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Community plan monitoring : a case study Nowlan, Paul John 1992

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COMMUNITY PLAN MONITORING:A CASE STUDYbyPAUL JOHN NOWLANB.A.(Statistics), The University of New Brunswick, 1975A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OFTHE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OFMASTER OF ARTS (PLANNING)inTHE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES(School of Community and Regional Planning)We accept this thesis as conformingto the required standardTHE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIAOctober 1992Paul John Nowlan, 19921i<<‘)F-U):Dy)cC)CDH-QhhCDftF-—1CDQiJJCDHQCDQU10HOC0H-MhF-F-H-H-I-’W<WCDHU1<CDH-UiCDW0H-PJQCDf--fr)CDh’5(DM0—0i<<QCDo-F-hiQrtH-p)Oc-Io0(J)()(ThOH-0P)f-toHcn;ioJçtHH-J(QIi<)03M-,CDr(0HH-0rtI-rjjCl)‘<U)CD)JPihhH-JOCDH,-HHC)P)OCfl0M-,D)CDLOCD‘<H’tIH-0H‘-0-<(flI-H-H-)CDPJP)cr H-0(QhftCDfri<Cl)Cl)CDhhCDD)H0CDCDCD3CnCDYhCDCflfrC)o(QCl)M.LQH-CDcFCDHOH-‘H0D)CDO)HCD---f-toCD)bH0H-’-CD0Pic-tLH-C)CDQ.’tIift(DCfl“<QCDCDHQrtCDH-CD) HQr-t(QftH-H-rtrthtiçt(tQQCDrt‘CDH HY.JH-HCoH-1Ci)iCD‘<(i)h)H-iH0rtF-<c1-‘-CDc(10H-CDH-Cn(flM,(iCl)Cl)‘<H-CD))HctH-U)c1fl(DC’)CD’<Jhh)CD0H-00CD CDABSTRACTIn this thesis, a monitoring system is designed andimplemented for the Community Development Plan for the MountPleasant neighbourhood of Vancouver, British Columbia. Theliterature review first provides the context for planmonitoring by showing that the complexity of urban systemsnecessitates a continuous planning process, i.e. a cyclicalor iterative linking of decision-making, implementation andmonitoring in order that planning can adapt to changingcommunity goals, issues, and trends.The role of monitoring in this continuous planningprocess is initially reviewed in terms of systems feedbackand control. However, the complexity of urban systemssuggests that concentrating on the goals and objectives of aplan provides too narrow a perspective for monitoring. Anexpanded role for plan monitoring, one that also addressesassumptions, policies, decisions and issues of concern, isreviewed in the context of a general monitoring systemmodel. This model incorporates four sub-systems:information collection; technical evaluation; provision ofadvice; and monitoring system improvement.The case study is conducted in three stages: first, amonitoring system based on the four function model isdesigned for the Mount Pleasant Plan; second, monitoringiiH-C)H-Cl)ftI-(iH-F-ftçtft1IjH-Cl)ftI)Cl)I-(1)iC)(Cli(ClJ0P)(ClF-<Q010Cl)(ClH,Cl)(ClP)ftHQ(ClH-(I)Cl)H-<H-CH-0H-QftP)P)C)h’ftC)H-H-C)H0Q‘tSh(1H-ftCl)H-Q-‘-(Cl(1)Q(1)Q(UF-(Cl0(ClI-hft(ClftH,-ftH-CiftHH(1)i(UH(Cl(1I-H-ftH-iI-(ClCl)(ClftH-ftft(Cl(ClH0H-C)QI-tC0(1(I)Cl)C)H-Hft(Uft(I)(Cl(CltQ(UH-<0(UH-(Clftft0ftHdft-I(ClH-ftHft(Cl0(U0(10Cl)(Uft0LQd(UH0HftHftI-ft0(ClI-H-(UI-i(Cl=ftH-0H-C)(U(ClCl)H-C)ift(UCl)(ClC)h’I-(Cl(ClftbC)ft(Cl<0(U0H(U<(Clft(Cl(U(Cl0Ci.(UCDtiCl)(ClftC0•(Clh(ClI(Clft(UC)(UI-hftC)tiHHH(I)C)H-((I)HH-QH0(U00Hft<H,H-Qft0(ClCl)Cl)(UftHH(ClCl)H-ft•H-iftftCl)<H-(UH(U(ClC)(Cl<Cl)ft-H,ti(UH-dC)ft(U(ClCl)(U(UH-h(ClH-(Cl0(Cl<Pi(UH-C)(U1_III(Cl(Ui-Cl)0(Cl(Uh’hH-Cl)Cl)ft(Cl(ClftHCl)H,Cl)—H-Cl)(Uft(ClftftH-C)(Clft0Q.Cl)(UQCl)(UiI-<fr(Uft0I-H-(U(ClCl)(ClH-H-‘t5H-LC1(ClC)Cl)JHCl)C)t3>(Ui(ClH=0(UCl)(ClH-(Cl(UH-P)0(U(ClftC)(1C)(ClH,ICl)C)C)ftCl)H-0(Cl(1HQ.0(Cl(ClC)“<0(C(ClftH-0HXCDH,H-H,ti(U•i0HH-(UftH-H-Cl)0H-CDftCl)(1Cl)Cl)ft(ClCl)(I)Cl)I-(ClH-ft(Cli(ClftH-(Cl—Cl)P)30(1C/)-.C)ft(UH-1H-0H-ftP1HftH-HP1P(ClftCl)ftH-ftH-H-(U(Cli‘-<HI-hCl)ftHCl)C)Cl)LQN0CQI-’ft—(Cl(ClH,ft1<(ClQ(Cl)I-H-H-H-H,(1(UH-QI(l)(U(5k<H,C)(Cl(ClCl)(Cl(Cl0Q(QftI-j0H-HftH,0(ClCl)Cl)H,(UftH(UCl)(U0FC5H,H0(UH-0(Cl(ClH-Cl)Cl)H-III-0(Cl(UftH,Q.I-CliQCl)<0(ClC)(ClH-HC)ftftft(ClftCl)Cl)Cl)H,IH-0H-HH-ftH-(U=H-iftII(ClH-ftft(ClftH,<C)H-0iftft(UC)I-(Cl(ClCl)Cl)-.i(U0(UH-(Clftft(ClCl)H-(UHft(Cl-Hft(U(ClH-Cl)((Uft0ftH,H-HCl)(0C)(UH,(QC)(Cl0(ClC)Cl)I<ftd0(Cl(1H-(U(Cl‘-Cl)0H-(ClH--.(1<Cl)HCl)Cl)(UCl)H0ftH-0Cl)(Cl•HH(1(ClH(UH,ft(UCl)Cl)(UI-C(1Cl)H-(UCl)ft-Cl)Q.QH,H-çftftQ.ftH-(1H-ftCl)H(Q(U(UH-0Cl)Cl)0(U(ClH-ft(Cl(QftI-(ClFtCl)Cl)fttQH-H-(U(ClH-(ClIIH-HQCl)<ft(U00(c(Clft(ClC)H,Cl)(ClFtTABLE OF CONTENTSAbstract iiTable of Contents ivList of Tables viList of Figures viiAcknowledgement viiiChapter 1Introduction 11.1 Problem Statement 11.2 Context 21.3 Methodology 41.4 Scope 51.5 Organization 6Chapter 2Plan Monitoring Theory and Practice 82.1 Planning Theory and Practice 82.1.1 What is Planning’ 92.1.2 A Brief Overview of Planning Practice inCanada 112.1.3 A Rational Planning Model 132.1.4 The Complexity of Community Planning 162.1.5 Implications for Planning and Monitoring. . . . 192.2 Plan Monitoring Theory 212.2.1 What is Monitoring” 212.2.2 Systems Feedback and Control 222.3 A Plan Monitoring System 292.4 The Information Collection Sub-System 322.4.1 A Data Collection Strategy- Mixed-scanning. .322.4.2 rpes of Information 332.4.3 What to Monitor’ 372.4.4 Sources of Information 452.4.5 Data Processing and Storage 502.5 The Technical Evaluation Sub-System 522.5.1 Methods of Analysis 542.5.2 Approaches to Monitoring 572.6 The Advisory Sub-System 582.7 The Improvement Sub-System 612.8 Summary 62ivTable of ContentsChapter 3Monitoring System Design 653.1 Local Area Planning in Vancouver 663.2 The Community Development Plan for Mount Pleasant. .683.2.1 The Community of Mount Pleasant 713.2.2 Impetus for the Plan 733.2.3 The Planning Process 753.2.4 Description of the Plan 763.3 The Monitoring System 773.3.1 The Information Collection Sub-System 783.3.2 The Technical Evaluation Sub-System 863.3.3 The Advisory Sub-System 883.3.4 The Improvement Sub-System 89Chapter 4Monitoring System Implementation 914.1 The Plan for Industry in Mount Pleasant 914.1.1 Retention of Industrial Focus 934.1.2 Major Streets 964.1.3 Residential Uses 974.1.4 Brewery Creek Industrial Enclave 994.2 Monitoring System for Industry in Mount Pleasant. .1014.2.1 Plan Implementation 1024.2.2 Assumptions 1034.2.3 Goals and Objectives 1044.2.4 Policies and Decisions 1054.2.5 Data Needs 1064.3 Monitoring System Implementation 1074.3.1 Goals and Assumptions 1074.3.2 Policies and Issues 1114.3.3 Analysis and Advice 115Chapter 5Conclusion 1185.1 Summary 1185.2 Implications for Monitoring 1225.3 Implications for Planning 1235.4 Suggestions for Further Research 1255.5 Conclusion 126Bibliography 128Appendix A.Mount Pleasant Plan Issues and Goals 134Appendix B.Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations 145VI-I-I-I-I-j‘-El‘—El‘-3‘-39)9)9)9)9)9)9)9)9)9)9)9)bbHHHHHHHHHHHHCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDHHHHHWL’JHcDLODC)‘-3C)CDCD9)9)0Cl)0CDCl)Iirt9)CDCDH-H-19)HQQCD09)CDCDCZCDCD9)i—I-C)HrtçtCDCDH-CDH-H-CDQ.Q.009)9)Cl)Hf-H’0CDH’Cl)bCD01)U.C))CrMiCDCDCrCDC)<CDCDC)0CDCDCDQCrCl)Mil-HH-Q.0H-HH<Cl)9)‘tiiICDCDH0iH.CDCDC)H-CDCr..H-9)•Ci).9)(-tCl)‘1.C).HQCDH-H9)CDHLIJI.HI-‘CrHH-HH’CDC)CD‘C)..9)CDCD.-C),..f-tCDH9)H...0I-iI..frH-H..CDi•.Cl)CD 9)‘CD Cr CD CDHHHHHHcccw‘cx‘c>ow‘-3‘-El9)9)HHCDCDD-@,W1’-)HH (I) ‘.3 0 ‘XI w LXI U)‘tiOP’‘-dC)‘-iiH9)CD00H9)CrCDH9)9)9)H’HiC)CDH‘tiH-HCDCrCD9)‘CICDH-CDi‘CIHQ01HCDCDCl)CDCDC)0CDCl)l3CDiC)Cl)CD‘-iC)11CD,—r9)CDC)9)CrQ.CDHCrç-rH-iQ-CDH-H-0H.<0CDH.CDCD.CDCl)..,C/)C),.Cl)C)C)::•CD.CDCD Q.iiH’•HCDHCDCDH‘cODODCx)CX)coJUiJHLIST OF FIGURESFigure 1. A Rational Planning Model .15Figure 2. A Continuous Planning Model 20Figure 3. Feedback and Control in an Industrial Process.24Figure 4. A Planning Control Model 26Figure 5. A Plan Monitoring System 30Figure 6. Monitoring a Community Plan. . . . .31Figure 7. City of Vancouver Local Areas 68Figure 8. Mount Pleasant Neighbourhoods 73Figure 9. The Mount Pleasant Industrial Area - 1987.... 92Figure 10. The Mount Pleasant Industrial Area - 1992.... 95viiACKNOWLEDGEMENTI wish to thank a number of people, without whosesupport, this thesis would not have been possible: my bestfriend Patricia, for pulling me out of complacency andrelaxing the 50/50 rule; my friends, who were understandingwhen I disappeared for a few months; my co-workers,especially Brian, Chris and Ann, who were both helpful andencouraging; and Phil, for his wisdom and patience inguiding me through this thesis.viiiCHAPTER 1INTRODUCTION1.1 PROBLEM STATEMENTPractically all municipalities in Canada have anOfficial Community Plan, i.e. a strategic policy documentadopted by local governments to control the use anddevelopment of land under their jurisdiction. In a typicalcommunity planning process, planners seek public input todetermine issues or problems, identify goals and objectives,develop policy options, assess policy impacts, and presenttheir findings to the locally elected members of Council whothen decide on which policies to adopt. Any part of theplanning process may be repeated a number of times beforethe plan is adopted by municipal Council. Followingadoption, the recommendations and policies in the plan areimplemented by staff. Subsequently, the outcomes of theplan may be monitored to determine if the goals andobjectives of the community are being achieved. Finally,the plan is reviewed and the planning process is renewed,either as a result of a problem revealed by monitoring or ata pre-determined time interval.A shortcoming of community planning is the relativelylittle attention that appears to be given to plan1Chapter 1. Introductionmonitoring, both in the planning literature and in planningpractice. In addition, under conditions of fiscalrestraint, monitoring programs are often drastically reducedor cut altogether. However, monitoring has an importantrole to play in ensuring that the aims and policies of acommunity plan continue to address the changing needs of thecommunity.The purpose of this thesis is to review the literatureon monitoring in the context of community planning and todesign and implement a community plan monitoring system. Indoing so, the following questions will be addressed:What is the role of monitoring in the planning process?What is the nature and function of a plan monitoringsystem?What are the elements of a monitoring system? andWhat constitutes an effective monitoring system?1.2 CONTEXTCommunity planners in the first half of the 20thCentury generally produced master plans that focused onachieving a pre-determined end state. Since the l960s andpossibly earlier, the emphasis in planning has changedconsiderably. Rather than espouse a static view ofcommunities, the current view is that planning should be acyclical process of implementation, review and adaptation to2H-ftH-iI-HCl)‘riDiCDDiCl‘rJftDiClCDaai30CDfCDH-D)0HMiHCl)Di-HH-<0CD‘a0ftftDiClMiDiCl)ft0CDHCl)ftDift0CDCDC)CDCDH-CDDi<aCDCrjClhH-CD0hftCl)aH-HjCD(PCL)H-f-r<Cl)ClDlHCt0CDCif-rDitiH-ClH-CDCl)f-fC)>cH-Cl)DlCDCl)Cl)ftftH-hh(PH-I-f-fCDCrCl)CDftftC)Cl)H-Cl)(P<CDH-ftCl)(I)aH--(PftHHCl-iCDCDCD00h0CDCDCl)ftHCDCDCDDl(PCl)iDi3(PhiliiCl)Cl)C)CDDlDlCl)H-ftCDCDCl)0ftCl)0Di00H-H-00Cl)ClH0hCl)ClH-Cl)H-Cl)LiH-H-frjHCl)0Cl)H-0<JiCl)DlCDCDIIClCl)HH‘C5(PCDCD<Cl)(P(PiMiCDCDCl)CD<f-fH-•0JDl(PH-f-i--0ClLiftLiX0Cl)fta0ftCl(I)CDDlMiHCDCDDiCl)i-H-CDf-rftHiH-CDCl)CDMil0ClCl)tiH-fta0CD0H-0Cl)‘tiCDtift0H-‘tiCDi‘<0Cl)fi-Cl)ftCrCDi0‘-CDD)HDl(PH-Cr‘H-0CT)LiaClHDlCDMiCl)<Cl)H-CDf-rDl0CrH-H<I-ClCl)DlftH-a0CrCDf-rH-DiDlMi00DlCDH-CDftCDaClDlI-jDiI-ilHH-hHCDMiftH-Cl)Cr-0I-(PCl)iCD‘tiH-‘<(PDlLiLi0ftCDDlCrDlH-DlCDCDCDCl)HiDi•I-HCl)Cl)Cl)IICl)CtCl)DlH-DiClLiDi(PDClHCDCD-H-CtftaClDiCDHH-0H-H-H-Cl)0ftH-0H-a00H-HaH-CrH-HTJCrCD0iCl)Cla0I-HiH0(Pi-H-Cl)CDCr0IIMih’H-CrCDDiH-H(P0iHCl)0CDCfCrpiH-CttJHCD‘CICDDiWI-(P00CtCrCrI-Cl)0aHCD“<Li(PDiCrHHCD0Mi0011CDHIICl(PDiH-Cl)tiCl)Cri•CDCrDiDiLiH-H-aDiH-DlLiCDi0ci3CDH-CDf-rf-ri-‘CICDiiH-ftftaCDiaDi-0f-rCl)H-a(PH<CDCDDik<ft-HCDh’Ct0f-f0‘f-rftCt0CDDiH-HH-a•H-0l-CDClCl)Mi3Dil-HCDCl)iC1H-CD1‘CI<0aCl)DlH-aH-Dl‘CICD•Cl)(P<(PH-HH-I-iDiCl)H-ClCriCl)0frCDDlHlftHH-Cl)CD(P(PCDMif-raiH-(PCrH-a0Cl)DiCD0H-H-Mi00CtMiCD03(PLiHMi(P13‘CIH-H-—ftftCl)HCDH-HCDH-HLiHCD‘ClHCl)aClCDft13II0•Hf-fk<Cl)13H-I-iCDCrHftiH-CDLi<13CDDi13CDCl)C)(Pftc-rClCl)CD1J13<1CDCl)aCDCD13H-a‘cii-H-CD13(PCD13CD13H-13H-h‘CICl)Crr’ftDi-TCDCD‘CICDH-Ijf-r(PDiftH-DiHMi0Cl)H-‘CIfttiHH-DlCl113‘tI13H13H‘<MiH-Di0II13CD0013ftftDiftH(P‘-<H1h’H-Cl(P‘-LLiH-DiaDiDiHDiCD0H-Cl)-13H--Cl)ftftl-Cl)Cl)ftft13H-DiIit313Cl)C/)(PCl)Cl0DiftCDH-H-13013(PLi.(P0aDl13H13DiDia0H-ClH-ClCDCDMiftCl)LiftCDftCl)CDaClIiDi1313CDftaft13‘<Cl)DiH-ClH(PHCl)DiMift13ftDiCl)Cl)ftCDHCl)Clft0H-CD13ftftCDaCDCl‘<1CDCDClDiCl13Cl)H-0ClCD1313Chapter 1. Introductiondesign and implementation of a monitoring system for aspecific plan. Furthermore, most of the literature comesfrom England where regional planning is required bylegislation. Most of that literature relates to monitoringof long-range strategic policy plans at the regional ormetropolitan level.1.3 METHODOLOGYThe aim of the thesis, to design and implement acommunity plan monitoring system, will be pursued by meansof a review of the literature pertaining to monitoring and acase study. The latter consists of designing andimplementing a monitoring system for the plan for the MountPleasant area in the City of Vancouver, British Columbia.The Community Development Plan for Mount Pleasant,adopted by Vancouver City Council in 1987, was prepared by acitizen’s planning committee with the assistance of theVancouver Planning Department. It is a broad-based plan,covering various physical, social, economic andenvironmental issues. Pertinent to the thesis purpose, theplan states that the “Community must review progress andcontinually monitor the Plan” (Vancouver l989a) . However,while the implementation of the Plan’s recommendations wasclosely monitored by Planning Department staff, no systemwas set up to monitor the outcomes of the Plan.4Chapter 1. IntroductionThe case study will be undertaken as if the thesisinvestigator had been a planner assigned the task ofdesigning and implementing a monitoring system. First, thePlan will be examined in order to understand its context andpurpose. Next, an overall organizing framework for themonitoring system will be developed. The monitoring systemwill then be set out in operational detail for theindustrial area strategy described in the Plan. Finally,the monitoring system will be implemented for that portionof the Plan addressing existing residential uses in theMount Pleasant industrial area. Data will be collected andanalyzed as if the monitoring program had been in operationon an on-going basis since 1987, when the Plan was adopted.Finally, the findings of case study will be discussed inorder to comment on plan monitoring in general.1.4 SCOPEThis thesis is about monitoring, particularly in thecontext of community land use planning, and deals withplanning theory only as necessary to highlight theory onmonitoring. The thesis does not specifically address thecommunity planning process and it offers a critique of thatprocess only where it relates to monitoring.In terms of designing a monitoring system, the thesisconcentrates on the Mount Pleasant Community Development5Chapter 1. IntroductionPlan. Further, the monitoring system is fully implementedfor only one of the several policy areas contained in thePlan.1.5 ORGAT\IIZATIONThe thesis has five chapters. Chapter 2, theliterature review, is presented in two parts. The firstpart provides a brief review of planning practice in orderto set the context for community plan monitoring. It isargued that the complexity of planning problems and thelimitations of rational planning necessitate a continuousplanning process where monitoring is quite important. Inthe second part, the literature on plan monitoring isreviewed. The review presents the concept of feedback andcontrol, describes a monitoring model, and discusses indetail each of the four components of that model.In Chapter 3, a monitoring system is designed for theCommunity Development Plan for Mount Pleasant. First, thelocal area planning process in Vancouver is explained.Second, the Mount Pleasant community and the contents of thePlan are described. Third, a monitoring system, based onthe literature reviewed in Chapter 2, is proposed.In Chapter 4, the proposed monitoring system isimplemented for the Mount Pleasant industrial area strategy.First the industrial area strategy is described and the data6Chapter 1. Introductionrequirements for monitoring the strategy are specified.Finally, data for monitoring the policy for residential usesin the industrial area are collected and analyzed.The final chapter first summarizes Chapters 2, 3 and 4.Next, the implications for monitoring and planning are drawnfrom the case study findings and from the experience ofimplementing the monitoring system. This discussion leadsto some general conclusions about plan monitoring. Thechapter ends with suggestions for further research.7CHAPTER 2PLAN MONITORING THEORY AND PRACTICEIn Chapter 1, it was suggested that monitoring does notreceive detailed attention, either in planning texts or inplanning practice. The purpose of this chapter is to reviewthe theory and practice of community planning and tounderstand and clarify the role of monitoring. The firstsection takes a look at community planning with theintention of providing the context for monitoring incommunity planning. The following sections examine thetheory and practice of monitoring, present a general planmonitoring model, and discuss each component of that model.The final section summarizes the chapter and provides thebasis for designing and implementing a monitoring system inChapters 3 and 4.2.1 PLANNING THEORY A1\ID PRACTICEIn this section, community planning is reviewed interms of urban land use planning as practised in Canada. Adefinition of planning is followed by a brief history ofplanning practice. A rational planning model is thenpresented. A discussion of the limitations imposed bycomplex planning problems provides the context for communityplanning and plan monitoring.80 Cl) ft CD 0 H CD Dl (Cl Dl ft Cl) 0 S CD ft H S CD S Dl Cl CD Dl H Dl 0 H, Cl) 0 S CD Cn 0 I-HftH-H Dl ft H-Cl) H Dl H ..J(1tiH-JHHftHCl‘rJ(QtiC)Cl)ftLJMCL)ft5Dli-OH-CD0hhCD10<HDl0H0<CD0H-ODfr<HH03Di3Cl)ftDlDlI-CDHClCl‘00H-H-H-1CDC)CDftJCDHHH-d3CDiC)CDI-LftH-CD0Cl)3CD0C)çftH((QCDH-CD‘iiDiH-Cl5H-XIICl)Cl—-ClCDH-HHC)CDDi(QDiDi5tiCl)CDDiCDCDCD(QDiHCDfrftDl-(Q5CDF--C)fttiDiCDH-CDti3DiH-t1ClH-I—LCDft0ClC)ftClDiF-ft3ftCl)jiCD0—H-H-H,DiH-C)CD3III—aCDH-0ClH-3DiHCDftClftC)H-0‘ti0C)0ft‘tift(Q<C)ftHCDH-H,03H,0C)H-I-C)Cl00‘<DiCD3<0Cl)DiCl)CD0ftCDCl)H,HCl)ftH-IIHftCDftH-CltiH-00Di<50Di00H-ftClH-H-0ftCDCD0di11Cl)CD5H,<tiCl)CD00IiH,f-315Cl)CDClCI)ftH-HC)H,CDDiH-0HH-C)CDtQDiIU.ftDiC)‘OHCDftfttiH-Cl)0ClCD3CDC)0DiH-Cl)CD—IDiCD“<0ftS-ftDiCl)0H,I-’Cl)ftCDClCl)‘-.0ft3CDH-CDCL)CDH-ftftI—’5CDH-Cl)•-H-‘tift‘CICD0h3CDH-H-5iDi0Di‘WClCl)HftCl)‘CIDi(.QHC)CDft‘CICD0ODtQCDDlDiCD0ftH3H-CD“<CDCl)ClC)H,—lH,53H-DlH,H-HDlCDCDH-H-CDtiI-DiH-CD300“<(QClftH-ftH-ClCDtiH-I-(I)ftDift<0C)5CDDiClCDCl)ftClCl)Cl)DiftH-CDH,DiCDti<ft0ClCD(CDCD‘-0H-IiII‘CIHHCDH-ftH-ftCD-0DiDiCl<CDHHHH,‘<H0CDDi5H-ftDiIII—CDCl)C)Cl)DiDi‘-<0iC)i‘CI0tiH-C)CDCD3Dift3ftfttiftClHH,H3DiftCl)H-CD•Cl55CDH-CDtQH-DiClHH-CD05Cl)H-Dl‘1DiCD335CL)CIHH-0<ftii‘CICl)—.ClCDft(Cl)CDDiCDC)DiDiDlH(QCDftH-CDCL)Cl)H-Di‘-<HCDftC)3CD0‘CII-DiftH-Cl)ftCl)DiDiftJDiHH003‘CIH-DiC)0(CDIIDiH,Cl)CD5DiDiH,ClHH5ClCDft0H-‘1DiCD(0Di5DitQCl)CDd-CDH0CDhHCDH-ftftClCDClHtQDiHftC)H-DiiS3‘CICDCD0ftCD<0CDH‘-0H-ft‘CIH-h1‘tiDiC)‘1DiDiftftODftftCQClCl)[305CDftCDCDftHDiHJC)Di0=0tCl)-Cl)<DiCD0CD<CD-Cl)H-<II5Cl)Di(DiiC)Cl)C-.-.)CD—-.H-DiDi0-DiCDftDiC)C)ft0ftI-Di5CDI-CDC)Cl)Di0i—-.i•<CDDitQCl)Cl)CDCDClftftft500CD‘ClCDCDH-CDH5H5CDCDtQCDC)ftCIDiC)c0ti0HH-ft-DiIQH-CD0CDCDiCD3iCDCDCD‘-ftftCDCDCl5---H-ClCDClCl0“<‘CIDiH-ft-H-HHCl)‘<H-CDH:ixChapter 2. Plan Monitoringor where the private sector cannot provide public goods andservices at a socially acceptable standard.In the late 19th century, planners were concerned withimproving living conditions in industrial cities (Leung1989:5) . Regulations regarding water supply, sewagedisposal, sunlight, fire protection and housing conditionswere enacted in the interests of health and safety. Sincethen, many more elements of public interest have beenconsidered in planning, for example efficiency, equity,environmental protection, recreation and visual amenity.Today, “modern planning is applied to the full range ofproblems that arise in the public domain” (Friedmann1987:24) . Planning is now practised at all levels ofgovernment in areas related to security, the economy, socialwelfare, the environment, regional development, land use,and transportation.Over the past three or four decades, debate in planninghas revolved around determining “what” should be planned,“how”, “by whom”, and “on whose behalf” (Hudson 1979:387;Bracken 1981:13) . Land use planning has adopted a goaloriented and issues-based approach to problem solving andencourages public participation. Although primarilyconcerned with land use and development, community planningalso addresses a broad set of social and economicobjectives.10C)C)oo H I-I Dl0 C) oCD CD I- -Dl U) < CD C) Di pi i I- çt Q CDH, h H, H- ClC) oH- CDDi U)HCrb CD0I-C)H0DlCDHIQU)CDCDHCD‘-H-<CrH-CrIU)CDHH-‘<:CDDiH-bC)HDl(I)H-CD‘1Cl-CD0Dl0HIiH,C)HiH-t30DiH,CrHI-jIH-H-H-IIC)CDC)“<H-U)HDlDlHH-I-CrCL)0CDH-‘tiC)Q.tQHCrCDDlU)DlCr3CDCOU)CDQDlHU)Cl0•U)Cl0CDH-U)0CDH,,—rQHDl H-CDCDDli<H(tC)CDDlHCDClClDlCDCD0‘ciC)H,‘ciH-H,I-U)00H-Ifr<0C)H-CD:iCDCrClU)H-0U)H,H DlHU)‘c3(cCrDlHC)DlH-CDHClClHH-U)CD0H-<1‘-H,CrH-H,H,H-U)c-rH-CDH-C-)Cl)0CDC)HCrDlDl—ClH-Ht-0ClDlDi3tlH,U)HClCrDlDlH-Cl)3U)Cr3çH-D(QC)HC)CDU)0H-tiH,DlDlHU)H,DlNU)hi0CrCrDl U)H-H-CDDlCr3CrF-(-Q‘ciCDIiI—LQC)DlciCDH‘—I-i<‘dC)ClIDlIHII‘ciCD‘ciDlDi0‘CrH0U)H-H1:-ItQ-0C)CD‘-C Dl,—r0Cl(CCDH,0H-C)HC)U)(0H-03CrCD‘C)0CtCDiH,FCICr0U)F1‘ciH‘ci03CDU)ci0C)CD•HH,H-ClH-H,C)HH-f1DiC)0ClCD 0 H, H Di H tQ Cr CD 0 ‘-C H-CD U) Di I-i CD Cl H- U) C) U) U) CD Cl H CDI\)Cr‘dU)‘ciH-0HU)Di‘-CH,H-3CDF1CDI-i0CDCtH-•CrI-U)ClC)CDC)‘ci)ClH-CrCDCDIiI-CH-HHCDC)‘ci‘CDi‘ciDi3U)ClCrCrI—CCrDiC)HCDCDCDHU)C)W‘--CDlU)ClI-CDiI-CH-I-jC)CrCDC)3H-‘cit-CH-H-0DiCD,—rI-CH-U)CrDiH-ClH,H-CD‘CICrjC)Di0H,Ct“l0CDClC)-0iCDH-IIII0H-<I-C0H-I-CCrHDiCl)0CDCDH-I-01H,Cl0CDCDDiCDU)<C)0H,U)U)CiCrH-DiCDH,DiCDClDiCDCiCrH‘C)CtHCiCJU)DiCr‘ci00DiCDI-CJI-CCi0Ci—‘CICDCD0H-H,<ClHCDI-C<CC)0Dio<C0I‘UCDH-dCiCiC)0<C0‘1Cl‘CIHHC)u<IHH-Ct0DiDi‘-<C0CDCl<CtJHCiCrCDI-CH-<H-<‘CIH-ClCDCiCrH-U)CDH0<CC)CrH-CiCD‘-CDlCiH-H-H-CiCDLQClCiCiCiCDDlCDU)CiCD0H-ti‘CIH-H,CDH‘CSI-HCiCiClC)0I1DlDiCiQCD‘CICl0C)0C)CiH-HU)<CDiClCrCiU)H-CrDl0CDCDHH-H-CiCiCi‘-CI-HC)C)CiH-U)CiCDCi‘<CCDCD(QU)C)CDHDiC)CiHCDCD0H-CtCr(Q‘-0CiHHi0DiH-—JCrCDH,ClCDCl0Cr‘-0•C)H-C)CDCiDiCiJCrC)DiHCD0CDH-•H,‘tI00‘-3ClDiDi0H-I-IjCl‘-<HQHCr0‘<Ci‘CIDlH<CH-0H-H0H-H-H<1C)DiClU)CDCDDiCiCDCDI-CHClClU)Di<CHCiH‘:<,DlCDIChapter 2. Plan Monitoringnot require it to have a plan, the City did recently producetwo documents that approximate a city-wide plan. The first,Goals for Vancouver (Vancouver 1980), is a statement ofbroadly-based public goals and their policy implications forthe development of the City of Vancouver. The seconddocument, The Vancouver Plan (Vancouver 1986), provides astrategy for managing change in core area employment, cityhousing, transportation, and urban environment. Thisdocument however was not officially adopted by City Council.As with virtually all municipalities, land use anddevelopment in Vancouver is controlled by zoning anddevelopment by-laws. In addition, Vancouver has officialdevelopment plan by-laws that govern land use anddevelopment in six sub-areas surrounding the CentralBusiness District. Some Vancouver neighbourhoods have localarea plans which are policy documents similar to officialmunicipal plans.Planning in the lower mainland of B.C. also provides agood example of the notion of a hierarchy of plans (Leung1989:218; Riera 1979:3.25). At the regional level, theGreater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD) has produced astrategy for region-wide land use planning, now called“Creating our Future” (GVRD 1975; GVRD 1990). Of particularnote is the Regional Town Centres policy which encouragesdecentralized office development in selected suburban120HCtP1Di1”)NHMiLDCl)0‘tJH0HDiiL\-)H0DiHDiCrOCDJCDI-H-H-H-H-CD)H0iWC)C)CDdCll-HFilJCDiCD=DiH-LQH-H-H-HX‘CDCDCl0CD0L-çiH-C)rj—rCl)C)DiCD‘-1Cl)IIH-tQtit3(QDiDlCDClH-C)C)Cl)0C)ClDiHHClHC)H-CI)Crl-00CJ)CrDiDlDiIDi0HCrC)H-H-H-HH-HCDMiDiCD0CrHCr‘tiCDCrCD0MiDi‘ti<I-LHH-Cl)H-H-DiHCl)HClH-IC)H-CrCtH-CDtQDiC)H-0CrDiCDoiC)H-H-tiClH0‘tiCl)H-CDCrCrDi00IC)H-ClDiCr<0(C)DiCDCl)3oDiCrhMi3HH•MioCDH-Cl)‘tiMiH<Cl)<H-IiHMiMiH-000CD0CD‘oCrDiC)0‘tiCDo(C)MiMi,QCl)II—1DiCDhH-<ClHH-CDHHtC)0CDUiCl)tiH-CrCDDi(C)j3c-rHDiDiDiCtCDCI)0-‘-CDDi<DiH3JCDC)o‘—J-Cl)H30-CD-Ct3CD00H-Cl)ClDiCDC)HHH-tiDiMiH-00I-CrHCDCr<CDCDH-0HHi-cMiCr(C)CH-ClC))Iti<Cr3Di‘<CD(C)!-MitiCl)DlClCD10CDH-CDCl)El))H-CDoCDC-tCDCl)Di0Mi(C)H-0C)rrCtH-H-IDiH-Cl)CD00H-I-JCl)0f-t(C)ClHCDDi,—tHCl)Cl)ClClDiCDCDDi3H-CDH-Cr‘DCt(C)H-CrCDH<HCl0Mi0l.QH-CDODCL)l’jH•Cl)HHHH-IW0MiH-0ti•J0‘-0‘CDCrCL)‘tiCDCDCDMiCrDi—CDCDH(C)CrC)ClCDDi•0H-ClCl)DiHH-0C)Cl)H0—ClH-HDi0oDiCrCr‘‘lCliC)CDCDCl)Cl)3Cl)H-H-CD‘tiI-ICDHC)DiClDiCDCr0<‘HCrH-Cl)‘<H-Ho,C)Cl)DiCDCDC)H-‘LCl)ClMiH-••30ClIIc-rDiCl)ti‘tiCDDi•Mi<H-CrCflCDCrCrClHCDHH-DiDi1JH-H-Cl)ClDiDiDiC)CrCrCl‘-CDCl)0ClCDI-CrC)CL)CD(C)CDH-ClH-HCl)CD‘-ICr0‘ClDiDiCl3DiHH-IIHCl)l-H-(C)DiDiCt(C)Di0H-Cl)LOiCDCrDiiCl)HH-CrClHODCD‘ClDiCDMiMi0c-rDi<H-CDCl-DiCDHCrHMiCDCrCD<HtiCD—-Cl)Dil-jc-rH-03CD‘-EDCt3DiCDCD0El)H-0C)‘tiMiCDCr(C)MiMiDi0Cl)<1DiCDClH-H-0C)Mi0CrMiH-H-Cri00CDH-hH-H0DiCl‘ClCr(C)3MiC)C)Cli-cCDCr0DiCDDiH-CDCDClH-Cl)hHDi0CDH0CDMiCl)CDftClH-HH-’CDClCDCDCl0CDCl)‘-0CDetiC)<CDiCDC)cxcCDCDiH-Cl0HHftft‘C)U)H-H-0H-0Cl)ft•I—’ftC)CDClCDiCl)0U)F-ClftF-H-CDIF-CDQ‘H,IC)0CDH-ilCDftb1<CDCl(0iftH,U)CDH-H-CDU)U)C)kiCDH-H-0CD[DU)CDC)—i-lCl)H,.H,tC)ftH-ftIçI)C)CD0H-IftCl)H-0Cl)CDCl)U)iU)H-hjH-HU)fl0IL’ihj5Cl)U)0--<:IHClF-Cl‘1‘-<C)CDftH-ftCDIcCD0I—iCl)‘0000Cl’EnI5‘CIClCl)Cl(CH-‘CiF-U)H,H,ftCl)‘1CDC)CDfr’CD0ClH’U)H-U)Cl)0CD‘CIU)Cl)H-CDCl)0CDiH,H,CDC)&C)ClClCD0‘1CDU)ft0U)CDCDftC)ClH,H-hhftCl0000CDCDCDH-CD0H’Cl)H,ifti0çtCD0U)‘CIiH’H-Cl)I—’U)C)iClH,CiU)‘1ftH-CDCDCDCDH’H-ftH-ftftCD‘CII-iQU)ftftftH,U)CDClIIH-H,U)‘-<CDU)CDCDClH,CD0U)0H-CD0CDftC)-‘C)LI—iH,CD‘tiCDCl)U)0HIICl‘CIC)‘CI‘CI)iH-C)I-0ftCDU)Cl)CDCl)0CDfthiU)ftH-U)CD0<Cl),QH-C)ftIIU)0ftQU)C)H-‘CI0H-H-ftCDC30iiftU)CDClCl)CD‘1U)0ClHH’iCDCl)U)CDH-CDH-‘CICD-3EnCDU)ClH’ftU)U)0ftH’—HHCDH-C‘Cl)CDI-’H-Cl)ftH-’I-i<CDCl)3Y‘-0Cl)H-F-ftft0Cl)H’CDU)0)Cl)H-ftCDH’Cl)U)<F-’Cl)c-lCDH-CD0’‘iCl‘-<fthiH-ftCDIIH’H-H-H-Cl)0ClCDH-U)(CDH,CDU)EQft0iCDU)0C)00t5H’iClEQC1H-Cl)ftH,H’‘CIhiClH-Cl)C)Cl)0CDCDft0)ftH-ft<Cl0<ftU)U)Cl)Cl)0ohiCDH-ftU)H’C)EQCD‘CIH’CDH-0H-JhiH-‘CIftClCl)<U)0C)iU)—Cl)0)hihiCDCDU)H,CDftH’‘CI0‘CI0CDEnClCDCD0CDCDCl)ftJCl)‘CIH--ClCl)Cl)H,CIftH-U)hi‘CIhi0hiftftCDC)U)H-hiCDCl)CD00hiCl)CDCl)CDClH--H’U)ftC)Cl-ClEQU)CDCD00ClF1ftCDH-F--’IiCDftEQEQChapter 2. Plan MonitoringVerify, [Define, and/ Detail the I____________ I_____________________________________________________IProblem—‘\ II I_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________I1 I 2 III Monitor I i / Establish I IPolicy I—— Evaluation I I0comes, H Criteria II I I II I I I$ 1 I II II III I I5 I i I II Display and I II I Alternative —Select among I i IdentifyI Alternative I I I PoliciesL Policies II ILIII I14I EvaluateI Alternative[ PoliciesFigure 1. A Rational Planning ModelThe next section describes the complexity of planningin the “real world”. The purpose is to introduce thecurrent view of community planning practice and todemonstrate the importance of 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2. Plan Monitoring2.1.5 Implications for Planning and MonitoringGiven the characteristics of planning problems, thereis now general agreement that planning practice has to bemore cognizant of and responsive to change. It has beenargued that planning should adopt an “evolutionaryperspective” in dealing with constantly emerging socialissues (Friedrnann 1987:167), that it should strive for“flexibility, adaptiveness, and continuity” (Sutton1979:22), and that it should become a “more managerial,continuous process of review and adaptation to policy”(Bracken 1981:15)These arguments call for a cyclical or iterativeplanning process in which monitoring plays a crucial role.If the first six steps of the rational planning model arecollapsed into the decision-making function, we get asimplified planning model consisting of three majorfunctions: decision-making, actions (implementation) andmonitoring (feedback), as shown in Figure 2(Riera 1979:3.5). As depicted in this model, a decisionleads to action which has an impact on the community, andmonitoring collects information about the community and itsexternal environment. The cycle is completed when thisinformation is fed back to the decision-making process whichin turn may modify the actions of the planning agency.19Chapter 2. Plan MonitoringOUTCO1CSCT I ON SINFOR1PTIONfONITORINGFigure 2. A Continuous Planning Model20Chapter 2. Plan Monitoring2.2 PJJAI\T MONITORING THEORYThe previous section described the community planningcontext and introduced the concept of plan monitoring. Thissection reviews the systems theory of monitoring. First, aworking definition of plan monitoring is provided. Next,monitoring is described according to the systems theoryconcept of feedback and control.2.2.1 What is Monitoring?Monitoring is sometimes seen as data collection andinformation processing (Sutton 1979:24). However, theliterature reviewed here indicates that for monitoring to beuseful to a planning organization, it should do considerablymore, as illustrated by these three definitions:A monitoring system provides the information withwhich progress towards plan objectives can beassessed, and also supports specificrecommendations for plan changes. (Ragatz 1983:2)A strong monitoring system is needed to collectand analyze information, and to give early warningof actual and potential problems. It should alsobe capable of indicating whether or not policiesare working satisfactorily, and, if not, why not.(Calgary 1977:6)Given also the broad intention that ... planningshould become a more managerial, continuousprocess of review and adaptation to policy,[an] essential concept in this role is that ofmonitoring, whose broad function is to assess ongoing change, to measure the impacts experiencedas a result of implementing plans and policies,and thereby reveal the need for, and requirementsto be met by, the plan ‘review’. (Bracken 1981:15)21f-I-DlCDCD H CD aDlf-I H-CDa Dl HH I-L oCD CD CD‘- 3 Di f-If-I--H Iif-I-(cCDU) f-IIDlDlftI-Hf-I-0I’-)U)j0 H,0 frf-IDlCD U)CD<DiU)f-If1H-CD DlU)I_<CDU) f-I- CDH0U)H0o<‘-<H,—JCDU)o--Di-f-I-oDlDlCDHH—JU)C)HUiCDUiC)—f-I-U)Di0U)H,c-I-Ht:1JCDCDa 0DlbDiDlII$1It0$1CDHDlHC)CDHCDçt(-IU)1<H-CDU)0:ioH-HU)0-0CDDlU) ‘-<H(DiH-Ci):iH-3ftf10(-1-CDCDCD0‘1CDf-I-U)I[-H-H-Dlf-I-CDH-HH(Nf-I-CDDlDiU)0f-I-U)f-I-hCD‘-<H-H,U)00f-I-I-iCD0Dl-f-I-HIU)c) Q.f-I-DlCDU)U)Dlf-IfrDl‘tf-I--CDCDI-DlC)DlU)f_I-1:-ICD00U)DlH-CD(QC)C)::31<00HC)H,H-H CDH-.CD xH,CDCDICD‘1‘1CDCD(p<DlH-DlH-H CDDiCDCDC)U)CDU)CDU)1<U)H-U)H-H,Dlf-I-f-I-CDCD(pCD(pCDU)U)U)U)o.I,<DloQ.U)U)aH-çtftf_I-H,CDCDI-.H,I-jDloCDU):3•U)HDlCl•H-iDlH,3C)IIU)Cl0oo‘<I-.U)U)f-IClçI-CDtif-tCDCDC)00HCDU)f-I-Cl‘tH-0DlI-CltiDl0CDCDU)C)Dl0CDHH-ftlU):‘ dU)U)f-I-CDCDI-<HU)U)0Hf-IC)CDH,CDçt0ClH ‘—CU)f-I-df-I-U)Dl0ftC)CD(--CoCD‘ClHHC)DlDlf-I-CD‘-<f-I-U)0f-I-H-IIH-CDoipU)H,0CDH,C)H-f-Ic-)ft 00 H-f-I- oF-‘--C‘HCD Cl)(pCDH-ClU)CD H,ftH-oH‘tif-II--CH-ooH-Cl)Cl CDH=ClII,H-CDC)CDDlClf-ItJ•CDDl C)f-I Dl c-ID) t3f-I-oCDft f-I‘--CCD‘ti 0I--CU)CDI)U) si0H ft U) 0 H,CI; ft CD Di U) CD CD Cl CD H, H CD Cl Dl U) Dl C) 0 IoL’J000f-I-o•H,(-‘CHLi.ClDlDlU)•a CDCDc-IH-I’)0C)‘-CQI-f-IH-H-CT)JCiitH-f-I-tiCD<I-<H,‘rJDlU)0CDQHbC)f-IHU)tiCDH0CDH•0CL)HI-CDiCDaU)3CDf-IDlCD(PH-f-If-I-ti‘JY’CD0Dlf-I-f-I-CDf-I-H-H,f-I-CDCDU)H,H-30ClCl)CDf-I-0f-I-H,a()0CiH-DlCl0f-I-oH,aCDtiH-Dl3CD<CDCDCDCD-H-lDlHC)HH0f-I-<U)DlDlCl‘tH-f-IiU)C)<DlC)CDCDC)tiCDU)0Htif-I-Dlf-I-DlH-DlCl)CD3f-I-C)CDCl‘-0f-I-<U)DlU)0H,H-CDaH0f-I-0Dlati00ClCDf-I-aaHCDoi-i0DlH-a‘-0aHHH-U)•t5H-CDHCDf-I-U)0DlHU)f-I-U)DiI<CD(QH-tiCD0ClDlU)CDDlaHClCDU)CDDlU)CDtiCDH-U)aU)a<DiH-f-I-CDDlU)f-IH-ClClH-ooCDCD3DlU)C3 Cl)H-U) CDHwH,C)DiCDH,‘t3Cl)C)C)0CD0CDCDCtCDfr’CD<DiCD0‘ClCDW1”)HiPDiCD00CDCDH-CDCl)ClCrCr1<C)Hb3HCDbH-CDCDDiCl)Di“lCl)DiI-i-0CDDi•DiClCDi—]HiH-DiC)H-‘<HC)tf-tC)CDCD0CDH0H-CDiCDClClCDCDDiH-CDCDOCDC)CrcICrCDCD—0Cr0CDCrI—iDiCDHDi1CDDiCr<H-CDHH-DiDiDiCDjCrH-CDH-‘<LO(Q<H-CDd0H-CrCDClCDC)CrCDCDCDClI—hCnCl00CDWCDCDCDCrOH—DiC)HCDC)H-0iCDH-HCrC)f-tC)H-H-CDiCD0—CrH,H-i-hQCD3CDC)<0H-f-tCDC)HCl)Cr0CDUiCDlH0CDDiDiDiH-CDCDI-IClCrHCl0CDCrH-3CDf-tCD—DihCrjj0H-I—iDiH,H-QCrHH0Cr‘Z3ClCDCDDiQ00l-H0I-t5DiHH0f-r5CDCDCrf-tC)JH,Hi-C)H3DiDiHC)I’<H<DiDiCDCDHDi—ICDQCrH-CD‘-<H-CDf-fH-C)Cl‘-0H-0CD•H-CrHH-DiCDC)H,=30CDCl3H,CDd•-0DHf-th00l\)‘<0—1HDi—1H-H-H-0H(-rH-CDDCDH,CDI-—j(1o0I-CrI-‘0l-C)Cr—CDCrCt—HQCr•.H-C)I-I00CDH•CDCDDiCDI-j“<WCt0CD0H,‘-0HDiH-ClCrCDCD‘tJCDCDI-H,Cr(-rHCD-QH-3CDH-H-—llDiHDiCDCDLQCDDi01’JC)C)CDCD0CDCfCDCfUiC)CDCDC)0Di0DiH-CDC)CDCl—DiH-CrCD‘0HHCrCrDiCDI--HIC)IH-[-ClHH-CrC)CDHH,JDiCDCDHH-iJCr0CDCDCD00Di-rcrCDCD(C)CDDiClCll-ClCDDi>ClCrDiC)CDCDCD0CDlH-H-HCr0CrDiCDC)CDhCDCDDiDiCD0hCl)0HC)CrCrMif-fCDCDHI-Cl0Ct-CD0(C)IICDHCDIf0CDhHCDf-fI-H-H-CDiDiCD00DiCDClIICD0DiCDClCr<l-H->(CD0hDiCDCDHCrCDCDCDCrIDif-rHCDC)CDC)ClCt0CDC)f-rDif-fDiCtIICiCDCD0CDCD0DiCD3tiCDCDH-H-IICDCDH,Di3H-HfrClII300C)ct•HCr3CD0CD0Cr(C)C)0CrDif-fHI-hI0H-C)I-IH-CDCDi0CrCD0Di0CDCD0IPI-CDCDC)CDCDCDH,HH,CrQ.CDHiDiCDDi<CDCDCDHCDDiCDhICDtiCDCDCDhICDf-rDitCDCDHH-C)CDCrCrCD‘-<CrhIClCDCrCDDiNH-CDtiCDCDCDDiI-IhIDiCrF-0CrClClH-J(C)Crk<CDH,CrCDDiDiCDH•CDCrHCDI-0CD0DiDi 3Chapter 2. Plan Monitoringinputs System______________________________t I_____control performancevariables indicatorsjadjustmonitorcontrol cont nuevariablesRorinindicatorscomparepredictive____________indicators tomodelperformanceindicatescriteria_pfcontrotrolappropriateresponseFigure 3. Feedback and Control in an Industrial ProcessIn the case of a thermostat, the house can be thoughtof as a system whose internal temperature is to bemaintained at a desired level. The thermostat monitors thetemperature and compares it to its internal setting, the24U]‘ti(0Cl)gii‘CS‘CScttjH-C)COCliC)çtH-CDCtC)Q‘CDHCliCDH-HI-H-0‘<Cl0CDCO30CDCDCDfrt<1-5Cl)0CDCDCOCl)COiH-CDH-CDCDCrCr‘rJç-t‘CSH-CrH-H-01-5HC)H-51II1-5CDf-rCDCD01Cl)Cl)1-5C)(Q0CtCL)ClCDCDHC)0CD(I)I-CI0H-H-CDCrCOCli—‘CSH-IICL)COi0HCO51Cr‘-<Cli51H-Ct3COH-H-COCrCl)Cr<151H-Cl)Cl)LQH-IIH-H,CtH,CDCl)HCOCDCD<COH,CDC)CrI-Cl)CL)I-H,H-H-Cr<CDCr‘CSCDClHl’l.C50CDCDf-r5))H-0CrCD‘-O0H-CD‘CS(I)C)H-f-r0Cl)C)51—.51CO@,Cr5100CtCrCtCl)51Cr0CDHCDCSCt-o(Q<CD‘CSCD‘CSI-hI-hCD0-CDH-HC)H-Cl)Cl)<11-5CDClCDH0CrC)=C)CrODH(CD0(HCDCtf-rçr1-5H-0CDO,H-0HC)H-Cl’51J53COCOJH00COCDCDCOCl)0CD‘1CSCD‘<H-CDH,1H,HH0‘--H‘CSCOCDCl)ClCOi-‘CSCl)COCl)COCDC)C)CrcCrCrCrCr05))COHCDCOI-CrCD1-500DCDJC)CDH-CrCD5JCl)H-CL)CrCDCDCDCrClClCliCDHc-rCl)C)Cl)COCD(1H-H-iCDCDCl)ClCO(C5CD3CDCOClCr‘CS0CtHCt><C)H-‘CSCl“<‘CSCr0CDHCD0‘-0Cl)5))‘CSH-0C)Cl)CrCOCDCl)Cl)CO-,I-CrC)1-5c-tH-0‘<a,-rIjCrCrH-•‘CS‘-0CDCDCrCD‘-<—i-0(I)Cl0CDCliCl)CD1-5••CDCOCD1-5C)CrCrCDCr1-5CrCDCX’01-5Cl)COH-C)ClCDCDI-SCrCl)CDHCl0’,I-SH-HCDCOC)CrCDH-H-1-5CO1-5QC)itH,H-—53510H-1-5<CO530CrCDCD0ClC)(I)Cr53CDHCl)—CO531-553CDCrCtHCrCDCr51f-rH-CrCDCl)Q0CrCl-’53CD-5Cl)0i-rH-CDC)I-51-5Cl)53Cre-1-553Cr0H,H5353-CliCD0JClCOH-530CDCDCDCrU)HCl)053CD53ClHCl)Crf-tCDC)‘-5CtCr53Cl)COCrCl)0Cl)C)0CDCl)c-rH530Cl)0CrI—50CDF-’H-H,r-r0H-Cr53‘-0CDCDCrCrCf51CDH-Cl)Cl)Cr‘CSCDClCL)JCDUiCl)5JCD53CrH-Cr‘-<CrHCD<CDCDC)H-CSCrCD<5CDtC)COH-=53ClHCDCO053CDCDH-CD0Cr53CD53c-r-‘Cr•H,5))I—5H-1-5tQCD-0Cl)Cl)Cl)CDC)CDCrCDCDH-H-C)H-1-5CD53‘-50‘-5CD<5<5CO53‘CSCrH-Cl)CSHCl‘CSCl53535353ClH-CDCD-553Cr53CDHCD00H-Cl)Cr53Cl)CO1-5Cl)051H-CD‘<5ClCOCOH,HH‘1CDC)CSCDHH,CD<1I-S•C)COH-CD‘-00CDCDClCrCOC)C0Cri-so’,HCD‘<5•H-Crb0531-5CD01-5C)H>5H-0CDCl)U)CD‘<553c-rCli51H,bCOHCDCr533H-53H-1-5CrCl)Cl)51CDCl0CDCr0CDCO535311030HClCr53Cl)53I-5CliI1-5HCl)Cl)H-53Cl)ClH-CDH-CrCO53ClI—’CD53Cl3CD1LQ—Chapter 2. Plan Monitoring(DISTUR.eANC__(poposAL.)MODEL,”‘STEMJCOMPARON1fjLI0N I I____I INO. y ILi— ——(CITY)Figure 4. A Planning Control ModelThe above planning control model is similar to thatapplied to industrial processes in the sense that the actualstate of the system is compared to the intended state and anodel of system behaviour is used to predict the outcomes ofcorrective actions. However, in reality, the city is acomplex system containing many parts and connections where260)C)CDQCDcDD)-Ji-hc5-JCDU1H-WH-MOCDC)HI‘-3cnH,oQ<Hi.CD.P)(DCDCD-CD.i’<H-•S01cCDCD<CD<lhhPJ‘-CDL-IQIIctct(DH-tC)CDH-HjC)H-tDC)F-CDçrfl-I-I.I_iOCDfrH-H-H,H-OF-’CD0Qçt3F—J$(D00(D0C)0CDCDC)H-IFlPJCD(DCD<CDCDH,HjictF-fl-CDCtQ.H-H,CtH-Cl)CDF-CDiF—)C)CD0Fl0HQI-)FlCDC)CD11•C)CC0)P)CCOCDFlyCt$iQ(tFl0-hCDCDF-’CD0rr<IJ.03C))rt3—LCDHHCD‘<CDPJHCD1CDrtCt(-t)CDCDCl-OH-H-l-ty’Cl-IQflrtH-CDCDiI—h0(D<-P)H-H-<FlQ-FlCDCD(DCD0)C)oOFlI)C)H-EM,Fl)CDi&C)CDCDCDCDCDiCflI-‘lCDH-•IIcCCDCDCDFlQM,1tT1<CDCJCD)CDCDCDft))H-FlH-Fl•H-JD)P)H-U)P1CDIjI—i•i01C)P1CDhhC)H-c.IJCDCDF—’CJ)iCDrrIiQil-hH-H,H-ctHH-IIII‘<CDk<Q-CDI.’-f-CC)iFlI-fliH-HP1PJH-CDI—Ci)1CD<C)U)CC‘.0OcCQOH-0CDCY(Of1C)OCt•ctP1OrtHU)0CDCDiICDH-I--HCDCCCDCDFl3CDFlWCDH-P)CDOCDHFl•H-CDCDP)f-CHCDcl-cl-FlP1i—IH-P11—hi-oCDFlPJFlCDCDCDHI-h0CCQCD•OFlCDPf-CCCF-CD‘<H-CDCDH-1DiDlDlCDC)CDC)ç)FlCCcCCDCCII‘<CDCC•CDCDCD•bCD01CC0CDH,0)CDCD-C)HCCH-fl<DlH-OflC)CDH-(CD0OQDlYH-CDCCH-O‘<Hct1-lCDQdC1FlPICD‘—i-cCCDCDHb0CDCDCDH-FlF—CDH,CDCDCCCDfl-C01CDDlCDctFlFlCDP)CDH-0FlF—FlC)FlQ.CDH-1i..tJCD<C)<YC)FlFl‘<0CDCDCCCDCDI—’HP11-lCDCDCDF—H-p)H-cl)DlHCDCDH-Q.CDH0)CDHFlCDCDCDHCtD)(QQH-<ciH-bCD‘<HD)CtCCf-CCDH---1QCDH-H-0FlCDC)Fl0U)C)H-D)H-C)-p1CCH-C)CDCD<CDH-CDH-CFHCDCDCCOH-OCDDlPCDC)CCCDQ1--hQCDtH,H-ii1CDCl-iCQH-FlQ.FlHCDH-iOCDCCCDH-Q-C)CDH-H-CDCDCDPJCDU)H0H<FlCDM,ct’-<C)‘<C)CDCDD)H,CCCD,QCDH-H-CDCCCCCDH-PiCDCCP1CDFlH-•><f-CD)ftiCtH-OCtCDC)CD0’<•CDD)CDCDCDCDCD0CDCDCCCD-HHFlQCDHCD•CDCDH-Cl-H-H-•0CCC)H-C)D)cP1D)CDCDCDU)H-H-CCH-FlIiC)-H-CCCDLiCCHCDCCFliICCC)1<HC)H-D)CD‘C5(CCDHCDFlC))CC0<CDCD0CCH,CDQ•H-CDCDCDCDCl)oo0)‘-‘1s:i:iCDl-’0CDCDH-C)ft<H-ftH-H-H0MiC)QCDhH-H-o)H-CDHCDC))i1)tQftMiH-F-MiH-‘<CDHI-’)CDH-Cl)Ci)))H-$1CrftCD I-H-Cl)HhC)CDI)CDftHjI-il))1:1)h’0CDftCDH-00oC)Cl)0CD QQCDftCr•CD<0HCDCDCl)frft3Cl)—JCl)H-CDC)CDftftoC)MiCDCD0Cl)H-0Cl)Hf-rHCtC)HoF-0Cl)Cl)h0CDftH-C)Cl)Cl)H-‘dCDftH’daCD•(c:lCl)f-r00Cl)0MiCDH-MiLI.C)CDft(Q‘ZC)I-H-Hft0C)Cl)H-Cl)0Cl)Cl)ftCl)Cl)liiiCD0Cl)Cl)<:HCl)ftH-CDCDCl)CDftC)QCDCDC)ClCDC)IIH-HH-c-tCl)Cl)H-C)Cl)H-iftH(H-ftHl.Q0Cl)ftH-Cl)IHCl)F-’Cl)F-H-(Cl)tJH-ftCDHC)CDCl)Cl)Cl)QC)i0ft-l<110IC)H-Cl)MiH-0H-0H-0Cl)t3(QI-ftI—i-tQCl)IIl:j-CDC)Cl0C)0Cl)Hftft H-ftFt5M00<CD‘1Cli<ICD0Cl)CDCDCl)ft‘tiI-—-0HCl)Cl)MiClftCl)‘-<0JftCDCl)Cl)CDCDCDClftCDCDH-Cl)<Cl)ClC)C)Cl)Cl)CD0ft-‘Cl)hCl))LI.H-ftC)CDHCDIIl-H0C)C)CD0CDftCl)ft1HftCl)I-0CDftCl)Cl)0Mi0ftCDHC)Cl)C)CH-C)ftH-1I-CDCDCl)ftCD1JCl)Cl)Cl)C)Cl)H-H-tQCl)Cl)CDH-H-•Cl)0CDCl)Cl)HClCl)CD‘tiCDHCl)Cl)Cl)I- H H-HH-CDCDIiiCQCl0C)H0Cl)Cl)C)H-ftçCDCl) Cl)ftHCl)•0MiMioCl)00Cl)Cl)ftH-HftH-Cl):•Cl‘-CD‘<H-—NC)CD0ft-Cl)‘CiHMiHCDMiCl):x:H-H-C)ftH-‘<C)jo0 MiCQ CD‘-ftCl)0J•’ftCiCDH-HoCDC) 0Cl)0-MiCl)0H-H-FlftCDCliClFlCD(CCD<H-CD HCD00CDft‘CiH-Cl)Cl)Cl)ftCl)Cl) Cl) ft CD Cl)03CD II CD H-CD 0 MiH-ft 0 H Cl) Cl) ft Cl) Mi Cl) Fl Mi 0 C) Cl) CD Cl 0‘Ci 0 H H ft H- 0 Cl) CD 0 ft CD H H Cl CD Cl) ft 0 0 Cl Cl) Cl ft Cl) C) Fl CD Cli ft CD‘- CD Fl H ft Cl) H Cl CD 0 Mi ‘-al Cl) H CD H ft 0 Cl) 0 CD CD x ft CD ft CD H- ft CD Fl Cl) ft CD Cl) ft CDChapter 2. Plan Monitoring2.3 A PLAZ\T MONITORING SYSTEMIn this section, a plan monitoring system model(Riera 1979) is presented. This general model, describingthe monitoring component of the continuous planning modelpresented earlier, includes the functions consideredessential to link plan implementation and decision-making.This model will be used as the framework for the review ofmonitoring in the remaining sections of this chapter.Depicted in Figure 5 (Riera 1979:3.9), the monitoring systemmodel has four components or sub-systems:1. The information collection sub-system involves thecollection, processing, and storage of all types ofinformation.2. The technical evaluation sub-system is concerned withanalyzing the information, evaluating the importanceand implications of change, formulating actionpossibilities, and preparing advice.3. The advisory sub-system involves the communication ofthat advice to decision-makers.4. The improvement sub-system is responsible forevaluating the performance of the monitoring system andrecommending improvements. (Riera 1979:3 .7)29Chapter 2. Plan Monitoring-INFORMATION I IFROM THE I ICOMMUNITY I I OVICE•_________F04’___._ _____IMPROVEMENT______ ___II SUB-SYSTEMINFORMATION : 1FROM OTHERORGANIZATIONS iSUCH AS,MUNICIPALITYPOLICE ANDPROVINCIALGOVERNMENTFigure 5. A Plan Monitoring SystemAn application of this model in community planning isshown in Figure 6 (Ontario 1982:3). Note that the firstthree components (information collection, technicalevaluation and advisory) are included, if somewhatimplicitly. First, data relating to the assumptions and theperformance or outcomes of the plan are collected. Thesedata are then analyzed in order to determine if theassumptions remain valid and the objectives of the plan arebeing achieved. Components of the plan are reviewed if30Chapter 2. Plan Monitoringnecessary. Finally, advice based on the analysis isprovided to Council.Figure 6. Monitoring a Community PlanThe remainder of the chapter reviews the literature interms of each of the four sub-systems of the monitoringsystem model. Each sub-system is reviewed individually.In the form of an annual monitoring report.31Chapter 2. Plan Monitoring2.4 THE INFORMATION COLLECTION SUB -SYSTEMThe information collection sub-system is responsiblefor collecting, processing, and storing all types ofinformation. The first sub-section below describes a datacollection strategy that has been proposed in the literatureas a means of coping with the possibly enormous datarequirements. The second sub-section briefly discusses thetypes of information in order to provide the basis forreviewing the subjects of monitoring in the third subsection. This is followed by a discussion of data sourcesand processing methods.2.4.1 A Data Collection Strategy - Mixed-scanningAn attempt to collect, process and analyze all of theinformation that might be useful for plan monitoring wouldsoon become an enormous and probably endless exercise. Forthis reason, a data collection strategy based on the “mixedscanning” approach to decision-making (Etzioni 1968:Chapter12) is often advocated. The mixed-scanning approach has twocomponents: scanning and tracking (Sutton 1979:44-45,Wedgwood-Oppenheim 1975:10). The scanning componentinvolves a wide-ranging scan, with a low resolution ofdetail, of all matters of potential significance. Anyproblems judged to be significant are then studied ingreater detail. 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Plan MonitoringTable 2. The OECD List of Social IndicatorsSOCIAL CONCERN INDICATORHEALTHLength of life Life expectancyPerinatal mortality rateHealthfulness of life Short-term disabilityLong-term disabilityEDUCATION AND LEARNINGUse of educational Regular education experiencefacilities Adult educationLearning Literacy rateEMPLOYMENT AND QUALITY OF WORKING LIFEAvailability of employment Unemployment rateInvoluntary part-time workDiscouraged workersQuality of working life Average working hoursTravel time to workPaid annual leaveAtypical work scheduleDistribution of earningsFatal occupational injuriesWork environment nuisancesTIME AND LEISUREUse of time Free timeFree time activitiesCOIV11VIAND OVER GOODS AND SERVICESIncome Distribution of incomeLow incomeMaterial deprivationWealth Distribution of wealthPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTHousing conditions Indoor dwelling spaceAccess to outdoor spaceBasic amenitiesAccessibility to services Proximity of selectedservicesEnvironmental nuisances Exposure to air pollutantsExposure to noiseSOCIAL ENVIRONMENTSocial attachment Suicide ratePERSONAL SAFETYExposure to risk Fatal injuriesSerious injuriesPerceived threat Fear for personal safetySource: OECD (1982), reproduced in Roseland (1988).36CD<<Cl)C)Fl-I-t:IjF3ç-tL”)—.H<H-HS—PiCl)0CDCl)0C)Cl)•HCl)HCL)Cl)FtHCDHCl)H-Cl)FtCDo0C)HC0--CDH-H-Cl)CDH•—JU)0Cl)-.0CDtQC)FtFtLQI-I)WWCDhCl)U)H-0CliC)0LQ1<HCDFtCl)Cl)CD3HHFt-H-i0HFtl-•Cl)H-Cl)Cl)Cl)0H-tCCl)U)U)H-H-f-tCl)Ft0Ftl-oFtHCD—0H0MiCDCDCliMCl0ClihhU)b0Cl)FtU)HHl-l-Ft0FtFtCl)03MiCDFt<C)-0FtHCD0CDI-00--iFtH-FtH-OCDo<‘iiCl)O.Mi)MiCl)1JCD--JCD00ClODHMiC)LI.U)••H-CDODH-ClCl)H-0FtCDCICDH-0)LQ—CIH-Fth-LQH-0Li.HH-C)H0IQ0Cl)•Ft0Cl)C)CiCDMiH0FtCl)CDCD•Cl)H-30hHH-‘-i-C)00H-hIHC)H-H-&CDc-r0l-Cl)<U)FtU)‘jU)-oLQCl)CDC)i—a-H--CDH-UiCl)0CD00Ftl-FtH-CliU)H-Cl)hICliQ.Ftl-Mi><C)Cl)FtFt0H-CDFtFt(QCl)•U)Cl)3CD•CiH-0C)hI0<0H-CDH-C)Q.C3FtH—CliC)oC)<MiCDII0U)ClFt•NCDCD0HHH0U)H-3CiCDC)CD03HDCl)CDhIFtCDFtU)H-3lH-0)HU)MihICD)tQFtCDClLI.U)QFtUiC)H0Cl)h•U)C)H-Cl)FtH---CDCT)—C)Cl)—H-C)U)CDCl)CDU)FtHC)0H-h—0UiC)CD0FtC)3U)Cl)(-0FtFtCl)CiClI’ihIFtU)MiFtH-CiCl)Ft0)H-0FtCl)U)U)U)CiH-C)CDFtH<FtICiFtCDC)-.••3Cl)0Cl)U)Ft••CDhICl)H-C)ClHCD0Cl)ODU)CDH-CDFt0CDCl)FtFtCliCDU)CliFtUiU)Ft3Cl)ClFtH-IU)00ClCl)CDCDCDClH-FtFt0)Cl)C)Cl)MiH<<iCD>ClhI000—10iHhIHLOFtFtCDCl)CDhICltiU)L0)C)0)C)tiCl)‘tiU)H-CDCD0ODHCD0hHH-0U)U)0‘tICl)‘tHCD-<C)UiCDH-H-—tOMiFtIICDH-Cl0H-0Cl)MiH-)0Cl0)‘z3H-H-00FtU)Ft<H-l-HCl)hIH-(l)hICl‘tIFtH-Hk<0H-HFtH-C)•hICDhI0C)H-ClU)hIClCl)ZC)Cl)ClU)Cl)Cl)U)CD$)iFtCDCl)Cl)C)FtH-‘tiCl)FtCDHtiCDU)HHC)C)0Q)FtCiH-Cl<HCDCD‘ti0NhIo?‘jH0Cl)ClCDU)Cl)H,QCiCl)U)Cl)FtHO3Cl)hICD‘tihICliCiHJH-Cl)U)H-C)CD)U)CDCDFtCl)U)CDC)(H0H-H-YCiU)-U)H-Cl)FtCiU)FtCl00FtU)FtU)H-Cl)CiCiFtH-CDCl)CDCD0FtFtHCDhIJ0•HhIlH-0ClhIC)CD3CDI0CD-CD0U)CDSMiChapter 2. Plan Monitoringbeen defined as “formally and broadly worded statementsabout what we desire to achieve in the long run” (Patton1986:140) . Obiectives are usually “more focused andconcretely worded statements about end states” (Ibid.)usually with a shorter term outlook.The aim of an objective may be clear, such as “toincrease the availability of affordable housing” or “toincrease the use of public transportation.” But anobjective may be vague, such as “to improve the image of acommunity.” Communities will sometimes deliberately expresstheir objectives in vague terms for political or technicalreasons (Riera 1979:2.10). For example, “motherhood”statements, which all can agree with, will be adopted whenspecific statements would be mired in divided opinion. Orimprovement made toward a qualitative objective soundsbetter than failure to meet a numerical target.The most common purpose of plan monitoring is toevaluate change in a community in relation to the goals andobjectives as set out in a community plan or relateddocument. The usual approach to monitoring goals andobjectives is to develop indicators or formulate keyquestions that can be answered through data collection.Goals and objectives are most easily monitored when they areexpressed as quantitative targets. 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Plan Monitoringc) Policies and Decisions of Other OrganizationsThe policies and decisions of other public agencies,particularly those that impact on the community, should alsobe considered in deciding what to monitor. Agencies operateat all levels of government and significant decisions areoften made outside the community. For example, federal orprovincial decisions about funding co-op housing projectsare ultimately felt in the community. Another example isprovincial government decisions regarding road constructionor funding of public transit.d) AssumptionsThe assumptions that are made during plan making havealso been proposed as a subject of monitoring. WedgwoodOppenheim (1978:12) describes planning as a “process wherebyaims, factual evidence and assumptions are translated by aprocess of logical argument into appropriate policies.”Assumptions are made about social attitudes and values,forecasts, or the impacts of the policies and actions ofother organizations. To emphasize the importance ofmonitoring assumptions, Wedgwood—Oppenheim adds that “whenthe outcomes of a plan deviate from expectations it isbecause some of these assumptions were incorrect” (Ibid.)Where possible, indicators are used to monitorassumptions. 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CD CD x ft F-h CD U) CD a ft H 0 U) H 0 0 Dl ft U) 0 CD 0 F-h ft CD Di U) ft CDChapter 2. Plan Monitoringb) Actual -Versus-Planned ComparisonsAs the title implies, the approach involves thecomparison of actual plan or policy performance to predetermined targets. When actual performance data arecollected regularly over a period of time, this method isalso useful for assessing change. However it does not allowus to determine conclusively the extent to which change canbe attributed to the policy (Patton 1986:312)C) With-and-Without ComparisonsThe with-and-without approach is more experimental innature. It involves a before-and-after comparison of twogroups or areas, one with a program or policy and the otherwithout (Patton 1986:311) . An example of this method mightbe to compare the effect of modifying the industrial zoningin one area with another area where industrial zoning isunchanged.A true experimental design, one that permits theevaluation of cause and effect, requires the use oftreatment (with) and control (without) groups that arerandomly selected from the population. In real worldplanning situations, policies cannot be assigned randomly insuch a manner. Thus the with-and-without approach islimited by the ability to select two areas or groups thatare similar enough to reduce the effect of other factors.55H-CDU)(1)-Q<ftQHH-H-C)ftQ—XH-0‘—CDftH-CDCDDiCDi0H-<•—tiC)HfthC)ft<$1ftHCDDiCDftHCDH-CDCDiCDDH-DiCDH-‘1F-CD‘ftDiCD‘tiHft0ft1hiHC)0CDftDiDiC)Cl)H-0<H-DiDiQC)U)ft0b’CD0c-i-0‘tirr,hftftCDH-H-CDi03CrU)I0JftCDCDCDC)CDhftftft0U)HCDJ’CDftQH-CDCDCHCDCDDi0CDIH-FDiU)3DiDiH-CDCDQft<0I’-’-HC)ft0S0M-,U)U)F1CDDiC)DihCl)H-DiDiftDiC)0CDl-.o-‘tift0HH-jU)CDQiI•-Cl)‘ClU)CDc-i-U)DiDlCDU)<Di0CDH-Cl)Wl-HCDftDiIDDiHftU)M,DiU)H-CDH0ftftC)II<DiDi0H-H•U)U)C)Di1JH-CDCDDiU)<0U)CDDi‘ClLQ0C)ODiCD0Q<CDDiDiftCDH-Qoi-U)i-H-0H-‘ClFl=U)DiCIU)CDCDDiDi0t5-CDH-I—h0H-ftDiHftF-h0‘ClftCDDiH0—tiDiIIU)H-F-htiH-C)tJtYftCrH-Qi‘ClDi0ftFlU)DiH-0HH-frjC)DihC)U)C)CD‘Ci0CDH‘ClHCDftCD‘-<0ftftDi0DiCDDi0DiU)ftDiHCl)M-ftH-iIHCDHC)DiCDC)CDQ.00C)Cl)HDiQH-‘-<i-IftC)DiU)FftI-ICDH-M-,C)CDU)IU)rrC)FlCD0H-HCDc-rftC)<U)i-ICDDiH-FlFl‘ClHDi<CD0C)CDQFl0H-FlCDDI-CDUiDiFlU)0HHDiCDCCDDi0CDHDi3ftDiCDDi‘<C)U)C)tQb@,-<HDiDiIft<1Dift0U)‘—J-I-0••DiHCDC)CDFlCDH3U)H-DiftWH-U)M0QDiU)0ftU)HCDH-U)0I-h(QH-Di‘CSOH‘ClH-HCDCDCDU)HftC)—tiDiCDU)H-C)U)CDDi‘ClftQH-0ftCDM,C)X-C)ft0CDU)0CnHft‘Cl<H-QH3Dift‘ClC0HU)CDC)DlH-ftHH-HDiC)FlCDFlooCD‘CIC)C)HU)C)H-J’CDFlH-0H-U)I-3‘CIDl<<0DiC)CDftCDCDHHDiH-DiDiCDU)‘ClU)<H-U)H-0tYCrLQDiftDiIIU)CDCD<1CDU)CL)JftQftDi0DiQ‘ClCDCDH-U)CD‘ClDlQDlFlDiHFlft0FlDiCD0H1FlCDft3CDDi0CDI-hFl=HDiDi0Qftft0ftH-H-HHCDH-CDCDFlU)CDCD3C)CDCD<DiftCDH-3CDFlU)ft<U)H-U)U)3I-hftCDHFlCl)H-CDU)CDH-CDMDi•ftQft0H-H-I-0F-hU)C)CDft0FlCDU)I-I-H-DiC)H-CDCDU)ftHft03Fl‘ti‘ClU)HU)ftH-DiCDDi1<IIiCDtYCldc-tH,Di000ClDi0‘—CDDiCD0i—çCD00HI-jH,hIH-DiClClf-Cf-i-UiCOCDCDCD0(QH,COH-Dl9H•f-C0f-CDl0IlCD0HIIDi00L’)COCOH}—(I)ClIIDlCD0CDtQII0QCD1iH-HJI—atiIICDCO0ClDlNCDCD-=Di‘tSf-Cf-CCDCDCO0CiH,rjCD><CDIIH-dClDl‘tiCD[If-CH-‘I(QJ00Cl00H,0<Cl0IIDiII0HHJCDD)<F-DlDl9CD‘ti000LH,HH91CL)0H-CDHII‘tDlHIlIIH-CDCDHDiH-010(QDl‘CSH-II0H-H-DlCDH-il3Cl)0CD<f-CCDCDçI—i500H-<(H-CO<DiClDlf-CDlCD<HQDiCl)(QtI0HDiIIH,t-’.:iCD0COCOH-CDIlClf-CDiDl(0Cl3IlH-Dlf-CH-CDCDf-CI—iDlH-f-C0H-IIH,f-CQCDIlIlCOCO0IIQcCiDlH,H-DlH-ClDiH-f-tI-ItjlH-COI-i0ClP10(Qf-CH0f-C0H,H-CQ‘CIQ00‘Ci•H-ClCD0IHH0CD‘-‘-Dl3IICOCDCO<H-‘C300COH0if-t0CDDliCDf-C‘CIDiDlDiCO0DlCOH,<DlIl(P0HIIf-C0Di0f-CCDYCDIIDlHH-DiH-0ftf-CH-H,‘CI00IIHDiDli30DlCDDlf-Cof-t0&H-<tJ‘tSH-IlClClCDf-CIlH,CDHDlH‘CSClClH-H-CDCD‘IDi0CDCDCltJIICD1030H,•o‘1DiClCOHCD0)lI-(PH-COUiH,(P0‘CIJCDCDHCODlClH•Cl—1CDJHCDHClDiCD03Di1ClDiH,Cl0ClClCl(PDlCDClCDP1H,CD3CD<Cl0CDClIlCODlClCDDiDlH’IlCl<JDl(PH-Cl0<I-HIIDlDlIIH-CD0CD:iClCl)<CDCOCl00DiDiClClCl0CO1COCOH’‘-i-Cl<CD00CDl-H-DioH’H-CDH-DiDi—‘IClH,CDCOHH3iCl00IlHzlCDCDH-H<ClHCO(P0ClH-IH-COCDClCDH-DiCO‘<‘10Di<CDCl‘CS00CDH,H-H-tYCD100-1ClQ0QIICOHIlDlH-13’H-H-CDDiH-o=(P•CDCOCO-J-Cl$1Cl3COHCDCl(P00PiH-CDH-CO‘-0Cl00J13’0ClClCOClCOI-JClH-COCL)CDCD‘CI-0CDH-Cl1-10CDCDDi1=HDiH-CDClIl0DiWCDCl‘IH,•H-COCDCOH-H,•ClCOClH,ClCDQ.Cl0H,H‘ICDCOCD0CDCD0’Di0‘1IIDiCD0H,CDClDi•H-CDf-C00CDDiClClCODiCDCDCl(ifHrjCDoDlCDHQDiDioCDiHH-lH(ifU)lDl-CDifClCD0hi,JClooc-I-CD‘10HDlC)CDC)ClH-X0<HDlH-CD•U)l-0 ‘1Cl)CDH-‘<C)0IfDlCl)hi,CrhCDçroICrU)CD‘-<HCDU)hCrDlDlCDHU)l-C03CD<hDiCDCDC)o(ifHH-hIfCD0H,Cl)i0CDhIiCrH-çtJCrpiU)CDCrCrCDH-Ct0:i00j.DiU)CDCrCDC)Cl0CrDlH‘t5Cli)<:CDCrCDCDC)H-U)Cl)H-<CDU)H-0iH-Crhi,ct0H-CDiCDCrClU)CDH-ClC)H-U)CD0U)HhhDlF-0CDCDl-U)c-rC)iCtDlIICDCrCDClH-HU)0DljClC)00CDCrH HCDtiCDCDHC)CDDlCriDlHcri00Dl Hlj.“<DiDiCDN(ifC)CDClCrClU)H-CrH-<(ifCD(CD0C)U)H--Cl CDH-H-Di(ifC)C)CDDiDiCl1HcrCrH-CDC)CDCDDi HDiCl‘tiCD0DiLQ<HCrCDCDH-H-U)HC)00<Di‘ti—I-H-CDCDCl‘tiDil-CrDl(ifCDC)Di<0CrCDhi,U)DiDi•—IIHCDCD ClI-’;Di‘tiC)CDC)l-QU)C)CDi‘tI0Cl0cClHiCD(ifU)Cr(ifHCDCD0U)H-h’ H-0Ii-’;hi-,H-CDCDCD<ClCrI-iH-DiU)CrCDH-DiHiI-U)(Qk<—ICDU)Cr(ifCrDiU)CDCD (ifF-}DiU)CrH-DDlU)CDClC) 0CrCl:iCDClDi(ifH-CDCrI-iH-DiCU)H-iDlH-HiU)H,(QDi(ifH-DiDiHCD‘-H-(-lU)j0CDCrCr0CD0CDhi,CrCD Cl CD Cr CD H CD Cl (if Di (Q CD Cr U) H-Cr U) CD U) CD H 0 h Dl Cr H 0 Di Di H- H Di H CDN txj (I) c) (1)Di H Cr CD Di Cr H CD C) 0 h U) CD U) 0 hi, Di C) Cr H 0 Di 1< CD 0 IH Cr CD hi,H h U) Cr Cr 0 C) 0 0 CD Cr U) 0 hi, Cr CD 0 H- Cr 0 H CQ U) U) Cr CD‘ciDi—CDo‘ciH-0z1DlU)‘ciHH-C)U)IIHH-CDH-0‘iffrci-Di0b0Dl<HC)0CD‘-CDCDH-HDl•‘ciiii-oi-DiCD(:—IDiI-<-1Q-r0CDH-03CDClCDDiWDlU)•‘ciCrCD‘ci1’Jl-(QDi0ClHHCDCDDi‘ciCrH,DiH-0Di‘-U)HI-CDU)CDCDl,DlCDiiDiU)DiC)l-CrCDU)C)CDiU)DlCDDiçrCrCDtiHHI<CrHDi‘-<‘ciCDHCDU)C)•c-rU)U)ClCrH-CDH-H-0HClDiC)CrU)(0U)U)Di-—0CDDiU)hhCr3U)Cr0CD:-J-0H-U)CD‘-i-U)hi,U)CDH-Cl‘1C)hi,H-CD0Cr0C)iHH-I-DiCFH<CrCD(ifH-CDC)H-0iU)H-DioH,(QU)U)DlCF-rDiU)oDiCl‘cihi,DlII‘ciDlCr10‘cil-ctCD00ClJH-c-rHDlCDU)H-C)CrC)DiH- CDCIQU)0CD Cr U)Chapter 2. Plan MonitoringIn addition to communicating advice to decision-makers,reports might be produced for more general publicdistribution. Wedgwood-Oppenheim (1975:24) identifies threeprincipal ways in which information is made available:formal or informal reports on particular issues; routinereports; and meeting specific requests for information. Aformal or informal report on a particular issue will be madefollowing an examination of that issue and may have arestricted audience. A routine report, usually producedannually, would cover all changes impacting on the communityand focus on significant developments.The timing of reports can also be important. Floydsuggests that monitoring reports should be “synchronizedwith the processes they seek to influence” (1978:484) . Thismight involve for example the provision of up-to-dateinformation to coordinate with a capital budgeting process.Elsewhere, it is stressed that reports released at the sametime once a year will improve continuity (Ontario 1975:16).In other cases, more frequent reporting may be desirable, aswith reports on particular issues mentioned above.A basic format for a monitoring report is presented bythe Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing(Ontario 1975:16-18) . The suggested outline has foursections. First, the introduction provides some backgroundto the monitoring work and a comment on progress or problems59DiDiL-’U)U)Ii-a-H-U)Y0H0CDCDCDCDJI-HH-DlH,Ui(-‘Jt’JHU)H-aaaDlCDCD1DltQa••0CD0ftf-fU)HHH-iiftftDiH-H-0CDCD<H-tQU)t1DiCl)C‘t5DlHF-00DlI-’-DiH,IDlCDCD<U)CD<U)<0H-0CD3iU)CDftDiQ.U)H-0ft<‘zj$1iCl)h0CD01iiU)SCDlJCiU)aCiCDCDrfaH-H-U)ft$1-H--1,ftHDiCiDl:iDl(QCDDlCD0DiH-<H3Q0ftCD11ftftftciDlat-ftDiVftU)Dif-fDi1f-fJ0CDHH-HH-VftaF-’-H-VDib&DiDlCDDiciCici0i0H-a0H,NJ(CU)CDftDl‘1aH-ciCDH0CDf-fU)CDV•0ffH-Dif-foH,CDH-CD0CiVF—’-aU)DiCiaU)CDI-j0aU)HU)HI-CDH-DiCDCL)H-00CiI-LU)HCD<xU)H-ftftIIftVcici‘-U)Dif-fH-ciDiCDf-fCD•DiH,H0CD0CD0CDf-fU)U)CiU)DiU)ft0HQI-ftU)H-U)II3QDlI-CD0U)H-hCiH-Hft0Di00ciCDH-H-CDH-H,CDH0CDCDciU)CiH-I3U)H,U)CDDiciaDiftci<CDDi-iciiH-aU)H-ft0H-fthH-CDciftU)CDH-H,a0Dii-i,aCi0U)U)ciftH-DiaHDiZciCD0H,I-IDiU)iiDia0CDci•0ftDiU)ft•0CiiI-iDi-<0U)ciLICiaDi3H-ft0CiaaiDiftCDCDU)H-VU)ft0CDH-HCDCDDiLQH0V‘IU)DiHCDCiHci-ftCDftH,CDaiiIICDHDiaHU)U)aftH-U)CDJ0DiCDciftU)H0H,0DiiiaVDi(CU)VDi•HDiLIU)CDCDCDft0CDiLI00HVci—0DiaQCDftIICDciDi0L’JftaftCDU)ftLIVVLICiCiCiCDftH-HCDU)U)CDCDCDCDa0LIH-IIU)aH0Di<Cici•aCD0LI0U)H-0U)CDCDU)H-H-0ftU)00(QciL<H-aDiH-H-CDDiCDH,Dl0IVa0ViH0‘IU)H-U)H,0ftHO3DiftVVciVU)ftt-VH,V0DlCiU)i0CDH-H-H-Di0LIH-VH-V3LILCDHDl<U)aH-aftLI0a0Cl)ciCl)H,CDH--iH-CDaVVDiU)H,H-CDLICl)aaQaftDlDlOCDa0U)0U)0•0<H-CiftLIft3U)LIJLIftH-LICDCDDiHCDH-QU)DiftH-U)0H00CDH-ftH-ciHDiftH,ft‘-SICiftHci3U)(0H-CDft-1J<U)U)HDlCD3•-H-——DiCDCDH-CDftH3U)U)H-0HDiaft0013ft13-O13ftVH,VLILIH,H-130U)•—JciH-LIH-—HCDft13CiLI•Ui0CD13DlCD013’13<1DiDi13ftCD)-H-H13•CDCD0ciCDLI—DlCiLIU)IiU)•ciChapter 2. Plan MonitoringThe advisory sub-system completes the link betweenmonitoring and decision-making as indicated with thecontinuous planning model. It is with these advisoryactivities that feedback actually occurs.2. 7 THE IMPROVEMENT SUB - SYSTEMThe fourth and final component of the monitoring systemis concerned with continuously evaluating and improving theperformance of the monitoring system. The improvement subsystem calls for an objective appraisal of monitoring systemperformance, consideration of operational changes, and thedevelopment of improvements (Riera 1979:F.15). The purposeof improvement is to make monitoring systems more dynamicand responsive to any changes required by the plan, thecommunity, or other considerations.Most monitoring systems will be implementedincrementally, gradually expanding and refining theircollection and analysis of data. At the same time, regularmonitoring activity will be evaluated and improved in lightof changing conditions and available resources. Forexample, alternative methods will be explored and tested,and more informative indicators of conditions in thecommunity will be developed. As issues change, some datasets will be dropped while others will be added. Reportformats and communication procedures will also be modified.61Chapter 2. Plan MonitoringIn order to work, monitoring system improvement needsto be explicitly supported by the planning agency andresponsibilities for improvement have to be clearly defined.In addition, the planning agency will be responsible forensuring information flow both within the organization andout to the community, other agencies and City Council. Therecipients of information will in turn provide feedback onthe relevance and usefulness of information and this willcontribute to system improvement.2.8 SUMMARYThis section briefly summarizes the main points thatwill be utilized to design and implement a monitoring systemin the next two chapters. The importance of monitoring in acontinuous planning process was emphasized in the initialdiscussion of the uncertainty associated with planning incomplex urban systems. When viewed in this context,monitoring is seen to play an integral role in linking planimplementation back to decision-making.To assist in designing a monitoring system, a fourcomponent model (data collection, technical evaluation,advisory, and system improvement) was then reviewed. Thefour components or sub-systems describe the monitoringsystem in distinct functional parts. However, the parts are62FriC)I-,ftF-FriCD0CD0CD‘1C)CL)CDCi<CDHi0HCDCDoCDI-QU)CDi-‘-iH-Cl)HH-CDQCDt-’ftU)CDC)CDH-CDU)Q.H-HHCtC)ftU)Hift<Cl)CD0CDftH-Cl)1H-C)C)CDH-0U)0CDU)0<ftft3HiU)CDU)00Cl)C)Cl)ftHCDftH-CDH-QHCDU)3CDCD0CD<CDftLQC)CDHiH-H-Cl)0CDoCDCDHQ.3<H-ftCDU)•CD0H-riHCDCDftjU)k<Cl)CDCDI(ClI-CDCl)HftH-CDCl)(QU)HiCDftCD13CDH-IU)CDCDftCD0CDl))13CDQ.CDCDhCDt-ftO<CDCDCDH-CDftWCDH•ftHi<1130ftHiJ‘1ftCDftCDCD013 CD0CDH-Cl)1313HiU)H13Fri0CDH-HU)HCDftHHCl)<H3’lHU)13U)CDCDCDHCDHt5CDH-0(QC)CD0CDCl)CD313U.ftU)IIU)CDCDCl)CD13CDCD‘-IC)Cl13CDftClHCDH-CDH-ftCDft<0CDH-t13CD13U)CD-CDCDQFri(QftClCD13•CDCDOft(-C)CDftc1CDH-Cl)h-I01CDft1313CDfto“<H-C)CD1313CDCDU)CD13C)IIH-ftCDFriftC)HhU)CDU)13Fri0:jCl)Cl)CDHCDI-tiCDCDFrIftCl)I-13CD0hICDftCDClH-CDU)hIt5Cl013Hi0CDhIhICDU)ftU)Ci$i131DCDQU)0ftC)H(QHCI)U)oCDU)CiftU)U)13U)U)HCDHHi<1CDHQH•HH-k<FrIH-Cl0HH3tIFrIC)CiH13U)CDU)<CDC)H0hI<ft13ClCDft0U)HU)‘tSClCD1313H1300U)C)hI13U)CDC)(ClCD13ftCl)H0CD0<H-CDCDCDCDHC)hjCl)Cl•CDU)CDH0H-CDFrioC)CDCDCD0HI-i13HHiU)HiQC)Cl)H-U)U)::13CiCiClftCDCDt513ft1313U)13ftU)CDH-13HH-13H-Ciftft0ClClCDftHU)13hICDU)13CDU)ft0H-CDH(ClCDlH-ClfthI13HIH0•U)CDCDHCl)CDH-0ftCDHiCD0H-3hI0ClhI0tI13Cl13CDHClCl)CiCiH-HCi0CDU)CDU)13I-hIftHiH-h313C)ftCDCiC)d0HibCDClftCl)U)H-CD0hICDCDCDCDCD13ftI-jCDCDI-fthIU)C)I-CD•CD0hI0Cl)H-HiC)ftHhI13C)CD0HI-jHi00<CDCD13HHiH0CD13HH-H-ft13ftU)U)H13CDft13CDCD13ftCl)H-CD(Q-013CDftC)Cift0hI13hIhICD13hIH-hI13(QCDC)U)ClCl013CDC)H-F-”10CDFriCDU)H-H-1313tI13IHftCDClU)‘(Q(QhIftFriH-U)CDCi13U)1-”00Xft13hIHiCDClftCDCD1313CD0130CDCD<<U)CDClU)HhIClCDCDhICD13I131313CDC)ftftH-ftCDU)Q.CDU)CDft13CD(DHH-C)13ClhICDU)131313C)U)U)ljC)CDhI13—FriU)13QU)U)013(Q00H13CDHHiH-CD0Cl)IihIHH-U)ftIiCi13ftCD1313CDCiCDHClCDU)ClClC)‘--I13Cl013H-H-ftH-HiftHi13ftftft•0tQCD13C)0H130H-CDftCD()0HHhIk<CDH-U)13HF--I(Q13Hft-<CDCDF<hICDIftfthI13CD(I)CD13H U)13ftoCD13 H- ftU)o13hIClH 13ft(Q0‘--ICDCDftCiCDH-hI‘--I CD‘--I13CDCD IihIftCDCDCD CDHi13oft‘--IU)U)C)H0o1313ItI H CDI--IftU)CD13 (Q CDH U) 13HF-CDCDCDCDitCDCDI-hCDH—I-hHU.H2)H-CDiCD()I-hooH2)IH,CrCDH-2)HCrCrHH-oCt0H CDCD-çt(:12)0‘-CDiHo:iHC)‘tSCDCDHC)CD2)f-rCrCDH-H-•HH-H-(Nc3(QH-Cr‘ti(QCDI- o‘-iiC)CDH-CDCDI.QCD0CDCt—I- C) CDp)oCDCt 2)H-CD-CrH,oH‘tSHH-C)0iH-<CDHH-CrH-CDHLQCHAPTER 3MONITORING SYSTEM DESIGNThe purpose of the thesis is to design and implement amonitoring system for community planning. It is proposed toaccomplish this purpose by means of a case study which willexamine and utilize the Community Development Plan for MountPleasant (Vancouver l989a). The case study will beconducted as if the monitoring system had been requested atthe time of Plan adoption in 1987.The purpose of this chapter is to design a monitoringsystem which will then be implemented in the subsequentchapter. However, before a monitoring system is designed,it is important to understand the context and purpose of thePlan. The first section introduces the local area planningmodel that was used to prepare a number of neighbourhoodplans in the City of Vancouver. The second sectiondescribes the Mount Pleasant community and the CommunityDevelopment Plan. The final section proposes a frameworkfor monitoring the Plan.65Chapter 3. Monitoring System Design3.1 LOCAL AREA PLANNING IN VANCOUVERThe local area planning model’ currently used inVancouver was initiated in the early 1970s, largely theresult of citizen dissatisfaction with the urban renewalprograms of the 1950s and l960s. During that earlierperiod, land was expropriated and redeveloped with little orno community input. People were displaced from their homes,often causing the permanent disruption of communities. Anattempt to build a freeway into downtown Vancouver unifiedpublic opinion against insensitive development decisions.Concerned about the physical and social turmoil causedby urban renewal, citizens used the electoral process tochange representation on City Council. Responding to theshift in public attitudes toward neighbourhood protectionand improvement, City Council directed City staff to involvecitizens in the decisions affecting their neighbourhoods.After a number of options for citizen participationwere explored by the Planning Department, City Councildecided on a partnership model. This model involvesdrawing citizen committees from the community and working,with assistance from City staff and other agencies, todefine problems, describe issues, set objectives, anddevelop neighbourhood plans” (Vancouver 1986a:5)1 This section draws primarily from the material inVancouver 1986a.66H CD C) H H 0 (l CD H H rr H H 0 0 H, H 0 C) H LI CD ‘z:I H HH-CDC)0)CDH)J0C)‘-ijH—0‘-3C)0ct‘tJH-C)030H,0HCDO‘ij‘?j0rjjI-‘rt0C)ClCDH-0H-CDC)‘t5CD00H-‘tSH-CDçt)(QctH0LIçtH0HtI<1C)U)U)CDpitQLILIrtCDCDLICDCDH-CLI-3ClC)CDctCDCL))LILIH-U)0LIH0rrCDH-H-C)C)CD<H0CDH-Hi(QU)rtH-F’)ctLIH-0t3LI-)iH-CL)H-•-0QCL)C)CDH-LI—C)çtCtb“<CDH-CDHCL)çtU)0CD-H-CL-CL)ClH-0‘tICL-<C)HH0CL-CL-CDLI0HCDCDCD0ClLICl<CDCDU)LIH-H,CDHU)0tICL)CDCDCD00HHLICDU)H0CL)CL-CDH0II<ftC)tICL)H-)CDCDH-HIIJLI00HCL)0iC)iCL)HO‘-3CDCDCDLIClCLCl)CDClH-U)cH,i-L-CD<))C)CD—1CDCL)tC3CL-)H-0CLCL-)U)CL)HWHCL)LIC)U)HiiCL)UiC)bC)0CDU)<U)H-CDH,CliCL)0CL)‘<0ClC)LIH-CDCDCL-0LIU)3HCL-CDCDCD3(LI<HH-LICDCl0CtU)U)HU)CLC)C)JCDCL-U)H-H-CD<CDH-C)U)LIHCL)iH-CDLICL)U)LICDHHftCD0CDi-C)HH-CL-H,00))CL)CDftH-(1)H--i,HftC)H,3H-CL-H,.DCL)<N0U)CDU)0C)CLCL)Cl)U)LI0LICDC)ClH-C)H-LI0HCL)CL)0LILI-CDLiiH-ClCL-CL)CL-CDClLIH0<CL)CDU)CL)H-1JCDH‘-<CL)CL)CL)H-CDClHCl)U)CL)<H<<CL-LILI0U)U)H-Cli3tICDC)H-‘t3H-(Q—CDCDH,C)‘tIt3C)HH0‘tiClC)H0CL)CL)HCDLI(QLII0CL)0HCDH-CL)CL-CL)U)H-U)C)0CL)CL)ci‘tIU)CL)ClCt3CDH‘tIC)U)CL-H3LI<U)H-‘-<iLIU)Cl)HH-CD-0CL)CDCDCDClH-H-CDLICL)CL)Clt3CDCL)LI0CDH-iU)l)CDCDHHH-1U)H,CL-LICL-H(CL-LIU)CD00HH,CD).Q0CL)ClCL-CDCL)C)(ClciH,0‘-0H-‘tiCl0CL)HLICL)U)H,CDC)HLiF’)3H,<tQCDCL-LICL)HHU)CDC)‘-0H-CL)CL)CDF’)CDH,CL)ciLICDH-0-0HC)CL)U)‘tILIH-H-CDCDCDCL)C)0HCL)HU)C)C)ClCDH,LILIH-CDC)•HH,CL-LI0CD0H-CL)HU)0CDCL)ciCL)‘<0CL-C)ciLIH‘CILIH-CL’HHLICDCL’H-<QCDCDCL)H-CL)H-CDHU)CDCL)C)CL-CL)iCL-CLCIClLIiLIHH-HC)‘<LI000CL-CL)CL)HCL)CDCL)1H-CDci‘CIciLIU)HiHH3H-CL)CL-ft3H-CDcicc)ClH-HU)(ClU)U)CDCL-CL)CL)CDCL<U)-ClU)Hcoi)L)f-tHC)U)LICDH‘<CD0CDU)H,-<(U-H,Cl 0 F1 I-’Cl) (IChapter 3. Monitoring System DesignINLWEST •—1GLISH EN - GEMWvIa1• 5TTHCONA WOOLAND5 HASTINGSC.3.. 5UNJSEWEST POINT GREY 4isi C1LlJTSILAN0 FAIv1EW MOUNT - nwv• PLEASANTLrAap\ ASUTUS5HAHNES5Y oumLEY PARK cRESOH5‘k ERISALE OAK.RWGE 1CTOgJA-FEASEIEWSUNSET jMAgPOLE ILLANEY•\\ .-.Figure 7. City of Vancouver Local Areas3.2 THE C0IIETNITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR MOUNT PLEASANTThe Community Development Plan for Mount Pleasant wasadopted by Vancouver City Council on October 6, 1987, sixyears after a local area planning program was initiated. Itwas prepared by the Mount Pleasant Citizens’ PlanningCommittee, with the assistance of the Vancouver Planning68Chapter 3. Monitoring System DesignDepartment and other civic departments and agencies.Containing recommendations on social, economic, and physicaldevelopment, the Plan is ‘a guide for the future of MountPleasant [that] establishes a framework for publicorganizations to use when determining budgets, resources,priorities, programs or by-laws applicable to thiscommunity” (Vancouver l989a:preface)In approving the Plan, Council and City staff made acommitment to carry out its numerous recommendations.However, the role of local citizens did not end with thePlan’s approval. For it is clearly stated in theintroduction to the Plan that the “community must reviewprogress and continually monitor the Plan” (Vancouverl989a:preface) . However, no formal plan monitoring has beendone beyond tracking implementation of the recommendations,the local area site planning office was closed over twoyears ago, and the citizen’s planning committee has not metin over a year (Apostolides 1992).It has not been the practice of the Vancouver PlanningDepartment to monitor local area plans. The City doeshowever prepare two monitoring reports for distribution tothe general public. The first, the Vancouver MonitoringProgram (Vancouver l992b), is compiled twice a year by thePlanning Department. This program was developed to monitorthe Vancouver Plan (Vancouver l986b) which, although not69Chapter 3. Monitoring System Designofficially adopted by City Council, provides a strategy formanaging change in the City. The Monitoring Programcollects time-series data in areas related to employment,housing, transportation, the urban environment, andpopulation. Information sheets, produced from these data,are distributed individually.The second monitoring program, Vancouver Trends(Vancouver l99lb), is published annually by the CityManager’s Office. It was developed to monitor the City’sprogress toward a broad set of goals identified in Goals forVancouver (Vancouver 1980) . Data collection is organizedinto sections corresponding to the ten categories of goalsin Goals for Vancouver. Each section lists the goals,summarizes key findings, and provides a large number oftime-series charts for the purpose of identifying long-termtrends.At the regional level, the GVRD has a generalmonitoring system (GEMONI), which collects time-series dataon a range of demographic, economic, and developmentindicators, e.g. housing starts and completions, migration,vital statistics, labour force and employment. These dataare generally available at the municipal level. Inaddition, the GVRD has a Commercial and IndustrialFloorspace System (CIFS) which contains floorspace data foreach commercial and industrial property in the GVRD.70Chapter 3. Monitoring System DesignThe following sub-sections describe the history of theMount Pleasant community, the issues that led to theinitiation of a local area planning program, the planningprocess, and the content of the Plan.3.2.1 The Community of Mount PleasantSituated at the south-east end of False Creek, MountPleasant is one of Vancouver’s oldest communities. Its richhistory goes back to the last quarter of the 19th Centurywhen the area along Brewery Creek was being developed forindustrial purposes. In 1872, a bridge was built acrossFalse Creek to the foot of Main Street and commercial andresidential development soon followed the lead of industry.Mount Pleasant prospered in the early 1900s, creatingvisions of an ‘Uptown Vancouver’ . The area surrounding theintersection of Broadway, Main and Kingsway became a centreof commercial and cultural activity. A number of importantbuildings were constructed, some of which still remain.However, by the 1930s, the uptown focus had shifted west tothe intersection of Broadway and Granville. Industrialactivity began to dominate and large homes were converted torooming houses to accommodate industrial employees.Today, Mount Pleasant is a culturally diverse communityof approximately 22,000 residents, about 5% of the City’s1991 population. In addition to containing a variety of71Chapter 3. Monitoring System Designhousing types, ranging from single to multiple familydwellings, the area is host to significant commercial andindustrial areas.Five neighbourhoods were identified during thecommunity planning process (Figure 8), each characterized bya distinct combination of land uses (Vancouver 1989a):1. Mount Pleasant Industrial is developed primarily forindustry with mixed uses allowed in the Main Streetarea. Commercial uses are permitted on Broadway andCambie Streets. A number of residential buildingsremain in the core industrial area from the periodprior to 1960 when the area was zoned residential.2. West Mount Pleasant is a residential area mainlyconsisting of two-family and multiple conversiondwellings with some multiple-family dwellings on 10thAvenue. Commercial activities are permitted on Cambieand Broadway.3. Main Street Core is characterized by commercialdevelopment along the major arterials. Multiple familydwellings occupy most of the area off the majorstreets.4. Mount Pleasant North consists largely of three-storeyapartment buildings, older multiple conversiondwellings, and some single family housing. and72(jJ i’J IC.) II ii MPi HU) a P) i CD ft U) C) I-H otY’ U) (1) (1) L ‘1 oH P)i U)ft = •CD CD I-]Pi H C’)1< :iH CDLO U)co C)D ‘1Cl) H c5P) ft U) H 0P)I I IJ0iH-HCD(41 (DCD‘10‘1:j(UIts0II-c oU))‘tiCDJoci1I-c ftftH- oF-0jCD[bo M) cH-U)CDHH-)&QU)1I-0CDcCDftHMJHP)H0:iH-M(CHU)‘<HP)ftjo:3ciU)cCD<10U)CD1:1•:i<ciCDCD‘1 C’) Hçl)0U)j U) 0ci t I-ti H CD Ci) P1 I-I H P1 H C) 0 ft 1 H U) P1 H >< ft ‘-‘I (U 0 0 H ci 1 ci0 II I-..Ci) IChapter 3. Monitoring System Designwas a fitting metaphor. Whereas in the past major streetsled to the heart of Mount Pleasant, they now “carryincreasing volumes of commuter through-traffic, fragmentingand disrupting the very heart of this community” (Vancouver1985:1)A number of other issues contributed to the growingimage or perception of a community in decline:Lack of community organization or cohesion.Highly transient population.Low level of community services.Socially deviant behaviour, particular streetprostitution and public drunkenness.Physical deterioration of commercial and residentialareas (Vancouver 1985; Vancouver 1989a)At the same time however, the citizens of MountPleasant recognized a number of positive features that couldprovide opportunities for community development:A diverse population with a wide background ofexperiences.Commercial and industrial businesses providing avariety of employment opportunities.A large supply of relatively affordable housing.• Convenient access to the cultural, entertainment andretail activities of a thriving and vibrant downtown.74Chapter 3. Monitoring System Design• Many buildings of heritage merit which provide a uniqueidentity for this community.• Spectacular views of downtown Vancouver and the northshore afforded by northwest facing slopes (Vancouver1985:23)It was felt by many that if the above problems were notaddressed, Mount Pleasant would “cease to exist as acommunity with focus and aspirations for the future”(Ibid. :1) . In response to local citizens and businessowners expressing concern over the negative physical andsocial trends facing the community, a local area planningprogram was initiated in August of 1981.3.2.3 The Planning ProcessIn April 1982, a neighbourhood planning office staffedby City planning personnel was opened. At the same time,local residents, property owners, and community groupsformed the Mount Pleasant Citizen’s Planning Committee towork with City staff in preparing the plan. The Plan wascompleted in three stages over a period of five years. Inthe first stage, a draft overall policy plan based oncommunity-wide issues was developed. Five neighbourhoodplans were then prepared during the second stage. Theproduct of the final stage was the Community Development75Chapter 3. Monitoring System DesignPlan for Mount Pleasant which combined the work of the firsttwo stages.3.2.4 Description of the PlanThe Community Development Plan for Mount Pleasant hasthree parts. The first introduces the reader to the MountPleasant community and provides some background information.The second part, titled Community Development Strategies,presents several recommendations dealing with the broadissues facing the community. Each of its ten sectionsfocuses on a substantive issue area, for example communitysocial development, housing, and industry. The third partprovides recommendations for zoning changes in each of thefive Mount Pleasant neighbourhoods and several commercialand residential sub-areas within them. The intent of thesezoning changes is to reinforce a defined character for eacharea while ensuring the overall integrity of the MountPleasant community.In both the second and third parts of the Plan, eachsection presents the background issues, lists the goals ofthe community, and provides a number of recommendations.First the goals are listed together and then recommendationsare provided by sub-category. There is not always a directrelationship between goals and recommendations. In mostcases, a goal is quite general while a recommendation is76Chapter 3. Monitoring System Designmore specific and directed at making some progress towardachieving one or more related goals. The Plan did notinclude an analysis of goal inter-relationships. The issuesand goals are presented in Appendix A of the thesis, and therecommendations are in Appendix B.While most of the recommendations called for immediateaction, some specified that further study of an issue wasrequired. Each recommendation clearly specified thedepartment or agency responsible for implementation.Besides the Planning Department, several agencies wereinvolved in both planning and plan implementation, forexample Social Planning, Engineering, Health, Permits andLicenses, Police, Parks, and Housing and Properties.Although the Plan is directed at a broad range ofcommunity goals, the available tools are generally limitedto those controlling the use and development of land.However, these tools can have far-reaching implications forthe development of the Mount Pleasant Community. Themajority of recommendations call for amendments to existingzoning, rezoning, or the creation and enforcement of variousregulations.3.3 THE MONITORING SYSTEMAs discussed in Chapter 2, the purpose of planmonitoring is to obtain information about plan impacts and77Chapter 3. Monitoring System Designother change in the community and to provide advice todecision-makers based on an analysis of that information.The purpose of this section is to develop a framework formonitoring the Mount Pleasant Plan. The monitoring systemmodel identified in Chapter 2 is adopted for this casestudy. This model has four functional components or subsystems: information collection, technical evaluation,advisory, and monitoring system improvement. Each componentis developed in the following sub-sections.3.3.1 The Information Collection Sub-SystemThe information collection sub-system is responsiblefor collecting, processing, and storing all types of data.However, it is first necessary to determine what data willbe collected and what their sources are.An initial step would be to list all the goals andobjectives, assumptions, and policies in a community plan.For each item on the list, at least one key question may beasked. For example, if one assumption is that thepopulation will increase by a certain amount, we would wantto measure population growth. In some cases, the keyquestion may be expressed as a performance indicator. Foreach key question, one or more data sources will beidentified.78Chapter 3. Monitoring System DesignAs will become evident, the data requirements can bequite large. A data collection strategy based on the mixed-scanning approach identified in Chapter 2 will probably haveto be implemented. Once the final requirements areestablished, processing and storing procedures can bespecified. The possibility that data requirements willchange with time must also be kept in mind.The following sections provide an organizing frameworkfor developing a monitoring system. The framework, based onthat presented by the Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs(Ontario 1982), will be used in Chapter 4 to implement themonitoring system.a) Plan ImplementationA large number of recommendations were made in theMount Pleasant Plan. Some identified actions that were tobe implemented immediately while others called for furtherstudy. For monitoring to be effective in assessing theoutcomes of a plan, the implementation of eachrecommendation should first be verified. The intent here isto identify the current status of the Plan. Table 3 isproposed for tracking plan implementation.For each recommendation, it is sufficient to know whataction was taken and when. The name of the agencyresponsible for implementation can also be recorded. If an79Chapter 3. Monitoring System Designaction produces more recommendations, these should be addedto the table. Recommendations which were not implementedshould be investigated.RECOMMENDATION AGENCY ACTION TAKEN DATEPLAN SECTIONPlan Sub-Section1. Recommendation2. RecommendationPlan Sub-Section1. RecommendationTable 3. Plan Implementation Scheduleb) Goals and ObjectivesThe basic purpose of monitoring is to determineprogress in achieving the goals and objectives set out inthe plan. For each goal in the Mount Pleasant Plan, a keyquestion can be asked. If the question is quantitative innature, an indicator may be developed. Table 4 provides auseful organizing framework. Attention should also be paidto goal inter-relationships, either conflicting orcomplementary.80Chapter 3. Monitoring System DesignGOALS and OBJECTIVES KEY QUESTIONS INFORMATIONNEEDEDPLAN SECTIONPlan Sub-Section1. Goal2. GoaiPlan Sub-Section1. GoalTable 4. Goals and Objectives Schedulec) Policies and DecisionsThe main purpose for monitoring policies is todetermine their effectiveness in achieving goals andobjectives. If the objectives of a plan are not beingachieved, it may be due to an inappropriate policy. Thismay in turn be due to a poor or faulty understanding of theissue or it may be that decisions are not being made inaccord with the policy.As discussed in Chapter 2, policies can be classed inone of three categories: strategic, general, andoperational. Operational policies provide the detail neededfor implementing the general and strategic policies whichmore closely reflect the goals and objectives of the plan.Depending on the policy being monitored, the informationneeded for monitoring may be identical to that needed forgoals and objectives.81Chapter 3. Monitoring System DesignLand use and development in Vancouver is controlled byzoning and development by-laws which specify among otherthings, permitted uses and building size. These by-laws areoften accompanied by design guidelines. Taken together, thecontents of the by-laws are policies that guide day to daystaff decision-making related to development control. Thus,according to the hierarchy of policies, they are operationalpolicies.For each policy in a plan, some key questions may beasked. The substantive matter of these questions willdepend on the goals of the plan and the intent of thepolicy. Table 5 will help to organize policies formonitoring. Regarding monitoring of decision-making, it isassumed that operational procedures ensure that decisionsare usually made in accord with policies. However,exceptions should be flagged for further review.POLICY KEY QUESTIONS IN FORMATIONNEEDEDPolicy Area1. PolicyPolicy Area1. PolicyTable 5. Policies Schedule82CD<CDhhI-hCDCl)Cl)CI)C)CDCDCDCl)H11Ci00S—H-0C)CDI-I-Q.crt.QoihH-Cl)Cl)0bCDCDCDH-CDoCDI-h0IQCl)I-ICDC)C)I-CDC)H-HH-0Q.Cl)H-Cl)-I-Cl)Cl)HCDH-H,QQI—iCl)C)CD00Cl)Cl)<rJH-CDI-hCDCl)CrCl)QCrCrH-0CliC)HC)oQ.Cr0iCl)I-hCl)Cl)iCr0CrCliCDCDH-I-H-Q.‘-CICl)‘dCI-CD3Cl)CDCl)0HCD0Cl)0Cl)CD-QC)F--tCDI—sCl)H-Cl)Cl)tiI-Cl)I-3CD0CDH-CDCL)CrCrCl)QCl)•Cl)H-0CliopiC)CD•‘tSH-‘tiCl)Cl)CDCrI-i,o3Cl)C)Cr0I-0cCDCtHH-i‘z30CrQH-H-CDH0H-I-hOjjH-H,CD0H-CDCD-tCDCDCl)H-HCDQCDH-•Cl)Hi0C)I-H-C)HC)H-C)(H-CDI-hif-tQCrCl)0Cl)C)F-’.C)Cl)Q.CliCl)c-rCDH-CDCli3H-CDCrpiCD-frijC)I•00Cl)C)QCrCD.Cr0CrCDCDC)•I-hCDCl)0H-0CDCl)I-Cl)H-H-Cl)H-0CDCl)I-1Cl)‘tSHCl)CDCr><HH,H0H-CDCl)‘tiCl)H-Cl)0Cr0C)CDHCl)HCl)Cl)H-CD0i,I-f,H<H-Cl)HCrH-rI-0Cl)1,1)C)CD0Cr0C)I-LbCDCl)H-Cl)Cr‘tSI-CDCl)Cl)c-IwHCl)CDCDCDCr<CDf-rH-H-Cl)CDHCl)CDI-HtiCDC)H-CDII0ClCl)c-rHCrCD‘-<3Cr00(QCDI-hCDCDH-Cl)3ClCl)H-O<H-CD0CD0Cl)H-0Cl)CrCl)0o•—0‘ti rr0I-iHCDQ(II•CrH-CrH-Cl)<H-CDCDCD0I-I-0CrCrCDC)H-<Cl)Cl-’0H-CDCDCt0Cl)Cl)(CDH,0C)iI—’.<Cl)H<1CDI-iCrI-0H-,H-[-.H-P)CrCDt3CDtTIICtH-l-CrCDN0QCr3CDCDCDI-hI-C)Cl)CliCDHCl)H-HiH-<‘rJ0c-i-F—,Cl)CL)CrH-0ClH-0CrCr.Cl)LQCDCl)Cl)C)jHCD0Cl)CrH-C)Cr<3Cl)•HH-CDCl)Cl)F—’-CrCl)HJH-ClCDC)H-CrCDCl)00CDCDClClCrH-I-QH-ClCr‘--aCDCDH,Cl)CDH-CDCDCD00CDCl)l-jciCrQCl0Cl3CD<CrCDCDHH-Cl)CL)Cl)‘-CICrCDHH-3CDCl)HHCDH0iCrCl)Cl)H-CDCr‘CDCl)-HCDCDC)Cl)Cl)Cl)F--’-Cl)I- CDChapter 3. Monitoring System DesignASSUMPTION KEY QUESTIONS INFORMATIONNEEDED1. Assumption2. AssumptionTable 6. Assumptions Schedulef) Issues, Uncertainty and the Un foreseeableBy virtue of their nature, these items are difficult tomonitor in a systematic fashion. For example, theoccurrence of certain events may signal the emergence of anew issue, the flaring up of a dormant issue, or a change incommunity values. Depending on the situation, it may bepossible to prepare a timely response. Regarding theunexpected side-effects of policies, these will usually bediscovered after they have occurred. However, experiencemay suggest areas to monitor closely in order to anticipateand perhaps prevent side-effects.Soft information and the notion of an early warningsystem referred to in Chapter 2 are most useful inmonitoring under conditions of uncertainty. The sources ofthis type of information are varied as well as variable. Aneffort should be made to provide opportunities forcommunicating this type of information within the planningdepartment.84Chapter 3. Monitoring System Designg) Data NeedsThe above tables will require data. To organize datacollection, a structured framework, describing availabledata sources, is recommended. For each item of informationneeded in the above tables, the columns in Table 7 should becompleted. To assist in developing the mixed-scanningstrategy, a priority level can be set for each data item.INFORMATION SOURCE FREQUENCY WHEN BASE ASSEMBLY HOW PRIORITYNEEDED AVAILABLE DATE PROBLEMS RELIABLETable 7. Data Needs Scheduleh) Data Processing and StorageAs data is collected, it will be processed and stored.For example, data might be aggregated, various descriptivestatistics might be computed, and time series might beexpanded. Also, tables and graphics might be printed anddata stored for later analysis. Exact procedures will varywith the type of data collected and the facilitiesavailable. However, a clear set of documented procedureswould facilitate the management of data collection,processing and storage.85DlWClCDD)C)DlIiClHHDlDlCDI-ai•CDCD0XCD0ClCDDlliC)Dl(1HCuW‘rJH-CDçtCDCl0ClH-çrH,—1CDClH,H•D)Cl)HhClI-H-lCDDl0Hf-r0<CrQ.Dl-ClCrCD0NF-Cr00C)çtHH-H-tJF-DiCDCD0CrC)H-F-Cr0000H-CflDlCDCD0CDiCDCDCrCDCrDiCrCDCDCrCrtJHLQCDH-‘-dDlClCrCDH-H-CDH0CrCt0C)CrCDCDCrClC)0Cr0tiC)CDH-CD0(QH,00H-HH-DiC)iC)CDcii—’H-0H,çrDiCrC)CrhCrpiH-HCDH-0H,C)H-Ci)CD0&ciCrClH,<1<Cl)JHtiH-CDiC)0iCl)H->ciCDCDHl-H-CrtibCDC)0tJCDCDDiCDDiC)H-C)LQI-Dl-CDHCDtH-HCtDiDiC)ciDl0I-I-tiHC)CDH-CDClCrHDl‘1DiC)H,CDI-iHCr<0LQHClCDDlH-HiiCtDiCl0HDlCDC)CDCrt10CDCDHClCDCIiCDC)ClDiCl)i<t’JiCDDiDl1JH,CD00C)Cl)CDCDDlCDDiDl<c-rCDHçr0CDH-hj0l-0ljHCrH-H,HDiHCDHDlciCrCDC)ci0tyCDCDDi(Q0lZjCDciH-CD‘-<I-0<ciCrH-ciI-pi<DlciCDCl‘-Cl0ClDlHCDCrDl3CDCDCtDiCrDiDiCDDi0CrHl-H-H-C100Di0cici0H-CDClHH-CrCDCr)-0C)ClCDH-dDiI-IiC)ci0H-H-CDDl0H-Dl30hCDDiCt00CrCDC)0Cr3(CCDI-ClCDiDlciDlCDH-(‘ClDl<CD0Crt—)H-CDH-CDCDCl3CDHC)CDciCDCD0H-HHDlCldCl)°ciCl)CD<C)--:iClCD3Cr0DlCr-DiHC)ciCD0II-IH-Dl0CDDl0C)IICrH-CDCi-CrCDIHC)ClC)Ci-jCDtDiCrCDDlH-CrCi-CDDlI-a<[Ii0HCD--CDDiCrHCrJt3CD0CDCD<I-iCl)H-<<<CDCDCDDiDiCrCDCDH,DlC)CDCDDllJ0CDCDDiCD0H-CDCrClCD0HDiCrCrClDiiCrDi‘-10HtiCrCDCrCl)0‘-Cr3II—ClCDDihCDH,0H‘CIH,CDCDCD1CDHCDDiC)Di‘CICliic-i-0H-H-Cr‘CIfr’lCrCDCDCDCDDiC)Di‘-ICD0I-’CDCth3JCrCrCDCl<CrClCDH0Di,Q‘-‘CrDi0DiCDCDH-DiCD0Di0H-<I-IciDiC)H-fr’C)Cri—Cr-tLQDiH-CDH03CDCDH-ci-C)DiDiC)DihI-cClDihtcC)iCD<ClDiDiH0DiCDCDCDCDC)Cr‘rJCDCDCDç-rH,C)H,‘ClDi30CDCl)CDDiH-CD-‘ClCl0HCDI-CDH-H,lI-CDC)Dicii-CDCl)•0H-H‘CliCDCDI3‘ClCDCDCD0C)CDDiH,<c-i-ClCD‘CIDi‘ClCDCr‘CIDi<‘-0DiCDCl)ClH(C)0I-ClC)CDH-Di0CDCrI-C)DiCDi0DiCDh3CDCrHC)H•DiCrCDCrH-ClCDDi0DiH-DiC)0Cr<CDCDCr,iHCl)CrH--IC)CrIH-CrH-<(11CDH0CDH(C)CDH-C)iI—ICDCDCD Di H Di Ft CD Di H CD C) CD U) Di Di H- C) CD H- CD 0 H CD Ft 0 C) 0 C) H- HDiDi ‘11Ft H- C)H HHHDi0DiU)hFtCD DiH H-o 1hCD HH-<FtHCD ‘1<CD0CDHFt<•CD CD 0 H CD H-Ft CD CD Ft H CD CD H Ft CDoDlbFtCDFtCDCDCDFt CDH-0Iti DiHC)Q.Ft CDCD DlH-CDCDFtDl0DiQHCl)‘-<FtCDCDH-I-CDH 11CDCD CDH-CDHC)H0 c:iCDFtU) CDCD oFt 0DiC)13CDHC)CD H-ftU)CDH-Cl)Di U)C)CD0 DiFthIH-H-01313 U)Dl0C)H-iFtFtDi HCDHHDiDi1313 Di U)DiH-01313Q.ItiCDH HI-C)C)0CDDi0tiCDFtli<FtDiHidDlII0Dit-hH13hIhI13U)H-HCD(cCDCUQ0oCDiDihh13CDQCD013<1C)I-hFtH-13DiHC)Di13k<CU13QCD••FtCDFt13-H-0i-hCDCDCD00 hICDHI-hhICD0H-CDhIhIhIHHH-U)DiDiCDFtFtFtitCD13CDH-H-H-113C)CDCD0FtDiC)<Di130C)DlDiCDFtFlHU)H-H-<Di0CDCl)hI013oH-H-M13CD13CD(Di0•Di13U)hIC)DiCDCDHHDi<13b13U)HCDCDIQCDHCDMCDCl)HCD0Ft0HCD<1H-CDICDHCDDlhIH13 ICUDiFtCl)CDI-hH-HFtFtH13CDCDflHDi U) H Dl 13 IDihICDHCD0Ft CDCDhIH13FlDieDlCDU)DiFtCDH-H-CDCD<113C)s:iCDH-FtFt0DiH-013C)DiH,FtFtFtH-HFt1301313CD13(CCDU)DiDi‘til:50H0hIDi<13CDCDH-013CDDlHH-13-SU)0U)FtCDH-tiHU)0HQCD13DiU)13lJ•CD13CD13PiH-FthI13-CDL0 IIHI-h‘tiH-Ft0hIH,Fl0H-C)CDDiCD$:1‘<HU)DiU)FtCDCDCDH-CDDihIU)C)13CDHQDiCDI-<Q Ft 13 Dl FtH-FtCD0130Dl><H-13h’DlCl)FtFtH-LC)H-FtCD‘CIDi0DlH0FtHC)H13hICl)FtCDH-Ft•U)DlDi13hIDi13H(DiHDiH•C)IH-HJ<Ft‘<C)H-H-CD1JU)Dl13U)hIH-U)QU)FtCDCD U)0CDCDCD-hFtIH-‘CI0Hftt0HbH1313Dl-CDCDIiCl)Ii1313C)CDU)hIDiCDFtCDH-0“<QHII(lH13HYC)CDFtH-H-CD0U)0I-h1313H-tQ‘rJC)CIC)CDDiI-CDDiFtCD13DiQH-FtCDC)h(I)Di<CD(H-0I-DiCD1313H0FtCDF-hC)FtDiDl0DiU)FtFt‘CI13U)CDtI‘-i-U)1CDhIC)CD•013H-FthIDlC)FtCDC)FtCD0U)13H-HCD0FtCDHCl)13DioFtCDHCDFt130H-DlDi0Ft13Ft13H,CDFtFt‘CICDCDH Di 1313 Ft 0 II 13 CD I-Chapter 3. Monitoring System Design3.3.3 The Advisory Sub—SystemThe advisory sub-system involves the communication toCouncil of advice generated during technical evaluation.The most common method for communicating the results ofmonitoring will be through policy reports submitted toCouncil via the City Manager. Reports might also beprepared for distribution to the general public.Some ideas for preparing readable and informativereports were suggested in Chapter 2 and are recommended.For example, reports could be produced annually unlesscircumstances require a report on a specific topic. Also,while monitoring will cover a wide range of topics, reportscould focus on significant changes.The monitoring report could be organized as a series ofinformation sheets. The first page would introduce thereader to the plan and the monitoring system. The followingsheets would then be organized according to informationcategory where each category, for example goals andobjectives, is referenced to the Plan if possible. Ifapplicable, the implications for overall goal achievementcould be included on each information sheet. The finalsection could then provide advice to Council on alternativecourses of action. In reports prepared for the generalpublic, the last section could present the decisions made byCouncil and a plan of action for the following year.88Chapter 3. Monitoring System DesignOne advantage of information sheets is that reports canbe assembled from routine monitoring activities. In thisway, significant items can be selected for the annual orspecial reports as desired. This method is currently beingused with the Vancouver Monitoring Program and it has provedeffective there.3.3.4 The Improvement Sub-SystemThe improvement sub-system involves the evaluation ofthe performance of the monitoring system and itsenhancement. Throughout the monitoring exercise, there willbe opportunities for making improvements. This isparticularly significant during the initial start-up phasewhere a monitoring system will be implemented incrementally.The success of monitoring will depend to a large extenton organizational considerations. First of all, monitoringduties and responsibilities should be made clear. Second,commitment and support of management will help provide asense of purpose, particularly if the results of monitoringare seen as making a contribution to the planning process.Finally, regular monitoring-related meetings will help toensure that information flows out to those who need it andback in to those who can improve the system.In this chapter, a monitoring system for the CommunityDevelopment Plan for Mount Pleasant was designed on the89Chapter 3. Monitoring System Designbasis of the literature reviewed in Chapter 2. The Plan wasfirst described and shown to be a broad-based policy planthat relied primarily on zoning control to achieve the goalsof the local community. The monitoring system which wasthen designed provided: an information collection subsystem, including an organizing framework for datacollection; a technical evaluation sub-system, withsuggestions for data analysis; an advisoxy sub-system,including suggestions on a format for communicating theresults of monitoring; and an improvement sub-system, withrecommendations for improving the monitoring system.90CHAPTER 4MONITORING SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATIONIn the previous chapter, a monitoring system for theCommunity Development Plan for Mount Pleasant was proposed.In this chapter, the monitoring system is implemented forthe section of the Plan that contains the Mount Pleasantindustrial area strategy. First, the section on industry isexamined more closely. Second, the data requirements formonitoring the industrial strategy are specified. Finally,the monitoring system is implemented for the policyaddressing residential uses in the industrial area. For thepurposes of the case study, data will be collected andanalyzed, and the resulting information will be treated asif the monitoring system had been in place since 1987.4.1 THE PLAN FOR INDUSTRY IN MOUNT PLEASANTThe Mount Pleasant industrial area (Figure 9) ischaracterized by a gradual north facing slope, small lotsizes, and a high concentration of wholesaling, service, andlight manufacturing activity (Vancouver 1992a) . Note thatFigure 9 shows the zoning as it existed in 1987 prior toplan implementation. M-l is a zoning district for lightindustry and M-2 is zoned for heavy industry.91Chapter 4. Monitoring System ImplementationFigure 9. The Mount Pleasant Industrial Area- 1987-I,“Th-1. 4Greot Northern yI_ IIBroadway12th Ave.S6th tgie.:192Chapter 4. Monitoring System ImplementationDuring the planning process, four areas of concern wereidentified:1. The retention of industrial focus;2. Major streets (Carnbie and Main);3. Residential uses; and4. The Brewery Creek industrial enclave.Each of these concerns is discussed individually below.The goals and recommendations listed below are as containedin the Plan (Vancouver 1989a) and provided in Appendixes Aand B. All of the recommendations for the industrial areaentail controlling land use and development. These controlshave been implemented through zoning by-laws. The policystatements provided below are from the zoning districtschedules in the Vancouver Zoning and Development By-Laws,or from related Land Use and Development Policies andGuidelines.4.1.1 Retention of Industrial FocusDue to its proximity to the Downtown and the CentralBroadway commercial area, the industrial area had been underpressure from commercial uses which can bid higher for theland and thus force out industry. The local community,concerned about the loss of blue collar jobs, wanted to“curtail the erosion of the industrial integrity of thearea” (Vancouver 1989a:47)93HDiH1ocr CD0 0HrtDlo:i CDCD b:i 0r’-)IU-ictH’0-DM0:) ODj:J•II 0 Di Di hj1’)H-:i(çi—(DitH(DH DiDiCDU)CD1DiCDU)Ncr0 j0CDMçtDloH0 DiDi ‘0 I, CD ri 0 H (U Di 0C)---U)CDiH-’-)h3’iUH-0NOHC)HH.OH-(Di•0iCDH-,iM,O-h.0iQCD0fi1FH-HQU)Q.hhir-hSCD5çijHtHH-H-tJioDiCDNU)H-H,tQCDr-iU)OOH-CU(flIQctCDDiH-ctCDtcCDjcrCDCDDiHhCDhhI-hU)ctQhCDQD)DiCDDIH-H-OCD0<ctH-U)ctflDiH-crCUU)DictFH-U)DiyO0crri-DiCDt3(QH0Fi0HJ0H-H0QhDiDiCt0cnCDcrF-S0DiIiHCD-hH•1DiicrDiU)051CDCDiSiH-0QhjCDM,ctCDfrcrCDHHI—nCDD)CDH-QOctU)U)0DiU)CD0DirtQ(rtrtH-U)I—jJct0HDiCDCDDi3HCrH00rt3Di1rrH-U)OctCuQU)l-<DiYi‘d’tIQiCD0IOcrCDjt’tJt1Diiç243H-tY0DiH-HHH-CDDiiH’dCDHH-HO0H-D)(QH-ocrç)p)iooCi(QH-CD0OH0U)I--U)CDiiiCUrtCDCDU)P)CD(iDiCDH-•1CD0I1U)cti><DiH-iH-<iCDcH-irJQ.çtrtH-OCDD)NH-H---U)Q1HOctH-U)ii0IDiCI-CDLijOCr’U)H-iHH-H-OCDDJOH-CDH-0ciH-ctH-iHrrU)QDiI0QYU)CDD)iH(QCD•QCD-toDi<0j0I-hU)0rroc-tcr0:iiHH-U)U)H500H-U)H’<H-Di011CrCDCDDiiçU)U)H-ctCTh3HDiDi1U‘ziiH-rrctiiHCDHH-P)IIcti3p)(1oU)<CD0k<HCDcrH-croCi)SD‘tiCI-c—I-H-HI--1-5HU)CrCDCDQ’<DioIHH-C)DlDiI-X0I)DiDiH’t5CD[IOH-siCD1f-flc-rçiU)iDiDi‘-<ICDitQc-r0iH-CDJH-H-CrrrHDi(Q(1)Chapter 4. Monitoring System Implementationd) PolicyThe primary intent of the I-i Schedule is topermit light industrial uses that are generallycompatible with one another and with adjoiningresidential or commercial districts. It is alsothe intent to permit advanced technology industry,and industry with a significant amount of researchand development activity. Service commercial usescompatible with and complementing light industrialuses are also permitted but not offices or retailstores.Great Northern WayI1co_iI:;.;::::• I-i ndustriat AreaC-3A Cambie StreetIC-3 Brewery CreekIC-2 Main Street16th Ave.Figure 10. The Mount Pleagant Industrial Area - 19924....EE.I IC,)IC,,IU,CD-I95COH-—C)(j)çtH-Di‘—‘-.--‘—rrQH-CDHCDcitQCDoCl)CD0CD1ctQifld—C)Dic1y’fl-—3DiI-!CD[-a-CDCDDiF-0Cl)k<DictH-CD0I-hCODiCl)CDDiCDDiHCDH-CDl-COH-Ct-iF-C)H-H,tQH-H-C!)DlCDC)C)0CDH-Ct0DlCD0‘1DiliCDDIH-CDciHci1’.QDitQDiHctCl)CDDlCl)(I)ci()Ct-C)H-Qui-’CtDlCOçt:i(tH-Q.ctQF-a-CDCl)DlIIQQQi0CrC!)H-CD0l-H-CD0t-CDCDC)CtCDCDDiDiF-Di0t—hCDciDiCD<CrNHH-H-DJH-CDCOCDI-COCO33F—CtctCDDlDiDlDlciCDCDCl)iCt0H-CDI-’!!JCDCnçtCDC)DlC)0CtQCDI—-.CtDiOCOODiCDCD(ClH-I-iCDC)c-tQ.Cl)CtC)DiCDH-t1QCD0C0CDF—H-Qi—hCDCtCDJ1P-CtH-CODi•CDC)CrCDOct-0ciCtQDiCDIDiCtCtDiQfrjH-Qc-tCtWCDt-JOCtciI-COHCDCDHDiH-C)j()ctfl0ctCOH-DiCrDiI—..Di0IQi-tjCOiC)•CtWCtfrH-tQCD0DlCt(DODiHl-0CDOCDCDH,CO•CDCD0Ct0Nf-tH-CDCDfr’!DiDl00CDH-CDH-HHif-tNJCO0CtQ.C,)CDCDDiH0CDDi1lH-Oi0Cl)CLODiCDCtODiDlf-tt’iDiC0CDC)Cl)H-CDouli-<CtDlciH-0Ctc-tH00h0CDDCl)HOH0i’ZICthhCDH-ciçtI0iH-C)CDCOI-!t-)03H-0DiCDCoCl)CDDiJDihhCDCDo•CtCrCOCDCtCDH-CLHCl)CDCD0CDftCtCDCICtDiCtCDDiCDCDCOHciiDiCDCt0CD CDHDl H0C) Dl ICDHH-CDCDHihQDlH-ICDO0DlH-hi,OFlrtHFlCDH-LQN ç-tCDH-CD0 I-LQH-CDodD000Q.CDCDH-LOc-t-JH-HoCDH 0DlOHFlCDH-HCD •CDOFlCt0CDIll-IH-DlctQf-I-HCD01rt CDDl rI-DIDl H HCD N 0 CD ‘I 0 I—c CD CD H CD f-r H Dl H f-I 0 H CD f-I Fl H Dl H CD CD CD DlI--c CD CD H CD f-r H Dl H CD CD CD CD I--c CD Dl CD 0 0 0 hi,0 I--c H H f-I-0 f-I CD N 0 HwH jj CDHCD-oHa,QHCD f-ICtH DlCDHDl FlCl)CDCDDlCDCD 0 f-t 0 CD CD f-I 0 Ui I--c 0 Dl Dl DlHH-CDH-OQH-f-0d-jdflOCDO-QrI-H-CDCDOCDCDOCDJf-I-0FlFlOOH-IDIH-FlctCDCDQ.CDCDFlCDII0CDCDQ.CDJ(HCDf-tCDC5CDH-CDCDCDCDCDCDQCQDlHCDH-1DlH-dCDCDH-DICDCDHQ.H-ftf-tCDf-I-Of-CDf-I-fI-Flf-IH-CtCDDlH-’3FlctH-H-OCDCDH-0DlcI-CDO(•CDOCD<CDf-I-HH-DlH-(QH-CDf-I-H(DH-HH-D)DiM,DlLQFl1OhhH-DlCDtiCtDlCD(IIHODl(QctHCDf-tH-CDOCDHf-I-H-I—iJ<l-i0<J:i<f-I-f-I-f-I-Qjf-I-DlOOf-tCDf-tCDOCDH-H-DlO0H-H-CD1JDlOM,M,•HH-f-I-f-I-flFlf-I-H-iCDH-CDctOCDH-Plf-I-f-I-DIlcI-CDCDCtH-tf-ICDH-CDOQCD•HCD0h<OH-CDH,DlCDFlOOHDlH-OCDCDf-I-0OctH-H-CDf-tH-H-Dl0c-I-Q<H-DlFlf-I-QH-CDCtFlf-I-H-CDflf-I-hhO<3CtCDFlOtPliCDIf-I-H-QI-h0-H-FlDIH-hhCDOFlCDDIWDl()00M,DIOjDIQf-I-H---HDIOM,CDDlH1H-OHf-I-CDH-CDOCtH-><‘tIi0<Dlf-I-CDDIFlLQCDCflDlQf-I--DlDiHCDCDf-I-dCDOLQC)f-I-FlCDCDCDiCDCDCDDlCDCDCDOCDDiFlOf-I-OP.FlCDHQOFlCDII0CDCDOCDH-CDC)CDCDQcI-H-<clPlcI-f-I-ctHDlPI1CDDlICDCDDlH‘—‘-FlCDOHf-I-cI-f-I-’JH-IlIFlH0HOH-H-FlH-CDOcI-FlQ(QFlCDH-CDCDFlYCDiCDH-Did!)OFlNCDOCDCDI.QOi00ct0CDCDH-CD-HCDf-I-fi-M,CDH-f-I-CtH-FlCDQCl)f-I-CDOf-I-H-HDICDf-I-DlCDQ.DlCDf-IFICDDl(H-HOO•JI-QOH-HCDCDOf-ICDDiO(QH,HCDOiCD0CDDiOOJi0DlH(PDlFlf-I-Jf-t(CtCDFl(HQCD‘tICD5<DJdCDiH-f-I-’t5CDCDft’—J-CDDl-CDH-H-H-I1CDH-DlH-H-CDCI)OH-f-I-iHOOH-H-<f-I-QiCDH-H-H-CDCDH-DlH-CDCDf-I-ihhCDtQH-CDQDlCDiFlCDDIHH-Fl1H-Dlf-tHQ<f-I-CDHHCl)0DlHO‘<DlCDJ1DlCD3f-I-CDHLHf-tOjCD‘—J-CDFlf-I-CD“<OM,QDl0CDH-DlFlOHFlDlik<f-I-H1H IChapter 4. Monitoring System Implementationlaw. Because of this non-conforming status, owners ofresidential buildings encountered difficulty obtaininginsurance or funding for renovations and alterations. Also,non-conforming buildings cannot be replaced in case of fire,thus removing incentive to invest in building improvements.At the time of plan preparation it was estimated thatapproximately 100 residential buildings remained, some witharchitectural and heritage merit. The residents of MountPleasant wanted to remove the restrictions imposed onexisting residential uses.a) GoalTo accommodate existing residential uses byreducing uncertainty with respect to upgrading.b) Recommendation1. Director of Planning to include within proposedindustrial zoning district schedules the followingconditional use description:“Residential uses which existed prior to and havebeen used continuously as such since (date ofenactment) .“2. Zoning guidelines should state clearly thatresidential uses are permitted with theunderstanding that owners and occupants will seekno operational limitations to industry.980çtH-iC)ClClC),HC)00ED0H-H-C)‘dCDHED000P10EDcti—’-0P1i-i300(DCllEDH-Q9(DH-H-[Ci99riClP1H-90H-H-H.H-IiCl)EDUi0P)ctctEDCDI-H-H-ClCDç-tçtCDPIP)ClOPCDC)CDctCD0EDH-0F--H-ictliO0Lç0CDCDCl)Uicrcr(DHED0MicrH-cDtQCDc2ii3iCDI-IP1HI-ICDCDH-H-H-030CDHH-crMi(1)9CDP)><C)HCD<0OCl)HClH-EDF1H-CDC)CliHC)ctH-(DtQC)QCDHH•ct<Nf—F--0MiH-Cl)><CDIIEDctClrsi0k<Cl).CDHCl)(DPICD<EDIC)MiQçrOHI-idEDc-tH-0<I-IH-HctHCl)H-Micrp)QCDEDctCl)MiCDED0CDH-CD‘CI0H-IICCDCDH-0CD0CDf1---‘CI(C)crH-ClCDEDCl()crQClCl)CDH-I-IcfhI-I-Cif-rXP1cr<ctED3CDCDCD0EDCDQP1H-jctCDCl)CtI--ClCDHCDEDf-tUl><<ct<CDOEDCDHH-‘CIO-H-Cl)Cl)H-ctoct0c-i-CDC)CDEDClHCl)EDHci-EDJCDCDP)CDCl)9I-IftCl)CDOCl)F—ctCDcH-(D’t5iH-EDIEDClHI-I-EDEflCDkDH-H-Hct0ICDCD0H-CDci-EDCDEDCDiF-çCDHEDCl)H,Cl)Cl)hCD0C0-QCDi(C)ctCDH-iCl)H-H-i-H-ci-(C)H-CDhClII—Cl)H-Cl)-I-CDCDCDH-CDri-Cl)CDCDH-HHW3EDCDi-’lri-H-0JiCl)Cl)ED00--JH-fr1))‘CIEDM-IEDF-3iHEDci-I-C-i-00UIf-i-COEDCDH-Or-H-H-O0ci-H-01))3CD<MiIIClfrPH-ctci0ClEDEDI-ci-0)QH-P1CDci-UH-UH0‘CIH-CDCDHClCl)ClH-3UClctClCDCDCll-0P10-ClP1-rtCDUClci-ci-0H-Cl)H-H-EDCDIHP10,0Cl11CDctH-0crEDCl)CDri-CDED(C)EDHH-CDCDC)ClH-Cl(C)H-ctH-CDCl)0HCl)Cl)C)F-ci-3HH-0iCDCtHEDCD’JEDCt<P1CDMi<H-H-f-i-EDCl)CD0(QED-ClEDCDN1))1))c-i-QI-ED-ClClEr)-F-1))330•CDci-CDCDctH-00ciCl)fi-f-i-0ClClMiM,i-Cl)OEl)EDED3CDH-HCt00CDH-0:ICDEDClCD000‘-1-CD<iClEDQQED00EDCDCl)-ICtHCDCDEDH-0H0‘CIEDCDHEDH-rtH-I30OCDClH-ci-IICtH-Hf-i-UClCD0‘C)‘CIl0H-HCl)iCl)ED1h’CDEl)Mi0NCl)ClCDCDH-90)3Ct0H(Q<EDIIoXHci-i-EDC)CDCDCl)CDH-HH-CDHHCDi-’-H-Hk<Cl)CDEDU]ci-HH-Hct(C)CD—1))Clçt—EDc-i-H-F-<HCl)0(C)EDChapter 4. Monitoring System Implementationcharacter of the area and allow live-in artist studios on atest basis.a) GoalTo allow development of the Brewery Creekcharacter area along Scotia Street.b) Recommendations1. Director of Planning to work with the MountPleasant Citizen’s Committee to prepareappropriate zoning and companion design guidelinesto foster the unique character of the BreweryCreek Industrial Enclave and that the Director ofPlanning bring forward recommendations forconsideration by City Council prior to the end of1987.2. Director of Planning to examine the BreweryCreek Industrial Enclave, between Main andBrunswick, for a potential pilot project for otherareas of the City, incorporating industrial usesand artist studio and accommodation.c) Action TakenThe Brewery Creek Industrial Enclave was rezoned toIC-3 on October 25, 1988.100H cDCJHCDQFtEDFED)13çtçtCl)t3CDFtl))1i)ED)Ft<flQfr-Ft’tjF-[-aIICDHh’0Pi0HHiEDFtCDH00)H-)CDJH-H(D(DI-aH-CDH<CD’-J-tQCDFtFtQCDCDC)CDCDCDH-CDP)0FtH-9HCDH-0FtH‘dCDIOH(FtOFtH-(QEDH-FtP)CD0CDP)0)I-FtCDjH-crIFtiHCD0CDHCDHCDCDCDW•PJ<H-CD1HP)CD))FtCD0(QCDk<HFtCDUIH-G:)FtH-EDCD0iiCDED)CDOIPJCl)(HFt))FtI-IEDHi0OOCDH-H><H-EDiEDEDH-CD&H-0EDEDOH-H-H-‘1CDI)H-H-C)FtFtNFt(j)Ft0FtED)frHHQOJ)H-Hi0ED90lD0H-HiCDbtjFtHCDP)CDHiFtEDI-Ft(DCDH,HQI-C)CDFtFtFtEDi-0HiCDH-H-FtHFtEDFtH-CD(DFtCDtflH-H-FtCD—0EDCD001-EDDiFt0FtFtHP‘1CDCDFtH-dQ0DiHiH-hCDH0FtH-I-0CDHiH-H,H-FtH,EDOH-HH-LQOC))ctCDrtC)FtH-H-FtHCDh0DlCDHiFtH-0HEDCDHEDFtDlihHEDtjIIFtCDCDFtH-.CICD0H-FtCD0•CDCDP1OCDP)CDEDH1(H-9$10CDHFtCDCDCDFt[flQ-HFtQc-tH-H-DlCDCDCDFtEDEDCDL1.PJI0P’Q.IICDFt(D•H-IIOFtH-WP)I-P)<H-CDP)I-.tQEDHEDEDDiCDH-JH-1iI-H-1H[nEDHDlFtH-i)CDOH-OFtEDHEDCDDl(FtFtC)I-(C)30CL)FtDIrt(C)EDHCD(rCDCDH-FtOiQHfrCDH-Q.EDDIH0bCDEDH-EDtED<ElIFtHH-DlHi9IH-HEDOPICDCDCDHriCDEDEDOH-H-HEDEDFtCDCl)C)DIFt0(C)H-3D)C)EDFtP1CDOC)JDIHCDH-FtCDCDtiJIIiH-friEDOCDFtFtEDHC)CDEDCD<FtFtHiCi)0H-EDFtDIFtCDFtDlH-I-Dl0$1C)H-H-0Ft0CDH-HQFtDIFtDCDCDP1DI<CD‘EDDlFtCDftDlHH-HFtCDI-IFtED0D)CDFtJIICDJDlCDCD(1-<WH-HFt0Chapter 4. Monitoring System Implementation4.2.1 Plan ImplementationTable 8 lists the recommendations set out in the Plan,the primary agency responsible for implementing therecommendations, the action taken, and the date. Therecommendations are arranged by each of the four substantiveissues area identified in the Plan.RECOMMENDATIONS AGENCY ACTION TAKEN DATE2.5 INDUSTRY2.5.1 Retention of Industrial Focus1. New zoning schedule with no Planning Rezoned to 1-1. Oct 25, 1988existing uses made non-conforming.2.5.2 Major Streets1. Rezone Cambie and Planning Cambie rezoned to C-3A. Oct. 25, 1988Main to C-3A. Main rezoned to IC-2. Oct. 25, 19882.5.3 Residential Uses1. Add as conditional use. Planning Incorporated in I-i and Oct 25, 1988IC-3 schedules.2.5.4 Brewery Creek1. Prepare zoning schedule. Planning Rezoned to IC-3. Oct. 25, 19882. Live-in artist studios. Planning Incorporated in I-i, IC-2, Oct. 25, 1988IC-3, and C-3A schedules.Table 8. Plan Implementation Schedule102Chapter 4. Monitoring System Implementation4.2.2 AssumptionsNo assumptions were explicitly written in the MountPleasant Plan and no forecasts were included. However, anumber of assumptions could be read ‘between the lines’.Regarding residential uses in industrial areas for example,it might be assumed that building owners would be eager toobtain building permits that were denied in the past. Thisassumption and a key question are listed in Table 9.ASSUMPTIONS KEY QUESTIONS INFORMATION NEEDED2.5 INDUSTRY2.5.3 ResidenaI Uses1. Applications for residential building How many permits are being issued? Building permitspermits for renovations will be made. by purpose.Table 9. Assumptions Schedule103Chapter 4. Monitoring System Implementation4.2.3 Goals and ObjectivesThe goals for industry presented earlier are listed inTable 10. No objectives which might have set shorter termtargets for industry were specified in the Plan. For eachgoal, a number of key questions and the information neededto answer each question are set out.GOALS KEY QUESTIONS INFORMATIONNEEDED2.5 INDUSTRY2.5.1 Retention of Industrial Focus1. To create an atmosphere in the What sort of development is Development permitMount Pleasant Industrial Area occurring? Building permitsconducive to industry. Levels of industrial employment? EmploymentWhat type of firms are moving in? Business licensesWhat are the land uses? Floorspace dataAre land values stable? Property data2.5.2 Major Streets1. To redefine uses and building What is the appearance of these Visual inspectionforms on the Cambie and Main Street streets?corridors which enhance the appearance What sort of development is Development permitof these major streets. occurring? Building permits2.5.3 Residential Uses1. To accommodate existing residential Are residenal buildings remaining? Property datauses by reducing uncertainty with Are residences being renovated? Building permitsrespect to upgrading.2.5.4 Brewery Creek1. To allow development of the What sort of development is occurring? Development permitBrewery Creek character area Building permitsalong Scotia Street. Are live-in artist studios increasing? Business licensesTable 10. Goals and Objectives Schedule104ClDiHHCD0C)CDDiC)iC)CDClH-H-CDMiCDCrwCDH-H-0CDf-ft0I-0LQI-’ftHCD<0DiH-HCDH-C1l-jHCDCDCDC)DiCrDl11ClDihDiCrCDCDH-IIMiCDHDiCDCDDC)CD00CrCri—it-CDCDCrCDQ.0CtMiHDi0MiC)CDMiH-MiftCrC)CtHCDMi::yHCDHCl)CI)0MiCDCD0HCD‘11i0CDcrCr‘tJCDCl)CDCD‘-DiCrIIDiUC)CtCDCl)0C)H-CrMi00CDHHCDHCDDiIHH-t5HHCl)Cr‘rJH-H-NDi030CrH(H-H-H-oC)DiIiH-H(QCl)DiH’Cl)c-r0H-C)HftDirrDiCrQc-rClCDDiH-tiCDDiC)C)CrC) 0 IIDiClDl C)CDCD0 MiH CrH-::j•CrNCD0hjCDH-CDiCrQ I- CD‘1(0 IIH DiCDCr><HDl0 CDH CDCD 0H-MiCDiiICDDiCri-Dic-rH-H3C)H-H(cDiCD<MiDiCrDiDiI<:0I-0CDhH-H-Di0Di(cHCDCD0 ftDiI]j$j><:DlCl)CDH-iiCD0ClCDH CDClDi‘-ij0WHiCl)HHiCDCDCDCDC)CrCDoDiMiHMiCD0H-0IIHi[-IH•IC)HDiC)C)Di•HNH-Di0CDMi:iHCDDlH-C) Cr(QMiDi•HClI-CD0ClH-C)0H-CrH(CDH-HClCDoIt0c-rHDiCrI-CDC)DiCDICD3MiCL)I-CD0IICrDiDi0ftH-CD‘1CDH-HCDCr><0CDDiDiCDCrCDC)H-CiCD00H‘ICDCDCl)-C)H-R’DiCrCDMiClCD00I-CrDiIDiCD‘tSC)<‘tSH-H-frHCD0rJHDiDiDiC)I-HF,<0 Di0CrfrMiCD0Cl•CttIH-CDCDCr‘1Hc-r CDH-H-ClftDihftClCDCDClC)CDClH-CrCDCr0H-IH-CD0CDCDi0CD-MiCDDiH-C)HLI.HC)CUCDHCDiC)CDCrtfCDH-CD0iCrI-tQ0Di<H0f-rH 0CDCDCl)-rCDCDI-iClCDCD•C)UCDCDHCr<Di0CDCrHH-Di00II‘tiH-CDHCD‘.<CrDiHI-0CDCDIi‘tiCt0CD frI:ICDHH-CD‘tiCrDl‘tiCrCD0CDDiCl3ç-rCr0•CrftCDH-Di(CDC)CrCDH-C)CDDiCDCDClClCDHJ’CDH-CDC)0J•C)MiH CDCrCDDlCL)11CDCDHDl0hCDDiCDttlHCDCD‘tiC)CDH-MiI-iMi0HHft CDH-ClClC)IiDCD CrCD CD CDHCD :1< C) CD CD Cl H C) C) C) 1’JH C)C) C) C) CD Mi CrH C) Ui) 0 H H- C) H- CD CD Di Cl U CD C) H- CD H- 0 CDCD CD C) H- Mi H- CD Cl H Cr CD CD C) CD Cl H CD CD Mi0 CD :1< Di I‘-al CD H Cr CD Cr 0 MiCr CD H Cl CD Cr H-Di H N 0 H Cl H- CD ft I- H- C) ft CD C) CD Cl H CD CDI H I-Chapter 4. Monitoring System Implementation4.2.5 Data NeedsFor each item of information needed in the abovetables, an entry can be made in Table 11.INFORMATION SOURCE3 FREQUENCY WHEN BASE ASSEMBLY HOW PRIORITYNEEDED AVAILABLE DATE PROBLEMS RELIABLEBuilding PALS Continuous On 1984 Need to set on/at Fair Highpermits (Vancouver) request boundaries, improvingBusiness BLMF Continuous None Need special Good Mediumlicenses (Vancouver) permissionDevelopment PALS Continuous On 1984 Need to set on/at Fair Mediumpermits (Vancouver) request boundaries, improvingEmployment GVRD ? On 1991 Available for 1991 Very Mediumrequest only goodEmployment Census 10 year On 1981 Cost charge applies Very Mediumperiod request goodFloorspace CIFS 2year On 1989 1991 notyet ready Fair Medium(GVRD) period requestLand use data PTF + BLMF Continuous On None Need to link 2 files Fair Highrequest Insufficient detailProperty PTF Connuous On None Need special Excellent Lowdata (Vancouver) request permissionTable 11. Data Needs ScheduleBLMF- Business License Master File (City of Vancouver)CIFS - Commercial Industrial Floorspace System (GVRD)PALS-Permits and Licenses System (City of Vancouver)PTF- Property Tax File (City of Vancouver)106P1U)U)hH-U)P1H-H-QdH-QP1C)H-U)00CDCDCDiFtdiP1HP10I-I-tQU)<WI-0H,H,Ft)MFtP1H1CDP1CDCDCD1H-CDP100P10P1HHQF-p1QU)HFtFtIIII<CDU)CD9C)1CDçtQCDH-H-p1U)C)FtH000H-H-i0CiP1P1(1)p1U)H-Ft-:if-CDH-FttQCD00c-tFtLQFtU)U)CDH-HP10HU)(QH-P1P1HH-H-H-CDQP1Ft9P1QC)FtP1FttQHH,H-00I-Ci0H0HH-LJH-0-HH-0U)0C)CDCDP1H-jCDFt00P1fr’H-U)‘t3H3p1U)HU)0<IQH,C)HP1CDH-PiCDP1CDhCDU)0Ft0U)•IIU)U)b‘-LP1Q0CDU)ç-LOCD‘-LCDH-CDHCD0FtFtP1P1CD(Q<U)U)P1H-CD0H,FtC)P10H-H-CD9HFtQCD<P)0FtJFtU)1FtFt0HH-,H-(i)FtP1HH-U)CDCD(P1FtCD“<09Q0HH(QH-FtU)CDiH-10C)U)NP1HCDP1IIH,0FtU)tIP1ClC)CDp1CD0-‘rjC)FtCDfr’hjP1CDtItIH-U)I-HCDFl<0Clc-i—ClQ0c-i-Cl0HFtP1CDU)ClFtP1H,iFlHCDCDFtP1P1H-HCDFtH-FtP1H-P1FtCDI-P1H-0C)Hi0U)CDP1U)FlH-HClU)‘u.U)I-H0H-3•C)P1p1P1Cl-uiH-t-iU)CDLOHU)H-Ci)U).Ht)FtH@LOFttQU)P1CDU)CDHP1C)CDCDC)WU)U)9p1U)H,CD0P1tiP1C)09U)CDH-CDP1U)Ft0H0FtLi-FtH,FtU)P1H-U)ClHFlC)P1H-9C)H00P1C)0CDIFlH-CDFtP1CDH3P1I--JFl0IIFtCDHCDClU)U)U)FtCFtH9FtCDiHClFlPiCD‘CIP1C)U)H0HIILOCDFtC)C)ClFt90H-P10i-ICDP1CD0cFtP1C)Ftl-jH-H-H-0H0FlU)<Fl—JFlH-0CL)P1H0H-‘itJP1HCDCT)P1CD0-P1CDClHU)H-FtU)CDU)U)FtU)FtiHU)lP1CDC)FtC)P1H-H-<0H,H-‘CIU)H-U)FtP10H-Ci)HFtFtIClCl0H,C)FlH-FtCDl-j3L0H-CDCDP1FlFlP10HCDClCDH-I))U)0H-U)H-Ft0Ft<CflHFtQ.P1•.FtFtc-i-CDCDU)H-FtFtCDC)H-H-CDCl0JCl)U)HU)Q.H-P10ClC)‘CICDH,ClFlFlCDFt<P1CDP1CDU)FCD0FlFlP1CDH-U)HFl>CDU)30,Q0U)P1HH0FlU)FtCDH-CDH-Cl<03•I3CDHU)U)U)H,H-P1H,FtH‘C)U)HP1‘CIFtFtP10H,ClFtFtH-H,P1CDHH-CDH-Fl0FtCDFtJFtFlNCDFtlHC)ClPiFlH-CDP10P10CDCDiClFttQ‘<HFtCDFtFtFtCDFlClFtU)H-‘-<P1P1H-P1CDCDJCDFtU)CDFtU)Ft<FtClFtP1P1U)I.Q0H-H-0H-CDH-p1FtU)U)0H,CDU)FtClFtCD0 IICtC)9)9)‘t3H-(QH-CDCDCD9)H<IICDH-9)CDift9)Cl)H-0H-CDQ9)0CDCD(QQtOHoH9)CtHCDHCDH-<H-CDJCDCDH9)H-C)1CDQ.CtftHH-CDI-(I)H-C)0HH-I-jH-9)9)9)QCDC)CDCt9)Ct‘xj9)C)HCDCDCDhh9)t5H-H-CDCl)09))-HI-H-II0Cl)JQ1CDlH-tCHHf-tHCLCl)LljH-H-hjCLCDCDCtCDCD3CDCDCDCD9)C)H9)H9)CDCDCtCL9)CDCLH-HCDH-H9)H-tl—j0çt<iCDCLCDH-I-I-h3H-ciCD-CD9)CDtYCLCDU)CDCD0C)CtI-9)Q9)9)I-h9)L-CtI-iQI-Mh’ftCD‘-l-’0CDf-tjCrC)0CDCDH-Cl)H-CDCDCDCl)9)CDCCDCD<I-•0()C)9)hC)CDCDCDftC59)CD9)9)CDI03I9)H9)H9)CD0CDH-0CDCtfto<10Ct0f-tQ-rJi-h0H-9)H-0CDCtCDHC)CDH-CDCD0C)F03f-tC)0C)CDh0Ct0CtCDCDCD0CDi-CD9)CDS-t<IICtCD3l-dC)f-tHft9)CD9)Q9)CDC)CDçtIl)0ftftC)CD0CD0-0CDrOH-I-hftH-QC)0J00H-IIII9)MCD-0LQHi—i-9)QI-hCD9)I-h9)ftCLC)H0CDHH-CDIIHftCDI-ftftH<CD-03CDIICD0CDH-0ftI-Cl)CD<H0tQCDCLCDft9)CDCD9)9)‘tIiHtOH-CDc0-CL)CDCD9)i-9)CLH-ftH9)ftH-M0Mfti-h9)CDCDHft.oCLft0CLH-‘9)H-H-0CDftH-HCLCD039)9)ftCDI-H-‘‘JCDCDC)CDhJHft0H0H-h0—JCl)fti-h9)CDH-CDI-ftCD09)CLH39)0F-’ftftCLHC)ftHftftHH-9)I-’-CX)CDIQII9)H-CD0<II‘<9)JCDH3HCi-CDCDCLI--09)QCD-H-CD0-CDCDCLCDI-hHftCLCDHH9)II9)CDH-CD<‘<CDi-9)CDCD9)C)F-’.—CLI-hCLCDCDftCDH-hjMCD-3ftCDHCLCDH--9)9)CDft9)F-’I-jHC)ftQH-i-Ho3CDH‘-LI-iCDH-H00iCl)H0H-<ft3ftHCDCDCD00CDCDiIIH-H-H-(I)CDH-CLCL‘tiCD3F-fti-HMCDCDftftCD9)CDi-h-CDCD9)CD<0H-CDH-CDCDF-’C)Cl)ftI-iII0CD‘C3H-ftCDCDCi9’ftH-CDI-iCD9’C)0CDCD0CDt5CD9)0CD9)C)9)H-CDCDCD9)0t-çC)0ftCLH-F-’FJ’0CDC)H-CQH-I-CDIICLH-CLDHftCD9)Nftft(C3HftCDHCDM-CD03CDHCLCD9)9)Q‘109)9)iU)CD‘dCDftHH-oH-CD9)ftF-’-ftHMI—’LQftHHi<CLi-0H-9)W9)H-9)CDCD9)CDCDH-CD9)H-tCDQ9)3h’3’3ftci)ftCDCDCD9)CDCDHCL‘t3H-CDCD0CL9)CDCD9)(QCDHCLl-’CDCl)ftHft9)CLftCDCDCDH0CDftCDH-c-i-CLCDCLIil--o<C)MCDftti0IICDi-C)H-0[-9)CDCDc-i-9)CDCDHCLCL0H3HCD-CDCDCDftI9)0CLCDF-’Chapter 4. Monitoring System ImplementationTABLE 12. LAND USE IN THE I-i AREA- 1991Number Total Percent Average Total Percent AverageLand Use of Lots Area (sg.fL) Lot size Floorspace FSRDwelling 67 250,470 7.8% 3,738 0.00Institutional 1 29,621 0.9% 29,621 0.00Manufacturing 75 685,634 21.4% 9,142 833,030 27.6% 1.21Office 30 263,538 8.2% 8,785 272,198 9.0% 1.03Parking 19 126324 3.9% 6,649 0.00Retail 12 105,415 3.3% 8,785 100,036 3.3% 0.95Service 56 462,607 14.5% 8,261 589,817 19.5% 1.27Transportation & Storage 4 29,185 0.9% 7,296 20,549 0.7% 0.70Utility&Communicattons 1 27,443 0.9% 27,443 32,641 1.1% 1.19Wholesaie 78 919,552 28.7% 11,789 1,003,609 33.2% 1.09Vacant 16 76,230 2.4% 4,764 0.00Storage & Warehou&ng 27 225,205 7.0% 8,341 169,094 5.6% 0.75TOTAL 386 3,201,224 100.0% 8,293 3,020,974 100.0% 0.94Source:City of Vancouver Property Tax FileCity of Vancouver Business License Master FileGVRD Commercial Industrisi Floorspace SystemTABLE 13. RESIDENTIAL USES IN THE I-I AREABUILDING TYPE 1987 1991 ChangeSINGLE FAMILY DWELLING 32 32 0VACANTRESID.<2ACRES 1 1 0PROP SUBJECT TO S.26(4) 4 3-1SINGLE FMY WITH BSMT STE 1 0 -1DUPLEX 13 12 -1MULTI-FAMILY-APT BLOCK 6 6 0MULTI-FAMILY-CONVERSION 16 16 0STORE(S)& LiVING QUARTRS 1 1 0TOTAL BUILDINGS 74 71 -3SOURCE: City of Vancouver Property Tax FileTABLE 14. RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE I-I AREABUILDING PERIITS ISSUED 1985-1992PURPOSE 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 TOTALALTER 1 1 3DEMOLiSH 1 1DEMOLISH-R/R 1 1TOTAL 0 0 1 2 1 5SOURCE: City of Vancouver Permits and Licences System109HI-”CD$1DiCDDi-CDCDc-I-CD•CDHoDi0HiCDQ‘<I-aoCDCDif-IH-cDi(Qt:T(Ci)IICDciCD•ciCDCDciCl)oH-ciCD(—I-F-CDCDH-CDCDH,IjH-H-CD0CDiDlI-ciHDiDil:3•f-I-H-LOiCDciH,LOciH-CDH,H-HHCD0ci‘ti‘-zCDC)H-ciCDD)H-oc-I-c‘C)HCD0CDCDCDC)CD0CDH-DlH-CDCDDlHf-I-HD)0ciHf-I-H-HciCDyCDciCDCDHH-ciDic-I-I-’)HCDti0ciDl0HCDH-:iCDc-I-iCDH0<HCDCDCDcici-C)C)H-H00HCDDlDiiciHCDHf-I-HHciCD<DiH-H-H-tQCl)H,(Y,•HH-—1H-HC)ciH-DlI-h(CF-f-I-0DlH-tQH-I1tif-I-0HCDciic-ICD-CD CDCDHIIH-IILOCDDiCD‘ticiciCDcoIIci‘tiH--CDCDI-CDc-I-0CDH-CDII>jH-H-ctC)f-I-DiH-HCDHDiDicif-I-Hcif-I-DlCDH-I-HciiCDCD‘<CDDiCDCDHCDoiC:)Dif-I--CDH-<b‘-DiI-cH-CDCDHCDC)CDCDH-0H-0Di:icici—ci<CDciciCDf-I-CDI-if-I-f-I-H-CDDi‘1HDiH-H-‘DHiDiOD0HLOt5ci(JiDiciif-I-Di•.p.f-II-cI-cHCDCDLOciCDDiH-Hf-I•CDCD‘tiLCDlI-cCDCDDiH-Di0CDiciI-cH-Xf-I-CDH-f-I-f-I-CD‘ti0if-I-HCDciDiH-WCDbI-NCDCDCD0‘f-I-f-I DiCDH-CDf-I CD<tQCDH-f-I Di 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4. Monitoring System Implementationremoved any right of appeal with respect to the abovelimitation.In response to the above request, the policy forresidential uses was immediately reviewed by the PlanningDepartment (Vancouver 1990). It was recommended by theplanner doing the review that the limit on additions beremoved from the dwelling use description and inserted inthe regulation section of the I-i district schedule. Thisrecommendation was based on the argument that, although notstated explicitly in the Mount Pleasant Plan, “the originalintent of the district schedule was to provide recourse tothe Board of Variance for dwelling units” (Vancouver1990:4). However, the Director of Planning decided not tofollow this recommendation. The response written to theowner stated that the limit was considered reasonable andexplained the options available under the existing 1-1district schedule. That owner obtained a building permit in1992 for the purpose of doing some alterations.The second incident was in relation to the publicationof the draft Central Area Plan in 1991 (Vancouver l99ld).Geographically, the Central Area encompasses all or part ofthe following local areas: the CBD, the West End, andportions of Kitsilano, Fairview, Mount Pleasant, andStrathcona. One proposed policy on business supportservices recommended confirmation of the Mount 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in informing the planningprocess, was accomplished by means of a case study. InChapter 2, literature indicated that the complexity of urbansystems necessitates a continuous planning process ratherthan one which simply targets desirable end states. Thatis, a cyclical or iterative linking of decision-making,implementation and monitoring is needed so that planning canadapt to changing community goals, issues, and trends.Within this context, literature was then reviewed onmonitoring within the systems theory concept of feedback andcontrol. In the planning control model, adapted fromengineering systems control, it was seen that feedback aboutthe actual state of the urban system is compared to theintended state as set out in the plan and, if necessary,corrective action is initiated. A comparison of engineeringand urban systems further illustrated the complexity of theurban environment and suggested that concentrating only on118Chapter 5. Conclusionthe objectives of the plan, as with the planning controlmodel, provides too narrow a perspective for monitoring.To provide the basis for designing a monitoring system,including an expanded role for monitoring, a generalmonitoring system model was then described. The remainderof Chapter 2 reviewed in turn each of the four sub-systemsof the monitoring model. First, with respect to theinformation collection sub-system, a discussion of thevarious categories of information that could be collectedended on the notion of “soft” or qualitative information andits potential contribution to a future-oriented monitoringsystem. Also, given the possibly enormous data requirementsof a plan monitoring system, the literature recommended adata collection strategy based on the mixed-scanningapproach.Second, regarding the technical evaluation sub-system,it was shown that while basic analysis can identify theamount or degree of change, determining the significance ofthat change and subsequently formulating and evaluatingalternative action possibilities would require furtheranalysis. Third, the advisory sub-system, concerned withcommunicating advice to decision-makers, was seen asproviding the feedback link for the continuous planningprocess. Finally, the role of the improvement sub-system119Chapter 5. Conclusionwas examined in relation to implementing a new monitoringsystem and improving an existing one.In Chapter 3, the first part of the case study, amonitoring system for the Community Development Plan forMount Pleasant was designed on the basis of the literaturereviewed in Chapter 2. The Plan was first described andshown to be a broad-based policy plan that relied primarilyon zoning control to achieve the goals of the localcommunity. The monitoring system which was then designedincluded: an organizing framework for data collection;suggestions for data analysis; a format for communicatingthe results of monitoring; and recommendations for improvingthe monitoring system.In Chapter 4, the proposed monitoring system wasimplemented for one section of the Mount Pleasant Plan,specifically its industrial area strategy. This part of theplan was described in detail and the data collectionframework developed in Chapter 3 was completed, that is,items to be monitored were identified, one or more keyquestions were developed for each item, and data needs weredescribed.Data were then collected and analyzed for the stillmore specific policy to maintain existing residential usesin the Mount Pleasant industrial area. These data indicatedthat in the four years since the policy was implemented,120H L’Jçtl-CDH-rtH-‘d()00FtC)(CD-l-I-MHCD0HCDC)0Cl)Cl)CD><0CDCD0HfrjCDClCl)ClCDihhC)CDiCDFtCDCDCDç-t0H-(QFtci)FtH-ciCl)CDCDCDI-CDH--FtciClCDCDCDhC)I-><H(0CDCDCDClHLQCDFtçt)çtCl)Cl)H-fr(H-Ih(0CDCl)CDICDClH)CDHCl)CDCl)C))CDFtH-ClH-f-tHClciCl)ClCDCDf-tCDCl)H-0Cl)H-ci’HNFtClFtHH-H-3Clih’Hf-tHH-fr(<hh01CDL-)CliCl(QHCDH-CD003Cl)0ciCD0H-Cl)HCDCDCl)0CliClC’)C’)ciMH-Cl‘tJFtFtJCl)XciFtI-iciCl‘-3ClCDQ0-CDt5f-tClFtCDCDCliCDCD‘-d0W(QH-I-jCDFtCl)f-tI-jH-H-CDCDCliCl)HCl)FtH‘t3<—Jf-tFtCDJCDC)C)H-Cl)CD•HCl)-tCDDH-‘<FtCDCD0CDHHLQCDI-(CDH-CDCl)“<0CDIiIiClH-CDc-tCDciCl)Cl‘-I”)I30ClH-‘-iiFtFtH-0<CDHC)CDH(QHI—(CDI-hCDCDCDH-0—Cl)HçtCl)CliClQCD3H-ClH-Cl)CliCliCDiI-CDCDCl‘t5CDCDFtI-’(MH--‘0ClCl)-Ft03FtCDH-FtC)-CDCDHFtCDCl)frCDH-CDH-FtH-CDCDHH0H-CDH-Cl[-I-(CDIICl)0Ft0CDI-(I-HH-ciC)FtCliMH-CDCDiHH-FtCDCDH-C)(Q‘<H-HCl)0CDf-t••Ftc-tH-CD(QCDHH--tI-(Q‘ZJJCDC)JII0IiClC)CDH-ClC30CDFtHCl)Cl‘-<CDFtCDC)M,CD0CDh(Ft0CDCDH-FtC)0CDCl)00tj<ftCD—o\°Fth(MFtHI-0<C)0CDH-ClCDCD0Ft0CDFtClHCDCl)CDFtCl)H-HFtcici0JH<H-frCl)H-IIClCDH0H-CDI-(FtI-hCDt5Cl)H-CD3CDFtCDFtCDtCICl‘tS0FtCD0f-tI-]FtCDH-CD0•0MH-IjFtJCDH-CL)I-h3H-0CDClC)H0C)CD<CDFt‘-iiCDCliHCl0CDCl)ClClC)H-I-(Cli3Ft-HH-><ClIICDH-CD-c-tciC)FtFt0FtCDCDCDCDH-H-0I-j<I-CDI-’(H-CliCDFt0CDCl)FtFt0I-CDClFtCD0CDCDC)H-ci3CDf-tCDCl)CDciCD0CDFtCDJCDCDCl)0ç-tH-H--HClFtClCl,ciiFrCDH-C)0CD0tIClciCDH-tiCl0çtFtClCD3CDH-C)CDiCl)CDC)CDMH-I—hCDCli•C)H-H-I-(ClH-FtI-(H-0‘tiH-HI-(Ft(CDCDCDFtFtFtH0C-Qcici<(QFtH-‘-<CDCl)C)0H-CDHH-Cl‘-(CDH-CDI-(CDJc-tCD03H-I-(FtC)CDCD3I-(CDFtHCDCDFth(0I-hClCD-tH-CDFtCDCD0><CDCDI-i,CD‘tiCDCDFtH-ClCDCDCD‘tiH-‘1ClQ0FtCl)Cl)ClFtClCDI-H-Cl)I-(CDCDCDFtciCDFtC)H-CDCliCD‘ciCliClFtCDH-CDCDCDi3CDiI-(CDCl0H-H-CDCDFt3(C)I-hFtCDiII3ClFtClciClH-Cl)H-FtFtFtCDIC)CDFtH--(‘tiCDlHClCDH-jCl)CDCDHClCl)0FtCD(C)FtFt0HCDFt0Chapter 5. Conclusion5.2 IMPLICATIONS FOR MONITORINGWe generally tend to think of monitoring primarily interms of collecting quantitative data on plan implementationto provide feedback to decision-makers. The case study inChapter 4 demonstrated that qualitative data are asimportant as quantitative data for monitoring communityplans. This lends further credence to the claims of anumber of authors cited in the literature review. Inparticular, Wedgwood-Oppenheim (1975), Floyd (1978), andSutton (1979) suggest that soft information can providetimely information about significant issues in thecommunity.If only quantitative data had been collected in thecase study, it might have been concluded that, althoughupgrading activity was low and some residential uses werelost, the goal to accommodate existing residential uses inthe Mount Pleasant industrial area was being achieved, thusimplying that the policy was correct. However, the softinformation suggested that the policy did not address allthe issues. In one case, the policy did not permit buildingadditions as large as home owners wanted, and in the othercase, the policy was more restrictive than the residents’wish to allow new residential development.The case study experience also demonstrated thevalidity of the notion that soft information can be122Di ClDlHItI0ft Dl ftDlH-I-o(Q CDftCl0ftoDiDiftH-H DloH-o Cl H-CDft H-0H0HWCDClH-iCDf-I-DiCD0 00 0ft H 0H-iftU)1< Di‘-i0ciC) CDftCD CDDi ft0 H,H,UidCDooft‘1ftDiCDH,H,C)HftoH-I-CDhDiCDHHCDHIi0c)H-Di‘<0ftU)9<CDH‘-CD0H-H‘zICDC)t•HftHDlCDiCljCD oH,j<0c0H0i-I-’LQ0 CD‘t50H0HDiH,H-HftjjH-0C)I-0H,H-Di0iH-hLCftftCD0DiDiI-IftI-H-H-CD1-)S0(Q•CDHDiCDH-HClftCDCDCD0ciDiftftDi0CDH,CDH-H H ftDiHCDU)H C)C)DlftH-ftftH-H-CD0CDClCDCDbH-CD CDH-<1H,DiH-HC) DiDi ftftCD ClHDiftClCDCDCDCDoCDH,C)CDoft HH-ftI-<0 C)H-CDCDCDCDCD CDCDClCDH-H,Li.H-ClCD(Q CD ClftH0H-CD CDCDft Di ft<H-U)DiDiCiCDhH,0CDH-0H-0‘-CDDiCl0CDDiCDH-ftCl<H,H-DiCDH-H-0ftCl0CDCDC)•-DiDiCDI-iCDCD(QClCDCDCDDioCl0C)H,h0I-0I-QCDDiCD CDH-Di‘tiICDHI-H-hCDH-0C)CDftC)H,CDDiCDDlCDftCDh’h0H-CDCDCDH,CDDlCDCl0H-DiCDiClH-ClftDiiClCDfttJI-iDiftH-‘<CDC’)CDC))H-CDC))ftHCD-CDCD -CDC)Di00tJH,HCDftHCD0IICDhHC)•CD0ft<H,H,CDCD0ClI-C)iiCD-Di ftC))ftftCDft::j0.QH-CDCDft00I-DiHC)HCDC)0HCD0HHClClDiH-‘tift:i:iHciH,Di0CDfth-)i-H-CDDi0Di‘-CDftCDftH,H-DiC)0ft‘t3C)00CDH-:iHCDH,CD0H-I-CDH,ft0DiDiH-hQfti0‘CCD(CDJ•CDft0H,Di0ftCDI-H-Di0CDCDH,0DiftH-H,HHftH-H-ClCDiClDi-CQC))ftC))ftDiHCDC))oCDDiH,ftCDCDCDH-0DiH,CDociIICDCl) I-DiDiH—ftDiHH-b‘-0ooCDCQiftH‘1‘-C)HDiCDH-CDHH CDftH-‘tSCDHDitDiCDC)ftH-CDftCD00 I-Cl‘tiH-CDH1DiIdC))C)CDDiiHhcjClftH-CDCDj0CDLQftCDCDCDftCDDlCDC))C))H‘CI DiClftt-frftftftDi0CDCDCD DiftCDC)CDHft0CD<H-CDDioh0ft0iCDI- Di‘CSC))HH,H0DiCDH,l-H-CDI—’CDCDftCDs:::hoCDIdCDI-—Id-CD0ClI-I-•JftCDCDH-0I-i0‘-CD(H HCDC)CD0C))C)C)‘CIftftCDH-CDHCDh0ftCDH-DiCDDi0HHH,0H-H,H,H-0HCDftCDCDftJHCDCDCDDiDiI-S CDftCl H-H,H,H C) H ft ft 0 H Cl CD ft H- H, Di Cl H 0 C) C)) ft CD 0 I-S ft CD C) C)) CD CD CD ft H- ftChapter 5. Conclusionmonitoring has an important role to play in informing theplanning process. In this regard, monitoring should resultin the communication of advice to decision-makers. Forexample, in response to each of the two issues revealed bysoft information, a short study was conducted by staff,advice was prepared, and a decision was made. However,while a formal monitoring system can ensure that informationis carefully considered and that advice is prepared, anydecision that is made on the basis of that advice is beyondthe realm of monitoring. However, a formal monitoringsystem may increase accountability for decisions.Regarding the development and implementation of amonitoring system for the Mount Pleasant Plan, the taskwould have been simplified had the requirements formonitoring been considered during the planning process. Inparticular, few of the Plan’s underlying assumptions wereexplicitly stated. It is quite likely that assumptions weremade about social and economic trends, the significance ofvarious community issues, the expected impacts and possibleside-effects of policies, and the sensitivity of policies tochanges in the environment. Clearly stated, this sort ofinformation may have provided clues as to what was importantto monitor.With respect to monitoring system implementation in thecase study, data were collected and analyzed for only one of124‘tIHCl)H-c1U‘-I0Cl)f-tDlU)C)U)CrUIdCl)HCrCriJCDQCtCrClCl)DiCD0Cl)0DlHCl)C<CDCl)IIiCDClCl)U)HijU)Di<H-ClCD0HCl)ClI—”Dl0CrCl)CrH-CDCDCl)<Cl)Cr(jCrl-H-C)CrLQH-C)CrCl0U)CDDlH-f-tCDH‘Ct‘d0H-DlC)CrG)qo)H-CDH-C)hCl)Cl)0C)H-H0Cl)HCDH-—CL)DlU)CDlIiDlU)Cl)DlCrDlCl)HQDl0dHH-Cl)DlH-CDLClCrCrU)(Q0HHHCrjQCDH-Dl<CDHHHCDHHHDl0L-CrHCl)‘‘ICl)Cl)CD‘1CD‘-<H‘<DiCl)0CrtICr[-hClCDDlC/)‘tIC)CDtiU)CD0Cl)<0I-hHMi<CrHC)0H-Dl0CDCl)CDCrCDDlCDC)0H-DlDlDiiCDClCl)ClC)CD(I)Cl)DllHCDCDCDH-DlI-iHCrH-U)CDCDCrH-C[-‘H-DlCrCl)l-CrC)i0HC/)Cl)HH-DlCDHDlH0H-03•C)0HH-jC)l-CCrMiCrCDCrC)Cl)i-niDlCD0CD-Cr0CDCDtiH-ii0DiCD0i0CrCDiIDlCl)HiHU)ClCDC:HCrHClCDH(HHH-CDHClUiClCrCDH-DiClqHClCl‘-<—H-‘-<CDiciiçrClCl<CDDlCD(Qi0HMiDitiCl)Cl)HH-H-Di‘tiClI-ICrCl)0MiCt0iiC)0Diii-rHCl0CDxC)HCDHCr0tjI-H-H-&‘tICrCr0CD0HdCDH-‘tIDiDiCD0C)MiCDCDCDC)Cli0hIDlCDH‘<H-l-CDH-CH-C)0DiHCDCl)IICrH-Cl)DizjCrhiHCrDi‘tJI-CtH-DiH-Cl)CQH0CrCDCl0C:C)i-ICDi-HCt0Cl0U)Q•MiCl1iJDiClHCDClI-ICT)IICl)<U)0CDhjH<C)LQH-CrCDH-C)DiUiCl)1CrH-Crpir:ijHCrCrCDh’‘-<MiClCr0CD‘1HiiC:)o(QCDCDCD“<ClH-CrLQCDCH-CrC)H-HCDIiCl)Cl)Cri-H-0MiCDDi‘titiLU)0DiIiDiC)CrDiCD0Cl)C)I-IU)HH-H-HDiihC)Cr0MiDiCDDiH-ClCrU)i-ICDHCrHCDU)-oH-MiU)C)DiCtC)Cl)MiH-0$)l•C)CDIi0CDCDCDDlCrCDCDCD0(Qi-CCl)tiCrC)hCCrClI-CCrDiU)ClI-IH-ClMiI-CDiHH-Cl)CrClCD00CriHMiCDCD‘0Di‘-iiMiCrciiMi‘tiDiCU)CCl-U)Cl)HtQ(I)CrCt0‘ci0Cr0CrCD‘-CDiCDH-‘ciCDCl)‘-CClDll-0-H-Mii-CCrI-CoCDDiCr‘-<C)•CDC/)H0H-DlH-CDC)U)0D‘ciH-ClH-HHCtIICliU-iCl)CtDiMiCDCDHCrH•H-HCl)‘ciCDCr•Cl)i‘-CDiDiMiDiCD‘ClCDi(H,QCtçtCtfi-MiIHH-H-H-H-0‘-cir)oMi0iDiH-C)CrDiC)C)H-H0Mi‘-UCDi-CDi0hCH-DiC)CrH-CD<1Di‘1ClCDHCDCl)i-ICr<CD‘CSClCDH-CrCDDiDiC)CrDiC)CrCl)QDiH-ClCrU)Di0CDDiDiHCr0CDDiCD•Cl)MiH0CD0Cr•CDCD0Mi0CrMiH-0CDCl)Chapter 5. ConclusionSimilarly, a case study of another plan could provide otherinsights into monitoring. Perhaps more challenging would bea case study to determine if monitoring results in betterdecisions or plans.During the thesis research, no literature was found toindicate how other municipalities monitored their plans. Asurvey of other municipalities could reveal how widespreadmonitoring is, how it is undertaken, what sort of data iscollected, and how advice is communicated.5.5 CONCLUSIONThe effectiveness of monitoring in informing theplanning process can be improved if soft information iscollected in addition to quantitative data. Softinformation is particularly useful in identifying emergingissues. Thus, it is more efficient to collect only keyquantitative data and rely on soft information to indicatethe need for detailed study. This is precisely what themixed-scanning strategy suggests.As presented in the thesis, monitoring completes thecontinuous planning cycle by linking, through feedback, planimplementation back to decision-making. For monitoring tobe effective, it is necessary that data be collected andanalyzed, and that advice be prepared and communicated todecision-makers. The challenge therefore, is to design a126Chapter 5. Conclusionmonitoring system that is closely linked to the decision-making process and has procedures for ensuring thatinformation is given careful consideration.Monitoring, like planning, is a process. However,unlike planning, monitoring has been largely neglected inthe literature. While this may be why monitoring appears tobe ignored in planning practice, it has also been hintedthat planners are not fond of being reminded of theirmistakes. However, in pointing out our mistakes, monitoringcan make us all better planners.127BIBLIOGRAPHYAnthony, R.N. 1965. Planning and Control Systems: AFramework for Analysis. Cambridge, Mass.: HarvardGraduate School of Administration.Apostolides, Michael. 1992. Personal communication,Sept .3,1992.Aronoff, 5. 1989. Geographic Information Systems: AManagement Perspective. Ottawa: WDL Publications.Bamberger, M. and B. Hewitt. 1986. Monitoring and EvaluatingUrban Development Proarams: A Handbook for ProaramManaaers and Researchers. World Bank Technical PaperNo.53. Washington: U.S. World Bank.Barnes, K. 1976. “Monitoring Development Plans.”Planner. 62:207-10.Bracken, I. 1981. Urban Planning Methods: Research andPolicy Analysis. London: Methuen & Co. Ltd.Branch, M.C. 1981. Continuous City Planning: IntegratingMunicipal Management and City Planning. New York: JohnWiley and Sons.Bruton, M.J. and D.J. Nicholson. 1983. Strategic Planningand Development Plans. Papers in Planning ResearchNo.70. Cardiff, Wales: Department of Town Planning,University of Wales.Bryson, J.M. and R.C. Einsweiler. l987a. “StrategicPlanning: Introduction.” Journal of the AmericanPlanning Association. 53,1:6-8.Bryson, J.M. and W.D. Roering. l987b. “Applying Private-Sector Strategic Planning in the Public Sector.”Journal of the American Planning Association. 53,1:9-22.Calgary. 1977. Provisional Guidelines for the Development ofa Strategic Monitoring System. Working Paper No.3.Calgary: City of Calgary Planning Department.Catanese, A.J. 1979. “Information for Planning.” in F.S. Soet al. eds. The Practice of Local Government Planning.Washington: International City Management Association.128BibliographyChapin, F.S. and E.J. Kaiser. 1979. Urban Land Use Planning.Chicago: University of Illinois Press.Cowling, T.M. and G.C. Steeley. 1973. Sub-Regional PlanningStudies: An Evaluation. Oxford: Pergarnmon Press.Czamanski S. 1973. Regional and Interregional SocialAccounting. Lexington,MA: D.C. Heath.Dickinson, G.C. and M.G. Shaw. 1977. Monitoring Land UseChange: Some Theoretical Considerations and a WorkableSolution. PRAG Technical Paper No.20. London: PlanningResearch Applications Group.Dror, Y. 1968. Policy Making Re-examined. San Francisco:Chandler Publishing Co.Etzioni, A. 1968. The Active Society: A Theory of Societaland Political Processes. New York: The Free Press.Floyd, M., A. Sutton, J. Friend and L. King. 1977.Monitoring for Develooment Planning. Report No.23.London: Department of the Environment.Floyd, M. 1978. “Structure Plan Monitoring: Looking to theFuture.” Town Planning Review. 49:476-85.Fox, K.A. 1985. Social System Accounts: Linking Social andEconomic Indicators Through Tangible BehaviourSettings. Boston: D. Reidel.Friedmann, J. 1987. Planning in the Public Domain: FromKnowledge to Action. Princeton: Princeton UniversityPress.Goetze, R. 1980. Neighbourhood Monitoring and Analysis: ANew Way of Looking at Urban Neighbourhoods and How TheyChange. Washington: U.S. Department of Housing andUrban Development.GVRD. 1990. Creating Our Future: Steos to a More LivableRegion. Burnaby, B.C.: Greater Vancouver RegionalDistrict.GVRD. 1983. Official Regional Plan: 1982 Monitoring Report.Burnaby, B.C.: Greater Vancouver Regional District.GyRO. 1975. The Livable Region 1976/1986. Burnaby, B.C.:Greater Vancouver Regional District.129BibliographyHarris, R. and D. Scott. 1974. “The Role of Monitoring andReview in Planning.” Journal of the Royal Town PlanningInstitute. 60:729—32.Haynes, P.A. 1974. “Towards a Concept of Monitoring.” TownPlanning Review. 45:5-29.Hogwood, B.W. and L.A. Gunn. 1984. Policy Analysis for theReal World. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Howard, Ronda. 1992. Personal communication, Sept.14,1992.Hudson, B.M. 1979. “Comparison of Currewnt PlanningTheories: Counterparts and Contradictions.” Journal ofthe American Planning Association. 45,4:387-98.James, Sandy. 1992. Personal communication, Sept.2,l992.King, N. 1974. Planning Theory: An Examination of theLinkages between Implementation, Knowledae and Action.In partial fullfilment of requirements for the degreeof Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Planning. Los Angeles:University of California.Klosterman, R.E. 1990. Community Analysis and PlanningTechniques. Savage, Md: Rowman & Littlefield.Krueckeberg D.A. and A.L. Silvers. 1974. Urban PlanningAnalysis: Methods and Models. New York: John Wiley &Sons.Leung, H.L. 1985. Towards a Subiective Aroach to PolicyPlanning & Evaluation: Common-Sense Structured.Winnipeg: Ronald P. Frye & Company.Leung, H.L. 1989. Land Use Planning Made Plain. Kingston,Ont.: Ronald P. Frye & Company.Lichfield, N. et al. 1975. Evaluation in the PlanningProcess. Oxford: Pergamon Press.Maguire, D.J. et al. 1991. Geographical Information Systems:Principles and Applications. New York: Wiley.McLoughlin, J.B. 1969. Urban and Regional Planning: ASystems Approach. London: Faber and Faber.Mondor, Phil. 1992. Personal communication on variousoccasions from May to September, 1992.130BibliographyOECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation andDevelopment). 1982. The OECD LIst of Social Indicators.Paris: OECD.Ontario. 1982. Monitoring Guidelines: An Aooroach toMonitoring Official Plans. Ministry of MunicipalAffairs and Housing. Toronto: Ontario GovernmentBookstore.Patton C.V. and D.S. Sawicki. 1986. Basic Methods of PolicyAnalysis and Planning. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Pyatt, G. and J.I. Round, eds. 1985. Social AccountingMatrices: A Basis for Planning. A World Bank Symposium.Washington: World Bank.Ragatz, R.L., Associates, Inc. 1983. Comprehensive PlanMonitoring: Guidelines and Resources for OreaonCommunities. Eugene, Oregon: Department of LandConservation and Development.Riera, Brian. 1992. Personal communication, Sept.lO,1992.Riera, B. 1979. A Social and Community Imoact Monitoring andReview System. A study by The Proctor and RedfernGroup. Report No.79017. Toronto: Ontario Hydro Routeand Site Selection Division.Riera, B. and M. Jackson. 1971. The Design of a Monitoringand Advisory System for Sub-regional Planning. A studyby Iscol Ltd. Loughborough, England: Notts/Derbys SubRegional Monitoring and Advisory Unit.Rittel, H.W.J. and M.M. Webber. 1973. “Dilemmas in a GeneralTheory of Planning.” Policy Sciences. 4:155-169.Roseland, M. 1988. “Jackson County, Oregon DiagnosticStudy.” Unpublished Paper. University of BritishColumbia, Vancouver: School of Community and RegionalPlanning.Rossi, P.H. and H.E. Freeman. 1989. Evaluation: A SystematicApproach. Newbury Park, Ca: Sage Publications.Scholten H.J. and J.C.H. Stillwell eds. 1990. GeographicInformation Systems for Urban and Regional Planning.Boston: Kiuwer Academic Publishers.131BibliographySimon, H.A. 1976. Administrative Behaviour. 3rd Edition. NewYork: Free Press.Sutton, A. 1979. Strategic Monitoring for Lona RanaePlanning. Report of a research project funded by theFederation of Canadian Municipalities, GreaterVancouver Regional District, and City of Calgary.Vancouver. 1980. Goals for Vancouver. Vancouver: VancouverCity Planning Commission.Vancouver. 1983. “Mount Pleasant Housing Policies.” Summaryof policy recommendations. Central files. Vancouver:City of Vancouver Planning Department.Vancouver. 1985. Mount Pleasant Overall Policy Plan.Vancouver: City of Vancouver Planning Department.Vancouver. l986a. “Local Area Planning.” Ouarterl Review.13,2:3-19. Vancouver: City of Vancouver PlanningDepartment.Vancouver. 1986b. The Vancouver Plan: The City’s Strateavfor Managing Change. Vancouver: City of VancouverPlanning Department.Vancouver. l986c. Local Area Planning: Articles from theOuarterl Review (1976-1985) . Vancouver: City ofVancouver Planning Department.Vancouver. 1986d. Mount Pleasant Industrial: A DraftNeighbourhood Plan. Vancouver: City of VancouverPlanning Department.Vancouver. 1989a. Community Development Plan for MountPleasant. Vancouver: City of Vancouver PlanningDepartment.Vancouver. 1989b. Community Development Plan for MountPleasant: Sunimarv. Vancouver: City of VancouverPlanning Department.Vancouver. l989c. “Local Area Planning in Vancouver: CitizenParticipation and Priorities.” Report to Council.Vancouver: City of Vancouver Planning Department.Vancouver. 1990. “Review of Residential Uses in MountPleasant I-i Area.” Central files. Vancouver: City ofVancouver Planning Department.132BibliographyVancouver. 1991a. Petition submitted by Concerned Citizensof the Mount Pleasant Industrial Lands. Central files.Vancouver: City of Vancouver Planning Department.Vancouver. l99lb. Vancouver Trends. Annual informationreport. Vancouver: City of Vancouver.Vancouver. l99lc. “Central Area Plan: Goals and Land UsePolicy - Report Back on Public Review.” Report toCouncil. Vancouver: City of Vancouver PlanningDepartment.Vancouver. l99ld. Central Area Plan: Goals and Land UsePolicy. Vancouver: City of Vancouver PlanningDepartment.Vancouver. l992a. Industrial Area Profiles. Vancouver: Cityof Vancouver Planning Department.Vancouver. l992b. Vancouver Monitoring Program. Informationupdated on a regular basis. Vancouver: City ofVancouver Planning Department.Vancouver. 1992c. Vancouver Zoning and Develooment By-Law.Vancouver: City of Vancouver Planning Department.Waller, J.D. 1976. Monitoring for Government Agencies.Washington: U.S. Urban Institute.Wedgwood-Oppenheim F., D. Hart and B. Cobley. 1975. “AnExploratory Study in Strategic Monitoring.” Proaress inPlanning. 5,1:1-58. Oxford: Pergamon Press.Whitlock, Rob. 1992. Personal communication, Aug.7,l992.133APPENDIX A.MOUNT PLEASANT PLAN ISSUES AND GOALS1. INTRODUCTIONThe numbering for the major headings in this appendixcorresponds exactly to that in the Community DevelopmentPlan for Mount Pleasant (Vancouver l989a). This numberingis preserved to facilitate reference to the Plan document.The goals are copied exactly as written in the Plan. Theissues are gleaned from the text of the Plan. A number ofthe issues, where relevant, are taken from the MountPleasant Overall Policy Plan (Vancouver 1985). For some ofthe substantive categories, no issues were discussed ineither document. Section 2. provides overall developmentstrategies. The intent of Section 3. is to develop thecharacter of each sub-area while ensuring the integrity ofthe Mount Pleasant neighbourhood.2. CO.&UYJUNITY DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES FOR MOUNT PLEASANT2.1 Community Identity and RepresentationIssuesDifficulty for the community to organize and present aunified voice to City Council and other governments.Goals1. To create political and administrative boundaries whichare consistent with historic boundaries of MountPleasant and other communities.2. To ensure that community positions on decisionsaffecting Mount Pleasant are sought and considered.134Appendix A. Mount Pleasant Plan Issues and Goals2.2 Community Social DevelopmentIssues• Lack of community organization or cohesion.• Significant minority of residents facing socialproblems.• Transiency.Street prostitution.• High crime rates.GoalsStrategies for community and social development inMount Pleasant must be aimed at resolution or management ofthe following problems:1. Visible and direct impacts of street prostitution andits implications for the community at large;2. General deterioration of social fabric and physicalenvironment of community;3. Escalating levels of transiency brought on by thecommunity’s poor image and lack of services;4. High levels of unemployment and welfare;5. Appearance and/or perception of high levels of crimeand socially deviant behaviour (public drunkenness,individuals urinating in public view); and6. Appearance of economically-depressed commercial areas.2.3 HousingIssues• Affordability/transiency/ownership.• Absentee ownership or lack of on-site management.• Neighbourhood character and poor physical upkeep.• Housing design with respect to safety.Usable open space.Goals1. To provide a variety of housing types suitable to avariety of household types, and to maintainaffordability where possible, balancing with othercommunity objectives.2. To enhance the quality of residential development byensuring that the distinctive building and streetscape135C) 0N)F-P) H U)0D)00oCDH-1DPIU)OO(D(DU)tfl(J)Q.cfCDDI0rtCD-DiH-DIHH,H-çtLi.CDH-DICDf-tOOCDHk<1f-fCDDIDI f-fU)aH-CDf-f0U)CDDIf-fI-I-CDDIf-tCDCDU)XCDH-noI-H-f-f1DI0U)CDU)U)0iiIU)f-f.Cl)CDCDO(QH-CDft‘1H-HCDHHf-fCDoi0(i)H-ctH-Of-f(D(QCDH-CD(Qifr.f-tDioçiDIH-i0QJDIOU)H-HCDU)f-hf-fftQk<-Ci):ji.CDCDHU)f-fCDDI:J•)‘tICDU)<dDICDC)‘—;DID)f-fCDh’1DIaOCDH-CDDI(OjH U).U) CD Ci)CD1H-H-0hU)Li.DIDIU)CDH-DICYU)CDQ.OHH-U)CDCDHHOCiIiH-H-H,hf-fftf-tf-tCDH-k<<tJU)If-tHHO00CiH,H,H,CD0Cit-fItU)H-H-OCDCDDIU)QQHHiCiCiHf-fOWU)DICDctctH-1<Li.DIDIOf-fDIHOHItsU)<DID)CDI-.hflf-CDD)HDIDICDt5IiCDH-f-fDICDU)CiDIf-fDIU)‘-iCDCD0Q.Cl)D)H,z;DIDIH-H-CJ)f-fCDCDCDCDctf-tU)C) 0WN)HDI H U)CDF-I-F-Q0H-O0H,0Itif-fHCDH-CDf-fHox DIDIJCDIQD)hCDH-Li.0j0iDI<oDI<f-fCD0CDCDH-CDCDf-ff-fCDf-IJCDf-fYXDID)CDH-CD0hU)QCiU)CD0f-fCD(QU)0H-tO0H-I-i00H,1c5t0CiCDDIDIOf-ftQf-ftC1CDf-fH-CDHH-JH-DI00CDDIH-IQ<CiHH<iD)H-t3OH-ctctQf-f0Of-fH-CD’<CihDId<CDHHLQCDO•H-CDHH,Oi—fD)U)O0<U)ItI0Q—DIDIOHCDCflHf-fCDODIi-’tcCi0ItCDU)H-H-H-DI:iDIiHliCD CDQ-DIU)CDiDICDCD1dU)CDDI1tsHU)CDDI0-DIItsI-, DiCDaf-fCDH C’)-U) Ci CDI-’ZU)CDODIOOWOOI-jOH-DII-’s:1js(D3ct1d1ij•CiCUf-t<H-Cl)I-’5;;CDDIH-CDCDCl)H0ctDIH-’dDlH(I)f-fHI-CDDICDH-U)c,I.U)f-f(DC))CDDII-sOItsDIaItioOH-CDEQ5JCDCDI-sD)f-f0 H-CDCDDID)CDHU)aoCDOf-fCDCDI-s a H DI H DI 51o Of-f0CDDI<DI1tsCDI-5Ci1h5HDIDIO00H-II<if-ff-f51H-CD‘<51CD-0CDiH,f-fODi-HH-CDCDDIDIH-CDaH-H-CDHCDU)H-U)H-Cif-ff-fts-CDCDDJOxI-stsCDH-CD0U)U)DIf-fU)f-fDIU)H[1•U)OI’<I-sIf-fCDU)0H,H-Hf-rCDCDCDaCl)f-fDICiCDi5151CDHH-DIf-tDICDCDCD Ci DI f-f CDN)J1 H 51 Ci U) f-f 1U-)N)C) 0 CD I—s a CD DI 51 L’l I IH wHC)HC)HU)0U)C)U)••U)03W‘)H)U)—JWOHC)JU)Ci•‘HCi•••HCiCDU)CDZU)CDiOhhHU)H-i-ZI-F-U)CD)rtH)OF-ZU)0CiCL)U)oLIOOOO0LILIOOOOhtiO0LIOCL)C)O‘tCiU)H-CDtiCtLICDHH-HU)OH-iLILIU)Ct)H-OH-C)JM,H-HH-HtILICtCDCDCL)•LI00U)U)HCtH-CtCDCt’i-tc-t0C)CtC)(DCtCiU)U)CL)Hk<CtH.0P)tiCL)P)I-hCDCi-HOH-0iOHH-H-CD(DCtCDCtCDCDOOCDOCDC)<CDCL)OCL)(DLIU)1—hU)CL)(DCDCL)0U)CDtDCL)’dLI(QCI‘l.OIU)JCiCDCDC)LIHU)c-tCDCDMH-iH-OCiCL)CiH-0H-CDCDH-CDU)(n<L)-ttihhH-U)rtCDt-hC)c)CL)IPLIC)CDC)I-hP))Qf-tHrtC)H-1’<U)CDCL)OHF-aH-CL-IC)CD-l0‘-ii0CtICL)CL)H-c-to><HHCDOLIU)H-LIH0<it-hH-H-’tiH-H-CDCiU)H-CD0CiIH-CltH-CL)CtF-<CL)CtCD(C)CL)-C)C)CDH-<CDCtCL))U)U)H-CtH-CDCtCL)H-Ci(nCDHClLICYCL)C)ClC)HCtrtU)‘tiQiHCL)Ci‘dCDH-CDH-CtCL)CtLI000HH-1<H-Ct<HiCtCtCiCD0çCL)CihhCDCDClH-H-CDP)CtC)C)CDLICDH,U)C)CL)(QH-Q.U)CL)CL)CDH-CiClCL)Ctc-i-ClH-’tlLIU)U)H•tJU)P)LICtH-HH•CiiCLJCDCL)CL)CtH-P)LICD<ctH-CD(QLICL)i0LItQH-HCDU).’tICiCDk-QCtCFClLI(DU)U)H-CtCtOLICDCDCiI-hH-•rtCD.CtCtCDLIP)CtCliH-LIU)0CL)CL)Ct01<CliU)H-CtHCDLICl)ItiOIiLICL)CDHCDCliCL)CL)C)C)H-I-hQ.CD0CDC)LICDP)C)0OZCt<tiCDc-iCDCD•’tiCL)LICtI-hOCDH‘ICtP).CDH0CiCtCL)CDLICDU)croc-iU)CiCiCtCiU)CtC)U)U)LICiU)U)CDLILICDH-H-CDdH-H-CDCL)0tiHHU)CDI-hLIClCDCtH-CDU)ClCDH-U)YU)CL)CtU)U)U)H-CtU)C)LIH-Cl)CDU)OCL)OCDCDCDU)U)U)LICtP)U)C)CtCt•H-HCtCDC)LILI0CL)H-C)•OCL)CLCDLICtCt)CtC)CL)H-H-CDHH-CtQCtC)<CtLICL)CiCDH-CL)CDJCDHLIC)0HCDU)H-00CtI—hCtI—h0<LIU)H)0H0U)CCD•CU)HWI:\)HD)U)i-C)Wt\JHDiC)‘H‘HCDU)CDCDQU)Di-HOOHflWOCDCCCH-frCctplCH-C3DlO31OI—CDCDDit31CDCDCDI-”CDCDDlQ.OCflCDIQChOHIDrtDlHCDCDCDH-CD0CflCDH-DDH-QCDDDCDVOU)DICDiOHU)tihctU)(QC)COOOCDM,ctOrr(Q(DHHCOOCDDI<i1QOU)Dlct-C1<CC•I—sCtH-CHctCDC)H-1<(DIH-CDCDH-(QDOHCDICDH-ctCH-CDCC1DlC.Q-rtHyH-çiLQC-H-CDCDçtCDctCDMDic-tCDNHJNCDCDCDHiCt’H--h<JOMCD‘1CDCtCDCDCCDD)DICOD)DlOH-L-(QDiH-H-CDO[-h<CDIU)Diortcj)c-t0ctQ.H-DISCCjctctH-Q[..DlliDiH-M,CiDICDFtiODlCCDhHCtH-ctDiDlQ.CtCDMOctHHU)H’-çtICDODl<<Q.joHH-CDH-ctH-ctCDCDCtQ<iiCtCD’CDCDrtht-O0I-H-ctjU)(-tQ.U)DiCDHH-CDDlbOCD<H-CD.’<U)OCDO‘-CCDODiOiCD’-DlH-CCD<CDrtctD)H-CDHDiiiH-’O(CDlCDU)Ct000DIH(DOH-Dlc-tc-t3OHDH-CDDI<‘-CdrtH-J•CDIU)COICDCDH-ctOCDCflCtQiI-iC)jftP)DlC5c-i<Dl00ctI-i<U)Cct<ci-DlH•CDctctI-ID)CDH-CDctCDctCDH-F-CDU)CD‘lU)CD-hU)CD[-IOctci-CDH-DbOJ’i--CCCDDlCDhhri-H-Cri-H-H-C)HI-DICDCiftc-1Qri-H-(QH-DlcthCH-OtQU)DiC3H-U)OOti‘<CDlH-CDCCDCDCDOtYCDCl‘Dl‘t5DlQtiDlDiDl(QI-—hOici-Di<ti‘tI0CDCU)CDIH-I-IU)CDDlCCDciri-U)ci-CDct’-i-L-hiDiCc’-U)HI-ICCDI-l5’U)ClI-IU)Dici-HDICDH‘tIODIH-U)IiCOI-1iCHOI-’CDIC)H-HrtClU)Dit5hhi-t,CDODICDQH-COOci-H-C)H-H-I-I,DlLJDiDiiiCI-l3’DlDici-I-’HctOH-HOU)<ILQ‘ciU)COHH-HCDMftI-IDIH-CD‘ci<DiClCDci-U)Diri-U)DiirtQrJU)CCDU)iDiU)H-U)ctCOU)ctDiCDI-ic-‘-I‘C5H-I-I0F-lCDDiOctHU)CH-ci-HCDH-U)QCDDiCDDiH-tjOCDI-IDiH-H-DiCCDlH-U)DiHCD<ct‘<0U)CDCt(C(liU)CDlI-ICflCDQ<i-H-CDU)iH-ftHDiH‘tIeci-‘DictctCH-C-0DiCDDlU)‘<H-ftctH-HC0‘<DiCDCF--h-”HMDi0U)ci-ClDiH-DiU)CH-ftHCjtiCDH-0H-ClClCCDClCDiCDiftH-i U)U)Appendix A. Mount Pleasant Plan Issues and GoalsGoals1. To generally improve the upkeep, cleanliness andappearance of Mount Pleasant’s commercial, industrialand residential areas.2. To ensure that development, including buildings, publicright-of-ways, signage and other built features,contribute positively to the environment as a whole.3. To ensure that physical obstacles to the mobility ofthe handicapped and infirm are eliminated.3. RECOAII’TENDED ZONING CHAZ\TGES IN MOUNT PLEASANT3.1 Broadway and Main Street CoreIssuesRun-down commercial node with no amenity and few moderncommercial services.Poor pedestrian orientation.Lack of parking.Goals1. New development should reinforce positive features andactivities in the area:a) high pedestrian volumes, both of a local and transitorigin;b) important heritage buildings which form a strongcharacter for the area;c) significant “cross road” role of Broadway and Main fortraffic and transit;d) east end of Central Broadway commercial strip.2. Public right-of-way improvements should reinforce thesame positive features and endeavour to overcomenegative problems, such as conflicts betweenpedestrians and traffic.3. Commercial node should be clearly defined, inaccordance with policies established in setting ofbeautification priorities - core area includes MainStreet between 7th and 12th Avenues, Broadway fromQuebec to Prince Edward.139C)HWC)HWC)HW0CD0CD0CDH)•CD)CDWH)CDLi•HH-HCDCDLI]CDCD0CDCDZiI]flCnZCDtiCDc-I-C!)OOLIJP)CJIJQJHtCDCDI-IllCDOCDOH-0c-I-I-iH-c-OOH-CDHCDCDCDHHCD00CDc-I-P)CD(1OCDCDH-00J)H-CDP)Ic-I-JG)dh‘-J-c-I-ctiOc-I-Qc-I-H-0P)H(DHP)CD(DMM,tJfl(DCDOH-c-I-LCCDC)ctctCD0CDP)0H-0CDO00H,<H-tQHCD01Jsc-I-H-c-I-flI-’H-hi,P)c-I-(Dc-I-CDCDCD—CDCDc-I-iCDP)ct0CDI-1iH-QHH-HJc-I--c-I-flCD]c-I-ctP)P)Qi0CDQ.H-CD0c-I-H-c-t(DP)P)0CDH-c-I-hc-I-0H1hiCDH-içtCD(I)H-C’JCDP)H-CDtQQCl)(00CDCD(Qhc-I-Cl))Hc-CDfrfl”—H-flC)CDCD0CDI-P)HC)CDCD(Q(D00sc-I-0c-I-tiCDCl)H-ClHP)b0I-PJCD•H-Cl)CDH-ct•P)0CDCD<I-CDQ0H00hXP)I-CDCD-CDH-hQ0H-CDCDH-H-QJi•CD•I-)CDH-H-CDCD00C)P)CDH-CDCDP)CDc-I-c-I-fl00H-0H-c-I-CDCDtic-I-c-FH-I-c-I-2iP)CDCl)Cl)CDI-Hc-I-H-fl•H-HH-fr(QP)CDCDCl)c-Ihc-I-rXlP)H-hQCD0CDCD(QHc-I-HP)c-I-H-it5H-1hCDh•CDHCDc-I-ClQCDCDC>CDHCDH-CDCDH-Q<H-ctCl)CDCDCl)P)<CDHCDCl)0c-I-CD<c-I-CD0CliH((0CDCDQ.CDH-CDH-HfrH-(D0•CD0c-I-<•CDCDtQH-0CDc-I(UCDCDCDCDc-I-1CD<1‘rJH••CD2CD(D(DH—CDflIc-tCDHI—aCDCDhH<(Uct0(UCl)CD0Cl)0H-HH-0flCD•)c-I-CDCDP)M,H-ClCl)hhc-I--HP)CDHtYçiH-CDc-I-c-I-0Hc-I-iOH-c-I-CDCD<PCI)<P)HCDh(DOCDc-I-OCD3OQaCDMCl)(IH-ICl)H-c-I-H-c-I-CD(UCD00HCD-c-I-—(U(1CDI-J)H-H-H-P)c-I-bc-I(UfrH-(H-0Hc-I-CDCDCD0CDCDc-I-CD0HW0HW0CD•0CD(JL’JHDi•CDHDi•CDLflCDCDCDCD-CD0flZPIjCDCDH-CDOOrt0H-CDhCDi0DiCtCDCDH-I-ID)CDDiCDDiCDrtCDOCDCrQflLJ-frQH-H-QttIOOCD’tCD-hQftHCD<13Cfl(DOOCDCDCDOCDOhhH-CDH-CDZCDS(DtQCrCD0(-rH-H,-c;-hf-rfr0f-rrtHQctCDJCtCDCDCDOOHDiOCD<DiOCDiCDOCDHOCD<CD‘-CDDiHOP)H-QCrOCD<H,HCtjDiCDDiDiCtHftctCriplhQCD<5i5<frHH’CDH-(JH-tftCDfrFtjf—LCD(DCD(DCDCDDiOP)Di0H-DitO‘<(DCDfrCD(I)QQçt13F’HrtH-CDc-r0r-tftCDCDCnç1CDCDCDCDOCDHCD0DiCDHODiH-)<-QCD(DCtDiCD00HO•’<H,CD(tH-hIP)<CDIt-’H-frO-fDiCDCDDirtH-DiCDCD3f-fIctO0CDHCDDiI-—H-CDftfrH-OCDHDiH-<f-tCD0(QH-CDt5L-hh’I-OH-CDCDD)IQCfitQCDIQH-CD1It3<HH-hH-JFt5OH-0=DiOCDDiH-CICDCDCfDih5CDtH<f-fhftOOH33CDHH-OOCDDiOrfCDt-hDiH,‘Z3C)H,flCtCDCDH-c-ii-H,0CDOCDCfH-DfrjH-0OCDH,Di<H-ft•0c-fQODiOCDCDc-toOCDDiQH-frCDF1DlDi0H’CDCfCDQ.DiDiHf-fH3ft00DiCDDicfDiHCDH-cisiFdHCDi-’CDciCDH-HDiH-H-flDiCDi-1HI-hH0HJhHc-tCDj()CtH-((1)t5DiCtiDiDiCICDciCiCDIH-ICiliCDOCD>H-CDH-H-CDCDDiH-CDirjOH-D)OHHQI-f-fflCDDiI—’H-CDOH-Cici<CDH-I-CDCf(CDf1-DiDlf1-(HHCDH-CfCD•CDIHH-HH-DiCDCDIIbCDCDCDiCDOH-3(QHCI-<Di(DODiDiflCD•H,DidIIDiDiCDCDCDCDDi0•ciDiciCDiiçiOi--.OI-CDIIciObCDH-f-I-CD03CDCiCDH-CDCtH-0Cff-fH-0CDCDH-Di•H-0DiCDLCD3H,Di10ciCD0.,DiCfci 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0I_IlWI-—)HDi H U)w 0 CI H CD Di U) Di rI 0 II çt :3HH U)•U) CDCDDlU)DiOH-hi,iH-C0hi,0 I-I-IH,DiHOOCDH ClH-CDrI-ctDiCViiVDi(Di:311Cr CDCD Hrtrt:31133CDOCDH-iiU)H11Cl:3H-CU)0HClClU).CD Di H U)rJ)ow I-Ui0HN 0CD(DQCDHCDHctQ((QbtQH-ct(J)ctCDiH-p)y00i-ioCDM000CDH-F-’-I—’CDhhO)H-ctH-00CDhJ<0H(flCflCDcrhP)PiCDcDctH-CDtDQCDhQ.CD0CDP)0I-cCDh1ctCDCDCDO)‘iP)ijH-EflH<F—aCDP)CDt3P)0CDO)rrCDCDCD(VP)crct0)0)HNç-tIjHH-k-iH,P)CDHH-(DPiHP1çr(-r(I)c-rcrH-0)P1hhCDfrhM,00p)P1 C’)c) 0 Cl)APPENDIX B.MOUNT PLEASANT PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS1. INTRODUCTIONThe recommendations in the Community Development Planfor Mount Pleasant (Vancouver 1989a) are reproduced in thisappendix. The text is as printed in the Plan Summary(Vancouver 1989b)145Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan RecommendationsSECTION22.1 COMMUNITY IDENTITY ANDREPRESENTATION2.1.1 Recommendations:Ward Representation1. City Council to implement the ward system or amodified ward system including some at largerepresentation in the City of Vancouver.2. City Council to select ward boundaries whichmaintain the integrity of historic communityboundaries, such as City Staff Option F (fromdocument Wards for Vancouver, January 1982)..3. City Council to establish municipal presence ineach ward to provide greater city-neighbourhoodliaison, public meeting space and a base for aldermenif the ward system is implemented; could beaccomplished in conjunction with existingcommunity facilities, such as Neighbourhood Houses,community centres or with the establishment of wardoffices.2.1.2 Recommendations: Community Input1.City Council request the City Clerk to report backon costs associated with publishing of City Hallinformation, including City Council and its StandingCommittees agendas, in the Vancouver Sun andProvince.2.2 COMMUNITY SOCIALDEVELOPMENT2.2.1 Recommendations: Street Prostitution1. City Council, with the assistance of the PlanningDepartment, establish a working committee composedof residents, professionals and representatives ofvarious interest groups, to study and preparerecommendations regarding prostitution, aimed atdeveloping city-wide policies and strategies for issueresolution, for presentation to the FederalGovernment, the Province and City Council.2. Federal, Provincial and Municipal authorities tocontinue to review the effectiveness of legislationdesigned to eliminate the public manifestations ofprostitution, and to provide relevant authorities withthe necessary powers to effectively deal with juvenileswho should not be involved in prostitution at all.3. City Police Department to protect residentialdistricts of the City from the aggravation of activitiesassociated with street prostitution, notablyunnecessarily high levels of traffic, loud verbalexchanges and bodily threats from customers andpimps; accomplish through increased police attentionalong Broadway and 8th Avenue between Cambie andClark Drive.146Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations4. Cttij Council to request that the Crown CounselOffice seek (1) restrictions from residential areasfor all convicted under Section 195.1 of the CriminalCode, and the area of restriction include MountPleasant and Grandview-Woodland and (2)imposition of more effective fines on both prostitutesand customers, to more clearly reflect the damagedone to this community.5. City Council to encourage the Attorney General’sDepartment to expedite the appeal process on Section195.1 acquittals.2.2.2 Recommendations: Transiency1. City Health Department to develop acommunity-oriented health unit in Mount Pleasant,preferably in conjunction with other neighbourhoodservices and a community meeting place.2. City Council and Social Planning Department toconsider establishment of multilingual, multi-serviceinformation centre in Mount Pleasant.3. Director of Social Planning to study and reportback to City Council on “town neighbourhood centre”concept for Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House.4. Social Planning and the Community DevelopmentWorker to investigate ways and means of enhancingthe role of existing schools in the future of thecommunity.5. Social Planning and the Community DevelopmentWorker to investigate community interest inconversion of Mount Pleasant Elementary School to acommunity school, in conjunction with an enhancedrecreational facility role.6. City Council to advise the Provincial Governmentwith respect to the critical need for English as aSecond Language (ESL) education in MountPleasant, and the importance of restoring previouslevels offunding.2.2.3 Recommendations: Overall CommunityDevelopment1. City Council to review status of CommunityDevelopment Worker position in conjunction withDirector of Social Planning’s November reportscheduled for the end of 1987.2. Director of Social Planning, Director of Planningand the Mount Pleasant Citizens’ PlanningCommittee to review status of social problems inMount Pleasant, and report to City Council as part ofDirector of Social Planning’s November report onoutstanding social problems and resourcerequirements to respond.3. Police Department to maintain the Police LiaisonTeam as an extremely valuable resource to thecommunity, to be retained until Mount Pleasantregains a stable residential character.4. Police Department to continue initiatives aimed at(a) increasing public awareness in regard to personaland property safety, through community informationmeetings, and (b) implementation of the BlockCaptain Program.147Appendix .8. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations2.2.5 Recommendations: Nagging Problems1. City Council to adopt a two year moratorium, onall unacceptable uses, as follows:ACCEPTABLE RESIDENTIAL CARE (STAFFED) ANDTREATMENT RESOURCES• seniors’ rest home• adult physically disabled (staffed) resources andindependent living• adult mentally disabled (staffed) resources• childrens’ residential care (staffed) treatmentresources [e.g., Laurel House five-bed treatmentcentre for autistic children under the age of 131• group homes for mentally disabled adults; approvalto be grarned on a case by case basis.Similar to non-mailcet housing, community amenitiesmust already be in place (with the exception of resthomes), small number of beds for each facility, andfacilities to be well-spaced in the community for bestintegrationINAPPROPRIATE RESIDENTIAL CARE (STAFFED)AND TREATMENT RESOURCES• half way houses, or group homes, or staffedresidential living quarters for those on probation,parole, or in conflict with the law: adults or children• half way houses, treatment centres, or staffed livingquarters for those who are alcohol and drug abusive;adults or children• emergency group homes for street kids or thoserequiring a behaviour management program, ortheraputic group homes or theraputic foster homeswith more than one child• residential care facilities for adults requiringpsychiatric care, or former mental patients• any drop-in facilities to be located only on majorarterial streets (e.g., Broadway) and not on the sameblock as any other drop-in facility, or other servicewith a drop-in component or any other treatmentservicehostelsresidential hotels or boarding hotelsdrinking establishments;night clubs;pool halls;amusement arcades;motels and hotels;residential hotels;establishments selling or otherwise handling guns,knives or other weapons;liquor stores;establishments selling or displaying pornographicfilms or materials;treatment clinics providing non-local services.3. Mount Pleasant Community Police Liaison Teamto develop and implement a community-basedstrategy to control and manage the sale and use ofalcohol in Mount Pleasant.4. Director of Permits and Licenses to investigate andreport back on increased control of operations whichdisplayor advertise pornographic films or material, orestablishments selling or otherwise handlingweapons, towards eliminating existing potentialnegative outward impacts on communities.2. Director of Planning to advise representativegroups regarding development applications involvingthe following uses:••148Appendix .8. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations2.3 HOUSING2.3.1 Recommendations: Tenure AndAffordability1. City Council to maintain and improve existingzoning controls and policies which encourage tenureand the retention affordable accommodation with amix of household types and incomes.2. City Council, with the assistance of the SocialPlanning Department, to no longer earmark NorthMount Pleasant for government-assisted housingprojects, in accordance with the following guidelines:ACCEPTABLE NON-MARKET HOUSING• seniors housing; providing community amenities inplace• co-operative housing; providing communityamenities in place, must follow income mixed“balanced community” approach• family housing (government assisted); providingamenities already in place, “balanced community”approach, small projects (8-25 units) and wellspaced from any other similar projectBalanced community is both single and two parentfamilies with reasonably broad income mix.INAPPROPRIATE NON-MARKET HOUSING• family housing (government assisted) within twoblocks of a similar development, without “balanccommunity” income mix approach• family housing (government assisted) within twoblocks of a similar development, of 25 units or mc• non-family government-assisted housing project,without “balanced community” income mixapproach2.3.2 Recommendation: AbsenteeOwnership And Management1. Director of Permits and Licenses and Director ofPlanning to prepare an information brochure andposter explaining the procedures to follow regardingenforcement of the Standards of Maintenance andZoning By-laws.2.3.3 Recommendations: Overall ResidentialDesign1. Director of Planning, in consultation with theCitizens’ Planning Committee, to prepare and reportback on new zoning district schedules which reflectthe following distinctive building characteristics ofthe areas:149Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendationsa) Apartment Area I- 10th Avenue betweenYukon and Ontario StreetsObjectivesi) to relate architecturally in scale andbuildingform to heritage district to south.ii) to buffer West Mount Pleasant fromcommercial development along Broadway.iii) to allow for families through considerationgiven in design of buildings and open spaces.b) Apartment Area 2- Main Street CoreArea, bounded by 10th Avenue, Kingsway,16th Avenue and Quebec StreetObjectives1) to develop an urban apartment building formconsistent with turn of the century building formprevalent in the area, as an alternative to new,nondescript styles.ii) to provide a population base in closeproximity to commercial uses along Main andBroadway.iii) to meet the housing needs of all ranges ofhousehold types, with focus given to singles,young couples and seniors.c) Apartment Area 3 - Mount PleasantNorth, north of Broadway, between ScotiaStreet and Clark DriveObjectivesi) to improve design quality of residentialdevelopment by visually breaking down longbuilding frontages and creating neighbourhoodamenities, including more usable open space.ii) to accommodate families as an importantdesign consideration.2. City Council to instruct the Director of Planningto make application to rezone the RT-2 area of theMount Pleasant Triangle to RT-2A, and that theapplication be referred to Public Hearing.3. Director of Planning to establish more clearlydefinable standards in zoning by-laws andaccompanying design guidelines for residentialdevelopment, for the provision of useable open spaceand play areas to meet community and socialobjectives.2.3.4 Recommendation: RS-1 Area OfMountPleasant Triangle1. Director of Planning and Director of Permits andLicenses to explore and report back to City Council,in conjunction with residents and property owners inthe RS-1 area of the Mount Pleasant Triangle, on thepossibility of allowing suites in the area inconjunction with upgrading standards of existingsuites.2.35 Recommendation: Residential Uses OnMajor Streets1. Director of Planning and City Health Departmentto undertake a city-wide study of problems associatedwith residential uses situated along major streets, toinclude examination of the following potentialsolutions:a) improved construction standards such asdouble glazed windows, air conditioning andvibration-reducing structures for newdevelopments along designated streets such as12th Avenue, Fraser Street, Broadway and ClarkDrive;b) provisions for flexible siting of buildings ondesignated streets;150Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations10-! F1 riiIIIIIIIhRS-1 RT-2RT—2A RM—3Ac) improved design standards, including alteredbalcony and window placement.d) effective landscaping and fencing techniquesto ameliorate noise;e) reduction of truck traffic on routes notdesignated for such purpose; andI) consideration of comprehensive redevelopmentstrategies in severe situations.2.3.6 Recommendation: Crime PreventionThrough Design1. Director of Planning and Police Department toresearch and report back to City Council on theinclusion of CEPTED principles in existing designguidelines applicable to commercial and residentialdevelopment throughout the City.2.3.7 Recommendation: Landscaping1. Director of Planning and Director of Permits andLicenses to explore and implement means of enforcinginstallation and maintenance of approved landscapingduring the life of the building (such as the posting ofperformance bonds).2.3.8 Recommendation: Development LeviesFor Public Amenities1. City Council review the matter of developmentlevies as a source of funds for much neededcommunity projects.[1 r—j IEZJ CEJ r’.-ElDIE LEEJ czc cE-zi [ElD cziEEl El zj [El[El] [El EElEJi[IIczjcac ciij czc. EEl EEl El CEEl‘in El’i iizj ci EEZJ CEll CJU [El] [El] C] CIII] CE] EDfl EEl C] k: EEl] LE]tJ LEl El]] CI] 1±2J [El Ccii EEl] CII CII]] C---JL1E3ilUDSEZiIIResidential Zoning Districts in Mount Pleasant151Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations2.4 COMMERCE ANDEMPLOYMENT2.4.1 Recommendations: Main AndBroadway1.City Engineer to proceed immediately with theimplementation of the Main Street BeautificationProject if results ofpolling are favourable.Commercial Districts in Mount Pleasant2.Planning Department and Economic DevelopmentOffice to assist the Mount Pleasant BusinessAssociation with stages 2 and 3 (Facade Improvementand Marketing) of the Downtown RevitalizationProgram.3.Council to instruct the Director of Planning tomake application to expand the district-servingcommercial core at Main and Broadway and that theapplication be referred to a Public Hearing, inconjunction with the design guidelines modelled onSection 3.1 of this plan.// ((J(j-- -_-—:-:J —nd4,e= ______z_.___Ljj;r— —Li- I---___HHLI ccflcc nci___ EEEE3 flJflucu_E JLEE1 tED EE LCclii 111) EltL1 L__j OCi LIczj OCiClii Xlili II clii’ULElilJ 112 [112i 12Z]E’I 2c: li.1 :E:ir12EE12c:12C—]iUz.3 1 .3D Eli ciiuJZEE L-]---iF..:[1litJr ziI H-EE-2.-. -.._cuDIc fl(6Ii e. CliC-3Ac—IC-2152Appendix .5. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations4.City Engineer to consult the Mt. Pleasant BusinessAssociation and Mount Pleasant Traffic PlanningCommittee on any arterial improvements consideredfor Main, Broadway or Kingsway.2.4.2 Recommendations: Local ShoppingDistrictsLCity Council instruct the Director of Planning tomake application to rezone existing C-2 Districts atBroadway and Fraser, Fraser and Kingsway (notincluding the northeast corner of Fraser andKingsway), Main Street between 12th and 16thAvenues, and Cambie Street between 12th and 16thAvenues to C-2C; and that the application be referredto a Public Hearing.2. Director of Planning to report concurrently on thesimilar zoning action for contiguous commercialareas, e.g. west side of Cambie Street between 13thand 14th Avenues, and the south corner of Kingswayand Fraser.2.4.3 Recommendations: City initiatives1. City Council, Director of Civic Buildings andDirector of Planning to take info account thefollowing considerations when studying expansion ofCity Hall facilities to Broadway:a) benefits to the community of Mount Pleasantin terms of physically upgrading an importantentry to the community;b) need for public amenity throughout MountPleasant and the extent to which City Hall canprovide leadership in this respect to thedevelopment industry generally;c) need to consolidate public information servicesin an easily accessible manner; andd) need to provide adequate visitor and employeeparking to reduce current impacts of parking onsurrounding residential community.2. Parks Board and Planning Department to developLions View Park at northeast corner of Broadway andCambie Street.3. City to continue to support upgrading of HeritageHall as a major community resource and heritagefocus, with particular attention to the followingconsiderations:a) provide funding to increase use of main floorfor community functions (specific requirementsinclude air conditioning, proper curtains, soundequipment); andb) other measures to increase useability of hail.2.4.4 Recommendations: EmploymentOpportunities1. City Council to designate Mount Pleasant as anarea within the City of Vancouver which wouldbenefit from provincial and federal governmentprograms aimed at revitalizing communitiesrequiring such attention.2. Economic Development Office and PlanningDepartment to assist the Mount Pleasant BusinessAssociation, the Vancouver Community College andlocal community groups with community-basedeconomic and job creation initiatives.153Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations2.5 INDUSTRY2.5.1 Recommendations: Retention OfIndusirwi Focus1. Director of Planning and Economic DevelopmentOffice tailor to Mount Pleasant an I or IC zoningschedule to allow industry, industrial office,business-service and clearly ancillary industrialretailing in existing M-l and M-2 Districts of MountPleasant, in consultation with property owners andindustrialists in the area, as well as interested partiesin the community, and bring forward the proposedzoning to City Council for referral to a PublicHearing.Industriai Zoning Districts2. Director of Planning to ensure that no existingindustrial use to be made non-conforming throughnew I or IC zoning, and that all existing uses appeareither as outright or conditional uses in the newschedule.2.5.2 Recommendations: Major Streets1. City Council instruct the Director of Planning tomake application to rezone portions of Cambie andMain Street to C-3A with design guidelines assuggested in section 3.4 of this plan; and that theapplication be refered to a Public Hearing.ucU[ZF LlfZ— czo: E:3 EJ LZI- czi oc___E- r1 L F r i ciir;; : Jrj hEl cEJU LII] Usi CIE LED CED CIIIczi ci LZZZJ C LJ c:z Em rulE:] R C] czi c_jo CIII EEJJ CII CE] EI] 0______-:1] ci L i cLZz c_jj cU El00N- c--IIrEDr mrm F1CICl[E[EII— —Ii C ] C _] C E JUL L I UCED lEE] I I fl1 CI I CE:] CIII CI) CIII_J C Z] CL]- C.- [LI] E] I I I CI 910(1] tEE] --JCE]C z IL lLCL_J LL_] czi T 1 LIZ] [1 I flCEED CE] CzE] r—_[El] 1-—.__JU Ucz ULEE] LEE] CE] L- L. I CE:] cEJ U[EE] tED [_1J LjJ e.‘ [ID] [[JO El] CE]Olfl= CriM-1 1][EDM-2154Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations2.5.3 Recommendations: Residential Uses1. Director of Planning to include within proposedindustrial zoning district schedules the followingconditional use description:“Residential uses which existed prior to and havebeen used continuously as such since (date ofenactment).”2. Zoning guidelines should state clearly thatresidential uses are permitted with the understandingthat owners and occupants will seek no operationallimitations to industry.2.5.4 Recommendations: Brewery CreekIndustrialEnclave1. Director of Planning to work with the MountPleasant Citizens’ Planning Committee to prepareappropriate zoning and companion design guidelinesto foster the unique character of the Brewery CreekIndustrial Enclave, and the Director of Planningbring forward recommendations for consideration byCity Council prior to the end of 1988.2. Director of Planning to examine the Brewery CreekIndustrial Enclave, between Main and Brunswick, asa potential pilot project for other areas of the city,incorporating industrial uses, artist studios andaccommodation.2.6 Tourism, Arts and CuluralDevelopment2.6.1 Recommendations: Fringe Festival1. City Council to designate the Fringe Festival as anofficial city event and commit financial resources tothe Fringe Festival Committee similar to those givento the Folk and Childrens’ Festivals.Theatre / Arts Venues____U3lL1__L 11 1I 1L__E1__ __I I CE]IJ 16th Ave.I I I l—°l_ ____HotJazz J’L&Grt GaaeryII ii IL_Jt(1I H Ifllr-,i i i i u Hall I I__— ‘LJ UP1l 1iI I F GOH Ballet.±J \D WWesterj&day’_ __Theapace? _______r— Fringe Festival_____II IIII olil1\_Zii‘\\EJ113=___nrI L_BruhanskiLIL-l2thwe.IL II i____- -irriuriutcçjrI IF 1fNr ir 1u_I rZJI1tU_IO1-IHeritage Hall -6th Ave u Vancouver Little Theotreii 1Li r i— ‘ Ill155Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations2.6.2 Recommendations: TourismOpportunities1. City Council endorse the following projects asimportant to the community of Mount Pleasant andallow project sponsors to indicate City Councilsupport for their efforts:a) Heritage Walking ToursSponsored by Vancouver Museums(See Section 2.7)b) Brewery Creek Historical SocietyProject directed at increasing awareness ofMount Pleasant’s early beginnings; studyprepared suggesting alternatives for “reviving”creek visually or in a real sense.Sponsored by Claude Douglas and CharlesChris topherson.c) Pioneer Junction RevivalProject directed at increasing awareness ofhistorical importance of Fraser and Kingswayintersection.Sponsored by Mount Pleasant NeighbourhoodAssociation.2. Director of Planning to work with Mount PleasantNeighbourhood Association, Business Associationand community-based arts groups to develop meansof informing local residents and tourists with respectto points of interest in the community (such asinformation kiosks or other community notificationmeans). (Also See Section 2.7 on Heritage Walk).2.7 HERITAGE2.7.1 Recommendations: Preserve ImportantBuildings And Sireetscapes1. City Council to adopt and immediately implementa Vancouver Heritage Management Plan.2. City Council to adopt policies to protect heritagebuildings in all parts of Mount Pleasant, such as:-Offer incentives such as added floor space ratioand height where developers maintain existingbuildings; and-Seek heritage designation as a condition ofrezonings and approval of major conditional usesinvolving buildings listed in the City’s HeritageInventory.3. City Council to advise all City departments andstaff when dealing with property in Mount Pleasantto regard the retention and reuse of buildings listedon the City’s Heritage Inventory as aCouncil-sponsored objective.4. Director of Planning to continue monitoring andupdating the Vancouver Heritage Inventory.5. Director of Planning to examine means of allowingsome minor commercial use of residential buildingslisted on the Vancouver Heritage inventory if thebuildings are no longer suitable for residential usewithout major structural alteration or additions (forexample, permitting a mix of commercial andresidential uses in heritage buildings adverselyimpacted by traffic on 12th Avenue).156Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations6. Directors of Planning and Permits and Licenses toinstitute a system of automatic notification tocommunity groups of all development activities onsites which contain a heritage building or are ofheritage significance.2.7.2 Recommendations: West Mount b) selected buildings on Main Street;Pleasantc) heritage elements which would reinforce theMain Street beautification project; andd) the Brewery Creek urban developmentproject._____________-,— L_J =B= O =1___I.—, ri n r’= = LJ___ —JL_JUi_. r—i rlProjects suggested for consideration under thisprogram could include the following:a) 10th Avenue heritage-themestreet beautification;1.Thë Director of Planning to develop and report backto Council on a heritage area (HA) zoning districtschedule for a portion West Mount Pleasant.2.City Council to instruct the Director of Planning tomake a Stage One application to the ProvincialGovernment for a Heritage Area RevitalizationProgram (HARP) designation for portions of WestMount Pleasant and the Main Street Core.West Mount Pleasant HA AreaProposed HA-5 (Heritage District)Remrnnmg RT-2A157Appendix .8. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations2.7.3 Recommendation: Brewery Creek1.Director of Planning, in conjunction with theMount Pleasant Neighbourhood Association, topursue preparation of a concept plan for revival of theBrewery Creek Water Course both symbolically andthrough incentives, such as bonus density, on publicand private properties.2.7.4 Recommendations: CommunityAwareness OfHeritage1. Director of Planning to continue work with theVancouver Museum to develop a Mount PleasantWalking Tour.2. Director ci Planning to continue working with theMount Pleasant Neighbourhood Association andother community groups to document the history ofMount Pleasant.L i1 [- I Ii) r—— -_IflJr_] .!]L0_ Ir ..w—q ==I iLEE1C1_h1UiF1] tarn w.I__r__Y1PPar] I =U Ui iii ii [r rQ____- r— r—, i-,.Brewery Creek WatercoursePropo$.d 8rwecy Crei pubtic op.n Qce network,acCOmpklt4d n COnp.action ,nth prr.tot_ Or.wery Crnek tntoric watercourne,markid inith siqn,oeid aggregate, or paint• Woll mixoln cornplVed‘IJEIE4%158Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations2.8 PARKS, OPEN SPACE ANDRECREATION2.8.1 Recommendations: Park Acquisition1. Park Board and Finance Department, inconjunction with Planning Department, to acquireand develop parks in accordance with the followingspecific priorities:a) Mount Pleasant North, in the vicinity of 7thand Fraser Street (central location to serve theneeds of the area);b) West Mount Pleasant, between Broadway and12th Avenues, in the vicinity of Manitoba Street;c) Mount Pleasant Triangle, between Broadwayand 12th Avenues, Fraser and Glen Streets;andd) In accordance with other deficiencies asdescribed in this section.The acquisition of property for park purposes isalmost always associated with the intent to demolishexisting buildings arid create open space. Should aheritage building be in the middle of a potentialassembly, the Park Board will only purchase it, if thebuilding can be relocated on property not controlledby the Park Board. The Park Board will only retain aheritage building if a previously identified recreationfurktion can be accommodated.2.8.2 Recommendations: CommunityRecreation Facilities1. Park Board, Neighbourhood House and VancouverCommunity College officials to undertake a needsassessment survey of recreation needs in NorthMount Pleasant, the Triangle and the BroadwayALRT Station area, and to report back to CityCouncil and the Park Board with results of thatsurvey.2. Park Board to investigate opportunities to developa satellite community centre in the vicinity of KingEdward Campus and China Creek Park, inconjunction with Vancouver Community College andlocal businesses.3. Park Board to monitor changing population andrecreational opportunities in Mt. Pleasant and toensure that the needs of all residents (includingstudents, the elderly and single parent families) arebeing met at public and private recreation facilities,noting that a balance must be achieved which meetsthe needs of the people in the area.159Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations2.8.3 Recommendations: Open SpaceDevelopment1.Ci(y Council to formally adopt a pedestrian/linearpark system as a priority for Mount Pleasant.Engineering, Park and Planning Departments todevelop a comprehensive plan for this system,including signage, public right-of-way improvementsincluding seating and other improvements, andreport back to City Council with respect to costs andproject timing.Pedestrian And Open Space Alternatives2.Park Board, Engineering and PlanningDepartments to develop and explore means ofimplementing City-initiated beautification project for:a) 10th Avenue, between Cambie and MainStreets;b) 7th Avenue, between Prince Edward and GlenDrive; andc) other linkages necessary to connect (a) and (b)in a continuous manner.I!I =EE-tr ZEZi cj zz3CEJJOL ZIJ -=IZL[-__--! ‘/)—--S.: -I EE-%,idc-, 4zlc——’-’ ‘t‘p =—EF--’c Great Nrtherfly -T--r Z_________Ifl rLEJ r AIJU LII- c1LJMain St. beautificationStreet beautification (proposed)Pedestrian routes (marked with signage and including rest areas)Emphasis on private improvements to pedestrian routeDesignated walkwayDesignated bicycle routeFull traffic lightsPedestrian actuated light160Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations3. City Engineer and Park Board staff, inconsultation with the Director of Planning and theMount Pleasant Citizens’ Planning Committee, todevelop and report back on a street tree plantingprogram for Mount Pleasant, with specific prioritygiven as follows:a) identified pedestrian routes;b) streets already having received localimprovement work, where trees were part of theimprovement;c) areas of Mount Pleasant historically deficientin tree planting;andd) high density residential areas.Tree types planted should be of a variety which reflecthistorical planting patterns on the street. Localresidents should be consulted.4. Park Board, Engineering and PlanningDepartments to include as a part of the MountPleasant Traffic Management Plan, consideration ofamini-park system as a specific means of adding openspace in areas with a lack ofpark space.5. Park Board to undertake minor improvements topark sites at 7th Avenue and Fraser Street, includinggrass and park benches, with final plans anddevelopment to be undertaken when the issue of streetclosure is determined as part of the TrafficManagement Plan.6. City Engineer to complete improvements andsignage on the 2nd Avenue pedestrian walkway andFirst Avenue cycle route.2.8.4 Recommendations: PeripheralRecreation Opportunities1. Park Board, Properties Division and Director ofPlanning to consider development of a small streetend park at the north foot of Ontario Street, as part offuture lease considerations of the City-ownedright-of-way; and that consideration includeconnection to the existing designated walkway along2nd Avenue. Concepts for this street-end park shouldinclude access for water-related activities, such asboating.2. City Council to ensure the plans for the proposedregional park, adjacent to the Science World Centre,continue to give proper attention to the needs ofadjacent communities, and that action to underminethe size and role of this park be resisted.3. Park Board and Planning Departments to ensurethat future plans for the development of theCNR/BNR lands give consideration to the followingprovisions:a)Park space which serves adjacent communitiesas well as the proposed community on theselands; andb)Pedestrian linkages from adjacent communitiesto connect to these park spaces if provided.161Appendix B. Mcunt Pleasant Plan Recommendations2.9 TRAFFIC, ALTERNATETRANSPORT AND PARKING2.9.1 Recommendation: Traffic ManagementPlan1.Engineering and Planning Departments tocomplete traffic management plan, with thefollowing principles in mind:a) keep commuter through-traffic on majorarterials.b) improve arterials with an emphasis onimproving linkages between crossing arterials,such as left turn bays and advanced signalmeasures and investigation of theKingsway/Quebec Connector.c) clarify role and designation of streets such as7th Avenue (between Cambie and Main Streets),12th Avenue (traffic load throughout MountPleasant) and route originating from 2ndAvenue along 5th Avenue and Fraser Street.d) implement mitigation measures wherecommuter shortcutting is detrimental to aneighbourhood in terms of unwarranted traffic,noise and reduction of safety.e) consultation with affected neighbourhoods tobe a prime consideration before implementation ofany measure.2.9.2 Recommendations: TransportationProjects1. City Council, in conjunction the City Engineerand in conjunction with affected communities, tostudy the feasibility of the Grandview Cut roadway,as a measure to direct commuter traffic around thecommunities of Mount Pleasant andGrandview- Woodland2. City Council to ensure that existing residential andcommercial districts are protected from potentiallynegative impacts if the Cambie Street corridor isconsidered for an ALRT corridor to Richmond.2.9.3 Recommendations: AlternateTransportation Modes1. City Council to foster greater public transitridership with the objectives of reducing trafficcongestion and parking shortages.2. City Council to reconsider the car poolingprogram, by investigating effective programs in othercities, and support alternate public transit projectssuch as a commuter rail system along Burrard Inlet.3. Bicycle Advisory Committee to develop and adopt acomprehensive bicycle program, governingdesignation of bicycle routes, education, safety andadequate enforcement.4. Bicycle Advisory Committee to develop aneducation program specifically directed to motoristsand cyclists to reduce accidents and frustrationbetween both groups.5. Director ef Planning to incorporate pedestrianweather protection requirements in existing andfuture design guidelines.162Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations2.9.4 Recommendations: Parking1. City Council to request that the Director ofPlanning, the Development Permit Board and theBoard of Variance seek every opportunity to ensurethat parking standards are upheld in Mount Pleasant,particularly in regard to new developments.2. City Engineer to undertake a needs survey in theMain and Broadway area and develop alternatestrategies for increasing parking in the area,including:a) examination of collective parkingopportunities for the commercial core;b) examination of private development initiativeswhich could provide parking for the generalcommercial area;c) expansion of the Downtown ParkingCorporation into Mount Pleasant;d) examination of existing bus stop patterns toeliminate unneeded stops which take up parkingspaces and impede efficient traffic flow;e) examination of means of providing employeeparking and/or seeking incentives to encourageemployee use ofpublic transit; andf) examination of means of maintaining parkingon Main Street, between 2nd Avenue and 7thAvenue.3. City Engineer to consider co-operative or collectiveparking opportunities in the industrial area if interestis expressed by property owners in the area.4. City Engineer to review, in conjunction with theDirector of Planning, the Mount Pleasant BusinessAssociation and the Mount Pleasant Citizens’Planning Committee, the concept of pay-in-lieuparking to determine if it would be a viable method toimprove existing parking shortages.5. City Engineer to extend Resident Permit Parkingzones to block faces where 60% of respondingresidents express support.6. City Engineer to ensure that adequate resources areavailable to provide for regular enforcement in allareas and special enforcement in problem areas.7. City Engineer, in consultation with Director ofPlanning, to review City auto parking and storagestandards for commercial uses such as auto repairservices and czr dealerships.8. City Engineer, in consultation with Director ofSocial Planning, to review City standards for securityand maintenance of underground parking lots.2.10 ENVIRONMENT2.10.1 Recommendations: Physical upkeepAnd Appearance1. Director of Permits and Licenses to report back toCity Council, in conjunction with the MountPleasant Citizens’ Committee, regarding increasedenforcement of the Standards and MaintenanceBy-law and Zoning By-law infractions.2. City Council to endorse the concept and offersupport to semi-annual citizen-sponsored clean-updays in interested communities, seeking support ofcivic unions to avoid potential conflicts.163Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations3. (a) The City Engineer establish a program toinitiate a few Local Improvements each year forpavement, curbs and sidewalks in MountPleasant, subject to funding availability;(b) City Council to establish the requirementthat, where possible, site redevelopment should bemade conditional upon the provision of curbs andsidewalks on all streets adjacent to the site.4. Police and Community Development Worker towork with building owners to demonstrate thefinancial benefits of ongoing maintenance andresident management.5. City Council to communicate to the VancouverSchool Board the need for education at all gradelevels, the concept of community pride andcommunity upkeep. The suggestions of communityclean-up days and community awareness eventscould form part of this education.2.10.2 Recommendations: CommunityLandscape Project1. Community groups, together with the LandscapeArchitects of B.C. or the ILB.C. School of LandscapeArchitecture, to develop a summer works programaimed at improving the landscape condition of MountPleasant, with consideration to possibly includeurban garden plots within the concept.2.10.3 Recommendations: SignConsiderations1. Director of Planning to report back regardingpossible amendments to the Sign By-law to bettercontrol the location and size of signs and billboards,such that important views are maintained and signsof businesses in an area are not obscured. Potentiallycontroversial signs or sign removals would bereviewed with relevant community groups.2. City Council to eliminate roof-top signs as aconsideration within the Sign By-law.2.10.4 Recommendations: General OperationsIn CommercialAreas1. City Engineer to work with the Mount PleasantBusiness Association to ensure proper and adequateplacement of litter containers in commercial areas.2. City Engineer to continue in the short term withefforts to curtail poster placement on City and Hydroutility poles; however, that consideration be given toproviding acceptable alternatives for the display ofcommunity information (e.g. kiosks, communityinformation boards or special pole display panels forsuch purpose).Community groups must also bear responsibility totake down dated material.3. City Council to support a district-wide recyclingprogram, with conveniently located depots and giveconsideration to discussion at a regional level on thereduction and/or elimination of the use ofnon-recyclable containers.2.10.5 Recommendation: Handicapped Access1. City Engineer to continue to improve wheelchairaccessibility throughout Mount Pleasant, workingwith special needs groups and housing co-operativesto determine improvements.164Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan RecommendationsLSection 33.1 BROADWAY AND MAINSREET CORERecommendations1. Director of Planning to define commercial node atBroadway and Main through extension of C-3A to12th Avenue.2. Director of Planning to further define commercialnode by terminating C-3A zoning at Prince Edwardand concentrate area east for mixed-use, lower scaledevelopment. SEE SECTION 3.2.3. Director of Planning to upgrade existing CentralBroadway Urban Design Guidelines to ensure thatnew development reinforces pedestrian environmentand building form and character.3.2 NEIGHBOURHOODCOMMERCIAL AREASRecommendations1. To ensure that existing commercial characteristicsof centres at Broadway and Fraser and Fraser atKingsway are retained, the pedestrian-oriented,mixed-use zoning C-2C is recommended to replaceexisting C-2.2. To provide for orderly development and animproved commercial image for Cambie and MainStreets, between 12th and 16th Avenues, C-2C isrecommended to replace the existing C-2.3.3 OTHER COMMERCIALAREASRecommendationNo changes recommended.3.4 EXISTING INDUSTRIALRecommendations1. Director of Planning and Economic DevelopmentOffice tailor to Mount Pleasant an I or IC zoningschedule to allow industry, industrial-office,business-service and clearly ancillary industrialretailing in existing M-l and M-2 Districts of MountPleasant, in consultation with property owners andindustrialists in the area, as well as interested partiesin the community, and bring forward the proposedzoning to City Council for referral to a PublicHearing.Director of Planning to ensure that no existingindustrial use to be made non-conforming throughnew zoning, and that all existing uses appear eitheras outright or conditional uses in the new schedule.2. City Council to instruct Director of Planning tomake application to rezone portions of Cambie andMain Street to C-3A, with appropriate designguidelines and that the application be referred to aPublic Hearing.165Appendix .5. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations3. Director of Planning to include within proposedindustrial zoning district schedules the followingconditional use description:‘Residential uses which existed prior to and havebeen used continuously as such since (date ofenactment).”Zoning guidelines should state clearly that residentialuses are permitted with the understanding thatowners and occupants will seek no operationallimitations to industry.4. Director of Planning to work with the MountPleasant Citizens’ Planning Committee to prepareappropriate zoning and companion design guidelinesto foster the unique character of the Brewery CreekIndustrial Enclave and that the Director of Planningbring forward recommendations for consideration byCity Council prior to the end of 1987.5. Director of Planning to examine the Brewery CreekIndustrial Enclave, between Main and Brunswick, fora potential pilot project for other areas of the City,incorporating industrial uses and artist studio andaccommodation.3.5 WEST MOUNT PLEASANTRecommendations1.Director of Planning to develop and report back toCouncil on a heritage area (HA) zoning districtschedule, for a portion of West Mount Pleasant, asshown in Figure 12 of plan (seepage 72).2.Director of Planning to prepare accompanyingdesign guidelines which will delineate architecturalstyle,form and building materials, to ensure that both3.6 MOUNT PLEASANTTRIANGLERecommendation1. City Council to instruct Director of Planning tomake application to rezone RT-2 area of the MountPleasant Triangle, to RT-2A.3.7 10TH AVENUE APARTMENTAREARecommendation1. Director of Planning to develop an amendedapartment zoning schedule which encourages abuilding form consistent with the heritage district tothe south.3.8 MAIN STREET COREAPARTMENT AREARecommendation1.Director of Planning to develop an amendedapartment zoning schedule which begins to develop astyle of building form and architecture with somevariety, to replace the repetitive development whichnow exists. Other principles outlined herein shouldbe adopted as part ofaccompanying design guidelines.renovation and new construction are consistent withthe heritage architecture of the area.166Appendix B. Mount Pleasant Plan Recommendations3.9 MOUNT PLEASANT NORTHRecommendation1. Director of Planning to develop an amendedapartment zoning schedule which begins to develop astyle of building form and architecture whichrespands to the diverse needs of people living in thearea. Useable, on-site open space is a priority.3.10 ZONING ANOMALIESCurrent Use: Parking Lot (City Hall employees)Current Zoning: RM-3AProposed Zoning: C-3AReason: City Hall todevelopment to north.longer relevant.3.10.2 West Side of Cambie Street, between13th and 14th AvenuesCurrent Use: Strip commercial developmentCurrent Zoning: C-2Proposed Zoning: C-2CReason: Bring zoning into linerecommended zoning on east side of street.3.10.3 North Side of 100 Block East 10th AvenueCurrent use: Federal Government officebuilding and Postal Station CCurrent Zoning: RM-3AProposed Zoning: C-3AReason: Bring zoning into line with use andzoning to north (along Broadway) and east(Main Street).3.10.4 North Side of 200 Block East 16th AvenueCurrent Use: Small retail outletsCurrent Zoning: C-2Proposed Zoning: Amended Apartment ZoningReason: Eliminate zoning anomaly.3.10.5 North Side of 200-700 blocks East 16thAvenueCurrent Use: Two-family DwellingsCurrent Zoning: RT-2Proposed Zoning: Amended Apartment ZoningReason: Move zoning boundary to 16th Avenueto provide better transition between apartmentuses and lower scale housing developments.3.10.6 North Side of 400 Block East BroadwayCurrent Use: St. Michael’s Anglican ChurchCurrent Zoning: RM-3AProposed Zoning: C-2CReason: Bring zoning into line with zoningalong Broadway.3.10.7 West Side of Clark Drive South of EastBroadwayCurrent Use: Two-family DwellingsCurrent Zoning: RT-2Proposed Zoning: Amended Apartment ZoningReason: Isolated zoning district.8’oodwa12th0-3.10.1 North Side of 400 Block West 10thAvenuesouth, commercialExisting zoning nowith167

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