouth, /^j node's And dear- l y M i M — c— ax •/ ,, . 1 VTi t— a •* • K M 7 —* : «U« r - - v 7 - —3-J " J r -cJ fail 4ca f33 ch i ld ! VI. *3F That's why- the c h i l - - dren come vis-it my house iP cP mm H i Ten. 31957 rock* "^J You are i 1'p SO ( —^-MZ 1 ear, > t r a h , y r - — — 1 _ cresc. . r——. 7 r _ r 1 i y iip- ==< (caresses Hansel) 1 £=3 I so che - arm-v i . ing— to r •> i *-' 1 dimin. 1 cresc. Bass., y y v T P I U animato. j y j c * , , V ^ f V ^ * U )/ Hause l (turning Toughly a w a ^ V / ^ ^ &, v V . o « « ' N fvW r (stamping ^ with his foo tV The Witch.(laughing Bhrilly.) v y j * ig - ly crone. Ha ha , wind. ha ha , ha haha ha ha hal IT m m m m m— y— • tfa¥ f J 1 31957 132 n ^ u e g r o n o n t r o p p o . 9v Cf V I These.daii^ty mor-sels I'm real- ly gloating on, , Jp cresc. -m AndyoUj my 1 'Ml 1st -or" ' 4 L "poco piu tranquil lo . a maid - eh, Im dot-ing onl u) ^ V ^ r * ^ l i t - - t ie f 1 y ^ r * > = E pdoke T e l ' Bel . •r 8£ rl Come, l i t - t i e mou - sey, Come in- to my hou - s e y ! Hb. 4-P I . C I . i F T Ji I t > 3" f 1 -r -r -r j f r p p ^ J J U ;>< J ^ N J ' p p- p 1 Q J H l W f t Come with me,_ my pre-cious, I'll giveyou wreeta so d e - l i - clous! 31957 Of chocola-te,tartSyand marzipan You_shal l bothjeat al l .you can, r dolce Str 7 i d 7 " And wed-ding cakeand strav?-ber- ry iceit j w - b t and ev 1- ry-thing Hb I •»—9-V o l . 1 F r p J^ P P JT monds, and peach-es and citrons are else that nice i s , yj lo,Aj reck PPP I*" r p wait - i ng , Ydull both _ f ind i t quite cap - ti- - va -H b . i i -i • Y i -31957 134 m Hansel. ^ 5 Sl-a t s Iwoiit go yes, quite := : = c a p - t i - va ting! yy j y yip P T y 1 » t w « > % a U - i c k f ca are quite too fr iend-ly! The W i t c h . ^ ' *A j y ^ i f r ' ^ y y in, you bag_ of bones. F l . 0 1 Hb.Bass u> W*v^5 Sw, see! h y p i r P J^P •4 y y /2.u)r\ See, how s i j l — , _ F l . Dear c h i l - dren, you real - ly may 31957 y\ ice- 135 blissl Come, lit -tie mou-sey, Come in - to my hou - sey! Cl. ' V I . I - i—k-f I*' p dolce Gretel. / UJ 11 But whot*^, f ' r p ^ V r J~< J>I F - H H ^ P ^ do you in-Come with me,_ my precious, I'll give you sweete so de - l i - cious! i h . ' ' - t U X ^ j l ^ A i y j ) tend to do with him? You .coe.— Hb. g ^^"J j I'll feed him won-der-ful dish - es, •r „,p r J a: . i f Hr. Bass. espressivo ffii < 3p i r w l ' i p ^ t j.ir p if P p He'll eat the best! what-ev-er he wish-es. To make him owect and dq . owect^nd do 31957 136 v fl8n p J i n H I i i i ' i r p ' p i i i r - i j j r p i And i f he's brave and patient too, And do-c i le and o 1 ^ r r p be-dient lifce-a—sheep, •fJieor Han-se l , Fll whisper -tt-"^ I have a great treat in store ciT r ^ U r SfQ«J< U i . Hansel. 5 Don't tell me se - crets, speak right 31957 ti %V»>£i j 137 < ^ i j p r v i H p r j jti J . < T P out. The Witch. Just tell me what this is all a - bout. EfeEE3E OT^" ~ dimin. -n J i g * w * Y i Y p „ , J ^ « " - - Sl~*M The Witch. 4 I I IF J - | y J»p p ^ t i J y , £ Yes.. my dear children, your eye and ear 3 P P ^ V p i p j )p p I cani hear and see per-fect-ly fir In this ad-ven-ture will quite dis-ap-pear. Eh? I cani hear andsee per-fect-ly fine. You CI. Hb.>_. , m Bel. gi^  ppp 9 p^ i pw'p r »iv p v"pM' jii p1 J ^ g leave them or else you'll pick-le in brine. Gre-tel, don't you be - lieve whatisheisays! crew. w &r iff i afflpj 31957 x.rfl« t; 138 Gf U>hr r P * y'lph^JHt Pip T it v . .e has in the meantime got out of the rope, r <X"U>a7 a n d r " n s w i t h C r e t e ' to the foreground.) Gome, let's go home H b . It's time to go. / " Ten. m m c r e s c . -•y—y- 5 ^ - r—p ^ 6" (Here they~are stopped by the Witch, who imperiously raises against them both UJt a stick which hangs at her girdle, with repeated gest ires of spell-binding.) £ - t0{£*\oL The Wi tch . M/ 31957 ^ 139 ( H e r e t h e k n o b o f h e r s t i c k *OOu~<L , kt«ul$ b e g i n s t o g l o w w i t h l i g h t . ) J^.a \ \fiu> Head on shoul-ders fixed a w - r y ! _ _ P o o o a TOCO piu animato jf Li> \<5 H b P C r . i n g l . p— JP w (C-r4 U P ) Ho - cus po-cus, nowcomes jo-cus Hb. Children, watchthe ma-gic HI Piu tranquillo. i f t ^ p p 1 J y ; ; v 1 jr* ''lO-jX-p p "p 1 fr head, Ryes are star- ingdul l as lead! Now.you an- gel,off to bedf 1. J^i 1 I •resc. 1 31957 Hansel , who is g a z i n g f ixedly at the i l luminated head, into the stable,' and shuts the lat t ice door ftN« j"pipjsjn"pIFjijTfip J^ JTP ipj)*' i * j , 1 upon » ' f —*— r n r Uo-cus po-cas,bo-nus jo- cus,ma-lus lo-cus, bo-cus po^cus! Bo-nus L - — C 1 — • 1 — - . H b espressivo If ^  .ItT ltt« ..hp _ J U j o . cus, — '"~ ' ' * * v & C - < L ^ (The stage gradual ly becomes l ighter ,whi ls t Ho-cus po-cus, W'B' bo-nus ma-lus lo-cus!i B'ass. _ Bass. CL-cl. P m f Bel Bass . ' Dble B . t the light of the m a g i c head diminishes.) Dble B. D r -O C-loSt-S door nhtf i ' J>J>I j j)ji £5 m'm jo-cus, ma-lus lo-cus ho-cus, pacus! ^ C}}^ t it ii — „ . , Now Cr. i n g i . lt&® S l \ - \ T * Gre - te l , be o - be-dientand - T f ^ i — » — „ - i wise, While TO » ft * J J J 5 - 5 - -J —PtTf f. *1 : ,l> ft J r - ^ - ^ J »-V. s j . J » * ' J d—^-J-J-— •JT-^—J r r. —#— # J — 31957 141 r • J>* p P r PTJ>»*< * * r i H r r H Han - sels grows n hig ger size Well feed him up, you'll see my F—rP f P Cr. ingl. S e t t e r * ^ J , « 4 j r » * « ( j f ^ ^ | c a ^ ^ T ho*>'j'l\y P11 T * J ' | J ' ' r P rea-s'ning. Sweet nuts and rai - sins make a tast-y sea - s'ning. CI, p i p I'll go in-Hr. r-^ p \j r p^ o n P e r r 1 j Bass. H4: '7 F—-^ T doors, and do all my chores And you remain here f° lit - de T 7 Hr. /»/» •tibre,- Gr Gretel (st i f f and inrt ioniess) (She gr ins as she holds up her f inger warningly , and goes into the house.) _ I — ^ K—-| 0. who Hi howid 31957 142 horrid u U n poco p i i i animato . Hansel (whispering hastily.) witch she isl Gre-tel, sh! I have a plan, i i>lf t y * you'll un-der-Wind PP Ten. 71' i 1 i m 3 P stand: just watch and see What-ev - er she may do to me! v , animato. j . (The Witeh comes out.satisfies herself that back— P ; h ! h u s h ! Gretel is s t i l l standing motionless and t h e n spreads before Hansel almonds and raisins from a basket.) pp J» i ' — i — 1 4 i»r" 1^ I ' M VI. ^ • ^ j ^ - p f r a - • H • o • ^ T M — i t J W — ^ — r ^ " Winn\_^ ifr * t f t p cresc. _ — r 11Iff— • — l r p ~ !lp p — 1 -p) ^ 31957 r fc f l^ It 30 The Wi tch . H E (9 You're such a joy! here's foo for Molto r i tenuto. (Sticking a raisin into Hansel's or you'll die. Hr. Here are cakes-and a pie (Shevturns to Gretel ami rtiserubauts her with a juniper branch.) ^^ ft-UG-31957 144 ^ P J ^ j j ^ p g f e moves again.) ( M l 81 Ri-gid bo-dy loosen,huSh •- Cl. Now you can move again. mm VI. 3 = * Hr. H i • j i i f i ' i i -1 j p r p p j>p p J>i •> p J-fp t p -light as a feath- er. First lift your arms and then you'll come together. Now you're a - ble, ? h p ^ r p h p W ' f * l p P p p P p "BD my pet, -Sefe the ta - ble, doii'l lui-UU,. lit-tie plate, lit-tie spc •go y pet, -Set> the ta - ble, doii'l ful -gU, lit - tie plate, lit - tie spoon, Come, WoiO <4eu,w**t £&b „, p P p p P p h Jt)ip vhff h J> J> pT P Don't be late,pret-ty soon , I'll be com - ing for my lit-tlemate! 31957 O f But I'm so hun - gry I will start on If. J 3= m Hb. p r i f — C I ? Vcl. 5 H 5^ u u ^ a ^ ^ ^ u c . ; ^ ^ i fe>r p ' P p^-g 1 r r " p pi r • you, dear Gre-tel, with your heart v«..'~» ^ "'••">" • « You're so ten-der, plump and Hb. 31957 1 m 147 egro. good, — Just the thing for witch-es'foodl ^ h ^ ~ Hb (Sue opens the oven door and sniffs i n i t ,herfac« Hb. 3L i ' l ighted upjby the de ep red g lare of the f i r e . ) W l n d . S 31957 P - P 148 ( S h e p u s h e s a c o u p l e m o r e f a g g o t s u n d e r ; t h e f i re f lames up a n d t h e n d i e s d o w n a g a i n . ) ^y^** 0 0 ( r u b b i n g h e r h a n d s w i t h g l e e . ) S * * * * - ^ \T> ^-\:o Gr p - J - J U -Yes, e -tel 4ee*, soon you will dis - ap - pear en in the ov-en she'speep-ing, quick-ly be-hindher Imcreeping! Onelit-t lepi Wh i  t   e's i i k- ui   creepi  gOne lit-t ie ush, Hb. 31957 B a t s l i f t , » 5 L n y4£ _ • K h - _ 1 > . > l g nig y (n " ' * » a ' i f t . oes tn r - i n u door, ' * y t h e n C / t soon will Gre-1 pnj i l l be | ff " 11 ? ^  ? • =* fc j If p J 4i ~ri «r f h ~ ^ ^ J i ! f-^-W-on " " 8 * — 7 r ft ' ' l l * * * * ^j— justdonefoaTP f{Jl0$ -Z_l 7 f J l _ lenfromtheov-eti I takeher shell ^ — ^ r u T P -a, ^ r • look like a cake from the bak- er 1 i / f t f 'fU * f ii i By ma-gic fire_ re ddianjt'din-to £nu-ger-breadl — — J — — TO ' t ^ t ~ L 1 i 1 ">' ^ J^jXJ^ | Hb. ^ - - " ^ i — ^ > '» — w^^h r — • r 7 r 7 | [ s — - — e 1 - * * ^ i H - L - — - ^ - - f V 1 l m m «. 1 fl ft Just look — k f — — 2 — M .: how sly! [/ F Pr\L r ; r7 He he, he he, i W " » | • ' —^ — \ cresc. - \ T"™ ? r., p -S V ? 1 iKnn r • - P - p %J^J-^-•iiA. ^ . . I I ; ; , ; «U m 1 » » . ? ? ? » • f l ft ft ft.fl. Iffz-ne lie > . i Iff" f - H ^ 1 — he he, > he he he he he he I t tit ^•"•4E : - r j ~ — • ^ 1 1 * titr glflurfr3 31957 1 5 0 L'istesso tempo. ( A - h ) (in ber wild delight she seizes a broomstick and begins to ride upon it.) ^ • ~ • • • - • . f t 5 * * * £ m m f I • 1 rV (She rides excitedly round on the broomstick.) p i p P V i p j f i i ,wn of day I ride a-way, I'm ~~9 '• ^ ^ p J lp - [ i l p l i g r j CU', (She ridafe agayy/Gretel meanwhile i s watching at the window.) here and there and ev"- ry-wherel F 1 > W fif i f f if i f f i •0—-0 At mid-night hour,when none can know, to join the witch - es' dance I got fP S*rV-W l I ' J l * : * H H * * 31957 151 1 4 te cresc. -i 3 i I 5 *• ti* w: U P I ; If. _ ,»Eff fff M Ji 1 ^ . , And three and four Are -p-fr-f-*f-witdi - es' lore, And i r m i i • r f p r f r J ^ = 1 v \JJ * P = 1 T j H 1 ; ip p And nine is t> J> Ji * five and six Are witch - es' tricks, And Hb: rune is one, And . . b t t J i cJ:$ I J-fQ^J.iloLoJL lis * - < " £ J 3 0**1 P B J'»p 1P -p up Tp 1P p ^ t J L XL* L J-, w h a t g ^ e ^ 1 ten is none, And seven is ni l , ^ rT?«Ji cresc. -5 t ^ | p f f - f V p » » And so they ride t i l l dawn of day I 31957 152 ^ ^ ~ - { H t J M i n g madly along she r ides to the back of the stage,and vanishes for a time behind the cottage.) 31957 153 (She hobbles back to (he stable and tickles ^ ^ . y ^ A \ I it***' CX*.*^ „ gJ^ • Hansel with a hirch-twig t i l l he awakes.) The W i t ch . J - <T ^ j f f p P * M p p » l »p n What a nap for one so young. Now let me of L / ' V ^ Hansel puts his of O'*^ tongue out.) 1^ P J J * ( Smacks with her tongue.) P P "P P H t see your tongue. F l . Hb Bawrty morse l ! ft P If T P I I ^ Dainty mor-sel 2fc What a ten - der juic - y plum! VI Now let me see your thumb 1 ^ 31957 154 < H a n s e l p o k e s o a t a s m a l l bone.) [to AU) VI sakes a - live! Whajti 4 & S B - ^ S t r . i aw / i < " p j ft«Ji_r »p if you're so skin ny, so le< 5 wrong.' u!'tt^ r1^ i»r3 ^fi 2L-'^rjiJP ^ J L - ^ ^ r ^ 1.  ^__ sn lpan 7* i S B Skin flabby like gel - a - tin As thin-31957 i The Wi tch . ^ <\Wvt,(c ^ f ^ s , - r W g[«»>b ^l^tk P P M ' P ' P P ing some raisins and almon I pp r i * p ] H i Bring some raisins and almonds sweet, F l . Hansel wants some more to M r p> * J e a t ! _ (Gretel runs into the house, and returns immediately with a basket full of almonds and 3 L i cresc. raisins.) iiir Oretel. > P T "p I p > f'tyij (Whilst the Witch is Hb.. . .  - Here are the ulmondrj! U -iuvni l\ = f f hj J -^ -^  1,3 .." Bass ftfri dim in. 2 hi m i 3 mm Vol.1- ' O - ' i feeding Hansel, Gretel gets behind her and makes the gestures of disenchantment with the juniper-branch.) « ' ' B t e l TTolt ly) H E LO 4»<.[s /'*^Ho-cus pocus, el-der-bush, m ^^^^^^ „Ten. VI. Fl. PP Hb. l ^ l . f M The Witch (turning suddenly round." > a i n i II I -K I ^ ft I ft » ' I 3 2 : m J>ji*p * i * B p M p p p i p T * Ri-gid oo-dy loosen, hush! Whatwer»yousaying,H4w»goose? I _ ft* P *flf r 31957 8 i pp 4 • 0 J B 3 Gretel (confusedly.) . > E E Han-sel nev-er will get fat. Eh?_ Han-sel nev-er will get fat. The Wi t ch . e,ws«' ^ \ v & our* ehehe! my little Miss,- IH stop your mouth with this 1 n St espressivo I / O r ' (She opens the oven door; the heat has apparently d i m i n i s h e d . Meanwhi le H a n s e l make9 violent s igns to Gretel . ) pie. FR T L E E , p C L O P "« » L r » — - r 31957 G 2 Hansel (softly opening the s t a b l e dootf) ThcWitch duoking greedily at Gretel.) 157 This pretty l i t t le daughter! Come,Gretel-mi»e-i sugar-maiden mine.! Cr. ingl. — Fl. (Gretel comes towards her.) m ?ep in the oven.be steady, See i f the gingerbread's ready Pe , I v i . | | j N v ^ " " ~ j i : * i . v i . . ii Ji /^~BfrT JiiJ' J p»i|HViJ'p up r are-fur- ly look, pet, Whe-ther it's cooked yet, But i f it wants mo 3 0 E * ' - Car -- l y look, pet, he-ther it's cooked yet, But i f it wants more Cr. i n g l . " • ~1 v i . 31957 158 ^ quick shut the door! (Gretel hesitates.) \<6 Vt, case*' Hansel (slipping out of the stable) J p r p g FI. •?•> a* • Gre - tel, care - ful! . 5 TV VMt*" The Wi tch J Just stand on tip - toe, Head bending for-ward, Try it, I pray, It's merely play! Hb. 0 ark »y IffrTrdck. P Ur. 3 E & nif\c\. 2 (palling Gretel b  f 8 31957 159 You'll have to show me How to stand on tip - toe! G l Furioso. The Witch (makes a movement of impatftnear' 0 ft* ri 4 (She begins creeping up to the as I say, I f s merely play I oven, mutter ing a l l the t ime, and j u s t as she i s bending over i t , Hansel a n d Gretel give her a , good p u s h , which sends her t o p p l i n g over i n t o i t , npon which they qoJekl£_sJuii-ihf door.) ^ <uau**y $^Ju?0V^~ t ''^Wren one l it-t ie push, "bang Goes the door, « langP Hansel (motfking hei) * u >piJ ^pithi^r Pu u J) "Then one lit4Ie push, bang Goes the door, c l a n g ! " Th en 31957 The Witch Valse. Un poco meno mosso.U =«h) I Hur - rah! Now the ov - en Un poco meno mosso.(J - ^ ) Hur - rah! Now the ov - en m m f a r t 4 : 7 ff(pesant&) -A—1-i i i * f p l r has a roast! we can boast our.witch is toast! Hur - rah! has a roast! we can boast our_witch is toast!. Fl. . Hur - rah! «: • s i Pi »*°*:WU* ^ - " j - " ^ ^ y J ^ L . ksuX Jj<£ i e^r r r it r p i r - T n p p r J i r i g j g Soon.she'll be black as pitch, nas-ty witch! No one to be-witch! Her_e-vi l r ; « T Pi r 1 pr j i j M | j a , r p Soon.she'll be black as pitch, nas-ty witch! N o . one to be-witch! Her_ e - vil lit 1 1 31957 l**k OS f 1 , r r r it r P I r < ' i t *-~rr1P)iipo 1 6 1 ,7/TMThey seize each r i r .rrrrr spell is done. we have won! Let's have some fun! Y^s, lets-HB-^ e 2 spell is done, we have won! Let's have some fun!. m Yes, let us m a tempo I other's hands.) ir-z± « 0—0. V eel-e-brate miss4ng an aw-ful fate. Now the old witch is done, Let's have a lot of fun - | 1 UlL/ llllDO I^llg till U TT 1 Ul J.ULt->> I 1 1/ II Ul\y II 11V11 1C f 1 ' r p r i r q J f L P - r . i r r r.ir-y „_f„l f a r o IM,. 0 0 0 i eel - e-brate missing an aiw-ful f te. Now the , /HE7-, rt. i TS-old witch is done, Let's have a lot of fun n • rr f mi S- ley' hur - rah, hur- rah! 0 Hip hur - rah! Hip hur-^ 3 Hey! hur - rah . hur-rah! M ip hur - rah! Hip hur-g i l g m t i * 1 cresc. 3g i^3( j^he7 t a ^ e each other round the waist and wait f ,f .f rah! Hur - rah!. rah! Hur - rah! Ji1 fit Iff I ffifff ff \ \ A A * A A A A A * A r* f* rx i r% A A A mm m 31957 163 A # s - ——•—1 A A A T 1 A A A » i A A 1 A A A A i—i IL-A A A a 3 3 * f r=*= r 0 | A A A | A A | A /5» espressito V c l . |> j >J>| ij>j>J i vi. ; y i l ' e > p -H g r P 1 g P P g p g -.: P J t 0 T' i i • ^—£ ~S " " W h e n they get there Hansel breaks l o o s e from ( - / H O Orete l and rashes Into the house, shutting the door after E t 4 ^ Dr. • m to - ^ S M T r * PP~ F * - i ~ f c r dolce a ; ' T 1 T T • I f U l f T — k r > r T T P 1 iJT 1 1 31957 163 sweetmeats into Gretel 's outstretched apron.) Ten. i Hh. t o . p 9*0. i 4? - h i - p » f f f r £L ~~~~ £ p 1 e • i fr' f 'T 1* = ? = f = -r * r J r* w -« •— * -8 *— P -« •— • f f = f = f e • i t = u = • K 1 -• 4 = j = = m r J v i (Meanwhile the oven beg ins c r a c k l i n g loudly , and the f lames b a r n h i g h . Then there is a l o u d c r a s h , and "ri J C B J i r i • fife * fife -ife JPiiQ^' i l 1 g mm cresc. •k the oven falls thundering into hits.) m mm I 31957 164 A K A- A 5 dimin. =TiJi 4 * J =r~*3 I S = 1 0 r^fc-rl, ' j I M l fall down,hurry towards the oven startled, and stand there motiouli-BB. Tfleir astonishment increases when Hr..' iHg VIU 9} - 4 ^ (con sordino) 1; Dr. they become aware of a troop of children around them, whose disguise of cakes has fallen from them.) — M *• r ~i—n~r r B O , — — r Base. — « * s p*H> B 5 <5 : iS 4 • •* r * < 9 «. wr H pi Up 4 - r — — H -m r - r -—M 1 P I pp A i ^ 1 XJlfaf i •4 • i : . 3 •4 31957 -l "Molto"tranquillo. (J = so) j faj^ Sopranos (Girls) 165 Scene IV. (mot inn less Gingerbread Children. A l to s (Boys) We're PP— —m— We're Molto tranquillo. (J = 8o> v i . 3= £3= I I S a s Str. (con sordino) PP mm and with closed eyes as the cake figures were before.) 6<l 1.1 * J sa*od> Sa-fg, we're freeli for e,. i - ver .- more!. we're freed saved, for e ver - more!. mm L r r H b . ^ - --0Tf Hr. TO: 1 But who are you? Your eyes are shut. You're sleep5 ing, and fiv rj rT:gi;Q*'' tjff[g^.W I • » Wlnd«to. * < &6. 31957* G~ yet we hear you sing. m * >JJPi'»r- P I I If you touch us sempre pp If you touch 4h f? l lCr EJTcT fr cir ffi tfif f y r? C -f pp «fto. . B E Hansel (embarrassed.) PI / i . j JJ /* ^ touch them 5 once, we'll o - pen up our eyes. i i i once, e'll o -y f t f f g f f c f pen up our eyes. m m.s. 1 G r e t e l ^ r-g, U t ^ ' 6 ry*H>c if*^ PP I'll touch them all with both of my hands! ft r r p <-we7 Tm a - fraid I can't. / " f i t o :« = o -31957 167 ( S h e caresses the Dearest c h i l d , who opens its eyes and imtles.) . . M<4 ^ c e - J L sec 4&r^ Z o ^ l [ l o t * ( G r e t e l goes a n d caresses a l l the rest of the c h i l d r e n , who open their eyes and a m i l e , Without nrovi i n g . mean-roco a poco acceieranao l i M l t r p ' r r f f r l sin' aJ . . """" i i f r frr *g ^ ^ H&nsel. Ho-cus po -cus e l - derbushl R i - g id bo - dy loosen, hush! 31957 1^ 1 els 168 (The Children jump up and hurry towards Hansel and Gretel from all sides.) Single. U s we Sing le . , * » tfuy-.."e thank, Tempo vivace. (J=8o ) C 1 Hb., . . . r - i . . i i - # « « f « * . L f r * f P ? f f f E f -we thank^ yetr 44$ m a '4* i-^SS A l l . (The children close in a circle round H.mirt O.) thank you bothl The_ spell is gone and we.areiree,Well A l l . . u ft Ther spejlis gone and we_arefree.We'll tW^tHi. i t III* 3* a s te=* i sing and we'll dance aud We'll shout T!(ji^  glee 1 Gome ev ' - r y -one and form.a_r ing, j o in . mm M-4 sing and we'll dance andwe'll shoutfor_glee I Come ev'- ry - one and form, a ^ r ing, join_ m i fit?? ft tint ?f 31957 169 hands to - - ther while we sing! T h e n 5 * 0 d hands to - ge - ther while we sing! Then sing and spring, then dance and.sing, For # B > 5 ^ ^ ing and sp#i«g, th«« dance and sing, That throughthe wood our song of praise'may J3 I F » P r>J3 J]i53 1 q» - - • " I *" | - i 1_J-LJ " - I * • - J ^ J - • cakes and a l l good things we bring, That throughthe wood our song of praise may cresc. 5 U L cf i f r/i sound, and e - - chore-peat-cresc. -it a l l a - round! 5^ sound, and e - chore-peat it a l l a - round; a l l a - r o u n d ! . * 3 j cresc. 31957 170 H a n s e l . The i i i ( d r a w i n g back.) m ( d r a w i n g back.) our thanks ^ 1 our thanks Hb. T e n . . . . J dimin 0 0 0 419- — m m a g o * _: J J I ^ f r r ^ . gels whis - pered i n dreams to us in s i - lent night— an ( F o n r Gingerbread C h i l d r e n at a t i m e s u r r o u n d H a n s e l a n d G r e t e l , a n d bow graceful ly to them.) V I 0— -# 7 espresstco f3£ I P m % 0 . IP * <&o. i Gretel. ^ji * j J3IJ r r r i r p r pir j i L r i ^ V 7 1 1 6 an gel8, What this happy; happy day has brought to light The an -Single, p gels, Praise and thanksl 31957 sempre Pud. t—*f -J V 1 u-iU-e i f f f • - f — d — i h ^ - i F inF 171 1 l l —P—«l—4^-watched a - bove our heads and led. us_ in the right Hear our_praise_and Hp I « BE jr watched a - bove our heads and led us in the right. We i Sing le We thank you both. —m—f~~$ • " • .? tLJ. J J I. H f * tiTIP T 0 m H i s fjir r<j J ' - ^ thanks for_ all — j o y t 1- it and hap - py de - light, j _ P f J ^ ~ T f 1 i * » praise and thank,. th'rtr j JJ|J_g we praise and thank S i for all our for all our joy— and_ hap - py de - light,. for all our i 1 f We thank you both for al l our hap - py de - light I We St i 31957 173 T.rl- i i> ^ 3 lst.tHrfr m v.-m for a lL our de - l ight! 7^ j ° y — a n d § hap - py de - l ight! A l l . 2=g 1 joy- a n d — hap - py ae - l ight! £ A l l W e X thank ^ s o a J r- ~ I r thank you both S E E *» 1* for our de - l ight! H i Wel l thank— you i f i n it.Uj.i-f 3 1 ^ "ir f (They a l l press round H a n s e l and Grete l to shake hands w i t h them.) r zfco r r I all our l ife! i - * J im r i r r j J V I all our life! to Wel l thank you all our l ifel i 1 5 Gretel . r r'T M We thank you now, Hanse l , i we * F T y 10- r r t J ^ *f thankyou all our life! y ir1 J We thankyou now, «4 We thank you both, *n - • • r iVy f t i • * ffi— We'll thankyou all our fife] We thank, fcCLLf r. rf;|'rT[r I rrrr IT rT r^fi ft rTr rrfr^gl e-rv? . we T f r Ir nJ 31957 thank you *ew> We thank. for our de - light! "i > »r 'T y l ' IIS t r y " ~ T f - d r t t T We thankyou now, We thank for our de - light! We thank i r _ •*--*-* ||8 < r f thankyou both, We thank. We thank. you all our life! you all our life! We thank you all. - seen - . d o our life! We Hr. Ten. We We _ -<5>-We praise and thankyou both for ff'j. J I N r ^ - J ir r - ^ i N praisH 4»a4&a and thankyou both for all our, joy. all. our de-light, for s i 31957 174 ritard. thank,- we thank for our. Of praise and thank you now for our de X5L a l l . our joy and for all our de al l our joy and our de - l ight , for al l our de •\oM "-Tfo'poco ritenuto. ""rrgWrk-l ight! . T l g l l U . 1 -tt#hll Father (behind the scene.) Wind. Tra la la l a , tra la l a l a , Un poco r i tenuto. Were our children on - l y here I 31957 175 (The Father appears ID the background w i t h the Mother, and stops when he ( h a l f s p o k e n ) Allegro molto.(eJ*t2o) Pa - ther! Mo - ther! E-9 0-Grete l . (the same.) Mother. Father. F a - ther! Mo - ther! Chi i l - dren deary Here's u»«vu-Kin 's , " * i I f " * - * ' ^ J E rr i f r i f r .r i - i ( joy fu l embracing. ) Han - sel and Gre - tel, safe and sound! ]<(idi e i f cvv t ^ ^<X^e^ 31957 176 ( M e a n w h i l e t w o u f t h e b o y s h a v e d r a g g e d t h e W i t c h , i n t h e f o r m o f a b i g g i n g e r b r e a d o a k e , o n t o f t h e Un poco j j j j j - i Jj m sempre, S i to 2 r u i n s of the o v e n . At the s ight of her they a l l burst into a shout of Joy. The boys place the Witoh i n the A l l . ft iMeae-nnfeso 2 5 t < J . . o O / l 1 - N •Hoi 8-i 2 3 -ma _ r — r ^ i s r -middle of the s t a g e . ) _:— _ r _ : — # t • * x r ft |Y* ff if M J|j j i i f f * l-f • T » f dimin. . . . -' — i l 3 ^ P 1 r f r ? r ? r ? r f t r ? \ £6^ L_J_at«T7 %H r M r I mm ^ = p f e Chil - dren,here's a , leg - sori Jaught!^ How the wrteh-h-jr . -s^lL was caught, A Wy. J - T * ' | i * e > " * v u _ r _ s - u — , u w w I** ' it 1 ~z:— ma r t r ft r-f i if ' r t ir prT i_ Un - a - w a r e , i In the snare Laid for you with cun - ning_ fF f - f 1 |lf f f Hi '^ f iffff I f t f r1 —•to— r 31957 A l l the rest 177 * tux we ram. — < • We can see the les - son taught How the witch her - self was caught, rare! =1 ft f In the snare Laid for us with cun Un - a - ware cresc. } ft mng Tl [7T3 i r Vol i ^ (The two boys d r a g the W i t c h Into the c o t t a g e s ) ^ ^ ^ " ^ raxeT i i r r r > i i p X - j - 1 r ^ r I? r E - vii can-not be ig-nored. jff . . . Bass Vir - tue is its own re-ward. F l . ) f 1 f f I 1 m m . / too a poco piii aUargando. rifen. »», r^ r r r i r v r iff f r ir ^  ,rr t When past bearing is our grief, -flndthe LordwiD surej - l y send re - l ief 1 Yes, 31957 178 When pat* b»at iug -w— our grief, God the Lord w i l l send. — M a e s t o s o Grete l . Phi allargando. motto cresc. ^ J 1 J r I When past Hanse l . bear , ing is 'our grief, d the Lord wi l l 1 •When past Mother. bear- ing is our gr ief , od the Lo rd w i l l When past Father . bear - ing is our gr ief , God the Lord w in & r f 1 f EE God the Lord w i l l 1 When past bear . ing Is our ' grief, od the Lord wi l l 1 When past ^Maestoso. bear - ing is our grief, it od the Lord w i l l Piu allargando. fell i t 6= 2 9- i I 31957 i l 179 olto vivace. (J=120) p , 0 send . re.- l ief! P _ send ?Z5 re - l ief! send . __ r e - l i e f ! ( w h i l s t t h e c h i l d r e n d a n c e i n a j o y o u s c i r c l e r o u n d t h e g r o u p , t h e c u r t a i n f a l l s . ) m i send _ re lief! ox. p n i send. send. re - l i e f ! re- l ief! Molto vivace. =120) The<_nd. 31957 M , MU5, 0 . I G . Schirmer paperback opera score editions are quality paperbacks designed to give y o u years of use. Each edition has smythe-sewn binding and quality cover and interior papers. • Ludwig van Beethoven FIDELIO English version by Theodore Baker •Vincenzo Bellini NORMA LA SONNAMBULA English version by Natalia MacFarren • George Bizet CARMEN English version by Ruth and Thomas Martin • Gaetano Donizetti THE ELIXIR OF LOVE (L'ELISIR D'AMORE) English version by Ruth and Thomas Martin •Charles Gounod FAUST English version by Ruth and Thomas Martin ROMEO AND JULIET English version by Theodore Baker • Engelbert Humperdinck HANSEL AND GRETEL English version by Constance Bache Revised by Hamilton Benz • Ruggiero Leoncavallo IPAGLIACCI English version by Joseph Machlis •Pietro Mascagni CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA English version by Joseph Machlis •Jules Massenet MANON English version by George and Phyllis Mead • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart COSI FAN TUTTE English version by Ruth and Thomas Martin DON GIOVANNI English version by W. H . Auden and Chester Kallman THE MAGIC FLUTE (DIE Z AUBERFLOTE) English version by Ruth and Thomas Martin THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO (LE N O Z Z E DI FIGARO) English version by Ruth and Thomas Martin • Otto Nicolai THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR English version by Joseph Blatt •Jacques Offenbach THE TALES OF HOFFMANN (LES CONTES D ' H O F F M A N N ) English version by Ruth and Thomas Martin • Giacomo Puccini LA BOHEME English version by Ruth and Thomas Martin MADAMA BUTTERFLY English version by John Gutman TOSCA English version by John Gutman • Gioacchino Rossini THE BARBER OF SEVILLE (IL BARB1ERE DI SIVIGLIA) English version by Ruth and Thomas Martin THE ITALIAN GIRL IN ALGIERS (L' lTALIANA I N ALGERI) English version by Ruth and Thomas Martin •Camille Saint-Saens SAMSON AND DELILAH English version by Walter Ducloux •Frederick Smetana THE BARTERED BRIDE English version by Marian Farquhar •Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky THE QUEEN OF SPADES (PIQUE D A M E ) English version by Rosa Newmarch • Giuseppe Verdi AIDA English version by Walter Ducloux A MASKED BALL (UN B A L L O IN M A S C H E R A ) English version by Peter Paul Fuchs DON CARLO English version by Walter Ducloux FALSTAFF English version by Walter Ducloux IL TROVATORE English version by Natalia MacFarren LA TRAVIATA English version by Ruth and Thomas Martin OTELLO English version by Walter Ducloux RIGOLETTO English version by Ruth and Thomas Martin • Richard Wagner DAS RHEINGOLD English version by Frederick Jameson DIE MEISTERSINGER VON NURNBERG English version by Frederick Jameson GOTTERDAMMERUNG English version by Frederick Jameson LOHENGRIN English version by Stewart Robb SIEGFRIED English version by Frederick Jameson TRISTAN UND ISOLDE English version by Henry Grafton Chapman DIE WALKURE English version by Frederick Jameson • Carl Maria von Weber DER FREISCHUTZ English version by Natalia MacFarren A 1305b G . S C H I R M E R / New York • London 

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