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Time for bee: a recital of compositions Copeland, Warren 1994

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TIME FOR BEEA RECITAL OF COMPOSITIONSbyWARREN COPELANDB.Mus., Queen’s University at Kingston, 1992A THESIS SUBMITTED N PARTIALFULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTSFOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSICinTHE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIESSchool of MusicWe accept thy)hG&iS as conforming to the required standardThe University of British ColumbiaApril 1994© Warren Copeland, 1994Jn presenting this thesis in partial fulfilment of the requirements for an advanceddegree at the University of British Columbia, I agree that the Library shall make itfreely available for reference and study. I further agree that permission for extensivecopying of this thesis for scholarly purposes may be granted by the head of mydepartment or by his or her representatives. It is understood that copying orpublication of this thesis for financial gain shall not be allowed without my writtenpermission.êØaøi’t of CThe University of British ColumbiaVancouver, CanadaDate________DE-6 (2)88)IIAbstractTime for Bee consists of a series of ten original musical/theatrical compositions createdbetween September 1992 and January 1994, first performed on the evening of January 28,1994 in the Recital Hall of the University of British Columbia. While each of the workscan be performed individually, it was the composer’s intent to create a recital which islogical in its progression. This should suggest that in some way the pieces belong togetheras a larger whole.The concept of “waiting” circulates throughout all the works, in the sense that the actualmaterial is either minimalist (and so one is forced to “wait” for changes), or the philosophybehind a given piece is similarly based, but may not be evident in the sounding music. Thestudies in the music machine, for example, try to incorporate necessary stage changesbetween pieces (and the waiting the audience goes through) into musical events about suchwaiting.A secondary interest concerns the concept of contradiction. The majority of the works are,for example, based upon high-sounding textures (flute, violin, clarinet, high piano andmallets, etc). The studies in the music machine attempt to introduce low-sounding texturesas a contrast, however, and throughout the recital a timpani and a bass drum sit off to theside of the stage, unplayed. These ideas, and others, are meant to serve as a contradictionto the unified high-sounding textures of the majority of the recital.Individual pieces are similarly based upon concepts of contradiction and waiting. Memory,as a concept, plays a prominent role in several pieces as well.W.C.ifiTable of ContentsAbstract . . . iiTable of Contents . . . . . iiiRecital Program . . . ivstudies in the music machine (title page) 1studies in the music machine 1 . . . 2Pertaining to a Winter Ice . 3[just(oo)] . . 32studies in the music machine 2 . . . 38Consequences . . . 39Toneleiter Continuum . . . . 49Guruli Naduri . . . 56studies in the music machine 3 . 57Melodium-H 58studies in the music machine 4 64iwait!idowait.iwait,andwaitingismyeh.Forwaiting,thatis,Astudiesinthemusicmachine1(1994)*iplace,andthatisthat!Ortoplayagain,sayehismyoccupationwait,(BassClarinet,...)notweight.Orwait!waitingismyayandnotneithermyweightnoranunknownwayte!Orkeepingtothisweightyplay,iplacewaitingeh,notweightyorwaytingeh,butplacemyoneeyeAwaitingagain,andhencePertainingtoaWinterIce(1993)cond.WallaceLeYeungrealizewaitingcanbelabelled,and/orplaced,distinctly,asmyehayay(Piano,(3lockenspiel,Xylophone,Vibraphone,Marimba, Tape)ehehand/orehay.Andplainlythus,oractuallyforthus,whicheveronestaringoutthepanemayprefer,iam,moreover,soobviouslyandnotonebitindifferentlyalivewithfrozenstillness, iinclinedtoclearlyfortherecorddesignatemywaitinginelaborationsachedtobreakitopen---toviewthelightwithin.onceagain!Formarvelouslymodulatedtothetuneofmyehreiteratedtheynoware--eversominutelyalteredsoftlyalteringtothetuneofasiUust(oo)](1993)saymyehreiterated(repeatsignreiterationappendixdefinedas(Flute,Violin)somewhatmodularofcourse,notindexedaslitterareallehhing),andsocansee,becanseebedistinctlybedefinedaspermycurrentnumerousstudiesinthemusicmachine2(1994)designationsofA,butwithmultipleappendicies--ABC..123--stating(...Bulfroar,...)uponwhichmywaitingehcan,orsuccinctlywillbe,ormyehhasmostrecentlybeen,thatis,andcouldsuccinctlyalwayspossiblywillbe,untilsuchtimeaschangeisdeemednecessary,thefirstthird,and/ortooonlyConsequences(1993)onethirdofme!Andimustsay,truly,onlytruly,trulyonlyonethird(2Trumpets,Percussion)ofme!andTruly!Butohglory,trulyitis,justtobeandsee!!.thanansweringquestions:ifoneknowsthequestion,ofcourse!Forayingis,onthisinevitableintrusionaryexcursion,withasecondand(Note:ThisparticularversionofConsequencesisthesecondoftwoexistingthenathirdnowrealized,thatis,onlyonethirdofme!Foroneoforchestrations,theotherofwhichwasoriginallycomposedfor2Trumpetsand6three,istrulyoneofthree,orathird,two,onethirdtoo,andnotjustpercussion.)one!Butasfortwoplustoo,equallytrue,two-howeasilyforgotten--butforwhomonemustseeasneverthelessequallytrue,too,thatoneof-INTERMISS10N-oneandnotoneplusone,butofoneandone,was,atinitialmomentsmine,onlyoneofone,andthus,anallsingularity,regardless.Regardless,thatis,ofsuchsimplefactsthatoneofeventuallythreetobeToneleiterContinuum(1992)**iseventuallytobeoneofthree,athird,too,onethird,orthreeofthree(Clarinet,Violin)minustwobeingonebutstilloneofonlythreetochoosefrom!Butthenperhapsitisnowtimetobe,and/or,preciouslyso,see?Ohglorybe,howitisjusttobe!!Andsee!mysea!..trulymysee!TwistedweavemyGumliNaduri(1994)(SoloTape)TIIVIEFORBEEForthoseofyouthatareinterestedinsuchthings,“Guruli Naduri”roughlytranslatesARecital ofCompositionsbyWarrenCopelandfromitsnativeGeorgia(Russia)to“WorkSong”.Ofcourse,“work”canmeanmanydifferent thingstomanydifferent people!b.c.,idobelieve,see?Buttimeitisnotformysecondothertwo-thirdthree’s,orasishouldsaycouldsay,notoneofmyasyetsaystudiesinthemusicmachine3(1994)unelaboratedbutdefinitelyinsinuateduponothersaytwothirdsbeand(...,Bassdrums),seeandseaehsee?see?Mayit,however,pleaseyou,andthankyou,whileifinishmyehwaitingAbeforecomingtothesedefinitiveMelodium-H(1992)**descriptivemattersmomentarily.Ido,however,nicelythankyoufor(Clarinet,Violin,Violoncello)yourpatronage,andrathernicelyatthat,yesrathernicely,andratherinotsometimesnot,whatnot,iknownot,yes,iknownotwhat,noatthat,studiesinthemusicmachine4(1994)(Banjo,Piano,2Trombones,Tenor),...*Forthecreationofthiswork,IwouldliketogratefullyackncrwledgetheinfluenceofbpNicholandhispoetryseries,“StudiesintheBookMachine”(fromNichol,bp.j.rjdji-ABookofFictions.ed.IreneNiechoda.Stra (ford,Ontario:TheMercuryPress,1993.I76pp).**ThesetwopiecesbelongtoBookOneofContiuumEtudes,asetofsixpiecesforvariouscombinationsofPia.no,Clarinet,Violin, andVioloncelloThisrecitalispresentedinpartialfulfillmentoftherequirementsforaM.MusdegreeinCompositionattheUniversityofBritishColumbia.Iwouldliketotakethisopportunitytothankalloftheperformerswhoputforthatremendousefforttopresentsomeofmycompositionstoyoutonight.Inorderofappearance,theyare:Robert Best(miscellaneous,glockenspiel)ChenoaAnderson(miscellaneous,flute)AndreaStoneman(miscellaneous,piano)ChrisKovarik(percussion/stagemanager)BradPack(percussion/stagemanager)KarenNoel-Bentley(bassclarinet,clarinet)Dominiquellrunchmann(vibraphone)AllanDionne(xylophone,percussion)VetnGiiffiths(marimba)AiyanaAnderson(violin)CameronMcKintrick(percussion)BorisFaure(Banjo)PeterGall(oboe)JamieHorvokas(msmpet)DaeyongRa(crumpet)LisaWagner(miscellaneous,cello)MichelleSpeller(violin)LisaGartrell(clarinet)WayneAlbitt(trombone)NeilBennet(trombone)JonathonQuicke(tenor)Fortheirhelpwiththelogisticsofputtingthisrecitaltogether,iwouldalsoliketothankChrisKovarikandBradPack.Fortheirendlessyearsofsupportandencouragement,iwouldliketothankmyparents.IwouldalsoliketothankToniGaul,AndrEaStonemanandChenoaAnderson,whowereboththereformeatthetimesineededthemthemost.Fortheirguidance, andengagingconversation,iwouldliketothankProfessor’sEugeneWilsonandKeithHamel.Forcominginatthelastminutetohelppullthingstogether,iwouldlikethankWallaceLeung.PertainingtoaWinter Icewascommissionedby,andisdedicatedto,AndreaStoneman.(just(oo)jwascommissionedbyAiyanaAndersonandChenoaAnderson,andisdedicatedtoCarolandCliffAnderson.Melodium-Hisdedicatedtomyparents.PatandJohnCopeland.ThetapepansforPertainingtoaWinierIceandGuruliNaduriwerebothcreatedusingtheNeXTenvironmentinthestudiosoftheUniversityofBritishColumbia.ForGuruliNaduriiwouldliketofullyrecognizetheuseofsamplesfromthemusicofMortonFeldman.SofiaGubaidulina,GyoergyLigeti,RobertNormandeauandPerfumeTree.So,icontinuetosewneverthelessagainthesepartstogether,onlyoccasionallydistractedfromtheseprepartoryvariationsbytheinsistantnaggingofmyothertwothirdsplaying;myayreiteratedtothetuneofmyowndesire,continuously,butnotunchangingeachline,relentlesslyprogressingforwardsalwaysbylawsofaverageforward(minustwointerveninghalfpages),andsocomingtowardsagarmentwhichfitsthusuponmyimage.Sotightlyitfitsthatenclavesofenviabletenderness,oh,suchtenderness,andunfittinglysoatthat,areneverthelesscommonbeyondcomprehension;andsewnenviablytoo,onemustnotice,likenothingtobesewnto,orby,atewnoratunebyatunoratonoratonneofandbyasunbefi.reiwouldlovetosirethesun,or,perhapsmyambition--perhapsmyambitionsbecomemenot.Justperhaps,atthat,theyembarassinglybecomemenot,butirrelevantissues,foridodigress.Suchanenviableskinofgarmentiwasenvisioning!Ohmyvision!aybeseize.Andtoactuallycommunicateuponmyehandtwoasyetunelaborateduponoccupations:tofunctionenviablywithanequitabletri(u)nity!Tounderstandandfunction,thatis,withmyeh,beandsee,thelasttwoofwhichiwillarriveuponsecondary/thirdairellee.Butfirst,ehasmywaitingiamdrawntoreturn.Curious,mybhesecondthirdofthreethirds33.3333333333333%foreveriunderstandcannotbeasmybhebutbemybeunderstanding:ofwaiting(forsomething?),andanunspecifiedwaitingforsomething(ie.nothing?).Thatis,atleast,myehandnotbhebee,butbeebe.How???ilacktheunderstanding.Certainlymuchlesssothanyoumightunderstandsaywhyhorsesgotowatercomparedtosaynotwatertohosesbuthosestowater.Butthenidodigressforagainiwasattemptingatransitionarypassagetomybe.Relatingi wastomyeh,butwhatofmybee?Justforme?iwill,however,wait,iwilleventuallywaitunspecified;somethingfornothing.Withnochanges,thatis.Specified,nothingchanges--somethingfornothing--andistillcontinuetowaitit.ifindcomfortinhowendlesslyiwaitforsomething.Butthatismyehnotmybe,asitshouldnowbee.mybhe.Onethirdbetomyunspecifiedbenaught.Ideallyonethirdasmysecondthirdtobemyunspecifiedbecanbeasisayunspecifiednothingandonethirdmyfirstthirdtoehcanbemycuriouslyobviousehgoestoasisaysomethingeh,notmyunspecifiedbe.Ohglorybe!Suchenvisualizeiseeandcomprehendwithmybe!Modularthinking,notsolitary,notthinkingsolitary,thatis,iswhatthinkingbringsglorytomygloryehbeize.Butmyglorybeandmyehcuriousonlytwothirdssee.imustforgetnotmysee.mysee?Ohmysee!havei lostmysee?Whatis/aremyseize?Horsestowater, justtwoconsequences.ineverthelsslackthehoses.Butnow,specifically,isittimeforbemybeemytimebeitis,andso,iTimeforBeeARecitalofCompositionsbyWarrenCopelandUBCRecitalHallSaturdayJanuary29,19948p.m.EveryoneWelcomeReceptionwillfollow1studies in the music machine #1-4(1994)Warren CopefanciThese four compositions, beyond a few general requirements, can be performed in any musical situation,by themselves -- singly, or as a group -- or separated by other entirely unrelated works, again, either singly, or asa group.The purpose of these works is left up to whomever organizes their performance, for they can be perceivedin many different ways, although in a concertfrecital they will philosophically blend well with other “minimalist”works. The reasoning behind this is, well, ... up to the audience. By mentioning the suitability of these studiesalong side minimalist works, the composer does not wish to prevent other combinations, anything but. Such ademand is not practical, and hardly feasible: but the composer has mentioned it nonetheless, and whomeverreads this may take it as he or she will.A timpani and a bass drum sit to the front of stage left for each. A pair (or more) of speakers are requiredas well (#1, and 3, although they may be there for all if desired).The tape part for #1 consists of clapping and hisses/jeers/boos, beginning with clapping and ending withhissing (as in a bad soccer game), lasting 35-40 seconds, fading out at the end. A tape copy can be received fromthe composer through 4Bee Music (current address: Box 183 Tiverton, ON NOG 2T0, or 2822 West KingEdward Avenue Vancouver, BC V6L 1T9).2studies in the music machine 1Nothing should precede this composition. Prepare the recital hail for a grandeur opening....(Before performing this piece, the stage should be set up for the composition directly following it.Ideally, the following composition should consist of at least five performers, one of which must be piano. All ofthe instruments, stands, and chairs required for the composition should be positioned on stage. Leave the pianobackstage, however, with room for it to be moved in at a later time. A timpani and a bass drum should be set onstage as well, however, at stage left, as if separate from the other instruments. A chair should be placed by itselfto the front of stage right. Loudspeakers should be set up on either side of the stage.)Having nothing before it, studies in the music machine 1 begins with an expectant audience. The lightsdim. There is a brief pause of wonder. Then it begins.°“ .LtII(from behind the audience, left side; loudly, male voice)‘ emerge from backstage left, carrying a ratchet in one hand, and a large elastic band in a pocket. Walktowards front stage right where the chair is placed. At about the 8” mark, almost halfway across thestage, play the ratchet sharply and loudly for two or three rotations, holding your arm high in the air.Continue to walk towards the chair. It should take about 20-25” to walk across the stage and reach thechair. Sit down and think idly about icebergs, setting the ratchet in your lap. Bring out the elastic bandand look at it (starting around the 40” mark), exrnining it as if you have never seen such a thing before.Don’t m’ilce a sound with it, but just before the piano is placed in position (see 8”), suddenly begin totwang a loud, cheery, but funky country tune on it, continuing beyond all other events and fading out.(The entire piece must not go beyond 3’ in length). When finished fading out, suddenly get up and leavestage through the audience, right side, yelling in a frustrated voice, “coming!, I’m coming!...I’m comingalready! (etc. ad lib). The piece will end when you have left the hail and the timpani player (see 30”)follows you.fj J tape fades in with a crowd clapping, eventually changing to jeers, yells and hisses at about the 8” mark.Fades out again by the 35” mark.6”the piano player for the next composition in the recital program should emerge from behind the audience,right side, and jog towards the stage as if uying to wave down a taxi. Look worried and flustered,constantly looking back the way you came, stumbling slightly, but saying nothing. Upon reaching thestage, exit excitedly through the piano doors (opened at the 8” mark).7,,Bass clarinet soloist emerges from backstage right, crossing the path of the ratchet player beforeeventually departing backstage left. Before leaving, wander around the stage, tapping feet on the flooroccasionally, as if testing the floor for its safeness. Pause briefly at 10”, 21”, 32”, and 40” to emit a low“growl” on the instrument. Moderately loud, not too long in duration. Slightly different in character eachtime. Leave stage by 75”.8”.\ (on ratchet sounding) two stage managers suddenly open stage doors and start to mindlessly move pianoout on stage, putting into position with the other instruments for the next composition. Do not rush, butmove the piano Out as quickly as possible, closing the doors again as you depart the stage. Must not gobeyond the 2’ to 2’30” mark.30”the person who presses “play” for the tape part should emerge from the console and arrive at the timpani’and bass drum on stage at this point, stamping feet on the stage like the bass clarinet player. Look at bothinstruments, acting as if aching to play them, but scared to “break them”. Continue to do this, nevermaking a sound with them, until the ratchet/elastic band player (see 0”) runs offstage into the audience.When this happens, look around desperately, somewhat bemused, and run after them, yelling, “Comeback here!,..” (etc. ad lib). The piece ends when you have both exited the hail.PertainingtoaWinterIceWarrenCopelandstaringoutthepane,alivewithfrozenstillness,iachedtobreakitopen--toviewthelightwithin.INSTRUMENTATION:PianoGlockenspielXylophoneVibraphoneMarimbaTapeNOTES:Thetapepartconsistsofarepeatingcuckooclockonly.Itispossibletousealiveclock,ifitcanbecontrolledtochimeaspecificnumberoftimes(ie)12,18and14times,atasteadypace--namely,2chimesforeverythreebeatsatJ=50-56.Ifthisoptionisused,theclockshouldbeplacedatthesideofthestage,withtheleastamountofhassleaspossibleincausingittochimeondemand.Itshouldhaveahighpitch‘cuckoo”ifpossible,andwitharichnessofsonoritybutquietdynamics.ADATtapeofthecuckooclock,however,isavailablefromthecomposer.Inthiscase,eachentryisgivenitsownindexnumberforeasyaccess,andthenpausedafterwardsuntilthenextentry.Thecomposercanbereachedthroughthefollowingaddress:4BceMusic/Box183TiverLon,OntarioINOG2T0CC.)6IC..?eh ii271.Y0A08CC.I910N©ITflCCCDOIT1314/15—IlI-‘HIA-q16ll17II¶1I.lC,U,0-4-44-II18tIz11.19WI$WIhe7tI72IrPtml‘C‘aC/ I21I2IIt-.Lfl\\IIISI22I0-‘II—I0oINJ-©)V.IL)171I—26t08.0aI27IA r______FLJ!AiIlIN\_____L)CtCt81‘—I.l.TIIj61I(JTEI—e.-ILiust(oo)]forIluicandviolinL)moment(s)donot justbegin,orend;kindlybelieve,ifyouwill,thattheyarepreceded,andfollowedby,inactualfactmuchcontradictionofthoughtandmemoryNOTES:Becauseoftheviolinscordatura,inwhichtwostringsaxedetuneddownwardsbyasemitone,thefollowingnotationalpracticewillbeused:Allpitcheswillbenotatedatperfonnance(asopposedtosounding)pitch.Whenaspecificpitchmustbeplayedononeofthedctuncdstrings,thestringislabelledbelowthenote,withthesoundingpitchinbrackets.Forexample:pizz IV(Ak)(sim)(G)HeretheopenGandAstringsareplayed, butsoundasemitonelower.Whenapitchisnotgivenalabel,itmustbeassumedthatitistheactualsoundingpitch,andshouldbeplayedassuch.Forscores,recordings,ormoreinformation,thecomposercanbereachedthroughthefollowingoffices:411ccMusicBox183Tiverton,ONTNOG2T0II2822WestKingEdwardAvenueVancouver,BCV61.1T9_____Htt4,___F)Fl)“kIHIj.,______AII1tff’iii’.’P’ri*fVIIiit_©:‘flIIffi’’_____-. IIIIIIi.)i)RHHL4L{1IIL4/‘______HIIt 1—£IIIL.inW1IIIIVJIll[LLI—F’.1_IL__“/iivrJ,) I1_iI/rnITrttn’(1II____)___ ____)I__________tfflWIIE)17EI—I1<II©‘I41•I’, I.IIn1tm* 1tn1tt4(4FiI1iL41II 1ASb“:7(.\)H “L—‘•‘F ,:® )).L‘1•f): Hr %1111* flu.uI’irmrflu.ruij1flu,trtffturtrmflu.41*14)9LEV®L38studies in the music machine 20”- VTwo performers, one a five-string banjo player, the other carrying a bullroar, walk out onto stage,acknowledging the applause (if any). The bullroar then begins playing, quietly, and very moodily.Playing somewhat continuously, but with some breaks in the sound. After the buliroar has played forabout 6”, the banjo player quietly begins to tune their instrument to a G-tuning, occasionally accentuatingdissonances, plucking the open strings together in other words, exaggerating the tuning process. Try tobe “musical”. The entire piece should never be louder than a mp.When the tuning is almost complete, the banjo player should slowly fade out, almost denying the listenerthe satisfaction of hearing the “proper” tuning.The bullroar should continue past the banjo somewhat, slowly fading out to nothing.When the bullroar is completely silent, the banjo player should leave the stage, leaving only the buliroar toV acknowledge applause (if any). The bullroar player should then immediately begin the stage changesnecessary for the next piece, signalling for help if necessary, even as the applause dies to nothing.aCDCCDcl€00-0-00)r)6E0ftg.EL.ftELS.ELELpQoxi =0ox-IICCftI0O1A\\VAJj7ftftfto.C000TIIAit?0’, I00C-‘I,-’ii.43©0%Ii0C,C,C,C,C00C,00II7Ce‘1b)bJ/00LII.I.AV9fr47$pHUI\.IS.‘I—8I* * *E 00 p* **-$ 0 00.3 8188 00 91.2g 00 0. 0 ILC ni E CD C,) 0 0aCDL(IIII IC00* I II —C ,.C p ICtCt—av4 yl V4 v v4 v7—v4 VI V’ V’ V VIv4 V4 v4 v’ V V ViV’V V v’ V v4 V V4 V4 VIV4V7-)-ç] E1 1) El I I,)’] EIV irV’Vl VI vi V4 V v]V v4 v4 V V ‘I.VI7-V41V4IU’YfII* 0 I I.III III III III III H IIV 4II05—VHI III III -j I’ II II0,I* 2(-‘IV AI“(10ll0>UiI1 All “ Viiiv—II II IIAIii r II i... j r v A ‘$1 VV)0AII IL II III II’ IIIAU’I NU’U’IUi0’57studies in the music machine 3A pair of loudspeakers should be on stage before this piece begins, preferably having been on stage forquite some time before this piece, if possible (ie perhaps following an electroacoustic piece). A timpaniand a bass drum sit at stage left as well. A person with a cello bow, and a sign saying “DISCOUNTS”attached to it (perhaps in the manner of a flyer annoyingly trying to sell something) sits centre stage (withthe sign placed in such a way that the audience can’t read it).0”When the hail is completely quiet, the person sitting down with the bow announces happily,p)A(geand then shows sign to the audience. Cause itto swing back and forth. At the moment “p)A(ge”is spoken, two stagehands come out and move the loudspeakers off stage. The speaker/bowcarrier continues to sit, showing off the sign. When the loudspeakers are gone, the speakerstands up, and carrying the bow, goes over to the bass drum, taps it once lightly with a hand(happily also), and goes offstage.1)çj)cii)€;:)j)(jL )‘Q ic ‘c mr f4)-‘‘* ** 0. o.* *I rC rTlL)IO CD(J Go‘I‘)ACV VC’C LJL’)0\CDCD8 -CD-4z,\\\\AIIIw a IAA $ySz 00C, (b I4

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