Open Collections

UBC Theses and Dissertations

UBC Theses Logo

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Facilities and equipment in use in secondary art programs in British Columbia Varro, Timothy Joseph 1989

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
UBC_1989_A8 V37.pdf [ 8.08MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 1.0097931.json
JSON-LD: 1.0097931+ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 1.0097931.xml
RDF/JSON: 1.0097931+rdf.json
Turtle: 1.0097931+rdf-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 1.0097931+rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 1.0097931 +original-record.json
Full Text
1.0097931.txt
Citation
1.0097931.ris

Full Text

FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT IN USE IN SECONDARY ART PROGRAMS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA by TIMOTHY JOSEPH VARRO Ed (Secondary) University of British Columbia 19 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTERS OF ARTS in THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES Visual and Performing Arts in Education We accept this thesis as conforming to the required standard THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA April 1989 © Tim Varro 1989 In presenting this thesis in partial fulfilment of the requirements for an advanced degree at The University of British Columbia, I agree that the Library shall make it freely available for reference and study. I further agree that permission for extensive copying of this thesis for scholarly purposes may be granted by the Head of my Department or by his or her representatives. It is understood that copying or publication of this thesis for financial gain shall not be allowed without written permission. T. Varro Visual and Performing Arts in Education The University of British Columbia 2075 Wesbrook Place Vancouver, Canada V6T 1W5 Date: April 1989 ii ABSTRACT The purpose of this investigation was to compile data and information on equipment and facilities that might indicate the physical conditions under which art is being taught in the secondary schools of British Columbia. The survey was conducted using a questionnaire which was returned by 187 secondary school art teachers. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS iii I would like to thank my thesis committee chairman, Dr. Graeme Chalmers for the vital support and clarity of his criticisms given me throughout my final year of studies and preparation of this thesis. Thanks are also due to Dr. James Gray, who taught me that intellect need never be opposed, and whose counsel sustained me through five difficult years of part-time course work and thesis preparation, while I was teaching full-time. Both their commentaries and advice demanded an attitude towards research and scholarship that would have been difficult for me to attain otherwise. I would like to express my appreciation to the British Columbia Art Teachers Association for supporting this study, and to President Barbara Sunday for her interest. I would also like to thank Ray and Judy Sept and Lora Finan for their assistance and my father Joseph Varro, whose wisdom and integrity has inspired me throughout my years of study. Finally, I wish to express my deepest appreciation and gratitude to my wife Linda. This study would not have been possible had it not been for her infinite patience, timely suggestions, and steadfast support. Thank you. iv TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Title Page Preface Abstract ii Acknowledgements iiList of Tables viCHAPTER ONE: 1 A. Introduction 1 B. Statement of the Problem 3 C. Research Questions 5 D. Definition of the Terms 6 E. General User Requirements 7 1. Size 8 2. General Facility Design Notes ....... 9 3. General User Requirements 10 4. Facility and Equipment Requirements . 10 5. VA2D Drawing and Painting Facility .. 11 6. VA2D Graphics Facility 17. VA3D Ceramics, Sculpture and Crafts . 12 F. Design of the Study 1G. Limitations 13 CHAPTER TWO: 14 A. Review of the Literature 1B. Review of the Previous Research 17 CHAPTER THREE: Methodologies and Procedures 2 3 A. Research Questions 2 3 B. The Pilot Study 4 1. Sample 22. Instrumentation 25 3. Data CollectionC. The Final Study 6 1. Sample 22. Instrumentation 27 3. Data Collection 8 V CHAPTER FOUR: Findings 30 A. Section One: Description of the Sample .. 30 Background Information on the Art Teachers 1. Education 4 2. Teaching Experience 38 3. School Location 42 4. Teaching Assignment 44 5. Number of Students Studying Art 45 6. Class Size 8 7. Art Rooms 53 8. Use of the Artroom 56 9. Supplies and Equipment Budgets 57 10. Art Fees 9 11. Art Courses Offered in the Secondary School 6 4 12. Professional Membership and Journal Subscription  9 B. Section Two: Facilities in Use 74 1. Floor Surface 75 2. Location 7 3. Floor Drains, Sinks Heavy Duty Drains. 79 4. Lighting, and Electrical System 85 5. Display for 2D and 3D Art Work 7 6. Storage Facilities, Window Space .... 91 7. Ventilation, Audio Visual Blackout Facilities 96 - C. Section Three: Equipment and Tools Available 100 1. Ceramics Equipment Available 102. Graphics Equipment Available 10 3 3. Photography Equipment Available 107 4. Film/Television Equipment Available . 110 5. Drawing and Painting Equipment Available 113 6. Textiles and Fabrics Equipment Available 5 7. Basic Handtools Available 117 8. Audio/Visual Equipment Available .... 122 vi CHAPTER FIVE: Summary and Conclusions A. Restatement of the Problem 125 B. Conclusion 12C. Recommendations for Further Study 128 References 130 Appendix One: Questionnaire 136 Appendix Two: Letter of Transmittal 14Appendix Three: Follow-up Letter . . 148 Appendix Four: British Columbia Art Teachers Association Endorsement 150 Appendix Five: University of British Columbia Ethics Review Committee Study Approval 152 vii LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1. Division of Space for a School of 2000 Students... 8 2. Sample Population of Art Teachers by Grade Level and School Population 33 3. Highest Academic Preparation 35 4. Country of Academic Preparation.. 36 5. Institution Last Attended 37 6. Total Years of Teaching Experience in British Columbia 39 7. Years of Experience Teaching in Present School.... 41 8. School Location by Community Population 4 3 9. F.T.E. or P.T.E. Art Teaching Assignment 44 viii 10. Number of Students Studying Art 46 10a. Number of Students Studying Art 47 11. Class Size for Schools With Grades 8-12 49 11a. Class Size for Schools With Grades 8-12 50 12. Class Size for Schools with Grades 8-10 51 13. Class Size for Schools with Grades 10-12 52 14. Number of Rooms Classified as Art Rooms 54 15. Number of Rooms Designed and Built as Art Rooms... 55 16. Number of Art Rooms that are Used by Other Teachers 56 17. Supplies Budget Allocation 57 18. Equipment Budget Allocation 58 ix 19. Art Fees for Schools with Grades 8-12 60 19a. Art Fees for Schools with Grades 8-12 61 20. Art Fees for Schools with Grades 8-10 6 2 21. Art Fees for Schools with Grades 10-12 6 3 22. Art Foundations Courses Offered 65 23. Visual Arts 2 Dimensional Art Courses Offered 66 24. Visual Arts 3 Dimensional Art Courses Offered 67 25. Special or Locally Developed Art Courses 68 26. Professional Membership 70 27. Journal Subscriptions.. 71 27a. Journal Subscriptions 72 28. Art Room Floor Surface Material 76 X 29. Art Room Location in the School 7 8 30. Floor Drains in the Art Facility 79 31. Number of Sinks in the Art Facility 81 32. Sink Conditions 82 33. Sinks Equipped with Heavy Duty Drain 84 34. Artificial Lighting 86 35. 2 Dimensional Display Facilities Within the Artroom and the School 88 36. 3 Dimensional Display Facilities Within the Artroom and the School 89 37. The General Quality of the Display Areas 90 38. Storage Facilities Centralized Within the School.. 92 38a. Storage Facilities Adjacent to the Art Room 93 xi 39. Window Space 95 40. Ventilation System Quality 97 41. Workman's Compensation Board Approved Ventilation System 98 42. Audio/Visual Blackout Facilities 99 43. Ceramics Equipment Available 101 43a. Ceramics Equipment Available 102 44. Graphics Equipment Available 104 44a. Graphics Equipment Available. 105 44b. Graphics Equipment Available 106 45. Photography Equipment Available 108 45a. Photography Equipment Available 109 xii 46. Film/Television Equipment Available Ill 46a. Film/Television Equipment Available 112 47. Drawing/Painting Equipment Available 114 48. Fabrics and Textiles Equipment Available H6 49. Basic Handtools Equipment Available 118 49a. Basic Handtools Equipment Available . ng 49b. Basic Handtools Equipment Available 120 49c. Basic Handtools Equipment Available 121 50. Audio/Visual Equipment Available 123 50a. Audio/Visual Equipment Available 124 1 CHAPTER ONE The Problem A. INTRODUCTION This study was born out of my need to know more about the general state of art equipment and facilities in secondary schools in British Columbia. My teaching experience is one of rebuilding existing art programs in a small rural school and implementing new art courses in a very large urban school. The initial motivation for this study is, ". . . based on the assumption that learning is achieved through inquiry, that inquiry is most effectively motivated by curiosity and that curiosity evolves out of the interests and values of the learner" (M. Erickson 1977, p. 22); as well as an understanding that those interests and values are manifested in the manipulation of materials and the handling of equipment. My experience in rebuilding and implementing art programs in both rural and urban areas added meaning to other studies of the status of art equipment and facilities in British Columbia secondary schools. Consequently, this study would add to that data bank. Yet, this is only the initial step, for the most important task—the sorting and 2 making use of this information—is still to be done. Who is to do it? Connelly et al (1980), believe that ". . . in the final analysis we the teachers do." Simply, it is the teacher who is charged with the responsibility of taking action (in the classroom) on information provided by research (p. 35). Armed with such data, art teachers are in a better position to make a comparative check and more accurately evaluate their own classroom facilities and equipment. Within a society at any given time the potential for change is not readily measurable, nor is the likelihood of any particular change or set of changes occurring within a certain time easily established. This data could be used on a professional basis, to make recommendations for changes and improvements. It is exceptionally difficult to determine what program possibilities allow for developing new secondary school art facilities without any information on the conditions under which art is being taught. This study could be a catalyst to further renewal of art education research into programs and facilities. Reviewing the results of this study and comparing them with the past data may enhance the picture of whether art facilities are better off or worse than they used to be. 3 Finally data from this study could assist in the development of more practical and functional facilities and environments for teaching and learning art. B. STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM We have little information about art education equipment and facilities at the secondary level in various schools in the province; and how these facilities affect the type of art program offered. It is assumed that there are several underlying concerns about the conditions under which art is taught at the secondary school level (Gray, MacGregor, 1985). This type of information, exchanged informally in discussions and conversations usually concerns extremes in existing conditions or a majority of "normal" or "everyday" situations. Although information is important to some art teachers in terms of developing their own programs and in facility upgrading there is not that much information or research on special art facilities and equipment. This is further compounded in that the visual arts, as in other areas of specialized knowledge, have been, to a large extent, isolated from one another. Michael Fullan, in his book, The Meaning of Education Change, (1982) states: "if 4 educational change is to happen, it will require that teachers understand themselves and be understood by others . . . in order to consider change, we must first understand stability and order" (p. 107). Before any change can be effected, there must be a thorough knowledge of existing conditions (MacGregor 1969, Fullan 1982)• For instance, many art teachers are unaware of the range or the nature of art programs outside their own; And yet, with accelerated social and cultural changes the need to examine the present day situation is most urgent. Only then can teachers prepare for the inevitable educational changes. Michael Fullan suggests that this knowledge, a primary function associated with the change process, is neglected. He states: Teachers do not have time for, (or their culture does not support) reflection or analysis either individually or collectively about what they are doing. Teachers seldom invite each other into their classes, being private has a long tradition (p. 118). By being private persons, opportunities to improve one's situation are missed. By being aware of alternatives, a greater range of choices is possible. 5 Since the secondary level art teacher is the prime mover and best knows the art programs, courses and facilities in their schools, an accurate description of art facilities and equipment can best be collected from them. Therefore, a study of the current conditions with respect to facilities and equipment being used by secondary art teachers in British Columbia was conducted. The purpose of the study was to survey the facilities and equipment in use in secondary art programs and provide a single comprehensive source of reference for art educators in British Columbia. This compilation of facts and information is now available to teachers who want to learn more about art facilities other than their own, as a basis for improving their own art programs. C. RESEARCH QUESTIONS Questions of concern are: 1. Under what physical conditions is art taught in the secondary schools? 2. What types of equipment are available to secondary art teachers? 3. What types of facilities are being used and/or developed in secondary art programs? 6 4. What specific art courses are offered in secondary art programs in British Columbia? 5. As a result of the 1983 publication of the 1981 Secondary Art Guide, are the art students in British Columbia experiencing and working with improved facilities? 6. What are the yearly budgets for supplies and equipment? D. DEFINITION OF TERMS For the purposes of this study, the following terms are defined and used as indicated here. Facility - as defined by the physical environment. This includes lighting, windows, floors, walls, shelves, cupboards, sinks, carpeting and so on. Also, two broad distinctions should be considered: specially equipped areas which have rather complex specifications, and non-specialized or general art facilities. The extensiveness or elaborateness of a facility depends in part on the nature of its sub-areas, such as a multipurpose room, a 3-D room for ceramics or sculpture, a graphic arts room (which includes a dark room for photography), and a teacher preparation area and storage (B.C. Schools Facilities Building Manual 1985). 7 Equipment - this term is best described by referring to the British Columbia Secondary Art Guide 8-12 (1983). It states in reference to specialized art media that in the use of tools and equipment that the student should demonstrate knowledge of, and the ability to use the equipment and processes of art as one of the learning outcomes. Equipment includes most things that are too large or heavy to be used as a hand tool yet, are generally lightweight and easy to move. Art Teacher - any person teaching courses listed or suggested in the British Columbia Secondary Art Guide, Grades 8-12. Secondary School - defined as a school that enrolls grades 8-12, or any combination of these. E. GENERAL USER REQUIREMENTS The purpose of this section is to discuss those requirements which apply to facilities in an art program. Generally, these specifications include layout, visual, acoustic and atmospheric conditions, use and storage of equipment and materials storage. On a more specific level is the need for certain types of space. These facilities include large and medium group areas, photography dark 8 rooms, ceramics area, teacher preparation area, sculpture rooms, and graphic arts rooms. 1. SIZE It was projected (Study of Educational Facilities 1970) that in a school of 2,000 students, about 700 will register in the art program. This is approximately 35%. For such an enrollment, the facilities required to serve an average of 90 and a maximum of 120 students at any one time would anticipate employment of four full-time art teachers each with his or her own room, Also, a total of 4,300 square feet should be allocated for such a program. A suggestion for the division of space is provided in Table 1. Table 1 - Division of Space for a School of 2,000 Students Art Rooms Sq. Ft. Multipurpose Room 1,750 3-D Room 95Graphics Room 900 Teacher Preparation Area 20Storage 500 TOTAL 4,309 GENERAL FACILITY DESIGN NOTES The ideal location would be on the main or ground floor for reasons of access. Since art rooms are quite often noisy their acoustical separation from general learning areas is recommended. A module or room allowance of 130m2 would be given to the art room area. The preferred ceiling height is 3,000 cm. The walls must include a writing board approximately 3-4m2 with a maximum area of tackboard on remaining unused wall; and a 40-60% light reflection factor. The floor should be resilient, and skid and chemical resistant. Lighting should include a 500-700 lux ambience and some natural light with northern exposure; blackout screens to windows, and possibly adjustable track lighting to provide flexible task illumination (British Columbia Schools Building Manual, 1985 p. 3.4.3.6). A ventilation system should be supplied for extracting air from special work stations: silkscreening areas, kilns, photo developing and printing areas. The sinks should all have sediment traps. The electrical service should include all connections for specially required equipment plus at least 8-10 110 volts outlets. 10 3. GENERAL USER REQUIREMENTS The British Columbia Schools Facilities Building Manual (1985) states that: To carry out an art program in a secondary school, the following facilities are required: a multipurpose room, a 3-D room, graphics room, a teacher preparation room, and storage (p. 3.4.3.2). 4. THE FACILITY AND EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS According to the British Columbia Schools Building Manual (1985), the typical multipurpose art facilities required for various activities such as drawing and painting, weaving and stitchery, fabric dyeing and printing, graphics, printmaking, sculpture, 3D construction and ceramics, may comprise; a main working area, a teacher's workspace, a lecturing space with blackboard and film screen, a storage facility and a darkroom (p. 3.4.3.2). It would appear, that this facility is required to have considerable flexibility to permit lectures, small-group learning, individual study in a variety of areas—in short, the potential to suit a number of situations and functions. 11 Listed as additional equipment, including the approximate dimensions for this multipurpose facility are lockable wall cupboards, deep adjustable shelves, deep paper and card storage shelves, a flammable liquids storage, a heavy duty work bench, an etching press, kilns, pottery wheels, a wedging counter and a dry mount press (p. 3.4.3.2). 5. THE VISUAL ARTS 2 DIMENSIONAL, DRAWING AND PAINTING OR DESIGN FACILITY The required facilities for activities in a visual arts 2 dimensional drawing and painting design, or art foundations class are listed as similar, plus the equipment addition of a light-table, and suitable storage (p. 3.4.3.3). 6. THE VISUAL ARTS 2 DIMENSIONAL, GRAPHICS FACILITY Along with the standard drying racks, etching press, flammables storage and light-tables, the requirements for graphics activities in a graphics facility might include "typical" additional equipment such as a printing room, a word processor, silkscreen stations, an offset press, and its related equipment. 12 7. THE VISUAL ARTS 3 DIMENSIONAL CERAMICS, SCULPTURE AND CRAFTS FACILITY The typical facilities and equipment required for these activities "might" include additional equipment, such as a hot plate, a grinder/sharpener, a bandsaw. Typical major equipment listed for such a facility is as follows: pottery wheels (electric or kick) kilns, wedging counter, work bench, looms and spinning wheels (p. 3.4.3.5). F. DESIGN OF THE STUDY The initial investigation began with an analysis of several surveys previously conducted in the province of British Columbia, the province of Alberta, and the United States (Ford 1964, Cassidy 19 67, MacGregor 1969, Colton 1965, Hodder 1972, John 1974, Woodcock 1979, Gray and MacGregor 1985, Chapman 1982 and N.A.E.A. 1969). The fact that some of these studies originate in Alberta and the United States does not limit their validity and inclusion in this study. This is because art programs in North America do not vary substantially in either philosophical content or methodology (MacGregor 1969, p. 2). The population and setting for this study are the secondary art teachers in the province of British Columbia. These schools enroll grades 8-12 inclusively. The study employed an ex post facto research design utilizing survey research procedures. The survey itself was conducted using a questionnaire. A copy of the questionnaire is included as Appendix 1. The questionnaires were sent throughout the province by mail to personnel involved in teaching art at the secondary level. The primary purpose was to obtain an indication of the types of art programs offered and information concerning facilities and equipment employed. G. LIMITATIONS The limitations of this study are at least two-fold. First, the study attempts to deal only with the physical setting of the art room, not with how the space is actually used. Second, despite an attempt to pilot and test the survey instrument, there may still be some lack of comprehensibility resulting in some faulty or inadequate responses. Only extensive piloting would have prevented this. However, time and budget constraints did not permit such testing. 14 CHAPTER TWO A. Review of the Literature This study of facilities and equipment is in no way intended to exhaust all the possibilities for improving or building an art program. A historical review of the related literature in British Columbia has revealed that this type of art education research has contributed in measuring, understanding, and evaluating existing art programs (John 1974, Hodder 1972, Woodcock 1979, Colton 1965). Unfortunately, for some art teachers, the equipment, tools, and facilities become useful only in developing skill as an end in itself. In this regard, John Michael (1980), suggests that under such conditions; The art curriculum, then becomes a series of skilfully executed exercises ... that the product becomes superficial with no "soul" or expression. It is the wise art teacher who appropriately develops skill of the students as a means to create art ... yet ... skill should always be a secondary consideration and should contribute to the expression so as to bring about a harmonious integration (1980, p. 18). Not only does this attitude do little to enhance the public image of dedicated individuals who devote their lives • > to the arts, it also seriously underestimates the importance of any aesthetic considerations that must come into play while the technical skill is taught and used. Although the B.C. Art guide was designed to assist the classroom art teacher in developing a sound art curriculum, its purpose was not to "offer" a complete, detailed, comprehensive plan. However, for developing a viable and effective art program it clearly identifies a wide variety of methods, ideas, techniques, equipment and facilities to be used. It includes opportunities for students to see and feel visual relationships; to develop imagination and personal imagery and to engage in the practical production of art work (p. 9). Also, the guide encourages the art teacher to teach students how to learn about art. The art student is expected to demonstrate a knowledge of, and use of a variety of mediums and techniques. The student is also encouraged to develop considerations for imagery, the elements and principles of design, historical and contemporary developments, and reasoned criticism. The curriculum is to be conceived as providing developmental activities for 16 students, as well as having an intellectual dimension. This requires that art teachers approach the teaching of art in a more analytical, self-evaluative, and critical fashion in relation to society. First there should be a constant re-evaluation of implementation techniques with more attention to specifics. For example, more attention must be placed on specific effort, specific purpose, specific goals, specific philosophy, and specific equipment and facilities. Perhaps, still in the 20th century, the old adage that a workman is no better than his tools holds true. For example, in the implementation of learning outcomes in ceramics, the British Columbia Secondary Art Guide suggests that; a student should demonstrate knowledge of, and the ability to use, the application of materials, tools and equipment, in processes in art (p. 75). Some of the possibilities in relation to ceramics equipment are suggested. They are: pugmills, dough mixers, kick and electric wheels, ball mills, extruders, electric and gas kilns (p. 76-77). The art curriculum guide continues to suggest that in all mediums such as drawing and painting equipment such as: drawing boards, paper cutters, light tables, easels, 17 airbrushes and spray paints (p. 107-108). For graphics and photography the equipment list is far more extensive and a list of possibilities is provided. They are; etching presses, offset presses, photographic mechanical transfer processors, binding equipment, contact printers, layout cameras, vacuum tables, plate burners, airbrushes, typesetting and word processing equipment, light tables, cameras, lenses, tripods, enlargers, etc. (p. 140-141). The list of tools and equipment in sculpture applications is just as extensive, ranging from arc welders to hand made tools (p. 171). In textiles, equipment such as drum carders, sewing machines, looms, spinning wheels, and dye vats are suggested (p. 194). Review of the Previous Research In the summer of 1958, the University of British Columbia hosted the second British Columbia Art Resource Conference. In attendance were representatives from all regions of the province, and a member representing the newly formed Canada Arts Council. This conference, which was devoted wholly to discussion and evaluation of the status of the arts in British Columbia, identified a variety of needs for each of the areas in the arts. Along with numerous 18 suggestions to improve funding and facilities was the recommendation that there be a thorough investigation of arts facilities detailing specifications, size, costs and materials (Walton 1958, p. 34). Furthermore, it was recommended that this information be made readily available to groups and communities that were planning new arts facilities (p. 27). In order to do this, an extensive statistical survey was undertaken, but not until 1963. In 1963, Alfred Colton, a graduate student at Western Washington State College, began this research as part of his thesis requirements. The study, "A Survey of the Educational resources in the Visual Arts in British Columbia", was a survey of all the related arts agencies. Completed in 1964, it was an important step towards identifying information on various art programs throughout British Columbia and the first survey to be made available to arts planning groups and the British Columbia Art Teachers Association membership (Colton 1965, p. I). For some the long awaited study became the basis from which future developments in art education could proceed (Colton, 1965 p. I). For art teachers, this study was the first that provided accurate information on the status of art facilities and course offerings in the British Columbia school system. However, in relation to the improvement of facilities and equipment in secondary art programs, the direct impact of this study is difficult to assess. In 1971, Geoffrey Hodder, an assistant professor at the University of Victoria, began the first specific inquiry into art in the secondary schools in British Columbia. For Hodder, this project was born out of the frustration he experienced in failing to find answers related to secondary school art facilities in the province. The body of knowledge concerning the art programs offered and the facilities available was, according to Hodder, very light indeed (Hodder 1973, p. 2). In his study, Art Programs and Facilities in Secondary Schools in British Columbia (1972), Hodder stated that great strides had been made in the art area at the secondary level in some schools and some districts, and that those less fortunate schools would hopefully benefit from this generous sharing of knowledge by their colleagues ... allowing them to check, compare and improve their situations (p. 35). While there was evidence to support the fact that improvements were occurring after the Hodder study, the reality reflected in a similar study suggested otherwise. Laurie John (1974), as part of his course work at the University of British Columbia, undertook a survey examining 20 much the same population as Hodder did two years previously. He reported that some of the same issues that were raised and discussed earlier still needed to be adequately addressed. He identified these as communication, conditions and teacher training (p. 16, 49). The first, a lack of or faulty communication between art education theoreticians/researchers and practitioners, prevented new research from having impact on classroom activities. Possibly, however, this lack of or faulty communication is not an important factor, since it is highly unlikely that even good research will make any contribution if it remains essentially within a closed system. No amount of good thinking by itself will address the ubiquitous problem of faulty communication (Sarason 1972, in Fullan, p. 206). It (research) clearly needs a mode for translating and disseminating the newly discovered knowledge (John 1974, p. 10). Secondly, there appeared to be; "no consensus on an adequate philosophy amongst art educators ..." (p. 16). Many art teachers simply chose to duplicate to a great extent only the "actions" accomplished by professional artists, with no thought to art education theory (p. 49). In 1978, The National Task Force on Arts and Education of the Canadian Conference of the Arts launched a national 21 inquiry into the arts and education in Canada. In the spring of 1978, as part of this inquiry, a British Columbia Committee on the Arts and Education was established. This steering committee was responsible for collecting information on arts and education in British Columbia, compiling a report, and making recommendations. One of the recommendations at the secondary educational level fell under provisions of specialized resources. Once again, the survey identified several major concerns of art teachers. One of the concerns stressed was that it is vital in the arts to have specialized supportive help available to the schools and to individual teachers. Another was that there still existed a need to "economically and effectively" (p. xii) upgrade the quality of arts education in the schools. It was recommended that a higher priority be given to provision of adequate facilities within the schools (p. xiii). While it appears that several studies have attempted to survey the conditions of art programs in an effort to improve the status of art education, any quest for sources of information concerning art facilities and equipment being used today at the secondary level indicates how such a compact, accessible data bank of these resources is lacking. absence of a definite pattern to pursue information as to kinds of training and other knowledge concerning the visual arts, and where it may be available has been, no doubt, an unconscious source of defeat or progress and of frustration (Colton 1965, p. 3). Yet, as recently as 1985, Gray and MacGregor determined that ; The nature of research concerning a variety of interlocking relationships such as course content, theory, production, implementation and evaluation with teacher personality characteristics, values, social skills, professional activities and pre-service training, were still relatively unstudied and unmonitored (p. 25). If we hope to improve our facilities and equipment now, it is crucial that information which we possess about our equipment and facilities be shared with other art teachers, if not, art teachers or; art educations themselves, who have masses of such information at their "fingertips" and who do not seem to realize their unique position, will by their very silence promote further isolation of the specialized art fields (Colton 1965, p. 2-3). CHAPTER THREE METHODOLOGIES & PROCEDURES This chapter restates the research questions and the subsidiary questions. The pilot study, selection of the sample population, instrumentation and data collection procedures are described. A. RESEARCH QUESTIONS Questions of concern are: 1. Under what conditions is art taught in the secondary schools? 2. What types of equipment are available to secondary art teachers? 3. What types of facilities are being used and/or developed in secondary art programs? 4. What specific art courses are offered in secondary art programs in British Columbia? 5. As a result of the 1983 publication of the new art guide, are the art students in British Columbia experiencing and working with improved facilities? 6. What are the yearly budgets for supplies and equipment? B. PILOT STUDY Before preparing the final form of the questionnaire, the items were tested in a small group pilot run. This pilot study assisted the researcher in testing the reliability and relevance of the questionnaire in that it allowed for identification of ambiguities, mechanical difficulties and for refining the content and format of the questionnaire. The researcher encouraged the pilot study respondents to comment about the instrument itself, to indicate any difficulties they may have experienced in completing the questionnaire. 1. SAMPLE Wiersma (1986) suggests that "a pilot study group need not be a random sample of prospective respondents, but that members of the group should be familiar with the variables under study and should be in a position to make valid judgements about the items" (p. 192-194). Borg and Gall (1983) state that "for some pilot studies only two or three subjects are sufficient, and it is rarely necessary to include more than twenty" (p. 100). The initial contact with the respondents was made in a small pilot study conducted in November, 1988 within the Burnaby School District #41. Four art teachers were selected from the Burnaby school district. Each of the respondents received an explanation clarifying the purpose of the study and a request to comment on any aspect of the instrument in spaces provided. All the pilot study questionnaires were returned within a three-week period. In addition to the four art teachers contacted, the pilot questionnaire was openly evaluated and discussed in a British Columbia Art Teachers Association executive council meeting during November, 1988. This discussion was useful in allowing the researcher to address concerns that were at first overlooked. 2. INSTRUMENTATION The pilot questionnaire developed by the researcher consisted of 63 questions, divided into three categories. Section one requested background information; section two required information on the art facility; section three sought information on the specific equipment used in the art program. 3. DATA COLLECTION The pilot questionnaire was administered in early November, 1988 to four Burnaby art teachers. All the respondents returned the questionnaire by mid-November, some with anecdotal comments and suggestions. These comments assisted the researcher in improving the comprehensiveness of the survey instrument. C. FINAL STUDY 1. SAMPLE The final questionnaire surveyed two hundred and eighty-nine secondary school art teachers in British Columbia, excluding the pilot study respondents. Although the Department of Education Directory (1987) reports that there are 312 secondary schools in British Columbia, thirty-three have enrollments in grades other than 8-12. These thirty-three schools were not included in the study. Of the two hundred and eighty-nine schools contacted, two hundred and seventy-nine were public schools. The remaining ten were from the Federation of Independent Schools. For the purpose of making the study as comprehensive as possible no distinction between independent or public schools is noted. 27 2. INSTRUMENTATION The final questionnaire remained in much the same format as the pilot study questionnaire. However, three changes were made. The first was made to question 16, Section One. Here a distinction between equipment and supplies budgets was introduced. The second change was made to question 19, in the same section, where extra space was provided for more elaborate answers concerning specially designed art courses. The third change was made in Section Three, to questions 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16 and 21. Each was provided with an extra space for "other" equipment and tools. The eight page questionnaire called for anonymous responses for a total of sixty-three questions divided into three categories. See Appendix 1. Section One dealt with background information and included 21 questions. Demographic information about the respondents was asked for, such as the highest academic preparation, the institution last attended, years of experience teaching art in B.C. schools, the size of the community and school, grades taught, the total number of students enrolled in art classes, the present class size, a list of all the art courses taught in the school, any professional association membership, and what professional journals, if any, were subscribed to. 28 Section Two entitled "Facilities in Use," again consisted of twenty-one questions. Here, information was requested on specific floor surfaces, the number of sinks, electrical outlets, the form of lighting, the availability of storage, 2D and 3D display cases, window space, desks, ventilation systems and blackout facilities. Finally, Section Three asked the respondents to indicate,, by checking spaces which pieces of equipment and tools they had available in their art rooms. 3. DATA COLLECTION In December of 1988, the final questionnaire was mailed to 112 members of the British Columbia Art Teachers' Association, it incorporated the suggested improvements discovered in the pilot study. See Appendix 1. The procedures for administering the questionnaire included a letter of transmittal (see Appendix 2) and a postage-paid, self-addressed return envelope. This was followed up with a further mailing to 177 art teachers who were not current members of the British Columbia Art Teachers' Association. This included another letter of transmittal (see Appendix 3), a self-addressed post-paid envelope. It was directed to the attention of the art teacher. Accompanying this second questionnaire was a letter of endorsement from Barbara Sunday, the British Columbia Art Teachers Association president. A copy of this letter appears as Appendix 4. During the follow up study, teacher strikes disrupted the contact with some of the respondents. Despite the several teacher strikes, the study was continued. Of the first 112 respondents contacted, 66 returned a completed questionnaire, for a response rate of 58%. Of the 177 additional questionnaires mailed, 121 responded with a completed questionnaire for a response rate of 68%. The total response rate for the entire sample population of 289 is 187 (64%). 30 CHAPTER FOUR FINDINGS The results of the study are presented in the order of the research questions they answer, and are, therefore grouped under the headings of Background Information; Facilities, and Equipment; and Tools in Use. The information in this chapter represents the findinqs of the final questionnaire and, as such, does not include the pilot study. SECTION ONE A. DESCRIPTION OF THE SAMPLE BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE ART TEACHER The Department of Education Directory (1987) reports there are 312 British Columbia secondary schools. However, a crosscheck with the addresses listed for these schools revealed that 33 enrolled grades other than 8-12. These 33 public schools were not included in the study. Of the remaining 279 schools, all were contacted by mail. The Federation of Independent Schools Directory (1988-1989) lists 16 secondary schools that enroll grades 8-12. Of the sixteen, a representative sample of 10 were chosen, and mailed a questionnaire. A total of 187 (64%) returned a completed questionnaire. These 187 respondents are representative of both the public school system and the Federation of Independent Schools in British Columbia. Out of the total of 289 high schools, contacted by mail, 37 (12%) were schools that enrolled grades 10-12. One hundred sixty-five (57%) of the schools enroll grades 8-12 and 87 (30%) were schools that enrolled grades 8-10. Of the total 187 respondents who returned completed questionnaires, 30 (16%) were from schools that enrolled grades 10-12. A total of 106 (56%) of the respondents taught in schools that enrolled grades 8-12 returned a completed questionnaire, and 51 (27%) of the respondents who taught in schools that enrolled grades 8-10 returned completed questionnaires. These figures can be seen in Table 2. In addition to collecting data on facilities and equipment in use, Section One of the questionnaire requested demographic information on the art teacher. Since the 187 respondents represent schools with a variety of populations ranging from 135 to 1,850, the data on student enrollment was collapsed to form three categories; category one with an enrollment of 500 or less, category two with an enrollment between 500 and 1,000, and category three with an enrollment of over 1,000 see Table 2. All respondents answered this question. These three distinct categories enabled the researcher to better handle the data, and to present it in a clearer manner. In the schools that enrolled grades 8-12, 39 (20%) had fewer than 500 students, and 39 (20%) enrolled students between 500 and 1,000. Twenty-eight (14%) of the schools enrolling Grades 8-12 had student populations over 1,000. Of the schools that offered grade 8-10, 24 (12%) enroll a student population less than 500, 2 5 (13%) enroll between 500 and 1000, and 2 (1.06%) enroll over 1,000 students. Finally, in schools that enroll only the senior grades, (10-12) 4, (2%) enroll less than 500 students, 15 (8%) enroll between 500-1,000, and 11 (5%) enroll over 1,000 students. Table 2 presents the school enrollments of the sample population. 33 Table 2 - Sample Population of Art Teachers by Grade Level and Population Response of Sample Sample Population Population N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 39 20.85 501-1000 39 20.85 1001-over 28 14.97 Subtotal 106 56.68 Grades 8-10 up to 500 24 12.83 501-1000 25 13.36 1001-over 2 1.06 Subtotal 51 27.27 Grades 10-12 up to 500 4 2.13 501-1000 15 8.02 1001-over 11 5.88 Subtotal 30 16.04 Total 187 100.00 * Figures unavailable from the 1987 Department of Education Directory of Schools, and the Federation of Independent Schools in British Columbia 1. EDUCATION In terms of the highest academic preparation, a total of 105 (56%) of the respondents hold a Bachelor of Education degree with an art major or concentration. This is followed by a total of 41 respondents (21%) who hold graduate degrees at the Master's level, and 35 respondents (18%) who hold a Bachelor of Arts, or Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. There was no indication given that any respondents had begun or completed doctoral studies. Table 3 presents the responses according to the enrollment categories. Table 3 - Highest Academic Preparation of Respondent Group Education of B.A./B.F.A. B.Ed. M.A./M.Ed./ the Sample M.F.A. Population N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 * 8 4.27 25 13.36 5 2.67 501-1000 ** 6 3.20 24 12.83 8 4.27 1001-over 6 3.20 14 7.48 8 4.27 Subtotal 20 10.69 63 33.68 20 10.69 Grades 8-10 up to 500 * 3 1.60 15 8 . 01 5 2 . 67 501-1000 * 7 3.74 15 8.02 2 1. 06 1001-over 1 .53 1 .53 0 0. 00 Subtotal 11 5.88 31 16. 51 7 3.7 Grades 10-12 up to 500 1 .53 2 1. 06 1 . 53 501-1000 * 1 .53 6 3.20 7 3 .74 1001-over * 2 1.06 3 1.60 5 2.67 Subtotal 4 2.13 11 5.88 13 6.95 Total 35 18.71 105 56.61 40 21. 39 * Seven non responses to this question Of the respondents who indicated their highest academic preparation 167 (89%) stated they were educated in Canada. Twelve (6%) indicated they were trained in the United States, while 6 (3%) indicated they were trained in other countries. These findings are presented in Table 4. Table 4 Country of Highest Academic Training/Education of Respondent Group Country of Education and Canada United States Other Training of the Sample Population N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 35 18.71 3 1.60 1 .53 501-1000 36 19.25 1 .53 2 1.06 1001-over 26 13.90 0 0.00 2 1.06 Subtotals 97 51.87 4 2 .13 5 2.67 Grades 8-10 up to 500 23 12.29 0 0.00 1 .53 501-1000 *19 10.16 5 2.67 0 0. 00 1001-over 2 1.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 Subtotals 44 23.52 5 2.67 1 .53 Grades 10-12 up to 500 3 1.60 1 .53 0 0.00 501-1000 14 7.48 1 .53 0 0. 00 1001-over * 9 4.81 1 .53 0 0. 00 Subtotals 26 13.90 3 1.60 0 0.00 Total 167 89.30 12 6.41 6 3.20 *Two non responses to this question. Of the 167 who stated that they were trained in Canada, 92 (49%) indicated that they were trained at the University of British Columbia and 34 (18%) stated they were trained at the University of Victoria. The remaining 33 (17%) make up the respondent group that were trained in other provinces. Table 5 indicates these findings by grade and school population. Table 5 - Institution Last Attended of Respondent Group Institution Last University University Attended of the of : British of Victoria Other Sample Columbia Provinces Population N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 11 5.88 11 5. 88 13 6.95 501-1000 17 9.09 9 4 .81 9 4.81 1001-over 20 10. 69 2 1. 06 4 2 .13 Subtotal 48 25. 66 22 11.76 26 13.90 Grades 8-10 up to 500 13 6.95 5 2.67 4 2.13 501-1000 *14 7.48 3 1.60 2 1.06 1001-over 2 1.06 0 0.00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 26 13 .90 8 4.27 6 3.20 Grades 10-12 up to 500 2 1.06 1 .53 0 0.00 501-1000 11 5.88 1 .53 0 0. 00 1001-over 5 2.67 2 1.06 1 .53 Subtotal 18 9.62 4 2.13 1 . 53 Total 92 49.19 34 18.16 33 17.64 * 28 non responses to this question. 38 2. TEACHING EXPERIENCE It was indicated that a total of 54 (28%) of the respondents had taught art in British Columbia between 11 and 15 years. This was followed by 39 respondents (20%) who stated that they had taught in B.C. between 6 and 10 years, and 31 respondents (16%) answered that they had been teaching art in B.C. between 16 and 20 years. A group of 3 0 respondents (16%) indicated they had taught art up to 5 years in B.C. Table 6 presents these findings. Table 6 - Total Years of Experience Teaching Art in British Columbia Schools Years of Experience of the Sample Population Under N 5 % 6 -N 10 % 11 N - 15 % 16 N - 20 % 20 N - 25 % 25 -N over % Grades 8-12 up to 500 *14 7.48 10 5.34 8 4.27 1 .53 4 2 .13 1 . 53 501-1000 4 2 .13 7 3.74 15 8. 02 6 3.20 5 2 . 67 2 1.06 1001-over _4 2.13 6 3.20 3 1. 60 8 4.27 5 2 . 67 2 1. 06 Subtotal 22 11.76 23 12.29 26 13.90 15 8.02 14 7.48 5 2.67 Grader 8-10 up to 500 5 2.67 6 3.20 7 3.74 3 1.60 3 1. 60 0 0. 00 501-1000 2 1.06 7 3.74 9 4.81 6 3.20 0 0. 00 1 . 53 1001-over 1 .53 0 0.00 1 . 53 0 0.00 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 8 4.27 13 6.95 17 9.09 9 1.60 3 1. 60 1 .53 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0.00 0 0.00 2 1. 06 1 .53 1 .53 0 0.00 501-1000 0 0.00 2 1.06 3 1.60 4 2 .13 4 2.13 3 1. 60 1001-over 0 0.00 1 .53 7 3.74 2 1.06 0 0.00 _l . 53 Subtotal 0 0.00 3 1.60 11 5.88 7 3.74 5 2.67 _4 2.13 Total 30 16.04 39 20.86 54 28.87 31 16.58 22 11.76 10 5.34 * Two non response to this question U) 40 PRESENT SCHOOL TEACHING EXPERIENCE It was indicated by a total of 75 respondents (40%) that they had taught art in their present school less than 5 years. Of these respondents 46 (24%) taught art in schools that enrolled grades 8 to 12. Next, a group of 52 respondents (27%) indicated they had been teaching in their schools between 6 and 10 years. Again, of these respondents 35 (18%) also taught in schools that enrolled grades 8-12. The third largest group, 27, (14%) indicated they had been teaching art in their present school between 11 and 15 years. Once again, the largest number of the 27, 15 (8%) of these respondents can be found in schools that enroll grades 8 - 12. Present school teaching experience in years and percentages is presented in Table 7. Table 7 - Years of Experience Teaching in Present School Years Teaching in Present Under 5 N % 6 -N 10 % 11 N - 15 % 16 N - 20 % 20 -N - 25 % over 25 N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 17 9. .09 18 9. .62 2 1. . 06 1 ,53 1 .53 0 0. . 00 501-1000 17 9. . 09 9 ,4. .81 10 5. , 34 2 1. ,06 0 0. ,00 1 ,53 1001-over 12 6. .41 8 4. .27 3 4. . 60 4 2. , 13 1 ,53 0 0. , 00 Subtotal 46 24. ,59 35 18. .71 15 8. .02 7 3 . ,74 2 1. ,06 1 ,53 Grades 8-10 up to 500 12 6. .41 5 2. .67 4 3 . . 13 3 1. , 60 0 0. .00 0 0. , 00 501-1000 9 4. .81 9 4. .81 2 1. . 06 3 1. ,60 2 2. .67 0 0. , 00 1001-over 1 .53 0 0. .00 1 i .53 0 0. .00 0 0. .00 0 0. , 00 Subtotal 22 11. .76 14 7. .48 7 3. ,74 6 3 . ,20 2 2. .67 0 0. , 00 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0. .00 1 .53 1 ,53 1 ,53 1 i .53 0 0. , 00 501-1000 5 2. .67 2 1. .06 4 2 . , 13 2 1. , 06 1 .53 1 ,53 1001-over 2 1. . 06 0 0. .00 0 0. , 00 6 3. ,20 3 1. .60 0 0. , 00 Subtotal 7 3. .74 3 1, .60 5 2. , 67 9 4. ,81 5 2 , .67 1 , 53 Total 75 40. . 10 52 27. .80 27 14 . ,43 22 11. ,76 9 4. ,81 2 1. , 06 * Zero non responses to this question 3. SCHOOL LOCATION Eighty-nine (47%) of the respondents indicated they taught in schools located in suburban areas with a population of 20,000 or more. They make up the largest group who returned complete questionnaires. This is followed by a total of 52 (27%) respondents who teach in schools located in rural areas with populations under 10,000, and a total of 34 (18%) of the respondents who teach in schools located in suburb areas with populations under 20,000. The largest of the groups of respondents is from the lower mainland, Fraser Valley and Vancouver Island. This is representative of the regions in British Columbia where the largest population concentration exists. The second largest group is from the rural areas. Therefore, it can be concluded both urban and rural school art programs are adequately represented. This data is presented in Table 8. Table 8 - School Location by Population of Community Sample Location of Sample Rural Suburb Rural Suburb Group by Population Under 10,000 Under 10,000 Under 20,000 Under 20,000 N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 33 17.64 1 .53 0 0.00 5 2.67 501-1000 *12 6.41 1 .53 4 2.13 21 11.22 1001-over **_0 0.00 _1 .53 _8 4.27 17 9.09 Subtotal 45 24.06 3 1.60 12 6.41 43 22.99 Grades 8-10 up to 500 * 4 2.13 1 .53 5 2.67 13 6.95 501-1000 1 .53 0 0.00 6 3.20 18 9.62 1001-over _0 0.00 _0 0.00 _0 0.00 _2 1.06 Subtotal 5 2.67 1 .53 11 5.88 33 17.64 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0.00 1 .53 3 1.60 0 0.00 501-1000 2 1.06 2 1.06 4 2.13 7 3.74 1001-over _0 0.00 _1 .53 _4 2.13 _6 3.20 Subtotal 2 1.06 _4 2.13 11 5.88 13 6.95 Total 52 27.81 8 4.28 34 18.18 89 47.59 * Four non responses to this question. 4. TEACHING ASSIGNMENT Of the respondents who answered the question on whether they had a full or part-time art teaching assignment, a total of 134 (71%) stated they were presently teaching art on a full-time basis. A total of 51 (27%) indicated they were teaching art on a part-time basis. Table 9 provides a summary by grade and school enrollment. Table 9 Full-time or Part-time Art Teaching Assignment of Respondent Group Sample Teaching Assignment Full-time Part-time of the Sample Group N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 21 11.22 17 9.09 501-1000 34 18.18 5 2.67 1001-over 3 12.29 5 2.67 Subtotal 78 41.71 27 14.43 Grades 8-10 up to 500 12 5.34 12 5.34 501-1000 20 10.69 5 2.67 1001-over _2 1.06 _0 0.00 Subtotal 34 18.18 17 9.09 Grades 10-12 up to 500 3 1.60 1 .53 501-1000 * 9 4.81 5 2.67 1001-over 10 5.34 _1 .53 Subtotal 22 11.76 _J_ 3.74 Total 134 71.66 51 27.27 * Two non-responses to this question 5. NUMBER OF STUDENTS STUDYING ART In terms of the largest number of students who are being taught art in school, 42 respondents (22%) indicated that in their schools they had between 151 and 200 students studying art. This was followed by 40 respondents (21%) who indicated that between 101 and 150 students were studying art in their school. Tables 10 and 10A provide a summary of art students enrollment figures by grade and school population. Table 10 - Number of Students Studying Art by Grade and School Enrollment Students Studying Art 0-50 51-100 101-150 151-200 in Each School of the Sample Population N % M % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 9 4.81 11 5.88 12 6.41 5 2.67 501-1000 ** i .53 5 2.67 8 4.27 9 4.81 1001-over 0 0.00 _0 0. 00 _1 .53 _5 2.67 Subtotal 10 5.34 16 8.55 21 11.22 19 10.16 Grades 8-10 up to 500 0 0.00 7 3.74 9 4.81 6 3.20 501-1000 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 3.20 7 3.74 1001-over 0 0.00 _0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 Subtotal 0 0.00 7 3.74 15 8.02 13 6.95 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0.00 1 .53 0 0. 00 3 1.60 501-1000 0 0.00 3 1.60 3 1.60 4 2.13 1001-over * 0 0.00 _0 0.00 _1 .53 3 1.60 Subtotal _0 0. 00 _4 2.13 4 2.13 10 5.34 Total 10 5.35 27 14 .44 40 21.39 42 22.46 * Three non-responses to this question Table 10A - Number of Students Studying Art by Grade and School Enrollment Students Studying Art in Each School of the 201-250 251-300 300-over Sample Population N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 1 .53 0 0. 00 1 .53 501-1000 9 4.81 4 2.13 1 .53 1001-over _4 2.13 _i .53 17 9. 09 Subtotal 14 7.48 5 2.67 19 10. 16 Grades 8-10 up to 500 2 1.06 0 0.00 0 0. 00 501-1000 8 4.27 0 .53 3 1. 60 1001-over 2 1.06 _0 0.00 _g 0. 00 Subtotal 12 4.41 1 .53 3 1. 60 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0. 00 501-1000 3 1.60 0 0.00 2 1. 06 1001-over _1 .53 _1 .53 4 2.13 Subtotal _4 2.13 _! .53 6 3.20 Total 30 16.04 7 3.74 28 14 . 97 48 6. CLASS SIZE Of the respondents from schools that enroll grades 8 -12 who indicated the class sizes per grade, 181 (96%) indicated that their largest class size was between 2 6 and 35. A total of 162 (86%) stated that their largest class size was between 16 and 25, (see Tables 11 and 11A). In the Junior Secondary Schools, seventy-one (37%) of the class sizes, range between 26-35 students, as noted in Table 12. At the senior level 40 respondents (21%) noted that their class sizes were rather small, ranging between 16 and 25 students. This information is presented by class size, grade and student population in Table 13. Table 11 Class Size For Schools With Grades 8-12 Class Size for the Sample of the Under 15 16 - 25 26 - 35 35 - over Population, N % N % N % N % Schools 8-12 Grade 8 up to 500 7 3. , 74 15 8. , 02 13 6. ,95 0 0. , 00 501-1000 1 4 , 53 9 4. ,81 22 11. ,76 1 ,53 1001-over 0 0. , 00 _7 3. ,74 13 6. ,95 0 0. . 00 Subtotal 8 4 . ,27 31 16. ,57 47 25. , 13 1 , 53 Grade 9 up to 500 11 5. ,88 18 9. , 62 5 2. , 67 1 .53 501-1000 4 2. , 13 7 3. ,74 24 12 . .83 2 1, . 06 1001-over _1 ,53 _3 1. , 60 12 9. ,09 _2 1. . 06 Subtotal 16 8, , 55 28 14. .97 46 24. .59 5 2 , .67 Grade 10 up to 500 13 6. .95 15 8, . 02 6 3. ,20 1 . 53 501-1000 5 2. , 67 14 7. .48 15 8. ,02 2 1, . 06 1001-over _2 1. .06 _7 3. ,74 13 6. ,95 1 . 53 Subtotal 20 10. . 69 36 19. .25 34 18, .18 4 2 , . 13 I Table 11A - Class Size for Schools with Grades 8-12 Class Size for the Sample of the Under 15 16 - 25 26 - 35 35 - over Population Schools Schools 8-12 N % N % N % N % Grade 11 up to 500 18 9. 62 16 8.55 1 .53 0 0.00 501-1000 7 3.74 10 5.34 16 8.55 3 1. 60 1001-over 2 1. 06 11 5.88 13 6.95 1 .53 Subtotal 27 14.43 37 19.78 30 16.04 4 2 .13 Grade 12 up to 500 21 11. 22 8 4.27 1 . 53 0 0.00 501-1000 10 5. 34 10 5.34 11 5.88 1 .53 1001-over 3 1. 60 12 6.41 12 6.41 _0 0.00 Subtotal 34 18. 18 30 16.04 24 12.83 _! .53 Total 105 56. 14 162 16.04 181 96.79 15 8.02 * Non responses to this question are difficult to determine simply because of the nature of the art teachers assignment. 51 Table 12 Class Size For Schools With Grades 8-10 Class Size for the Sample of the Population Under 15 16-25 26-35 35-over Schools 8-10 N % N % N % N % Grade 8 up to 500 0 0. 00 10 5. 34 12 6 .41 1 .53 501-1000 0 0. 00 6 3. 20 16 8. 550 2 1. 06 1001-over 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 2 1 .06 0 0. 00 Subtotal 0 0. 00 16 8 . 55 30 16 . 04 3 1.60 Grade 9 up to 500 1 53 14 7. 48 6 3 .20 1 .53 501-1000 0 0. 00 3 1. 60 18 9 . 62 3 1. 60 1001-over 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 1 .53 0 0. 00 Subtotal 1 • 53 17 9. 09 25 13 .36 4 2.13 Grade 10 up to 500 7 3. 74 7 3. 74 6 3 .20 1 .53 501-1000 1 53 10 5. 34 10 5 .34 2 1. 06 1001-over 0 0. 00 1 • 53 0 0 .00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 8 4 . 27 18 9. 62 16 8 .55 3 1. 60 Total 9 4 . 81 51 27. 27 71 37 .96 10 5.34 * Non responses to this question are difficult to determine simply because of the nature of the art teachers assignment. 52 Table 13 Class Size For Schools With Grades 10 - 12 Class Size for Sample of the Population Schools 10-12 Under N 15 % 16 N - 25 % 26 N - 35 % 35 N - over % Grade 10 up to 500 0 0 . 00 2 1.06 1 .53 0 0. 00 501-1000 1 .53 5 2.67 3 1.60 0 0. 00 1001-over 0 0 . 00 3 1.60 0 0.00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 1 .53 10 5.34 4 2.13 0 0. 00 Grade 11 up to 500 0 0 .00 2 1.06 1 .53 0 0. 00 501-1000 0 0 . 00 6 3.20 7 3.74 0 0. 00 1001-over 0 0 . 00 5 2.67 4 2 .13 0 0. 00 Subtotal 0 0 . 00 13 6.95 11 5.88 0 0.00 Grade 12 up to 500 0 0 .00 2 1.06 1 .53 0 0.00 501-1000 3 1 . 60 9 4.81 2 1.06 0 0. 00 1001-over 1 .53 6 3.20 3 1.60 0 0. 00 Subtotal 4 2 . 13 17 9.09 6 3.20 0 0. 00 Total 5 2 .67 40 21.39 21 11. 22 0 0. 00 * Non responses to this question are difficult to determine simply because of the nature of the art teachers assignment. 7. ART ROOMS Of the total number of respondents, 113 (60%) indicated there was only one room classified as an art room in their school. Sixty-three (33%) of the schools in this category were in schools that enroll grades 8-12. Of the total sample group, forty-nine (26%) noted that they had two rooms in their school that were being used for art classes. The schools with the majority of art rooms appear to be the schools that enroll grades 8-12, with a population of 1,000 or more. The number of art rooms according to grade and school population can be found in Table 14. It was indicated by 70 (37%) of the sample population that the room in which they were teaching art was not specifically designed and built for art room use. Table 15 presents this data. Table 14 - Number of Rooms Classified as Art Rooms Number of 1 2 3 4 5 Art Rooms in the School N % N % N%N% N% Grades 8-12 up to 500 **31 16, .57 3 1 .60 2 1. ,06 1 .53 0 0. ,00 501-1000 28 14. .97 9 4 .81 2 1. . 06 1 . 53 0 0. , 00 1001-over _4 2. .13 16 8 .55 2 1. . 06 4 2. . 13 2 1. ,06 Subtotal 63 33 . .68 28 14 .97 6 3 . .20 6 3 . .20 2 1. ,06 Grades 8-10 up to 500 20 10. , 69 4 2. 13 0 0. , 00 0 0. . 00 0 0. ,00 501-1000 *18 9. . 62 6 3. 20 0 0. . 00 0 0, . 00 0 0. , 00 1001-over _0 0, .00 2 1. 06 0 0. . 00 0 0. . 00 0 0. , 00 Subtotal 38 20. , 32 12 6 .41 0 0. , 00 0 0. . 00 0 0. ,00 Grades 10-12 up to 500 4 2. ,13 0 0 .00 0 0. , 00 0 0. . 00 0 0. , 00 501-1000 6 3, .20 7 3 .74 2 1. ,06 0 0, .00 0 0, .00 1001-over 2 1, .06 2 1 .06 3 1. . 60 4 2 . . 13 0 0. .00 Subtotals 12 6. .41 9 4 .81 5 2 . , 67 4 2 . , 13 0 0. , 00 Total 113 60, .43 49 26 .20 11 5. .88 10 5. . 35 2 1. , 06 *Two non responses to this question Table 15 - Artrooms Designed and Built as Artrooms Number of Zero One Two Three Four Five Rooms Designed As Art Rooms N % N % N % N % N % N 0 1 3 Grades 8-12 up to 500 22 11. 76 14 7 . .48 1 .53 1 . 53 0 0. .00 0 0. , 00 501-1000 14 7. 48 17 9. , 09 6 3 . .20 1 , 53 0 0. , 00 0 0. , 00 1001-over 8 4. 27 _3 1. . 60 9 4. .81 2 1. , 06 4 2. . 13 1 , 53 Subtotals 44 23 . 52 34 18. , 18 16 8. .55 4 2 . . 13 4 2 . , 13 1 , 53 Grades 8-10 up to 500 8 4. 27 13 6. .95 3 1. . 60 0 0. , 00 0 0. , 00 0 0. , 00 501-1000 7 3. 74 13 6. .95 4 2 , . 13 0 0. . 00 0 0. .00 0 0. . 00 1001-over 0 0. 00 _2 1. .06 0 0, .00 0 0. .00 0 0. .00 0 0. . 00 Subtotal 15 8. 02 28 14, .97 7 3 , .74 0 0. . 00 0 0. .00 0 0, . 00 Grades 10-12 up to 500 1 • 53 3 1, .60 0 0. .00 0 0. .00 0 0. , 00 0 0, . 00 501-1000 3 1. 60 5 2. .67 5 2. .67 2 2. , 67 0 0. ,00 0 0. . 00 1001-over _7 3. 74 2 1. . 06 0 0, .00 2 2. .67 0 0. .00 0 0, . 00 Subtotals 11 5. 88 10 5. .34 5 2 . .67 4 2. .13 0 0. ,00 0 0. .00 Total 70 37. 43 72 38. .50 28 14, .97 8 4. .27 4 2. .13 1 .53 *1 non response to this question 8. USE OF THE ART ROOM Thirty-five respondents (18%) indicated that they shared art rooms with another art teacher; 148 (79%) stated they were the only art teacher in their art room. A total of 39 (20%) indicated that teachers from other subject areas used their room. Table 16 presents this information. Table 16 - Art Teachers Who Share Rooms with Other Teachers Art Rooms With Art Teachers With Other Teachers that are Yes No Yes No Shared N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 5 2 . 67 34 18 . 18 15 8 .02 24 12. 83 501-1000 *10 5 . 34 28 14 .97 6 3 .20 32 17. 11 1001-over 6 3 .20 19 10 .16 5 2 .67 23 12 . 29 Subtotal 21 11 .22 81 43 .31 26 13 .90 79 42 . 24 Grades 8-10 up to 500 1 .53 23 12 .29 5 2 .67 19 10. 16 501-1000 6 3 .20 19 10 .16 2 1 . 06 23 12. 29 1001-over * 2 1 .06 0 0 .00 1 .53 0 0. 00 Subtotal 9 4 .81 42 22 .45 8 4 .27 42 22. 45 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0 .00 4 2 . 13 1 .53 3 1. 60 501-1000 2 1 .06 13 6 .95 3 1 . 60 12 6. 41 1001-over 3 1 . 60 8 4 .27 1 .53 9 4. 81 Subtotal 5 2 .67 25 13 .36 5 2 .67 24 12. 83 Total 35 18 .71 148 79 . 14 39 20 .85 145 77. 54 *Seven non responses to these question 9. SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT BUDGETS A total of 127 (67%) of the respondents indicated that their yearly budget for supplies was less than $2,500.00 and 59 (31%) indicated that their yearly equipment budget was less than $2,500.00. Unfortunately, the response to this question was poor, possibly because in many schools there exists no equipment budget, but rather a replacement budget Table 17 Supplies Budget Allocation by Grades and School Population Supplies Budget -1000 N % N % Sample 1001-2500 N % 2501 5000 N % + 5000 Grades 8-12 up to 500 *22 11. 76 13 6.95 3 1. 60 0 0. 00 501-1000 *19 10. 16 13 6.95 2 1. 06 0 0. 00 1001-over 1 • 53 6 3.20 9 4.81 7 3 . 74 Subtotal 42 22. 45 32 17.11 14 7.48 7 3 . 74 Grades 8-10 up to 500 * 7 3. 74 13 6.95 3 1.60 0 0. 00 501-1000 * 4 2. 13 14 7.48 6 3.20 0 0. 00 1001-over * 0 0. 00 1 .53 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 11 5. 88 28 14.97 9 4.81 0 0. 00 Grades 10-12 up to 500 * 0 0. 00 4 2.13 0 0.00 0 0. 00 501-1000 3 1. 60 7 3.74 3 1.60 2 1. 06 1001-over * 0 0. 00 0 0.00 5 2.67 5 2 . 67 Subtotal 3 1. 60 11 5.88 8 4.27 7 3 . 74 Total 56 29. 94 71 37.97 31 16.58 14 7. 49 * 15 non responses to this question 58 or an occasional injection of money. In any event it appears that 74 (39%) respondents may not know either their supplies budget, or what is available in dollars for the purchase of new equipment. The information on supplies allocation is presented in Table 17, and information on budget allocation in Table 18. Table 18 Equipment Budget Allocation by Grades and School Population Sample Equipment 1001- 2501-Budget -1000 N % N 2500 % N 5000 % + 5000 N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 *17 9.09 5 2 . 67 0 0. 00 0 0.00 501-1000 * 4 2 .13 1 . 53 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 1001-over * 4 2.13 2 1.06 1 .53 0 0.00 Subtotal 25 13.36 8 4.27 1 . 53 0 0.00 Grades 8-10 up to 500 * 5 2 . 67 2 1. 06 0 0.00 0 0. 00 501-1000 * 5 2.67 4 2.13 0 0. 00 0 0.00 1001-over *_1 .53 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 Subtotal 11 5.88 6 3 . 20 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 Grades 10-12 up to 500 * 2 1. 06 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0. 00 501-1000 * 3 1. 60 3 1. 60 0 0.00 0 0. 00 1001-over * 0 0.00 1 .53 1 .53 4 2.13 Subtotal 5 2.67 4 2 .13 1 . 53 4 2 .13 Total 41 21.92 18 9.62 2 1. 06 4 2 .13 * 122 non responses to this question 10. ART FEES In terms of art fees charged to students, 86 (45%) of the schools that enroll grade eights do not charge art fees. This data by grade level reveals that 32 (17%) schools that enroll grade nine students, 3 8 (20%) of the schools that enroll grade 10, 38 (20%) do not charge individual art fees. In schools that enroll grade 11, 22 (13%) do not charge a fee, and in schools that enroll grade twelve, 2 3 (12%) do not charge art fees. However, of those that did charge art fees the bulk of the fee structure for grades 8, 9 and 10 seemed to be between the 0 to $5 range, and between $6 to $10 range in grades 11 and 12. Tables 19, 19a, 20, and 21 present the exact fee charged in each grade and school size per student. Table 19 - Art Fees Charged Per Student in Schools that Enroll Grades 8-12 Art Fees Per Zero -5 6-10 11-20 20 Over Student N % N i N % N 3 i N % Grade 8 up to 500 25 13. . 36 9 4 , ,81 4 2 . 13 0 0. .00 0 0. , 00 501-1000 29 15. .50 5 2, . 67 3 1 . 60 0 0. , 00 0 0. , 00 1001-over 1 .53 ii 7, .48 _5 2 . 67 0 0. , 00 0 0. , 00 Subtotal 55 29. .41 28 14 , .97 12 64 . 17 0 0. ,00 0 0. , 00 Grade 9 up to 500 15 8. ,02 9 4. ,81 13 6. 95 2 1. ,06 0 0. ,00 501-1000 9 4. ,81 10 5. . 34 14 7. 48 3 1. , 60 0 0. , 00 1001-over _1 .53 _9 4, .81 10 5. 34 2 1, ,06 0 0. . 00 Subtotal 25 13. . 36 18 9, . 62 37 19. 78 7 3. .74 0 0. . 00 Grade 10 up to 500 14 7. .48 8 4, .27 15 8 . 02 2 1. ,06 0 0. . 00 501-1000 12 6. .41 9 ' 4. .81 13 6 .95 3 1. ,60 0 0. ,00 1001-over _! • .53 _6 3, .20 14 7 .48 1 .53 0 0. .00 Subtotal 27 14, .43 23 12. .29 42 22 .45 6 3 . ,20 0 0. ,00 Non responses to this question are difficult to accurately assess simply because of the nature of the question. Table 19a Art Fees Charged Per Student in Schools That Enroll Grades 8-12 Art Fees per Zero -5 6 -10 11 -20 20 Over Student N % N % N % N % N % Grade 11 up to 500 10 5. 34 5 2.67 12 6.41 12 6.41 0 0.00 501-1000 8 4. 27 7 3.74 15 8.02 5 2.67 2 1. 06 1001-over _2 1. 06 _5 2.67 8 4.27 9 4.81 0 0.00 Subtotal 20 10. 69 17 9.09 35 18.71 26 13 .90 2 1. 06 Grade 12 up to 500 11 5. 88 5 2.67 12 6.41 11 5.88 0 0.00 501-1000 8 4. 27 7 3.74 14 7.48 6 3.20 2 1. 06 1001-over _2 1. 06 _6 3.20 8 4.27 10 5.34 0 0. 00 Subtotal 21 11. 22 18 9.62 34 18.18 27 14.43 2 1.06 Total 148 79. 14 104 55.61 160 85.56 66 35.29 4 2.13 * non responses to this question are difficult to assess simply because of the nature of the question. 62 Table 20 Art Fees Charged Per Student in Schools that Enroll Grades 8-10 Art Fees Per Zero -5 6-10 11-20 Student N % N % N % N % Grades 8 up to 500 13 6.95 10 5. 34 1 . 53 0 0.00 501-1000 18 9.62 7 3. 74 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0. 00 2 1.06 0 0. 00 Subtotal 31 16.57 17 9. 09 3 1. 60 0 0. 00 Grade 9 up to 500 3 1.60 9 4. 81 12 6.41 0 0. 00 501-1000 3 1.60 10 5. 34 11 5.88 1 . 53 1001-over 1 .53 0 0. 00 1 .53 0 0.00 Subtotal 7 3.74 19 10. 16 24 12.83 1 .53 Grades 10 up to 500 3 1. 60 9 4. 81 11 5.88 1 . 53 501-1000 4 2.13 10 5. 34 10 5.34 1 . 53 1001-over 1 .53 0 0. 00 1 .53 0 0. 00 Subtotal 8 4.27 19 10. 16 22 11.76 2 1.06 Total 46 24.59 55 29. 41 49 26.20 3 1.60 * non responses to this question are difficult to assess simply because of the nature of the question. Table 21 - Art Fees Charged Per Student in Schools that Enroll Grades 10-12 Sample of the Population Art Fees per Zero -5 6-10 11-•20 20+ Student N % N % N % N % N % Grade 10 up to 500 2 1.06 1 .53 1 .53 1 .53 0 0.00 501-1000 0 0. 00 3 1.60 6 3.20 0 0. 00 1 .53 1001-over 1 .53 4 2.13 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 Subtotal 3 1.60 8 4.27 7 3.74 1 .53 1 .53 Grade 11 up to 500 1 .53 1 .53 1 . 53 1 . 53 0 0.00 501-1000 0 0. 00 6 3.20 4 2 . 13 3 1. 60 1 . 53 1001-over 1 .53 6 3.20 2 1. 06 0 0. 00 0 0.00 Subtotal 2 1.06 13 6.45 7 3.74 4 2 . 13 1 .53 Grade 12 up to 500 1 .53 1 .53 1 .53 1 .53 0 0.00 501-1000 0 0.00 6 3.20 4 2.13 4 2 .13 1 .53 1001-over 1 .53 5 2.67 3 1.60 0 0. 00 0 0.00 Subtotal 2 1.06 12 6.41 8 4.27 5 2.67 1 .53 Total 7 3.74 33 17.67 22 11.76 10 53.47 3 1.60 * non responses to this question are difficult to assess simply because of the nature of the question. 11. ART COURSES OFFERED IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL Of those respondents in school grades 8-12 and 8-10 who indicated the art courses that were being taught in their school, 144 (77%) stated that they offered Art Foundations at the grade eight level. This was followed by 145 (77%) respondents who indicated that their schools offered Art Foundations in grade 9, and 161 (86%) who indicated that Art Foundations was offered in grade 10. In the schools that offered the senior grades 11 and 12 119 (63%) offered Art Foundations 11 and 115 (61%) offered Art Foundations 12. Only sixty-eight (36%) of those respondents who taught senior grades indicated that they offered an Art Careers 12 course. Table 22 provides information on the art program and the individual art foundations courses offered by grade and school population. The Visual Arts 2 Dimensional courses appear to be taught in all grades by at least 31% of the sample population, (see Table 23). The Visual Arts 3 Dimensional courses are taught by at least 20% of the sample population, summarized in Table 24. There did not appear to be that many specialty courses offered indicated by the sample population, as Table 25. Table 22 - Art Foundations Courses Offered in British Columbia Secondary Schools Sample Art Foundations Art Foundations Art Careers 8-12 N 8 % N 9 % N 10 % N 11 % N 12 % Grades 8-12 up to 500 36 19.25 36 19.25 38 20. 32 33 17.64 31 16.57 501-1000 34 18.18 35 18.71 33 17. 64 33 17.64 30 16.04 1001-over 27 14.43 27 14.43 26 13 . 90 27 14.43 28 14.97 Subtotal 97 51.87 98 52.40 97 51. 87 93 49.73 89 47.59 Grades 8-10 up to 500 23 12.29 22 11.76 22 11. 76 0 0.00 0 0.00 501-1000 25 13.36 22 11.76 20 10. 69 0 0.00 0 0. 00 1001-over 2 1.06 2 1.06 2 1. 06 0 0.00 0 0.00 Subtotal 50 26.73 46 24.59 44 23. 52 0 0.00 0 0.00 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0.00 0 0.00 3 1. 60 3 1.60 3 1.60 501-1000 0 0.00 1 .53 11 5. 88 13 6.95 13 6.95 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0.00 _6 3 . 20 10 5.34 10 5.34 Subtotal 0 0.00 1 .53 20 10. 69 26 13.90 26 13.90 Total 147 78.60 145 77.54 161 86. 09 119 63 .63 115 61.49 * non responses to this question are difficult to assess simply because of the nature of the question. U1 66 Table 23 Visuals Arts 2 Dimensional Courses Offered in Secondary Schools Sample VA2D Art Courses Offered VA2D 9 N % N VA2D 10 % N VA2D 11 % N VA2D 12 % Grades 8-12 up to 500 10 5.34 10 5. 34 15 8.02 14 7.48 501-1000 9 4.81 7 3 .74 29 15.50 27 14.43 1001-over 11 5.88 11 5.88 25 13 . 36 22 11.76 Subtotal 30 16.04 28 14.97 69 36.89 63 33 . 68 Grades 8-10 up to 500 13 6.95 13 6.95 0 0.00 0 0. 00 501-1000 16 8.55 13 6.95 0 0.00 0 0. 00 1001-over 1 . 53 2 1. 06 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 30 16.04 28 14.97 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0.00 2 1.06 4 2.13 4 2. 13 501-1000 0 0.00 0 0.00 14 7.48 13 6.95 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0.00 11 5.88 11 5.88 Subtotal 0 0.00 2 1.06 29 15.50 28 14.97 Total 60 32.08 58 31.01 98 52.40 91 48 . 66 * non responses to this question are difficult to assess, due to the fact that the art courses offered vary from year to year and from school to school. 67 Table 24 Visual Arts 3 Dimensional Courses Offered in Secondary Schools VA3D Art VA3D VA3D VA3D VA3D Courses Offered N 9 % N 10 % N 11 % N 12 % Grades 8-12 up to 500 4 2 . 13 4 2 . 13 11 5 .88 12 6.41 501-1000 6 3 .20 4 2 . 13 17 9 .09 17 9.09 1001-over 10 5 . 34 ii 5 .88 23 12 .29 21 11.22 Subtotal 20 10 . 69 19 10 . 16 51 27 .27 50 26.73 Grades 8-10 up to 500 11 5 .88 11 5 .88 0 0 . 00 0 0.00 501-1000 11 5 . 88 9 4 .81 0 0 .00 0 0.00 1001-over 0 0 . 00 0 0 . 00 0 0 . 00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 21 11 .22 18 9 .62 0 0 700 0 0.00 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0 . 00 1 .53 1 . 53 1 .53 501-1000 0 0 . 00 1 .53 12 6 .41 11 5.88 1001-over 0 0 . 00 0 0 . 00 9 4 .81 10 5.34 Subtotal 0 0 . 00 2 1 .06 22 11 .76 22 11.76 Total 41 21 .92 39 20 .85 73 39 .03 72 38.50 * non responses to this question are difficult to assess, due to the fact that the art courses offered vary from year to year and from school to school. Table 25 - Special or Locally Developed Courses Offered in British Columbia Secondary Schools  Special Sample of Specialty or Locally Developed Art Stage Craft Film Studies Media Res. Photo Jr. Graphics Other Courses N % N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 0 0.00 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 1 .53 1 .53 1 .53 501-1000 0 0.00 0 0. 00 0 0.00 3 1. 60 2 1. 06 5 2.67 1001-over 1 .53 1 . 53 0 0. 00 4 2 . 13 4 2. 13 1 .53 Subtotal 1 .53 1 .53 0 0. 00 8 4.27 7 3.74 7 3.74 Grades 8-10 up to 500 0 0.00 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 2 1. 06 2 1. 06 3 1. 60 501-1000 0 0.00 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 2 1. 06 1 .53 0 0. 00 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0. 00 0 0.00 0 0.00 2 1. 06 0 0. 00 Subtotal 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0. 00 4 2.13 5 2.67 3 1. 60 Grades 10-12 i up to 500 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 .53 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 501-1000 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0. 00 1 .53 2 1. 06 0 0. 00 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0.00 4 2.13 0 0.00 1 .53 6 3.20 Subtotal 0 0.00 0 0.00 5 2. 67 1 .53 3 1. 60 6 3.20 Total 1 .53 1 .53 5 2.67 13 6.95 15 8.02 16 8.55 * non responses to this question are difficult to assess, due to the fact that art courses offered vary from school to school. co 12. PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP In answer to the question concerning membership in professional associations related to art education, a total of 115 (61%) indicated that they were members in good standing of the provincial Art Teachers Association. Thirteen (6%) indicated they were members of the Canadian Society for Education through Art and 12 (6%) indicated that they were members of the National Art Education Association. Sixty-seven (35%) indicated they did not belong to any professional association at all. Table 26 presents this data. In a related Question #21, the data also revealed that the professional journal subscribed to by the majority of respondents, 56 (29%) was School Arts. Tables 27 and 27a profile this information. Table 2 6 - Membership in Professional Associations Professional Associations BCATA CSEA INSEA NAEA ATA None of Sample Population N % N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 24 12.83 2 1.06 0 0.00 3 1.60 1 .53 14 7.48 501-1000 27 14.43 2 1.06 0 0.00 2 1.06 0 0. 00 11 5.88 1001-over 16 8.55 5 2.67 2 1.06 4 2.13 1 . 53 10 5.34 Subtotal 67 35.82 9 4 .81 2 1.06 9 4.81 2 1. 06 35 18.71 Grades 8-10 up to 500 15 8.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 .53 0 0. 00 9 4.81 501-1000 14 7.48 1 . 53 1 .53 1 .53 0 0. 00 10 5.34 1001-over _2 1. 06 1 .53 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 31 16.57 2 1.06 1 .53 2 1.06 0 0. 00 19 10.16 Grades 10-12 up to 500 3 1. 60 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 1 .53 501-1000 8 4.27 2 1.06 1 .53 1 .53 0 0. 00 7 3.74 1001-over _6 3.20 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0. 00 5 2.67 Subtotal 17 9.09 2 1.06 1 .53 1 .53 0 0. 00 13 6.95 Total 115 61. 50 13 6.95 4 2.14 12 6.42 2 1.07 67 35.83 * non responses to this question are difficult to assess, as a respondent may be a member of more than one professional association Table 27 - Journal Subscription of Respondents  Journal Art School Arts and Studies in Canadian Review Subscription Education Arts Activities Art Education of Art Education of Sample N%N%N%N% N% Group  Grades 8-12 up to 500 8 4.27 11 5.88 7 3.74 0 0. 00 1 .53 501-1000 4 2 .13 11 5.88 5 2. 67 1 . 53 1 .53 1001-over _7 3.74 ii 5.88 _6 3.20 3 1. 60 3 1.60 Subtotal 19 10. 16 33 17.64 18 9.62 4 2 .13 5 2. 13 Grades 8-10 up to 500 3 1.60 6 3.20 7 3 . 74 1 . 53 0 0. 00 501-1000 7 3.74 9 4.81 1 .53 2 1. 06 0 0. 00 1001-over _0 0. 00 _0 0.00 1 .53 0 0. 00 1 .53 Subtotal 10 5.34 15 8.02 9 4.81 3 1. 60 1 .53 Grades 10-12 up to 500 1 .53 1 .53 0 0. 00 0 0.00 0 0. 00 501-1000 4 2.13 6 3.20 4 2.13 0 0. 00 2 1.06 1001-over 1 3.20 1 .53 0 0.00 2 1. 06 0 0.00 Subtotal 6 3.20 8 4.27 4 2.13 2 1.06 2 1. 06 Total 35 18.72 56 29.95 31 16.58 9 4.81 8 4.28 * non responses to this question are difficult to determine as some respondents subscribe to more than one journal. Table 27a - Journal Subscription Journals B.C. Art Teachers Association Journal N % Multicultural and CrossCultural Research in Art Education N % Others N % None N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 10 5.34 0 0.00 10 5.34 8 4.27 501-1000 20 10. 69 1 .53 9 4.81 9 4.81 1001-over ii 7.48 _0 0.00 4 2 .13 8 4.27 Subtotal 44 23.52 1 .53 23 12.29 25 13.36 Grades 8-10 up to 500 7 3.74 1 .53 1 .53 8 4.27 501-1000 6 3.20 0 0.00 11 5.88 6 3.20 1001-over 0 0.00 _0 0.00 0 0.00 1 .53 Subtotal 13 6.95 1 .53 12 6.41 15 8.02 Grades 10-12 up to 500 1 .53 0 0. 00 1 .53 2 1.06 501-1000 7 3.74 0 0. 00 4 2.13 2 1.06 1001-over 1 .53 0 0.00 0 0.00 4 2.13 Subtotal 9 4.81 0 0.00 5 2.67 8 4.27 Total 66 35.29 2 1.06 40 21.39 48 25. 66 * non responses to this question are difficult to determine as some respondents subscribe to more than one journal. 73 The sample population is representative of the total population of the art teachers in British Columbia. The majority of the responses 89, (47%) represent schools located in urban areas of 20,000 people or more. These communities located in the Lower Mainland, Fraser Valley and Vancouver Island are the areas in British Columbia of the largest concentration of population, see Table 2. The majority of the schools represented 54 (28%) in this study, all have student population between 501 and 1,000, see Table 2. Demographic information provided by the respondents (Art Teachers) reveal that a majority 105 (56%) hold a Bachelor of Education Degree with an art major or concentration, see Table 3. A total of 123 (65%) respondents have been teaching art in B.C. under fifteen years, while 63 (33%) have taught over sixteen years, see Table 6. SECTION TWO B. FACILITIES IN USE School facilities are to be designed for the purpose of implementing a program in art education. The facilities can either restrict or encourage activities necessary for the development of a complete program of art education (Schultz 1969, p. 8). Section Two of the questionnaire requested information about the art facility itself including the physical environment, lighting, windows, floor, walls, shelves and sinks. In a comparison of the data concerning items such as location,lighting, material storage, display space and especially ventilation, a need for greater concern on the part of the art teacher, school boards, and the B.C. Ministry of Education is indicated. Perhaps neither the province nor the school boards have realized that changes taking place in art education curriculum today may require far greater space and more equipment than that which is provided. 1. THE ART ROOM FLOOR SURFACE Most respondents 146 (78%) indicated that their art room floor was covered with linoleum. Fifteen (8%) of the respondents group indicated that they had concrete floors. Although 2 5 respondents indicated they had carpet on the floor of their art rooms, almost all 25 indicated that it was only used in a very small portion of the room. The larger portion of the room was either concrete or linoleum finished. The data on floor surface is presented in Table 28. Table 28 - Art Room Floor Surface Material *Floor Surface Wood Concrete Tile Carpet Linoleum Material of the Respondent Groun N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 0 0.00 1 . 53 5 2. 67 1 .53 31 16.48 501-1000 0 0.00 5 2.67 4 2. 13 1 . 53 33 17.55 1001-over 0 0. 00 3 1. 60 2 1. 06 1 0. 00 23 12 .23 Subtotal 0 0. 00 9 4.81 11 5. 88 2 1.06 87 46.27 Grades 8-10 up to 500 0 0. 00 1 .53 5 2.67 0 0. 00 18 9. 62 501-1000 0 0.00 0 0. 00 2 1. 06 0 0.00 23 12.29 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0. 00 2 1.06 0 0.00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 0 0.00 1 .53 9 4.78 0 0.00 41 21.92 Grades 10-12 1 up to 500 0 0.00 0 0. 00 2 1. 06 0 0.00 2 1.06 501-1000 1 .53 3 1. 60 2 1. 06 0 0.00 9 4.78 1001-over 0 0.00 _2 1. 06 1 .53 1 .53 _7 3.74 Subtotal 1 .53 5 2.67 5 2.67 1 .53 18 9.62 Total 1 .53 15 8. 02 25 13.36 3 1.60 146 78. 07 * responses to this question are difficult to determine since a single room can have more than one type of floor surface. CTN 77 2. ART ROOM LOCATION A total of 184 (98%) participants responded to the question concerning the floor on which the art room is located. One hundred and thirty-two (70%) indicated their art room was located on the first floor. Data on location of the art room within the school can be found in Table 29. Table 29 - Art Room Location in the School Sample Group Basement 1st Floor 2nd Floor 3rd Floor Art Room Location N % N % N % M % Grades 8-12 up to 500 *1 .53 3,2 17. ,11 4 2. , 13 0 0. ,00 501-1000 4 2. ,13 29 15. ,50 6 3. ,20 0 0. ,00 1001-over *2 1. .06 12 6. .41 9 4. ,81 4 2. ,13 Subtotal 7 3. .74 73 39. .03 19 10. ,16 4 2. ,13 Grades 8-10 up to 500 2 1. .06 17 9. .09 5 2. .67 0 0. .00 501-1000 0 0. .00 20 10. .69 3 1. .60 2 1. ,06 1001-over _0 0. ,00 0 0. .00 _2 1. ,06 0 0. ,00 Subtotal 2 1. .06 37 19. .79 10 5. .34 2 1. .06 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0. ,00 2 1. ,06 2 1. ,06 0 0. ,00 501-1000 0 0. ,00 13 6. .95 2 1. , 06 0 0. , 00 1001-over _2 1. ,06 _7 3 . ,74 _2 1. ,06 0 0. ,00 Subtotal 2 1. , 06 22 11. ,76 6 3 . ,20 0 0. , 00 Total 11 5. ,88 132 70. ,59 35 18. ,72 6 3 . ,20 * three non responses to this question. 79 3. FLOOR DRAINS, SINKS, AND HEAVY DUTY DRAINS A floor drain in the art room is not essential. Unless the room is required to be used as a multi-purpose room, ceramics or sculpture classroom, a floor drain is not useful. Only 35 respondents (18%) indicated that they had floor drains. Of these 35, 22 (62%) offer Visual Arts 3 Dimensional ceramics courses. Table 3 0 presents these findings. Table 30 - Floor Drains in the Art Facility Floor Drains in Art Rooms Yes No of Sample N % N Grades 8-12 up to 500 * 7 3.74 30 16.04 501-1000 14 7.48 25 13.36 1001-over _2 1.06 26. 13.90 Subtotal 23 12.29 81 43.31 Grades 8-10 up to 500 3 1.60 21 11.22 501-1000 6 3.20 19 10.16 1001-over _j0 0.00 __2 1.06 Subtotal 9 4.81 42 22.45 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0.00 4 2.13 501-1000 3 1.60 12 6.41 1000-over _0 0.00 11 5.88 Subtotal 3 1.60 27 14.43 Total 35 18.71 150 80.21 * Two non responses to this question ART ROOM SINKS A majority of respondents 74 (39%) indicated that they had two sinks in their rooms. All art rooms had at least one sink. An additional forty-eight (25%) indicated they had one sink. Table 31 presents a summary of the number of sinks in each room. A total of 110 teachers (58%) noted that the sink(s) they used had clogging problems on an infrequent basis and forty respondents (21%) stated they experience no difficulties whatsoever. Table 32 presents this data. Table 31 - Number of Sinks in the Art Facility Number of Sinks in Art Rooms of 1 2 3 4 5 6 Sample Group N % N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 * 8 4, .27 13 6, .95 8 4, .27 3 1, .60 2 1. ,06 3 1. ,60 501-1000 9 4. .81 17 9, .09 7 3 , .74 4 2, .13 0 0. , 00 2 1. ,06 1001-over 10 5. .34 _9 . 4, .81 _9 4 , .81 0 0, .00 _0 0. , 00 0 0. , 00 Subtotal 27 14. ,43 39 20, .85 24 12. .83 7 3 , .74 2 1. , 06 5 2 . , 67 Grades 8-10 up to 500 6 3. ,20 15 8, . 02 1 .53 0 0, .00 0 0. , 00 2 1. , 06 501-1000 6 3 . ,20 11 5, .88 6 3 , .20 1 .53 1 ,53 0 0. , 00 1001-over _2 6. ,06 0 0. ,00 _0 0, . 00 _0 0, .00 0 0. , 00 _0 0. , 00 Subtotal 14 7. ,48 26 13 . .90 7 3 , .74 1 .53 1 1 ,53 2 1. , 06 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0. ,00 2 1. ,06 1 , 53 0 0. .00 0 0. , 00 1 , 53 501-1000 4 2. ,13 3 1. , 60 3 1. . 60 3 1, .60 1 , 53 1 i ,53 1001-over _3 1. ,60 4 2. , 13 _2 1, . 06 _2 1. .06 0 0. , 00 _P_ 0. ,00 Subtotal _7 3 . ,74 _9 4. ,81 _6 3. ,20 _5 2 . .67 _1 * ,53 2 1. , 06 Totals 48 25. ,67 74 39. ,57 37 19, .79 13 6. .95 4 2 . , 13 9 4 . ,81 * 0 non responses to this question i Table 32 - Art Facility Sink Quality and Conditions Sample Sink Conditions Non- Poor Fair Good Operational N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 *0 0. .00 8 4, .27 22 11. 76 7 3 . 74 501-1000 0 0. ,00 8 4, .27 23 12. 29 8 4. 27 1001-over 0 0. , 00 _5 2 , , 67 15 8. 02 8 4. 27 Subtotal 0 0. ,00 21 11. .22 60 32 . 08 23 12 . 29 Grades 8-10 up to 500 0 0. . 00 4 2 , . 13 13 6 . 95 7 3 . 74 501-1000 0 0. ,00 4 2 . . 13 19 10. 16 2 1. 06 1001-over _0 0. ,00 0 0. .00 _2 1. 06 _0 0. 00 Subtotal 0 0. ,00 8 4 . .27 34 18 . 18 9 4. 81 Grader 10-12 up to 500 0 0. ,00 0 0. ,00 4 2 . 13 0 0. 00 501-1000 0 0. , 00 4 2 . .13 5 2 . 67 6 3. 20 1001-over _0 0. ,00 _3 1. ,60 7 3. 74 2 1. 06 Subtotal _0 0. ,00 _7 3 . .74 16 8. 55 8 4. 27 Total 0 0. ,00 36 19. ,25 110 58. 82 40 21. 39 * Two non responses to this question. 83 Even though 150 respondents (80%) of the sample noted that their sinks either seldom or never caused them drainage problems, 72 (38%) also indicated they had no heavy duty drain or trap system. Table 3 3 presents this data. Table 33 - Art Facility Sinks Equipped with Drains and Traps Sample Sinks with Traps 0 12 3 4 5 N % N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 * 22 22, .76 6 3, .20 3 1. . 60 4 2 . .13 2 1. . 06 0 0. , 00 501-1000 * 13 6, .95 12 6. ,41 11 5. ,88 1 .53 1 ,53 0 0. , 00 1001-over 6 3, .20 10 5. , 34 _7 3. .74 _ 5 2. .67 0 0. ,00 0 0. ,00 Subtotal 41 21, .92 30 16. . 04 21 10. , 69 10 5, .34 3 1. , 60 0 0. , 00 Grades 8-10 up to 500 7 3. .74 11 5. .88 6 3. ,20 0 0, .00 0 0. .00 0 0. . 00 501-1000 9 4, .81 7 3 . .74 6 3 . ,20 3 1, .60 0 0. ,00 0 0. .00 1001-over _1 .53 _1 .53 _0 0. , 00 0 0, .00 0 0. ,00 _0 0. , 00 Subtotal 17 9, .09 19 10. .16 12 6. .41 3 1, .60 0 0. ,00 0 0. .00 Grades 10-12 up to 500 2 1. .06 1 i ,53 0 0. ,00 1 .53 0 0. ,00 0 0. , 00 501-1000 6 3, .20 3 1. .60 2 1. , 06 1 .53 2 1. , 06 0 0. .00 1001-over _6 3. .20 2 1. .06 _1 ,53 0 0, . 00 _2 1. , 06 _p_ 0. ,00 Subtotal 14 7, .48 _6 3 . ,20 3 1. ,60 2 1. .06 4 2. , 13 __g 0. , 00 Total 72 38. .50 53 28. . 34 36 19. ,25 15 8, . 02 7 3. ,74 0 0. , 00 * Three non responses to this question 85 4 THE ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEM Of the respondent population 154 (82%) indicated they had between 4 and 11 electrical outlets in their room, and all functioned properly. Only 7 (3.74%) of the sample population indicated that any were non-operational. Seventy-seven (41%) of the sample population stated that the quality or artificial lighting was good. Fifty-seven (30%) noted that it was fair; only 26 (13%) indicated that the quality of room light was very good. The implication concerning these findings indicates that illumination is generally good and that few electrical problems are experienced. Table 3 4 presents the data on artificial lighting. Table 34 - Art Facility and the Quality of Artificial Lighting Quality of Artificial Sample Lighting in Art Room Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent of Sample Group N %N %N %N %N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 * 5 2. ,67 11 5. ,88 11 5. ,88 10 5. , 34 0 0. ,00 501-1000 3 1. ,60 13 6. .95 20 10. .69 2 1. ,06 1 ,53 1001-over _2 1. , 06 _5 2. ,67 12 6. ,95 3 1. ,60 _5 2. , 67 Subtotal 10 5. , 34 29 15. , 50 44 23 . .52 15 8. ,02 6 3. ,20 Grades 8-10 up to 500 1 , 53 13 6. .95 7 3 . .74 3 1. , 60 0 0. , 00 501-1000 2 1. , 06 7 3 , ,74 15 8 , . 02 1 ,53 0 0. , 00 1001-over _g 0. ,00 _l .53 1 .53 0 0. ,00 _0 0. ,00 Subtotal 3 1. , 60 21 11. .22 23 12 , .29 4 2. , 13 0 0, ,00 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0. , 00 1 . 53 2 1, .06 1 .53 0 0, . 00 501-1000 5 2 . ,67 2 1. . 06 3 1, . 60 4 2. , 13 1 .53 1001-over _0 0. , 00 _4 2 , . 13 _5 2, .67 2 1. . 06 0 0, . 00 Subtotal 5 2. , 67 7 3 , .74 10 5. .34 7 3 , .74 1 . 53 Total 18 9. , 62 57 30. .48 77 41. . 17 26 13. ,90 7 3. ,74 * Two non responses to this question oo 87 5 2 DIMENSIONAL AND 3 DIMENSIONAL DISPLAY AREAS A total of 120 (64%) indicated that they had access to 2 dimensional display areas in their room and 157 (83%) elsewhere in the school. Fifty-six (29%) and 139 (74%) noted that they had use of 3 dimensional display areas in the room and school. Tables 35 and 36 present the data on 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional display areas by grade and school size. Table 37 summarizes the general qualities of these display areas. Table 35-2 Dimensional Art Facilities in the Art Room and School 2 Dimensional * Art Room ** School Display Facilities No Yes No Yes and School N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 22 11.76 15 8.02 30 16. 04 7 3.74 501-1000 24 12 .83 15 8.02 30 16. 04 8 4.27 1001-over 20 10. 69 8 4.27 26 13.90 2 1. 06 Subtotal 66 35.29 38 20.32 86 45.98 17 9.09 Grades 8-10 up to 500 18 9. 62 6 3.20 21 11.22 3 1.60 501-1000 17 9.09 8 4.27 24 12.83 1 .53 1001-over _! .53 1 .53 _1 . 53 _i .53 Subtotal 36 19.25 15 8.02 46 24.59 5 2.67 Grades 10-12 up to 500 1 .53 3 1.60 3 1. 60 1 .53 501-1000 9 4.81 5 2.67 12 6.41 2 1.06 1001-over _8 4.27 _3 1.60 10 5. 34 _l .53 Subtotal 18 9.62 11 5.88 25 13.36 _4 2 .13 Total 120 64.17 64 34.22 157 83.96 26 13 .90 * Three non responses to this question ** Four non responses to this question Table 36-3 Dimensional Art Facilities in the Art Room and School 3 Dimensional Display Facilities * Art Room ** School in the Art Room Yes No Yes No and School N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 7 3.74 30 16.04 23 12 .29 14 7.48 501-1000 10 5.34 29 15.50 27 14.43 12 6.41 1001-over 9 4.81 19 10.16 21 11.22 _7 3.74 Subtotal 26 13.90 78 41.71 71 39.46 33 17.64 Grades 8-10 up to 500 8 4.27 16 8.55 19 10.16 5 2.67 501-1000 10 5.34 15 8.28 23 12.29 2 1.06 1001-over _0 0.00 _2 1.06 0 0.00 2 1.06 Subtotal 18 9.62 33 17 . 64 42 22.45 9 4.81 Grades 10-12 up to 500 2 1.06 2 1. 06 2 1.06 2 1.06 501-1000 8 4.27 6 3.20 14 7.48 1 .53 1001-over _2 1.06 _9 4.81 10 5. 34 0 0.00 Subtotal 12 6.41 12 9.09 26 13.90 3 1.60 Total 56 29.95 128 68.45 139 74.33 45 24.06 * Three non responses to this question ** Three non responses to this question Table 37 - The General Quality of the Display Facilities Sample Quality of General Zero Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent Display Space N% N%N%N%N%N% Grades 8-12 up to 500 * 3 1 .60 8 4, .27 11 5, .88 7 4, .27 7 3. .74 0 0, , 00 501-1000 1 • 53 10 5, .34 7 3, .74 23 12. .29 6 3. .20 3 1, . 60 1001-over _1 • 53 _6 3, .20 _8 4, .27 _9 4. .81 3 1. , 60 _1 .53 Subtotal 5 2 .67 24 12, .83 26 13, .90 28 14, .97 16 8. .55 4 2, . 13 Grades 8-10 up to 500 0 0 .00 5 2. .67 4 2. .13 10 5. .34 5 2. .67 0 0, .00 501-1000 0 0 .00 4 2, . 13 10 5, .34 11 5. .88 0 0. .00 0 0, . 00 1001-over 0 0 .00 _0 0, . 00 1 .53 1 .53 0 0. ,00 _g 0, . 00 Subtotal 0 0 .00 9 4. ,81 15 8. .02 22 11. ,76 5 2. , 67 0 0, , 00 Grades 10-12 up to 500 1 .53 1 ,53 1 ,53 0 0. , 00 1 ,53 0 0, , 00 501-1000 0 0 .00 3 1, ,60 3 1, .60 7 3 . ,74 1 , 53 I .53 1000-over _! .53 _1 , 53 6 3 , ,20 2 1. , 06 _1 ,53 _0 0, , 00 Subtotal 2 1 .06 _5 2 . , 67 10 5. , 34 _9 4. ,81 3 1. , 60 _i ,53 Total 7 3 .74 38 20. , 32 51 27. ,27 59 31. ,55 24 12. , 83 5 2 , , 67 Three non responses to this question. VO o 6 STORAGE FACILITIES, WINDOW SPACE In the cases of 59 teachers, (31%) of the sample population, it may be evident that far too little consideration for storage space in the classroom had taken place. One hundred and twenty-four (66%) respondents indicated that a centralized storage facility (away from the art room) was available. Table 38 summarizes the findings. However only 81 teachers (43%) indicated that there was adequate storage facilities adjacent to the art room. Table 38a summarizes the findings concerning adjacent storage facilities. Table 38 - The Availability of a Centralized Storage Facility  ** Adequate * Centralized Yes No Yes No Storage Facility N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 28 14. .97 8 4. .27 11 5. .88 18 9. .62 501-1000 22 11. .76 17 9. , 09 16 8. . 55 6 3. .20 1001-over 17 9. .09 10 5. . 34 10 5. . 34 10 5. .34 Subtotal 67 35. ,82 35 18. , 71 37 19. , 78 34 18. , 18 Grades 8-10 up to 500 15 8. .02 9 4. ,81 9 4. .81 6 3 . .20 501-1000 19 10. , 16 6 3 . ,20 10 5. , 34 9 4. ,81 1001-over _2 1. ,06 _0 0. , 00 _0 0. , 00 2 1. . 06 Subtotal 36 19. ,25 15 8. , 02 19 10. , 16 17 9. , 09 Grades 10-12 up to 500 3 1. ,60 1 , 53 2 1. , 06 1 .53 501-1000 10 5. , 34 5 2. , 67 5 2. , 67 5 2, .67 1001-over _8 4. ,27 _3 1. , 60 7 3 . , 74 1 .53 Subtotal 21 11. ,22 _9 4. ,81 ii 7. ,48 7 3. .74 Total 124 66. ,31 59 31. ,55 70 37. .43 58 31. .02 * Four non responses to this question ** Fifty-nine non responses to this question Table 38a - The Availability of Adjacent Storage Facilities * **Adequate Adjacent Yes No Yes No Storage Facilities N%N% N% % Grades 8-12 up to 500 23 12. .29 14 7. .48 10 5. . 34 16 8, .55 501-1000 33 17. ,64 6 1 3, .20 19 10. . 16 14 7, .48 1001-over 25 13. ,36 _3 1. . 60 13 6. ,95 12 6, .41 Subtotal 81 43. .31 23 12, .29 42 22. .45 42 22, .45 Grades 8-10 up to 500 19 10. ,16 5 2. .67 10 5. , 34 9 4. .81 501-1000 19 10. .16 6 3. .20 16 8. .55 3 1, .60 1001-over _2 1. .06 0 0, .00 _0 0. .00 2 1, .06 Subtotal 40 21. ,39 11 5, .88 26 13 . ,90 14 7, .48 Grades 10-12 up to 500 2 1. ,06 2 1. .06 2 1. . 06 0 0. . 00 501-1000 12 6. ,41 3 1. , 60 6 3. ,20 6 3. .20 1001-over _7 3 . ,74 4 2. . 13 _5 2. .67 2 1. .06 Subtotal 21 11. ,22 9 4. ,81 13 6. ,95 8 4 , .27 Total 142 75. ,93 43 22 . , 99 81 43 . ,31 64 34 . , 22 * 2 non responses to this question. ** 42 non responses to this question. WINDOW SPACE Ninety-six per cent of the sample population indicated, that the quality of their window space was either good, 43 (22%), very good 23 (12%), or excellent 30 (16%). Table 39 presents these findings. Table 39 - The Quality of Window Space in the Art Room Sample Quality of the Zero Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent Window Space N %N %N %N %N %N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 *4 2, .13 10 5. .34 6 3. .20 9 4. .81 2 1. .06 6 3 , .20 501-1000 4 2, .13 7 3 , .74 6 3. ,20 9 4. .81 6 3. .20 7 3 . .74 1001-over 1 .53 _7 3, .74 5 2. .67 _4 2, . 13 _5 2, .67 _6 3 , .20 Subtotal 9 4, .81 24 12, .83 17 9. , 09 22 11, .76 13 6, .95 19 10, . 16 Grades 8-10 up to 500 1 .53 8 4. .27 2 1. , 06 7 3 . , 74 2 1. .06 4 2 , . 13 501-1000 1 .53 5 2. .67 9 4. .81 7 3 . .74 2 1. . 06 1 .53 1001-over 0 0, .00 0 0, .00 _0 0. . 00 _1 . 53 _1 .53 0 0, . 00 Subtotal 2 1, . 06 13 6. ,95 11 5. , 88 15 8. . 02 5 2 . , 67 5 2 . . 67 Grades 10-12 up to 500 1 .53 1 ,53 0 0. , 00 0 0. . 00 0 0. ,00 2 1, .06 501-1000 0 0. .00 3 1. , 60 2 1. ,06 3 1. , 60 4 2. . 13 3 1, . 60 1001-over _0 0, .00 _4 2 . , 13 _2 1. , 06 3 1. . 60 _1 ,53 _1 .53 Subtotal _! .53 8 4. ,27 _4 2. , 13 6 3 . , 20 _5 2. .67 6 3 , .20 Total 12 6. .42 45 24. ,06 32 17. , 11 43 22. ,99 23 12. , 30 30 16. .04 * Two non responses to this question VO 7. VENTILATION AND AUDIO/VISUAL FACILITIES Today an important word is "pollution." Pollution not only of the environment, but, also pollution of our very bodies. In this regard, the ventilation system within an art room is most crucial. Only 24 respondents (12%) indicated that no ventilation system existed in their room. However, this 12% may be breathing toxins, fumes, odours, dusts and other substances that are not considered safe by the Workman's Compensation Board. A total of 122 teachers (65%) rated the existing ventilation system in their room as either poor (40%), or fair (25%). Only 45 (24%) indicated that their ventilation system was officially approved by the Workman's Compensation Board. Table 40 presents this data. It is important to note that 57 (30%) of the sample group respondents, did not know whether or not their ventilation system was approved by the Workman's Compensation Board, or in the case of 24 (12%) of the sample population did not have any ventilation system in operation within their art room. Table 40 - Ventilation System Quality Ventilation Zero Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent System N % N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 8 4. ,27 13 6. ,95 11 5. .88 1 .53 4 2. , 13 0 0. ,00 501-1000 1 .53 14 7. ,48 10 5. .34 8 4 . .27 6 3. ,20 0 0. ,00 1001-over _6 3 , ,20 _8 4. .27 _6 3, .20 _4 2. .13 2 1, .06 _2 1. , 06 Subtotal 15 8. ,02 35 18. ,71 27 14. .43 13 6. .95 12 6. .41 2 1. ,06 Grades 8-10 up to 500 2 1, .06 10 5, . 34 4 2, . 13 7 3. .74 1 .53 0 0. .00 501-1000 2 1. .06 11 5, .88 11 5, .88 0 0. .00 1 .53 0 0. . 00 1001-over _L .53 1 .53 0 0, . 00 _0 0. . 00 0 0, .00 _0 0. .00 Subtotal 5 2, .67 22 11, .76 15 8, .02 7 3. .74 2 1, .06 0 0. .00 Grades 10-12 up to 500 1 .53 1 .53 1 .53 0 0. . 00 1 .53 0 0. .00 501-1000 2 1, .06 8 4. , 27 3 1. .60 1 * .53 0 0. .00 1 ,53 1001-over _1 » .53 _9 4< ,81 _! .53 _0 0, .00 0 0, .00 _0 0. .00 Subtotal 4 2. . 13 18 9. ,62 _5 2. .67 _1 .53 _! .53 _! ,53 Total 24 12, .83 75 40. . 10 47 25, . 13 21 11, .22 15 8, .02 3 1. , 60 * Two non responses to this question Table 41 Ventilation Quality Workman * s Yes No Compensation N % N Board Approved Ventilation System Grades 8-12 up to 500 7 3.74 12 6.41 501-1000  3.74 12 6.41 1001-over 10 5.34 __6 3.20 Subtotal 24 12.83 30 16.04 Grades 8-10 up to 500 6 3.20 8 4.27 501-1000  3.20 6 3.20 1001-over __0 0.00 _1 .53 Subtotal 12 6.41 15 8.02 Grades 10-12 up to 500 2 1.06 1 .53 501-1000 6 3.20 7 3.74 1001-over _1 .53 _4 2.13 Subtotal _9 4.81 12 6.41 Total 45 24.06 57 30.48 * Eighty-five non responses to this question AUDIO/VISUAL BLACK OUT FACILITIES Eighty two respondents (43%) indicated they had no audio/visual blackout facilities in their rooms. Table presents this data. Table 42 The Availability of Audio/Visual Black Out Facilities Sample Audio/Visual Yes No Blackout Facilities N %  % Grades 8-12 up to 500 *18 9.62 18 9.62 501-1000 22 11.76 17 11.76 1001-over 17 9.09 11 5.88 Subtotal 57 30.48 46 24.59 Grades 8-10 up to 500 *10 5.34 13 6.95 501-1000 16 8.55 9 4.81 1001-over __0 0.00 _2 1.06 Subtotal 26 13.90 24 12.83 Grades 10-12 up to 500 1 .53 3 1.60 501-1000 0 5.34 5 2.67 1001-over __7 3.74 __4 2.13 Subtotal 18 9.62 12 6.41 Total 101 54.01 82 43.85 * four non responses to this question 100 SECTION THREE C. EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS AVAILABLE This section of the questionnaire examined the specific pieces of equipment for each particular art course listed in the British Columbia Secondary Art Curriculum Guide (1984). The primary purpose of this study was to discover what equipment and tools are in use. The nearly limitless nature of the many pieces of equipment available are presented by tables. These tables, 43-50 indicate exactly by school population, and grade level, the equipment and tools used by the respondents in their classrooms. Tables 43-50 are presented in the same order as the research questions they answer. 1. AVAILABLE EQUIPMENT FOR USE IN CERAMICS CLASSES A total of 172 (91%) of the sample population indicated that they had use of at least one kiln in their classroom. Of the remaining 11 respondents who indicated they did not, 10 did not need a kiln because they did not teach ceramics. There were four non responses to this question. The next piece of equipment most often indicated was the electric wheels, used by 141 (75%) and kick wheels used by 85 (45%) of the respondents. Responses are tabulated according to school size and grade level in Table 43 and 43a. Table 43 - Equipment Available for Use in Schools for Ceramics Classes  Ceramics Equipment Kiln Enamling Pugmill Slab- Jiggeling Claybin Available to the n Press Tool Sample Population N % N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 36 19.25 8 4.27 3 1.60 2 1.06 1 .53 13 6.95 501-1000 36 19.25 13 6.95 13 6.95 1 .53 0 0.00 12 6.41 1001-over 25 13.36 12 6.41 15 8.02 2 1. 06 1 .53 11 5.88 Subtotal 97 51.87 33 17. 64 31 16.57 5 2.67 2 1.06 36 19.25 Grades 8-10 up to 500 23 12.29 11 5.88 5 2.67 1 . 53 0 0. 00 6 3 . 20 501-1000 25 13.36 6 3.20 7 3.74 0 0.00 0 0. 00 13 6.95 1001-over _2 1.06 2 1. 06 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 2 1.06 Subtotal 50 26.73 19 10.16 12 6.41 1 .53 0 0.00 21 11. 22 Grades 10-12 up to 500 3 1. 60 0 0.00 1 . 53 2 1. 06 0 0. 00 2 1. 06 501-1000 15 8.02 6 3.20 4 2 .13 3 1. 60 0 0. 00 7 3.74 1001-over _7 3.74 21 11.22 4 2.13 2 1. 06 0 0. 00 5 2 . 67 Subtotal 25 13.36 8 4.27 9 4.81 7 3.74 0 0. 00 14 7.48 Total 172 91.97 60 32.08 52 27.80 13 6.95 2 1.06 71 37.96 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. 1 M o Table 43a - Equipment Available for Use in Schools for Ceramics Classes  Ceramics Equipment Electric Kickwheel Banding Scales Vent- Others Available to the Wheel Wheel ilation Sample Population N % N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 24 12.83 18 9.62 5 2.67 10 5.34 16 8.55 2 1.06 501-1000 32 17.11 21 11.22 8 4.27 18 9.62 23 12.29 4 2 .13 1001-over 20 10. 69 13 6.95 _7 3.74 16 8.55 13 6.95 3 1. 60 Subtotal 76 40.64 52 27.80 20 10. 69 44 23.52 52 27.80 9 4.81 Grades 8-10 up to 500 21 11. 22 10 5.34 8 4.27 10 5.34 14 7.48 2 1. 06 501-1000 17 9. 09 11 5.88 4 2. 13 9 4.81 13 6.95 5 2.67 1001-over 2 1.06 _1 .53 _0 0. 00 0 0. 00 _0 0. 00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 36 19.25 22 11.76 12 6.41 19 10.16 27 14.43 7 3.74 Grades 10-12 up to 500 1 . 53 2 1. 06 1 .53 2 1.06 2 1. 06 0 0.00 501-1000 14 7.48 5 2.67 5 2.67 7 3.74 8 4.27 6 3.20 1001-over _3 1.60 _4 2.13 4 2.13 6 3.20 _4 2.13 1 .53 Subtotal 18 9.62 11 5.88 10 5.34 15 8. 02 14 7.48 7 3.74 Total 134 71.65 85 45.45 42 22.45 78 41.71 93 49.73 23 12.29 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. o to 103 2. AVAILABLE EQUIPMENT FOR USE IN VISUAL ARTS 2 DIMENSIONAL GRAPHICS CLASSES. Only 89 (47%) of the sample population indicated that they had use of an intaglio press. Even fewer 72 (38%) indicated they had use of a fire proof storage cabinet for solvents and thinners, and toxic chemicals. The majority of the sample population 109 (58%) indicated that they were able to use drying racks in their rooms. These responses are presented in Table 44, 44a and 44b. Table 44 - Equipment Available for Use in Schools for Graphics Classes Graphics Equipment Offset Intaglio Lithography Line Plate Available to the Press Press Press Camera Burner Sample Population N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 2 1.06 18 9.62 4 2.13 1 .53 1 • 53 501-1000 2 1.06 22 11.76 1 .53 3 1. 60 6 3. 20 1001-over _7 3.74 12 6.41 1 .53 6 3.20 5 2. 67 Subtotal 11 5.88 52 27.80 6 3.20 10 5.34 12 6. 41 Grades 8-10 up to 500 0 0.00 12 6.41 2 1.06 1 . 53 3 1. 60 501-1000 0 0.00 10 5.34 1 .53 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 0 0.00 22 11.76 3 1.60 1 .53 3 1. 60 Grades 10-12 up to 500 2 1.06 2 1.06 2 1.06 2 1.06 3 1. 60 501-1000 5 2.67 8 4.27 0 0.00 4 2.13 4 2. 13 1001-over _3 1.60 _5 2.67 1 .53 3 1. 60 4 2. 13 Subtotal 10 5.34 15 8.02 3 1.60 9 4.81 11 5. 88 Total 21 11.22 89 47.59 12 6.41 20 10. 69 26 13 . 90 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. Table 44a - Equipment Available for Use in Schools for Graphics Classes Graphics Equipment Vacuum Drying Pressure T-Shirt Available to the Table Rack Washer Press Sample Population N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 1 .53 17 9.09 1 .53 3 1.60 501-1000 6 3.20 26 13.90 4 2 .13 5 2.67 1001-over 5 2.67 18 9.62 2 1.06 0 0.00 Subtotal 12 6.41 73 39.03 7 3 .74 8 4.27 Grades 8-10 up to 500 0 0.00 8 4.27 0 0. 00 1 .53 501-1000 1 .53 12 6.41 0 0. 00 1 .53 1001-over 0 0.00 _J, .53 0 0.00 1 .53 Subtotal 1 .53 21 11.22 0 0.00 3 1.60 Grades 10-12 up to 500 2 1.06 2 1. 06 1 .53 2 1. 06 501-1000 4 2.13 12 6.41 1 . 53 3 1.60 1001-over 2 1.06 _1 .53 0 0. 00 1 .53 Subtotal 8 4.27 15 8.02 2 1.06 6 3.20 Total 21 11.22 109 58.28 9 4.81 17 9.09 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. i_, o I Table 44b - Equipment Available for Use in Schools for Graphics Classes  Graphics Equipment Light Fireproof Ventilation Dry Mount of the Sample Table Cabinet System Press Population N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 12 6.41 12 6.41 11 5.88 4 2.13 501-1000 24 12.83 17 9. 09 21 11.22 7 3.74 1001-over 11 5.88 14 7.48 10 5.34 _4 2.13 Subtotal 47 25.13 43 22.99 42 22.45 15 8.02 Grades 8-10 up to 500 10 5.34 7 3.74 10 5. 34 4 2 .13 501-1000 7 7.34 11 5.88 6 3.20 6 3.20 1001-over 0 0. 00 _g 0. 00 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 17 9.09 18 9. 62 16 8.55 10 5.34 Grades 10-12 up to 500 4 2.13 3 1. 60 3 1.60 2 1.06 501-1000 12 6.41 6 3.20 7 3.74 5 2 . 67 1001-over 5 2.67 2 1. 06 _0 0. 00 1 .53 Subtotal 21 11.22 11 5.88 10 5.34 8 4.27 Total 85 45.45 72 38. 50 68 36.36 33 17.64 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. H o 107 3. AVAILABLE EQUIPMENT FOR USE IN VISUAL ARTS 2 DIMENSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY CLASSES The one piece of equipment that was most often indicated available for use in photography classes was a black and white 35mm photographic enlarger. Eighty-seven (45%) of the respondent sample noted they had use of these pieces of equipment. Yet only 85 (45%) indicated that they used 3 5mm S.L.R. cameras. Sixty-seven (35%) had use of camera flash units. Very few 18 (9%) noted that they had colour print enlargers and 7 (3%) indicated that they were able to use larger 2x5 format cameras. Tables 45 45a present a summary of photographic equipment in use by grade and school population. Table 45 - Equipment Available for Use in Schools for Photography Classes  Photography Color Black and 2x5 Format 35mm SLR Tripod Light Equipment Enlarger White Camera Camera Table Available to the Enlarger Sample Population N % N % N % N % N % N & Grades 8-12 up to 500 4 2.13 18 9. 62 1 .53 18 9.62 11 5.88 8 4.27 501-1000 5 2.67 18 9.62 1 .53 17 9.09 18 9.62 18 9.62 1001-over _3 1.60 16 8.55 0 0.00 16 8.55 13 6.95 12 6.41 Subtotal 12 6.41 52 27.80 2 1.06 51 27.27 42 22.45 38 20.32 Grades 8-10 up to 500 1 .53 8 4.27 0 0. 00 8 4.27 4 2.13 6 3.20 501-1000 1 .53 12 6.41 0 0. 00 12 6.41 7 3.74 5 2.67 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 _0 0. 00 _0 0.00 Subtotal 2 1.06 20 10.69 0 0. 00 20 10.69 11 5.88 11 5.88 Grades 10-12 up to 500 1 .53 3 1.60 2 1.06 3 1.60 2 1.06 3 1.60 501-1000 2 1.06 7 3.74 2 1. 06 7 3.74 7 3.74 6 3.20 1001-over 1 .53 _5 2.67 1 1. 06 4 2.13 2 1.06 4 2.13 Subtotal 4 2.13 15 8.02 5 2.67 14 7.48 11 5.88 13 6.95 Total 18 9.62 87 46.52 7 3.74 85 45.45 64 34.22 62 33.15 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. Table 45a - Equipment Available for Use in Schools for Photography Classes  Photography Equipment Avail- Flash Studio Tacking Dry Mount Darkroom Sink able to the Lights Iron Press Thermostat Sample Population N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 14 7.48 9 4.81 4 2 .13 5 2.67 12 6.41 501-1000 12 6.41 5 2.67 5 2.67 7 3 .74 9 4.81 1001-over 15 8.02 7 3.74 _5 2.67 6 3 .20 _9 4.81 Subtotal 41 21.92 21 11.22 14 7.48 18 9.62 30 16.04 Grades 8-10 up to 500 6 3.20 2 1.06 2 1.06 2 1.06 4 2.13 501-1000 9 4.81 4 2.13 6 3.20 6 3.20 4 2.13 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0. 00 0 0.00 0 0.00 Subtotal 15 8.02 6 3.20 8 4.27 8 4.27 8 4.27 Grades 10-12 up to 500 3 1.60 0 0.00 2 1. 06 2 1.06 3 1.60 501-1000 5 2.67 4 2.13 5 2.67 5 2.67 3 1.60 1001-over _3 1.60 _4 2.13 2 1.06 3 1.60 3 1.60 Subtotal 11 5.88 8 4.27 9 4.81 10 5.34 9 4.81 Total 67 35.82 35 18.71 31 16.57 36 19.25 47 25.13 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. 110 4. EQUIPMENT AVAILABLE FOR USE IN FILM/TELEVISION ART COURSES In this day and age of the video camera, there appears to be little impact of newer media on the art classes of British Columbia. Seventy-seven (41%) had a video camera available in the artroom, seventy-one (37%) a VCR machine and seventy-seven (41%) a television to view the video materials. Super 8 and 8mm cameras are indicated at 26 (31%) and 5 (2%) respectively. Table 46 and 46a presents this data. Table 46 - Equipment Available for Use in Film/Television Classes  Film/Television Super 8 Regular 8 16mm Movie Video Video Equipment Avail- Movie Camera Movie Camera Camera Camera Machine able to the Sample Population N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 3 1.60 1 .53 1 .53 24 12.83 20 10.69 501-1000 10 5.34 1 .53 0 0.00 15 8.02 12 6.41 1001-over _5 2.67 3 1.60 3 1.60 11 5.88 12 6.41 Subtotal 18 9.62 5 2.67 4 2.13 50 26.73 44 23.52 Grades 8-10 up to 500 3 1.60 0 0.00 3 1.60 10 5. 34 10 5.34 501-1000 1 .53 0 0.00 2 1.06 11 5.88 12 6.41 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 Subtotal 4 2.13 0 0.00 5 2.67 21 11.22 22 11.76 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 .53 1 .53 501-1000 3 1. 60 0 0.00 0 0.00 4 2.13 3 1.60 1001-over 1 .53 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 .53 1 .53 Subtotal 4 2 .13 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 3.20 5 2.67 Total 26 13.90 5 2.67 9 4.81 77 41.17 71 37.96 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. Table 46a - Equipment Available for Use in Film/Television Classes  Film/Television Tele- Video 16mm 8mm Tripod Studio Equipment Avail- vision Editor Camera Editor Lights able to the Sample Population N % N % N % N % N I N % Grades 8-12 Up to 500 23 12.29 3 1.60 0 0.00 2 1.06 15 8.02 6 3.20 501-1000 15 8.02 2 1.06 0 0.00 6 3.20 11 5.88 6 3.20 1001-over 12 6.41 3 1.60 1 .53 5 2.67 _5 2.67 _3 1.60 Subtotal 50 26.73 8 4.27 1 .53 13 6.95 31 16.57 15 8. 02 Grades 8-10 up to 500 10 5.34 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 5 2 . 67 1 .53 501-1000 12 6.41 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 1 .53 9 4.81 2 1. 06 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 0 0.00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 22 11.76 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 . 53 14 7.48 3 1. 60 Grades 10-12 up to 500 1 .53 0 0. 00 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 .53 2 1. 06 501-1000 3 1.60 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 2 1. 06 5 2.67 1 .53 1001-over 1 .53 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 .53 1 .53 1 .53 Subtotal 5 2.67 0 0.00 0 0.00 3 1.60 7 7 . 34 4 2 .13 Total 77 41.17 8 4.27 1 .53 17 9. 09 52 27.80 22 11.76 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. 5. EQUIPMENT AVAILABLE FOR VISUAL ARTS 2 DIMENSIONAL DRAWING AND PAINTING CLASSES Of the equipment for the drawing and painting classes, 84 (44%) of the sample group indicated that they had the use of floor easels. Eighty-eight (47%) indicated that an air brush was a part of their classroom equipment. Eighty-one (43%) indicated they had light tables for this program. Table 47 presents this data according to school size and grades. Table 47 - Equipment Available for Use in Schools for Drawing and Painting Class Drawing and Painting Floor Table Air Light Paper Equipment Available to Easels Easels Brush Table Cutter the Sample Population N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 17 9.09 14 7.48 17 9.09 12 6.41 36 19.25 501-1000 21 11.22 14 7.48 26 13 .90 24 12.83 35 18.71 1001-over 15 8.02 13 6.95 16 8.55 14 7.48 24 12.83 Subtotal 53 28.34 41 21.92 59 31.55 50 26.73 95 50.80 Grades 8-10 up to 500 7 3.74 4 2 .13 6 3.20 7 3 .74 23 12.29 501-1000 6 3.20 7 3.74 7 3.74 6 3.20 20 10. 69 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0.00 _0 0.00 0 0. 00 2 1. 06 Subtotal 13 6.95 11 5.88 13 6.95 13 6.95 45 24.06 Grades 10-12 up to 500 3 1. 60 ' 2 1.06 3 1. 60 4 2.13 4 2.13 501-1000 9 4.81 5 2.67 7 3.74 11 5.88 14 7.48 1001-over _6 3.20 1 .53 _6 3.20 3 1.60 6 3.20 Subtotal 18 9.62 8 4.27 16 8.55 18 9.62 24 12.83 Total 84 44.49 60 32.08 88 47.05 81 43.31 164 87.70 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not posess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non response to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. 6. EQUIPMENT AVAILABLE FOR USE IN VISUAL ARTS 2 DIMENSION TEXTILES AND FABRICS ART CLASSES It either appears that fabrics and textiles classes can be managed with little in the way of equipment or such classes are not being taught. Findings are presented in Table 48. Table 48, indicates that the equipment available for the fabric and textiles courses is minimal. However responses to this question reveals that much in the way of equipment is still required to properly teach fabrics and textile courses. Table 48 - Equipment Available for Use in Fabrics and Textile Courses Fabrics and Textiles Sewing Weaving Belt Ventilation Equipment Available to Machine Loom Loom System the Sample Population N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 5 2.67 10 5.34 5 2.67 3 1.60 501-1000 8 4.27 11 5.88 11 5.88 10 5.34 1001-over 8 4.27 ' _6 3.20 _6 3.20 _6 3.20 Subtotal 21 11.22 27 14.43 22 11.76 19 10.16 Grades 8-10 up to 500 1 .53 2 1.06 1 .53 3 1.60 501-1000 6 3.20 6 3.20 7 3.74 7 3 .74 1001-over 0 0.00 1 .53 1 .53 0 0.00 Subtotal 7 3.74 9 4.81 9 10.16 10 5.34 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 501-1000 4 2.13 6 3.20 6 3.20 3 1.60 1001-over 0 0. 00 1 .53 1 .53 0 0. 00 Subtotal 4 2.13 7 3.74 7 3 .74 3 1. 60 Total 32 17.11 43 22.99 38 20.32 32 17.11 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. 7. BASIC HANDTOOLS AVAILABLE FOR USE IN THE ART CLASS The one piece of equipment that was indicated most often by the respondents as being most available was the paper cutter: 167 (89%) noted they had at least one. The next most indicated basic handtool was the hammer, 134 (75%). Seventy-one of the respondents noted they had access to them. This is followed by pliers (129: 68%) and files (126: 67%) as the pieces of small equipment and hand tools that were most often indicated. Tables 49, 49a, 49b, and 49c present this data. Table 49 - Basic Handtools Available for Use in Schools  Basic Handtools Files Pliers Chisels Mallets Screw Available to Drivers the Sample N% N% N%N% N% Population  Grades 8-12 up to 500 23 12.29 25 13. 36 18 9. 62 16 8. 55 19 10.16 501-1000 26 13.90 29 15. 50 19 10. 16 19 10. 16 25 13.36 1001-over 24 12.83 21 11. 22 19 10. 16 19 10. 16 20 10.69 Subtotal 73 39. 03 75 40. 10 56 29. 94 54 28. 87 64 34.22 Grades 8-10 up to 500 18 9.62 18 9. 62 16 8 . 55 14 7. 48 15 8.02 501-1000 17 9.09 17 9. 09 14 7. 48 13 6. 95 10 5.34 1001-over . 0 0. 00 _0 0. 00 _1 • 53 _0 0. 00 0 0.00 Subtotal 35 18.71 35 18. 71 31 16. 57 27 14. 43 25 13.36 Grades 10-12 up to 500 2 1.06 2 1. 06 1 • 53 0 0. 00 2 1.06 501-1000 9 4.81 11 5. 88 8 4. 27 8 4. 27 11 5.88 1001-over 7 3.74 _6 3. 20 _4 2 . 13 _4 2 . 13 5 2.67 Subtotal 18 9.62 19 10. 16 13 6. 95 12 6. 41 18 9.62 Total 126 67.37 129 68. 98 100 53. 47 93 49. 73 107 57.21 * The nature of this question, and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. Table 49a - Basic Handtools Available for Use in Schools Basic Handtools Hammers Staple Solder Vises Spray Available to the Sample Population N % Guns N % Gun N % N % Gun N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 25 13.36 24 12.83 7 3.74 14 7.48 7 7.34 501-1000 29 15. 50 29 15.50 15 8.02 12 6.41 7 7.34 1001-over 21 11.22 20 10.69 11 5.88 11 5.88 6 3.20 Subtotal 75 40.10 73 39.03 33 17.64 37 19.78 20 10.69 Grades 8-10 up to 500 16 8.55 16 8. 55 10 5.34 10 5.34 1 .53 501-1000 18 9.62 14 7.48 9 4.81 6 3.20 3 1.60 1001-over 1 .53 _g 0.00 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 0 0.00 Subtotal 35 18.71 30 16.04 19 10.16 16 8.55 4 2.13 Grades 10-12 up to 500 3 1.60 3 1. 60 2 1.06 2 1.06 2 1.06 501-1000 13 6.95 11 5.88 6 3.20 8 4.27 4 2.13 1001-over _8 4.27 _8 4.27 _4 2.13 4 2.13 4 2.13 Subtotal 24 12.83 22 11.76 12 6.41 14 7.48 10 5.34 Total 134 71.65 125 66.84 64 34.22 67 35.82 34 18.18 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. Table 49b - Basic Handtools Available for Use in Schools Basic Handtools Hand Paper Band Available to the Saw Cutter Saw Sample Population N % N % N Grades 8-12 up to 500 23 12.29 31 16.57 5 2.67 501-1000 26 13.90 34 18.18 5 2.67 1001-over 23 12.24 27 14 .43 6 3.20 Subtotal 72 38.50 92 49.19 16 8.55 Grades 8-10 up to 500 14 7.48 22 11.76 2 1.06 501-1000 16 8.55 24 12 .83 1 .53 1001-over _1 .53 2 1. 06 0 0.00 Subtotal 31 16.57 48 25.66 3 1. 60 Grades 10-12 up to 500 3 1.60 4 2 .13 1 .53 501-1001 10 5.34 14 7.48 2 1.06 1001-over 6 3.20 _9 4.81 0 0.00 Subtotal 19 10.16 27 14.43 3 1.60 Total 122 65.24 167 89. 30 22 11.76 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. Table 49c - Basic Handtools Available for Use in Schools Basic Handtools Drill Table Grinder Other Available to the Press Saw Sample Population N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 5 2.67 14 7.48 6 3.20 2 1.06 501-1000 2 1.06 1 .53 9 4.81 2 1.06 1001-over 3 1.60 _4 2.13 2 1. 06 0 0.00 Subtotal 10 5.34 19 10.16 17 9.09 4 2.13 Grades 8-10 up to 500 3 1.60 3 1.60 6 3.20 1 .53 501-1000 1 .53 1 .53 4 2 .13 0 0.00 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0.00 _0 0.00 0 0.00 Subtotal 4 2.13 4 2.13 10 5.34 1 .53 Grades 10-12 up to 500 0 0.00 1 .53 0 0.00 0 0.00 501-1000 2 1.06 2 1. 06 4 2.13 0 0.00 1001-over 0 0.00 0 0.00 2 1. 06 0 0.00 Subtotal 2 1.06 3 1. 60 6 3.20 0 0.00 Total 16 8.55 26 13.90 33 17.64 5 26.73 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. 122 8. AUDIO/VISUAL EQUIPMENT AVAILABLE FOR USE IN THE ART CLASS The video machine/television was indicated available by 124 (66%) of the sample group, in comparison to about 75 (40%) who answered question #10. Video equipment was often available through the audio/visual departments or through the library. Tables 50 and 50a presents the data on available audio/visual equipment. Table 50 - Audio/Visual Equipment Available For Use  Audio/Visual Opaque Overhead 16mm movie 8mm movie Slide Equipment Projector Projector Projector Projector Projector Available to the Sample Population N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 20 10.69 30 16.04 17 9.09 3 1.60 27 14.43 501-1000 22 11.76 28 14.97 13 6.95 6 3.20 26 13.90 1001-over 15 8. 02 17 9.09 _9 4.81 _7 3.74 16 8.55 Subtotal 57 30.48 75 40. 10 39 20. 85 16 8.55 69 36.89 Grades 8-10 up to 500 11 5.88 18 9.62 7 3.74 0 0.00 15 8 . 02 501-1000 12 6.41 19 10.16 9 4.81 4 2 .13 16 8.55 1001-over 0 0. 00 1 . 53 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 1 . 53 Subtotal 23 12.29 38 20.32 16 8.55 4 2.13 32 17. 11 Grades 10-12 up to 500 4 2.13 3 1. 60 2 1. 06 1 .53 3 1. 60 501-1000 12 6.41 10 5.34 6 3.20 2 1.06 13 6.95 1001-over 8 4.27 _6 3.20 5 2.67 _3 1.60 _8 4.27 Subtotal 24 12.83 19 10. 16 13 6.95 6 3.20 24 12.83 Total 104 55. 61 132 70.58 68 36.36 26 13.90 125 66.84 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. i-1 to CO Table 50a - Audio/Visual Equipment Available for Use  Audio/Visual Filmstrip Video/ Cassette Film Stereo Equipment Avail- Projector Television Deck Screen able to the Sample Population N % N % N % N % N % Grades 8-12 up to 500 29 15.50 35 18.71 30 16. 04 30 16. 04 15 8.02 501-1000 24 12.83 25 13.36 26 13 . 90 22 11. 76 11 5.88 1001-over 16 8.55 13 6.95 10 5.34 18 9.62 8 4 .27 Subtotal 69 36.89 73 39.03 66 35.29 70 37.43 34 18.18 Grades 8-10 up to 500 13 6.95 13 6.95 12 6.41 12 6.41 5 2.67 501-1000 14 7.48 16 8.55 15 8.02 17 9 . 09 8 4.27 1001-over _l .53 _1 .53 _1 . 53 0 0. 00 0 0. 00 Subtotal 28 14.97 30 16. 04 28 14.97 29 15. 50 13 6.95 Grades 10-12 up to 500 3 1. 60 3 1. 60 4 2.13 2 1. 06 2 1. 06 501-1000 10 5.34 11 5.88 10 5.34 10 5.34 1 .53 1001-over _7 3.74 _7 3.74 _6 3.20 _6 3.20 3 1.60 Subtotal 20 10.69 21 11.22 20 10.69 18 9.62 6 3.20 Total 117 62.56 124 66.31 114 60.96 117 62.56 53 28.34 * The nature of this question and the limitless amount of equipment any art teacher may or may not possess makes it difficult to accurately assess the non responses to this question. Also many pieces of this equipment might be non-applicable to certain artrooms. H CHAPTER FIVE 125 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS This chapter presents an overview of the contents of Chapter Four. There is a restatement of the research problem, and the research questions, followed by a summary of the findings, and conclusions. The chapter ends with recommendations for further study. A. RESTATEMENT OF THE RESEARCH PROBLEM As discussed in Chapter One, the aim of the study was to determine the current conditions, and availability of art facilities and equipment in secondary art programs throughout British Columbia. The purpose was to provide a single comprehensive source of reference to art teachers concerning art education facilities and equipment in British Columbia. B. CONCLUSIONS Findings from the data were compiled to establish a picture of the conditions of the art facilities throughout the province of British Columbia and to determine what equipment is being used in the art programs. The resulting conclusions and recommendations made are simply indications which show the immediate outcomes of the survey questionnaire. The success of this study and its recommendations will only be measured by the quality care and rapid attention in which the data presented in this study becomes outdated in future studies of this kind (Corton 1965, p. 87). As may be expected, some schools have better art facilities than others. Even the size of any given school building in British Columbia vary. This study reveals that 113 (60%) of the sample population have one art room. Of these respondents, who teach in schools of student populations of 500 or more, this single facility is not adequate to permit proper implementations of the art courses listed in the Art Guide, grades 8-12 (1983). These conditions impose considerable burdens on the involved respondents in that many art activities such as pottery, printmaking, silkscreening and sculpture cannot be undertaken optimally because of restricted space. It might be said, that their students, are in fact, denied involvement in many art activities that are suggested in the 127 British Columbia Art Curriculum Guide (1983). Class size is another important factor in the development of an art program (Hodder 1974, p. 32). Many respondents indicated that their class size was in excess of 26 students per class. Only a few noted a maximum class size of less than 25 students. Again many art activities such as sculpture, ceramics, and printmaking are contingent upon the available space. The effect of the supplies and equipment allocation upon any art program is obvious. It is reasonable to assume that a low budget has a restrictive effect on materials and equipment available. This study reveals that either 122 do not know their budget allocations, or do not come to know what their supplies or equipment budget is. Also 153 do not supplement their situations by charging art fees. Ninety-one percent (172) of the respondents indicted that they have the necessary equipment to teach ceramics. Ninety-four (50%) indicated they had equipment that enabled them to teach intaglio printmaking. Ninety-two (49%) noted they were able to teach photography. Seventy-two (38%) had use of video/audio equipment in the class room. Ninety (48%) were able to teach drawing and painting, and even less 128 58 (31%) were set up in a way that allowed them to teach a proper fabrics and textiles class. C. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FURTHER STUDY - It is necessary to help art teachers describe program philosophy and relevant art activities in such a way that these statements would assist in the development of guidelines for functional art facilities in schools. - It is necessary that further studies of this kind be periodically completed by members of the British Columbia Art Teachers Association and the information published so that we have up to date data and can see changing patterns and trends. Such data may help schools make improvements to their own facilities by providing a basis for comparison. - It is necessary that class size be reduced to a manageable labratorary number, similar to the industrial education class sizes. In order for either supplies and equipment budgets to be increased, to allow for a greater selection in the purchase of equipment, or for the art teacher to be permitted to charge an art fee to each student, teachers need to know what their budgets arel 129 It is necessary that rigorous accrediting of Secondary Art programs be conducted whether or not the teacher/s has/have the equipment and facilities to implement the Secondary Art Curriculum should be an important part of this process. 130 REFERENCES Association for Educational Communications and Technology. Evaluative checklist: an instrument for self-evaluating an educational media program in colleges and universities. (1979), Wash. D.C. Barkan, M. (1966). Curriculum Problems in Art Education, In E.A. Mattil, Editor, A Seminar in Art Education for Research and Curriculum Development, V.S.V.E., Pennsylvannia State University, pp. 240-255. Borg, Walter R., Gall, Meredith, D.; (1983). Educational Research An Introduction. 4th Edition, Longman Inc. p. 100. British Columbia Schools Facilities Building Manual (1985). Ministry of Education, Victoria, British Columbia. British Columbia Arts Resource Conference (June 26, 27, 28, 1956) Alec Walton, Chairman, University of British Columbia. 131 References - cont'd. British Columbia Secondary Art Curriculum Guide (1983) Ministry of Education Curriculum Development Branch, Victoria, British Columbia. Bruner, J.S. (1977). The Process of Education (Revised) Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Cassidy, Neil. Some Relationships Between Art Teacher Qualifications and The Art Programs Offered in the Senior High Schools of Alberta. Unpublished Master's thesis, University of Alberta, Edmonton, 1967. Chapman, L.M. (1982). Instant Art Instant Culture: The Unspoken Policy For American Schools. Teachers College Press, Columbia University. Colton, A.S. (1965). A Survey of Educational Resources in the Visual Arts in British Columbia, Published Masters Thesis, B.C.A.T.A. 132 References - cont'd. Connelly, F.M. et al (1980). Curriculum Planning for the Classroom. Ontario Teachers Federation, O.I.S.E. Erickson, M. (1977). Uses of History in Art Education, Studies in Art Education, Vol. 18(3), pp. 22-28. Ford, Ruth G. A Study of Organization For Art Instruction In The Elementary Schools of Alberta. Unpublished Master's thesis, University of Alberta, Edmonton, 1964. Fullan, M. (1982). The Meaning of Educational Change. Toronto: OISE Press, p. 118. Gray, James U., MacGregor, Ronald N. (1987) PROACTA: Personally Relevant Observations About Art Concepts and Teaching Activities Canadian Review of Art Education Research and Issues. Vol. 14. 133 References - cont'd. Gray, J.U. (1980). British Columbia's Art Education in the 80s: A Neglected Creature is Acknowledged Canadian Art Education in the 8 0s, Canadian Society for Education Through Art pp. 2-7. Hodder, G.S. (1972). Art Programs and Facilities in Secondary Schools in British Columbia. Faculty of Education, University of Victoria. John, L.N. (1974). A Study of Current Conditions in Art Education and Proposals for Change Unpublished Master's Thesis, University of British Columbia. Lahr, Stephen L.; (1984). Who Teaches Art: A Report of Recent Surveys. Studies in Art Education. Vol. 25:2, pp. 115-120. MacGregor, Ronald N.; (1969). Art Room Facilities in Use in Alberta. University of Alberta. 134 References - cont'd. Michael, J.A. (1980). Studio Art Experience, The Heart of Art Education, Art Education Vol. 33(2), pp.15-19. Mills, E. Andrew, Thomson, D. Ross (1985). A National Survey of Art(s) Education. A Report On The State Of The Arts In The States. NAEA Newsletter. Planning facilities for art instruction. (1969). National Art Education Association. J.B. Schultz, Editor. Rush, J. (1984). Editorial: Who Decides? Studies in Art Education, Vol. 25(4) pp. 203-204. Study of Education Facilities, (1970). Metropolitan Toronto School Board, 49 Jack Ave., Toronto, Ontario. Wiersma, W. (1986). Research Methods in Education, An Introduction, Fourth Edition, Toronto, p. 192-94. References - Cont'd. Woodcock, George (1979) Arts and Education in British Columbia. A Report For The National Inquiry Into Arts And Education In Canada of The Canadian Conference Of The Arts. Published by B.C. Committee On Arts And Education Canadian Conference Of The Arts. APPENDIX ONE QUESTIONNAIRE 138 6. please indicate the population of the city/town/community in which you teach. 1. ( ) rural under 10,000 2. ( ) suburb under 10,000 3. ( ) suburb under 20,000 4. ( ) urban over 20,000 7. I am presently teaching art full time( ), part time( ), N/A( ) 8. Are there any other art teachers in the same school as yourself? yes ( ), no ( ) If so, please Indicate full time ( ), part time ( ) 9. Please circle the grades taught in your school. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 10. What is the total enrollment of students in your school? 11. Please indicate the total number of students presently being taught art in your school. 0-50 51-100 101-150 151-200 201-250 251-300 301-over ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) 12. What Is your present class size (per grade) in your art classes? grade 8 grade 11 grade 9 grade 12 grade 10 •  13. How many rooms In your school are classified as art rooms? 14. How many of these art rooms were specifically designed and built for art classes? Include special names and purposes Do other 1) art teachers share your art room? 2) teachers share your art room? yes ( ), no ( ) yes ( ), no ( ) What is your approximate yearly art budget for; 1) supplies $ 2) equipment $ What (If any) are your art fees? grade 8 grade 9 grade 10 grade 11 grade 12 Please indicate the art courses taught in your school. ART FOUNDATIONS 1. grade 8 ( 2. grade 9 ( 3. grade 10 ( 4. grade 11 ( 5. grade 12 ( others VA2D grade 9 ( ) grade 10 ( ) grade 11 ( ) grade 12 ( ) VA3D grade 9 ( ) grade 10 ( ) grade 11 ( ) grade 12 ( ) ART CAREERS grade 12 ( ) Do you specifically create streams or student programs of the above courses? yes ( ), no ( ) if so, please describe Are you now a member of a professional association? Yes ( ), no ( ) If so, please Indicate which one(s) B.C.A.T.A. C.S.E.A. I.N.S.E.A. N.A.E.A. A.T.A. ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) 140 21. Do you subscribe to any professional journals? Yes ( ), no ( ) If so, please indicate which one(s) 1. ( ) Education 8. ( ) Journal of Aesthetic Education 2. ( ) Art Education 9. ( ) Canadian Review of Art Education 3. ( ) School Arts 10. ( ) Journal of Art and Design Education 4. ( ) Art Activities 11- ( ) B.C. Art Teacher's Association Journal 5. ( ) Visual Art Research 12. ( ) Journal of Multicultural and Crosscultural 6. ( ) Studies In Art Education Research in Art Education 7. ( ) Arts in Psychotherapy 13. ( ) others SECTION TWO: FACILITIES IN USE IN ART ROOMS What kind of floor surface do you have in your art room? On what floor is your art room located? 3. Do you have a floor drain in the art room? yes ( ), no ( ) 4. How many sinks do you have in the art room? 5. Which term adequately describes the operations of the sink? N/A poor fair good non-operational clogs regularly seldom clogs never clogs ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) 6. Are any sinks equipped with a heavy duty drain and trap system? yes ( ), no ( ) If so, how many? 7. Please Indicate the number of electric outlets you have in your art room. 0-3 4-7 8-11 12-15 15-over ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) 141 8. Please indicate the number of electrical outlets that are non-operational. 9. What form does the artificial lighting take in your room? 1. ( ) incandescent 2. ( ) fluorescent 3. ( ) other, explain 10. Which term best describes the artificial lighting in your art room? poor fair good very good excellent ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) 11. Are there display cases or similar facilities available for exhibition of 2 dimensional art work in your art room? yes ( ), no ( ) 12. Are there display cases of similar facilities available for exhibition of 2 dimensional art work in your school? yes ( ), no ( ) 13. Are there display cases or similar facilities available for exhibition of 3 dimensional art work in your art room? yes ( ), no ( ) 14. Are there display cases of similar facilities available for exhibition of 3 dimensional art work in your school? yes ( ), no ( ) 15. Does your school supply you with a centralized storage facility for art materials? yes ( ), no ( ) If so, is it adequate for your needs? yes ( ), no ( ) 16. Does your art room have a storage facility adjacent to it? yes ( ), no ( ) If so, is it adequate for your needs? yes ( ), no ( ) 17. Which term best describes the window space in your art room? none poor fair good very good excellent ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) 142 18. Which term best describes the display space in your art room? none poor fair good very good excellent ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) 19. Which term best describes the types of desks/tables used by your students in your art room? individual art tables accommodating regular classroom desks groups of students desks other 20. Which term best describes the ventilation system in your room? none poor fair good very good excellent ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) If you have one, is it W.C.B. approved? yes ( ), no ( ) 21. Are there A/V black out facilities in your room? yes ( ), no ( ) SECTION THREE: EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS Some equipment and tools are necessary to carry on an art program. It is a basic assumption that these will be made available for all phases of instruction. Please indicate the equipment and tools that you use in your art program, and comment on the nature of this use. 1. The equipment that is available to me for classroom use in my ceramics classes is; 1. ( ) Kiln 2. ( ) enameling kiln 3. ( ) pugmlll 4. ( ) slab press 5. ( ) jiggerlng tool 6. ( ) clay bin 7. ( ) electric wheel 8. ( ) kick wheel 9. ( ) banding wheel 10. ( ) scales 11. ( ) ventilation system 12. ( ) others 2. What pieces of the above equipment require upgrading? 3. In your opinion, which of the above equipment do you need to operate a (VA3D) ceramics program? 143 4. The equipment that is available to me for classroom use in my graphics classes is; 1. ( ) offset press 9. ( ) t-shirt press 2. ( ) intaglio press 10. ( ) light table 3. ( ) lithography press 11. ( ) fire proof cabinet 4. ( ) line camera 12. ( ) ventilation system 5. ( ) plate burner 13. ( ) dry mount press 6. ( ) vacuum table 14. ( ) paper cutter 7. ( ) drying rack 15. ( ) others 8. ( ) pressure washer 5. What pieces of the above equipment require upgrading? 6. In your opinion, which of the above equipment do you need to operate a (VA2D) graphic program? 7. The equipment that Is available to me for classroom use in my photography classes is; 1. ( 2. ( 3. ( 4. ( 5. ( 6. ( 7. ( ) colour print enlarger ) B & W enlarger ) 2x5 format camera ) 35mm SLR camera ) camera tripod ) light table ) camera flash unit 8. ( ) studio light 9. ( ) tacking iron 10. ( ) dry mount press 11. ( ) darkroom sink thermostat 12. ( ) paper cutter 13. ( ) other 8. What pieces of the above equipment require upgrading? 9. In your opinion what pieces of the above equipment do you need to operate a Photography (VA2D) class? 144 10. The equipment that is available to me for classroom use for a film/television program is: • 1. ( ) super 8 movie camera 2. ( ) regular 8 movie camera 3. ( ) 16mm movie camera 4. ( ) video camera 5. ( ) video machine 6. ( ) television 7. ( ) video editor 8. ( ) 16mm editor 9. ( ) 8mm editor 10. ( ) camera tripod 11. ( ) studio lights 12. ( ) other 11. What pieces of the above equipment require upgrading? 12. In your opinion, what pieces of the above equipment do you need to operate a film/television (VA2D) class? 13. The equipment that is available to me for classes is; 1. ( ) floor easels 2. ( ) table easels 3. ( ) air brush classroom use in my drawing and painting 4. ( ) light table 5. ( ) paper cutter 6. ( ) other 14. The pieces of the above equipment require upgrading? 15. In your opinion, which of the above equipment do you need to operate a (VA2D) painting class? 16. The equipment that is available to me for classroom use in my fabric and textiles design course Is; 1. ( ) sewing machine 4. ( ) ventilation system 2. ( )weaving loom 5. ( ) other 3. ( ) belt loom 145 17. What pieces of the above equipment require upgrading? 18. In your opinion, which of the above equipment do ou need to operate a (VA2D) fabric and textiles design course? 19. What were the three last pieces of equipment purchased for your program? Give name and date purchased. 1. 2. 3. 20. The basic handtools that are available to me for classroom use in my art room are; 1. ( ) files 9. ( ) vises 2. ( ) pliers 10. ( ) spray gun 3. ( ) chisels 11. ( ) hand saw 4. ( ) mallets 12. ( ) paper cutter 5. ( ) screwdrivers 13. ( ) band saw ~ 6. ( ) hammers 14. ( ) drill press 7. ( ) staple guns 15. ( ) table saw 8. ( ) solder gun 16. ( ) grinder 21. What A/V equipment do you have use of in your art room? 1. ( ) opaque projector 2. ( ) overhead projector 3. ( ) 16mm movie projector 4. ( ) 8mm movie projector 5. ( ) slide projector 6. ( ) film strip projector 7. ( ) video/t.v. 8. ( ) cassette deck 9. ( ) film screen 10. ( ) stereo 11. ( ) other Thank you for taking the time to complete this questionnaire. You may mall It back to me by using the enclosed stamped, self-addressed envelope. TIM VARRO APPENDIX TWO LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL APPENDIX THREE FOLLOW-UP LETTER APPENDIX FOUR BRITISH COLUMBIA ART TEACHERS ASSOCIATION ENDORSEMENT APPENDIX FIVE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA EHTICS REVIEW COMMITTEE STUDY APPROVAL 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

    

Usage Statistics

Country Views Downloads
Japan 4 0
China 3 9
Canada 2 1
United States 2 0
City Views Downloads
Tokyo 4 0
Beijing 3 0
Ashburn 2 0
Vancouver 1 0
Montreal 1 1

{[{ mDataHeader[type] }]} {[{ month[type] }]} {[{ tData[type] }]}
Download Stats

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.831.1-0097931/manifest

Comment

Related Items