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UBC Theses and Dissertations

Report and preliminary working plan for the University forest Allen, George Samuel 1935

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I U . B . C . LIBRARY ; | M£ ^<^£LV± !. REPORT and. PRELIMINARY WORKING PLAN for the UNIVERSITY FOREST by George Samuel A l l e n . A Thesis submitted for the Degree of MASTER OF APPLIED SCIENCE in.the Department of FORESTRY The University of B r i t i s h Columbia A p r i l , 1935 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Pr e f ac e • *«..< ».«.*<«*..'*»-- ...... '».•»•*•.».**•.•-.»*• » 1 Acknowledgments ..«.....»....». * •.«......... *.. •.« * 2 Key Map 3 F*r o & jj.3pi,Qc"Q •#•••»•*•••••*»#»«***•»»•••»*•*•••• 4 Summary of Report and Plan ..................... 5 PART I . REPORT ON THE UNIVERSITY FOREST......... 7 Location and Ownership .., . 8 XiO@3.tti>S.on »• • «• - • • • . • • • » * • > » « • k..* 9 Own©r*sliij? • *•**•*«•«» • # • * * • • • •«#•••#•»•*••• 3 Area 8 IjOCSiX Coiicijt'fcHons • «*••••**• * *•«•••« 0 •**•*•••••« 9 Phy 3 iogi*o.piiy *»«•*.*«*• • *•••.«•*<.«*••••#»»«• * *. 9 S o i l . 9 Hi story. ,,...,...«....*....,...-................... 10 General hi s t o r y ........................... 10 Past Injuries ............................. 10 Economic Conditions ..•........................... 12 Labor « , ...,.... *',...<... • • • . . *.« . «•..'..,«-..,' 12 Market ...»*.....«* *. -«.««#*.«'*..».*«*««..*.«. 12 Transportation * . . 12 Forest Description ,... 13 Forest types 13 Forest condition 14 Growth ..... 14 Source of data 14 Estimate of timber and growth ............. 15 PART I I . PRELIMINARY WORKING PLAN FOR THE TOVfRSlTf PQRfi&T ... 7TTTT 16 Xnt/yo^t^c ti* 3. oil • • • »• •»«. «*^ «f 0 * 0 0 0 * * 0 »• 1*7 Objects of management ..................... 17 Di v i s i o n of the forest .................... 17 TABLE OP CONTENTS (continued) Page S l l v i e u l t u r a l Treatment ......................... 18 S ] p 0 c i©s *••••*•*•• * • .• • • •*> * • • •»*••••» IS Operations 18 P i n a l cuttings (marking rules) ............. 18 Thinnings .................................... 19 Cleanings and l i b e r a t i o n cuttings .......... 19 Reproduction .. 19 Regulation of the Cut . . 20 Sustained annual y i e l d at present 20 Sustained annual y i e l d when managed ........ 20 De t a i l Plans.* 21 Plan of cuttings ........................... 21 IPXSLTI of pXsiixfc JLTV^ *.•»-*»*#-•-• o- •'*#••••*.•'•- • 22 Plan of nursery sowing ...............*..... 23 3?l?0fc©Ci/l^ OXl * * »*.**•«« *' * • * '•• • • «-*-*.» • • • • * * a • • • • 2*^1 ]Fi.!E*6 »..»• « • * « • »-#••.•*•*-#•• « • •#-*•••• » • • • * • • » * • • • •- * 24 Insects 24 Diseases ................................... 24 Special Problems •........ •. •...................... 25 APPENDIX. Appendix I . Stand description, stand table (per 2 g acre),, f.b.m, stock table (per acre), and cubic at to stock table (per acre) f o r each block ........... 129 Appendix I I . Local volume tables (f.b.m. and cubic) 130 Dou^X&3 1^3.1° **.•*•+.«;-*.*•-• • * • * • *•>•*•*•*•••«••** X3X Red Cedar 132 Balsam and Western Hemlock ........ 133 Alder and Maple ............................. 134 Y i e l d t ables. Douglas P i r ................. 135 Red Cedar (60 years Appendix I I I . Description of species 138 Estimate of cedar poles by blocks 144 Area c l a s s i f i c a t i o n by blocks , 145 Appendix IV. Mapsf U t i l i z a t i o n map, map of forest condition, cover map and drainage map ...... 146 Blbllograp^hv^. ........ ..».•«....•••.......••..... 147 ILLUSTRATIONS Page Plate I , Frontispiece. General character of the forest cover. Block 11. ..... 4 Plate VI. Open character of stand on Block 1, ... 27 Plate V. Dense cedar-hemlo.dk.. Block 5, ......... 43 Plate I I I * Block 9 from Marine Drive, showing new d i t c h . Typical hardwood stand with some coniferous under.st.ory.. ........... 6.0 Plate VII. Dense codar-hemloek on Block 12 ...... 72 Plate IV. Block 12 looking west. Typical group of cedar reproduction surrounded hy dense salmonberry . .. *................. . 73 Plate VIII. Block 13 from Marine Drive .......... 77 Plate IX* Mature fIr-balsam-eedar on Block 20. .. 105 Plate X, Mature cedar. Block 21.................. 109 Plate I I . Block 21. Mature cedar, hemlock and balsam* Logging road In foreground. ... 110 -1-( PREFACE It i s the aim of the Department of Forestry to b u i l d the University Forest into a research and p r a c t i c a l laboratory f o r f o r e s t r y and botany students, and Into a demonstration forest which w i l l serve as a recreation area, as a home for wild l i f e , and as a windbreak f o r the botanical and hor t i c u l t x i r a l gardens. With t h i s i n mind, the area was surveyed i n 1934~»35 to determine what should and could be done. From t h i s survey, a plan was constructed which w i l l serve as a basis i n bu i l d i n g th© area Into a forest worthy of the name. -2-ACKMOflLEIXffiEHTS The writer wishes to acknowledge with apprec-i a t i o n the kind assistance of the following: the P a c i f i c North-west Forest Experiment Station, Portland, Oregon, for valuable tables and bu l l e t i n s ? the Research D i v i s i o n , Forest Branch,. V i c t o r i a , B.C. f o r survey sheets and -growth, data; J.H.Jenkins, Esq., Forest Products Laboratory, Vancouver, B.C. f o r data re the uses of hardwoods; B.C. Forest Branch, Vancouver, B.C.; and Professor F.Malcolm Knapp f o r encourage-ment and constructive c r i t i c i s m throughout the preparation of -this t h e s i s . -3-K E Y M A P U N I V E R S I T Y F O R E S T U N I V E R S I T Y 09 BRITISH COLUMBIA V A N C O U V E R . B . C . -5-SUMMARY OF REPORT AND PLAN. Location. The University Forest l i e s west of the University buildings between Marine Drive and the University campus. Area. Total area, divided into 45 blocks, Area covered by report, blocks 1 to 25, 104.01 acres 56.93 acres Area c l a s s i f i c a t i o n . Forested Cultivated Scrub Total Acres 44.94 0.78 11.21 56.93 Per cent 78,9 1.4 19.7 100.0 Merchantable timber. Species F.b.m. Cu. F t . Cords F i r 139252 27454 305 Cedar 143380 30106 334 Hemlock 25801 7069 78 Spruce 4713 1185 13 Balsam 46110 10412 116 Alder 42098 14185 158 Maple 66308 15331 170 Cherry 2687 1689 19 ::Hardwood 111093 31205 347 Conifers 359260 76227 846 ;otal: 470353 107432 1193 Sustained annual y i e l d . Under present conditions: 16 M f.b.m., a l l species -6-Sustained annual y i e l d (continued). When regulated: 22 M f.b.m., p r i n c i p a l l y softwoods. Rotations and cutting c y c l e s . Species Rotation • Cutting cycle P i r 60 years 10 years Cedar (1 H 11 TI Balsam ti n r? H Hemlock tr « it ti Alder 30 years 30 years Maple « it Species recommended... Primary species: f i r and cedar. Secondary species: lodgepole pine, hemlock, spruce, balsam, alder, maple, cascara. Treatment recommended during the f i r s t cutting cycle. 1. Remove a l l overmature and decadent timber. 2. Remove a l l dead-topped cedar, a l l mistletoe-infected hemlock, and a l l trees of poor form, 3. Liberate young conifers by removing suppressing hardwoods; leave t h r i f t y hardwoods which are not wolf trees. 4. Plant openings and bare spots to suitable species, using 2-3 transplants In a l l cases. Revision of the plan. This plan i s Intended to i n i t i a t e management during the f i r s t cutting cycle of 10 years. At the end of that period, r e v i s i o n of the plan w i l l be e s s e n t i a l . PART 1 REPORT ON THE UNIVERSITY FOREST. o LOCATION AND OWNERSHIP Location. The University Forest l i e s to the south-west and adjacent to the University buidings. Its boundaries are: Marine Drive on the south-west and west; the proposed Chan-c e l l o r Boulevard on the south-east and east; the farm lands and botanical gardens on the north-east. The west wireless pole of the Point Grey Wireless Station i s the north-north-west corner of the area. The south-east boundary of the area covered by the report i s Agronomy Road. •> Ownership. The Forest i s owned by the University of B r i t i s h Columbia and i s under the control of the Department of Forestry. Area T o t a l area 104.01 acres. Blocks 1 to 25- 56.93 acres. LOCAL CONDITIONS Physiography. The area i s quite f l a t with a s l i g h t south-west aspect, well-drained on the whole, and approximately 250 feet above sea - l e v e l . Climate. The climate Is s i m i l a r to that of Vancouver C i t y . Mild summers and winters, few extremes In temperature, and a high r e l a t i v e humidity are usual. The growing season i s long and l a s t s from the end of March to the end of September; during t h i s period, the r a i n f a l l Is f a i r l y evenly d i s t r i b u t e d . The l a s t k i l l i n g f r o s t comes about March and the f i r s t about October. The p r e v a i l i n g wind Is from the east and averages about 4 miles per hour v e l o c i t y during the year. An occas-ional high wind up to 30 miles per hour occurs, but i s rather the exception. On the whole the climate i s very suitable to the growth of trees. S o i l . The area i s covered by a g l a c i a l t i l l , deposited during the Post-Pleistocene e r a . The s o i l varies In depth from shallow to f a i r l y deep and, i s a loam to sandy loam* . The site-Index f o r Douglas f i r on t h i s area i s 130, i n d i c -ating a s i t e II f o r B r i t i s h Columbia and a s i t e III for Washington and Oregon. 6 -10-HISTORY General h i s t o r y . This area, o r i g i n a l l y a v i r g i n f i r - c e d a r stand, was logged s e l e c t i v e l y during the early part of t h i s century. Only the very best trees and logs were removed during the cutting,, and since then i t has remained untouched except for small cordwood c u t t i n g s . For t h i s reason, the fo r e s t cover has a very uneven appearance and consists of overmature trees which were not considered good enough to remove, mature trees which were too small at the time of logging, and reproduction which has come i n since logging. The Forest was surveyed and divided Into 45 blocks, each approximately 2 1/2 acres i n area, by B.Lamarque,D.l.S. i n 1926. Between 1924 and 1930, roads and t r a i l s were cut and several drains constructed. In 1935 a through drain from the . l e s t M a l l , through blocks 11,10 and 9, to Marine Drive was constructed. Past I n j u r i e s . Ho serious f i r e s have occurred although f i r e - s e a r s on some of the larger f i r s and cedars indicate the presence of small ground f i r e s i n the past* Rabbits, and possibly grouse, have done consider-able damage to planted f i r s , chewing o f f the leaders and branches to within 6 inches of the ground. Many f i r s have been pruned thus year a f t e r year and may be considered as -11-f a l l u r e s . The only Important disease present i n the forest Is mistletoe on the hemlock, {Arceuthobium tsugensls). Many of the hemlocks, suppressed i n the o r i g i n a l stand, are d i s -eased and form a constant source of danger to hemlock reprod-u c t i o n . White pine b l i s t e r rust,(Cronartium r i b i c o l a ) , i s present i n the t e l i a l stage on black currant plants i n the h o r t i c u l t u r a l gardens. Hence, growing white pine In any numbers i n the forest Is out of the question. There i s serious danger that the white pine i n the nursery i s already inf e c t e d . -12-ECONOMIC COHDIT.IONS Labor. One man i s employed at present i n the forest to clean, plant and cut cordwood, A small gang of men from a l o c a l m i l i t i a r e l i e f camp i s cutting wood and cleaning and planting; t h i s labor w i l l possibly be available during the remainder of 1935. Market. Cedar poles have been sold to the University and It Is probable that cedar poles and posts w i l l f i n d a steady l o c a l market i n the future. The B.Hammond and Sons Company w i l l take a l l the alder and maple logs of 9 inches diameter and 8 feet length and larger that the forest can supply. These are sawn at t h e i r Vancouver m i l l and manufactured Into furniture.. Snags, p a r t l y decayed logs and trees f i n d a l o e a l market as firewood. TransportatIon. Transportation fnom the forest w i l l l i k e l y be by truck i n the future* Logging In the forest i s at present done by hand with some skidding by truck, I t may be possible to procure the loan of a small t r a c t o r to f a c i l i t a t e the hand-l i n g of large logs. Under management, the forest should keep one man ste a d i l y employed, and the University should, In the near future, receive considerable revenue from the sale of forest products. -13-PORBST DESCRIPTION Forest types» The forest was o r i g i n a l l y of one type: f l r - c e d a r -hemlock-balsam, with the f i r and cedar predominating* Since logging, cedar and hardwoods have come i n r a p i d l y and have l a r g e l y replaced the f i r . For convenience, the present forest cover has been subdivided into three sub-types: pure hardwood, mixed conifer and hardwood, and pure c o n i f e r * The general composition of these sub-types Is as follows: 1. Pure hardwood. Approximately 90 per cent of the stand Is hardwood. The p r i n c i p a l species are alder and maple; the secondary species are cherry, willow, cascara., and crab-apple. 2*. Mixed conifer and hardwood. This i s the p r i n c i p a l sub-type of the f o r e s t . I t consists of a f a i r l y even mixture of conifers and hardwoods^ usually hardwoods with an under story I of c o n i f e r reproduction* The p r i n c i p a l species are eedar, hemlock*, balsam, alder and maple; the secondary species are f i r , spruce, cherry, willow, cascara, crab-apple. 3. Pure c o n i f e r s . Most of t h i s type Is pure cedar, cedar and hemloek,. or a mixture of cedar, hemlock and. balsam* A l i t t l e f i r occurs here and there but Is not a main species In any part of the area. This type i s nearly a l l i n the 1 to 20 year age c l a s s , having come In since logging. -14-Porest condition. Acres % Forested Non-forested To t a l Pure Hdwd Mixed C & H Pure Con. T o t a l C u l t l v ated Scrub T o t a l 3,64 6.4 27*07 47 .5 14,23 25,0 44,94 78,9 0.78 1.4 11.21 19,7 11.99 21.1 56,93 100.0 Growth. The present rate of growth Is estimated from Increment borings as follows: Species F i r Cedar Hemlock Spruce Balsam Alder Maple Growth % 4,0 2.5 3.0 2.0 5.0 8,5 6.0 These growth rates apply only to t h r i f t y trees smaller than 30 inches d.b.h. Trees larger than t h i s are making very l i t t l e growth and t h i s Is o f f s e t by the decay i n the overmature trees, is estimated, The future annual growth^in a mixed coniferous stand,to average 400 f ,b,m» per acre. Pure alder on a 30 year rotation/should average 400 f.b.m. , or 100 cubic feet per acre per year. Source of data. The growing stock estimates are based upon a 100$ cruise of the forest by blocks. Growth estimates are based upon increment borings covering a l l age classes, and c a l -culated by the Pressler formula. -15-Bstlmate of merchantable timber and annual growth. F.b, ,ra. Cu.Ft. Volume Species Volume Growth Volume Growth cords F i r 139252 2020 27454 390 305 Cedar 143380 2500 30106 520 334 Hemlock 25801 780 7069 210 78 Spruce 4713 100 1185 25 13 Balsam 46110 1800 10412 390 116 Alder 42098 3580 14185 1190 158 Maple 66308 3480 15331 790 170 Cherry 2687 140 1689 90 19 Conifer T o t a l 359260 7200 76227 1535 846 Hardwood Tota l 111093 , 7200 31205 2070 347 Grand Total 470353 14400 107432 3605 1193 PART II PRELIMINARY WORKING PLAN fo r the UNIVERSITY FOREST -17-INTRODUCTION Objects of management. 1. To develop a demonstration forest and a fo r e s t laboratory fo r students of natural sciences, and provide a permanent shelter f o r wild l i f e , 2. To provide a windbreak f o r adjacent University grounds. 3. To produce saleable forest products on a sustained y i e l d basis and create permanent employment f o r at l e a s t one man. D i v i s i o n of the f o r e s t . The forest d i v i s i o n w i l l remain as i t i s at present, the north h a l f being divided Into 25 blocks each approxim-ately 2 1/2 acres i n area. -18-SILVICULTURAL TREATMENT Species.. Douglas f i r , red cedar, western hemlock, lodgepole pine and grand f i r are the species most suited to the area. During the f i r s t ten-year period, planting w i l l he confined to f i r , cedar and lodgepole pine among the c o n i f e r s . Cascara and dogwood w i l l he the only hardwoods planted during the f i r s t period. Operations. The s e l e c t i o n system i s the most suitable to use In the all-aged mixed stands on the area.. In the even-aged stands and deciduous stands, c l e a r c u t t i n g i n small groups i s recommended. Eotatio^ suitable are: 60 years f o r a l l c o n i f e r s , whieh should produce an average diameter of 12 inches and more i n a l l species; cutt i n g cycle of 10 years. For the hardwoods, a r o t a t i o n of 30 years i s suggested; t h i s should f produce an average d.b.h, of 12 Inches. F i n a l cuttings. \ F i n a l cuttings during the f i r s t decade w i l l be confined to the removal of overmature and decadent t r e e s , poorly shaped trees*, and wolf trees, as per the following marking r u l e s : 1, Mark a l l overmature and decadent timber. 2. Mark a l l dead and Insect-infected t r e e s . -19-3. Mark a l l wolf trees and trees of abnormal form. 4. Hark a l l dead-topped cedar. 5. Mark a l l mistletoe*Infected hemlock* Thinnings. Thinnings w i l l be car r i e d out i n the pure conifer-ous stands which are overstocked. These w i l l remove dead and dying trees, and any others that are crowding more d e s i r -able trees. Thinning should r e s u l t i n a spacing of approx-imately 8 feet by 8 feet In the 1 to 20 year o l d stands. Thinning In the plantations w i l l be c a r r i e d out as soon as competition becomes severe. Cleanings and l i b e r a t i o n c u t t i n g s . These are the p r i n c i p a l cuttings necessary during the f i r s t decade. Wolf trees which overtop young conifers w i l l be removed and w i l l include both hardwoods and c o n i f e r s . Thick underbrush w i l l be cleaned up at the same time to make planting easier and to give the young conifers a better chance to survive. Reproduction. Reproduction during the f i r s t period w i l l be ob-tained by planting 2-3 coniferous transplants i n cleaned areas. Weeding w i l l be necessary f o r three or four years a f t e r planting to allow the young trees to get ahead of the salmon-berry . -20-REGULATION OF THE CUT  Sustained annual y i e l d i n present condition i n M f.b.m. Conifers Hardwoods Species Y i e l d Species Y i e l d F i r Cedar Hemlock Spruce Balsam 4.6 4,8 0.9 0.2 1.5 Alder Maple Cherry 1,4 1.7 0,1 Total 12.0 Total 3.2 Sustained annual y i e l d when f u l l y stocked and managed. Y i e l d w i l l approximate 22 M f.b.m, of a l l species grown, and w i l l be p r i n c i p a l l y softwoods. DETAIL PLANS Plan of euttlngs. Year Block No. Nature of Cutting Hardwood Y i e l d F.b.m. Cords 1935 11 Cleaning. 12 Liberation cutting and cleaning. 1190 4.5 10 d i t t o 640 2 # 5 7 d i t t o 941 10.2 1936 8 Liberation cutting and cleaning. 1773 6,3 9 d i t t o 2028 6.6 13 d i t t o 2980 10.6 5 Thinning, Liberat i o n cutting and cleaning. 3188 16.5 1937 4 Thinning. Liberat i o n cutting and cleaning. 5608 20.7 1938 3 Liberatio n cutting and cleaning. 3206 12.3 1939 r i 2 •t Thinning.. Liberat i o n cutting and cleaning. 4707 15.9 1940 1 Thinning. Liberat i o n cutting and cleaning. 13268 40.5 1941 14 Liberation cutting an'i cl eftnlng * 7957 17.9 1942 15 d i t t o 2668 16.6 1943 17 d i t t o 6138 14.6 1944 16 Liberatio n cutting, cleaning, &thinning 1910 8.3 -22-Plan of planting. Year Block Area ~ l a c r e s ; — to be planted. No. of plants needed. No. Bare P a r t i a l l y stocked Total P i r Cedar Pine To t a l 1935 11 0.84 0,45 1.29 1220 180 150 1550 12 0.54 0.91 1.45 1280 360 100 1740 10 1,12 0.69 1.81 1890 280 2170 7 1.25 0,62 1.87 2010 240 2250 1936 8 1,04 0,30 1.34 1290 120 200 1610 9 0.41 0.25 0.66 700 100 800 13 1,33 0.46 1.79 1760 180 200 2140 1937 4 - 0.80 0.80 640 320 960 1938 3 0 ,45 0.40 . 0.85 870 150 1020 1939 2 0 * 50 0.50 400 200 600 1940 1 0.13 1.50 1.63 1380 600 1980 1941 14 0.24 0,56 0,80 720 240 960 1942 15 0 .48 0.52 1.00 690 210 300 1200 1943 17 0.18 0,32 0.50 480 120 600 1944 16 0.73 0.37 ; 1.10 1180 140 1320 -23-Plan of sowing f o r Forest Nursery. Year No. of s e e d b e d 3 (4 f t , by 12 f t . ) t o "be sown* F i r Cedar Pine (Pj) Total 1935-36 3/4 1/3 1/8 1 1/4 1936-37 1/2 1/8 1/16 11/16 1937*38 1/2 1/8 1/5 13/16 1938-39 1/4 1/8 1/24 5/12 1939-40 3/4 1/10 1/24 11/13 1940-41 1/3 1/8 1/10 7/12 1941-42 1/3 1/5 1/10 2/3 1942-43 1/5 1/8 1/8 9/20 1943-44 1/3 1/8 1/16 1/2 1944-45 1/2 1/8 1/16 3/4 PROTECTION F i r e , Slash disposal w i l l he ca r r i e d out with a l l s i l v i c -u l t u r a l c u t t i n g s . Road systems w i l l be developed In order to make every part of the forest a ccessible. Insects, Species to be planted should be chosen from those non-suseeptlble to Insect attack. I f a species shlch i s susceptible Is grown, i t should form only a small percent* age of a mixed stand. Diseases, Confine the species to those non-susceptible to any serious diseases. The danger of b l i s t e r rust on white pine i s too great to allow planting of white pine except on a very small scale In mixtures. A l l mistletoes-diseased hemlocks should be removed as soon as possible to stop the Infection of hemlock reprod-u c t i o n . When the overmature timber Is removed and the mature i s managed on a ro t a t i o n of 60 years, heart r o t w i l l be p r a c t i c a l l y eliminated from the f o r e s t . SPECIAL PROBLEMS 1* I t i s desirable to f i n d a method of obtaining natural regeneration a f t e r c u t t i n g . At present t h i s i s almost impos i b l e , and a l l regeneration must be by planting due to the heavy growth of salmonberry which springs up. 2. Some experiments with seed-spots should be c a r r i e d out i n order to determine whether or not t h i s method would be successful i n establishing a new stand, 3. Growth studies should be carr i e d out more accurately during the f i r s t period to serve as a basis f o r the new plan. An alder y i e l d table would be valuable, 4. A d e t a i l e d study of the s o i l would be of value. - 2 6 -AFFENDIX I. Stand d e s c r i p t i o n , stand table* f.b.m. stock table and cable stook table of each block* BLOCK I Area 4.22 acresj scrub area 0.13 acres. North-xvest aspect. S o i l - loam to sandy loam. The block i s well stocked with hardwoods, cedar and hemlock. Hardwoods predominate over the north-westj towards the south-west end t h i s grades into f a i r l y dense coniferous reproduction. Some cedar extends into the main crown canopy, but a large proportion of thi<§ i s dead-topped. Some f i r reproduction has come i n along the north-east boundary. Maple and cedar are the predominating species. Recommendations. The heavy cedar-hemlock reproduction should be thinned as soon as possible. liere the hardwoods predom-inate, the young conifers should be released and the spaces planted. The s i t e Is suitable f o r f i r , cedar, hemlock and maple and should be l e f t as a mixed stand as f a r as possible, Estimates of timber. Species F C H B A Ch Total F.b.m. 8693 10799 363 717 1688 11402 177 33840 Cu.Pt. 1671 2698 174 209 650 2787 217 8406 LCords 18.6 30.0 1.9 2.3 7.2 31*0 2.5 93.5 PLATE VI. Open character of stand on Block!. -28-STAND TABLE BLOCK 1 071 14-41. 0 1 4 1 0 - 4 1 iS-A- V I-Lb 8 1 - 4 6 4 T - 7 aq-^s l-qo 4S-36 S-Xl o-qs 5V4I o-qs O-^ S 57-3L 4 4 © 4q-o<<> I) 1 4 2 7^ 0 J 4 4q-S3 fe-b4 Sfc-4\ ixvqfc. 2-37 3o-io q-4t> 2-31 443X 4-SO 37 4 x »x- 33 5-4.75 qq-oi 2 8 + \o -45 7-11 X-«b4 XI X3 2-o4 351o?> 7-3S 4 5 -V] L o S o \- 4-qa j o a l-t«T lo-<V3 5.Lo 3o-vo 7-sq 4 3 - 3 f t 5 3 & 1 LIB 2-Ct X-fei Viq. 1-56 1-35 • 2 4 - n s-qs 37-45 45-03 O-4-T 1 - 4 1 OC\S v q o 4-14 • — 1 — 4 - q b 2.3-4U 4-So 3^ -94 VI -to?, 0-14 0 - q 5 l-tq 0-47 2-b4 X-Ul fc-i L X - 1 3 IQ qo l-i-74 OX4 0-47 OX4 0 - 4 7 1-4-2- | 3-St. Vov.1 IS-3o I 7 - 3 Q O M OX4 o-47 0-14- X-l3 4-2.7 o-H 711 o - 3 o I- iq 0 - 4 7 I . 4 1 -3-3-2. 0-24 4-qb L-L4 0 - Z 4 o-qs 0-47 14 a o-qs ILL X-t V 4 7 4 0 - 4 7 OX4 071 O X 4 O-A-1 0-H I A - X O-TI 0-47 i-ia, [ 0 - 7 1 : o-qs" l-bb 2-ftS 0-9,3 o-qs O X 4 0 - 4 7 o-T.1 !•(.«. 0 - 1 4 O-T-4 0-47 0.q5" 045 \ - 4 X 22 0-47 0-41 OX4 0-24 0 - 7 V 24 0-24 O -2.4 0 -7 .4 0-47 2G 0 x 4 0-24 0-24 0>24 0-47 28 i.IS i-iq o-4T 0-47 l-Ub 3o OX4 0-14 0-47 0 - 4 7 o-i 1 3 4 0-1.4 0-X4 0-24 0-X4 0 - 4 7 0-47 0-47 0-47 42 0 - 1 4 0-1.4 ; 6X4 50 O - H O X 4 0-Z4 7 4 0-24 Q - X 4 0-24-19 153 4-7 [ "37 49 3V8 (.53 -29-P.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 1 I S - 1 5 T V 3<o IS S b 1 0 ( 9 5 3 iq 3=\ » < V O 1*1 2."2. I I o T - l ST) n <*U tq-s- I to 1 T - O 1 1 IO i vo (oO V V S" \ - l 5 <*2- ST 1 3 9 . I 1 3 1 V 3 1 V 1 I 1 1 S3 &3 V O l \ O I v%S v o* 31 \ *1 1 3 0 1 5 | \ 5 1 5 A - I •2-10 "2.1 O 3 f t (o 3 » 8 f e 3fc> X H So 3 C o " 2 . 5 s - r - S C o - 2 . Vol - i-T -S 7.31 3 > U X 19,7.0 l l O -4t>15 4.00 X1Q-Z--30-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 1 1 - 4 i .q 5. b q-t. q>"b 131-1 l4o-T 1-4- 1-3 . "3.- fc, 1 - 4 x-t 1 4 14-t, l i t l l l . l 1-4 4 - X X-l lOlo iqx 3fe"i- <o-4 (.<V-o lO-1 U- v Xjfc 54-1 1 l~S 15.X S - o V l " 3 lloX Xb-3 4 - 4 - ^ 03-^  IS- | S i . l i b 2.XO 2.4-. 4 4-<»-4 2S<» 14-X U t » - x 1 i - i IX-X 2X-a 54-"S> 51-o 51-0 22 xq.fc, iq .u I tD 41-fe 24 I V 7 . 1 % - X 2 1-4 2Co 2. [. fc •L\-to IS-O 28 1X13) 5V4- 1 ^ - 1 3 o i o - l 3<3-2. <»4-4 q 4 - t 34 4 o - 3 4 »-o S l - 3 3<b qo-z Q0-2 <\0 2. t l -x 4 * (.1-2 50 1 Q«V.X I Q 4 . X >04-X 31Z-Q i i x o 3~i-i-o 3^S-^  t^.-S 4»-T. UxU-o ISi-«| U o - " 5 SV4- febSb ICftl-l--31-BLOCK 2 Area 1.45 acres* a l l productive. North-west aspect. S o i l - g r a v e l l y sandy loam to sandy loam. The block i s f a i r l y well stocked, grading from a dense young stand of balsam and cedar at the south-east end to a sparse hardihood cover with coniferous understory at the north-west end. Cedar and maple predominate over the whole block but balsam and cedar are the predominating species i n the south-east comer. Recommendations. The young coniferous stand should be thinned and the remainder of the block should be given a l i b e r a t i o n cutting and cleaning followed by planting. Estimates of timber. P C H B A M Ch T o t a l P.b.m. 5471 8887 384 3709 693 3940 75 23158 Cu.ft. 1008 1771 101 756 296 1106 28 5066 Cords 11.2 19,7 1.1 8,4 3 « 3 . 12,3 . .3 56,3 -32-STAND TABLE BLOCK 2 HAsROV/cOOS JNVWUE 3-45 •3-45 3-4S O-feq •assc, 2 It, 10-35 qq-3(» 99-3 Us 1-58, 24.15 Obq V |4S 3"\-95 2-oT 22 -n 3-4-S 26-2S Slo-5o 21-11 2 i -n 3<3-^ 5 10-35 3-45 11.-St. 3o-3(, 1-3© ( 24,21. 21-bn S l - C l c b-21 o-bq a-qi 15- 81 4 83 3u-sn 4-V-4Q ST • 21 1-38 136 . & 9 l i b-qo 26-29 1-18 3b-S1 4S-S4 O-bq, 2-OT 8-28 • 23-4-U 1-3D 33-12. 55 - IS 3-4-S 4 -63 lta-fe.3 o-tq 14-IS 12-4-1. 21 -bO > 4 - 4 q - o-bq o-bq X-07 ; 3-4S 5-91 2-0-1 X-Tfc ' S-S2- n - i i O-bq ; >144 20-20 2 It. l-5q lo-3S V O .35 Obq o-uq i - ib 4-14 b-q 0 i-5"q O-bq o-bq 1-38 4 - *4 4 - 1 4 o-bq 8-SI \o -35 1 Obq 0-1,9 116 i 1-36 1-38 2-1W 1-38 i O-bq ' 2-on 4 - \ 4 4-14 b-2v ouq D-b^  o-tq O-bq 1-38 24 28 O-bq 2-lb - • 1 o-bq 4 1 4 j O-bq o-bq 4-Q3 3o o-bq o-bq o-uq 32. 34 O-bq • o-bq i o-bq 3<b q-bq j 1 i. - J o-bq 1 o b q 1-38 38 O-bq l-3 Q 4o 1-38 j 1-38 54 O-bq o-faq o-bq 1 * i i lo-tJ IL6-4 »5-<q : ob-3 218-8 44 8 iqs-o 4- 242 1 5K.-5 -33-P.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 2 I A 35 X I 55 55 X14 2.IQ z-n zz 24 2<o 2?> (o«3,X 1435 fc88 bo 4-35 32 34- <o0 4-s 1 ° -iq<# i 5 o l 40 5A 244-1 A-q 1 1 4 l o i •& 4 3 3 A-«X Zl W X-J-o Z-4-I IIO 11.5 K . 5 "*4 514- <ooA 134 133 2.^ T> A-Col A-T-4- VOIA VO\4 IA33 XT"! X3b 23ft 51 S 534- 534 534 131 5 • 1* I S 435 ^ • " s , s (oOA (oQ4 (0^ 4 <»S4 zxqq 2-2-qq IftZZ IbXX. xq4i xq4i-m 3 ti T_q xc s 1556 4-n i i n 5-a. 3141= v5qi i -34-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 2 2-6 A S iq.3 14-S 2-5 qt-v, 1 Ql -S 1-4 1-1 1- \ 5-to 20 1 •53-b -14-S 9o-l I 1-2. \ A-o ?)2-l A-q. l i s t i3q-t lA-8 Lft-3 S3-I C|3-1 fa-3 (.-3 3o-4- 45-5 "82-2 V(o-D Ifc-fc 33-fc> 7o4 TO-4 l S I "J lo<o-3 11 -1 S4-Ti 49-C 49.<• I CJA-A s « . o 104-3 • 944 iq4-4 xq>i Ls-i fa 5 V 41-4 41-4 lots-22 24 2C 28 2-94 •<«> 143-5 5C4-3 ai-B . "32-a fcAT-l 30 B&-2 88-2 31 34 lll-lo l \ V b 3C. 1344 13 4--A 134--A 38 ISl-O, 2B2 b 43A 1 434-1 AO 339,2 339-2- 33^ -2, 54 54i-o 5410 54 V-O tqS-3 VV-i.i-2 -70-0 S H - 5 1S03-0 2o4-i lui-f, »4<« q^ C-U 34^4.4 -35-BLOCK 3 Area 1*30 acres? scrub area 0,45 a c r e s . Aspect west. S o i l - sandy loam. The forest cover Is a mixture of hardwood and con-i f e r s ranging from hardwoods with an understory of cedar In the south h a l f to a eedar*balsam mixture In the north h a l f . Some mature cedar and balsam form the upper canopy. Maple and cedar are the predominating species. The ground cover i s p r i n c i p a l l y • salmonberry, Windfall i s bad along the south boundary and along the road. Recommendations, The w i n d f a l l slash should be cleaned up, and the block given a l i b e r a t i o n c u t t i n g and cleaning followed by planting,; Estimate of timber. P C B A M Ch To t a l P,b,m, 4267 4445 2172 1141 1630 435 14091 Ou.ft, 785 879 1021 346 565 198 3795 Cords 8,7 9,8 11,3 3,8 6,3 42,1 -36-STAND TABLE BLOCK 3 1 H A R O ^ O O & S o-TT 3-o5 3-85 ( o - ! 5 iov-t»\ I C 5 V - I . \ 28 4ft 1-54 io-n 40-11 4o-7q q-23 13-65 23-06- q-23 q a 3 32-3\ q-23 3 o 6 l»-\5 l 8 - 4 ( o O ~[-[ 23-tO 2-3| XC-ift 44-fe4 1-54 O 77 3G6> S3q 2-31 31-S"! \-S4 3S-4X 4o-8 l O-J7 077 l 54 1-3* 23-61 3-oa 29 !(. 3&-&0 1-54 1-54 2-31 23-61 4-tl 3 o i q 32-33 , 1-54 13-65 3-84 »q-23 iq- 13 2-31 lV-54 X-3 1 IU- ic I t - i t 4.WI q-23 5-38) . iq-xx iq-22 3-OQ U-lS 1-3\ M-54 11-54 0-77 0-7T 2»t)4 3-84 X-3 1 9-qq V0-7t» 2-31 1-3 1 4 - U 4-t.x 1-54 1-54 3-o8 3-oft 0-T7 0-17 0-77 0-77 \ S 4 x-3\ 0-77 0-71 27 0-77 C>-77 1-S4 1-54 24 It. o-77 1-54 2-3 I 077 o-7T 1 6 0-77 0-77 o n 30 » 3fc 1-54 V-54 1-54 071 0-71 0 7 7 48 0 77 0-77 0-7,7 54 o n 0 77 0-77 l4fa-3 11-3 4&-X- l5"q-4- "SO - o xn- s 414-1 -37-F.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 3 |T_0 X A - Q 1t1 A-T2. -AT. 3 2-3 -J.^, 123 V X . 3 - | ^ . 3 1 - 0 3 4 - 3 i4-e> 14& xcno zq> l 0 " 3 (OS > 3 o l 3 o 2-U>0 3 ( o 5 " 1 1 t%5 4Q6 "5^3 S - £ | 3 24 ^ 321 IK.3 \ 5 f t 5 5 ^ 3 . 5 C \ 3 X a 4-QQ 4 - 0 0 io 31 34-34. n ? -IIS •4-3 iboQ, Kooq 34 3 l % 2 ST-ftX 3i.,8-2 3 2 8 2 3 4 - i q l < o 1 l Q3T.1. U54- 3 3 S X4-1--1 »ot)3q -38-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 3 b-X 5 5 - 4 ISA -n- o -ix-o |4«> b«t-x i x q q-i4 3 X 2 b4<° 134 - 5 2 7 1 5S-3 2 o -<b 103 - 8 \ o 3 - 3 M fc-q 4xX X 5 - 4 - \ o q - % 11 b-7 3 q - 3 -low 18-b 4>o • l 4 o - O D O - I 23-8 111 x n i nq-x 3b-X 3 ( e - X 2X 24 2& 3o 32 3b> 43 54 1,04.. 48-S" bq-o 3X4 141-t 2q%o q o i x b q . o 1 3 3 - f a 33?>0 %2-4 4-1b-0 14Tb xqt>-o b 0 4 - 0 8o-3 138-b 4->3--3 82-4 -41.b-0 iqfc-o b b 4 0 (,04° (.nu-i. 2ob?3 2bb-4- 4-341 151-5 ftSvb xqivq -39-BLOCK 4 Area 2*50 acres,; a l l productive, Horth-west aspect, S o i l » gra v e l l y sandy loam. The forest cover grades from a dense mixed stand at the north end to an open mixed stand at the south. Cedar, balsam and maple are the predominating species. Ground cover i s p r i n c i p a l l y swordfera. Recommendations, The denser parts of the stand require t h i n -ning; the remainder should receive a l i b e r a t i o n cutting and cleaning followed by pla n t i n g . Estimate of timber, P C H B A M Ch Total F,b.ra. 225 10490 1870 1550 1345 4062 200 19743 Cu.ft, 64 2002 409 382 670 1114 86 4725 Cords ,7 22.2 4.6 4.2 7,5 12.4 .9 52,5 -40-STAND TABLE BLOCK 4 1 H A R D W O O O S oe-w CB0A» lAt-oeR MAPLE CHERRY "TOTAL 1 2 F 1'2 Q-4 Sb-ft 2-e j bfc-O i » 1 bfc-o 10 0-4 Si-Co 2-4 n-b i 4W-0 4tO f 3-b 3q-2 3i-4 ftSZ 28-4 K I \ 5-1. 2 1-3 1A--4 fe-0 18-4 55-t . 0-4 52-% 5b, o loq-b 3 1-2. b-8 vq-b 32$ 3-1 4q-b 40 STo-8 4 1-2 2-3 l-U i t 13-2 3-2 3T.-b b-4 4T-2 JoO-4 5 0-4 0-8 4-4 5--C. fa-8 2b-O 4-o 34.-8 | 4T.-4 j& 08 > 8 1 -1. 3-U b-8 lfe-4 1-2 1 24-4 so-8 0-4 6-4 b- O 0-8 V4-o 14-ft a 0-4 2-4 2- % n-(=, 8o 0-8__j IC-4 iq-2 9 0-4 0-4 b-4 1-2- S-2 s-c ! i v o to 0-4 Ob Oft 2-o 3-Co \-b o-a fa-O a-o \Z 0-4 2-o 3 2. 2-a. l-<- 4-4 14- 0-4 0-4 D-% 0-4- 0-4 D-4 V-2. 2-0 J 0-4- 0-4 0-8 C-4 a-4- V-2. (8 0-4 0-4 0-4 20 22 0-4 0-4- 0-4 Q -4 Oft 24 0-4 0-4 O- 8 V-2 2.4. 0-8 0.-8 OQ o-6 y 0-4 1-2 0-4- <^-4 K 0-4 0-4 p-4 S 34 0-4 0-4 0-4 4o 0-8 0-8 Oft 44 o-4 D-4 0-4 "SO 0-4 . 0-4 O- 4 1—n . 12-0 U6-4 I lO-ft 334-8 1^-2 2ife-4 21-3 3Cfa-4 fa4v-2 | 1 -41-F.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 4 22 24 2a 3o 32 34 3fe 38 40 4-2-AA-16 So q3 2oo I K lo A-"J-A 3a 31 9 3 t 1 5" 5\ vqi- 28-3 111 fe3 - 2 - \ \ l i q I 0 2. 1 8 1 A H l -3<o S-S 9 1 4 4 44- 44 V 31 213 84 84 <o8 (oft •2.3<» Sft qft 9 6 q<b 9 ^ V 8 0 Vfto 21 (0 136 46>?> A Ob (»lC 334 334 334 4 l(e 3qq S l S 3SO 5 b O 11 qs-4 0 1 . l o s e (o Co O q i 8 402. 105(» t#W0 9 1 f t ST. q 4 - 0 T-(ole O q i b 4 i q w i 4 b (0-2.0 StoS4 538> KolS fto 2243 I b n l -42-BLOCK 4 CUBIC STOCK TABLE 3-2. o a 2-4 1 -2 I 3 C 21-2 4-3 9n-U Ul-2 o -8 \ -2 2-0 43-2 3C.-0 4<o &4-o 8C,-o i-t, 13-2 14-3 5 3-2 S-(„ U4--8 l2C|.l« 4 - 8 2-4 3-4 lO -to 4b-3 5o-4 qn-2 lo l -8 Co-6 IO-4 10-4 21-fc 3q-<. Ob (i (.-0 q3-U i o-a 3-2 tq-j. ^.3-X 4l-(o n-2 14-a loa-o q-w >4.?> 14.4 tO-4- lo -4 lO-4 3\ -2. 20-3 4V-(o 14.4 14.4 5(oO 13-8 »8-8 1 8 - 8 22 25-2 25-2 3o o 3o-o SS-2 24 3Q 4 3o-4 T 1-2. n i-2 lO l-b 2<» 11-0 T.2-0 2 2-0 28 as-(. 43-0 4ft-o V3V<o 3o 82-0 82o 82 - 0 3X Ho-8 Uo-6 U o - 8 3tp "U -8 4o iqva iqt, 8 44 122-0 122-0 1 22-0 SO n3-( . 2S-(o floo-ft lto1-<o IS3-0 l«.4^0 It^.o 445-t. 34-4 143-0 l8q\0 -43-BLOCS S .rea 2.65 acres; 3erub area 0.08 acres. A'est aspect. S o i l - loam to sandy loam. The block i s covered by a dense,mixed conifer-hardwood stand. Cedar and hemlock, maple and cherry are the predominating species, although considerable f i r i s also present. « Recommendations. Most of the block requires thinning, accompanied by a l i b e r a t i o n cutting and cleaning. The west boundary should be drained and the area planted to f u l l stocking with c o n i f e r s . Estimate of timber. P C H B A M Ch Total F.b .m. 1182 1765 3638 18 832 1635 721 9792 Cu.ft. 315 467 994 15 352 574 559 3275 Cords 3.5 5.8 11.0 .2 3 . 9 6.4 6*2 36.4 PLATE V. Dense cedar-hemlock. Age 1 to 20 years. -44-STAND TABLE BLOCK 5 0-% Oft 3-4 b-4 2-3 1 l.O TV-O v t I- I Sq-3 124-3 sq-3 121 B-q-z. 2T.-2 O-j <0-4 23-4 2<J-4 44-2 Ifeb-S i i 55- I 3-1-4 2-3 1 Q2-Q i q 24-CJ l«o-2 43-O 14S-Q 8-3 3qu 3T.-4 C.-4 bw-b a-U 33- Co 3o-X lo(o-4 IS3-2 4- I n i iq-3 41-1 1-5 21-0, 2o-4 43- 6 84-q 3-4 IX-4 l o t o-b 2T.-X 3-0 IX-ft 32-O 59-2 Q-4 5-2. U-i V- \ Vb- I 2-3 13-S 28Cc 4fc 1 l-Q, 4-5 44 0-4- 111 3o 3 4 5-1 12- » 23-b I- V i s - 3-0 0-4 (o-O 4-5 3-D -8-3 I <b- Co 22- <o 0°, i q 2-Co 5-3 o-4 1 • 5* 4- I (e- o U-3 1-5 i i 0-4 3o vq 11 4-q -i-q II O b 0-4 2-3 2-3 o « 0-4 3-5" 5-"6 O-b 0-6 V-fa 0-4 O -4 O-ft 2-4 »• i V-5 2.- (, O -4 0-4 3-0 o% 0-4 1-2 0-4 0-4 \-fe 1- 1 I- 1 V- 1 0-4 0-4- Ob O-b 0-4 0-4 0-4 Q-4 Ob 4 q q 3 3 3 3 vnx-n 0 4 v o - 3 sface-io 2 4 - 2 i4v-(o 13-1-3 303.1 b-cq-i -45-F.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 5 bo 1 1 4 T i8o (.2. - n >65 •bl.4 U 4 -3.3. ib >4b b» 35 M i 3«J3 130 •q-5 i i -2.cn 141 3\ i b 114 4 3 » l£Ti \ io lb. o 4 4 44 && 34 <o l "so 3 i5 4bS b8 bb 533 \ n •2.4 b Hb 344 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 qb m 3.0 ft 3o & 244 244 i & 2 44 (o bbb I3r|3 24q2 3>4. l* n 2T2 1203 3bqs -46-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 5 It. £•3 XI.-«. XX. »l-4 »4-l V -T. qq (o-O 2 X qt. u-4 7.X \ q-q 5-7. iq-1 q.t. SI-1 zq-b 32-o XI-(. 1 OX-3 4(o'8 2 4 3o-4 31 I q X •3(2 5 4 - 0 114 -4 !4(o-l 3(o-3 XO-4 34-X IX- c iob-q 34-<» 31-5 x<»-u 5bt UW-2 43-1 3-<« 3C-S 34-0 q-w IX-l 2o-q s^-q q4-5 5X- \ vi-i 13-0- (.-6 \\ !•(«, (DO°J 1 Q-4 10-4 2o-b 112- \ 14 - 4 14 - 4 Ub-S Sq.(. »bb l o b T.ft-4 102-3 >02-x Ho qx-0 3o-4- 35-fc 3S(o (o(o-0 3ns.o (.Tvl. 132-T. Xlfc-U XlO-q 5(o OX |73S.b -47-• BLOCK 6 Area 2*65 acres,, a l l productive and f u l l y stocked* North-west aspect. S o i l - sandy loam. The block i s covered by a f a i r l y even stand of natural cedar reproduction,, 5 feet i n height to 4 Inches d.b.h. Early In 1935 It was cleaned and planted to f i r ^ with a l i t t l e cedar and lodgepole pine. It Is f a i r l y low-l y i n g and a few spots w i l l require d r a i n i n g , Recoxnmendations * Cleanings w i l l be necessary f o r a few years u n t i l the young transplants are above the salmonberry* I t may be necessary to remove some of the larger f i r , hemlocks and cedar i f they develop into wolf trees In the future. Drainage should be improved as soon as possible* Estimate of timber. F C H B Total F.b.m* 337 117 18 85 557 Cu.ft. 169 32 18 25 244 Cords 1.9 .4 .2 .3 2,7 - 4 8 -STAND TABLE BLOCK 6 P i n e n-3 1-1 IAl-1. »Avx 4 . S C . 0 m-i I S - 12- 1 i-q 4 . 9 l.Ob-5 bo'b-S 4 - q ioq-5 1-5 A S IXO-4 I X O A -I O X 5 - 6 - q S - 3 0 - 4 > AX. iq-o \ 0 ( o ln-x s - i 0 4 A3-q 4 3 - q S "I 3 0 1-5 1-1 U - 3 I 1 - 3 A - X I S t - 5 0 - 6 C o BO 5 3 OA 1-5 Ob b o A- Z . l - l 5-3 5-3 I-A OA Oft 3- 1 3 - \ l.q OA OA- 2. 1 2.-1 0 - 4 0-A- O-A o a OA-O-A-0 b OA OA O © O-A-O-A 50b-O AfeOl XO-b 1.3-a 151 A-q 1 0 3 3 - 4 I Q 3 3 - 4 -49-P.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 6 qo 52. 31 32. 3fe> 31 1 \ O -50-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 6 iq-o u.<v o % '***' li-t, 7-0°, V3<o loi-l ix-o u-t, R-w -51-BLOCK,7 Area 2.50 aeres; scrub area 1,25 acres*. West aspect* S o i l - sandy loam,*. A large part of the block Is covered by a sparse hardwood stand and dense salmonberry. The north-east part Is covered by f a i r l y t h r i f t y cedar and hemlock reproduction* Cedar and hemlock and maple predominate. Recommendations, A l i b e r a t i o n cutting and cleaning followed by planting are necessary f o r restocking t h i s block. Estimate of timber.-. P C H A M Ch Total F*b,ia* 16500 5315 45 312 1973 67 24213 Cu,ft, 3250 1011 14 176 659 81 5191 Cords 36,1 11.2 .2 1.9 7.3 ,9 57,7 -52-STAND TABLE BLOCK 7 o-a n-x ia-o 3-fe o-o l-fe l0«l-2 2-4 3Vb 8-o 2-4 4b-4 3-G, lb-8 0-4 l-O 3o-8 S-l 4b-4 14-8 10-4 101-2 too ll-O i-a 0-4 Ib-O 0-4 4-0 0-4 4-8 2o-8 O-a 1-2 5-fe 1-2 8-8 0-4 U-2 o-a 12-4 2V-2 l b o-a 0-8 3 1 l-fa loo 2-8 14-4 n-b 0-4 0-8 1-2 l b 10-8 \ 2 13b 14-8 0-4 0-4 4-4 84 3 2 Ib-o lb-4 lb b-4 o-8 8-8 8 a O-a 0-4 1-2 IL 4-4 l b "lb %-h 0-4 0-4 0-8 o-a 4-D 0-4 5-2 b-o o-4 3-1 3-b 3-b i i l-(o 2-8 2-8 0-4 0-4 0-4 0-4 0-4 0-4 O-ft o-a o-8 •21 24 o-a O-o 0-8 2fc 28 0-4 O -4 0-4 0-4 0-6 30 0-4 0-4 0-4 31 0-4 0-4 0-4 •42 0-4 0-4 0-4 44 0-4 0-4 Q-4 0-4 o-a Q»8 °-4 0-4 0-4 82 o-4 0-4 0-4 12-8 184-4 35-1 8-4 24-O-a 23-2 Ill-Co IC-O l<oO-8 4Ql-b -53-F.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 7 7-1* \8 ArA- i 5 l-i-J 2-1 Vqq 74-3 3 ( o \74 3Co 1-24 »3> I OT. 11 107. < o f t u s u s n q n q (.8 -a. C o U8 114 22 TA l i b 2Co IB loft 3 0 7.57. 31 3oo 11 (o ZOD 1ST. 3 0 0 38 o 2Ho "3«0 q i o 8 1 S 1 •3.C3 O 42 Co4 <oo4 3oo C o 0 4 3 0 Q fee n u o n u o 211* o 32 3 B 4 o 3840 3 8 4 0 UCocro 21-j.O 18 oi44 \ i5 i & q 2.-\ q4t qiobs -54-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 7 0-4 3-2 2-7. 2-4- 3-4 « H 32-O 5-4 <*•«. 37.-0 tn-t 33-u n-a fa-q-o t>4-4 At !>S>4 4-8 si-a sx« 111 3 o 0 lt-1 n-z 3b-o 3-u i o 4 n - i 14-4 53-2 58-<« 4c- 0 52-b 3q-b 3q-b 41-b 41-b q-b 14-4 14-4 32-O 72 74 2b 2ft 30 32 47 44 b3 524-Q 82 77to-0 bo-ft 42-% SO -4 CoT-2 "lb-8 bO-o 4 2 - 8 50-4 5"8-8 b-l-7. lb - 8 524-0 llU'O 45-o 48-o bO-8 qo-a 50-4 Sft-fc bl-2 14.-8 S24-0 n t - o 1 3 o c j -o A^<\«r 5 - b ll'O-O "104 2b3-b Vl-4- 3bb-4 2olt4 -55-BLOCK .8 A r e a 1,58 a c r e s I s c r u b a r e a 1.04 a c r e s * West a s p e c t * S o i l - sandy loam* Most o f the a r e a i s d e n s e l y c o v e r e d by s a l m o n b e r r y . Some c e d a r r e p r o d u c t i o n I s coming i n a t t h e s o u t h - e a s t and n o r t h - e a s t corners,. Some mature c e d a r I s p r e s e n t on t h e b l o c k . Maple and ce d a r a r e the p r e d o m i n a t i n g s p e c i e s . Recommendations, G l e a n up t h e ? / i a d f a l l s l a s h a l o n g t h e r o a d , d r a i n t h e swampy a r e a n e a r M a r i n e D r i v e , c l e a n and p l a n t t o c o n i f e r s * E s t i m a t e o f t i m b e r . C B A M Ch T o t a l P .b .ra. 5830 668 109 1621 43 8271 C u * f t * 1178 137 28 525 23 1894 Cords 13.1 *3 5.8 .3 21*0 -56-STAND TABLE BLOCK 8 O-fe O-fc , O - f c So-fc S T S b - 3 SCo.-s X 5 S •3-e, 7 . q - i 2-0.-1 8 - 2 . • 3 - Z . » 1 -4 1 4 - f c 5 o o fc-S, l o - q 4 - 4 l - q ( o - 3 2 - 5 18,-4 O - f c 2 1 - 5 2"1-b O - f c O - f c lfc -5 n-> I C - 5 O - f c n i O - 1 v s q \ - "3 I 5 - 2 1 5 - 2 O- Co H - 4 1 2 0 l 2-o O ( o O-fc, 5 1 O - f c W-a tvq T o o-fe I t i t , 4 - 4 4 - 4 4 - 4 2 - S O - f c 2>-\ \-q 1-q i q O-fc O - f c O - f c O-fc 1-2 O - f c O-fc O-fc O - f e O fc O - f c O-fc O - f c O - f c Z 4 e>-fe o-fc O - f c o-fe \ - 2 . 2 8 O- (o O . fc O - f c 4 0 O- fc O - f c 0 - ( o O - Co O - (o O - t b q2-T \€-2 0-t» l O V i 18"2> IS-Q-O lo-fc 1 2 8 4 2 8 2 - 4 -57-P.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 8 2>0 I I I "oO io loo loo I 7.7. I 7 -7 . V 7.-L 3 o be, q q ion t 5 5 111 10T V o l I -SS 1 111 2 4 4 1 3 i o c o a o q 7 8 37.q 3i .q 4o 7 3 & A 2384 ifaqo •4-HS (oq l O l l o 7.7 I U Z 5 7 3 S -58-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 8 a-4- 4s.-b 4 8 - 0 4 « o 3b W 8 3qO 4 q o 53-2 SV7. 4-o-fc 4 Q-(o 4 o - b b-fc 5 4 1 3 4 1 - 3 1 . - 3 3 T - - 3 3 2 - 5 11 - Q 1 1 - O lS-b IS-lp 2 .4 U 7l-b 2i-b 2 V - 1 , lt>-L T - o -2 X % - 2 5-2-2. 3 l - 3 3 2 - 3 2 4 S 3 -4 1 4 0 - 4 xa (.1-6 bn a b-l-t, 4-0 bo 4-T1-5 477-5 4 2 1 - 5 •745-4 ). G % T 0 834-2 | O 0 3324 144 3tp4o liqq-O -59-BLOCK 9 Area 1.07 acres; scrub area 0.41 acres. West aspect* S o i l - loam to sandy loam. The block i s nearly f l a t and f a i r l y well drained. The forest cover Is p r i n c i p a l l y young cedar, 1 foot In height to 2 inches d.b.h. with some hardwood as an overstory. Ground-cover Is dense salmonberry. Recommendations... The area should be cleaned and planted to co n i f e r s . Estimate of timber. C H A M Ch Total F.b.m. 613 202 413 1491 124 2843 Cu.ft. 170 52 116 439 40 817 Cords 1.9 .6 1.3 4.9 .4 9.1 PLATE I I I . B l o c k 9 f r o m M a r i n e D r i v e , showing new d i t c h . T y p i c a l hardwood s t a n d w i t h some c o n i f e r o u s u n d e r s t o r y . -61-ST AND TABLE BLOCK 9 " 3 - 2 . ZS-q O-q 3 5 - 1 fa-5 ua-5 5 - f a O-q 1 3 1 - 5 1 3 1 - 9 •So-q 7-4 O-q Bq.Z sq-z. 4-fa 2 5 4 q i - 3 5 I < } V « 3 f t - 4 -1 C o - 7 0-q nu 3 - 1 q - 3 1 3 - Q 3 o - U 1 3 - q 2-ft it T i4-a 3 l - 5 O-q C-5- l-ft> q-z 1ft q - 3 1 \ - V Z . o - 3 l-ft i-ft z-e> 3 - 1 fa-S l-ft O-q 3 - 2 3 - T 3 - 7 7 - 4 -O-q Zft 0 4 4 - C , 4-- C O-q O-q o-q fa-5 ~l-4 ft-3 l-ft 3 - 1 o-q 4»-4 <b-4-0-q o-q l-ft V-ft O-q 2-1 1 - 1 o-q 3 - T o-q 5-S G<S Q-q o-q o-q z.-u 3-1 - 4 - C o O-q O-q o-q o-q ija o-q o q O-q 22 0-q O-q O - q 24 2B 3 0 O-q o-q o-q 15-7 I f o l - q 2-4-. q ie> O - q 305-2. Z4-8- 13C-1 54-fo Z15-S 5ZO-2 - 6 2 -F.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 9 18 18 A-q 15b i a 113 2 4 1 22 24-2b 18 3o \ -aq 18° 13q 2 l b 2q zq 58 M5 q% 3oo 152 4 - T i 22 O V QQ q 8 58 IT3 H Q I o o 58 H 3 3 5q, l i b 2oo 7oo l O O 5Ti 18^ I b l 38b 1 3 C J 3 Ub, l b q 5 "iCo s i -63-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 9 x-e i -a 4-1= I4'6 iq-4-3-fe V(. v -a S-4- xi - i . 3 l X Co-3 S i ? , 1 b - X si-fa a-q iq-t, i s - 3 3o-?> •4 b-1 X3-4- 00-x 13.-4- )x-\.Q 1 n o 4-4,0 Tvi-4- 133 1 l o Q - 0 i b o 3 C - D -42-3 42-3 \ * V 3 3Co 3CQ 3fa-0 22 5b 1 STo-n 5V2 24 2fa 2b 30 fco-O b o o loOO IS-q-l 4-0-b 2 0 1 "J lOfc -q 4-»o-4 - i C o - q 5 S f a - X 2 b 3 q -64-BLOCK 1Q Area 2.50 acresj scrub area 1.12 acres. P l a t aspect. S o l i - sandy'loam. The block Is badly overgrown with dense salmonberry. On the north-east side of the area some cedar reproduction i s coming i n ; t h i s grades Into a cedar-hemlock mixture towards the north. Scattered patches of cedar and cedar-hemlock r e -production ocuur here and there over the block. The s i t e i s f a i r l y well drained and suitable f o r f i r , cedar, alder and maple. The p r i n c i p a l species at present are cedar, alder and maple. Recommendations, Cleaning and planting are necessary to f u l l y stock the area. Estimate of timber C H : S A M Total F.b.m, 20 112 18 182 458 790 Cu.ft. 11 50 5 115 111 292 Cords a ,5 .1 1.3 1.2 3.2 -65-STAND TABLE BLOCK 10 0 / C O N I F E R S H A R D W O O D S CEOAR MS meet B A V S A M |MAPl£ TbTW-\ 5-2 I - 4 1 1-fc n - f c 5 a . -o 4rfc-0 i-fc 3-c o>-a 54--0 3 4 - 0 \o l - l fc3-fe Z -4 faq-2 0 - 4 52- fc •5-2. l-Z ( o ' a - l I S"6-4 zq-fc 2 5 . - O U 4 - 0 I ,» . | nq-z o-a fc-a l-Z l-Z 3 2 - 4 3-o 3 - f c -1 0 - 4 1 2 0 4 4 - 4 o-a 2 0 - O Z -O o-a 2-3-fc 1-2 1-2 o- a i - 2 zee. fc-a z- 0 8-a l-Z 2 - D 0 - 4 - j - f c 12-4 i-z 4 - 0 l l - O x-a 1-2 1 4 0 Ifc-O iz. l-Z. 2 . 4 ic 0 - 4 Z - O •A-A • -4 - 4 o-a I-Z. z-o z-o 0-4- 2 - 4 8 0-4- o-a 0 - 4 - 1-Co o-O t-2. 2 -a l-Z 1- 2 i- 2 0 4 0 . 4 o.« o-a \ \z 0 - 4 0-4- 0 4 o-«*. o- a m. 0 . 4 . o-A O A O- 4 O - 4 O- 4 • 1 " ' ' * • r ,m • 1 lO -4- 228-4 zn-fc a-a 3 - 2 . o-a znq-zi na-o 4-0 -Q Zn.fc 14-5-fc A - 2 4 - 3 t ! - 6 6 -P.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 10 13 i 2ft 3S 4=> k6 3 2 1 2 . 3 7 . 7.fc » 7 - 2-4 7-fc 24 Sb (oft <oO ft 4 5 7 Cod lft3 7.57, 3\C -67-CTJBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 10 1 1 l - 4 3-Co ).(. <xiO I-Co "5-Co s-2. l l - O 1-4- * 4 - 4 VQ.-U I-fc -4-4- 1-7. Q.-2. S.fc 1.?, & 4 Vo-b 10-b lo-'o 4 - * - 4 - 4 a-a, ft-a q-C« 4fe (.-ft <••?> V(,-4 1 4 - 4 14.4 1 4 4 i%a va-a ia-a 4 - 4 Zo-O 2-1 l lo- lo 4 C-o 4 - 4 - 4 qo-4 Un-0 -68-BLOCK 11 Area 2.65 aeres; scrub area 0.84 acres.. South-west aspect. S o i l -• sandy loam.. The block Is densely covered with salmonberry Patches of good cedar reproduction occur scattered, and the north-east edge i s planted to f i r and a small amount of pine spaced 6 feet by 6 f e e t . A few large f i r saplings are grouped near the north corner; these had been partially.shaded by hardwoods which were removed early i n 1934* A bare swampy area occurs near the centre of the . block and needs draining. The block i s now being cleaned and planted ( A p r i l , 1 9 3 5 ) . R ecommendat Ions y, Drainage of the bloek should be improved^ and the planted stock should be kept free from weed compet-i t i o n by cleaning for several years.. Estimate of timber* P • C II Total Fib.m. 64 48 112 Cu.f t . 45. 9 19 73 Cords .5 .1 •2 .8 - 6 9 -STAND TABLE BLOCK 11 23 + 3 © q.\ 0-4 M 3-I.O ^T-ft \no-c 3-Q IA-.-S \ q va-?j m-o m o 15" Co1-C» a-O l-q O A oO-A OOA (oQ 32.I 3-4- I. | OA- 4-3-O 43-0 3-8 2>-5 l-<3 Q © lO-O T-O-O 1-5 u.o o-a o-a q i ° ^ < v' 3 0-6 \-\ o a x-n " i - i M M 2-2 i-2 O -a 0-4- 1-2 1-2, O- A- 0-4 O xiq-3 i o s q ia-(o x a o A. .-a. i-&-<q 5 « i q 0 - 4 O - A sea-a -70-F.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 11 24 42- 4 1 4 2 . 4-2--71-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 11 3-x I I \.w s-i ^-q u-c - X T . a.«, ft-a "1*7. 7 - 7 . q.<q. <-\-4 3 - 4 3 - 4 3 - 4 4 5 o - 3 . 7 ic|.| 7 7 . q T 7 . q -72-BLOCK 12 Area 2.50 acres; scrub area 0.54 acres. South-west aspect. S o i l - loam to sandy loam. The eastern hal f of the area i s covered by a dense stand of young cedar which requires thinning; t h i s cover grades into scrub and salmonberry cover towards the west, ©n the south-east i s a s t r i p of older mixed stand which again grades into young cedar at the north-east end of the block. Hardwoods are r e l a t i v e l y sparse over the area. Recommendations. The dense cedar should be thinned as soon as possible to prevent stagnation. The remainder of the area should be cleaned and planted to f i r , cedar and lodgepole pine. Estimate of timber. P C B A 11 Total F.b.m. 257 2860 1025 1165 25 5332 Cu.ft. 73 617 292 379 32 1394 Cords .8 6.9 3,2 4.2 I 1 5 « 5 J ffi PLATE VII. Dense cedar-hemlock on Block 12. PLATE IV. Block 12 looking west. Typical group of cedar reproduction surrounded by dense salmonberry. -74-STAND TABLE BLOCK 12 0-4 Ha X C , 2 - 0 2 - 4 4 8 0 1-2 O -Q 51-4- 5 2 - 4 2 0 5 5 b 4 4 2-4 o-4 fc-4-a 2-a C7-U 2- B M 1 0 - 4 U-fc. 2 - f t 7.4. q.o-4 faft-8 IS-2 4 - i - 2 1X8- O 2ia-4 o •a l-Cfa 5 0 -O 4.4 1-2 5-1-2. IT.- O 2 2 - O 4 o - 4 <\1 - f a O •4 0-4 31.-2. fa-8 2 - o 4-1 - "i. i - fa X-O 7-fa 52-a o •4 2.1-7. 3vX 0 - 8 2 S - X V X l-u X-0 4-a 3 0 - Q 0-4 1 0-Q •2.-4 i-x-«a 1-7. l - X 0-4 2-a o a 4-$ l-(o o - a •so 2-a l - X 4--Q I X - O 7 4 V-£o 4--O l-(o 0-4 2 - 0 cfa-o 0-4 O-ft, 2 - a 4 . 0 X - O o -a 2-a fa.8 0-4 o -6 1-7. 0 - 4 Q - 4 lfc> o-4 0-4 i- fc, 2 - 4 2 - 4 2 - 4 4-8 O- 4 o - a 1 -2 2-a 2-0 4-0 0-4 Q - 4 0-4 b-8 o - a d-8 0-4- 0-4 0-4 L2 0 - 4 0-4 o - a o a 32 o a o - a ° - a 3 4 D - 4 Q - 4 °-4-V2Q 2^8-4 4TS-fa lO-a 3(,q.X <^6-Q 2 8 - 4 75-2 20fc,o 575-2 4 . 4 -75-F.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 12 3 0 ( C o ~ [ \ C O 2<o 12. (04-41 V02. T(o 110 n q 4 4 1 3 - 5 4 4 H 6 2,8 q 4 4 22. 70 q& z»2 no 3 0 8 1Q •5>o& 3 2 . 34 b O O 3 5 0 (a OO 3 - a O (* OO 3-3-0 1 0 3 H 4 4 4VO \CaS-- 4UW lO 41 C - 2 \ - i . 3 -76-CTJBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 12 3-2 4 a 3 2 12-.a U-2. 4 - 6 I U Q 2ft 6 4 - 8 4 . a <?•<. <\<° IX-O 2 l - f c 3-fc 2.X I S A 2 2 2 14-O 5 - U <<-»(o 4 » - a 4 . 8 u-a 1 \- (o 3 - u a u i.a-2 l»D 3 C 20 a 2»tZ 26 A it,.A 5 - i c . 1 o -Ct 3 Q - C S 4 1 - U 4 1 - U Tl-V l O A- l O - 4 * o - 4 2a-a 2a-a 2B& 22 32 34 2 S - 2 4 t - a n o 2 Q - 4 7 4 - X 24(.-Tj l l l - O V(o ^ 4 - 1 . I 5 1 - C 12-a )fc<-.<>- SSq.O BLOCK 13 Area 2.49 acres; scrub area 1.33 acres. F l a t aspect. S o i l - loam to sandy loam. The block i s poorly stocked on the whole and covered by a heavy growth of salmonberry. A central s t r i p running east and west i s p a r t i a l l y stocked with mixed saplings but requires considerable planting. Cedar, alder, maple and cherry are the predominating species. Previous plantations of f i r have been badly cut back by ra b b i t s . Recommendations. A small area requires draining. The whole block should be given a cleaning followed by planting. Some of the saplings nay require to be removed should they develop Into wolf trees. Estimate of timber. P C H 8 A M Ch To t a l F.b.m. 3580 1787 398 105 802 2158 20 8850 Cu.ft. 657 396 124 34 305 627 15 2159 Cords 7.3 4.4 1.4 .4 3.4j 7.0 .2 24.0 - 7 8 -STAND TABLE BLOCK 13 Pi T H E . Zl<b Q- C3 2-Z -4 lo-o 2 2 - Q O-a IX X 4 - 3 C - 4 4 b 4 % 0-4 i-4~ a 0-6 b-4 3- Co o-4 U-2 1 1 - 2 3-2 •2.-a b-o -4--0 \ Q - 4 l-fe IX x a b-a qx 2 - 4 0-6 3-2. 2.-4- 4-6, 1-2 X- Q 3-2. 3 X 5-2 o-a o-3 o •Or 2 - o 3-Co 4 - 4 o-a l b X-o 4--0 0 - 4 o-a, 1-2. l b 4 - 6 X-O o 4- 2 - 4 l-X o-a l-b x-o O-A o- 4 o-a I-Co 2 - 4 o-4 0 - 4 Q-a G - 4 0-4 o-a I- b 0-4 Q•4 0-4 22 0-4 24 2.C 0 - 4 0 - 4 2a o-a °-3 3b, ° - A -6 - 4 Q-4 SO 0-4 0 - 4 2 2 - 4 3 b - 4 14-a q 4 - 4 loa-b \ C O 2X- Q c b- o ia -a n-2. 10-4 a-4 ll-b a-o lO • o b-4 a-o fa-4 i-b 2 - 4 4-a 3-fc a-b 4 - 0 4-a o-a l-x o-a I X 0 - 4 0 - 4 Q-4 0 - 4 0 - 4 0 - 4 o-a 6 - 4 0 - 4 0 - 4 32-8 5\-X xi-x i-x x-o x-4 uo-a bo-o bq-b 4 U Q ms-Co xab-4 - 7 9 -P.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 13 8 T2- VO q o 44- -74 a iT-to a\c 22 24 2c 28 3 2 . 3 2 . 5 5 5 4 4 > fc 4 o l » 4 l o 4 1 0 7 . 1 5 4 5 5 S i 5 4 I 3 5 qa no iftfc 4 1 (a I 0 4 1 0 4 •LSfc 3-2.0 *& 1 142. 1 3 5 l8<-\ <\"b H 3 Job ia(. tfc 1 4 * fc ifc loo 7.0 0 1 0 0 50 > 4 3 2 1 4 - 3 7 . 1 4 2 1 1 4 3 2 "7 1 5 1 5 q 4 1 2 3 4 6 V I 8fa3 ft I I < \ 1 3 3 4 0 -80-CTJBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 13 2Z 24 0- a i-fc o e 1- fe, 2 . 4 n o 3 - 4 148 1 2 - 4 2e> 4 3 - i . t 4 - 4 n -u 4.o H - o Z4-Q fc-O l l - T L 33<* Z O 4 lO •& T T . l T - < o Z Z - O 1 4 1 l i t 4oft 14-8 z o a 1 Z - 4 Z.-&--& V 8 8 ZO-4 3 o o 2<o 3U-o 3 C o o 28 85-(. ac So Zfez-B zc.-a.-a 3 S . O i i o 3»S 1 2 . - 4 - 3 & - 4 - 4 4 44-o SO-o 3C Z l < o 4-a.. o ^4<o Vq.fc (.Bo 8 1.1 zo-a as-c Z8-6 4 M 1&-8 »8-8 IX) 4 3o•o 3o•O 3 4 . . Q 8>S-t» 3 C - 0 3 C o - o Zbz- 8. "i-fczft 158-4- 41 6 13-6 484-8 izz-OZ5<3-8 t-O 318-8 8 U5<o -81-BL-OCl 14 Area 1*85 acres. Scrub area 0.24 acres. North-west aspect. S o i l - loam to sandy loam. The north-west h a l f i s covered by a hardwood stand with a cedar under story of trees up to 3 inches d »b.h. The south-east h a l f consists of cedar-hemlock reproduction In dense salmonberry, with an occasional mature tr e e . Windfall has been bad at the east corner along the d i t c h . Recommendat ions. Clean up the windfall #. complete the drainage system, clean and plant to c o n i f e r s . Estimate of timber. C H A M Ch Total P.b.m. 6016 2044 1264 6499 194 16017 Cu.f t . 1198 353 401 1143 63 3158 Cords 13.3 3.9 4.5 12,7 .7 \ 5 ( 4 3 X " i l "!.(. 5 8 - 4 B4 O-S XI- I 3 a q.T 10 W-3 q-i s q 3.--2_ 3-X II XX 3X OS |.| 0-5 OS O-S o-s I- lo 0-5 o-s OS O-S - 8 2 -STAND TABLE BLOCK 14 2VZ OS Q-5 Ul-I 13-O i q x iaq X\b 4 3 5-4 l- b 0- S OS OS XX. 1- I I- I O-S OS lb l'b 4 - " 3 23-& l fe -o 4 4 4 1 I 2 1 I 5 - 7 1 3 0 b-S e-b 3-X 0 - - 5 Q-5 3-Q 1-b It lb X-X S-4 4"3 5-q 5-4 4-q 3- X O-S OS hi l-V 2o- O I 4 - If e>-i U-3 (=•4 1-5 t-l-l 1 3 - 0 3o-a U3<6 4--b x4-a 13-0 ll-X IX-q u-q 8-o 8-1 i o - q q-i l o o l-l 22 OS o-s o-s 24 O-S O-S lb I- (o 2- 1 2b 28 0-S OS o-s S o I- V 1-1 I-1 32 O-S OS OS 34- O-S O-S o-s 3(o 3 8 I-1 V- I I-1 4 b o-s OS 23-2 I fax-1 43-X l-O 23b-lo 2A-1 lOXX 25 4 151-3 3q3-<q -83-F.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 14 10 8 IO ( . 5 1*34 X 4 q l(o~l 15 28 45 b-4-4 o fc-8 IOS 1-5-2. (•8 loS -8c. 157 8b 152 3 5 XI ft 551 "i4U ZOS i o 1.21 84-v x x 210 3,1 S 1XX 2 14 22 24 2fe 28 30 32 54 3b 38 ixo 2CO feq3 31*3 4-3-7 ix e»q bb6 IXO bb3 2b>o bq3 315 4-31 i x b q l i b I 20 q i b ib44 2bo b q 3 3 1 5 -4-31 I X b C | 1185 118-5 V18>5 3 X 5 X I I Q 5 4--iSl fa83 3513 I Q S 4^oi BbSTo -84-CUEIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 14 OS 2 2. 2 1 IS-2 3o-4 4S - C 48-"3 1-5 I S 4-C 25-6 3-0 38 4 3^q 2 1 2 1 l\-X 41-3 52-S 5 5 - 2 3 o • 3-Q 11-8 4-8fc> <oft-4 1 1-4 4.5 20 -6 25-3 i q i 53-q I2( qs i 12V 0 O O \2o lo-o qi-a 54-1 18-1 1 1 t(o4--C 164-1. 12-Cj 18-S 3o-3 3o-5 2(oO 2C-0 3<V(«, V8-0 S i b 83(o 34-S 34.S 73-S 23-S 58 O 22 31-5 3\-<S 3i-S 24 12S 1 2 - 5 142-4 142-4 2 1 4 4 2C 26 5 3 - S S3-S 5 3 - 5 3o 138C I3"6C. 138 t» 32 7 i S 13-S 1 3 - S 34 84-0 *84,0 84-o 3(. 3 3 256-7 238-1 238-1 4C \60-0 1 ?jCS-0 > D O - O (.41-8 iqo-i 8 3 6 - 5 7»<o-q loi%.0 3 3 0 8(.a-1 H 0 1 - 2 -85-BLOCK 15 Area 2.50 acresj scrub area 0.48 acresj c u l t i v a t e d area (Botanical Garden) 0.41 acres. North-west aspect. S o l i - loam. The north-east side of the block Is swampy from the botanical garden to the t r a i l and only suitable for cedar, hemlock or lodgepole pine. At present i t i s bare except f o r a few young cedars. The south-west has a f a i r stand of cedar-hemlock on a damp s i t e . The remainder of the block i s covered with alder and an understory of cedar from 10 feet In height to 4 inches d.b.h. Windfall i s bad along the d i t c h on the south-west boundary, p r i n c i p a l l y In spruce and hemlock. Recommendations. ; Release the cedar from the hardwoods, drain the swampy a r e V and plant to c o n i f e r s . Estimate of timber. P C H A M Gh Total P.b.m. 172 892 828 2320 216 132 4560 Cu.ft. 82 324 331 1306 102 90 2236 Cords .9 3,6 3,7 14.5 1.1 1.0 24 .8 - 8 6 -STAND TABLE BLOCK 15 S-o •2-S 1-s 1-5 o-S xa-5 10 X-o 4 o O 4 - Q - O l o Xl -O I S o S 1 4 - 0 I S IS" 7 S - S y a-o lo-O l-O I-o 3-o xq-o "l -O 3 -S n-o n-s -4 (o-S x-o z-i-o l x-o O S o •s •4-2--0 5-5 x-s 4-_o vx-o S 4 - - 0 n o CD-O t o I •s 25-5 n o X-S X-S XX-o 4-7-5 O-S <-?-s (oS l - O i n s n s l-O 1-5 ao-o 3-1-5 o-s D O 1-0 O S l l - O iq-o I- o xo-o 3\ -O 3 o n-s I Q - 5 i a o o-s l - O ll-S 24--O I S A - O 5 -S ix-s l -O o-s 1 4 - 0 iq-s 3-0 2-5" 5 5 1 3 - S l-O O S I S - O 7 0 S 1-5 I S 3>-o O S I- 0 u- o 1 4 - - 0 3-5 •x-o 5-5 -\o I S B-5 1 4 - Q o-s 3-o l-O 4 - 5 O S lo-s o - S O - S O - S O S l -O I- s O S O S l - O I- 0 I S O - S o -s o-s »8S 147-5 54.Q 4-Q 5 S 3 o 22.2-S 127-5 13-5 XT.O Uo-3.0 3qS-S - 8 7 -P.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 15 »Q5 1 0 3 7 . 0 8 2 > < o I Z - 2 . )ft 40\ ( o O q 105 8o I as 22-4 48 272. 457 41 IU8 Tq 283 2)52 32 3 8 4 (.12 45 45 54 5 4 lc>8 153 V.6 (.t, I tq, l«.q 237 152 IS2 152 « < o 44<b 4 1 4 q < 4 C U f c O loa t ( o 1 3 . 3 4 - 2 2 S O -88-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 15 "3-0 is-o 43-0 4 o 5-v.o T».-O IO-S n o u s 7S-0 C o 3-o 34-o i o c s ' V1Q 5-z n o 35 loS-o I is -Z q-o i l l lt-1 S5.-S 4 5 a-j "HS-O 17.0-1 3i .S 1(oO 51-5 m o ICS 15V-Q 13-5 4«6-0 24-0 3S-5 S3S OS l o i - o Ibl-S 195 IQ.--S 13,-0 >3-o 7.CO 4S-S 15-S tS-S 3<o-0 3CO Sl-S 34-S 33o |XQ,S 131. 4 294.S 52.2-5 4\-o 3C-0 S«iq.5 3<\4-4 -89-BLQCK 16 Area 2.50 acres; scrub (area iO.-7.5; acres; c u l t i v a t e d 0.26 acres. Over most of the productive area, the forest cover consists of cedar-hemlock reproduction 1 foot i n height to 6 Inches d.b.h. with some mature cedar. Reproduction towards the north-east end of the area Is very good. Cedar and hemlock are the predominating species. Recommendations. The block should be cleaned and planted up to f i r and cedar. Estimates of timber. ? C II A M Total P.b,m. 593 5582 1895 30 825 135 9060 Cu.ft. 128 1033 521 8 466 50 2218 Cords 1.4 11.5 5.8 .1 5.2 .6 24.6 -90-STAND TABLE BLOCK 16 2 1 2 4 2 C 2 8 3 o 3 2 3 8 b-O I 4 V 4 14-8 I-A 5"0-4 18-4 l - C Q-4 o-6 (o-A zq-u 5 -X O A I A T.-X 3V4- 13-2 2-8 3 2 4 23-2 0-4 1*2 13-C» O - a l-(o b-fc >2 1-2 A.Q 5-2 O-fe a - 4 2 4 0-4- Z - O 2-4- ° - 4 0-5 Z . Q 0 - 4 o-A 0-% 2-O 0-4 OA- 0-4 l b O-A 0-8 O - A 0-4 0-8 OA-O A 0-4 0-4 O- 4 o-4 2-4 1-2. l - Z iCpA-o mi* 3Q.-2 5S-2 U - Q 4o-4 15-b IO-4 3-2 3-2. l-b O -4 Z-A l-Z. 0-8 0-4 0-4 o -8 O-A O-A-O -A-O-A Q-4 11 Z -O o-4 2-4 0-4 5-2 l l 4- % o-4 5- 2 0-4 S-b IQ-O O-A 5-2 3-b Q-4 4-o O - Q l - b X-O Q - 4 0-4 Z . - 4 q -2 I l - Z 3-b 2-4 x-o 8-a 0- a 1- 2 . o-a 0- A- Co-O 1- 2 . L I C 4-0 -5-b> Z-o l - b Z-O 0-4 0-4 l(o4-o •oo-o 4 8 - 4 Ice-4 b3-b 2 Co 4-Q-O b o 21-fc l(o-4 n-z q-z 9-8 (o-q 3-z 2-4 2-6 l - b 0-8 0-4 0 - 4 o-a 0 - 4 0-4 0-4 O-A 0 - 4 2(.-4 'i'32-O U 4 4 Z-4 14-4 4-Oq-b 5zo 4 - 8 l"Vb T.4-4 5l»4-0 -91-P.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 1 6 lb 3 2 0 1 5 2 2 2 4 2fc> 2 f t 3 o 3 2 , 3% 3 C 5 4 l»2 qu 1 1 C I t . 1 l o 8 2 5 2 3o Q 4-Co2-3 4 1 4 4 3 2 . 2.»q l U Q I la I 12 382 " 6 3 fa 8 1 4 - 4 - 5 1 3 2 . I 2 , a 3 3 0 2 2 O 3 U - q 1 2 <• I l o i 7 - O b 2 5 1 3 Q Q 4<bl q 3 4 1 5 51 iqs 128 ifeo 4 4 - 3 1 4 C O ^ ° 3 C . C J 2 1 ( o I l o i 20 8 2 S 2 3 o o 4 C o 2 2 3 1 2 2 3 3 1 S 8 1 2 3 2 4 Q i ' i o 5 4 3 64 3C.24 -92-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 16 3 2 2-4- 4 3 VO-4 40-0 V-Co 4-8 4C-4 2-4 •40 1 7 \-X V4-3 XI-c. 2-4 24.0 33& 3-2. U-O 2-2 I (o-4 3-Vfe S-C, 3q.2 SS-C, 3-Co 4--B n o 2-3-4- 2S-X 2S-X S O-fe 2.0 •?» 2o-3 n-io n-Co 3o-4 n-U q-C 34.0 34-. 0 43- (. sq-x ©4-4 10-4 lO - 4 <H-8 11-4 4i-(o S4-0 14.4 144 <o8-4 XU-4 1 Co - O 47-4 42-4 i>2 37-2 37-2. 22 2S-X XSX 7 S 2 24 Uo-o C0O-8 2fe 3UO iCo-0 3&.-Q 2ft 4-2-8 42-8 4X-B 2>0 5o-4- SO-4 5Q-4 32 Sft-ft S8-o 58-8 36 8fa& 8C-o 51-2 413-2 20B-4 "3-4 t*7fc-X »8fe-4 XO-O 4-6 Xiv-X 887-4 -93-BLOCK 17 Area 1,13 acres; scrub area 0,18 acres. North-west aspect. S o i l - sandy loam. The forest cover Is r e l a t i v e l y sparse with most of i t concentrated i n the southern h a l f of the block. The north-west h a l f Is s c a n t i l y Covered by hardwoods with an understory of young conifers and dense salmonberry» The p r i n c i p a l species arecedar and hemlock, alder and maple, with cedar predominating. Considerable mature cedar and balsam are present on the area. Recommendations. A l i b e r a t i o n cutting and cleaning followed by planting are necessary. Estimates of timber. F C H B A M Total F.b.m. 9917 6480 402 6241 3744 2394 29247 Cu.ft. 1984 1322 164 1273 878 433 6058 Cords 22.0 14.7 1.8 14.1 9,8 4.8 67.3 -94-STAND TABLE BLOCK 17 •2T 2.5z.q n i 212-1 212-q 73-4 n i s.4- O.q 23-4 4-S 1% Co-3 4-.S qq qq 14.4. lo lb 2~J 2-1 S-A- 1 1 - 7 g-1 8-1 2-1 (o-3 o -q -* » t 1 1 qq ift.-j o-q v] 3 c 2-1 S-4 1 8-1 1 1 7 3-C. 3-c. 3-(o • I » I 3-b 12 S-4 5-4 oq lo-3 o-q 8 1 13-5 oq o-q 1-8 q-s 4-5 1 ^ - f l lev?. S-q. 0-q 1 W 1 VI (J to-3 lo - 3 i-8 1-8 3-b 3-(o 2-7 2-7 U-3 oq O-q 4.=- t-3 1-2 1-2 1 3 - S <• -3 (o-3 t - 3 o-q 1 3 X T 3 - ( „ 1-8 5-4 8-1 Lif 1 L _0:3 j L o-q l-ft i-o 0-q 7 - T 4-5 o c i o-q 1-3 2-1 2 . - 7 -4-S «- o-q O-q o a 24 oq o-q l - O "2b o.q 0-q l-O o q 0-q - 2 - 7 0-9 oq o-q 1 1 o.Q l r \ 3 Q cq 2-n 7. -7 oq 0-q o-q •4o o-q O-q i o-a so 0 -Cj o-q 0-Q 8o O-Q, O-q CvQ 5-4 23(0-7. 1,2.. I q q 3(.3C» 4SO 4.13. 1 - 3 q i q 4 5 f c - 3 -95-P.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 17 I04 4 1 151 \5l 5"4 I X . H i 8<o &(o H I lOto So 1 6 4 44-0 4-(ol •^ ( « 1 1X2 3 1 8 i ^ 0 0 b o f t 3 o 4 °.'"2 I 4 H \ 3 q z-]4 -4-13 4.4-1 7.XO I Q 1 4 3 9 0 1 5 1 54-1 q i U <3T.b 14 -13 2 - 7 - X i b l i f e 1-14 2* 3 V O l o o I O I O V01O it* 3 i c 1 3 a i u 4 t .c j3 iaoi i e 4<«a 4-c.a 855 8 S S l"823 30 xi5a» x i x o x i x o 3 2 1160 ixao ixao 40 uas v \ 8 8 SO Z o 8 B X.088 7.08« 8 0 8Z80 8 X 8 O * 2 8 o 8li<o s i - i S 35(0 S S T - 3 , 203^0 3313 xwq 5 « z 1^141 - 9 6 -CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 17 >o-a 10-3 3-Co 25-2 3-fc 37-4 43-2 \-8 4-5 21-0 2-1-Q 5 3 - 5 31-8 t-3 44.1 4-4- \ U-X II.-2 32-4 -2.2 4 Ifc-X a-3-4 3q-(, 2^ -1 29 1 i»q-3 2 4 a » 4 4 lOft-0 141. "7 122-4 122-4 2Uq- 1 IU3-6 IQ-3& ic-i-a 214 <-|3t# 12(-S I2q-W l»4 ft 194-4 3l5-q 3<».o t2- 1 q~8-i 84-<• 4-2-3 ixu-q 2 2 5- 0 4*q 5C-T lxi-5 11*2-0 \Cx-o 283-5 5l» 4 5V1 24 feft-4 I3«s-S Il64 iq8 4 2(e 8l-o 151.S 233-5 S3-fc T 3 - U 332-1 2o 9>-3 (08-0 V08-0 2o4''» SO I 13-4 433-8 541-2 542-2 32 24q-3 2443 24q-3 40 221-4 72t--q- XX' -4 So 3Q0-b 34o-(o 3q.o-<. 1 K.SU-0 II.5I.-D nss-q ino-o 1444 UZU-fc 4iqn-u 1U-1 383-4 3-Co Ufe3-1 5sfc »T4 -97-BLOCK 18 Area 2,23 aeres; scrub area 0,14 acres. North-west aspect. S o i l - loam to sandy loam. The north-west h a l f of t h i s block has a f a i r l y even coniferous cover mixed with hardwoods. Cedar, hemlock and balsam of a l l ages are present,, and several mature f i r s are scattered over the block.. The south-east h a l f Is p r i n -c i p a l l y hardwoods with some eoniferous understory. fi'S Cedar and hemlock,, alder and maple predominate. Recommendations. The area should regeivw a l i b e r a t i o n cutting and cleaning followed by planting. With t h i s treatment i t can be developed into a f i n e s e l e c t i o n f o r e s t . Estimate of timber. F C H B A M Ch Total F.b.m. 23832 10229 1338 6159 2150 4346 69 48123 Cu.ft. 4478 2136 337 1367 818 642 27 9806 Cords 49.8 23.7 3.7 15.2 9.2 7.1 .3 109.0 -98-STAND TABLE BLOCK 18 215 *4-o 14-(.S "I4-US O A S 3,-q fc-3 3- fa 4 1 1 5 4 2 - 2 S S 0 5 l & »0-3S 1 Q - 4 5-4 3-IS i o--vs 25-(,C XS-US 3c»-o 4-OS 3-C 0 - A . * ; 1% <\4 o-q 15 lO 1I . -S5 3U-4-S X-2S 0-q S-«b5 2-~l 2.T.-3-5 1 xn-oo 3x-"b5 o-s 2-as 3- IS" 4 - O S U-25 O '45 vS-IS V3-q 0-4S VZ5 5-«V n-T- 12.-C i4-"os 0-4S 1-35 '•30 T-1.S 1 - 1 5 q q U-lo o-q 0-q 0-4"5 3>- (5 4-oS OQ o-q 2.--I 0 •4'5 q-o °-4 O-4-S 0-45 S-4 o q 0-4S <.-TS 1 -1 . 0-q o -45 1-35 q-45 O - 4 5 0 - 4 S )0-35 u-n 0-4-5 0-4"? 0-q t-15 O - q i t s 8 - 5 S i - 3 s 0-4S 1-3 O -45 0-4-5 2.-25 0-45 0-q O-q 2, IS 0-45 • 0-45 2-1 a o-qo o q \-QO I - 8 0 0-45 o q i%o i - 8 a 22 o q 2-no 0-4S 0-4S 3- 1 s 24- 0 4 135 2-25 0 -4S O-4-S 2-"\0 2<o 0 4 5 OA'S 0>q O-q 2e> o q 0-4S 1-3-5 O 4"5 O-4-S 3o o-q O-q o-q 34 l-"SB o- 4-s: 1-8 3<b 0-4S 0-45 O-4-S 0-45 o-q 4<o O-4-S 0-45 0 - 4 - 5 SO 0-45 G-4S 0-4S feo 0 - 4 5 Q-4S O-AS (o(o 0 - 4 S Q-4S 0 - 4 . 5 -Q - 4 S 0-45 0-4S W-3 0-4S VS-3Q 185-3 S\3 \S2-o? 34-2-35 -99-F.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 18 l«> \ 3 il i& 25 3<b »2l (.1 U Q i 8 q i 8 q 32-B 1 3 q iqs nq 2>C»2. 22 « 7 4-11 2<o vaa 3(ot> 3 0 3 o o 8 4 1 1 6 2 ^ 4 5 S «v<. 8 4 3 5 0 VUXQ to 2 4 0 5 fc>b T.q-2.0 Co8 3 l O Q 3 1 \ 8 3 51 l b 2 . 5 o 2 B l 4 5 3 o 2 \ 4 15 3 3 \ 3 1 f c 4 3 O 5 8 5 4 ^ V 8 8 . * v q 4 q 2 3 2 . 4 4 1 1U> i C o 5 1 3 4 b i 4 t 1 t - 3 C W 3 U 3oq x o i 2 0 1 l I I lo 2 1 4 2 1 4 1 4 « 4 S 5 t o S 5 C 4 1 - 1 4 - J - l \ 3 4 3 3 o o 3 0 0 3 o o 3 0 Q i i 8 2 u al-4 5 S 8 4 2 8>42. l i e n 8 4 3 8 4 3 1 fe.7.0 I t x o Z 4 o S 2 4 0 5 2 ^ 2 . 0 3 1 3 1 Q Q IOC87 4 5 8 1 t o o -J -T -T. q«-4 IR4°, I1S8O -100-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 18 2 1 i-1 3o-b q-o 3-2 42-8 4-5-q 2 1 11 iu-2 11 ix-q 2S<o 3-b 3-U 4o4 181 S-O b4-ft b8-4 4? 4-5 48<« 8 i Sb-1 b 1-2 b-i 5-8 13-q IO4-0 44 lOt>-9 1 22-3 lft-0 U4-1 IS-3, 1 3.0-0 1 480 3a.-4 lb-Co 4Q-0 11-1 U-1 bO--J 21-u 4C-6 4«. % US-2 lb-2 l b - 2 . \3>-4 SQ.-4 3b o 3n-t> 22-Q OVI >444 144-4 22 24 I13-4 bft4 loS-S «<»«-1 2*81 2C.4-I ^3-1 40 0 33-1 4o • o 252-4 L 0 4 - I 2b 40-S 1V8 l\q-3> i i q - i 28 qb-2 12-2 I 8 V 4 54-0 54. o 242-4 30 (•0-0 12-0 1320 132-0 34 22fct> 22b-8 22b-3 3(b bb-s 8fe-S 8S-o 8S-o 11 l-S 4(o ISS-fe ISS-b IS-i-b So 2<\S-«S 2 q s - S xqss (.0 4So-o 4So-o 45 0-O bb SS4-0 SS4. 0 bo sqoo sqoc> Sqo-O 10Qo-3> qSft.o l-SV-2 bl3 -2 Vjlo-l 3« . ( - -1 2 8 1 - 8 12-2 bfcfc-1 43qi-4 -101-BLOCK 19 Area 2.50 acres. Scrub area 0,15 acres. Plat aspect. S o i l - loam with considerable humus. The block i s covered by an all-aged stand of mixed species. I t Is f a i r l y well stocked except towards the south-east edge which i s s c a n t i l y stocked with hardwoods and young c o n i f e r s . Cedar and hemlock predominate over the block. Recommendations. The area should receive a cleaning and planting, and should be managed on a selection b a s i s . Estimate of timber. F C H S B A . M Total F.b.m. 797 6873 3837 1338 17 4897 108 17867 Cu.ft. 158 1495 1085 363 5 1540 66 4758 Cords 1.8 16 .5 12.1 4.1 .1 17.1 .7 52.9 -102-STAND TABLE BLOCK 19 i q - 2 2 5 - 2 1 1 3 - 2 1 ( 3 - 2 l q -2 . 2-a 1-2 o • 4 2 3 b 2 3 -Co (o-O 2- Q o-a a a a-o o-a I V • 2 3.Co 0 - 4 1 5 - 2 0 < 4 1-2- i o-o 13-2 2a-4 i - b 1 2 % a-o 2 o o- 4 23-2 2- 4 - o-a q - b V fe- 4 i q - b 3-Co 15-Co io-a o-a 21-2. 3-2 o-a T 2 >4-o 4 - 1 - 2 2-a Q - 4 i. o-a fa-4 o-a i a - 4 1 2 . i-fc 3-2 1 3 - Co 3 2 - o l - Co O 0 TX. o-a » b & 4-a 0-4 o-a b - 4 2 3 - 2 0 . -4-o a 5 -Co 1-2 0 - 4 140 »o-a O-b \2- o 2b-O o - 4 2-0 4 - 4 1 -2 2 •(. i t , 1 - 2 o a 1 0-4 1 o - O o-a l-Co 4 - 6 l b Q - 4 B - 4 a-a 0-4 4 2 11 -fa o-a 2-a 0 - 4 4 - 0 b - 4 b - 4 l o - 4 2- 4 o-a (o - 4 8 - 4 1-2. q - b I b - O 0 - 4 2 - 4 o-a 3-Co 5-2 0 - 4 4 2 1 -to 1-2 o-a 3-<b 3 - 2 . 3 - 2 . u-a 0 - 4 l b o-a 7 - a 2-0 2 - Q 4-a Q - 4 o-a 0 - 4 I-fc i - b 0 - 4 0 - 4 o-a yu l - b 2 2 o-a o-a 0 - 4 0 - 4 1-2 2 4 o-a a -a O - 4 O - 4 1-2 2<b O - 4 Q - 4 o - 4 2 3 o-a o -a o-a 3 Q 0 - 4 o - 4 0 - 4 S 2 . O - 4 0 - 4 0 - 4 l i b . I 3 l b 14-0 1-2 3 D 3 - b 11-2 8 - 4 3 l - b 1 2 2 - b 42b-2 -103-F.B.M . STOCK TABLE BLOCK 19 5 z .52. A-o 7-51 7 4 Q 24-5 44 C, I4b> 22 24 2b 28 3Q 12 27 1 4 4 54-70 I q i 27 b I <e>2 41 b 252 I 26 3 1 1 8q b.3 i b 4 11 o 33C -b8 244 >2.2 322 232 2-2 4 4 ' t> 5 5 8 5 I 2. 5 b 5 i q z . 2 1 . Vb7 4 1 b -J-52 i t q 333 34-q 33«a 3 6 2 4 4 3 o 7 S 3 q 3 3 3 bo7 344 qfeq 3 3 6 8qb 5 12. 5 b 5 37 6 5 2 Q Ib7 -4- v Co 2 5 2 i e>b 244 52 l<037. 1 0 3 2 103-2. 3 i q 2 7 4 q I S 3 S 5 3 5 4 5 i 4 5 iqsq 4 3 , 2ooz "1147 -104-CITBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 19 3-2 5(o 14.4 Q-6 4-0 13.1. 3-l» (a-4 - d b 2-2 4-.b 23-fc 3-4 2 l l » 4l.b \o-4 t-4 *5-|-(, iq-2 38-4 44.4 2q-C» lX-4 4l-(p 2C-4 s-i-2 2>(. 2>3C» i Q 4 144 " SO-4 24> 3b o 18 05-fa 3o S*o-4 52 iq.4.8 24-o 44.t> 3-2 3-2- T5-2 2o-8 So-4 2-2 (o4-8 *85 t 43 b •»••» 2-5 2-8 b l -2 m - o 3xo s i b s-i-<<- b q c T3(<, qi-4 13-2 lO""»l» inqx 83-2 8 8 4 5 - o ^3-4 nio-l. 112-4 83-2 8 3 - 2 vq,S-<<-132-2 l i o z o q - 2 loq-2 VQQ..-2. 128-4 »2«6-4 So-4 3oo 3o-o 8o-4 l»o-8 =>5-lo *5»S-to qt»-4 3b-o 3C.-Q 85-fc, bS-U So-4 SO-4 194-8 1 ^ 4 - 8 (.3-2 5<iV0 434-2 1 4 S - Q 2 2 124T--U t\(,-0 2b-4 lft -2 loleO-U lO,0'i'2 -105-BLOCK 20 Area 2.50 acres; scrub area 0.06 acres. Plat asnect. 3 o i l - loam with considerable humus. The block Is covered by a f a i r l y even stand of all-aged mixed species. Considerable mature f i r and cedar Is mixed i n with the younger age classes. Towards the south-east side hardwoods become predominant. Cedar and hemlock, and alder are the predominating species over the block. The ground cover consists of swordfern and some salmonberry. • Recommendations. The young conifers should be lib e r a t e d from the hardwoods towards the south-east of the block, and the whole block should be cleaned and planted. It should be man-aged as a s e l e c t i o n f o r e s t . Estimate of timber. '  P C H 8 A 1 Ch Total F.b.m. 17610 6952 3355 2395 9550 1580 255 41702 Cu.ft. 3385 1509 864 567 2367 303 70 9065 Corda 37.6 16.8 9.6 6.3 26.3 3.4 .8 100.7 -106-STAND TABLE BLOCK 20 I \3-Co <=>-4- Q - 4 14-4 l 4 - 4 5 41.-4 \- fc. O . f t 7-4- 47-T. 4 7 - X l O 2 o 8 «T-X 0-4 S -- C -5.1.-0 a x - o l " 1 4 - 8 8 - 4 X - 8 <x-4 3 o - 4 4--o S- X • a a i a a 4 q - x Z (o-O 7-4 X - O X T . - U 5 - X S - b l b - 4 4^0- O o 5 0 - 4 8 - 8 l-i-4 O -4 0-4 •!_-»-• 4 n - x a a 1.T--4 4 4 - a o A a a T<° o - a o - t , i a o "O-Q q - c I X - O z q - u 4 7 • Co 5 3-2 S - 7 Q - 4 a a (o-a S - b 2 - 4 l S - X X 4 0 o G 3-C 4 - o l - l o i o - a -2.-a o-a 1 4 - 4 X X - Q T 1-7. a - 4 o - a 4 . 4 x a l- b • 4 - 4 a - b S D - 4 l - b O - D •J--4 q - b l - X t o - a 13.-X 0-8 l - X 3>-X 0-4 O - 4 4 o V O o - a l - x 0-4 X - 4 b - a t - a q - X 1-2. I t . I d 0-4 "3- C. t - 4 0-4 (o b (0-4 1 4 o - & O - Q l - X l - X 4 - 0 q . c O • 4 a - o I X - O 16 O - 4 0-8 l - x Cs-4 X-8 4 - 8 O - 4 5 X a - o \ o 1-1 o - b 0-4 O -4 x - a l - b l - b 4 - 4 Z O 0-4 6 - 4 l - b i t , x - o 2 2 Q - 4 o - a 0-8 0 - 4 1 - 4 0-4 Q - 4 o a -3-X 14 o - a Q - 4 O - 4 l - X Z f c 0-8 0-4 l - X l - X 2 3 I X V- X 0-4 Q - 4 I- Co 3o 2.-2. 0-4 0-4 0 -4 4-7- Q - 4 0-4 Q - 4 CoO 0-4- 0-4 0-4 7fc 0-4 0-4 0-4 •4 • a •4 4 - 4 1 4 1 - 2 (ol-fe 1 7 - 4 I fe -O 2-Svb 88-0 ^84 34-2 I b l - b 40-i-X l b -107-F.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 20 12 3 7 . •4-5 a q I 82 2 2 24 A-b lb 88 1»8 q o 12b 32 243 4 I O 7 2 1 (.4 lb4 5SC> 4 4 I 0(o i o q 752 8 4 S 5 I an 43-3 124 I 22 I 22 •Bot, 3^2 l b 1 1 b I 549 2 2 2"30 i q x . 4 V 2 4 212. I053 I 8b 18b 2 4 2 2 U 2 1 b 244 2 b 334 3 2b UWX. 2 8 ( . 1 4 < o 2 4 5 o 32. 3 o o 3cse> •4-Z U 4 fc>o4 b 8 2 7 c o 2 7 t o 7 b 3 3 4 b 3343 -2fo 2 1 2 "3ov xva 3 o C 4 3 ( i C84 a i 4 142.4 l 4 3 o 3R.2 itqb 54-q 1 1 0 3"\7 |43Q 1 4 4 S2o lo(o2 3 B O 10O 4 "2>o 0 to 4 27 b 0 3 3 4 a 7 0 4 4 2-7at 1 3 4 2 qsij. 17V25 3022 <»32. l o Z . 4S"Sb. Ibbbl -108-CTJBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 20 3-ln a-o l\-b 4 3 X U-2 3-2 Sn-w bq-2 1-4 •2.-4 vx- o 1(.-% 4b 3-5-4 3-C» b-4 4.4 14-4 b7-2 a-4 7S - c qo-o b a <,-& x& 6 3-U 3bo 4 2 - 8 1-X IS-U S-X lU-o 74-«> 7 4 - 8 102-3 2S-U 3a-4 q-b 73- <a 10-6 6 i«-a U&-U 1 6 4 2 3t-X 44-4 44-4 isq.-i 14,7-U I04 Xojyo 347-x i q x 2"4-o (.2-4 7o-% V17-X m-s 1 4 4 I87-X 314-4 nq-x 57- O X7-b 7T-C. lbU-4 1-5-7 7 S-X "2-4 l-b 37-2 qb-o qi»-0 133-X 71 14 4o-°j So-4 bo-ft q3-u 4U<o 13l-b bo-b 3o-o 3S-U "iO-O bo-o x q i - u 3S-b qt>-4 7Co 7xo 70-0 141-0 I 4 2 0 2% 1284 i x a - 4 4«6-o 17U-4 30 3x S8-8 4X v ix-o I vx-o I lx-o b Q S l 4 o S74-0 S X 4 . 0 lb bSb-0 bSb- 0 bSU-O 1334-0 U03-b 345-b X1U-3 253O-0 q4b-o IXl-X 28-0 VOqU-o 3G»2l»0 -109-BLOCK 21 Area 1.97 acres, a l l productive. North aspect. S o i l - loam. The forest cover consists of a very good stand of mixed species with a l l ages quite evenly mixed. Cedar and balsam predominate i n a l l ages, and considerable mature cedar, balsam and f i r Is present. Ground cover i s swcrdfern and salmonberry. Recommendations. The block should be cleaned and openings planted to tolerant c o n i f e r s . Estimate of timber. P C a B A M Total E.b .m. 17308 20315 1822 17438 3513 2630 63026 Cu.ft. 3379 , 4018 486 3617 962 464 12929 Cords 37.5 44.7 5.4 40.2 10.7 5.2 143.7 PLATE X. Mature cedar. Block 21. PLATE I I . B l o c k 2.1. Mature c e d a r , hemlock and balsam. L o g g i n g r o a d i n f o r e g r o u n d . - I l l -STAND TABLE BLOCK 21 O S xo-3 3 o 23-3 23-o < q - J - - 4 5 - Q 3o-4 V23-b 125 b 14- -a. 3 - t o 3-x-S 5"o-3 O S SO-O o-S 7-fc, 137. 43-\ b 4 4 V-5 lb-7 \ q - b b4-2 7 < o q-1 -23-q 4o-b 1 4 2 o-S \7-2 53-3 4- U •a-1 b-b V q . " 3 - 2 0 ia-3 l-O 22-3 4 I - l o 2-o 4-1 OS b-b 7-b 1-v 14 4 2\-3 l- o 3-Q 0-5 4-5 V2-2 5-\ \7-3> 2.1 b 2- O 2 0 5-1 2 0 o-S 2-b q - l o o s v-o l«5 3 o 4 - i o 0-5 5-1 81 I - 5 o-5 2.- O b-l 2- O o- I io-i O - S 0-5T O - S V-5 s-b 5 b 7 • I V • Q o-S OS 2 - Q 3-cj O -5 3 5 5-5 O - S IS l - O 2.0 O "5 2-S •4-S O ^ 1 - 5 OS 2-5 2-5 o-S 3- O 5-5 I- o V-O V- o 3-o 3- O O-S 3-5 t o - 5 o-S V- O O-S \S 3-S I - O VS 2-5 b-O 2-0 O-S I S 4 - Q 1- O V-O S-o 22 v-o v-s 2.S O-S O-S 3-o 24 o-s o-s V- O l-o 20, V- O I S 2-S I- O V - O 3-S IS o-S O-S O-S 30 V-O V-5 2-S 2- 5 32 O - S I- o I - S I- 5 34 l-O o-S V-5 I S 3C 3.J3 OS v-s O S 2-5 2-S 4 0 o-s O-S O-S 42 \- o \- 0 l-O 44 O - S O-S O-S 4"3 \ • O V • 0 v • 0 54 o-s. o-s o-S 84 O S O -5 O • £ 4-o ita-2 54-1 I 5 3 - 0 37 q - 3 57-2 7 0 4 a-O V3<o-2 5«S-5 -112-P.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 21 BN-'SM* 4 i 1 1 \ Q t q 2 4 2 1 5 1 3 4 l o X.O 2 . 0 l o <\<* l b 1 1-2. l 8 2 1 6 i v g 1 4 1 1 2 6 3 2 I ( o 0 -30 7 4 5 2 o 5 <oB 3 ( 6 1 1 3 5 4 3 - J - 7 ( = 4 5 l 3 to 1 V O 2 l O S S b s o i 8 4 5 q I 1 1 4 5 1 8 7 - 155 4 5 1 <\41 2 4 5 1 1 2 . 3 Co 1 1 3 14 I S O 2 o i fao3 3 4 3 3 4 3 i 4 q i 22 1 4 Q nqs 1(335 2 3 3 7 . 3 3 I l - b 0 2 4 1 1 1 3 3 4 S O l o 5 o b 2 C 4 ( 6 V 2 . 3 0 U . 4 8 n o n o 2 4 1 8 2ft 5-0 1 5 0 1 5"o 1 S O fe3o n q 4 2 4 1 4 2 4 1 4 3 2 . 3 " i 5 142.1. n q i * l 7 l 3 4 •an 5 8 2 0 l ( o q 5 l ( o S 5 3(o 3 6 n a i l o a q 3 D n 3 8 n 4-o (aU 0 ' U o b>b 0 4 2 . I S VO V 5 ( 0 I S I 0 4 4 • 6 2 5 82<5 8 7 . 5 4 b 4ft 54 2 I 3 | l o < \ o 1 1 3 1 2oq ,o 7.1 3 1 8 4 4 4 1 5 4qis 4 n i 5 "o l f t ta 1 0 3 1 2 . 1 1 5 8 8 5 2 . 2 0 - 0 1 5 1 1 * 3 1 3 3 5 3 d o 3 1 <*<\3 -113-CTJBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 21 4 . 0 4-0 70 4 8-o 2 -0 3 0 - 4 3 4 - 4 3 o - lo 4 5 27-lo 3 - 0 3o -b 4 - 0 - \ fc-0 7-1 8 4 42-7 14-0 «5bl b 5 - 4 3 - o 4 - 3 4-5 ll-W So 4 So-4 b7-o S o bS b - 5 27-O 3 3 - D 5 5 3 6 - S b O-S o-o 3 b - 0 4 4 - 0 3 4 o 8-5 - 4 2 - 5 8b-5 1 2 0 SS-S 18-S 8b-o lo So 130 1 8 0 lb40 3 \ 0 52-o 32-O 13S-D lOVO 18-0 I l l o ' O 2 b \ - 0 33- o 4o-0 3 4 5 103-S T-V \ - O 47-0 24-o 7 i-o 1 6 7 - 0 4<o-S 130,-S 2.38-0 bo-0 bOO 348-0 22 t>3 -0 l ^ % - 5 37-5 3 7 - S 2 7 b - 0 24 3 f t o H - 5 llQ-S I lO-S 2b q o o 2U7-5 352-5 \04-0 IQ4-0 4-5 >o-5 18 - 8 6 0 8%-o 8 6 - 0 3o l 2 b - o 3bl -S 487-"5 481-5 32 13-S i n - o 350-5 3 5 Q - 3 3 4 lb8-o ISft-O 3 1 - . - 0 3 2 l o - 0 3b 3o i73-s 3 1 2o5-0 l o q o loq-o 4-Q I 1 3 0 l i 3 - o 123-0 42 28oo 7.8o-o 2 8 0 0 44 ISl-ff 157-5 I 52-T 4 8 381-0 381-o 387,-0 5 4 3q2-5 3q7-5 3q -x.-S 1020-0 IO7.0 • 0 nvs-o 10 T><\< 24W-« l8ib-3 S3VV3 4381 2-0 72S-b bsbl-q -114-BLOCK 22 Area 1,84 acres; scrub area 0,33 acres. Worth aspect. S o i l - sandy loam. The north-east of the block i s mainly open scrub; the remainder of the cover consists of mixed mature species with some younger age classes. Cedar and maple predominate over the block. Recommendations, The block should be cleaned and the young conifers l i b e r a t e d from the hardwoods. A l l openings should then be planted. Estimate of timber. P C H B A M Ch Total F.b-.m-. 7612 15141 305 3227 366 3487 11 30150 Cu.ft. 1925 3166 7fl 803 167 722 10 6868 Cords 21.4 35.2 .8 8.9 : 1.9 8.0 .1 76.3 -115-STAND TABLE BLOCK 22 -2-1-X. I-to 22-8 22-& 33-X 0 - 5 X - X . l - o 3b-T 3 - S \-(. X - 1 2- \ 10-2 4 4 \- 1 O S X X 8 4 U-5 I - 1 a - i lb-8 O S 1 - b 3-a X X 14-1 84 n - b 12-4 3yS 3-a. 3-a V- c q.2 O S <V8 x-1 13-S 2X1 1 -l x x \ • I 4 4 1.4 S - 4 U-5 i o-q o -S o . 5 I T 10--3 lo-8 1 b 4 - 3 , O S fe-4 U - 4 o - s O-S 1- b l b 3 - X 3-1 0-5 O - S \ - O X-1 3 - a o - s i-o e>-o o - s O - S X X X X 4-4 4 4 O - S O-S" l b I-1 2-1 3 - X 1-1 o - s l ( o 1- 1 l< I 2-1 o - s Q - S O S O S l-O o-s o -S 0-5 » b> 1- b l b 3-1 I- V I • I 2-2 x - x 3 3 2 1 o - s o-s O - S o - 5 l - O 1 4 o - s O - S l - O O - S o - S i-S 2G> l b O - S 2- \ x - l O - S \ • I I- lo l-c. "Jo I- 1 I • V 2-2 x - x 32. l - b 34 O S o-S O S 3>b o - 5 o-s- o - S 4 4 O S o-s O - S 5 4 O - S o - S O - S SCo I-1 I • I H S O o - s o - S O S 3-b « 1 - 2 Ifc-J O S I S - t o U3 - S IS- I Sb-3 (2- 4 © 4 - o x v x - s -116-P.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 22 1&2 2 2 1 6 lo \s fe2 n iq-2. 2 2 3 2CoO W4 so i 2 q \ 3 j o 3 2 3 4 3Co 4 4 5 4 Sfc b O 2 3 , o o 152 1 2 0 0 3 0 O 5o3 OT.5 boo 3 4 3 2 . 4 o l O S 2 C 5 " 3 3 4 4 - I O to O O 3 q tS 102. 41V 10.2 2C.S l o 3 3 to 3 3 b b o l l o 2 t \ 2 0 0 3oo 503 b25 b o o 3432. 2.3 OO 1 8 S t l O =12 •=5.3 o4 3q2 1S5 232. 3o5 bib no 2-v5 I o \ 1 1 2 84 t bR. ^ C j 2 b 0 3 n S S °,42 2 3 2 4 q i 3os q,bb U 3 3 bCoO l<o7-l \ 2 Q O 3 o o 5 " 0 3 b 2 S 3432. - a / s o o 4 i " i - \ B 2 2 q V<ob U 5 4 l4X«fo tqq >»«\S (o 2 l O O i w »f c -117-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 22 b - 4 2- o 2S- < o 2 5 - b l-S (••; 4b 4 b (q-2 T.O-1 4 - S XO b-5 ( 6 4 Xb-b 3- • 5 4 4 0 5 5 5 4 S 81 148 148 3q-u 4 3 - 3 n-b V l-lo l i b (X-1 2q-1 4 1 - 3 Ixo VX-O 181 3 0 - 1 2b-0 ltp-o (6-0 (ft-o 4 4 0 3 3 - 0 XO-O 3 4 . ^ 8 7 s is-x l-s-x ( b 2 - 1 fax- o S l o . l H 8 « \ 3 2 - 0 V 3 2 - Q 2*3- O - V 22 5 6 - 5 565 3 1 - S 3 7 5 Sb-O 24 I V S 12-5 4 4 - 5 4 4 - S U7,-o 2Ce qo-o 31-5 m s Vl l -s 1?) 555 2 3 - 3 - 5 733-5 3 0 22b b> Soo 3 ( b - b 3(b-b 3 2 235 X 235 X 135-X 3 4 8 4 . 0 84-o 84-o 3<b <*b-o 4 b o Sb-Xl 44 I5VO \53-o »S3-o 54 VSOO \5o-o \5o-0 S l o bu8'8 t&8-3 bb8-8 *50 nxoo i x o o IXO-0 \ 0 4 ( . - ( i ixon 4 0 2 43b-5 3243-S q(-o 3 q 2 - 3 5 • 5 4 t > q o 3732-"a -118-BLOCK 25 Area 2,50 acresj scrub area 0.38 acres. Berth aspect, S o l i - loam to sandy loam. Over most of the block there i s considerable large alder with a scanty understory of coniferous reproduction. Towards the south-east end and also near the north-east edge, however, there Is very good mixed coniferous reproduction coming i n . Cedar Is the predominating species with hemlock quite numerous. A small amount of mature cedar Is present. Recommendations. Coniferous reproduction should be released from over shading hardwoods,, and the block should receive a cleaning followed by planting,. I t should be l e f t as a mixed hardwood-coniferous stand v/ith the hardwoods i n small groups. Estimate of timber. C H S B A M Ch Total P.b.m. 1470 6300 1000 887 305 3090 2697 65 15755 Cu.ft. 263 1330 323 203 69 1073 565 35 3861 Cords 2.9 14.8 3.6 2.3 .8 11.9 6.3 .4 42.9 -119-STAND TABLE BLOCK 23 3 - 2 83-to 3-<o 2-4 0-8 43-b q , 3 b o-a T V X l 4 o 1-2 3-2. Q-4 0 - 4 4-4 3 - b O j O - O -2.1-X Ho-o x v - x U - 2 . 4 . 0 0-8 3 . fa 2o-4 8-8 x-a 1-2.-Q 3 X-4 0 4 10-4 11 - l o l-X b - 4 3 0 - 0 o-a S b i - b 8-4 3 a-4 0 - 4 - n c , 14. a o - a 3 - f a x i - x -2_- O b-a 3-2. I1.-4 • sq • b S - b 4-a i - b 1-2. 1 3 - 2 X-4 5 -x X - 4 I O - Q X 3 X 1-2 3.2 4.4 3 - f a 3 - b 42. I I ' Co l - X 3-b o-a 5-fa Co- O X-8 V-2. l o o v s - b l b G-4 2- O 5 b o-8 0-4 b-a a-8 Q-4 G-4 2 0 o-4 \ - x 0 - 4 4-o o-a 8 4 b - 4 2 -o lO-4 fc-4 14-4 4-2 o-a o-a i - b . b-a 0-4 n - x 8-8 C 3 - 4 2 - 0 2-4 4-. a l - b . Q-4 b-8 q - X I- to 1-2. 2-8 l- Co l-X. X-8 5-b o-4 0-<8 l-X 0-4 0-8 l - x x - 4 2-4 0-4 2-3 0-4 0 - 4 1-2 l - b 0-4 4-4 0-4 22 24 0-4 0 - 4 o-a o-8 2 b 28 0-4- o - 4 0-4 •So 0 - 4 o-a l-X 1 X 32 0 . 4 0 - 4 0-4-38 0 a o-a o-a C o XXO-O b 4 - 3 q-2 25-Co 0 - 0 32.b-4 44-b 4\X I2 . 0 1 0 4 - 0 4 3 Q - 4 -120-F.B.M, STOCK TABLE . BLOCK 23 12 -3 4(o 3 2 -3*0 235 24 2Sq 3S-| 1 32- 32 b4 i n 13 230 2q4 2 2 »5-6 1 OQ I OX 2Co 4 3 5 <o(S • 4 4 »b4 1 2 4 \3( 3 o 5 (a \3 lOCo ioq 2 l S* fe8 (35 2 0 3 4 ( 3 322 1 2 2 4q4 % 2R4 3 q 2 Bob 132 131 ("2.2 22 24 1313 i b q 4 o5 4o5" 2Co 28 3«Q 3oo -3©0 30 4 T O 5o4 q i 4 0,14 32 3oo 3oo l o O 36 3.23 <=\23 -121-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 23 i-/x 7-2 l - C IO-0 2 4 -o W-2 4.« 4-o o 4-8 1-7. C o 3v<. 4 - 6 2-4 4 o - % 3-t» l c U-O U-C 7-7.-6 5 6 - 3 l 4 o 7 2 - 3 3 - 4 3 -4 c a 57-C 57-C 1 0 - 4 1 0 - 4 2 o - a 1 4 - 8 4 4 7 4 1 -c -4 4 8 - o 5 4 4 81- C 27-2 C - 6 VI 5 - C 3 3 - 4 4 4 . 0 6 7 - 6 4i-<o 3 l - 2 7 2 - 8 i q - 2 2 4 - 6 4 4 - o 1 4 - 4 1 8 - 8 4 ^ - 2 qc-o 2 " l C 1 1 3 - U 16-8 5 C - 4 T 5 - 2 7 4 - 0 2 4 - 0 2.2 2 4 3 o - 4 5&o 8 6 - 4 2 C 2 8 4 t > 0 4 8 - 0 3 0 87-4 too-% 183-2 3 2 ^6-a 5 8 8 3a »73- lo 1 7 3 - C 5o-o 4lo-6 qs-v, &44 loo-0 87-7 183-2 56-8 V73-b VOS-2 532-0 l 2 q - 2 6 1 - 2 2 7 -1 . 8 7 5 - 1 4 x q - 2 22C.Q l 4 o bl.q . 2 . 1 5 4 4 - 4 -122-BLOCK 24 Area 2,86 acres; scrub area 0.38 acres. Plat aspect. S o i l - sandy loam. The forest cover consists of mixed cedar-hemlock-balsam reproduction, maple and scattered mature f i r , c e d a r and balsam. The stand i s quite dense near the h o r t i c u l t u r a l gardens. Groundcover i s salmoriberry, swordfern and Holodiscus sp. Recommendations. The dense reproduction near the north-east boundary should be thinned* The remainder should receive a l i b e r a t i o n cutting and cleaning followed by p l a n t i n g . Estimate of timber.. F C H 8 A M Ch Total F*b,m» 19365 4247 80 3804 1158 8949 11 37614 Cu.ft. 3635 992 59 730 466 1605 13 7501 Cords 40.4 11.0 .6 8.1 5,2 17.8 .1 83,3 -123-STAND TABLE BLOCK 24 2-o-1 M S 1- o o - i s S-t o-3S < o » s '«- '* 8 1 - 5 0 b--2, 1-lS 0-35 O-IS 40-2. \-05 o - l 44-0? 44-05 bl-S l  O •IS -fc 0-3S 8»- 5 1 -50 32-2 2-ft • 3 \ S 0-35 3ft- 5 40-15 2 3 3 \7.-fa 0-3S 51-35 S-T- 2-1 4<o-4- 103-T5 21-3 35 o - i \fc-4 o - I S < V b C-3 2.2.-O 3 - ) 5 3 q - \ q&4o 12-q 4 4 Q •3S 8-4 O-I 3 ^ 1 5 Cel. 20-1 T.-80 3^-1 <oT-45 4 4 5-2. 3 - \ 5 13-25 <o-3 i \-q 2-a 27-OS 3S-3o x - a 4 q o- 35 \ 0 S q l S-2 a>-i 0-3S I 4- to 23-TO i--r • 2-45 O 1 4 - 8 S 4-5 a o \-a--5 H -35 0-35 2-45 0-33 3-15 2- a 3 - V 5 Q-3S t -3 q-45 2.-4- I OS 3-4-5 4-2. 3-VS 0-35 T-I ll-IS 1-05 I OS 1-4 0-2 "2.- V 3- IS 0-35 o n \ 1 5 4-35 5 - 2 5 0-3S 0-35 O-I ' • i s •2- V.O 3 - a s 4-55 l-OS" l-OS Q-3S 1-4 1-13 7.-00 l - o s l-OS O-I o-io 115 1-4 1-15 0-35 l-OS I- 4 3-15 o - i O 2 O -35 o- 3 5 l o 5 Q-3.S 0-35 0-35 0-35 0-35 \ 0 5 I -o5 1-40 O-I 0-1 Q' l O-I 0-35 0-3S 1-4 0-3S 0-3S 0-35 22 24 26, 2a o - i 3o 3 2 34 C3-3S 0-3S 0-35 0-35 0--\ 3<e> o-3S 0-3.S 0-3S 42 Q-3S 54 Q-3S 0-3S 0-3S <=2 O 3S o-3S Q-35 4 3 Q-3S 0-3S ° - ^ 5 21^4 lol-SS l--\S 51-35 1-45 351-t, 4T-T5 IX7-4S l<4 2oq.q SCl. 5 32- a -124-F.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 24 18 S4 18 52 2,3 l o 33 q.o s c IS 2 3 47 1 12. 1 3 .4 74 q . 4 3 8 I S3 14"^ 143 1 »o 123 212 343 81 25 7 1 32 l ' T . 2 1-2.1 2 2 I fe4 24 \ 22 122 4 4 o 20, 5*34 28 l O l 3S2 1054 332. 3o 2.-2.3 223 3 2 3 4 3>oq 5 o q 5 C 3 3fc I SO 1 SO 42 q u o q u o 5 4 1432 14^2 4 2 20 12. 20 1 2 4 8 2 4 * 4 24 \ 4 4 7 7 1 1485 2 D I2>30 St \ 4 4 0 5 3ia .q I 34 2.X& \4<» nq. 2.4C 2^8 l 18 3 4 4 I -2 I I t>4 fe4o 5 3 q 28 5 2t I 4,87 -2.4 3 144 242 53^ 8 3 2 . 1 3 8 4, 2 2 3, 543 S7 2-S 4 o 14^2 l O 12 2 < 4 \ 4 3 S 3 8 > 1 3 V S 2 -125-CTJBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 24 l»-o 2 3 - 3 22 24 2(0 2 f t . IXVI 3 o 32. 3 4 3 C 42. 5"4 t-n-4 tT - 3 1 6 - j t o 4 . 1 .24 1-1 t»-3 V! 5 U 2S-2 32- C Slo-o 3 S 1 2(.-ft 4 4 . 5 501-3 4 o - 0 44 4 3 o-4 1- 4 v • o 2 - I T 2 - 4 1 1 3 - 4 S - O Ift-O 3 2 -0 q - o Ifc.ft 11-1 14.-4 22-o U-3 12-te U-3 q> 3o-% »<*,-2. 14.0 74.1 3S - -J 2-5.2 ^-2 3C-4 32-U 2 5 - 2 1 4 3 llo-lo 4 3 - 3 3 5 - 1 It. ft 4 4 - 5 S q - 3 4 o - 0 > 4 6 - 4 2 1 1 4 3 l f t - l 4 b 2 4 2 l O 2b-'S q-vs 22-1> 42- o (. o - 4 S O -Q 5 6 - o 2 ) 3 1 - f t 4 - 1 . - 3 -i.^ s"-&-q Us-v, l Q . q 2 5 - 2 S~o-o S\\ ts-4 14-4 4 5 * . lo-ft 2 5 - 2 5 1 - b i 4 ^ - 2 2 . I O Slo-I 2 ( 0 - 5 - X C o - S ^ 3 - 5 " V . 2 0 -3 12-ft "12-6 4 2 - 0 2 3 1 - t o 4 4 S <oO-4 l » 4 1 4 - 0 0 " 1 f t - 4 2 1 1 - 4 4 b 2 - q mo-l M-i-i x«»-i» XSS-3 i f t q i - q vt.3.1 sci-2 4 . 1 , 1234 2c-Lift -126-BLOCK 25 Area 2.49 acres; scrub area 0.95 acres. South aspect. S o i l - sandy loam. On the whole t h i s block i s poorly stocked , Salmon-berry covers most of the block, and the forest cover consists of hardwooda with some cedar and hemlock reproduction as an underwood. A few mature cedars and some hemlock saplings are scattered among the hardwoods, R e c ommendat1ons. The area should receive a l i b e r a t i o n eutting and cleaning followed by planting. Estimate of timber. C H A M Ch Total F,b,m, 1425 792 540 2862 88 5707 Cu,ft. 342 221 307 696 69 1635 Cords 3.8 2.5 3.4 7,7 •8 18.2 -127-STAND TABLE BLOCK 25 W - l o 2 3 - 2 X4-.5 34 -a U - 2 . i t Q - 4 - 2-4 6 1 - 4 8 4-4 2 2 0 3 - C o I X 2 b - 6 2 C o - a 0-4 n c 4-o 0-4 22-4 L.-4 IS-2 3 l - < o 54-Q l-X O-B x c & fa>-8 1 - 2 . • S C o - 4 1 0-4 l Q - 4 2i-X 41 -8 14/1. Oft 0-4 s o 0-4. X 4 - 8 1 X - O 1 4 0 l S-7. 42-0 Q - 6 0-4 4-6 X 4 n-C n-x 4 X C o b Xl-fe, xq-x O -4 2 o I X 3-2 4- 0 8 0 4 - b l ( o - b "2.Q - O 2 - 4 l-X 3 - C o 1 1 . 3-X I t 14-4 t b - O I1_ l-X T - - 6 2 3 0-0 <o-4 2 - < o O-b 0-4- l-X l-X 2-Q l-X 5 - 2 fa>-4 o«a o 0 Q - 4 - 2- Q X * l-X 0-4 4-4 ( o - 4 l-X I X l-C 3.X Q-4 5-X C o - 4 O-o O-o 0 b 2-a 3 < o 4-4 Q-4. 0-4 0 - 4 0 -4 0-8 l-z. O - A - 0-4 6-4 0-4 o-& o -4- O.4- 0-8 O-o o-b (•fa o - 4 0 - 4 o-4 o-4 Oft d-4 o - 4 0-4 0 4 0-4 Q - 4 22 24 2 Co 28 3o 0.4. 0-4 0 . 4 2-4-6 IS&C-4- 34-6 1'4 4-4 Q - 4 1S1X 5T-X Cft-ft <»7-(o l^fa-o 450-0 -128-P.B.M. STOCK TABLE BLOCK 25 •at, 24. 4s ~ I Q S O X.-Z. 1 5 0 2IS 22 24 24 2o b o 4 b 4 b 51 lo2- 13 \ Colo 2 1 4 4b 43 51 I C o 21 \ 114 55 5 5 4 4 44 8 b (43 5 4 • 5 4 bb 4b 122 42 122. 184 l<H L<U 330 10 l o 131 IT>1 20-7 St St 8 8 o 252 252 3bo bbO 152 5 l O 3 l-f b b l 2 1 4 VV4S 3 5 I 3 q t 2 2 8 3 -129-CUBIC STOCK TABLE BLOCK 25 X - 4- 4-6 3o-4 X o - b 4-4 sn-c loT-4-2- 4 4 0 -a V l . " J - - X S-4 8-4 iq-c a - 4 3(o-4 4 > a 4 - a Co-ft l i b x=.x 10-ft T>q-lo IS-lo (a I T - l o 3SX 4 . 4 sn-x. m - a i q x \C\--L. IX-q 40-6 S 4 1 -ix,-q 14-8 lo -4 xo a I X . i u- \ 1 4 - 4 14-4 -2.6-5 XT-fe 4-3-1» "3>n to a i x 1Q - 4 XO-4 X4 -0 "2.4-0 44-4 XS-X XS-X X 5 - X 5a • 4 4a-o 4 a 0 4 a o ST>-4 5o-4 s o - 4 '•ab-q *)t>b 111--) V l % - 4 l»-S<V-X -130-APPEHDIX I I . Local Yolttae Tables for Douglas F i r Red Cedar Balsam and Hemlock Alder and Maple. Y i e l d Tables for Douglas F i r Red Cedar (60 year r o t a t i o n ) . -131-DOUGLAS PIR D.B.HV Height 6 48 8 60 10 72 12 83 14 91 16 98 18 107 20 112 22 117 24 122 26 127 28 132 30 , 136 32 140 34 144 36 149 38 153 40 157 42 160 44 164 46 168 48 { 171 50 174 52 178 54 181 56 184 58 187 60 190 62 193 64 196 66 199 68 202 70 205 72 208 74 211 76 214 78 217 80 220 82 223 84 225 86 228 88 230 F,B J 31 65 118 187 264 365 433 576 698 837 1003 1174 1331 1559 1783 1994 2221 2444 2722 3004 3283 3580 3934 4262 4570 4950 5350 5750 6150 6500 6900 7300 7650 8000 8370 8800 9200 9600 9950 10300 10600 Cu-.Ft 4 9 17 27 39 48 66 84 102 124 1.49 176 206 238 284 317 355 400 445 497 551 604 657 722 785 854 925 1000 1070 1150 1230 1310 1390 1470 1550 1640 1740 1840 1940 2040 2140 2240 -132-RM> OKDAR D.B.H. Height P.B.M. Cu.Pt.. 6 44 % 8 49 20 4' 10 54 30 9 12 60 56 16 14 64 90 24 1.6 70 128 31 18 75 152 40 20 79 175 51 22 84 240 63 ' 24 88 345 76 26 92 418 90 28 97 520 107 30 100 630 126 32 104 750 147 34 108 875 168 36 ' 111 1006 192 38 115 1154 217 40 118 1320 246 42 121 1510 280 44 124 1650 305 46 128 1870 346 48 132 2090 387 50 136 2320 434 ' -52 138 2580 487 54 140 2850 547 56 143 3120 608 58' 146 3440 680 60 150 3770 754 62 152 4090 818 64 155 4420 884 66 158 4780 956 68 160 5140 1028 70 163 5520 1104 72 165 5870 1174 74 168 6230 1246 -133-BALSAM AND WESTERN HEMLOCK D.B.H. Height P.B.M. Cu »Pt • 6 28 mm 2 8 42 17 5 10 61 . 40 13 12 73 79 24 14 82 137 37 16 90 210 52 18 98 305 69 20 104 402 93 22 110 530 117 24 116 668 145 26 122 820 175 28 127 997 205 30 133 1196 241 32 138 1422 277 34 142 1640 316. 36 147 1889 359 38 152 2178 410 40 156 2456 455 42 160 2720 505 44 164 3026 559 46 169 3345 622 48 173 3674 685 50 177 4007 745 52 180 4250 810 54 184 4552 874 56 188 4830 938 58 192 5080 1013 60 195 5410 1075 62 198 5730 1135 -134-ALDER AMD MAPLE D.B.H. Height Cu.Ft. F.B.M. 6 52 4 -7 56 6 -8 59 8 12 9 62 9 21 ro- 64 11 32 l l 66 14 45 12 69 17 64 14 72 25 109 16 76 36 169 18 80 47 245 20 84 60 343 22 87 75 465 24 90 89 610 -135-YIBLD TABLE FOR DOUGLAS FIR Site Index 130 Total Age No. of trees per acre Aver-age d.b.h, in s . Aver-age height D, C-D Basal area s q . f t . V o l . per acre. M.a.i. f.b.m. M.a.i, eu.ft. Cu,ft, f .b .m. 20 1173 2,5 26 70 803 - — 40 40 703 6.2 72 141 4113 15300 382 103 60 309 10.4 107 175 7147 35100 585 119 eo 188 14.41 122 197 8857 47000 587 111 100 140 17.1 130 215 10027 55900 559 100 120 114 19.7 137 231 11177 64000 533 93 140 96 21.0 145 246 12310 72100 515 88 160 86 24 a 152 262 13433 80200 501 84 Culmination of f.b.m. growth 60 or 80 years. Culmination of•eubie growth 60 years. -136-YIELD TABLE FOR CEDAR.. 60 YEAR ROTATION Average d.b.h. 14 Inches. D.B.H. No. of trees per acre No. of poles No, of posts F.B.M. 2 1 - -4 4 - - -6 12 - 20 -8 20 * 50 400 10 33 - 80 990 12 40 25 60 2240 14 40 30 60 3600 16 33 30 50 4488 18 27 25 40 4185 20 17 15 40 2975 22 13 12 30 3120 24 5 4 19 1725 26 3i 2 10 1254 28 2 2 5 1040 1 L 250 145 460 26017 Normal mean animal increment^ 60 year r o t a t i o n : 433 f.b.m. per acre. Probable mean annual Increment, 60 year r o t a t i o n : 350 f.b.m per acre. -137-APPENDIX I I I , Description of Speeie3. Estimate of Cedar Poles by Blocks, Area C l a s s i f i c a t i o n by Blocks. -138-DESCBIPTIOW OF SPECIES Douglas f i r . (Pseudotsuga t a x i f o l i a ) . Most of the f i r on the area i s overmature and was l e f t In the sel e c t i v e logging operations. A small amount of f i r reproduction Is coming i n naturally and t h i s w i l l be supplemented by planting. L i t t l e need be said regarding the character of the wood. At present i t i s very valuable as a s t r u c t u r a l timber, i s quite durable i n contact with t h e ' s o i l , but Is a d i f f i c u l t wood to work. Consequently, it's use may be displaced i n the future by more workable woods which hase been treated, or whose strengths have been better u t i l i z e d by more e f f i c i e n t s t r u c t u r a l design. Western Red Cedar. (Thuya p l l c a t a ) . Cedar i s the moat abundant species on the area and forms approximately 3/4 of the coniferous stand. A good mixture of age classes exists although the majority of the trees belong In the 1 to 20 year age c l a s s . The wood 3 h o u l d always be valuable f o r posts and poles, and as i t grows ra p i d l y up to pole s i z e , i t should be a very good species to grow i n a small f o r e s t on a pole rot a t i o n * Western Hemlock. (Tsuga heterophyila). P r a c t i c a l l y a l l of the older hemlock on the area i s hemlock mistletoe infected and a constant source of -139-danger to younger trees. The species i s not very abundant and at present i s not being added to by planting. Hemlock w i l l probably be a valuable wood i n the near future, for i t i s more e a s i l y worked than i s f i r and i s a better wood for i n t e r i o r f i n i s h . Grand F i r or Balsam. (Abies grandis). Some mature trees and a f a i r amount of reproduction of balsam are scattered over the area, mainly i n blocks 2, 3,4, and 21. This species should be encouraged to grow i n mixed stands: It i s f a i r l y tolerant and produces an excellent . boxwood, a product which should be r e a d i l y saleable i n the future. Sitka Spruce. (Plcea s i t c h e n s i s ) . Only a few specimens of spruce occur naturally i n in the f o r e s t . Some have been added to these by planting. It i s not a species to encourage f o r i t Is susceptible to aphis i n f e c t i o n or spruce g a l l and very susceptible to wind-f a l l . Western Yew. (Taxus b r e v i f o l l a ) . Only a very few specimens of yew occur and are of more value as a c u r i o s i t y than as a commercial species. Western White Pine. (Pinus montlcola). A few white pine transplants have been set out i n ± H the f o r e s t , but the species i s not recommended because of the ever-present danger of b l i s t e r rust i n f e c t i o n from -140-n e a r b y b l a c k c u r r a n t p l a n t s . Western Y e l l o w P i n e . { P l n u s p o n d e r o s a ) , A few y e l l o w p i n e have been p l a n t e d and s h o u l d be s u c c e s s f u l on t h e d r i e r s i t e s . I t s use I s n o t recommended, however, u n t i l more i s known r e g a r d i n g i t s s u i t a b i l i t y t o t h e c o a s t . Redwood ( S e q u o i a s e m p e r v l r e n s ) and P o r t O r f o r d Cedar (Chamae-e y p a r i s L a w s o n l a n a ) , A v e r y few o f t h e s e s p e c i e s have been p l a n t e d i n t h e f o r e s t as an experiment o n l y . Lodgepole P i n e . ( P l n u s c o n t o r t a ) . T h i s s p e c i e s does not o c c u r n a t u r a l l y on t h e a r e a b u t i s c o n s i d e r e d t o be a s u i t a b l e s p e c i e s f o r low s p o t s and w e t t e r s i t e s . I t s use i s recommended i n even-aged mixed s t a n d s . Red A l d e r . ( A l n u s r u b r a ) , 1 A l d e r i s t h e l e a d i n g hardwood of the P a c i f i c l o r t h w e s t . The volume c u t and used l o c a l l y i n t h e m a n u f a c t u r e o f f u r n i t u r e exceeds a m i l l i o n b o ard f e e t p e r y e a r . I t i s a good s p e c i e s t o grow on a woodlot o r s m a l l f o r e s t as i t makes r a p i d g r o w t h , has a r e a d y market and i s easy t o h a n d l e i n t h e woods, A l o c a l m a n u f a c t u r i n g p l a n t w i l l t a k e a l l t h e a l d e r t h a t the U n i v e r s i t y F o r e s t c a n s u p p l y and pay the f o l l o w i n g p r i c e s f o r l o g s 9 i n c h e s and l a r g e r and i n l e n g t h s o f 8, 10, o r 12 f e e t : -141-#6,00 per M f.b.m. i f the logs are c o l l e c t e d at the forest by the company. |9.00 per M f.b.m. I f the logs are delivered to the m i l l . The logs are scaled by the B.C. Log Scale. With a l l i t s advantages, alder should be encouraged to grow i n places where i t w i l l not Interfere with the growth of coniferous reproduction. T h r i f t y alders should be l e f t during cleanings; these w i l l put on rapid growth and w i l l be a source of revenue i n a few years. Also,the presence of some hardwood i n mixture with the conifers w i l l keep the s o i l from d e t e r i o r a t i n g . Broadlsaf Maple. (Acer macrophyllum). Maple i s also an Important hardwood i n the P a c i f i c Northwest, The annual cut l o c a l l y i s about 20 M board f e e t , used p r i n c i p a l l y i n furniture manufacture.. The wood has s i m i l a r c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s to eastern maple but i s only 80 per pent as strong. Maple has s i m i l a r advantages to alder and i t 3 growth should be encouraged In the forest where i t w i l l not i n t e r f e r e with the growth of coniferous t r e e s . The present prices being paid f o r maple logs by a l o c a l m i l l are as follows: |7.00 per M f.b.m. If c o l l e c t e d at the forest by the company. $10,00 per M f.b.m i f delivered to the m i l l . -142-Western Cherry. (Prunus demissa) . There i s a limited quantity of cherry i n the forest and i t s use Is at-present l i m i t e d to firewood. Willow. (Salix sp.) Crab-apple (Pyrus r l v u l a r l s ) and Flowering Dogwood (Cornus K u t t a l l i l ) . These are r e l a t i v e l y unimportant i n the forest and are represented by only a few specimens. Dogwood should be encouraged as i t i s a beautiful ornamental tree, but the willow and crab-apple should be cleaned out as weed species. Cascara. (Rhamnus purshiana). There are only a few cascara trees i n the forest but i t i s being spread by the b i r d s . It i s a valuable species, the wood and bark containing a medicinal drug. Cascara i s exceedingly tolerant of shade and should be t r i e d out i n mixed plantations with f i r and cedar. I t i s a very hardy tree, subject to few Insect pests and fungous i n j u r i e s , and should be a valuable secondary species for plantations, Onee the trees have been established, the species can be coppiced and sure reproduction w i l l be had i n the future. The recommended spacing i n the f i e l d varies from 2 feet by 3 feet (Davidson) to 6 feet by 6 feet (Moody). 6 feet by 6 feet v/ould be a suit a b l e spacing to use and would be uniform with the spacing used at) present f o r f i r and cedar. -143-Cascara (continued). The seed should he sown In t h e seedbed i n rows i n t h e autumn, and fresh seed should be used i f possible. I f t h e s e e d has to be stored, It should be s t r a t i f i e d a f t e r the pulp has been removed by soaking.In hot water. Depth of sowing i n the seedbed should be about one quarter inch. It has been estimated that a y i e l d of at least 1300 pounds of bark per acre per year may be expected from a cascara plantation. -144-ESTIMOT OP CEDAR POLES BIT BLOCKS Block No. No. of poles. Block No. No. of poles. 1 11 13 1 2 2 14 1 3 2 15 5 4 6 16 5 5 6 17 4 6 1 18 10 7 3 19 8 8 1 20 10 9 1 21 10 10 - 22 3 11 • - 23 10 12 1 24 10 25 3 ota l number of poles on tne f o r e s t : 114. -145-AREA CLASSIFICATION BY BLOCKS Block Forested Hon- forested Pure Mixed Pure Total C u l t i v - Scrub Total TOTAL hdwd. C-H conifer forested ated AREA 1 0.61 1.62 1.86 4.09 0,13 0.13 4.22 2 0.10 0.20 1.45 - - - 1.45 3 — 0.85 - 0.85 - 0*45 0,45 1.30 4 - 1.82 0,68 2.50 •a* - mm 2.50 5 0.10 .1,17 1.30 2.57 - 0.08 0,08 2 .65 6 - mm 2*65 2.65 - — _ ' 2.65 7 — 0.23 1.02 1.25 _ 1.25 1.25 2.50 8 - 0.48 0.06 0.54 1.04 1.04 1.58 9 _ 0.42 0,24 0.66 0,41 0,41 1.07 10 mm » 1.38 1.38 — 1.12 1,12 2.50 11 -mm- . - 1,81 1.81 mm 0,84 0.84 2.65 12 - 0.37 • 1.48 1.85 0.11 0,54 0.65 2.50 13 1,16 1.16 - 1.33 1.33 2.49 14 -> 1.21 0,40 1.61 - 0*24 0.24 1.85 15 0.18 1.37 0,06 1.61 0.41 0.48 0.89 2.50 16 0.16 1,01 0.34 1.51 0,26 0,73 0,99 2.50 17 0.04 0.91 «. 0.95 0.18 0,18 1.13 18 1...15 0,89 0.05 2.09 — 0.14 0.14 2.23 19 0.23 2.03 O.OS 2.35 0,15 0.15 2.50 20 0.15 2.22 0.07 2,44 0.06 0.06 2.50 21 0.04 1.93 - 1,97 - — - 1.97 22 _ 1.51 - 1,51 - 0.33 0.33 1.84 23 0.33 1.67 0.12 2.12 mm. 0.38 0.38 2.50 24 0.24 1.S7 0.37 2,48 mm 0,38 0.38 2.86 25 0,31 1.18 0.05 1.54 mm 0,95 0.95 2.49 'otal 1 3.64 27.07 14.23 44.94 0.78 11,21 11.99 56.93 -146-APPEHDIX IV... Maps. Map of Ut i l i s a t i o n . , ap of B'orest Condition. Cover Map,, 'Map of Drainage., L. U N I V E R S I T Y C A M P U S M A P OF U T I L l Z / \ T l O M . U N I V E R S I T Y F O E E S T . U M I V E E S I T Y O F B R I T I S H C O L U M B I A V A M C O L P S / E E . B L C . c a l e 1 lo * 2 0 0 F t S u r v e ^ e c i 5. R a p p e e * . G 3 A . p i r > > 3 o " c i . b . b . B a l s a r r ; > 30* d k b . H e r o l o c U > 3 0 " d b b. C e d a c > so" a.bb. M a p l e > so" d.t> b. Fir* ' o o o o - m e n c h a n l a i f c a l e . Fool" pa t b . . L o o * i n o P o a d ^ Iroo p o s l - 5 roai-klD(^ b l o c K Co @ C o n c r e t e rrv o n u r n a n t " , 0 I P O O po*5>V" tnarkioa^Curve . Bloc U L F O F U M W E C 5 1 T Y C A M P U 5 M A P o r F O E E S T COhDITIOn U M 1 V E E S I T Y F O E E I S T U M I V E C S I T Y O F D K I T I 5 H C O L U M B I A V A N C O U V E R . B . C . Scale 1 In — 2 0 0 Ft S u r v e y e d 2* M a p p e d \*3"34-5 GL&A, UNIVERSITY CANPU5 C O V E R M A P U N I V E R S I T Y F 0 R E 5 T U N I V E R S I T Y *\ B R I T I S H C O L U M B I A V A N C O U V E R . B . C S c a l e \ to = 2 0 0 Fir S u r v e y e d &. M a p p e d • *-* L » i • * , 4 . 1 t f r i * * • 9 /NET "fe, e- L * A A A II ; *.4 \ v. . * \ * 1 * 4** •••-:-::<>. i&x * 3 II*. 'I * •hi ; I * $ ; 20 ; 4 * * • 1 « t .ti > 7^  I 5 V v * X •'•*> 4 > v * * : 1 L e g e n d : Hardw o o d . 4 k CecLcxr-. A rVr*. A Hemlock . A "3prcj.ee Dolaarn. T'J Barren •scrub. T y p e boundary CuU'wated. I T r e e s above \"2"dao.. ^ T r e e s 2." 1o •2" cho.. * Trees le-ss than 2."dUa.. o R G \ A t LJnwerstTy £ M A P OF D R A I N A G E U N I V E R S I T Y F O R E S T UNIVERSITY » BRITISH COLUMBIA. V A N C O U V E R . B . C . -147 BIBLIOGRAPHY 1, B.C. Forest Service, "Volume, Y i e l d , and S&and Tables for some of the P r i n c i p a l Timber Species of B r i t i s h Columbia';' 2. Meyer, i'.H. "Volume Tables f o r Western Hemlock". 3. Meyer, W.H, "Interregional Volume Tables for Old-growth Douglas F i r " , 4, R.Bourne, "Working Plan Headings", Empire Forestry Journal, Volume 13, No*2, 1934, 5, Recknagel* "Forest Working Plans", Second E d i t i o n , 6. Johnson, Hanzlik, and Gibbons, "Red Alder of the P a c i f i c Northwest, U.S.D.A. B u l l e t i n Ho. 1437, 1926. 7* Starker and Wilcox. "Cascara", Reprinted from The American Journal of Pharmacy, Volume 103, Nos. 2 and 3, February and March,, 1931, 

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